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Sample records for diplopia

  1. Macular Diplopia.

    PubMed

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques. PMID:26564922

  2. Nonsurgical management of diplopia.

    PubMed

    Fraine, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Diplopia is a potential undesirable outcome of nearly any ocular surgery. In some cases, the unexpected strabismus and diplopia resolve quickly without intervention, especially if due to swelling or minor insult from the surgical procedure. When double vision persists, effective treatment may be more elusive in patients in which the strabismus is the result of a restrictive process. The sudden onset of strabismus makes treatment more challenging. Frequently these patients will require surgical intervention. Where possible, patients may be managed with nonsurgical treatments until the time of surgery or indefinitely if successful and acceptable to the patient. Diplopia has been documented as a result of restrictive strabismus following vitreoretinal surgery, glaucoma surgery, orbital decompression surgery, strabismus surgery, orbital surgery, conjunctival surgery, cataract surgery, blepharoplasty, and others. The treatment of diplopia after ocular surgery is complicated by the incomitance and torsion that may be associated with restrictive strabismus as well as the variability of the deviation during healing. Nonsurgical treatment options include prisms or occlusion. Fresnel prisms are used primarily, but occasionally the prism is ground into the spectacles. Occlusion of the involved eye may be partial or complete, using a "pirate" patch, adhesive patch, Bangerter foil, tape, or related method. PMID:23002469

  3. Diplopia and enophthalmos in blowout fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Hwang, Pil Joong

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the changes of diplopia and enophthalmos in patients with blowout fractures. Three hundred sixty-two patients who presented with blowout fractures between March 2006 and February 2011 were analyzed. The sequential time changes of diplopia and enophthalmos were measured in the operated group and the observed group according to (1) the duration of preoperative observation (early: within 7 days, late: 8-14 days, delayed: >15 days); (2) the defect size (minimal: <1 cm(2), small: 1.1-2.0 cm, medium: 2.1-3.0 cm(2), large: >3.0 cm(2)); and (3) the age of the patients (<20, 21-40, 41-60, >61 years).Among the 362 patients, 242 (66.9%) had an operation, and 120 (33.1%) did not. The duration of preoperative observation did not affect the postoperative diplopia or enophthalmos. There were significant differences of enophthalmos among the operated groups with a different defect size at the preoperative period (P = 0.036 [Pearson χ(2)]). There were significant differences of diplopia among the operated groups with different defect sizes at the 6 months' follow-up period (P = 0.014 [Pearson χ(2)]). The diplopia in the older age group (>60 years) was significantly greater than that of the other 3 groups at 6 months (P = 0.023) and at 12 months (P = 0.023, [Pearson χ(2)]).We think surgery should be delayed until the swelling is decreased unless the medial rectus muscle is incarcerated. We also think that the defect size is not an important factor for whether to perform surgery. We think that the reason for the greater diplopia in the older age group is that the adaptation of binocular convergence is decreased in the older age group. PMID:22777445

  4. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  5. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  6. Neurocysticercosis with Diplopia Responds Well to Albendazole.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akihiro; Nakamura, Itaru; Fujita, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Shinji; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Fujii, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of neurocysticercosis concurrent with taeniasis in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a headache and diplopia. Oculomotor disturbances with a left adduction deficit were observed. Fundoscopy revealed papilledema. Additionally, computed tomography of the brain revealed more than 20 small cysts within the parenchyma, most of which were associated with ring enhancement. Moreover, serum antibody testing (Western blotting) for Taenia solium-cysticerci was positive. The patient received albendazole and corticosteroids, and progressive resolution of the neurological symptoms and papilledema was observed starting approximately three days after administration. This patient has been asymptomatic for more than one year. PMID:27150884

  7. Diplopia: A Diagnostic Challenge with Common and Rare Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Mariana; Miranda, Ana; Narciso, Marco R.; Mieiro, Luis; Fonseca, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 71 • Female, 41 • Famale, 67 Final Diagnosis: Diabetic neuropathy • meningioma • drug-induced diplopia Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Clinical and imagiologic study Specialty: Ophthalmology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Diplopia is a symptom with very different etiologies. It may be caused by pathology in the eye, orbit, extraocular muscles, neuromuscular junction, or in the central nervous system. Case Reports: Three clinical cases of hospitalization due to isolated diplopia are presented here, illustrating different etiologies. Conclusions: The present article aims to address the differential diagnosis of this clinical condition and to warn of less frequent causes of diplopia, such as adverse effects of commonly used drugs. PMID:25865898

  8. Resolution of diplopia after repair of the deep orbit.

    PubMed

    Sleep, T J; Evans, B T; Webb, A A C

    2007-04-01

    The degree of resolution of diplopia after repair of a blow-out fracture of the orbital floor varies and depends on many factors. We present six patients, each of whom had extensive fractures of the floor of the orbit that extended posteriorly to its anatomical limit. The mean (range) time for the resolution of diplopia after reconstruction was 4.4 (1-7) months. We think that its slow resolution in these patients may require preoperative counselling, and also the postoperative management of patients with extensive disruptions of the floor of the orbit posterior to the anterior limit of the inferior orbital fissure (within the deep orbit) must be carefully planned. PMID:16814905

  9. Binocular fusion, suppression and diplopia for blurred edges

    PubMed Central

    Georgeson, Mark A; Wallis, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose (1) To devise a model-based method for estimating the probabilities of binocular fusion, interocular suppression and diplopia from psychophysical judgements, (2) To map out the way fusion, suppression and diplopia vary with binocular disparity and blur of single edges shown to each eye, (3) To compare the binocular interactions found for edges of the same vs opposite contrast polarity. Methods Test images were single, horizontal, Gaussian-blurred edges, with blur B = 1–32 min arc, and vertical disparity 0–8.B, shown for 200 ms. In the main experiment, observers reported whether they saw one central edge, one offset edge, or two edges. We argue that the relation between these three response categories and the three perceptual states (fusion, suppression, diplopia) is indirect and likely to be distorted by positional noise and criterion effects, and so we developed a descriptive, probabilistic model to estimate both the perceptual states and the noise/criterion parameters from the data. Results (1) Using simulated data, we validated the model-based method by showing that it recovered fairly accurately the disparity ranges for fusion and suppression, (2) The disparity range for fusion (Panum's limit) increased greatly with blur, in line with previous studies. The disparity range for suppression was similar to the fusion limit at large blurs, but two or three times the fusion limit at small blurs. This meant that diplopia was much more prevalent at larger blurs, (3) Diplopia was much more frequent when the two edges had opposite contrast polarity. A formal comparison of models indicated that fusion occurs for same, but not opposite, polarities. Probability of suppression was greater for unequal contrasts, and it was always the lower-contrast edge that was suppressed. Conclusions Our model-based data analysis offers a useful tool for probing binocular fusion and suppression psychophysically. The disparity range for fusion increased with edge blur but

  10. Diplopia after hyaluronic acid gel injection for correction of facial tear trough deformity.

    PubMed

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Heirati, Abtin; Pakdel, Farzad; Kiavash, Victoria

    2012-10-01

    A 38 Year-old-female presented with diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid swelling 1.5 months after hyaluronic acid filler injection of tear trough deformity. Comprehensive eye examination showed an inferior oblique muscle restriction on the right eye. Diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid puffiness were treated by injection of hyaluronidase which resulted in disappearance of both diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid puffiness. PMID:22571493

  11. Diplopia as the primary presentation of foodborne botulism

    PubMed Central

    Khakshoor, Hamid; Moghaddam, Ali Akbar Saber; Vejdani, Amir Hossein; Armstrong, Blair K.; Moshirfar, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Foodborne botulism is a serious condition caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. Clinically, botulism presents as bilateral cranial nerve neuropathy and descending paralysis. We report a unique presentation of botulism to remind clinicians of this potentially fatal condition. In this observational case report initial evaluation showed only esodeviation. This progressed to unilateral cranial nerve six (CN VI) paresis along with systemic signs. Clinical diagnosis was made based on in-depth history and concurrent symptoms in three other patients. Foodborne botulism presenting as diplopia and unilateral motility deficits is rare and can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. PMID:22993467

  12. Recurrent Diplopia in a Pediatric Patient with Bickerstaff Brainstem Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Chapados, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute complete external ophthalmoplegia is a rare finding in clinical practice that is associated with diseases affecting the neuromuscular junction, the oculomotor nerves, or the brainstem. Ophthalmoplegia has been reported with acute ataxia in Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BBE). Up to 95% of these cases are associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies. Only a small number of cases of anti-GQ1b negative MFS have been documented in pediatric patients. This is the first case reporting a recurrence of ocular symptoms in an anti-GQ1b antibody negative patient with BBE. Case Presentation. An 8-year-old Caucasian boy presented with complete external ophthalmoplegia without ptosis, cerebellar ataxia, and a disturbance of consciousness. He had recently recovered from a confirmed Campylobacter jejuni infection. On subsequent laboratory testing he was anti-GQ1b antibody negative. He had a recurrence of diplopia at four-week follow-up. Conclusions. This patient's recurrence of diplopia was treated with a five-week course of oral corticosteroids which did not worsen his condition, and this may be a therapeutic option for similar patients. We will discuss the symptoms and treatment of reported pediatric cases of anti-GQ1b antibody negative cases of MFS and the variation between cases representing a spectrum of illness. PMID:27293928

  13. Selective diplopia in Parkinson's disease: a special subtype of visual hallucination?

    PubMed

    Nebe, Angelika; Ebersbach, Georg

    2007-06-15

    Diplopia is sometimes reported by patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without apparent oculomotor disorders. We assessed clinical features and associated oculomotor and perceptual performance in 14 patients (6 male, 8 female) with PD with a peculiar type of selective diplopia. Duplication of images was confined to single objects or persons, occurred repetitively, and lasted few seconds in all subjects. Frequency of episodes ranged from several episodes per day to three episodes per year. In six of seven subjects undergoing comprehensive ophtalmological examination, subtle ocular disorders (heterophoria, strabism, etc.) were found. Nine of 14 patients were suffering from current or previous visual hallucinations and 3 more patients developed hallucinations within 3 years of diplopia onset. Selective diplopia of isolated single objects and persons in PD is possibly related to hallucinosis and minor ocular disturbances seem to be a triggering factor for this peculiar type of misperception. PMID:17230466

  14. Cholesterol granuloma of a Haller cell associated with unilateral exophthalmos and diplopia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol granuloma is rare in the paranasal sinuses. We present what is to our knowledge the first case of cholesterol granuloma of a Haller cell associated with unilateral exophthalmos and diplopia in a 55-year-old man. PMID:26719083

  15. Unilateral acquired Brown's syndrome in systemic scleroderma: An unusual cause for diplopia

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Neelam; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Ramakrishnan, Renagappa; Maheshwari, Devendra; Trivedi, Bhakti

    2015-01-01

    Brown's syndrome can be congenital or acquired with multiple causes. It has been described as a ocular complication in various rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases. We describe a case of 27-year-old female patient with 5 years old history of systemic scleroderma who developed vertical diplopia, a left head tilt, and restriction of left eye on elevation in adduction. The patient responded to systemic steroids with resolution of diplopia. PMID:26669341

  16. The scotogenic contact lens: a novel device for treating binocular diplopia

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Matthieu P; Bonci, Fabrizio; Pandit, Anand; Ferguson, Veronica; Nachev, Parashkev

    2015-01-01

    Binocular diplopia is a debilitating visual symptom requiring immediate intervention for symptomatic control, whether or not definitive treatment is eventually possible. Where prismatic correction is infeasible, the current standard is occlusion, either by a patch or an opaque contact lens. In eliminating one problem—diplopia—occlusive techniques invariably create another: reduced peripheral vision. Crucially, this is often unnecessary, for the reduced spatial resolution in the periphery limits its contribution to the perception of diplopia. Here, we therefore introduce a novel soft contact lens device that instead creates a monocular central scotoma inversely mirroring the physiological variation in spatial acuity across the monocular visual field, thereby suppressing the diplopia with minimal impact on the periphery. We compared the device against standard eye patching in 12 normal subjects with prism-induced binocular diplopia and 12 patients with binocular diplopia of diverse causes. Indexed by self-reported scores and binocular perimetry, the scotogenic contact lens was comparably effective in eliminating the diplopia while significantly superior in acceptability and its impact on the peripheral visual field. This simple, inexpensive, non-invasive device may thus be an effective new tool in the treatment of a familiar but still troublesome clinical problem. PMID:25680615

  17. Diplopia of pediatric orbital blowout fractures: a retrospective study of 83 patients classified by age groups.

    PubMed

    Su, Yun; Shen, Qin; Lin, Ming; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-01-01

    Orbital blowout fractures are relatively rare in patients under 18 years of age, but may lead to serious complications. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate diplopia, clinical characteristics, and postoperative results in cases of orbital blowout fractures in the pediatric population. Eighty-three patients, all less than 18 years old, with orbital blowout fractures, were divided into 3 groups by age: 0 to 6 years old, 7 to 12 years old, and 13 to 18 years old. The cause of injury, fracture locations, diplopia grades, ocular motility restrictions, enophthalmos, and postoperative results were reviewed from their records. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact analyses, analyses of variance, and logistic regressions were performed to determine characteristics associated with diplopia, and to identify factors related to residual diplopia in pediatric patients. The most common causes of injuries were traffic accidents in the 0 to 6 years old group, normal daily activities in the 7 to 12 years old group, and assaults in the 13 to 18 years old group. Floor fractures were the most common location in both the 0 to 6- and 7 to 12 years old groups, and medial-floor fractures were the most common location in the 13 to 18 years old group. The occurrence of preoperative diplopia was related to ocular motility restriction and enophthalmos, but not with the age group, the gender, the cause of injury, or the fracture locations. The time interval from injury to surgery was significant in the outcome of postoperative diplopia (P < 0.01). A statistical difference was also found in the recovery time from diplopia among the 3 age groups (P < 0.01). The characteristics of orbital blowout fracture varied among the different age groups. It was related to 2 factors, the cause of injury and fracture locations, which probably resulted from structural growth changes and differences in daily habits. Children had a slower recovery from orbital fractures, and the younger the

  18. Diplopia of Pediatric Orbital Blowout Fractures: A Retrospective Study of 83 Patients Classified by Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yun; Shen, Qin; Lin, Ming; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Orbital blowout fractures are relatively rare in patients under 18 years of age, but may lead to serious complications. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate diplopia, clinical characteristics, and postoperative results in cases of orbital blowout fractures in the pediatric population. Eighty-three patients, all less than 18 years old, with orbital blowout fractures, were divided into 3 groups by age: 0 to 6 years old, 7 to 12 years old, and 13 to 18 years old. The cause of injury, fracture locations, diplopia grades, ocular motility restrictions, enophthalmos, and postoperative results were reviewed from their records. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact analyses, analyses of variance, and logistic regressions were performed to determine characteristics associated with diplopia, and to identify factors related to residual diplopia in pediatric patients. The most common causes of injuries were traffic accidents in the 0 to 6 years old group, normal daily activities in the 7 to 12 years old group, and assaults in the 13 to 18 years old group. Floor fractures were the most common location in both the 0 to 6- and 7 to 12 years old groups, and medial-floor fractures were the most common location in the 13 to 18 years old group. The occurrence of preoperative diplopia was related to ocular motility restriction and enophthalmos, but not with the age group, the gender, the cause of injury, or the fracture locations. The time interval from injury to surgery was significant in the outcome of postoperative diplopia (P < 0.01). A statistical difference was also found in the recovery time from diplopia among the 3 age groups (P < 0.01). The characteristics of orbital blowout fracture varied among the different age groups. It was related to 2 factors, the cause of injury and fracture locations, which probably resulted from structural growth changes and differences in daily habits. Children had a slower recovery from orbital fractures, and the younger

  19. Vertical Diplopia and Ptosis from Removal of the Orbital Roof in Pterional Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shilpa J.; Lawton, Michael T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Horton, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a newly recognized clinical syndrome consisting of ptosis, diplopia, vertical gaze limitation, and abduction weakness that can occur following orbital roof removal during orbito-zygomatic-pterional craniotomy. Design Case series. Participants Eight study patients, ages 44 – 80 years, 7 female, with neuro-ophthalmic symptoms after pterional craniotomy. Methods Case description of eight study patients. Main Outcome Measures Presence of ptosis, diplopia, and gaze limitation. Results Eight patients had neuro-ophthalmic findings after pterional craniotomy for meningioma removal or aneurysm clipping. The cardinal features were ptosis, limited elevation and hypotropia. Three patients also had limitation of downgaze and two had limitation of abduction. Imaging showed loss of the fat layers which normally envelop the superior rectus/levator palpebrae superioris. The muscles appeared attached to the defect in the orbital roof. Ptosis and diplopia developed in two patients despite Medpor titanium mesh implants. Deficits in all patients showed spontaneous improvement. In two patients a levator advancement was required to repair ptosis. In three patients an inferior rectus recession using an adjustable suture was performed to treat vertical diplopia. Follow-up a mean of 6.5 years later revealed that all patients had a slight residual upgaze deficit, but alignment was orthotropic in primary gaze. Conclusions After pterional craniotomy, ptosis, diplopia and vertical gaze limitation can result from tethering of the superior rectus/levator palpebrae superioris complex to the surgical defect in the orbital roof. Lateral rectus function is sometimes compromised by muscle attachment to the lateral orbital osteotomy. This syndrome occurs in about 1% of patients after removal of the orbital roof and can be treated, if necessary, by prism glasses or surgery. PMID:25439610

  20. Restrictive Strabismus and Diplopia 2 Years After Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy With Medpor-Coated Tear Drain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yoon-Duck; Lee, Chung-Hyun; Johnson, Owen N; Woo, Kyung In

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman who underwent conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with Medpor-Coated Tear Drain 2 years ago presented with diplopia on left gaze for 4 months. Limitation of extraocular movement of OS on left gaze was observed on duction test. The forced duction test revealed restriction of the left medial rectus muscle. Orbital MRI demonstrated an enhancing soft tissue lesion surrounding the tube in inferomedial aspect of left orbit. Removal of the tube and adhesiolysis were performed. Histologic findings were consistent with a chronic inflammation with fibrosis. After surgery, limitation of extraocular movement and diplopia were completely resolved. Jones tube coated with a thin layer of porous polyethylene allows the ingrowth of fibrovascular tissue into the coating, decreasing the probability of tube extrusion, but can also accelerate fibrotic changes around the tube causing restrictive strabismus. PMID:24914690

  1. Temporary Diplopia After Gow-Gates Injection: Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Fa, Bernadette Alvear; Speaker, Steven R; Budenz, Alan W

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with various local anesthetic techniques have been recorded in case reports and reviews. This current case reports a transient incident of blurred, double vision (diplopia) following a Gow-Gates mandibular block injection. There is descriptive discussion on possibilities associated with intra-arterial injection, intravenous injection, diffusion through tissue planes, and the autonomic nervous system pathway to lend credence suggesting the etiology of the complication. For practitioners, recognizing when a complication arises from anesthesia delivery and managing the patient in an appropriate manner is essential to an overall agreeable outcome. PMID:27585417

  2. Neuro-Behçet disease presented diplopia with hemiparesis following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Yun; Park, Sun Young; Hwang, In Ok

    2012-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is rare in childhood. We report a 9-year-old boy with neuro-Behçet disease who presented diplopia and weakness on the left side after a cerebral concussion. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hyperintensity of the right mesodiencephalic junction on T2-weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. Prednisolone administration resulted in complete remission and normalization of abnormal MRI finding. Brain MRI is a useful diagnostic tool when the neurological sign is the first symptom of subclinical BD. PMID:23049594

  3. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  4. New excimer laser technique for the correction of strabismus and diplopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Dimitri T.

    1994-06-01

    We used the ArF excimer laser to determine the feasibility of performing prismatic photoablations in model eyes (plastic spheres simulating the eye), and in rabbit corneas. This would correct diplopia and small angles of deviation, and result in minimal refractive alterations. We modified excimer laser delivery system that achieved the desired corneal contour of prismatic ablations. 193-nm argon fluoride laser was used at fluence of 160 mJ/cm2 and ablation rate 5 Hz. 5.0-mm diameter, 40 um corneal epithelial ablation were followed by 5.0- mm diameter, prismatic photokeratectomy (PPK). We were able to achieve prismatic photoablation of PMMA blocks and lenses. No other refractive changes accompanied the prismatic photoablation of PMMA blocks and lenses. No other refractive changes accompanied the prismatic effect. In rabbits re-epithelialization of the 5-mm ablations was complete by day 3, and corneal haze was not observed by gross examination. Epithelial hyperplasia and subepithelial scarring were noted at the deep edges. PPK holds important therapeutic potential for fine-tuning results of conventional strabismus surgery, and for patients with stable diplopia following nerve palsy and ocular surgery.

  5. Late migration of an orbital implant causing orbital hemorrhage with sudden proptosis and diplopia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, C E

    1996-12-01

    A 31-year-old woman complained of sudden diplopia and proptosis associated with a headache. Approximately 10 years earlier, she had sustained a right orbital blowout fracture during a snow machine accident that was repaired using a Supramid implant. She presented with 4 mm of right-sided proptosis by Hertel exophthalmometry, with limitation of up and down gaze. She manifested a right gaze preference with a left head turn to achieve fusion. Visual acuity was 20/20 on both sides; however, there was 20% red desaturation and a subtle afferent pupillary defect on the right side. Goldmann visual fields were full and the retinal examination was normal. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the orbits with and without contrast demonstrated a large right posterior inferior orbital mass. Once the periorbita was breached during orbitotomy, a burgundy serosanguinous material emerged. Gram staining revealed red cells without organisms. The implant had not been fixed by wires or screws. Upon removal, the implant appeared oversized, encompassing the orbital floor, medial and lateral walls. Postoperatively, the proptosis, gaze preference with face turn, afferent pupillary defect, desaturation abnormality, and diplopia resolved. PMID:8944386

  6. De novo FUS P525L mutation in Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dysphonia and diplopia.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Claire S; Webber, Alina; Gan-Or, Ziv; Moore, Fraser; Dagher, Alain; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (jALS) is characterized by progressive upper and lower motor neuron degeneration leading to facial muscle spasticity, spastic dysarthria, and spastic gait with an early onset (before 25 years old). Unlike adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), patients with jALS tend to have slower progression of motor neuron disease and prolonged survival to a normal life expectancy. Mutations in FUS gene have been reported in jALS,(1) including p.P525L mutation that has been consistently associated with early onset and aggressive presentation.(2) Here, we report a patient carrying p.P525L FUS mutation and experiencing an aggressive course of ALS presenting with dysphonia and diplopia. PMID:27123482

  7. [A syndrome of chronic ataxic polyneuropathy, ophtalmoplegia, IgM paraprotein, cold agglutinins and anti-disialosyl antibodies can cause diplopia in patients with chronic sensory polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolmos, Eva Brøsted; Moth Henriksen, Marie; Abildgaard, Niels; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2012-10-22

    CANOMAD is a rare syndrome of chronic ataxic polyneuropathy, ophtalmoplegia, IgM paraprotein, cold agglutinins and anti-disialosyl antibodies. We present a case of a 65-year-old woman with clinical and electrophysiological features of chronic sensory polyneuropathy and diplopia. Serum samples from the patient contained IgM paraprotein and anti-GM2-antibodies. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins resulted in an improvement of the patient's diplopia and polyneuropathy. The case shows the importance of considering CANOMAD as a cause of diplopia in patients with chronic sensory polyneuropathy. PMID:23095653

  8. Can customized implants correct enophthalmos and delayed diplopia in post-traumatic orbital deformities? A volumetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Pedemonte, C; Sáez, F; Vargas, I; González, L E; Canales, M; Salazar, K

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether orbital reconstruction with customized implants can correct post-traumatic orbital deformities such as late enophthalmos and delayed diplopia. The hypothesis proposed was that an overcorrection of the orbital volume is needed to resolve enophthalmos. A retrospective observational descriptive study was conducted. Patients with a major trauma who required customized orbital implants for the delayed treatment of unilateral orbital fractures that had initially been operated on using titanium mesh and/or osteosynthesis plates were included. The orbital volumes of the unaffected contralateral side, of the affected orbit after initial reconstruction with mesh, and of the affected orbit subsequently reconstructed with the customized implant were calculated. All of the patients included in this study had diplopia in the gaze position prior to the installation of the implant. In addition, they all had severe enophthalmos. After surgery, no patient with a customized implant showed diplopia. The enophthalmos was corrected in all but one case. On average, orbits reconstructed with customized implants had lower volumes compared to the unaffected contralateral side. In cases where the enophthalmos was resolved, the volume was reduced by an average of 8.55%. Further studies using a larger number of cases and with controlled volumetric corrections using CAD/CAM are needed. PMID:27157630

  9. [»Shermer's neck« is a rare injury in long-distance cycle races. Association with diplopia described for the first time].

    PubMed

    Berglund, Bo; Berglund, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Shermer's neck was first described in 1983 in an ultra-distance cyclist and it is often associated with neck pain (in our patient diplopia as first symptom) and exhaustion and impaired neck motor function with inability to extend the neck against gravity. The diplopia, for the first time described in connection with Shermer's neck, was accentuated when elevating the eyes and looking at distance, most likely reflecting exhaustion in the elevator muscles of the eye. Shermer's neck usually appears after 800 km of non-stop bike racing. Risk factors include former neck injuries, staying low in aerobars for a long time, and wearing helmet light/cameras. Prevention includes neck strength training, muscle stretching, raising of handle bars and different kinds of chin support. The most important treatment is rest and not riding a bike. In our patient the diplopia was normalized after 4 hours of sleep. It can take 2-14 days to regain full neck motor function. The possibility of developing Shermer's neck and diplopia (»Berglund's diplopia«) must be taken into account when many untrained individuals participate in popular shorter races over about 300 km. PMID:26671432

  10. Diplopia, Convergent Strabismus, and Eye Abduction Palsy in a 12-Year-Old Boy with Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro; Jacinto, Sandra; Pinto, Maria do Carmo; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is defined by clinical criteria of increased intracranial pressure, elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and exclusion of other causes such tumors, vascular abnormalities, or infections. The association of PTC with levothyroxine (LT4) has been reported. A 12-year-old boy has been followed up for autoimmune thyroiditis under LT4. Family history was irrelevant for endocrine or autoimmune diseases. A TSH level of 4.43 μUI/mL (0.39-3.10) motivated a LT4 adjustment from 75 to 88 μg/day. Five weeks later, he developed horizontal diplopia, convergent strabismus with left eye abduction palsy, and papilledema. Laboratorial evaluation revealed elevated free thyroxine level (1.05 ng/dL [0.65-1.01]) and low TSH, without other alterations. Lumbar puncture was performed and CSF opening pressure was 24 cm H2O with normal composition. Blood and CSF cultures were sterile. Brain MRI was normal. LT4 was temporarily discontinued and progressive improvement was observed, with a normal fundoscopy at day 10 and reversion of diplopia one month later. LT4 was restarted at lower dose and gradually titrated. The boy is currently asymptomatic. This case discloses the potential role of LT4 in inducing PTC. Despite its rarity and unclear association, PTC must be seen as a potential complication of LT4, after excluding all other intracranial hypertension causes. PMID:27379191

  11. Diplopia, Convergent Strabismus, and Eye Abduction Palsy in a 12-Year-Old Boy with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria do Carmo; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is defined by clinical criteria of increased intracranial pressure, elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and exclusion of other causes such tumors, vascular abnormalities, or infections. The association of PTC with levothyroxine (LT4) has been reported. A 12-year-old boy has been followed up for autoimmune thyroiditis under LT4. Family history was irrelevant for endocrine or autoimmune diseases. A TSH level of 4.43 μUI/mL (0.39–3.10) motivated a LT4 adjustment from 75 to 88 μg/day. Five weeks later, he developed horizontal diplopia, convergent strabismus with left eye abduction palsy, and papilledema. Laboratorial evaluation revealed elevated free thyroxine level (1.05 ng/dL [0.65–1.01]) and low TSH, without other alterations. Lumbar puncture was performed and CSF opening pressure was 24 cm H2O with normal composition. Blood and CSF cultures were sterile. Brain MRI was normal. LT4 was temporarily discontinued and progressive improvement was observed, with a normal fundoscopy at day 10 and reversion of diplopia one month later. LT4 was restarted at lower dose and gradually titrated. The boy is currently asymptomatic. This case discloses the potential role of LT4 in inducing PTC. Despite its rarity and unclear association, PTC must be seen as a potential complication of LT4, after excluding all other intracranial hypertension causes. PMID:27379191

  12. Correlation between the Time to Surgery and That to Recovery from Postoperative Diplopia Based on a Single-Center, Retrospective Experience: A Case Series of 11 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Background We conducted this study to identify the correlation between the time to surgery and that to recovery from postoperative diplopia. Methods In the current single-center, retrospective study, we enrolled a total of 11 patients (n=11) who were diagnosed with white-eyed blowout fracture and underwent surgical operation at our institution between January 2009 and January 2013. To identify the correlation between the time to surgery and that to recovery from postoperative diplopia, we divided our patients into the three groups: the group A (time to surgery, <2 days) (n=4), the group B (time to surgery, 3-7 days) (n=4) and the group C (n=3) (time to surgery, 8-60 days). Then, we compared such variables as sex, age, signs of soft tissue injury, preoperative nausea/vomiting, the degree of preoperative diplopia and the side of the fracture on computed tomography scans between the three groups. Results In our series, mean age at the onset of trauma was nine years (range, 5-16 years); the mean time to surgery was 30 days (range, 2-60 days); and the mean follow-up period was one year (range, 6 months-2 years). Our results showed that the time to recovery was shorter in the patients with a shorter time to surgery. Conclusions We found that the degree of recovery from impaired ocular motility and diplopia was the highest in the patients undergoing surgical operations within 48 hours of the onset of trauma with the reconstruction of the fracture sites using implant materials. PMID:25276639

  13. [Glomus tumor with diplopia].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Cucu, B; David, L; Stinghe, Alina; Furedi, Gabriel; Halmaci, Viorica; Enache, Veronica; Lacusteanu, Monica

    2009-01-01

    This paper highlights the case of a 46-year-old female patient who seeks ophthalmic medical advice for her complaint about double vision on right gaze. Patient's medical history reveals several symptoms like headaches, progressive hearing loss on right side and dysphonia for which all investigations proved irrelevant. Thourough clinical examination, lab exams and imaging techniques revealed the cause for this symptoms i.e. glomic tumour with middle ear extention. We find this case to be exceptional as ocular symptoms led to the diagnose of a non-ocular serious, possible life threatening condition, bearing in mind that previously occured non-ocular symptoms couldn't elucidate the cause. PMID:19899551

  14. Extensive complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus pushing 3rd molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia and chronic sinusitis: a rare presentation and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Monika; Das, Debdutta

    2015-03-01

    Odontoma is a mixed odontogenic hamartoma involving both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. If left untreated, it can lead to complications in certain conditions. Here is a rare presentation of an extensive complex odontoma in maxillary sinus pushing third molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia in upward gaze occasionally and chronic sinusitis. Although odontomata are not uncommon and are familiar to practitioners, but some aggressive cases may cause problematic sequelae. Even postoperative complications may result if oral surgeons are not aware of the potential pitfalls associated with the surgical removal of large maxillary antrum odontomata. This article reports a rare presentation which can be considered unique because when obstruction of sinus drainage is evident, serious complications such as orbital infections, epidural and subdural empyema, meningitis, cerebritis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess and death can occur. It also addresses points and pitfalls concerning surgery to remove odontoma. PMID:25848139

  15. Enigmatic intracranial cyst causing diplopia and trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Pelluru, Pavan Kumar; Rajesh, Alugolu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression by intracranial cystic lesions can cause cranial nerve palsies and bony changes. With the advent of imaging techniques, grossly accurate diagnosis is possible. However, few cases do surprise the clinicians both intra, and postoperatively. A 27-year-old male presented to us with complaints of double vision for 4 months followed by sharp, shooting pain in the left V1 and V2 distribution for 1-month duration, on examination, he had left lateral palsy and decreased pin prick and temperature sensation in V1 distribution. On computed tomography scan, a cystic lesion noted which is isodense in the middle cranial fossa with erosion of the underlying bone. On magnetic resonance imaging lesion was iso to hyperintense on T1-Weighted and hyperintense on T2-Weighted, brilliantly enhancing on contrast administration. Provisional diagnosis was trigeminal schwannoma, left temporal craniotomy and total excision of the cyst done. Histopathological examination showed cyst wall lined with collagen. Postoperatively patient neuralgic pain subsided with persisting sixth nerve palsy. PMID:26425164

  16. Enigmatic intracranial cyst causing diplopia and trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Pelluru, Pavan Kumar; Rajesh, Alugolu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression by intracranial cystic lesions can cause cranial nerve palsies and bony changes. With the advent of imaging techniques, grossly accurate diagnosis is possible. However, few cases do surprise the clinicians both intra, and postoperatively. A 27-year-old male presented to us with complaints of double vision for 4 months followed by sharp, shooting pain in the left V1 and V2 distribution for 1-month duration, on examination, he had left lateral palsy and decreased pin prick and temperature sensation in V1 distribution. On computed tomography scan, a cystic lesion noted which is isodense in the middle cranial fossa with erosion of the underlying bone. On magnetic resonance imaging lesion was iso to hyperintense on T1-Weighted and hyperintense on T2-Weighted, brilliantly enhancing on contrast administration. Provisional diagnosis was trigeminal schwannoma, left temporal craniotomy and total excision of the cyst done. Histopathological examination showed cyst wall lined with collagen. Postoperatively patient neuralgic pain subsided with persisting sixth nerve palsy. PMID:26425164

  17. Blowout fracture-orbital floor reconstruction using costochondral cartilage causing pain, warping, and diplopia

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital floor reconstruction is the most challenging component in the midfacial trauma management. Most often owing to the complexity of the fractures, the floor reconstruction requires grafts or other substitutes. Literature reveals several sources of autogenous sources of such grafts. Though most of the grafts are well taken and gives an ideal result, at certain instances, owing to the complex nature of the graft, its biochemical nature, reaction to the grafting, biochemical response, a reactionary change may result at late stages. The aim of this manuscript is to present a rare instance of warping of a costochondral graft that was used as a part of the orbital floor reconstruction giving rise to an ophthalmic emergency. The situation was immediately diagnosed and successfully managed. The situation, structural, and biochemical mechanisms behind such a phenomenon are discussed. PMID:26981485

  18. Blowout fracture-orbital floor reconstruction using costochondral cartilage causing pain, warping, and diplopia.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M

    2015-01-01

    Orbital floor reconstruction is the most challenging component in the midfacial trauma management. Most often owing to the complexity of the fractures, the floor reconstruction requires grafts or other substitutes. Literature reveals several sources of autogenous sources of such grafts. Though most of the grafts are well taken and gives an ideal result, at certain instances, owing to the complex nature of the graft, its biochemical nature, reaction to the grafting, biochemical response, a reactionary change may result at late stages. The aim of this manuscript is to present a rare instance of warping of a costochondral graft that was used as a part of the orbital floor reconstruction giving rise to an ophthalmic emergency. The situation was immediately diagnosed and successfully managed. The situation, structural, and biochemical mechanisms behind such a phenomenon are discussed. PMID:26981485

  19. Isolated trapdoor-type medial blowout fracture in an adult presenting horizontal diplopia treated by endoscopic endonasal approach.

    PubMed

    Noh, Woong Jae; Park, Tae Jung; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kwon, Jae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Orbital blowout fracture frequently occurs along the floor or medial aspect of the orbital wall, which are the two thinnest areas of the bony orbit. True trapdoor injury of the orbit is less common and is rare as an isolated medial wall injury, because the medial orbital wall has several bony septa within the ethmoid sinus that provide support and decrease the risk of a trapdoor fracture. Additionally, the incidence of trapdoor-type blowout fracture in adults is lower than in children. In a trapdoor-type blowout fracture with restricted ocular movement, prompt diagnosis and early intervention are associated with better clinical outcomes. We encountered a case of trap door-type medial blowout fracture with horizontal eye ball movement limitation in an adult. She underwent endonasal endoscopic reduction surgery for the medial blowout fractures. Here we report this case, and suggest early diagnosis and prompt surgical exploration. PMID:24964421

  20. An isolated orbital mass with proptosis and diplopia: an uncommon metastasis from intracranial olfactory neuroblastoma in a chinese patient

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianqin; Cui, Hongguang; Feng, Shi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare neuroectodermal malignant neoplasm that originates from the olfactory sensory epithelium. In reported cases involving the orbit, the primary neoplasms could invade the orbits through bone destruction or cranio-orbital communication anatomical structure. The present study reports a rare case of orbital metastatic tumor arising from an intracranial ONB in a Chinese patient, which is the first case demonstrating an uncommon route of ONB involving the orbit. Patient and methods A 62-year-old man with a right orbital tumor was diagnosed as having a secondary tumor arising from intracranial ONB. Clinical examination, including ocular imaging examination, and histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed. Results In the ocular examination, a focal, firm, nontender swelling with ill-defined margins in the right orbit was found on palpation. Proptosis, limited eyeball movement, and visual loss were also observed. The unenhanced computed tomography scan showed a homogeneous, isolated, ill-defined soft tissue neoplasm in the right orbit. The histopathological study revealed irregularly shaped nests of tumor cells surrounded by avascularized fibrous stroma. The monomorphic malignant tumor cells are small round blue cells that are slightly larger than mature lymphocytes, with a very high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio. The immunohistochemical staining for tumor cells was positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A, cluster of differentiation 56 (CD56), cytokeratin, vimentin, S-100 protein, and negative for epithelial membrane antigen, and cluster of differentiation (CD99). Conclusion This is so far the first Chinese case of orbital metastasis from intracranial ONB that has ever been reported. Metastasis might be another route of ONB invading the orbit besides direct invasion. PMID:27601919

  1. TRANSITORY CONSECUTIVE ESOTROPIA AFTER AMITRIPTYLINE TREATMENT FOR NOCTURNAL ENURESIS -CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Cioplean, E Daniela; Camburu, L Raluca

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old child operated for intermittent exotropia and V-pattern with a good result 2 months after bilateral Lateral Rectus Muscle Recession. The binocular vision was restored in primary position and down-gaze with excellent stereopsis at near and distance and a deviation of +4 PD in primary position. Three months later, the patient developed a consecutive esotropia of + 18 PD in primary position with diplopia in all gazes triggered by Amitriptyline treatment prescribed one month earlier for nocturnal enuresis. Diplopia was solved in time after anticholinergic medication cessation. During the recovery period, Fresnell prisms have been used in order to eliminate diplopia. Three months after diplopia onset, the binocular vision was restored showing a transitory and reversible effect of the Amitriptyline treatment. Fusion vulnerability can be a possible risk factor in developing diplopia and esotropia in patients treated with anticholinergic drugs. PMID:26978874

  2. Temporal posttraumatic limited ocular movement with suspected trapdoor fracture.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Seok; Yokota, Harumasa; Ito, Haruna; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Trapdoor fractures, or blowout fractures, result from muscle entrapment after orbital floor fractures. The incarcerated muscles may become necrotic because of ischemia; immediate surgery is recommended for symptomatic persistent diplopia or clinical evidence of entrapment. We report a case of spontaneous resolution of diplopia in a patient with a high suspicion of a trapdoor fracture. A 15-year-old girl presented with diplopia after being hit in the eye while playing volleyball. Computed tomography did not show a fractured orbital bone, but the forced duction test was positive when the left eye was pulled forward toward the left. Magnetic resonance imaging was negative for edema and inflammation in the extraocular muscles. With observation only, the diplopia resolved 2 weeks after onset. A negative forced duction test confirmed the resolution. Observation only may be appropriate in cases with posttraumatic limited ocular movement, after imaging has excluded an emergent condition. PMID:25170246

  3. Temporal posttraumatic limited ocular movement with suspected trapdoor fracture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young-Seok; Yokota, Harumasa; Ito, Haruna; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Trapdoor fractures, or blowout fractures, result from muscle entrapment after orbital floor fractures. The incarcerated muscles may become necrotic because of ischemia; immediate surgery is recommended for symptomatic persistent diplopia or clinical evidence of entrapment. We report a case of spontaneous resolution of diplopia in a patient with a high suspicion of a trapdoor fracture. A 15-year-old girl presented with diplopia after being hit in the eye while playing volleyball. Computed tomography did not show a fractured orbital bone, but the forced duction test was positive when the left eye was pulled forward toward the left. Magnetic resonance imaging was negative for edema and inflammation in the extraocular muscles. With observation only, the diplopia resolved 2 weeks after onset. A negative forced duction test confirmed the resolution. Observation only may be appropriate in cases with posttraumatic limited ocular movement, after imaging has excluded an emergent condition. PMID:25170246

  4. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients will complain that they have difficulty concentrating on near work (computer, reading, etc.) and that the written word blurs ...

  5. Spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof fracture.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Lambe, Gerald Francis; MacKinnon, Craig; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of a spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof blow-in fracture with resolution of associated diplopia and blepharoptosis highlighting the need for a low threshold for reimaging this cohort of facial fracture patients. PMID:22801127

  6. Subperiosteal Orbital Hemorrhage Complicating Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Marc C.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2004-09-15

    Subperiosteal orbital hemorrhage (SPOH) following cardiac surgery has not been previously reported. We present a patient who developed diplopia and right eye proptosis immediately after cardiac surgery for a mitral valve repair and coronary artery bypass graft. A computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated a right superior SPOH. The diplopia and proptosis resolved spontaneously within 4 weeks. Follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the SPOH.

  7. The ophthalmic implications of the correction of late enophthalmos following severe midfacial trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, N T

    1991-01-01

    Severe midfacial trauma presents several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. Acute rigid fixation of the facial skeleton accompanied by bone grafting to restore the confines and volume of the orbit provide the best opportunity for acceptable aesthetic results. The severity of the trauma causes the late postoperative complication of enophthalmos. Injury to orbital structures with subsequent cicatricial change results in significant alteration in extraocular motility with resultant diplopia. There are no reports in the literature which critically evaluate the effect of late enophthalmos correction on extraocular motility, diplopia, and vision in patients who have suffered Le Fort or NOE fractures. A retrospective study is presented which reviews the results of late surgery for the correction of enophthalmos in 40 patients, all of whom had severe "impure" orbital fractures. This study addresses the following questions: (1) Can the globe effectively be repositioned?, (2) Is there a change in subjective diplopia?, (3) Does a change in extraocular motility occur, and if it does, is it predictable?, (4) Is there a risk to visual acuity? and finally, (5) Do the answers to questions 1 through 4 suggest that late surgical intervention for the correction of enophthalmos should be recommended for this patient population? During a 9-year period, 44 patients with severe diplopia trauma received surgery for enophthalmos correction. A review of 40 patients on whom 56 operations were performed is presented. Thirty-eight patients had enophthalmos and 35 had inferior displacement of the globe. Medial displacement of the globe occurred in 11 patients. Twenty-nine patients had diplopia. Six patients had vision too poor on the injured side to have diplopia. Enophthalmos was improved in 32 patients. Dystopia of the globe was improved in 31 cases. However, neither enophthalmos nor dystopia of the globe could be improved with every operation. Only 35 of the 48 operations for

  8. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Kwen, Peterkin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Midbrain infarction Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Computed tomography of the head and magnetic resonance image of the brain Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. Case Report: An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. Conclusions: A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of mid-brain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy. PMID:26447784

  9. The functional outcome of blow-out fractures managed surgically and conservatively: our experience in 100 patients.

    PubMed

    Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Rasmussen, Janne; Toft, Peter Bjerre; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The proportion of orbital blow-out fractures (BOFs) which are operated upon varies. The purpose of this study was to determine the treatment pattern of BOFs at our tertiary trauma centre and to evaluate the functional outcomes in patients according to whether they were managed surgically or conservatively. The study design is a retrospective cohort study and the setting is Tertiary care University Hospital. The participants include patients with isolated BOFs admitted to our Trauma Unit from 2010 to 2013. Of the 100 consecutive patients included, 60 had available follow-up data. The presence of diplopia and enophthalmus was determined by reviewing the medical records. Data from the patients' initial consultation and their 3-month follow-up were also collected. Of the 60 patients whose data could be analysed, 36 had been managed surgically and 24 conservatively. Of the patients managed surgically, 25 had diplopia in peripheral gaze before surgery and 12 at 3-month follow-up. Nine had diplopia in primary gaze before surgery and none at 3-month follow-up. Five had enophthalmus before surgery and two at 3-month follow-up. Of the patients managed conservatively, eight had diplopia in peripheral gaze initially and seven at 3-month follow-up. Three had diplopia in primary gaze initially and one at 3-month follow-up. One had enophthalmus initially which was still present at 3-month follow-up. Primary gaze diplopia disappeared while secondary gaze diplopia was present in about a third of patients, whether managed surgically or conservatively at the 3-month follow-up. Standardised follow-up as well as clear indications for and against surgery are warranted. PMID:26935055

  10. Treatment of orbital blowout fracture using porous polyethylene with embedded titanium.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhuyun; Zhuang, Ai; Lin, Ming; Li, Zhengkang; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-03-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of porous polyethylene with embedded titanium in the repair of orbital blowout fracture. The study was designed as a prospective case series. Patients who were diagnosed with orbital blowout fracture from May 2012 to March 2013 were included in the study. A composite material of porous polyethylene and titanium mesh was used. Orbital volumes before and after surgery were measured, and the results of diplopia and ocular movement were recorded. The occurrence of diplopia was grouped and compared according to the time interval between injury and surgery. The incidence of other complications was also recorded. A total of 26 patients were involved in the study. The minimal follow-up time was 12 months. All surgeries were performed uneventfully. The orbital volume significantly decreased after the surgery, and the remission rate and the elimination rate of diplopia in 12 months were 85.7% and 47.6%, respectively. Postoperative diplopia was correlated with the time interval between injury and surgery. One patient presented with undercorrection of enophthalmos, and another patient presented with acute aggravation of diplopia and exophthalmos after surgery, which was resolved with treatment. In conclusion, porous polyethylene with embedded titanium was effective and safe in the repair of orbital blowout fracture, and studies with more subjects and longer follow-up period are recommended in future studies. PMID:25699530

  11. Bitemporal hemianopia; its unique binocular complexities and a novel remedy

    PubMed Central

    Peli, Eli; Satgunam, PremNandhini

    2014-01-01

    Bitemporal hemianopic visual field impairment frequently leads to binocular vision difficulties. Patients with bitemporal hemianopia with pre-existing exophoria complain of horizontal diplopia, sometimes combined with vertical deviation (with pre-existing hyperphoria). The symptoms are a result of the phoria decompensating into a tropia (hemi-slide) due to the lack of retinal correspondence between the remaining nasal fields of both eyes. We measured these effects using a dichoptic perimeter. We showed that aligning the eyes with prisms could prevent diplopia if the bitemporal hemianopia is incomplete. We also describe the successful use of a novel fusion aid – the ‘stereo-typoscope’ – that utilizes midline stereopsis to prevent diplopia resulting from hemi-sliding in patients with complete bitemporal hemianopia. PMID:24588535

  12. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the orbit: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Menon, J; Brosnahan, D M; Jellinek, D A

    1999-12-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign fibroosseous lesion which rarely occurs in the orbit. We report on a 7-year-old girl with aneurysmal bone cyst of the orbit who presented with painless proptosis and diplopia. Optic nerve compression resulted in field loss and delayed visual evoked potentials. Radiological and histological features are discussed. The lesion was excised via a frontal craniotomy and the orbital roof reconstructed with a prefabricated titanium plate. Post-operatively a rapid resolution of the proptosis and diplopia followed. Previous reported cases of this rare entity in the orbit are also reviewed. PMID:10707141

  13. An analysis of pure blowout fractures and associated ocular symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun Woo; Lim, Jin Soo; Yoo, Gyeol; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-05-01

    Blowout fractures are one of the commonly occurring facial bone fractures and clinically important, as they may cause serious complications such as diplopia, extraocular movement limitation, and enophthalmos. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current patient demographics and surgical outcomes of 952 pure blowout fractures from 2 hospitals of the Catholic University of Korea, from 2003 to 2011. The medical records were reviewed according to the cause, fracture site, ocular symptoms, time of operation, and sequela. Male patients outnumbered female patients, and blowout fractures were most often seen in 21- to 30-year-old men. The most common cause was violent assault (40.7%). The medial orbital wall (45.8%) was the most common site, followed by floor (29.4%) and inferomedial wall (24.6%). The most common ocular injury was hyphema. Diplopia was presented in 27.6%; extraocular movement limitation was detected in 12.8% patients, and enophthalmos was encountered in 3.4% patients. Diplopia, extraocular movement limitation, and enophthalmos were significantly improved by surgical repair (P < 0.05). Postoperative complications were persistent diplopia (1.6%) and enophthalmos (0.4%). We surveyed a large series of blowout fracture in the Republic of Korea and recommend this study to serve as an important guideline in treating pure blowout fractures. PMID:23714863

  14. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  15. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  16. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  17. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  18. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  19. Clinical Pearls and Management Recommendations for Strabismus due to Thyroid Orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Al Qahtani, Elham S; Rootman, Jack; Kersey, James; Godoy, Flavia; Lyons, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid orbitopathy causes a unique form of strabismus with adult-onset diplopia. Prisms can be a temporizing measure, but many patients require strabismus surgery, which can be challenging. In this article, we highlight clinical guidelines for addressing strabismus due to thyroid orbitopathy and review our surgical experience. PMID:26180468

  20. 38 CFR 4.78 - Muscle function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Muscle function. 4.78... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.78 Muscle function. (a) Examination of muscle...) Evaluation of muscle function. (1) An evaluation for diplopia will be assigned to only one eye. When...

  1. 38 CFR 4.78 - Muscle function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Muscle function. 4.78... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.78 Muscle function. (a) Examination of muscle...) Evaluation of muscle function. (1) An evaluation for diplopia will be assigned to only one eye. When...

  2. 38 CFR 4.78 - Muscle function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Muscle function. 4.78... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.78 Muscle function. (a) Examination of muscle...) Evaluation of muscle function. (1) An evaluation for diplopia will be assigned to only one eye. When...

  3. 38 CFR 4.78 - Muscle function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Muscle function. 4.78... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.78 Muscle function. (a) Examination of muscle...) Evaluation of muscle function. (1) An evaluation for diplopia will be assigned to only one eye. When...

  4. 38 CFR 4.78 - Muscle function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Muscle function. 4.78... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.78 Muscle function. (a) Examination of muscle...) Evaluation of muscle function. (1) An evaluation for diplopia will be assigned to only one eye. When...

  5. Esotropia

    MedlinePlus

    ... assessed. What are the treatment options for esotropia? Management of esotropia is based on a number of factors. The overriding principles are: • Re-establishment of ocular alignment • Maximization of binocular vision • Relief of diplopia •Treatment of associated amblyopia Treatment ...

  6. Clinical Pearls and Management Recommendations for Strabismus due to Thyroid Orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Qahtani, Elham S.; Rootman, Jack; Kersey, James; Godoy, Flavia; Lyons, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid orbitopathy causes a unique form of strabismus with adult-onset diplopia. Prisms can be a temporizing measure, but many patients require strabismus surgery, which can be challenging. In this article, we highlight clinical guidelines for addressing strabismus due to thyroid orbitopathy and review our surgical experience. PMID:26180468

  7. Ocular myasthenia gravis: treatment successes and failures in patients with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kupersmith, Mark J

    2009-08-01

    We previously reported that prednisone reduced the frequency of generalized myasthenia (GMG) and controlled diplopia without major adverse effects at 2 years in patients with ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG). Questions remain as to whether study subjects had long-standing disease, biasing results towards a steroid benefit, and if prednisone merely delayed GMG onset. Here, we performed a record review of a referral neuro-ophthalmology service OMG database for patients who were followed-up for > or =4 years or until GMG developed. We studied the effect of prednisone on GMG incidence and control of ocular symptoms. Generally, patients with diplopia were recommended for prednisone therapy. Most remained on daily 2.5-10 mg for diplopia control. We compared the results for prednisone-treated and "untreated" (pyridostigmine only) patients. Of 87 patients, 55 were in the prednisone-treated and 32 were in the untreated groups. GMG developed in 7 (13%) of the prednisone-treated (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.22-0.76) and in 16 (50%) of the untreated (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.68-4.60) patients. After OMG onset, GMG developed at a mean 5.8 and 0.22 years in prednisone and untreated groups. Diplopia was present at the last exam in 27% of the prednisone-treated (mean 7.2 years) and in 57% of the untreated (mean 4.6 years) OMG patients. For 48 prednisone-treated patients who did not develop GMG, OMG treatment failure occurred in 13. Thus, prednisone delays the onset of GMG and has sustained benefit in reducing the incidence of GMG and controlling diplopia. Without prednisone, GMG develops in 50% of OMG patients, typically within 1 year. PMID:19377863

  8. A novel approach to the treatment of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Hun Soo; Wada, Takeshi; Takayama, Katsutoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV who presented with progressive chemosis and diplopia. To prevent potential lethal arterial wall injury due to the fragility of the arterial vessel wall, the ipsilateral carotid artery and internal jugular vein were surgically exposed for direct insertion of endovascular sheaths, and transvenous embolization was performed using triple microcatheters with detachable coils. The clinical course was uneventful, and chemosis and diplopia subsequently resolved. By the 6 month follow-up, MRI revealed no recurrence of the CCF. These techniques offer a unique access alternative for endovascular treatment, thereby reducing the risks associated with arterial dissection that often accompanies transfemoral access in this particular condition. PMID:25432980

  9. Isolated inferior rectus muscle rupture after blunt orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Patrick; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was referred to our department with diplopia, periorbital swelling and haematoma of the left eye after orbital trauma due to a punch. During the examination, mild enophthalmos, hypertropia and a total absence of infraduction were observed. An orbital computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a left orbital floor blow-out fracture, with caudal herniation of periorbital fat and rectus inferior muscle. Repair was performed under total anaesthesia with placement of a Titan mesh. The following days were marked by the persistence of diplopia without improvement of infraduction. A postoperative, 0.5 mm CT scan highlighted a complete rupture of the inferior rectus muscle, not seen before operation, by a 1.0 mm-sliced CT. In this case, orthoptic therapy was undertaken with good results after 6 months and without need of a second repair. PMID:24963904

  10. Microsurgical technique of symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Fu; Hsu, Sanford P C; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2015-07-01

    Symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm is rare. Cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus are subjected to the mass effect of an expanding aneurysm. Microsurgical clipping is the treatment of choice to relieve compressive cranial neuropathy. In this video, the authors present a case of intracavernous aneurysm causing diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness. The patient was operated on via a pretemporal transclinoid-transcavernous approach. The aneurysm was completely obliterated through direct clipping. There were no new-onset neurologic deficits and complications after the operation. Complete recovery of the diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness was observed at the 6-month postoperative follow up. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4w5QUoNIAQM. PMID:26132609

  11. Combined study on the causes of strabismus after the retinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J M; Wright, K W

    1994-12-01

    Extraocular muscle imbalance and diplopia after retina surgery have been previously reported, but the etiology is still controversial. In order to better understand the cause of strabismus after retinal surgery, the authors retrospectively studied 30 patients with persistent strabismus following retinal surgery and combined the result about seven patients of strabismus after retinal surgery in the previous report. Results showed multiple etiologies for the strabismus. Causes of strabismus included fat adherence syndrome (14 patients), non-specific restrictive adhesion (11), displacement of superior oblique tendon (2), scleral explant interfering with ocular motility (1), lost or slipped muscle with adhesion (2), sensory strabismus (2), macular pucker causing ectopic fovea (2), and previous strabismus before the retinal surgery (3). Knowledge of the varieties of abnormalities that can cause strabismus and diplopia will help both the retina and strabismus surgeon prevent and treat strabismus after retinal surgery. PMID:7853737

  12. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma With Repeated Intratumoral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Bao, Yuhai; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2016-09-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannoma is extremely rare, with only 35 pathologically confirmed patients being reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a patient of trochlear nerve schwannoma in the prepontine cistern manifesting as facial pain and double vision and presenting the image characteristics of repeated intratumoral hemorrhage, which has never been reported in the literature. Total tumor along with a portion of the trochlear nerve was removed by using a retrosigmoid approach. Facial pain disappeared after operation, and the diplopia remained. Follow-up studies have shown no tumor recurrence for 2 years and the simultaneous alleviation of diplopia. Information regarding the clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical outcomes of trochlear nerve schwannoma are discussed and reviewed in the paper. PMID:27607129

  13. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  14. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery treated by transarterial coil embolization--case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Miyachi, Shigeru; Oi, Sachie; Yamamoto, Naohito

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) manifesting as right conjunctival chemosis, exophthalmos, and diplopia. The lesion was treated successfully by trans-arterial coil embolization using the double catheter method with balloon assist. Injury to the PPTA is relatively rare and the PPTA should be sacrificed together with the fistula during the repair. PMID:21273742

  15. Transient uniocular visual loss on deviation of the eye in association with intraorbital tumours.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, P G; Levy, I S; McDonald, W I

    1987-05-01

    Five patients with unilateral orbital tumours are described in whom transient loss of vision occurred on deviation of the affected eye from the primary position. Other presenting features were diplopia, proptosis, poor visual acuity, visual field defects, pupillary abnormalities, fundal changes and altered colour vision. Abnormalities on fluorescein angiography suggest that the visual loss is due to transient ischaemia. Temporary uniocular loss of vision on eye movement may be an early sign of an intra-orbital mass. PMID:3035104

  16. An uncommon case of pediatric neurobrucellosis associated with intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  17. An Uncommon Case of Pediatric Neurobrucellosis Associated with Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  18. [Use of hypnosis in certain forms of childhood strabismus].

    PubMed

    Medková, L; Tejklová, M

    1992-10-01

    The authors describe the case of a mentally very labile boy suffering from strabism. When he was excited, the deviation of the affected eye increased, diplopia, nausea and headache developed. Hypnosis was applied and the condition improved after 12 sessions. His behaviour changed and progress in school improved. The authors draw attention to new therapeutic possibilities of some forms of strabism in mentally labile children by application of hypnosis. PMID:1486630

  19. Transient uniocular visual loss on deviation of the eye in association with intraorbital tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, P G; Levy, I S; McDonald, W I

    1987-01-01

    Five patients with unilateral orbital tumours are described in whom transient loss of vision occurred on deviation of the affected eye from the primary position. Other presenting features were diplopia, proptosis, poor visual acuity, visual field defects, pupillary abnormalities, fundal changes and altered colour vision. Abnormalities on fluorescein angiography suggest that the visual loss is due to transient ischaemia. Temporary uniocular loss of vision on eye movement may be an early sign of an intra-orbital mass. Images PMID:3035104

  20. Cavernous angioma with olivary hypertrophy and contralateral cerebellar diaschisis.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Y; Nomoto, T; Kitamura, S; Terashi, A

    1997-07-01

    We describe a 66-year-old man with a 20-year history of ataxic gait who suddenly developed diplopia on rightward gaze. Neurologic examination revealed right hemi-ataxia and hemi-hypesthesia, and left internuclear ophthalmoplegia. MRI showed a cavernous angioma in the left tectum, mild right cerebellar atrophy, and left interior olivary hypertrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging demonstrated contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. We discuss the findings and review the literature concerning contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. PMID:9240502

  1. Is Delayed Release of Superior Oblique Muscle Entrapment in Orbital Roof Fracture Worth Correcting?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Muralidharan, Chiyyarath Gopalan; Roy, Indranil Deb; Janjani, Lalit

    2016-07-01

    Acquired Brown's syndrome is a rare entity. Delay in treatment can cause fibrosis or scarring with questionable prognosis of vertical diplopia. To the best of the knowledge of the authors the present case of 22-year-old male is the first in existing literature where delayed release of superior oblique muscle entrapment in orbital roof fracture was found to be an effective technique. PMID:27391521

  2. Isolated sixth nerve palsy after intravitreal ranibizumab injection.

    PubMed

    Caglar, Cagatay; Kocamis, Sücattin Ilker; Durmus, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    After intravitreal ranibizumab injection for diabetic macular edema (DME) in a 55-year-old man, the patient was admitted to our ophthalmology clinic with the complaint of diplopia. Given the results of the patient's history, physical exam, and negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we believed that the patient had a sixth nerve palsy related to ranibizumab injection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case with isolated abducens palsy after ranibizumab injection. PMID:26340018

  3. Mucormycosis complications in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Arce-Salinas, C A; Pérez-Silva, E

    2010-07-01

    This case involved a 75-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus. Two months previously, she had a flare that was treated successfully by increasing the dosages of prednisone and azathioprine. A sudden onset of ocular pain, diplopia, and loss of vision suggestive of optical neuritis or vascular involvement confused the issue, and rhinocerebral zygomycosis was demonstrated later. We review the presentations of this fungal infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with emphasis on its initial features. PMID:20064915

  4. The philosopher Socrates had exophthalmos (a term coined by Plato) and probably Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    According to a previously published theory, Socrates was afflicted with temporal lobe epilepsy since his childhood. Plato, Xenophon, and Aristoxenus described Socrates as having exophthalmos, probably diplopia, and some symptoms compatible with hyperthyroidism. Using these data, we theorize that Socrates had Graves' disease. In order to determine a cause of his temporal lobe epilepsy, we speculate that the philosopher also had autoimmune thyroiditis and Hashimoto encephalopathy during his childhood and his epilepsy may have been a sequel to this hypothesized encephalopathy. PMID:25553768

  5. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia: Clinical features, Classification, and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-12-01

    Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE.Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging.Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing.AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  6. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Thymic Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kristin O; Beneck, Debra M; Dinkin, Marc J

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman with ptosis and diplopia was found to have myasthenia gravis (MG) associated with amyloidosis of the thymus gland. Systemic MG is frequently associated with thymomas or thymic hyperplasia but has only once previously been reported in association with amyloidosis of the thymus. This case demonstrates that isolated ocular MG rarely may also be associated with amyloidosis of the thymus. PMID:25822660

  7. [Case of Borrelia brainstem encephalitis presenting with severe dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuji; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Yoshimasa; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2010-04-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old man who developed severe dysphagia owing to neuroborreliosis. He showed dysphagia, diplopia, hiccups, and walking difficulty Neurological examination revealed mild disturbance of consciousness, diplopia on left lateral gaze, left-side-dominant blephaloptosis, gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus on left lateral gaze, mild bilateral muscle weakness, palatoplegia, dysphagia, dysarthria, and truncal ataxia An increased pharyngeal reflex caused dysphagia in this patient. An EEG revealed intermittent high amplitude slow wave activity. However, head MRI, blood count, serum chemistry, and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed no abnormality. Initially, brainstem encephalitis with unknown etiology was diagnosed. The hiccups, diplopia, and ptosis were improved by corticosteroid therapy, but other symptoms were refractory to corticosteroid therapy and IVIg. After these immunotherapies, anti-Borrelia IgG and IgM antibodies were found to be positive, and symptoms, including dysphagia, were improved by doxycycline and cefotaxime. Because the clinical symptoms of Borrelia infection are widely variable, neuroborreliosis should be considered in patients with brainstem encephalitis refractory to conventional immunotherapies. PMID:20411811

  8. The Role of Computer-Assisted Technology in Post-Traumatic Orbital Reconstruction: A PRISMA-driven Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kelvin H; Chong, Kelvin K L; Young, Alvin L

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic orbital reconstruction remains a surgical challenge and requires careful preoperative planning, sound anatomical knowledge and good intraoperative judgment. Computer-assisted technology has the potential to reduce error and subjectivity in the management of these complex injuries. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to explore the emerging role of computer-assisted technologies in post-traumatic orbital reconstruction, in terms of functional and safety outcomes. We searched for articles comparing computer-assisted procedures with conventional surgery and studied outcomes on diplopia, enophthalmos, or procedure-related complications. Six observational studies with 273 orbits at a mean follow-up of 13 months were included. Three out of 4 studies reported significantly fewer patients with residual diplopia in the computer-assisted group, while only 1 of the 5 studies reported better improvement in enophthalmos in the assisted group. Types and incidence of complications were comparable. Study heterogeneities limiting statistical comparison by meta-analysis will be discussed. This review highlights the scarcity of data on computer-assisted technology in orbital reconstruction. The result suggests that computer-assisted technology may offer potential advantage in treating diplopia while its role remains to be confirmed in enophthalmos. Additional well-designed and powered randomized controlled trials are much needed. PMID:26643191

  9. Proposal of success criteria for strabismus surgery in patients with Graves' orbitopathy based on a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Jellema, Hinke Marijke; Braaksma-Besselink, Yvette; Limpens, Jacqueline; von Arx, Georg; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Mourits, Maarten P

    2015-11-01

    Proposal of success criteria for strabismus surgery for patients with Graves' orbitopathy (GO) based on a systematic review of the literature. We performed a systematic search of OVID MEDLINE, OVID Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the publisher subset of PubMed, to identify studies reporting on success criteria of strabismus surgery in GO. In addition, we handsearched several orthoptic journals and proceedings of strabismological congresses. Of the 789 articles retrieved, 42 articles described success criteria for strabismus surgery in GO. Most studies defined success in terms of a subjective diplopia-free field in primary and down gaze. Almost half of the studies used a graded scale (excellent, good, acceptable and failure) to describe the outcome of surgery. Three of the eligible studies described a tool to quantify the field of single vision in detail. Quality of life was not reported as an outcome measure in any of the published studies. In conclusion, success criteria for strabismus surgery in patients with GO are poorly defined and no consensus is available. The lack of standardization hampers comparative studies and thus the search for the best surgical treatment for diplopia in patients with GO. Therefore, we propose strict success criteria including a tool for quantification of remaining diplopia plus a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire (the GO-QoL). PMID:25876459

  10. The Role of Computer-Assisted Technology in Post-Traumatic Orbital Reconstruction: A PRISMA-driven Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Kelvin H.; Chong, Kelvin K. L.; Young, Alvin L.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic orbital reconstruction remains a surgical challenge and requires careful preoperative planning, sound anatomical knowledge and good intraoperative judgment. Computer-assisted technology has the potential to reduce error and subjectivity in the management of these complex injuries. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to explore the emerging role of computer-assisted technologies in post-traumatic orbital reconstruction, in terms of functional and safety outcomes. We searched for articles comparing computer-assisted procedures with conventional surgery and studied outcomes on diplopia, enophthalmos, or procedure-related complications. Six observational studies with 273 orbits at a mean follow-up of 13 months were included. Three out of 4 studies reported significantly fewer patients with residual diplopia in the computer-assisted group, while only 1 of the 5 studies reported better improvement in enophthalmos in the assisted group. Types and incidence of complications were comparable. Study heterogeneities limiting statistical comparison by meta-analysis will be discussed. This review highlights the scarcity of data on computer-assisted technology in orbital reconstruction. The result suggests that computer-assisted technology may offer potential advantage in treating diplopia while its role remains to be confirmed in enophthalmos. Additional well-designed and powered randomized controlled trials are much needed. PMID:26643191

  11. Management of complicated multirecurrent pterygia using multimicroporous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Kim, Jae Chan; Moon, Jun Hyung; Koo, Hyun; Kim, Tae Hyung; Moon, Nam Ju

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the efficiency of multimicroporous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) insertion in complicated multirecurrent pterygia. Methods A total of 62 eyes from 62 patients with a multirecurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon or motility restriction-related binocular diplopia were recruited. All eyes underwent pterygia excision followed by application of 0.033% mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and conjunctival limbal autograft. Multimicroporous e-PTFE was then inserted intraoperatively in 30 eyes between the transplanted amniotic membrane and the conjunctiva (group A), but not inserted in the other 32 eyes (group B). The main outcome measures were symblepharon formation, motility restriction, binocular diplopia, subjective score of conjunctival hyperaemia and postoperative pterygium recurrence. Results In the mean follow-up period of 17.2±2.3 months, symblepharon formation, motility restriction, diplopia and conjunctival hyperaemia were significantly improved after surgery in group A patients (p=0.000, 0.000, 0.008 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative symblepharon formation, motility restriction and conjunctival hyperaemia were significantly less in group A compared to group B (p=0.024, 0.027 and 0.000, respectively). After surgery, corneal recurrence developed in one eye (3.3%) from group A, which was significantly lower than the eight eyes (25%) from group B (p=0.027). Conclusions Multimicroporous e-PTFE insertion may provide a novel approach for treating intractable complicated multirecurrent pterygia. PMID:23505304

  12. Pure orbital blowout fractures reconstructed with autogenous bone grafts: functional and aesthetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kronig, S A J; van der Mooren, R J G; Strabbing, E M; Stam, L H M; Tan, J A S L; de Jongh, E; van der Wal, K G H; Paridaens, D; Koudstaal, M J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ophthalmic clinical findings following surgical reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts of pure blowout fractures. A retrospective review of 211 patients who underwent surgical repair of an orbital fracture between October 1996 and December 2013 was performed. Following data analysis, 60 patients who were followed up over a period of 1 year were included. A solitary floor fracture was present in 38 patients and a floor and a medial wall fracture in 22 patients. Comparing preoperative findings between these two groups, preoperative diplopia and enophthalmos were almost twice as frequent in the group with additional medial wall fractures: diplopia 8% and 14% and enophthalmos 18% and 55%, respectively. One year following surgery there was no diplopia present in either group. In the solitary floor fracture group, 3% still had enophthalmos. It can be concluded that at 1 year following the repair of pure orbital floor fractures using autogenous bone, good functional and aesthetic results can be obtained. In the group with both floor and medial wall fractures, no enophthalmos was found when both walls were reconstructed. When the medial wall was left unoperated, 29% of patients still suffered from enophthalmos after 1 year. PMID:26711249

  13. The Long-Term Effective Rate of Different Branches of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia After Single Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan-Zhang; Wu, Bai-Shan; Yang, Li-Qiang; Yue, Jian-Ning; He, Liang-Liang; Li, Na; Ni, Jia-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) guided single radiofrequency thermocoagualtion (RFT) in 1137 patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia after a follow-up period of 11 years, specially focused on duration of pain relief in different branches of trigeminal nerve, side effect, and complications. Retrospective study of patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia treated with a single CT guided RFT procedure between January 2002 and December 2013. The mean follow-up time was 46.14 ± 30.91 months. Immediate postprocedure pain relief was 98.4%. V2 division obtained the best pain relief rate: 91%, 89%, 80%, 72%, 60%, and 54% at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 years, respectively. No statistical difference pairwise comparison was in other groups. The complications included masseter muscle weakness, corneitis, diplopia, ptosis, hearing loss, limited mouth opening, and low pressure headache. Masticatory weakness mostly occurred in patients with V3 branch involvement, while Corneitis and Diplopia all in patients with V1 branch involvement. No mortalities observed during or after RFT. All different branches division of trigeminal neuralgia achieved comparable satisfactory curative effect; V2 obtained the best excellent pain relief, after RFT procedure. Facial numbness is inevitable after RFT, which patients who have pain in all 3 trigeminal divisions and patients who desire no facial numbness should be cautious. Masticatory weakness is mainly related with V3 injured, while Corneitis and Diplopia in patients with V1 injured by RFT. PMID:26559288

  14. Three-dimensional evaluation of postoperative swelling in treatment of zygomatic bone fractures using two different cooling therapy methods: a randomized, observer-blind, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment and complications in patients with zygomatic bone fractures can lead to a significant degree of tissue trauma resulting in common postoperative symptoms and types of pain, facial swelling and functional impairment. Beneficial effects of local cold treatment on postoperative swelling, edema, pain, inflammation, and hemorrhage, as well as the reduction of metabolism, bleeding and hematomas, have been described. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative cooling therapy applied through the use of cooling compresses with the water-circulating cooling face mask manufactured by Hilotherm in terms of beneficial impact on postoperative facial swelling, pain, eye motility, diplopia, neurological complaints and patient satisfaction. Methods Forty-two patients were selected for treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures and were divided randomly to one of two treatments: either a Hilotherm cooling face mask or conventional cooling compresses. Cooling was initiated as soon as possible after surgery until postoperative day 3 and was applied continuously for 12 hours daily. Facial swelling was quantified through a three-dimensional optical scanning technique. Furthermore, pain, neurological complaints, eye motility, diplopia and patient satisfaction were observed for each patient. Results Patients receiving a cooling therapy by Hilotherm demonstrated significantly less facial swelling, less pain, reduced limitation of eye motility and diplopia, fewer neurological complaints and were more satisfied compared to patients receiving conventional cooling therapy. Conclusions Hilotherapy is more efficient in managing postoperative swelling and pain after treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures than conventional cooling. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register ID: DRKS00004846 PMID:23895539

  15. Bilateral transverse sinus thrombosis secondary to a homozygous C677T MTHFR gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Ziad M; Mahfouz, Rami; Taher, Ali; Sawaya, Raja A

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a previously healthy young man who presented with headache, diplopia, nausea, vomiting, and bilateral papilledema. Magnetic resonance venography of the brain revealed thrombosis of the right transverse sinus. Blood tests showed elevated homocysteine levels, and coagulation studies revealed a homozygous C677T mutation and a heterozygous A1298C mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The patient had no other etiology for venous thrombosis. We recommend screening patients who present with sinus thrombosis for MTHFR gene mutations. PMID:18666857

  16. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Mark A.; Jellish, W. Scott; Leonetti, John P.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertaining to the perioperative management of the Jehovah's Witness are discussed along with the patient's course and management. PMID:17170989

  17. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chaney, M A; Jellish, W S; Leonetti, J P

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertaining to the perioperative management of the Jehovah's Witness are discussed along with the patient's course and management. PMID:17170989

  18. [Case of Fisher syndrome with ocular flutter].

    PubMed

    Nakayasu, Koki; Sakimoto, Tohru; Minami, Masayuki; Shigihara, Syuntaro; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of Fisher syndrome accompanied by ocular flutter. A 19-year-old man presented with diplopia and vertigo, associated with preceding symptoms of common cold. Since symmetric weakness of abduction in both eyes, truncal ataxia, diminution of tendon reflexes, and gaze nystagmus were noted, he was diagnosed as having Fisher syndrome. Ocular flutter also was noticed during horizontal gaze. Serum anti-GQ1b antibody and anti-GM1 antibody were detected. He was followed without therapy and the symptoms resolved. The accompanying ocular flutter may suggest that a central nervous system disorder may also be present in Fisher syndrome. PMID:20593660

  19. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Ipsilateral Horner Syndrome in a Patient With Carotid-Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kal, Ali; Ercan, Zeynep E; Duman, Enes; Arpaci, Enver

    2015-10-01

    The combination of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner syndrome was first described by Parkinson and considered as a localizing sign of posterior cavernous sinus lesions. The authors present a case with right abducens nerve palsy with ipsilateral Horner syndrome in a patient with carotid-cavernous fistula because of head trauma. The patient was referred to the ophthalmology clinic with diplopia complaint after suffering a head trauma during a motorcycle accident. Cerebral angiography showed low-flow carotid-cavernous fistula. PMID:26468854

  20. [Palsy of CVI caused by ecchordosis physaliphora].

    PubMed

    Stahl-Hoffmann, V D; Gräf, M; Cesnulis, E; Schuknecht, B; Lorenz, B

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of symptomatic ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) in a 34-year-old woman who presented with progressive diplopia due to palsy of the left sixth cranial nerve. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed typical characteristics of a congenital EP lesion with compression of the left abducens nerve presumably because of a secondary herniation of the arachnoid mater. We performed an augmenting combined recess resect procedure on the left eye. No progression of the lesion was observed over a period of 5 years. For differential diagnostics an EP has to be distinguished from skull base tumors, such as chordoma and chondrosarcoma. PMID:26502168

  1. Three Cases of Acquired Simulated Brown Syndrome after Blowout Fracture Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ji, So Young; Yoo, Jae Hong; Ha, Won; Lee, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Brown syndrome is known as limited elevation of the affected eye during adduction. It is caused by a disorder of the superior oblique tendon, which makes it difficult for the eyeball to look upward, especially during adduction. It is classified into congenital true sheath Brown syndrome and acquired simulated Brown syndrome. Acquired simulated Brown syndrome can be caused by trauma, infection, or inflammatory conditions. The surgical restoration of blowout fractures can also lead to limitations of ocular motility, including Brown syndrome. We report on three patients with acquired simulated Brown syndrome, who complained of diplopia and limitation of ocular motility after operations to treat blowout fractures. PMID:26015892

  2. Three cases of acquired simulated brown syndrome after blowout fracture operations.

    PubMed

    Ji, So Young; Yoo, Jae Hong; Ha, Won; Lee, Ji Won; Yang, Wan Suk

    2015-05-01

    Brown syndrome is known as limited elevation of the affected eye during adduction. It is caused by a disorder of the superior oblique tendon, which makes it difficult for the eyeball to look upward, especially during adduction. It is classified into congenital true sheath Brown syndrome and acquired simulated Brown syndrome. Acquired simulated Brown syndrome can be caused by trauma, infection, or inflammatory conditions. The surgical restoration of blowout fractures can also lead to limitations of ocular motility, including Brown syndrome. We report on three patients with acquired simulated Brown syndrome, who complained of diplopia and limitation of ocular motility after operations to treat blowout fractures. PMID:26015892

  3. [A Case of an Orbital Metastasectomy in a Renal Cell Carcinoma after Sunitinib Treatment : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Hiroo; Oyama, Norihide; Koike, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    An 81-year-old man had undergone radical nephrectomy for a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in October 1998. Twelve years postoperatively, he developed diplopia and photophobia. Orbital metastasis of RCC was suspected and sunitinib treatment was given for 16 months. Computer tomography revealed a partial response of metastatic tumor for the first 2 months and stable disease for the next 12 months. However, it enlarged in the last 2 months. Total resection of right metastatic orbital tumor with deep lateral orbital decompression was done in January 2012. He has been well and without any local recurrence, distant metastasis or vision loss for 24 months. PMID:26411656

  4. Supratentorial cortical ependymoma: An unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    PubMed

    Mohaghegh, Mohammad Reza; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Okhovat, Ali Asghar; Pour, Elnaz Babaei

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. Two thirds of ependymomas arise in the infratentorial or intraventricles, whereas one-third are located in supratentorial space. But supratentorial "cortical" ependymomas are very rare. We report a case of a cortical ependymoma in a 17-year-old boy. The patient presented with transient recurrent right weakness and diplopia. This tumor was located in the left parieto-occipital region and he had gross total excision. Microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed grade III differentiation ependymoma. PMID:25878997

  5. An epibulbar chocolate cyst: a rare complication of silicone-based scleral buckle.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Gogia, Varun; Gupta, Shikha; Nayak, Bhagabat

    2015-01-01

    A patient with a history of vitreoretinal surgery presented with nasal dystopia, diplopia and epibulbar bluish black mass simulating a chocolate cyst in the right eye. After a non-conclusive ocular examination, he underwent CT of the orbit along with volume rendition and three-dimensional reconstruction, which demonstrated intact globe with laterally displaced band-buckle assembly along with peri-scleral buckle element (SBE) soft tissue proliferation. Imaging-assisted exploration of the lesion was performed and retained scleral buckle element (SBE) was removed in toto; thus relieving the patient long-standing dystopia. PMID:26240109

  6. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in cyhalothrine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Mohaghegh, Mohammad Reza; Teimouri, Somayyeh Sadat; Okhovat, Ali Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Acute onset bulbar symptoms with respiratory failure and descending paralysis may occur in several neuromuscular disorders including variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), diphtheria, botulism and toxins. We present a 51-year-old man who presented with complains of ptosis and dyspnea following pyrethroids spraying in an enclosed area for eradication of flea. Within 5-6 days of admission limb weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria, blurred vision, diplopia, tremor and respiratory distress added to previous symptoms. Temporal profile of events after exposure, development of similar symptoms in patient's son, electrodiagnostic findings and exclusion of other etiologies confirms intoxication etiology. We reviewed the literature and provide an extensive electrodiagnostic overview. PMID:27099845

  7. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed. PMID:23355565

  8. Diagnosis of brainstem abscess in the cerebritis stage by magnetic resonance imaging--case report.

    PubMed

    Adachi, J; Uki, J; Kazumoto, K; Takeda, F

    1995-07-01

    A 52-year-old male presented with a brainstem abscess manifesting as high fever, diplopia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid showed the lesion as a ring-like enhanced mass consisting of a necrotic center with surrounding edema, whereas postcontrast computed tomography revealed no such confirmatory findings. He was treated with antibiotics as the lesion had been detected in the acute cerebritis stage. Serial MR images showed that the lesion decreased remarkably in size. MR imaging can detect brain abscess in the earliest inflammatory stage. PMID:7477693

  9. Persistent trigeminal artery as a rare cause of ischaemic lesion and migraine-like headache.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, S; Kurzepa, J; Czekajska-Chehab, E; Staśkiewicz, G; Polar, M K; Nastaj, M; Stochmal, E; Drop, A

    2015-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare remnant of the embryonic intracranial circulatory system that forms a carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis. In most cases PTA does not have clear clinical implications. However, some authors report the association of PTA occurrence with vertigo, dizziness and nerve palsy, resulting in diplopia, strabismus or trigeminal neuralgia in patients. In rare cases it may also be related to posterior cerebral circulation strokes. This work reports the case of a female patient who presented with migraine-like headache and an ischaemic lesion in the left temporal lobe in association with PTA. PMID:25792408

  10. Decompensation of ocular torsion following malrotation of a toric intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Ramskold, Louise; Lodhia, Vaishali; Jones, Alistair; Jain, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) are being increasingly used to correct corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery. A quarter of patients that undergo cataract surgery may benefit from a toric rather than a spherical IOL. However, these implants must be positioned accurately, because postoperative rotation of the toric IOL can have clinically significant consequences. We present the first documented case of a 78-year-old woman who presented with diplopia as a result of exacerbation of a preexisting torsion following toric lens implantation. PMID:26691041

  11. A 45-year-old woman with reversible bilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peter Yat Ming; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen Chun; Wong, George Kwok Chu; Zhu, Xian Lun; Siu, Deyond Yung Woon; Kwan, Marco Cheuk Lun; Poon, Wai Sang

    2013-01-15

    A 45-year-old woman complained of a progressive 2-month history of bilateral hearing impairment and diplopia on upward gaze. She had a history of a recurrent pineal region ganglioglioma with repeated tumor excision, adjuvant radiotherapy, and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt performed 12 years prior. Subsequent imaging studies 6 years ago showed a pineal region cyst with progressive increase in size and a Rickham reservoir (Codman; Johnson & Johnson, Raynham, MA) was placed for percutaneous cyst fluid aspiration. The size of the cystic lesion remained static upon follow-up CT scans for several years. PMID:23319478

  12. Assessing therapy response of secreting pineal germ cell tumor on simultaneous 18F-choline PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Shankar, Ananth; Afaq, Asim; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-09-01

    An 18-year-old man presented with 6 weeks' history of diplopia, early morning headaches, and blurred vision; on ophthalmologic examination, Parinaud syndrome was revealed. Brain MRI scan showed a calcified pineal mass. Brain simultaneous PET/MRI with 18F-choline showed an avid enhancing mass occupying the pineal region with restricted diffusion. A second examination after chemotherapy demonstrated reduction in both size and radiotracer activity of the mass. Our study emphasizes the potential of simultaneous 18F-choline PET/MRI being a useful tool for contribution in the diagnosis and treatment assessment in a convenient way with minimal radiation exposure and reduced throughput patient time. PMID:24217533

  13. Diagnosis of Tensilon-Negative Ocular Myasthenia Gravis By Daily Selfie.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Elan L; Botelho, James V; Horton, Jonathan C

    2016-09-01

    The initial symptoms of myasthenia gravis are usually ptosis and diplopia. The diagnosis is often confirmed by testing for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies or by observing the effects of intravenous edrophonium (Tensilon) injection. However, these standard tests may be negative in patients with isolated ocular findings. We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with negative serologic and Tensilon testing. She was asked to photograph herself daily. The resulting sequence of daily selfies captured striking fluctuations in her ocular alignment and ptosis. Daily selfies may be a useful strategy for confirming the clinical diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis. PMID:27529328

  14. Acute Painful Ptosis Secondary to IgG4 Dacryoadenitis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rumana; El-Khyat, Abdul; Berry-Brincat, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old lorry driver presented with 3 weeks of blurred vision, pain and diplopia. There was a right upper lid ptosis with some restriction of eye movements. A CT revealed an enlarged lacrimal gland and lacrimal gland biopsy showed IgG4-positive plasma cells. The patient responded to oral prednisolone and fully recovered. As a condition which mimics a number of diseases, an IgG4-related disease presents a diagnostic challenge and ought to be considered in both acute and chronic presentations. PMID:27293410

  15. Transvenous sclerotherapy of a large symptomatic orbital venous varix using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Venu; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    An orbital venous varix is rare and can present with diplopia, proptosis, or hemorrhage. Treatment can be challenging, especially if the varix is in a posterior location within the orbit, since surgical exposure becomes difficult. A few case reports have been published describing transcatheter embolization of an orbital varix with coils, direct percutaneous injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue, and the percutaneous injection of bleomycin. We present a case of a symptomatic orbital venous varix of the left inferior ophthalmic vein successfully treated with transvenous endovascular sclerotherapy using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin. PMID:26109623

  16. FLT PET/CT in a Case of Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, Alexandra; Prassopoulos, Vasilios; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Tsougos, Ioannis; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    A 32-year-old woman, with spare previous medical history, presented with neurological symptoms of numbness and diplopia. The patient underwent brain MRI, which revealed a lesion of abnormal signal in the midbrain that could be attributed to subacute stroke; however, consecutive MRIs revealed multiple lesions of abnormal signal pointing to demyelinating disease. During symptoms investigation and MRI findings assessment, the patient underwent a FLT PET/CT examination, which revealed lesions of increased FLT uptake, probably indicating active disease and blood-brain barrier disruption. PMID:27088385

  17. A solitary hemangioblastoma located on the trochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiwei; Wang, Chongqian; Shi, Jiong

    2014-02-01

    Hemangioblastomas are tumors of the central nervous system that originate from the vascular system. They are most commonly composed of stromal cells in small blood vessels and usually occur in the cerebellum and spinal cord. We report a rare instance of a patient with a solitary hemangioblastoma located on the trochlear nerve. A 27-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache, vomiting, and diplopia. Imaging studies revealed a round mass lesion anterior to the pons with subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns of the posterior fossa extending to the fourth ventricle. A biopsy confirmed it was a hemangioblastoma. PMID:24012244

  18. Somatostatin-receptor positive brain stem glioma visualized by octreoscan.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Pichler, Josef; Mustafa, Hamdy; Nussbaumer, Karin; Zaunmüller, Thomas; Topakian, Raffi

    2007-06-01

    In diffuse brainstem gliomas often surgical biopsies cannot be obtained. The diagnosis relies upon imaging criteria, first line being MRI. Gliomas generally express somatostatin receptors (SSTR), which might enable receptor imaging. We present the case of a female adolescent with acute onset of hallucinations, dysphagia and diplopia. MRI detected a suggestive large pontine glioma. This lesion presented with marked In-111-pentreotide tracer uptake. SSTR-scan provided information about SSTR-expression, tumour viability and extension. Radiopeptide therapy for selected patients might be discussed. PMID:17627256

  19. Right Gaze Palsy and Hoarseness: A Rare Presentation of Mediastinal Tuberculosis with an Isolated Prepontine Cistern Tuberculoma

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Aina, Olufemi; Basunia, Md; Oke, Vikram; Schmidt, Marie Frances; Quist, Joseph; Enriquez, Danilo; Gayam, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    We describe a previously healthy young man who presented with headaches, diplopia with right lateral gaze palsy, dysphagia, and hoarseness over a 2-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a small enhancing mass at the prepontine cistern and chest CT showed a left mediastinal mass. Mediastinoscopy and lymph node biopsy were performed. DNA probe and culture of the biopsy specimen were confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Resolution of neurologic symptoms was noted after 6 weeks, in addition to regression of brain stem and mediastinal lesions after 12 weeks of antituberculous therapy. PMID:26693365

  20. Recurrence of cyclic esotropia after surgical correction.

    PubMed

    Cahill, M; Walsh, J; McAleer, A

    1999-12-01

    Cyclic esotropia is a rare form of strabismus in which a convergent squint appears and disappears typically, but not always, in a regular 48-hour cycle. Characteristically, the convergent squint, when present, has a large angle with associated suppression and no binocular function. On normal or "nonsquinting" days, no manifest deviation is detectable (although in some cases there may be an esophoria). Physiologic diplopia is appreciated, whereas fusion and stereopsis are all normal. Amblyopia may occur in up to 20% of cases. PMID:10613585

  1. Customized Orbital Decompression Surgery Combined with Eyelid Surgery or Strabismus Surgery in Mild to Moderate Thyroid-associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Woo; Lee, Jae Yeun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of customized orbital decompression surgery combined with eyelid surgery or strabismus surgery for mild to moderate thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). Methods Twenty-seven consecutive subjects who were treated surgically for proptosis with disfigurement or diplopia after medical therapy from September 2009 to July 2012 were included in the analysis. Customized orbital decompression surgery with correction of eyelid retraction and extraocular movement disorders was simultaneously performed. The patients had a minimum preoperative period of 3 months of stable range of ocular motility and eyelid position. All patients had inactive TAO and were euthyroid at the time of operation. Preoperative and postoperative examinations, including vision, margin reflex distance, Hertel exophthalmometry, ocular motility, visual fields, Goldmann perimetry, and subject assessment of the procedure, were performed in all patients. Data were analyzed using paired t-test (PASW Statistics ver. 18.0). Results Forty-nine decompressions were performed on 27 subjects (16 females, 11 males; mean age, 36.6 ± 11.6 years). Twenty-two patients underwent bilateral operations; five required only unilateral orbital decompression. An average proptosis of 15.6 ± 2.2 mm (p = 0.00) was achieved, with a mean preoperative Hertel measurement of 17.6 ± 2.2 mm. Ocular motility was corrected through recession of the extraocular muscle in three cases, and no new-onset diplopia or aggravated diplopia was noted. The binocular single vision field increased in all patients. Eyelid retraction correction surgery was simultaneously performed in the same surgical session in 10 of 49 cases, and strabismus and eyelid retraction surgery were performed in the same surgical session in two cases. Margin reflex distance decreased from a preoperative average of 4.3 ± 0.8 to 3.8 ± 0.5 mm postoperatively. Conclusions The customized orbital decompression procedure decreased

  2. Frontal sinus cholesterol granuloma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Nicholas L.; Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Chaudhry, Ajaz L.

    2014-01-01

    A case report of a massive cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the frontal sinus in a 15-year-old male subject treated endoscopically is reported. CGs are slowly expanding, cystic lesions that are rarely observed in the frontal sinus. Frontal sinus CGs characteristically present with proptosis, diplopia, and a unilateral painless expanding mass above the orbit. Patients frequently report a history of chronic nasal obstruction or head trauma. Although the pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely multifactorial in etiology. Surgical resection via endoscopic sinus surgery has been gaining popularity because of the minimally invasive approach and lower rates of recurrence. PMID:24612824

  3. Pseudo-Duane's retraction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duane, T D; Schatz, N J; Caputo, A R

    1976-01-01

    Five patients presented with signs that were similar to but opposite from Duane's retraction syndrome. Most had a history of orbital trauma. On attempted abduction a narrowing of the palpebral fissure and retraction of the globe was observed. Diplopia with lateral gaze was present. Roentgenograms (polytomograms) showed involvement of the medial orbital wall. Forced ductuin tests were positive. Surgical repair of the fracture and release of the entrapped muscle as determined by forced duction tests and by postoperative motility led to successful results. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:867622

  4. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in cyhalothrine poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Keivan; Mohaghegh, Mohammad Reza; Teimouri, Somayyeh Sadat; Okhovat, Ali Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Acute onset bulbar symptoms with respiratory failure and descending paralysis may occur in several neuromuscular disorders including variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), diphtheria, botulism and toxins. We present a 51-year-old man who presented with complains of ptosis and dyspnea following pyrethroids spraying in an enclosed area for eradication of flea. Within 5-6 days of admission limb weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria, blurred vision, diplopia, tremor and respiratory distress added to previous symptoms. Temporal profile of events after exposure, development of similar symptoms in patient's son, electrodiagnostic findings and exclusion of other etiologies confirms intoxication etiology. We reviewed the literature and provide an extensive electrodiagnostic overview. PMID:27099845

  5. [Frontoethmoidal mucocele. Diagnosis and treatment in 7 cases].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; Pardo Romero, G; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Mora Santos, Ma E; Alvarez Domínguez, J

    2007-01-01

    Mucocele has its origin by blockage of the paranasal sinuses ostium with mucinous retention inside, sometimes purulent (mucopiocele), and progressive slimming with gradual destruction on the bone walls. We report an own review of 7 patients with diagnosis of frontoethmoidal mucocele, 4 men and 3 women, 50-years average. The oftalmologic clinical symptoms (diplopia, exoftalmos and the eyeball movement restrictiv) were the most frequentjointly to cefalea. The kind of surgery that we have performed, in 6 of 7 cases, was FES with marsupialization (4 times) and external ethmoidectomy (2). We have performes a literature review at this respect. PMID:17844955

  6. Spontaneous Meckel's cave hematoma: A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Alafaci, Concetta; Grasso, Giovanni; Granata, Francesca; Marino, Daniele; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is vascular compression. However, other causes must be considered. Among these, spontaneous hematoma of the Meckel's cave (MC) causing symptomatic TN is very rare. Case Description: We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with a 2-month history of left TN and diplopia. Neuroradiological examinations revealed a well-defined hematoma in the left MC. The patient underwent surgical decompression with a progressive neurological improvement. Conclusion: Despite the number of lesions potentially affecting the MC, spontaneous hemorrhage is rare but should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26539319

  7. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor during pregnancy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, S; Oliveri, G; Filosomi, F; Petraglia, F

    2007-04-01

    The case of an 18-year-old primipara in the second trimester of pregnancy affected by a primitive supratentorial mass is described. Main symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were severe headache, diplopia, and left hemiparesis. In the 20(th) week of pregnancy a fronto-temporal craniotomy was performed with complete excision of the tumor. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Three months after being discharged, the patient still presented headache and apathy, and a magnetic resonance imaging scan again showed the presence of a temporal lesion; therefore, after caesarean delivery the second surgical resection of the tumor was performed. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy was required. PMID:17505462

  8. [A BANEFUL CUTANEOUS LESION].

    PubMed

    Defaee, A; Mancini, I; Vandemergel, X

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a patient presenting meningeal carcinomatosis and cutanenous metastasis as first manifestation of gastric adenocarcinoma. A 57-year-old patient was hospitalized because of headache and diplopia. Clinical examination revealed VI cranial nerve paralysis and anterior neck infiltration. Cutaneous biopsy and umbar puncture showed signet ring-cells. Extensive work-up disclosed gastric adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastasis and carcinomatous metastasis are both present exceptionally as first manifestation of gastric adenocarcinoma. We discuss frequency, etiology and treatment of these manifestations. PMID:27295896

  9. Myasthenia Gravis Presentation After a Cervical Laminectomy With Fusion.

    PubMed

    Deters, Darlene; Fowler, Stephanie L; Orozco, Raymundo; Smith, Patrick R; Spurlock, Shelby; Blackmon, Darlene; Thomas, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disorder that causes skeletal muscle weakness. Typically, myasthenia gravis affects the ocular, bulbar, neck, proximal limbs, and respiratory muscles. Although the presentation is typically observed with complaints of vision and bulbar symptoms such as diplopia, dystonia, and dysphagia, this article presents a case study of an elderly man with a history of increasing upper extremity weakness with complaints of worsening hand dexterity and intermittent episodes of expressive aphasia. After cervical laminectomy with fusion, this gentleman was admitted to the medical intensive care unit, in a complete myasthenic crisis. PMID:27258955

  10. Transvenous sclerotherapy of a large symptomatic orbital venous varix using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Venu; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Kahana, Alon

    2016-08-01

    An orbital venous varix is rare and can present with diplopia, proptosis, or hemorrhage. Treatment can be challenging, especially if the varix is in a posterior location within the orbit, since surgical exposure becomes difficult. A few case reports have been published describing transcatheter embolization of an orbital varix with coils, direct percutaneous injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue, and the percutaneous injection of bleomycin. We present a case of a symptomatic orbital venous varix of the left inferior ophthalmic vein successfully treated with transvenous endovascular sclerotherapy using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin. PMID:26122325

  11. Abducens nerve palsy after schwannoma resection.

    PubMed

    Bobbio, Antonio; Hamelin-Canny, Emelyne; Roche, Nicolas; Taillia, Herve; Alifano, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Tumors of the posterior mediastinum are mostly neurogenic and could involve the intervertebral foramen and the medullary canal. We describe the case of a patient who underwent surgery for a nerve sheet tumor originating at the level of the right second neural root. Resection was associated with an incidental dural tear and cerebrospinal fluid leak that was promptly repaired. One week after surgery, horizontal diplopia occurred. A palsy of the left abducens nerve secondary to intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. We present the pathogenic cascade leading to this ocular complication after posterior mediastinal surgery. The surgical techniques to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:25639411

  12. A case of traumatic bilateral abducens and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Ferda; Mut, Senem E.

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 47 Final Diagnosis: Traumatic bilateral abducens • unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Incidence of unilateral abducens palsy from head trauma has been reported to be as high as 1% to 2.7%, but bilateral abducens nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Report: We present a case in which bilateral abducens nerve and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy developed with a high Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3 hours after head trauma due to a motor vehicle crash. Conclusions: This case highlights the occurrence and management of posttraumatic bilateral sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23847710

  13. Combined Orbital Floor and Medial Wall Fractures Involving the Inferomedial Strut: Repair Technique and Case Series Using Preshaped Porous Polyethylene/Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Raymond I.; Davies, Brett W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined orbital floor and medial wall fractures can be technically challenging to repair, particularly when the inferomedial strut is involved. A surgical repair technique is described utilizing a single preshaped porous polyethylene/titanium implant to span both defects. Methods Retrospective interventional case series. Results Fracture repair was performed on 17 orbits (16 patients) between October 2009 and February 2012. Subsequent surgical revision was required in three cases (18%). Visual acuity was stable or improved in all cases. Of 7 patients with preoperative diplopia, 5 improved and 2 remained stable postoperatively, and there were no cases of new or worsened diplopia following surgery. Postoperative asymmetry in Hertel exophthalmometry averaged 1.0 mm (range 0 to 2 mm). Preoperatively, average orbital volume was 122.7% compared with control (range 109 to 147%, standard deviation [SD] 9.6), which improved to 100.3% postoperatively (range 92 to 110%, SD 5.7). The average decrease in orbital volume was 22.5% (range 10 to 54%, SD 11.4, p < 0.001). Conclusions With careful preoperative planning and meticulous surgical technique, combined orbital floor and medial wall fractures involving the inferomedial strut can be successfully repaired with a preshaped porous polyethylene/titanium implant through a transconjunctival/transcaruncular approach with inferior oblique disinsertion. PMID:24436754

  14. A case of acquired Brown syndrome after surgical repair of a medial orbital wall fracture.

    PubMed

    Seo, Il-Hun; Rhim, Jay-Won; Suh, Young-Woo; Cho, Yoonae A

    2010-02-01

    A case of acquired Brown syndrome caused by surgical repair of medial orbital wall fracture is reported in the present paper. A 23-year-old man presented at the hospital with right periorbital trauma. Although the patient did not complain of any diplopia, the imaging study revealed a blow-out fracture of the medial orbital wall. Surgical repair with a calvarial bone autograft was performed at the department of plastic surgery. The patient was referred to the ophthalmologic department due to diplopia that newly developed after surgery. The prism cover test at distant fixation showed hypotropia of the right eye, which was 4 prism diopters (PD) in primary gaze, 20 PD in left gaze, while orthophoric in right gaze. Eye movement of the right eye was markedly limited on elevation in adduction with normal elevation in abduction with intorsion in the right eye present. Forced duction test of the right eye showed restricted elevation in adduction. Computerized tomography scan of the orbits showed the right superior oblique muscle was entrapped between the autografted bone fragment and posterior margin of the fracture. When repairing medial orbital wall fracture that causes Brown syndrome, surgeons should always be careful of entrapment of the superior oblique muscle if the implant is inserted without identifying the superior and posterior margin of the orbital fracture site. PMID:20157416

  15. Longitudinal tear of the inferior rectus muscle in orbital floor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of longitudinal avulsion of the inferior rectus muscle following orbital floor fracture and describe its clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) features and management. A 53-year-old man felt vertical diplopia in all gaze immediately after the trauma. Orthoptic assessment showed left over right hypertropia of 20 prism diopters and left exotropia of 10 prism diopters in primary position. The left orbital floor fracture and the prolapse of orbital contents into the maxillary sinus were presented by CT. Exploration of the orbit was performed under general anesthesia. The displaced bone fragment was elevated and repositioned below the slastic implant. Diplopia continued in all directions of gaze, although the impairment of depression was reduced postoperatively. A residual left hypertropia of 10 prism diopters and exotropia of 10 prism diopters was present in primary position 1 month after surgery, though there were no enopthalmos or worsening of hypesthesia. Repeated CT revealed the muscle avulsion of inferior rectus at the lateral portion of the belly. The avulsion of a small segment of the inferior rectus and its herniation into maxillary sinus in more posterior views was detected by review of the preoperative images. Muscle avulsion should be considered in the management of orbital fracture if orbital tissue entrapment and nerve paresis are excluded as causes of reduction in ocular motility. A thorough review of the imaging studies for possible muscle injury is required before surgery in all cases of orbital fracture. PMID:22551369

  16. [Necrosis and reconstruction of the inferior oblique muscle after removal of a wooden intra-orbital foreign body].

    PubMed

    Huber, K K; Hartmann, K; Vobig, M; Krombach, G A

    2006-08-01

    A 39-year-old patient presented 3 days after a bicycle accident with a progressive left periorbital inflammatory swelling and diplopia in upgaze. On the day of the accident, a cranial x-ray did not reveal a fracture or an orbital foreign body, and the 2.5 cm skin wound on the left lower eyelid was sutured. For further evaluation, computer tomography) was performed. This did not show a radio-opaque, orbital foreign body. An explorative orbitotomy was carried out and revealed a 3.7 cm long wooden fragment medial to the inferior oblique muscle (OI). The extraconal portion of OI was found to be necrotic. Complete reconstruction of the OI was not possible due to the extent of the necrosis. The residual muscle was fixated to the orbital septum. Recovery was good and the diplopia resolved after 6 months. This case emphasizes the importance of a meticulous inspection of skin wounds with a high risk of remaining wooden foreign bodies and shows the possibility of functional recovery of extraocular muscles following partial reconstruction. PMID:16819664

  17. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  18. Timing of operation for blowout fractures with extraocular muscle entrapment.

    PubMed

    Sugamata, Akira; Yoshizawa, Naoki; Shimanaka, Kosuke

    2013-12-01

    Many authors have advocated early surgical intervention to avoid muscle degeneration in patients with blowout fractures with evidence of extraocular muscle entrapment imaged under computed tomography. However, there is still no golden standard with regard to the target timing of operations for releasing extraocular muscle. Between January 2002 and December 2011, the authors treated eight cases of blowout fracture with extraocular muscle entrapment. Notes from presumed cases of blowout fracture were retrospectively reviewed for information relating to surgical treatment and prognosis. In this series, a patient who was operated on 7 hours after injury showed the quickest recovery from diplopia. In contrast, a patient who was operated on 18 days after injury showed persistent diplopia for 2 years. Nevertheless, in patients who were operated on 3-11 days after injury, there was no obvious correlation between the outcome and the number of days between injury and the operation. It is concluded that, when emergency surgical intervention within several hours is not possible, it should be performed as soon after the injury as possible in order to prevent the increase of predictive fibrosis around the extraocular muscle. PMID:23848420

  19. Need for airbag and seatbelt to reduce orbital injuries from steering wheel knob.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to report a blowout fracture of the orbital floor and medial wall caused by being struck by a steering wheel knob of an automobile and to discuss the use of airbags and seatbelts as a preventive measure for orbital injuries. A 58-year-old man was struck in the left eye by a steering wheel. His car hit a telephone pole, and he had a frontal collision injury. In this frontal impact, his left eye was hit by a Brodie knob attached to the steering wheel. At the time of injury, the speed of the car was about 65 km/h. He was not wearing a seatbelt, and the airbag had not deployed. Swelling and ecchymosis were observed at the left periorbital area, and he had diplopia on a left-side gaze. A CT revealed fractures in the medial and inferior wall of the left orbit. Entrapped soft tissues were reduced, and the medial wall and floor were reconstructed with a resorbable sheet. His diplopia disappeared 12 days after surgery. To prevent the injury from the steering wheel knob, an airbag should be installed in any vehicle, which has a steering wheel knob. Legislation mandating the use of airbags as well as seatbelts in vehicles with attached steering wheel knobs should be made. PMID:25376138

  20. Fixation of fractured inferior orbital wall using fibrin glue in inferior blowout fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun Jun; Yang, Ho Jik; Kim, Jong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of surgical treatment for orbital fracture are to return soft tissue to its original position as well as reduce and fix the bone fragments properly. Reduction of the orbital bone through a subciliary or conjunctival incision and reduction using a urinary balloon catheter were simultaneously performed on 53 patients between 2010 and 2013. Fibrin glue was used to attach the reduced bone fragments. These patients had less than 2 cm(2) of bone defect and showed diplopia, eye movement limitation, and enophthalmos. Diplopia, eye movement limitation, and enophthalmos were each reduced to 3/32, 2/25, and 2/48, respectively. There were no adverse effects, such as infection or hematoma, and because implants were not used, there was no possibility of its extrusion or foreign body reaction. The operation time decreased compared with when using an implant, and the bone fragments remained in a fixed position even after removing the urinary balloon catheter. Therefore, the use of fibrin glue proved to be effective in orbital floor fractures. PMID:25565237

  1. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: A Study of 100 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Litre, Claude Fabien Colin, Philippe; Noudel, Remy; Peruzzi, Philippe; Bazin, Arnaud; Sherpereel, Bernard; Bernard, Marie Helene; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes.

  2. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. PMID:25698607

  3. Acute Cranial Neuropathies Heralding Neurosyphilis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Neurosyphilis Symptoms: Diplopia •facial droop • facial nerve palsy • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Symptomatic early neurosyphilis with isolated acute multiple cranial nerves palsy as initial manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It is caused by direct invasion of the central nervous system by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. Case Report: A 31-year-old African-American homosexual man presented with bilateral hearing loss, constant vertigo, intermittent horizontal diplopia, and bilateral facial droop, which was associated with occipital headache without fever. Neurological examination revealed bilateral vestibulocochlear and facial nerve palsy. On brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after administration of gadolinium, he was found to have extensive isolated basilar meningeal enhancement involving the midbrain, pons along the seven and eight nerves complex bilaterally, consistent with basal meningoencephalitis. Conclusions: Neurosyphilis can present as initial manifestation of HIV infection with early involvement of basal meninges and cranial nerves. It is important to understand that neurosyphilis is still a significant disease with complex neurological presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis is crucial due to potential persistent disabilities that can be easily treated or even prevented. PMID:25265092

  4. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  5. Results after En Bloc Lateral Wall Decompression Surgery with Orbital Fat Resection in 111 Patients with Graves' Orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Nicole; Guthoff, Rudolf F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of en bloc lateral wall decompression with additional orbital fat resection in terms of exophthalmos reduction and complications. Methods. A retrospective, noncomparative case series study from 1999 to 2011 (chart review) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO) patients. The standardized surgical technique involved removal of the lateral orbital wall including the orbital rim via a lid crease approach combined with additional orbital fat resection. Exophthalmos, diplopia, retrobulbar pressure sensation, and complications were analyzed pre- and postoperatively. Results. A total of 111 patients (164 orbits) with follow-up >3 months were analysed. Mean exophthalmos reduction was 3.05mm and preoperative orbital pressure sensation resolved or improved in all patients. Visual acuity improved significantly in patients undergoing surgery for rehabilitative or vision threatening purposes. Preoperative diplopia improved in 10 patients (9.0%) but worsened in 5 patients (4.5%), necessitating surgical correction in 3 patients. There were no significant complications; however, one patient had slight hollowing of the temporalis muscle around the scar that did not necessitate revision, and another patient with a circumscribed retraction of the scar itself underwent surgical correction. Conclusions. The study confirms the efficiency of en bloc lateral wall decompression in GO in a large series of patients, highlighting the low risk of disturbance of binocular functions and of cosmetic blemish in the temporal midface region. PMID:26221142

  6. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  7. Acute audiovestibular deficit with complete ocular tilt reaction and absent VEMPs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Ban, Yumiko; Tsutumi, Tomoko

    2011-07-01

    A patient presenting with vertical diplopia along with ocular tilt reaction (OTR) due to peripheral vestibular dysfunction is a rare occurrence. OTR is an eye-head postural reaction consisting of head tilt, skew deviation, conjugated eye cyclotorsion, and alteration of vertical perception, and is thought to occur with central lesions, mainly brainstem lesions. Here, we report a case of a patient who was suffering from left acute peripheral cochleovestibular loss. He had profound deafness and absence of caloric response on the left side. No central lesion was observed on magnetic resonance images. Neuro-ophthalmological examination showed OTR consisting of head tilt, skew deviation with left hypotropia, excyclotorsion, and tilt of the static visual vertical directed to the left side. Both utricular and saccular dysfunctions were identified by the absence of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) on the left side. Within a month, the OTR disappeared completely probably because of vestibular compensation. This is the first report to state that the peripheral otolith dysfunction causing reversible vertical diplopia was identified by objective examinations (VEMP). PMID:21431953

  8. Ophthalmological outcomes of patients treated for pineal region tumors.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Elizabeth V; Lyons, Christopher J; Hukin, Juliette; Cochrane, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The ophthalmological outcomes of children treated for pineal tumors have received limited attention in the literature. METHODS This paper reviews the outcomes of 29 children treated for pineal and posterior third ventricular tumors in the contemporary era using chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and resection as defined by the histology and/or marker profile of the tumor. RESULTS At the time of diagnosis, all patients except 1 had hydrocephalus and all had ophthalmological involvement. Papilledema was found in 69% of patients. Seventy-five percent of patients had partial or complete Parinaud's syndrome, and diplopia or blurred vision was noted in the remaining patients. Visual acuity was impaired in 8 patients. Outcomes were dependent on the histology of the tumor and the treatment required. Those patients who did not requiring resection showed a lower rate of ophthalmological worsening during treatment and greater long-term improvement, in particular with respect to up-gaze palsy. Patients who underwent resection for postchemotherapy residual disease or primary resection showed greater worsening during treatment and lesser degrees of recovery. All patients with impaired visual acuity improved with treatment. CONCLUSIONS As the mortality of germ cell and other pineal tumors decreases, posttreatment morbidity remains, specifically that related to convergence nystagmus, accommodation, and diplopia. In addition to survival, ophthalmological morbidity should be reported in studies concerning the outcomes of treatment for pineal neoplasms. PMID:26799411

  9. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma with relapses in the lacrimal glands

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, Rita; Proença, Helena; Pinto, Filomena; Fonseca, Ana; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report an unusual case of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with repeated relapse in the lacrimal glands, in spite of complete remission for several years after treatment. Methods: A 78-year-old male with small lymphocytic B cell NHL, stage IV disease (lung invasion), was submitted to surgery and chemotherapy in 2001, with complete remission of the disease. In 2003 he developed a nodular lesion in the right lacrimal fossa. Pathology results revealed a local relapse of NHL. Radiation and chemotherapy were initiated and complete remission was again achieved. In 2012 the patient developed a new nodular lesion located in the left lacrimal fossa, resulting in diplopia, ptosis and proptosis of the left eye. Orbital computerized tomography (CT), ocular ultrasound and incisional biopsy were performed. Results: Orbital CT revealed a lesion infiltrating the left lacrimal gland and encircling the globe. Biopsy results confirmed a local relapse of B cell NHL. The patient was submitted to local radiation therapy with progressive resolution of ptosis, proptosis and diplopia. Response to treatment was monitored with ocular ultrasound. Conclusions: Patients with NHL diagnosis should be immediately investigated if ophthalmic or orbital symptoms develop. NHL extension to the orbit and adnexa is infrequent (5% of NHL cases) but may occur at any stage of the disease, including as a relapse site. In such cases, radiation and chemotherapy achieve good results, inducing long periods of remission.

  10. Neuro-Ophthalmological Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, João

    2015-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmological emergencies constitute vision or life-threatening conditions if diagnosis and treatment are not promptly undertaken. Even with immediate therapy, these clinical entities carry a high rate of morbidity. They may present with diplopia, visual loss, and/or anisocoria. Arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is an ominous condition, which can cause permanent and severe vision loss, stroke, or aortic dissection, requiring immediate steroid therapy. Pituitary apoplexy may go unnoticed if only computed axial tomography is performed. Diseases affecting the cavernous sinus and orbital apex region, such as cavernous sinus thrombosis or mucormycosis, can give rise to simultaneous vision loss and diplopia and, if not treated, may extend to the brain parenchyma causing permanent neurological sequela. An isolated third nerve palsy may be the harbinger of a cerebral aneurysm, carrying a significant risk of mortality. Horner syndrome can be the initial presentation of a carotid dissection, an important cause of stroke in the young adult. The neurohospitalist should be familiar with the workup and management of neuro-ophthalmological emergencies. PMID:26425250

  11. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Catalan, Mauro; Naccarato, Marcello; Grandi, Fabio Chiodo; Capozzoli, Francesca; Koscica, Nadia; Pizzolato, Gilberto

    2009-02-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a rare demyelinating disease mainly affecting children, characterized by acute onset, progressive course and high mortality. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our Unit for diplopia and ataxia ensuing 2 weeks after the onset of pneumonia. MRI T2-weighted images showed signal hyperintensities in the brainstem. Antibodies against Mycoplasma Pneumoniae and cold agglutinins were found. Two weeks later the patient had a worsening of his conditions: he developed left hemiplegia with motor focal seizures and the day after he was deeply comatose (GCS = 4). A second MRI scan showed extensive hyperintensities involving the whole right hemisphere white matter with a small parietal hemorrhagic area. The clinical and neuroimaging features suggested the diagnosis of AHL, Aciclovir in association with steroid therapy were administered and then plasmapheresis was started. After 30 days of coma, the patient gradually reacquired consciousness and motor functions; anyway a left hemiplegia persisted. PMID:19145402

  12. Yet Another Atypical Presentation of Anti-GQ1b Antibody Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alroughani, Raed; Thussu, Anil; Guindi, Raouf T

    2015-09-24

    Variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome such as Bickerstaff encephalitis and Miller-Fisher syndrome have been reported. We report a 15-year-old boy who presented, after a prodromal illness, with 3-day progressive limb weakness, diplopia, and acute urinary retention. Clinically, he had horizontal gaze-evoked and upbeat nystagmus, bilateral extensor plantars in addition to quadriparesis and areflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine was unremarkable and cerebral spinal fluid analysis showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. Nerve conduction study revealed symmetrical axonal neuropathy. Anti-GQ1b antibody was positive. A combination of IV methylprednisone followed by IVIg was instituted which led to remarkable clinical recovery. This case underpins the importance of recognizing atypical presentations of acute autonomic dysfunction and central nervous system features such as nystagmus, which may be associated with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome. Features mimicking myelitis and brainstem encephalitis may pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma among the treating physicians. PMID:26487925

  13. Yet Another Atypical Presentation of Anti-GQ1b Antibody Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, Raed; Thussu, Anil; Guindi, Raouf T.

    2015-01-01

    Variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome such as Bickerstaff encephalitis and Miller-Fisher syndrome have been reported. We report a 15-year-old boy who presented, after a prodromal illness, with 3-day progressive limb weakness, diplopia, and acute urinary retention. Clinically, he had horizontal gaze-evoked and upbeat nystagmus, bilateral extensor plantars in addition to quadriparesis and areflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine was unremarkable and cerebral spinal fluid analysis showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. Nerve conduction study revealed symmetrical axonal neuropathy. Anti-GQ1b antibody was positive. A combination of IV methylprednisone followed by IVIg was instituted which led to remarkable clinical recovery. This case underpins the importance of recognizing atypical presentations of acute autonomic dysfunction and central nervous system features such as nystagmus, which may be associated with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome. Features mimicking myelitis and brainstem encephalitis may pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma among the treating physicians. PMID:26487925

  14. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  15. Nivolumab for the treatment of malignant melanoma in a patient with pre-existing myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Osamu; Yokota, Kenji; Atsuta, Naoki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Akiyama, Masashi; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 79-year-old man with lymph node recurrence of malignant melanoma received nivolumab, an anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody. He had pre-existing ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) and a continued small amount of corticosteroid. Grade 3 creatine phosphokinase elevation appeared after two doses of nivolumab, and the treatment was postponed until it improved to grade 1. After three doses of nivolumab, he experienced diplopia and facial muscle weakness which were consistent with an acute exacerbation of MG, and the symptoms relieved without additional treatment for MG. He achieved shrinkage of metastasis after ten doses of nivolumab. Although a case who died due to MG after administration of nivolumab was reported recently, pre-existing MG is considered not to be always a contraindication of nivolumab. PMID:27019533

  16. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Potentially Unrecognized Diagnosis after Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Cordingley, Dean; Essig, Marco; Mansouri, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic optic neuropathy is a rare cause of visual disturbance after head injury that can be difficult to distinguish from coexisting vestibulo-ocular dysfunction because of the overlap in presenting symptoms in patients with these conditions. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl who sustained a head injury during a ringette game leading to blurred vision and diplopia persisting 5 months after injury. Clinical history and physical examination findings were consistent with a traumatic optic neuropathy, convergence insufficiency, and postconcussion syndrome. Neuroimaging was normal. The patient was managed using a multidisciplinary approach. At 6 months of follow-up, neuro-ophthalmological examination demonstrated evidence of permanent partial optic nerve injury, and formal neuropsychological testing fell primarily within normal limits. The patient was advised to retire from collision sports. The authors discuss the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and management of concussion patients presenting with persistent visual symptoms. PMID:26745167

  17. Visual impairment in stroke patients--a review.

    PubMed

    Sand, K M; Midelfart, A; Thomassen, L; Melms, A; Wilhelm, H; Hoff, J M

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of all stroke patients suffer from post-stroke visual impairment. Hemianopia is the most common symptom, but also neglect, diplopia, reduced visual acuity, ptosis, anisocoria, and nystagmus are frequent. Partial or complete recovery of visual disorders can occur, but many patients suffer permanent disability. This disability is often less evident than impairment of motor and speech functions, but is negatively correlated with rehabilitation outcome and can lead to a significant reduction in day-to-day functioning. To be visually impaired after stroke reduces quality of life and causes social isolation because of difficulties in navigating/orientating in the surroundings. A thorough diagnosis including targeted examination and later follow-up with eye examination and perimetry is essential in order to establish the extent of the visual impairment and to select the best rehabilitation strategy. Patients seem to profit from visual rehabilitation focused on coping strategies. PMID:23190292

  18. Refractory hypotension in a patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Hou, Xiaojun; Ding, Suju; Guan, Yangtai; Zhen, Huimin; Tu, Laihui; Qiu, Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient with gastric carcinoma underwent radical distal gastrectomy type II + Braun anastomosis, and received total parenteral nutrition for 10 days after surgery, followed by small amounts of semi-liquid nutrition for 3 days and liquid nutrition for 2 days. The patient developed refractory hypotension for more than 1 week in the early course of disease, and on Day 15 after surgery presented with characteristic signs of Wernicke's encephalopathy, including diplopia and mental confusion. The hypotension did not improve despite appropriate fluid replacement soon after admission. Treatment with moderate dose of thiamine for 3 months partly relieved ophthalmoplegia and confusion, but not Korsakoff syndrome. This extraordinary presentation with refractory hypotension and the unusual course of the disease encouraged us to present this case. PMID:21969096

  19. Advanced cocaine-related necrotising sinusitis presenting with restrictive ophthalmolplegia.

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, Gerassimos; McHugh, James; McCarthy, Karon; Bunting, Howard

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral infero-medial orbital wall destruction, associated with loss of sinonasal architecture. The patient presented with intermittent horizontal diplopia following an acute on chronic infective sinusitis. Eight months previously the patient had developed a midline hard palate fistula for which a palatine prosthesis had been fitted. The broad differential diagnosis is discussed, though in this patient chronic cocaine abuse was identified as the underlying aetiology. Eye movement restriction worsened progressively with bilateral inflammation around the medial and inferior rectus muscles. Attempts to resolve the recurring cycle of sinus infection and inflammation by palatal fistula closure failed despite augmented techniques mobilising flaps from both nasal and palatal sides. PMID:27010976

  20. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-04-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  1. A case of isolated abducens nerve paralysis in maxillofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Elif Seda; Keskin, Ekrem; Atik, Bekir; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2015-01-01

    Nervus abducens is a pure motor nerve located in the pons. It retracts the eyeball laterally by stimulating rectus lateralis muscle. In case of their paralysis, diplopia and restriction in the eye movements while looking sideways, are seen. Since the same signs are seen due to the muscle entrapment in blowout fractures, its differential diagnosis has importance in terms of the treatment protocol and avoiding unnecessary operations. In this article, we present a 22-year-old male patient who was referred to our department due to the prediagnosis of blowout fracture following maxillofacial trauma. However, he was diagnosed with abducens nerve paralysis after the consultations and analysis and his restriction of movement was resolved via systemic steroid treatment instead of unnecessary operation. PMID:26981484

  2. Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: missed diagnosis of 'white-eyed shunt'.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with bilateral blowout fractures. She presented with diplopia showing impaired abduction of the left eye soon after trauma. No other orbito-ocular signs, such as exophthalmos, ptosis, or chemosis, were found. Orbital reconstruction was performed, but no improvement in her ophthalmoplegia was observed after surgery. A carotid angiography showed that she was suffering from a posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with isolated abducens nerve palsy. Coil embolization was conducted under the consultation of a neurosurgeon, after which her ophthalmoplegia resolved fully. This is a rare case of posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula without classic orbito-ocular signs, the absence of which may cause diagnostic confusion. PMID:23415244

  3. The Hydraulic Mechanism in the Orbital Blowout Fracture Because of a High-Pressure Air Gun Injury.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Joo; Chung, Eui Han

    2015-10-01

    There are 2 predominant mechanisms that are used to explain the pathogenesis of orbital blowout fracture; these include hydraulic and buckling mechanisms. Still, however, its pathophysiology remains uncertain. To date, studies in this series have been conducted using dry skulls, cadavers, or animals. But few clinical studies have been conducted to examine whether the hydraulic mechanism is involved in the occurrence of pure orbital blowout fracture. The authors experienced a case of a 52-year-old man who had a pure medial blowout fracture after sustaining an eye injury because of a high-pressure air gun. Our case suggests that surgeons should be aware of the possibility that the hydraulic mechanism might be involved in the blowout fracture in patients presenting with complications, such as limitation of eye movement, diplopia, and enophthalmos. PMID:26468824

  4. Cerebellopontine angle primitive neuroectodermal tumor mimicking trigeminal schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saad Akhtar; Ujjan, Badar Uddin; Salim, Adnan; Shamim, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) comprise a group of aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring in central nervous system as well as in peripheral locations. Primary cerebellopontine angle (CPA) PNET is an extremely rare entity. It is important to have knowledge of this pathology and to be able to differentiate it from other commonly occurring CPA tumors, such as vestibular and trigeminal schwannomas. This distinction is essential because of the difference in the overall treatment plan and prognosis. Case Description: This report describes a case of a young male presenting with diplopia and numbness of face; magnetic resonance imaging showed a CPA mass. With a provisional diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma, the patient underwent surgery. Histopathology provided a diagnosis of PNET. Conclusion: We discuss the importance of recognizing this rare condition and how this entity differs from the commonly occurring tumors. PMID:26862446

  5. Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula of an Adult-Type Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery with Multiple Vascular Variations

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  6. Direct carotid cavernous fistula of an adult-type persistent primitive trigeminal artery with multiple vascular variations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Kwon, Do Hoon; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  7. A Case of Orbital Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Mark; Prendes, Mark Armando; Wilkes, Byron; Lee, Hui Bae Harold; Fraig, Mostafa; Nunery, William R

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys of the United States. In this case report, a 33-year-old woman who presented with a right orbital mass causing progressive vision loss, diplopia, and facial swelling is described. Lateral orbitotomy with lateral orbital wall bone flap was performed for excisional biopsy of the lesion. The 1.5 × 1.8 × 2.3 cm cicatricial mass demonstrated a granulomatous lesion with necrosis and positive staining consistent with Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of orbital histoplasmosis to be reported in the United States and the first case worldwide of orbital histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum. PMID:25186215

  8. Orbital varix thrombosis: a rare cause of unilateral proptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryckie George; Maddock, Thomas B; Ananth, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Orbital varices are thin walled, low flow, distensible veins which may rarely present with periorbital pain, proptosis or visual loss. Most orbital varices may be managed conservatively and only warrant surgery in the presence of recurrent thrombosis, disfiguring proptosis or acute visual loss. This report concerns an 84-year-old Caucasian woman who was admitted following a fall and noted to have isolated proptosis of the right eye, with vertical diplopia. All biochemical and haematological investigations were normal. A CT scan of the orbits demonstrated a serpiginous soft tissue mass within the superior portion of the right orbit, consistent with a thrombosed orbital varix. Conservative management was agreed with prism glasses and ophthalmological follow-up. PMID:23355578

  9. Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Administered to Abolish Acquired Nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. John; Tomsak, Robert L.; Grant, Michael P.; Remler, Bernd F.; Yaniglos, Stacy S.; Lystad, Lisa; Dell'Osso, Louis F.

    1992-01-01

    We injected botulinum toxin into the horizontal rectus muscles of the right eyes of two patients who had acquired pendular nystagmus with horizontal, vertical, and torsional components. This treatment successfully abolished the horizontal component of the nystagmus in the injected eye in both patients for approximately 2 months. Both patients showed a small but measurable improvement of vision in the injected eye that may have been limited by coexistent disease of the visual pathways. The vertical and torsional components of the nystagmus persisted in both patients. In one patient, the horizontal component of nystagmus in the noninjected eye increased; we ascribe this finding to plastic-adaptive changes in response to paresis caused by the botulinum toxin. Such plastic-adaptive changes and direct side effects of the injections - such as diplopia and ptosis - may limit the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of acquired nystagmus. Neither patient elected to repeat the botulinum treatment.

  10. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy L H; Cartagena, Ana M; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2016-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated. PMID:27366189

  11. [Onset of myasthenia gravis in primary care. Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission involving the production of autoantibodies directed against skeletal muscle receptors, in most cases of acetylcholine. Clinically it is characterized by the appearance of muscle weakness after prolonged activity, which tends to recover after a period of rest, or administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. It is a relatively rare disease, although the prevalence has increased by improved diagnosis and increased longevity of the population. The diagnosis can be based on evidence after it is suspected using pharmacological, immunological or electrophysiology tests. Treatment can be divided into: symptomatic, short term and long term. We report the case of a patient who complained of diplopia, this muscle weakness being the most common initial symptom of the disease. PMID:24095170

  12. Multidisciplinary treatment for prepubertal juvenile myasthenia gravis with crisis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yusuke; Inoue, Masayoshi; Nabatame, Shin; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    The management of juvenile myasthenia gravis (MG) remains controversial. We report herein the case of a 12-year-old girl with prepubertal juvenile MG with respiratory crisis who underwent thymectomy following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The patient initially developed progressively worsening fatigability, eyelid ptosis, and diplopia, followed by worsening generalized weakness, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Even after i.v. immunoglobulin, the patient presented with rapid onset of severe dyspnea requiring respiratory support with mechanical ventilation and was graded as Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class V. After a course of i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy, successful control of respiratory crisis was achieved, and trans-sternal thymectomy was performed. Partial remission was achieved postoperatively with oral pyridostigmine without immunosuppressive agents such as steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for 18 months after thymectomy. Early thymectomy following induction methylprednisolone pulse therapy might be a treatment option for prepubertal juvenile MG with severe respiratory crisis. PMID:27324449

  13. Selective response to rituximab in a young child with MuSK-associated myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Iyadurai, Stanley J; Connolly, Anne; Zaidman, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Neuromuscular junction disorders in children are either genetic, such as congenital myasthenic syndrome, or autoimmune with circulating antibodies most commonly against acetylcholine receptors. There is limited experience recognizing and treating children with myasthenia associated with muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies. We report a seven-year-old child with intermittent esotropia since age 3 months, and two years of progressive and severe diplopia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial weakness. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies and genetic testing for congenital myasthenic syndrome were negative. Muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were significantly elevated. Ophthalmoplegia and bulbar weakness were refractory to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, corticosteroids and IVIg but completely resolved following treatment with rituximab. Her neurologic examination remained normal at the most recent follow-up, 15 months after initiation of rituximab. Children with MuSK myasthenia, like adults, can respond to rituximab despite long standing disease and failure to improve on other immunosuppressant medications. PMID:25998611

  14. Orbital hemorrhage and eyelid ecchymosis in acute orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Reifler, D M; Leder, D; Rexford, T

    1989-02-15

    We examined two patients with acute orbital myositis associated with orbital hemorrhage and eyelid ecchymosis. Both patients were young women (aged 22 and 30 years) who had painful proptosis, diplopia, and computed tomographic evidence of single extraocular muscle involvement with spillover of inflammatory edema into the adjacent orbital fat. Patient 1 showed contralateral preseptal eyelid inflammation and did not suffer an orbital hemorrhage until after an episode of vomiting. In Patient 2, the diagnosis of occult orbital varix was initially considered but an orbital exploration and a biopsy specimen showed no vascular anomaly. Both patients were treated successfully with high-dose systemic corticosteroids. Some cases of idiopathic orbital inflammation may be related to preexisting vascular anomalies or orbital phlebitis. PMID:2913803

  15. Phenytoin intoxication with no symptoms correlated with serum drug level: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Avcil, Mucahit; Duman, Ali; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Kapci, Mucahit; Akoz, Ayhan; Canakci, Selcuk Eren; Ozluer, Yunus Emre

    2015-01-01

    In high-dose intake of phenytoin, which is used frequently to treatepilepsy, nystagmus, diplopia, nausea-vomiting, lethargy, confusion, seizure, and coma can be observed. In recent studies on phenytoin intoxication, in which seizure and coma were observed in drug levels greater than 50 ug/mL. The serum phenytoin level of apatient, who consumed approximately 100 pcs of 100 mg phenytoin tablets in an effort to commit suicide, and who had no pathological finding in her neurologic examination, was 124 ug/mL. High drug level and the absence of toxic effect (or the absence of toxic effect correlated with the drug level) indicates that cytochrome P450 is functioning, but there can be a mutation in the MDR1 gene. In our case study, we report on phenytoin intoxication in a patient having a high level of phenytoin but no symptoms correlated with serum drug level, as supported by the findings in the literature. PMID:26966493

  16. [Food poisoning caused by Clostridium botulinum type E].

    PubMed

    Aureli, P; Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M

    1984-01-01

    The results of a microbiological investigation carried out into a home-canned tuna fish are reported in relation to a suspected botulism case. Toxin of Cl. botulinum type E was detected by mouse toxicity and neutralization tests. The food specimen were also cultured for Cl. botulinum. The isolates was identified as Cl. botulinum type E by biochemical, gas chromatographic and immunological tests. The outbreak in which for the first time in Italy, the Cl. botulinum type E is involved, concerns one person who showed typical signs and symptoms consistent with botulism (abdominal cramps, dilatated pupils, diplopia, dysphagia, paralysis of lower upper limbs). The laboratory results are discussed with relation to environmental characteristics of the micro-organism and their resistance to same chemical and physical factors with are involved in the canning practice. PMID:6398700

  17. [Headhache secondary to intracranial hypotension in a Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Surgery].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Mendía, Begoña; Angulo-Taberno, Marina; Jaroid-Audes, Ricardo; Untoria-Agustín, Carmen; Rivero-Zelada, David

    2016-01-01

    Intracraneal hypotension headache is a well known syndrome in neurosurgery practice. In most cases cerebrospinal fluid leaks are caused by medical interventions, such as lumbar puncture, peridural anesthesia and surgical interventions on the spine. Clinical symptoms tipically show orthostatic headache that resolves in supine position, and other symptoms like neck tightness, vertigo and diplopia. RMI diagnostic confirms paquimeningeal enhancement and subdural hygromas. Conservative treatment usually includes bed resting, hydratation and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids, resolving spontaneously in one to four months. The importance of the diagnosis lies in the differential diagnosis with other causes of headache, as symptomatic limiting factor in the rehabilitation of the patient and the same favorable prognosis. PMID:27420146

  18. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chaker, Nibrass; Bouladi, Mejda; Chebil, Ahmed; Jemmeli, Mehdi; Mghaieth, Fatma; El Matri, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK) with decreased visual acuity (4/10). Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy. PMID:24966563

  19. [What do you actually see? Visual impairments and their simulation for well-seeing subjects].

    PubMed

    de Jong, P T

    2003-12-20

    Most physicians know little about how persons with limited vision perceive something. Sometimes, simple technical aids can make it possible to get an idea as to what a visual disorder means to the person involved. Examples of this are the wearing of glasses of varying positive power and light transmittance, or the study of case histories, paintings and photographic simulations. Among the latter are a woman who painted what she 'saw' with her removed eye, an anophthalmic man who painted from memory, and the painting of a protanopic artist who chose colours by reading the labels on the paint tubes. Thus one may gain insight in disturbances such as phantom images, diminished visual acuity and visual field loss, metamorphopsia, diplopia, dazzling, and visual agnosia. And also in disturbed image fusion, in depth and stereoscopic vision, dark adaptation and colour vision, as well as diminishing visual functions at high age. This article contains colour illustrations that simulate the disturbances. PMID:14735855

  20. Inferior oblique recession in thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid-related orbitopathy is a form of orbital inflammation associated with thyroid dysfunction, developing in many patients with Graves disease. Fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle can lead to restricted elevation and vertical ocular misalignment, which may be improved by recessing this muscle. In some patients, vertical misalignment persists after surgical weakening of one or more vertical rectus muscles. In this case series, unilateral inferior oblique recession as a secondary procedure after inferior rectus recession reduced hypertropia in primary gaze from 9(Δ) ± 3(Δ) to 1.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ) (mean ± standard deviation) and largest hypertropia in side gaze from 18.3 ± 2.1(Δ) to 3.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ). Postoperatively, all 3 patients were diplopia free in primary and downgaze. PMID:26059675

  1. Orbito-Masticatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Pradeep; Bhatti, M Tariq; El-Dairi, Mays A; Price, Evan B; Lin, Amy Y; Alaraj, Ali; Setabutr, Pete; Moss, Heather E

    2016-09-01

    We describe 2 unique cases of visual symptoms occurring during mastication in patients with lateral orbital wall defects. A 57-year-old man reported intermittent double vision and oscillopsia after a right fronto-temporal-orbito-zygomatic craniotomy with osteotomy of the lesser wing of the sphenoid for a complex invasive pituitary adenoma. Proptosis of the right globe was present only during mastication. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a bony defect in the right lateral orbital wall. A 48-year-old man presented with transient diplopia and scotoma in the right eye elicited by chewing. CT and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a bilobed lesion connecting the temporal fossa to the orbit through a defect in the right lateral orbital wall. The regional neuroanatomy and pathophysiology as pertaining to these cases are discussed. PMID:26919071

  2. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tommy L. H.; Cartagena, Ana M.; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M.

    2016-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated. PMID:27366189

  3. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  4. [Pseudotumor cerebri secondary to consumption of minocycline in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    González Gili, Lucas O; Buffone, Ignacio R; Carrara, Laura E; Coto, María B; Fortunatti, Eliana A; Dejtera, Mabel; García Elliot, María F; Giacone, Alejandra; Luncio, Anabella C; Masnicoff, Sebastián D; Oviedo Crosta, María B; Parroua, Marianela; Romano, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome characterized by an elevated intracranial pressure greater than 20 cmH2O with ventricles and cerebrospinal fluid of normal characteristics. Consumption of minocycline have been described among the causes associated with this syndrome. We present a 13-year old female patient with a history of acne treated with minocycline who began with severe headache, diplopia and blurred vision. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri was made, indicating the immediate antibiotic suspension and the beginning of the treatment with acetazolamide. Although the pathogenesis of pseudotumor cerebri is not fully known, an association with minocycline has been observed. This antibiotic is often used by health professionals for the management of acne, so it is important to consider its complications before being prescribed. PMID:27079408

  5. Various Neurological Symptoms by Neurolymphomatosis as the Initial Presentation of Primary Testicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Yoshitaka; Gotoh, Akihiko; Hamano, Yasuharu; Yahata, Yuriko; Sakurai, Hiroko; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Neurological symptoms induced by the infiltration of malignant lymphoma into the nervous systems are subsumed under the term neurolymphomatosis (NL). Here, we report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese man with primary testicular lymphoma complicated, as seen in various neurological findings, by secondary NL prior to testicular swelling. Painless right scrotal enlargement was noticed more than 1 month after the appearance of neurological complications such as right upper extremity numbness, dysarthria, facial palsy, and diplopia. Proactive investigation and biopsies of extranodal sites at high risk of central nervous system infiltration of malignant lymphoma, such as the testes, should be considered when secondary NL is suspected based on imaging findings. PMID:26034480

  6. Surgical treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Anja; Schittkowski, Michael; Esser, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    The aims of surgical treatment in Graves's orbitopathy (GO) are improvement of function and appearance. Since antiinflammatory treatment of GO rarely results in a complete resolution of symptoms, surgical treatment is very important for patients well being. Rehabilitative surgery includes orbital decompression, squint correction, lid lengthening and blepharoplasty and these procedures have to be performed in centres of expertise. Various techniques have been developed for orbital decompression which allow now a graded approach to proptosis reduction and optic nerve decompression in emergency situations. Extraocular muscle recessions can be successfully performed to treat most of the patients with diplopia. Only large or complex squint angles are difficult to treat and step by step procedures are recommended in these patients. Lid lengthening procedures are performed most often in GO patients and should be performed under local anaesthesia to get a good result. Serious complications are rare. PMID:22632370

  7. Indication and technique of transnasal microscopic orbital decompression for endocrine ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    May, A; Fries, U; von Ilberg, C; Weber, A

    2000-01-01

    If endocrine ophthalmopathy progresses despite conservative treatment then indications for surgical decompression are: loss of visual acuity, increasing strabism, and severe keratopathy. Endonasal microsurgery ensures a binocular view onto the intranasal landmarks of the orbital walls and allows simultaneous decompression of the medial and inferior wall as well as a good relief of pressure at the orbital apex. Surgical decompressions were performed on 29 orbits in 19 patients, 16 by using the endonasal microsurgical, 3 via external approach. The microscopic approach was entirely comparable with regard to the reduction of proptosis with a mean improvement of 4.2 mm against a mean of 4.7 mm by external approach and a mean 0.2 of better visual acuity in both procedures. The microsurgical technique is considered superior to an external approach avoiding external scars, neural pain, and reportedly less diplopia. The healing phase and the hospitalization time are shorter. PMID:10810256

  8. [Giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Alberione, F; Caire, F; Fischer-Lokou, D; Gueye, M; Moreau, J J

    2007-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign, uncommon lesions (1% of all intracranial tumors). Their localization is intradiploic in 25% of cases, and exceptionally subtentorial. We report here a rare case of giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst. A 74-year old patient presented with recent diplopia and sindrome cerebellar. CT scan and MR imaging revealed a giant osteolytic extradural lesion of the posterior fossa (5.2 cm x 3.8 cm) with a small area of peripheral enhancement after contrast injection. Retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy allowed a satisfactory removal of the tumor, followed by an acrylic cranioplasty. The outcome was good. Neuropathological examination confirmed an epidermoid cyst. We review the literature and discuss our case. PMID:18008017

  9. Reconstruction of Extended Orbitomaxillectomy and Hemimandibulectomy Defects With Fibula Flaps and Patient-Specific Implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wendy W; Martin, Mark C

    2016-03-01

    An extended orbitomaxillectomy and hemimandibulectomy for polyostotic juvenile ossifying fibroma resection were performed with the assistance of patient-specific cutting guides. The resulting defects were reconstructed in stages. First, a patient-specific mandibular reconstruction plate was fixed to the hemimandibulectomy defect in the same operation as the resection. After margins were proven to be free of tumor on histologic analysis, a free fibula flap contoured to the reconstruction plate was used to reconstruct the mandible. Reconstruction of the maxilla, alveolus, and orbit were performed with a second free fibula flap and patient-specific implants. The lining of the total nasal vault cavity was reconstructed with septal flaps. At 7 months postoperatively, the patient had an excellent esthetic result and resolved diplopia. PMID:26900747

  10. Beneficial effect of botulinum A toxin in blepharospasm: 16 months' experience with 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Maurri, S; Brogelli, S; Alfieri, G; Barontini, F

    1988-08-01

    After introducing the problem of blepharospasm, we report our experience on treatment with purified botulinum A toxin in 16 cases of blepharospasm, symptomatic in two and essential in 14, than had not responded to drugs. The changes in intensity and frequency of spasm after treatment were evaluated on a clinical scale and by review of videotapes. The beneficial effect appeared within a week in most patients, lasting from 6 to 28 weeks (mean 13), and reached the maximum at the third-seventh week. Mild spasms and female patients responded better. Repeated injections were followed by better response to the drug. Complications, exclusively local, were represented by transient corneal exposure, ptosis, lacrimation or diplopia. PMID:3220708

  11. Initial presentation of CNS-restricted acute lymphoblastic B cell leukaemia as peripheral polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piovezani Ramos, Guilherme; Villasboas Bisneto, Jose C; Chen, Dong; Pardanani, Animesh

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month course of progressive lower and upper extremity weakness in addition to binocular diplopia. Diagnostic lumbar puncture revealed atypical lymphoid cells with 28% blasts. Immunophenotype was consistent with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Further work up showed no systemic involvement but extensive thoracolumbar-sacral leptomeningeal disease. The patient was treated with several courses of intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy followed by craniospinal irradiation for consolidation. There was initial steady improvement in neurological symptoms and leptomeningeal disease, the latter being ascertained through radiological studies and cerebrospinal fluid examination. After 10 months of response, the patient relapsed with central nervous system (CNS) and systemic disease. B-ALL is a rare precursor lymphoid neoplasm that generally presents with systemic disease. While CNS involvement is not uncommon, isolated involvement of this compartment without systemic disease is exceedingly rare. PMID:27095809

  12. Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis and Skull Base Osteomyelitis by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Ana Rita; Brandao, Mariana; Paula, Filipe Seguro; Castro, Elsa; Farinha, Fatima; Marinho, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) is an uncommon disorder characterized by localized or diffuse thickening of the dura mater, and it usually presents with multiple cranial neurophaties. It has been associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, traumatic, toxic and neoplasic diseases, when no specific cause is found the process is called idiopathic. The infectious cases occur in patients under systemic immunosuppression, which have an evident contiguous source or those who have undergone neurosurgical procedures. We describe a case of a 62-year-old immunosuppressed woman with diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, which had HCP and osteomyelitis of the skull base caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa, presenting with headache and diplopia. We believe this is the second documented case of pachymeningitis secondary to this microorganism. As a multifactorial disease, it is essencial to determine the specific causative agent of HCP before making treatment decisions, and great care is needed with immunocompromised patients. Keywords Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Hypertrophic pachymeningitis; Ophtalmoplegia, optical neuropathy; Osteomyelitis; Skull base PMID:22505989

  13. Endovascular Treatment of a Mycotic Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Using a Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek; Jain, Vikash; Mathuria, SN; Khandelwal, N

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracavernous carotid artery mycotic aneurysms are rare and management is determined by clinical presentation. We describe the first documented proximal intracranial mycotic aneurysm treated by a balloon expandable Aneugraft PCS covered stent. An 11-year-old female child presented with acute onset fever, headache, chemosis followed by diplopia, right-sided ptosis with ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Subsequent work-up included serial computed tomographic arteriography and digital subtraction angiography which revealed a progressively enlarging intracavernous carotid aneurysm. An Aneugraft PCS covered stent was successfully deployed endovascularly, and complete exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. The use of covered stents in intracranial vasculature can be an effective and safe treatment modality for exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm in selected cases. PMID:24070080

  14. A case of ocular cardiac reflex in a child with blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Soma Sekhara; Landry, Jonathan P; Douglass, Kate; Venugopalan, Poovathum Parambil

    2014-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy re-presented with refractory vomiting 18 h after blunt facial and head trauma. Initial CT of the brain performed at his first visit was normal. He was found to have a heart rate of 56 bpm (age appropriate 65-100 bpm) with a blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg. Physical examination revealed an injected sclera and limited vertical movement of the left eye. Neurological examination revealed no focal deficits, but a Glasgow Coma Scale of 14, with mild confusion, depressed mental status and diplopia on upward gaze. Performing upward gaze extra ocular movements exacerbated the patient's bradycardia and confirmed the presence of the oculocardiac reflex. High-resolution CT of orbits demonstrated a left orbital floor fracture with entrapment of the left inferior rectus muscle. Surgical correction resolved his bradycardia. PMID:25422334

  15. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  16. Management of strabismus in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Harrad, R

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid eye disease is an auto-immune condition characterised by an acute inflammatory phase followed by a fibrotic phase, which sometimes leads to restricted eye movements and diplopia. Medical treatment with systemic steroids with or without orbital radiotherapy and immunosuppression can control the inflammatory response. Strabismus surgery should be carried out only after the inflammation is no longer active and after any decompression surgery. Surgery comprises recession of tight muscles using adjustable sutures so as to maximise the area of binocular single vision. There is debate as to whether adjustable sutures should be used for the inferior rectus muscle. Patients should be encouraged to have realistic expectations, as binocular single vision may not be achievable in all directions of gaze and lid retraction may be made worse by surgery. PMID:25523204

  17. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling. PMID:18030122

  18. Association of Titanium Mesh and Bovine Pericardium Membrane in the Treatment of Severe Enophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Silva, Leonardo de Freitas; Magalhães, Tibério Gomes; Santana, Diego Matos; Pimentel, Gabriel Gomes; Faverani, Leonardo Perez; Mello, Manoel de Jesus Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    The blowout fractures may be classified as pure or impure depending on the associated structures. There are 2 main theories attempting to describe the mechanism of injury, the hydraulic, and blocking mechanism. The complications of this type of fracture may involve diplopia, enophthalmos, and ocular movement restriction. Several materials are available for the reconstruction of orbital floor, including the titanium mesh, which present great properties, such as easy modeling and stabilization, small thickness, and shape maintenance. There, however, are disadvantages such as the possibility of adherence formation. The aim of this report is to describe the case of a patient with an 8-month blowout fracture sequel, presenting extensive enophthalmos and treated by affixing a titanium mesh associated with bovine pericardium membrane in the orbital floor. Therefore, based on a 2-year follow-up, it was possible to observe how effective the association between these 2 materials in solving the case was. PMID:26468837

  19. Transient ischemic attack presenting in an elderly patient with transient ophthalmic manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sparshi; Saxena, Tishu; Singh, Sweta; Singh, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient neurological deficit of cerebrovascular origin without infarction which may last only for a short period and can have varying presentations. We report a case of 58-year-old male with presenting features of sudden onset transient vertical diplopia and transient rotatory nystagmus which self-resolved within 12 h. Patient had no history of any systemic illness. On investigating, hematological investigations and neuroimaging could not explain these sudden and transient findings. A TIA could possibly explain these sudden and transient ocular findings in our patient. This case report aims to highlight the importance of TIA for ophthalmologists. We must not ignore these findings as these could be warning signs of an impending stroke which may or may not be detected on neuroimaging. Thus, early recognition, primary prevention strategies, and timely intervention are needed. PMID:27433041

  20. Orbital complications:diagnosis of different rhinological causes.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, Yumiko; Strassen, Ulrich; Hofauer, Benedikt; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical course of orbital complication using a standardised diagnostic pathway. Seventy-three patients with orbital complications underwent a multimodal diagnostic pathway comprising ENT examination, leucocytes/CRP, CT-/MRI-scanning and disease-related data. Twenty-nine patients suffered from rhinosinusitis, 28 from mucoceles, 13 patients from neoplasms and three patients from rheumatic disorders. Clinical examination diagnosed 60 patients with eyelid swelling, 55 patients with ocular pain, 14 patients with diplopia, 4 patients with exophthalmus, 29 patients with visual field defect and 4 patients with visual loss. The diagnostic pathway identified acute rhinosinusitis with a sensitivity/specificity of 90 %/90 %, mucoceles with 79 %/100 %, neoplasms with 100 %/96 % and granulomatosis with polyangiitis with 100 %/100 %, respectively. All patients left the hospital in good general condition and with regular ocular motility; two patients suffered persistent visual loss. The standardised application of a widely accepted diagnostic pathway reliably distinguishes different causes of orbital complication. PMID:25323154

  1. External ophthalmoplegia with orbital myositis in an adult patient after chickenpox infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster and chickenpox are caused by a single virus, varicella-zoster virus. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus-associated ophthalmoplegia is well documented. Very rarely, herpes zoster and chickenpox cause external ophthalmoplegia. A 48-year-old man was diagnosed with chickenpox and treated with intravenous acyclovir. He suddenly reported diplopia and restricted left eye movement. MRI of the orbit revealed thickening and abnormal contrast enhancement of the preseptal space and lateral rectus muscle of the left eye. In this case, external ophthalmoplegia occurred following chickenpox with radiological evidence of orbital myositis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of external ophthalmoplegia of radiologically confirmed orbital myositis after chickenpox infection. PMID:24835802

  2. [Early detection and treatment of strabismus].

    PubMed

    Mojon, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An early diagnosis of strabismus is important in order to rule out treatable organic causes and in children, if indicated, to start as early as possible with an amblyopia treatment. Early detection will also decrease the risk for accidents secondary to diplopia, to the loss of binocular vision and to the restriction of the binocular visual field in case of esodeviations. The following therapeutic options exist: in some cases the prescription of the correct refraction will be sufficient, for small deviations a prismatic correction may allow a longstanding treatment, for larger or incomitant deviations strabismus surgery will be necessary, which nowadays can be performed using minimal-invasive technique on an outpatient base. PMID:26982644

  3. A case of isolated abducens nerve paralysis in maxillofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Elif Seda; Keskin, Ekrem; Atik, Bekir; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2015-01-01

    Nervus abducens is a pure motor nerve located in the pons. It retracts the eyeball laterally by stimulating rectus lateralis muscle. In case of their paralysis, diplopia and restriction in the eye movements while looking sideways, are seen. Since the same signs are seen due to the muscle entrapment in blowout fractures, its differential diagnosis has importance in terms of the treatment protocol and avoiding unnecessary operations. In this article, we present a 22-year-old male patient who was referred to our department due to the prediagnosis of blowout fracture following maxillofacial trauma. However, he was diagnosed with abducens nerve paralysis after the consultations and analysis and his restriction of movement was resolved via systemic steroid treatment instead of unnecessary operation. PMID:26981484

  4. The history of stereoscopy.

    PubMed

    Crone, R A

    1992-01-01

    Ptolemy (127-148 AD) studied physiological diplopia, correspondence and the horopter. He had all the data to build a theory of depth perception through disparity detection, but left that undone. Alhazen (1000 AD) associated depth perception with the sensation of binocular convergence, just as Kepler (1611) and Descartes (1637). With the development of the concept of retinal correspondence and the fusion of the retinal images in the brain (Huygens 1667, Newton 1704) a cerebral mechanism of disparity detection became thinkable. The rise of Empiricism (Molyneux' Premise, the case of Cheselden) postponed the solution of the problem, finally reached by Wheatstone (1838). Physiological proof of Wheatstone's theory came from the experiments of Barlow et al. (1967). PMID:1473457

  5. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma Treated with Gamma Knife after Excision: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuro; Shima, Ayako; Hirai, Hisao; Suzuki, Fumio; Matsuda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannomas are extremely rare. We present a surgically excised case of trochlear nerve schwannoma followed by Gamma Knife (ELEKTA, Stockholm, Sweden) after histologic confirmation. A 52-year-old man presented with diplopia, gait disturbance, and sensory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large cystic mass at ambient cistern on the right side. Subtotal excision followed by Gamma Knife surgery was undertaken. His neurologic symptoms disappeared with radiologic reduction in size at 15-month follow-up. Because Gamma Knife can manage trochlear nerve schwannomas well, surgical excision should be reserved for large ones and limited to subcapsular or subtotal removal with the expectation of possible recovery of neurologic dysfunction. PMID:26623236

  6. Ethmoid Osteoma as a Culprit of Orbital Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ai; Li, Yinwei; Lin, Ming; Shi, Wodong; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Orbital emphysema is generally recognized as a complication of orbital fractures involving any paranasal sinuses. The recognition about its etiology has extended beyond sole trauma, but few articles mentioned tumors to be a possible cause. In this case report, we present a patient with orbital emphysema associated with ethmoid osteoma without orbital cellulitis or trauma history. The patient developed sudden proptosis, eyelid swelling, and movement limitation of the left eye, peripheral diplopia, and left periorbital crepitus after a vigorous nose blowing. Complete surgical resection of ethmoid osteoma followed by repair of the orbital medial wall was performed with assistance of combined endoscopy and navigational techniques. Twelve-month follow-up showed no residual lesion or recurrence; the orbital medial wall was accurately repaired with good visual function and facial symmetry. Tumors should be considered for differential diagnosis of orbital emphysema, and combined endoscopy and navigational techniques may improve safety, accuracy, and effectiveness of orbital surgeries. PMID:25950683

  7. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought. PMID:27110412

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension with bilateral subdural hemorrhage: Is conservative management adequate?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohammed Tauqeer; Hameed, Shahul; Lin, Kei Pin; Prakash, Kumar M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension complicated by bilateral subdural hemorrhage that resolved with conservative management. A young male presented with severe orthostatic headache associated with dizziness, neck pain and diplopia. Brain imaging revealed characteristic pachymeningeal enhancement and bilateral subdural hemorrhage. Radionuclide cisternography confirmed the Cerebrospinal fluid leak at the cervical 5 and cervical 6 vertebral level. He had clinical and radiological resolution with bed rest, hydration and analgesics and has remained symptom free since then. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension may be complicated by bilateral subdural hemorrhage. A conservative treatment approach is a viable option, as it may help improve the clinical and radiological outcome, especially when interventional facilities are not available. PMID:23661973

  9. Solvent encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Day, R E; Oliver, J S; Lush, M; Watson, J M

    1981-01-01

    Nineteen children aged 8-14 years were admitted over a six-year period with an acute encephalopathy due to toluene intoxication. Seven had a history of euphoria and hallucinations. The remainder presented with coma (4), ataxia (3), convulsions (3), and behaviour disturbance with diplopia (2), A history of glue sniffing was elicited in 14, but in the remainder toluene assay confirmed the diagnosis. Thirteen children recovered completely; five still had psychological impairment and personality change on discharge from hospital but were lost to follow-up, and one has a persistent cerebellar ataxia one year after the acute episode, despite absence of further exposure. Toluene inhalation is an important cause of encephalopathy in children and may lead to permanent neurological damage. Diagnosis is most important if further damage due to continued abuse is to be prevented, and toluene assay is a valuable aid to diagnosis. PMID:6790121

  10. Isolated Unilateral Ptosis due to Paramedian Midbrain Infarction.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Eriko; Nakamura, Haruko; Endo, Masanao; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Tatsuya

    2015-05-01

    A 59-year-old man who had hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and left eye glaucoma developed sudden vertigo and left ptosis; he did not notice diplopia. He visited our hospital on day 3 after onset and neurologic examination showed left ptosis. His left visual acuity was counting fingers, and the light reflex was sluggish owing to glaucoma. Pupil sizes were equal, and eye movements and the lower lid were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance images revealed an acute infarction of the left paramedian midbrain. We considered that selective damage to the oculomotor fascicles innervating the left levator palpebrae superioris caused ipsilateral ptosis. As the fascicles for this ocular muscle run in the small area adjacent to those for the medial rectus, inferior rectus and superior rectus muscles, this is an extremely rare case of midbrain infarction presenting with isolated unilateral ptosis. PMID:25817621

  11. Brain abscess as the initial presentation of a macroprolactinoma: Case report.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Almanza, Matilde; Cámara-Gómez, Rosa; de San Román-Mena, Laila Pérez; Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Ramos-Prol, Agustín; Botella-Asunción, Carlos; Merino-Torres, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Macroprolactinomas may behave invasively and infiltrate the skull base, causing a subsequent thinning that can also lead to a bone defect and a direct route of entry for pathogens. We describe the case of a 34-year-old male admitted to hospital with fever (38°C), headache, stiffness in the neck, diplopia and neurological impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed two bilateral abscesses in the fronto-parietal areas with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis and a pituitary adenoma that extended from the suprasellar region, eroding the sellar floor into the sphenoid sinus. Laboratory hormone measurements showed increased levels of prolactin and low levels of FSH, LH and testosterone. The patient received antibiotic treatment and surgery was performed. The patient developed central deafness as a neurological deficit. It is advisable to include pituitary adenoma in the differential diagnosis of meningitis even though its onset as intracranial abscess and rectus sinus thrombosis is extremely rare. PMID:25487178

  12. Sheehan syndrome: a splinter of the mind.

    PubMed

    Vaphiades, Michael S; Simmons, Debra; Archer, Robert L; Stringer, Warren

    2003-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with headache and diplopia after hypotension from postpartum hemorrhage. A noncontrasted cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an enlarged pituitary with a rim of slight increased signal. A repeat gadolinium-enhanced cranial MRI showed peripheral enhancement of the pituitary gland surrounding an isointense central area consistent with infarction of the pituitary and the clinical diagnosis of Sheehan syndrome. The patient was treated with intravenous hydrocortisone. Immediately after treatment, her symptoms remitted and the examination normalized. One month later, a gadolinium-enhanced cranial MRI was normal. The characteristic appearance of the post-gadolinium enhanced cranial MRI helped confirm the diagnosis of Sheehan syndrome and facilitate early treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:12686307

  13. Diabetes insipidus and increased serum levels of leptin and lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) in an adolescent boy with a primary intracranial germinoma. Case report and an endocrinological revaluation of literature.

    PubMed

    Carella, C; Rotondi, M; Del Buono, A; Sinisi, A M; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Mone, C M; Vizioli, L; Sorvillo, F; Mazziotti, G; Bellastella, A

    1999-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented with a four-month history of polyuria-polydipsia and a diplopia which had reverted after treatment. The neuroimaging studies performed had been strongly suggestive of an optic nerve glioma, while endocrinological investigation (beta-hCG 420 IU/L) has lead to the correct diagnosis later confirmed at the immunohystochemical analysis performed at biopsy. The high serum level of hCG was unaffected by bromocriptine nor octreotide, while the PRL level (80.0 microg/L) was reduced only by bromocriptine. Among the several tumor markers which may be secreted by such lesions, ours is the first reported case of an elevation of serum LDH for a primary intracranial germinoma. Moreover, the elevated value of serum leptin reported by us might be due to the insensitivity of the hypothalamic structures to endogenous leptin. PMID:10475155

  14. [A case of orbital apex syndrome due to aspergillus infection that avoided loss of visual acuity by optic canal decompression].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Shirata, Akiko; Sato, Taku; Kishida, Yugo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Yamane, Kiyomi

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of left orbital pain, headache, diplopia and left-sided ptosis, which she had suffered for two months. On examination, the patient had loss of visual acuity, left-sided ptosis, lateral gaze disturbance, and was diagnosed as having left orbital apex syndrome. An abnormal signal to the left orbital cone was detected on MRI. Serum β-D-glucan was increased, and serum Aspergillus antigen and antibody were both positive. Although antifungal drugs (voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B) were administered, the symptoms deteriorated. The patient then underwent optic nerve decompression surgery and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone, which gradually improved the patient's symptoms, Aspergillus hyphae were confirmed by pathological examination. To obtain good prognosis for patients with orbital apex syndrome associated with Aspergillus infection, optic nerve decompression surgery should be considered. PMID:26616482

  15. A unique case of foreign-body associated orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongmu; Shetlar, Debra J; Yen, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of diplopia and right-sided orbital pain with eye movement. Examination revealed an edematous, ptotic right upper eyelid with conjunctival hyperemia, proptosis, and significant limitation to upward and downward ductions on the right. MRI was significant for a homogeneously enhancing lesion within the superior rectus muscle. A laboratory evaluation seeking an infectious, inflammatory, or autoimmune process was nonrevealing. A diagnosis of orbital myositis was made, and the patient experienced significant improvement with oral corticosteroids. The patient's symptoms, however, recurred after attempts at a slow taper of the corticosteroids. An orbital biopsy of the lesion revealed fibroadipose tissue containing irregularly shaped yellow-white deposits birefringent under polarized light, suggestive of silica crystals. The patient denied any history of trauma or prior surgery. An intraorbital triamcinolone injection to the superior orbit allowed resolution of symptoms and a successful taper off systemic corticosteroids. PMID:22082591

  16. Orbital Metastasis of Cervical Carcinoma – Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Anupriya; Horo, Saban; Balasubramanian, Dhipak Arthur; Ram, Thomas Samuel; Peter, John Victor

    2016-01-01

    The orbit is a frequent site of metastasis, particularly from the breast, prostate gland and the lung. Carcinoma of the cervix metastasizing to the orbit is rare. We report a 27-year-old woman with Stage II B cervical cancer who presented with progressive painless protrusion of the left eye of one month duration associated with diplopia. Histology of the orbital mass was similar to that of the cervical cancer and reported as squamous cell carcinoma. She received palliative radiation to the left orbit 30 Gy in 10 fractions along with chemotherapy (Paclitaxel and Carboplatin). This resulted in regression of the proptosis. We review published literature of cases of carcinoma of the uterine cervix with metastasis to the orbit. PMID:26894102

  17. Bifocal orbital and nasopharyngeal amyloidomas presenting as Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert Y; Chapman, William B; Witterick, Ian J; Deangelis, Dan D

    2011-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with a slowly progressive left hyperglobus, left infraduction deficit, bilateral lower eyelid retraction, and dysphagia. He had a notable chin-down head position, diplopia in primary position, and 3 mm of left proptosis. He had been diagnosed with Graves disease 3 years before presentation. CT scans showed enlargement of the left inferior and medial rectus muscles with associated stranding of the retrobulbar fat and a low-density heterogeneous mass in the left aspect of the neck protruding in the nasopharynx. Biopsies of the orbit and nasopharynx revealed focal areas of amyloid. This represents the first report of bifocal amyloidomas of the orbit and nasopharynx. PMID:21178798

  18. ‘Sutureless’ transconjunctival approach for infraorbital rim fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan; Ramesh, Keerthi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the ease and surgical outcome of using sutureless transconjunctival approach for repair of infra-orbital fractures. Design: Prospective clinical case series. Materials and Methods: Totally 5 patients with infra-orbital rim or orbital floor fractures were selected and the fractures were accessed through a pre-septal transconjunctival incision. After reduction and fixation, the conjunctiva was just re-approximated and re-draped into position. Incidence of post-operative complications such as diplopia, lid retraction, eyelid dystopia, foreign body granuloma and poor conjunctival healing was assessed at intervals of 1 week, 15 days and a month post-operatively. Results: No complications were observed in any of the 5 patients. Healing was satisfactory in all patients. Conclusion: The sutureless technique appears to be a time saving and technically simpler viable alternative to multilayered suturing in orbital trauma with minimal post-operative complications. PMID:25821377

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS) is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS. PMID:24575029

  20. Horizontal strabismus surgical outcomes in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Z; Dooley, I; Fahy, G

    2014-06-01

    Strabismus may result in impaired stereopsis, diplopia, undesirable appearance, amblyopia and negative psychological impact. This study provides epidemiological and surgical outcome information about patients attending University College Hospital Galway requiring strabismus surgery. We report a retrospective analysis of 75 consecutive patients, who underwent horizontal strabismus surgery. Sixty-one (81.3%) patients had clinically significant refractive errors, hyperopia being the most common. Thirty-four (45.3%) patients had amblyopia and nine (12%) required further treatment. A cosmetically acceptable result with a post-operative ocular deviation within 25 prism dioptres of straight (grade 2) was achieved in 70/75 (93.3%) of patients. The overall mean change in ocular deviation per mm of muscle operated was 3.25 prism dioptre/mm. The outcomes of strabismus surgery in an Irish hospital compare very favourably with other jurisdictions. This data will help plan service delivery. PMID:24988834

  1. Concomitant progressive supranuclear palsy and chronic traumatic encephalopathy in a boxer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old ex-professional boxer who developed diplopia and eye movement abnormalities in his 60’s followed by memory impairment, low mood and recurrent falls. Examination shortly before death revealed hypomimia, dysarthria, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and impaired postural reflexes. Pathological examination demonstrated 4-repeat tau neuronal and glial lesions, including tufted astrocytes, consistent with a diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles composed of mixed 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau and astrocytic tangles in a distribution highly suggestive of chronic traumatic encephalopathy were observed together with limbic TDP-43 pathology. Possible mechanisms for the co-occurrence of these two tau pathologies are discussed. PMID:24559032

  2. Analysis of nocebo effects of antiepileptic drugs across different conditions.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Franco, Valentina; Gasparini, Sara

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nocebo effect in all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the clinical conditions in which these compounds have been studied with the exception of epilepsy. We searched for all double-blind, placebo-controlled trials performed in adult patients, testing AEDs in any clinical condition except epilepsy. The following data were extracted from the placebo arms: the number of randomized patients, the number of patients withdrawing because of adverse effects (AEs), and the number of patients with 11 predefined AEs (dizziness, ataxia/coordination abnormal, diplopia, somnolence, fatigue, headache, memory impairment, tremor, abnormal thinking, anxiety and depression). Outcome measures were the percentages of patients whithdrawing due to AEs and reporting the selected AEs. RCTs included in the analysis were grouped in six main categories of clinical conditions (pain, movement disorders, psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, obesity and binge eating disorders, and miscellanea). Proportions of patients with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) have been calculated for all reported outcome measures. Thirteen AEDs were studied and the total number of selected RCTs was 157. Significant percentages of placebo-treated patients withdrawing due to AEs and with specific AEs were observed in several cases. Significant differences emerged across different conditions. Comparisons with results of a previous meta-analysis on all RCTs in patients with drug-resistant epilepsies showed that ataxia, diplopia and fatigue were significantly more frequent, and patients withdrawing were significantly less frequent, in placebo-treated epileptic patients. Significant differences have been identified in the AEDs-induced nocebo effect across different conditions. Placebo-treated epilepsy patients have significantly more frequent neurological AEs. PMID:26810717

  3. Superior rectus transposition combined with medial rectus recession for Duane syndrome and sixth nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mehendale, Reshma A.; Dagi, Linda R.; Wu, Carolyn; Ledoux, Danielle; Johnston, Suzanne; Hunter, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vertical rectus transposition (VRT) is used to treat abduction limitation, but new vertical deviations and anterior segment ischemia are concerns. Johnston and Crouch described superior rectus transposition (SRT), a procedure in which only the superior rectus muscle is transposed temporally. We describe our results using augmented temporal SRT with adjustable medial rectus muscle recession (MRc) for treatment of Duane syndrome I (DS) and sixth nerve palsy. Methods Retrospective surgical case review of patients undergoing the SRT procedure. Pre- and post-operative orthoptic measurements were recorded. Minimum follow-up was 6 weeks. Main outcome measures included angle of esotropia in primary position and the angle of head turn. Secondary outcomes included duction limitation, stereopsis, and new vertical deviations. Results The review identified seventeen patients (10 with DS and 7 with sixth nerve palsy). SRT+MRc improved esotropia [from 44 PD to 10.1 PD (p< 0.0001)], reduced abduction limitation [from −4.3 to −2.7 (p<0.0001)] and improved compensatory head posture [from 28°to 4° (p<0.0001)]. Stereopsis was recovered in eight patients (p=0.03). Three patients required a reoperation; one for overcorrection and 2 for undercorrection. A new primary position vertical deviation was observed in 2/7 patients with complex sixth nerve palsy and 0/10 DS patients. No patient described torsional diplopia. Conclusions SRT allows for the option of simultaneous medial rectus recession in patients with severe abduction imitation who require transposition surgery. SRT+MRc improved esotropia, head position, abduction limitation, and stereopsis without inducing torsional diplopia. PMID:22332212

  4. Clinical Assessment of a New Stereoscopic Digital Angiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, Thierry; Douek, Philippe; Finet, Gerard; Turjman, Francis; Picard, Catherine; Revel, Didier; Amiel, Michel

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical feasibility of an experimental modified angiographic system capable of real-time digital stereofluoroscopy and stereography in X-ray angiography, using a twin-focus tube and a stereoscopic monitor. Methods: We report the experience obtained in 37 patients with a well-documented examination. The patients were examined for coronary angiography (11 cases), aortography (7 cases), pulmonary angiography (6 cases), inferior vena cava filter placement (2 cases), and cerebral angiography (11 cases). Six radiologists were asked to use stereoscopic features for fluoroscopy and angiography. A questionnaire was designed to record their subjective evaluation of stereoscopic image quality, ergonomics of the system, and its medical interest. Results: Stereofluoroscopy was successfully used in 25 of 37 cases; diplopia and/or ghost images were reported in 6 cases. It was helpful for aortic catheterization in 10 cases and for selective catheterization in 5 cases. In stereoangiography, depth was easily and accurately perceived in 27 of 37 cases; diplopia and/or ghost images were reported in 4 cases. A certain gain in the three-dimensional evaluation of the anatomy and relation between vessels and lesions was noted. As regards ergonomic considerations, polarized spectacles were not considered cumbersome. Visual fatigue and additional work were variously reported. Stereoshift tuning before X-ray acquisition was not judged to be a limiting factor. Conclusion: A twin-focus X-ray tube and a polarized shutter for stereoscopic display allowed effective real-time three-dimensional perception of angiographic images. Our clinical study suggests no clear medical interest for diagnostic examinations, but the field of interventional radiology needs to be investigated.

  5. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy for Management of Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas: Long-Term Outcomes of Tumor Control and Visual Function at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Kapoor, Sumit; Kharkar, Siddharth; Batra, Sachin; Jackson, Juan F.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Miller, Neil R.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the long-term outcomes of patients treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCRT) for presumed optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 9 patients with a presumed ONSM were treated with FCRT at our institution. The indications for FCRT were significant visual dysfunction at presentation, progression of visual dysfunction during a period of observation, tumor growth documented by sequential imaging, or a combination of these findings. In 2 patients, FCRT was performed as adjuvant therapy, and in 7, it was the initial and primary treatment. Results: Of the 9 patients, 6 were women and 3 were men, with a mean age of 47 years. All 9 patients had evidence of optic nerve dysfunction in the affected eye, characterized by reduced visual acuity, a visual field defect, and a relative afferent pupillary defect. In addition, 2 patients had proptosis and 1 had diplopia. The mean follow-up period was 98 {+-} 31.7 months (median, 90; range, 61-151). After FCRT, the visual function improved in the 7 patients who had undergone FCRT as the primary treatment. However, 2 patients who were blind in their affected eye at FCRT remained blind. In 4 of the 7 patients with improvement, the improvement was documented within 1-3 months after FCRT. The tumor control rate was 100%. Proptosis and diplopia also regressed in 100% of patients. At 2 years after FCRT, 1 patient had developed radiation retinopathy. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that FCRT is a safe and effective treatment of ONSMs, affording satisfactory long-term tumor control, good functional outcome, and low treatment morbidity. FCRT should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with presumed ONSMs for whom the treatment has been deemed appropriate.

  6. Thyroid antibody-negative euthyroid Graves’ ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ishrat; Taylor, Peter; Das, Gautam; Okosieme, Onyebuchi E

    2016-01-01

    Summary TSH receptor antibodies (TRAbs) are the pathological hallmark of Graves’ disease, present in nearly all patients with the disease. Euthyroid Graves’ ophthalmopathy (EGO) is a well-recognized clinical entity, but its occurrence in patients with negative TRAbs is a potential source of diagnostic confusion. A 66-year-old female presented to our endocrinology clinic with right eye pain and diplopia in the absence of thyroid dysfunction. TRAbs were negative, as measured with a highly sensitive third-generation thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) ELISA assay. CT and MRI scans of the orbit showed asymmetrical thickening of the inferior rectus muscles but no other inflammatory or malignant orbital pathology. Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical and radiological features, and she underwent surgical recession of the inferior rectus muscle with complete resolution of the diplopia and orbital pain. She remained euthyroid over the course of follow-up but ultimately developed overt clinical and biochemical hyperthyroidism, 24 months after the initial presentation. By this time, she had developed positive TRAb as well as thyroid peroxidase antibodies. She responded to treatment with thionamides and remains euthyroid. This case highlights the potential for negative thyroid-specific autoantibodies in the presentation of EGO and underscores the variable temporal relationship between the clinical expression of thyroid dysfunction and orbital disease in the natural evolution of Graves’ disease. Learning points Euthyroid Graves’ ophthalmopathy can present initially with negative thyroid-specific autoantibodies. Patients with suggestive symptoms of ophthalmopathy should be carefully evaluated for GO with imaging studies even when thyroid function and autoantibodies are normal. Patients with EGO can develop thyroid dysfunction within 4 years of follow-up underpinning the need for long-term follow-up and continued

  7. One year follow up of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Meguid, A; Lappas, A; Hartmann, K; Auer, F; Schrage, N; Thumann, G; Kirchhof, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with exudative age related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods: A consecutive interventional case series was performed on patients who underwent macular translocation between June 1997 and January 2000 at the department of ophthalmology, University of Aachen, Germany. A retrospective pilot study was set up with a minimum follow up of 12 months in 39 consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation secondary to ARMD. The surgical technique included pars plana vitrectomy, induction of retinal detachment, 360 degree retinotomy, removal of the choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVM), macular translocation, peripheral laser retinopexy, and silicone oil endotamponade. Results: 18 patients showed predominantly occult CNVM, six patients had predominantly classic CNVM, and 15 showed subretinal haemorrhage. At the 12 month follow up 13 patients (33%) showed an improvement in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale), 18 patients (46%) retained stable visual acuity with a change of equal or less than three lines (logMAR scale), and eight patients (21%) showed a decrease in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale). Recurrence of CNVM was observed in three (8%) eyes at 5–11 months postoperatively. Other complications included proliferative vitreoretinopathy with retinal detachment (n=10), peripheral epiretinal membranes (n=9), macular pucker (n=2), corneal decompensation (n=2), and hypotony (n=11). 18 patients (46%) complained about persistent diplopia. Conclusion: Macular translocation surgery is able to maintain or improve distant vision in the majority of patients with exudative ARMD. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy and diplopia are the two major complications. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing macular translocation with observation for patients with the occult form of exudative ARMD may be justified. PMID:12714406

  8. Evaluation of the visual function of patients with locked-in syndrome: Report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Graber, M; Challe, G; Alexandre, M F; Bodaghi, B; LeHoang, P; Touitou, V

    2016-05-01

    Although visual function is thought to be preserved in patients with locked-in syndrome (LIS), enabling them to communicate through vertical or lateral eye movements or blinking of the upper eyelid, nothing is known about the actual visual function of patients with LIS. The goal of this study is to evaluate the visual function of patients with LIS which may enable better evaluation of the state of consciousness of these patients. Patients with LIS seen in a single neurovascular unit of a tertiary center between 1997 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient had a specialized neuro-ophthalmological evaluation under optimal environmental conditions (light, contrast, examination distance, head position, best ergonomic adaptation, and establishment of a means of communication with help from the patient's friends/family). Visual acuity, extraocular eye movements, confrontational visual field, slit lamp and fundus examination were performed. Thirteen patients (6M/7F) were included in this study. Mean visual acuity was 20/60. Oculomotor examination was abnormal in 77%. Forty-six percent of patients presented binocular diplopia mainly related to a VIth nerve palsy. One patient presented complete ophthalmoplegia. Forty-six percent of patients had nystagmus responsible for oscillopsia (oculopalatal tremor). An abnormal visual field was observed in 17% of patients, and abnormal pupillary light response leading to photophobia was present in 22% of patients. Keratitis or dry eye syndrome was present in most patients and was a major cause of pain and visual impairment. Our results suggest that the visual function is impaired in all patients with LIS. This impairment is multifactorial including mostly binocular diplopia or oscillopsia but also refractive errors, dry eye syndrome, keratitis or visual field defect. This altered visual function may alter the ability of the patient to interact with his environment and lead to underestimation of their state of consciousness

  9. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Treatment of Acute Traumatic Superior Oblique Muscle Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Talebnejad, Mohammad Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam; Nowroozzadeh, M. Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection into the inferior oblique (IO) muscle for management of unilateral acute traumatic superior oblique (SO) palsy. Methods: In this prospective case series, 10-20 units of botulinum toxin A (Dysport, Ipsen, Biopharm Ltd., Wrexham, UK) was injected into the ipsilateral IO muscle of 13 consecutive patients with unilateral acute traumatic SO palsy. All patients received injections within four weeks of the incident. Results: Mean age was 29 ± 15 years and 12 (92%) subjects were male. Mean amount of hypertropia (in primary position) was decreased from 10.0 ± 3.9Δ at baseline to 4.6 ± 8.9Δ, one month after the injection, and to 1.5 ± 2.7Δ at final follow-up (P = 0.001). IO overaction improved from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 1.0 ± 1.2 and 0.6 ± 0.9 (P ≤ 0.001), and subjective torsion from 5.3 ± 3.9 to 3.2 ± 3.4 and 1.6 ± 2.5 degrees (P ≤ 0.001), at the same time intervals respectively. One month after the injection as well as at final follow-up, 10 (77%) patients were diplopia-free in primary and reading positions. Subgroup analysis showed that patients who recovered had less baseline hypertropia as compared to those who failed (8.3Δ vs. 15.7Δ, respectively; P = 0.01). All patients with a favorable outcome had baseline hypertropia of 10Δ or less. Conclusion: A single injection of BTA into the IO muscle can rapidly and safely resolve symptomatic diplopia in patients with acute traumatic SO palsy, while waiting for spontaneous recovery. PMID:26730311

  10. Transient isolated brainstem symptoms preceding posterior circulation stroke: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Nicola LM; Simoni, Michela; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Transient isolated brainstem symptoms (eg, isolated vertigo, dysarthria, diplopia) are not consistently classified as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and data for prognosis are limited. If some of these transient neurological attacks (TNAs) are due to vertebrobasilar ischaemia, then they should be common during the days and weeks preceding posterior circulation strokes. We aimed to assess the frequency of TNAs before vertebrobasilar ischaemic stroke. Methods We studied all potential ischaemic events during the 90 days preceding an ischaemic stroke in patients ascertained within a prospective, population-based incidence study in Oxfordshire, UK (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002–2010) and compared rates of TNA preceding vertebrobasilar stroke versus carotid stroke. We classified the brainstem symptoms isolated vertigo, vertigo with non-focal symptoms, isolated double vision, transient generalised weakness, and binocular visual disturbance as TNAs in the vertebrobasilar territory; atypical amaurosis fugax and limb-shaking as TNAs in the carotid territory; and isolated slurred speech, migraine variants, transient confusion, and hemisensory tingling symptoms as TNAs in uncertain territory. Findings Of the 1141 patients with ischaemic stroke, vascular territory was categorisable in 1034 (91%) cases, with 275 vertebrobasilar strokes and 759 carotid strokes. Isolated brainstem TNAs were more frequent before a vertebrobasilar stroke (45 of 275 events) than before a carotid stroke (10 of 759; OR 14·7, 95% CI 7·3–29·5, p<0·0001), particularly during the preceding 2 days (22 of 252 before a vertebrobasilar stroke vs two of 751 before a carotid stroke, OR 35·8, 8·4–153·5, p<0·0001). Of all 59 TNAs preceding (median 4 days, IQR 1–30) vertebrobasilar stroke, only five (8%) fulfilled the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) criteria for TIA. The other 54 cases were isolated vertigo (n=23), non-NINDS binocular visual

  11. Risk of Musculoskeletal Injuries, Fractures, and Falls in Medicare Beneficiaries With Disorders of Binocular Vision

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Repka, Michael X.; Yu, Fei; Lum, Flora; Coleman, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Disorders of binocular vision are increasingly prevalent among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older. Visual impairment is a recognized risk factor for fractures. Despite the association of visual impairment and fracture risk, to our knowledge, no study has examined the influence that disorders of binocular vision (strabismus, amblyopia, diplopia, and nystagmus) may have on musculoskeletal injury and fracture risk in the elderly population. Objective To evaluate associations between disorders of binocular vision and musculoskeletal injury, fracture, and falls in the elderly. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective study of 10-year (2002-2011) musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall prevalence in a 5% random sample of Medicare Part B fee-for-service claims for beneficiaries with disorders of binocular vision. Participants included Medicare beneficiaries living in the general community who were 65 years or older with at least 1 year of Medicare Part B enrollment. Exposures Diagnosis of a disorder of binocular vision. Main outcomes and measures Ten-year prevalence of musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall in individuals with and without disorders of binocular vision. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, region of residence, systemic and ocular comorbidities, and duration of follow-up. Results There were 2 196 881 Medicare beneficiaries identified. Of these, 99 525 (4.5%) had at least 1 reported disorder of binocular vision (strabismus, 2.3%; diplopia, 2.2%; amblyopia, 0.9%; and nystagmus, 0.2%). During the 10-year study period, there were 1 272 948 (57.9%) patients with documented musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for the association between disorders of binocular vision and any of the 3 injury types was 2.23 (95% CI, 2.20-2.27; P < .001). The adjusted OR was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.25-1.29; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance Medicare beneficiaries with a disorder of

  12. Iatrogenic Injury to Medial Rectus After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Priyadarshini, Omega; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Agarkar, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is the mainstay of the treatment in sinus disorders, to re-establish the drainage of the affected sinus. The close proximity of the orbital structures to paranasal sinuses makes them vulnerable to inadvertent injury during the sinus surgery. Medial rectus (MR) muscle is the most commonly injured extraocular muscle during ESS due to its anatomic proximity to the thin medial wall of the orbit. This is a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series of six patients presenting with MR injury after ESS. We discuss the management, outcome and review the published literature. A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria. The presenting complaints were diplopia, squinting and limitation of ocular movements. Two patients underwent surgical exploration of the MR muscle and reattachment of the muscle along with injection botulinum to the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Two patients who had small angle strabismus and who were able to fuse were advised orthoptic exercises and prisms as management. Remaining two patients were advised surgical intervention to correct strabismus but they declined further surgical intervention. Management of MR injury following ESS is complex, often resulting in suboptimal outcomes. Since early intervention is associated with better outcomes, early referral by otolaryngologists to ophthalmologists would result in better outcome. PMID:26693458

  13. Choroidal Metastases From Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Carmel L; Toy, Brian C; Kistler, Henry B; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2016-05-01

    A 92-year-old man presented with months of progressive blurry vision, worsening acutely in his right eye. He denied pain, diplopia, or photopsias. His history was significant for multiple myeloma, prostate cancer, and malignant melanoma of his right shoulder treated with local excision. He had local recurrence with hepatic metastasis of the melanoma treated with radiation and chemotherapy. On examination, his visual acuity was counting fingers in the right eye and 20/60 in the left eye. Amsler grid testing demonstrated metamorphopsia in the right eye. Fundus exam of the right and left eyes revealed multiple, elevated, pigmented choroidal lesions, with associated subretinal fluid in the right macula. This appearance is consistent with hematogenous metastasis of cutaneous malignant melanoma to the choroid and associated serous fluid-causing metamorphopsia. The patient was enrolled in a clinical trial combining plasmid IL-12 with pembrolizumab (Keytruda; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ). He passed away 2 months after initial presentation to our clinic. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:497.]. PMID:27183558

  14. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  15. Profile of Gaze Dysfunction following Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Fiona J; Wright, David; Brand, Darren; Jackson, Carole; Harrison, Shirley; Maan, Tallat; Scott, Claire; Vogwell, Linda; Peel, Sarah; Akerman, Nicola; Dodridge, Caroline; Howard, Claire; Shipman, Tracey; Sperring, Una; Macdiarmid, Sonia; Freeman, Cicely

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the profile of ocular gaze abnormalities occurring following stroke. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol including assessment of visual acuity, ocular alignment and motility, visual field, and visual perception. Results. 915 patients recruited: mean age 69.18 years (SD 14.19). 498 patients (54%) were diagnosed with ocular motility abnormalities. 207 patients had gaze abnormalities including impaired gaze holding (46), complete gaze palsy (23), horizontal gaze palsy (16), vertical gaze palsy (17), Parinaud's syndrome (8), INO (20), one and half syndrome (3), saccadic palsy (28), and smooth pursuit palsy (46). These were isolated impairments in 50% of cases and in association with other ocular abnormalities in 50% including impaired convergence, nystagmus, and lid or pupil abnormalities. Areas of brain stroke were frequently the cerebellum, brainstem, and diencephalic areas. Strokes causing gaze dysfunction also involved cortical areas including occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. Symptoms of diplopia and blurred vision were present in 35%. 37 patients were discharged, 29 referred, and 141 offered review appointments. 107 reviewed patients showed full recovery (4%), partial improvement (66%), and static gaze dysfunction (30%). Conclusions. Gaze dysfunction is common following stroke. Approximately one-third of patients complain of visual symptoms, two thirds show some improvement in ocular motility. PMID:24558601

  16. [Ophthalmic complications and local anesthesia. Pathophysiology and types of eye complications after intraoral dental anesthesia, and clinical recommendations].

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Lozanoff, Scott; Zinkernagel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews the different types of ophthalmologic complications following administration of intraoral local anesthesia. Since the first report by Brain in 1936, case reports about that topic have been published regularly in the literature. However, clinical studies evaluating the incidence of ophthalmologic complications after intraoral local anesthesia are rarely available. Previous data point to a frequency ranging from 0.03% to 0.13%. The most frequently described ophthalmologic complications include diplopia (double vision), ptosis (drooping of upper eyelid), and mydriasis (dilatation of pupil). Disorders that rather affect periorbital structures than the eye directly include facial paralysis and periorbital blanching (angiospasm). Diverse pathophysiologic mechanisms and causes have been reported in the literature, with the inadvertent intravascular administration of the local anesthetic considered the primary reason. The agent as well as the vasopressor is transported retrogradely via arteries or veins to the orbit or to periorbital structures (such as the cavernous sinus) with subsequent anesthesia of nerves and paralysis of muscles distant from the oral cavity. In general the ophthalmologic complications begin shortly after administration of the local anesthesia, and disappear once the local anesthesia has subsided. PMID:25428546

  17. Ischemic tissue injury and progenitor cell tropism: significant contributors to the pathogenesis of pterygium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Ha, Hyo Shin; Kim, Jae Chan

    2015-03-01

    Pterygium is a common ocular surface disease characterized by triangular wing-like growth consisting of subconjunctival hypertrophic connective tissue. Pterygium is easily complicated by adhesion to the eyelid and diplopia related to motility restriction of the eyeball. Beyond the cosmetic problems, this condition has a catastrophic effect on quality of life. Post-surgical recurrence rates of pterygium excision have been reported to be very high. Therefore, identifying the distinct pathogenic pathways of the disease may lead to new therapeutic strategies with lower risk of treatment failure. Based on the relatively low vascularity and known-predominance of disease occurrence in the nasal conjunctiva of normal eyes, we proposed that hypoxic ischemic injury can elicit the development of pterygium. Here, we review hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha-induced activation of the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) signaling pathway as a possible mechanism. Supporting this concept of pathogenic mechanism, we also highlight bone marrow-derived progenitor cell tropism as a main contributor to pterygium pathogenesis. PMID:25314135

  18. Surgical Approaches and Management of Panfacial Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Patients with multiple fractures involving upper third of the face, the mid-face and the lower third are generally referred to as Pan-facial fractures and managing these cases is extremely complicated. Proximity of the maxillofacial region to the important features or senses such as visual function (diplopia), olfaction, respiration (airway management), chewing or mastication (occlusion), deglutition and aesthetics; makes the scenario a little more complex for the surgeon operating in this particular region than the surgeon operating any other part of the body. Inability to directly visualize and reduce all the components of a pan facial injury along with inadequate stability of the fractured bones leads to persistent deformity. It is challenging to follow an established pattern for repairing the pan facial fractures. Each case with this type of fracture is unique and requires skill and expertise of the surgeon to restore the pre-traumatic anatomy and facial aesthetics. Despite all the aggressive treatment, most of the patient’s with pan facial trauma may have some residual deformity which may require another correction surgery later. This article briefs about the management and simple approaches used to reduce and fix a case of pan facial trauma in a 23-year-old male. PMID:26436064

  19. Intracranial chordoma presenting as acute hemorrhage in a child: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth A.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Shah, Sanket U.; Abdulkader, Marwah M.; Bonnin, Jose M.; Ackerman, Laurie L.; Shaikh, Kashif A.; Kralik, Stephen F.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant neoplasms derived from remnants of the embryological notochord. Pediatric cases comprise only 5% of all chordomas, but more than half of the reported pediatric chordomas are intracranial. For patients of all ages, intracranial chordomas typically present with symptoms such as headaches and progressive neurological deficits occurring over several weeks to many years as they compress or invade local structures. There are only reports of these tumors presenting acutely with intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients. Case Description: A 10-year-old boy presented with acute onset of headache, emesis, and diplopia. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain were suspicious for a hemorrhagic mass located in the left petroclival region, compressing the ventral pons. The mass was surgically resected and demonstrated acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Pathologic examination was consistent with chordoma. Conclusion: There are few previous reports of petroclival chordomas causing acute intracranial hemorrhage. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a petroclival chordoma presenting as acute intracranial hemorrhage in a pediatric patient. Although uncommon, it is important to consider chordoma when evaluating a patient of any age presenting with a hemorrhagic lesion of the clivus. PMID:25949851

  20. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. Methods We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. Results The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. Conclusions FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT. PMID:23270432

  1. Pineal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Concomitant With Pituitary Prolactinoma: Possible Correlation Between 2 Distinguished Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Jung, Shin; Noh, Myung-Giun; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is the first reported case of pineal lymphoma with concomitant prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma. A 51-year-old male experienced worsening headaches accompanied by nausea, diplopia, and memory loss for 1 month. Cranial nerve examination revealed bilateral upward gaze limitation with convergence impairment, which is known as Parinaud syndrome. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass in the pineal gland with a coexisting mass within the enlarged sella fossa. Hormone analysis revealed hyperprolactinemia. The pineal mass was removed without injuring the hypothalamus, brain stem, or any neighboring vessels. Pathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the pineal gland. After further studies, the pineal lymphoma was determined to be a secondary tumor from a gastric primary tumor. The patient died 6 months after diagnosis due to systemic progression of DLBCL. Although the mechanistic link between hyperprolactinemia and lymphoma progression has not been clarified on a clinical basis, high prolactin levels may contribute to the rapid progression and therapeutic resistance of the lymphoma. PMID:26937937

  2. Pineal mixed germ cell tumor with a synchronous sellar lesion in the sixth decade.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Manoj; Hirano, Hirofumi; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Yonezawa, Hajime; Campos, Francia; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Sugata, Sei; Arita, Kazunori

    2011-04-01

    Intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs) typically affect children and adolescents. We here report on a 59-year-old male patient presenting with diplopia, polydipsia and polyuria. On clinical examination, slight restriction of the upward gaze was seen on the left side. Computed tomography demonstrated calcifications in the pineal region and enhanced neurohypophysis. Magnetic resonance imaging displayed a heterogeneous pineal mass of 3-cm diameter, which was multicystic with an enhanced cyst wall, and also swelling of the pituitary stalk. The pineal lesion of the tumor, which included calcifications and keratinaceous components, was totally excised using an occipital transtentorial approach. Histopathological examination showed it to be a mixed GCT with germinoma and mature teratoma components. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided complete disappearance of the suprasellar lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of mixed bifocal GCT in an older adult reported in the literature, although a few cases of tumors with a single histological component have been reported. Hence, our case further underlines the possibility of the occurrence of GCTs in older adults and advocates the consideration of GCTs in the differential diagnosis of such cases for appropriate management. PMID:21287366

  3. Recurrent Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Lamdhade, S.; Almulla, A.; Alroughani, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae. PMID:24790762

  4. Secondary Bilateral Orbital Involvement from Primary Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Cheek.

    PubMed

    Furudoi, Shungo; Yoshii, Takashi; Komori, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient with oculomotor nerve palsy due to secondary orbital infiltration from the primary malignant lymphoma of the cheek. The patient was a 78-year-old female who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (diffuse large B cell lymphoma [DLBCL]) of the cheek. The patient received chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. The combined treatment brought about complete remission. About 6 months after the last treatment the patient began to have left blepharoptosis and impaired vision. Findings from ophthalmological and neurosurgical examinations suggested no intraorbital or intracranial lesions. Repeated MRI and CT scans also showed no such lesions. One month later, the patient suddenly had a left oculomotor disturbance, diplopia and exophthalmus, followed by right oculomotor nerve palsy. An MRI revealed bilateral intraorbital tumors. Recurrence at the orbital tissue of malignant lymphoma originated from the left cheek appeared to cause the ophthalmological symptoms. Salvage chemotherapy was performed and her ocular symptoms were recovered. However, the patient died approximately 10 months after recurrent orbital tumor onset. PMID:27604535

  5. White-eyed blowout fracture: Diagnostic pitfalls and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ching Ching; Shaari, Ramizu; Rahman, Shaifulizan Abdul; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-09-01

    White-eyed blowout fracture was first termed by Jordan et al. in individuals sustaining a blow to the periocular area and presenting with ocular symptoms, although with minimal soft tissue signs of trauma. It is often found in pure orbital floor blowout fractures among paediatric patients, and it could manifest as a linear or hinge-like trapdoor deformity. Unlike the more common open orbital blowout fractures with distinct diagnostic clinical signs, white-eyed blowout fractures are rarer and their diagnoses can be easily missed, subsequently costing an optimal time window for surgical intervention. This is critical as better outcomes are found with earlier release of entrapments. This report describes a case of a white-eyed blowout fracture in a 10-year-old child faced with its diagnostic challenges. The current literature review discusses the types of fracture pattern, signs and symptoms, mechanism of action, as well as timing of surgery. In view of the common complication of persistent diplopia, clinical pitfalls in achieving this diagnosis are emphasized to prevent any delay of treatment. Current literature evidences are weighted towards urgent surgical intervention, as positive outcomes are found to correlate with earlier release of entrapments. PMID:25986667

  6. Unilateral Abducens Nerve Palsy as an Early Feature of Multiple Mononeuropathy Associated with Anti-GQ1b Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Kinno, Ryuta; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Tanigawa, Hiroto; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Patients with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome show various combinations of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, areflexia, or altered sensorium as clinical features. We describe herein a unique case with unilateral abducens nerve palsy as an early feature of multiple mononeuropathy involving dysfunctions of the inferior dental plexus and the ulnar nerve, which was thought to be associated with anti-GQ1b antibody. A 27-year-old man presented with acute-onset diplopia. He subsequently experienced numbness not only in the right lower teeth and gums but also on the ulnar side of the left hand. Neurological examinations revealed dysfunctions of the right abducens nerve, the right inferior dental plexus, and the left ulnar nerve, suggesting multiple mononeuropathy. Serum anti-GQ1b antibody was positive. This is a rare case report of a patient with unilateral abducens nerve palsy as an early feature of multiple mononeuropathy associated with anti-GQ1b antibody. We suggest that anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome should be taken into consideration as a differential diagnosis of acute multiple mononeuropathy if ophthalmoplegia is present unilaterally. PMID:21490718

  7. [Case of invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis developing orbital apex syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kamoshima, Yuuta; Sawamura, Yutaka; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hamada, Shinsuke; Izumi, Naoto; Okugawa, Shu

    2007-10-01

    Sino-orbital invasive aspergillosis has been regarded as a lethal disease. The authors report a case with a successful treatment result. A 65 year-old woman, with mild diabetes mellitus, presented progressive right visual disturbance, diplopia, ptosis, and severe periorbital pain over a period of 2 weeks. MR images with gadolinium contrast showed a heterogeneously enhanced mass extending from the right orbital apex to the cavernous sinus. Despite steroid pulse therapy, her symptoms progressed. An open biopsy revealed invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis. Intravenous and oral antifungal agents were administered, but the aspergilloma gradually expanded. Her general status deteriorated due to intractable periorbital pain that was resistant to narcotic analgesics. By a craniotomy, the aspergilloma involving the orbit and cavernous sinus was radically removed leaving the internal carotid artery intact and simultaneously rhizotomy of the trigeminal nerve was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful and the pain was remarkably ameliorated. Three years after the surgery, she has been well, receiving voriconazole and experiencing no relapse of the disease. PMID:17969338

  8. [An operative case of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex].

    PubMed

    Saino, M; Kayama, T; Kuroki, A; Siraisi, Y; Sato, K; Nakai, O

    1996-11-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a rare cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex manifesting as headache, left facial dysesthesia, diplopia, left hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Neurological examination revealed dysesthesia of territory in all divisions of the left trigeminal nerve, left incomplete abducens nerve palsy, left mixed hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Plain CT scan showed a smoothly marginated mass involving the left petrous apex. The mass was isodense with the brain parenchyma and not enhanced by contrast medium. The mass appeared heterogeneously slightly hyperintense on the T1-weighted MR image and homogeneously hyperintense on the T2-weighted MR image except for the peripheral portion. The mass was not enhanced after intravenous gadolinium DTPA administration. Surgery via a petrosal approach totally removed the mass in the intracranial, extradural space. Histological examination showed typical features of cholesterol granuloma, with cholesterin clefts, hemosiderin deposits, and erythrocytes in non-specific granulation tissue. Cholesterol granuloma most commonly occurs in the middle ear cavity, and rarely in the petrous apex. The characteristic hyperintense appearance of cholesterol granuloma on T1- and T2-weighted MR images is very useful for differentiation from other lesions of the petrous apex and the cerebellopontine angle such as cholesteatoma, mucocele, chordoma, and meningioma. Solid cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex should be treated by total removal via craniotomy, not by drainage which is commonly performed by otorhinologists. PMID:8934474

  9. Chondrosarcoma of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Tadashi; Sasaki, Tomio; Takakura, Kintomo; Ishida, Tsuyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with chondrosarcoma, grade I or II, and one with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the skull base were treated at our clinic between 1967 and 1991. The patients were three men and three women who ranged in age from 21 to 39 years. The presenting symptoms were diplopia, decreased visual acuity, or symptoms of involvement of VIIIth and lower cranial nerves. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 18 months to 14 years. A plain skull x-ray and tomography of the skull, computed tomographic (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed a calcified mass. Angiograms showed an occlusion of the arteries or venous sinuses, or both, in four patients, and a distinct tumor stain in one. The tumors were subtotally removed in all six cases. Two patients received postoperative irradiation for the residual tumor. In one patient, extraocular movement was compromised postoperatively, although in the other five patients there was no aggravation of the neurologic signs. Follow-up CT scans and MRI demonstrated no recurrent tumors nor any enlargement of residual tumors. Based on these findings, we advocate aggressive surgical removal of these tumors, which should be augmented by radiation therapy if the postoperative CT scans or MRI reveal residual tumors. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17170863

  10. Comparison of Absorbable Mesh Plate versus Titanium-Dynamic Mesh Plate in Reconstruction of Blow-Out Fracture: An Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woon Il; Kim, Woo Seob; Bae, Tae Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background A blow-out fracture is one of the most common facial injuries in midface trauma. Orbital wall reconstruction is extremely important because it can cause various functional and aesthetic sequelae. Although many materials are available, there are no uniformly accepted guidelines regarding material selection for orbital wall reconstruction. Methods From January 2007 to August 2012, a total of 78 patients with blow-out fractures were analyzed. 36 patients received absorbable mesh plates, and 42 patients received titanium-dynamic mesh plates. Both groups were retrospectively evaluated for therapeutic efficacy and safety according to the incidence of three different complications: enophthalmos, extraocular movement impairment, and diplopia. Results For all groups (inferior wall fracture group, medial wall fractrue group, and combined inferomedial wall fracture group), there were improvements in the incidence of each complication regardless of implant types. Moreover, a significant improvement of enophthalmos occurred for both types of implants in group 1 (inferior wall fracture group). However, we found no statistically significant differences of efficacy or complication rate in every groups between both implant types. Conclusions Both types of implants showed good results without significant differences in long-term follow up, even though we expected the higher recurrent enophthalmos rate in patients with absorbable plate. In conclusion, both types seem to be equally effective and safe for orbital wall reconstruction. In particular, both implant types significantly improve the incidence of enophthalmos in cases of inferior orbital wall fractures. PMID:25075357

  11. Medpor Implant Fixation Using Fibrin Glue in the Treatment of Medial Orbital Wall Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nakheon; Song, Seung Han; Kyung, Hyunwoo; Oh, Sang-Ha

    2015-06-01

    The optimal treatment modalities are determined based on the symptoms and degree of the bone defects in patients with medial orbital wall blowout fracture. Most of the patients in this series underwent implant surgery. However, there are many patients whose implants were not fixed during surgery. Therefore, some patients who had implant migration occurred had been reported. We have therefore used methods for applying fibrin glue (Tisseel, Baxter Healthcare, Norfolk, United Kingdom) for the fixation of implant. Between 2007 and 2013, a total of 168 patients underwent porous polyethylene orbital implant (Medpor) surgery with the application of Tisseel. All the patients underwent surgical treatments via a transcaruncular approach, for which the Medpor was used. Postoperative complications include 6 cases of the limitation of extraoccular movement, 10 cases of diplopia, and 7 cases of enophthalmos. However, there were no specific complications caused by Tisseel. All the patients were satisfied with the treatment outcomes. In this study, we report the usefulness of Tisseel in the fixation of the medial orbital wall fracture using the Medpor implant with a review of literatures. PMID:26080196

  12. 'White-eyed' blowout fracture: a case series of five children.

    PubMed

    Foulds, J S; Laverick, S; MacEwen, C J

    2013-06-01

    The 'white-eyed' blowout fracture is an orbital injury in children that is commonly initially misdiagnosed as a head injury because of predominant autonomic features and lack of soft-tissue signs. We present five patients who presented with nausea and vomiting following an apparent mild head or facial injury. None of the five had any external evidence of injury. Despite each case describing diplopia, there was a delayed diagnosis of at least 24 h. CT examination demonstrated an inferior orbital wall fracture in all cases with entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle. Each patient underwent surgical repair, two within 48 h of their injury, both of whom achieved complete recovery of ocular movements, while three were delayed beyond 48 h, with a resulting residual limitation of upgaze in all. It is, therefore, important for clinicians to be aware of this condition, so that it can be diagnosed early in order for early surgical release to be performed, which is associated with an excellent prognosis. PMID:23592727

  13. Survey of Common Practices among Oculofacial Surgeons in the Asia-Pacific Region: Management of Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Victor; Chiam, Nathalie; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-01-01

    A web-based anonymous survey was performed to assess common practices of oculofacial surgeons in the management of traumatic orbital floor blowout fractures. A questionnaire which contained questions on several controversial topics in the management of orbital floor fractures was sent out via e-mail to 131 oculofacial surgeons in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. A total response rate of 58.3% was achieved from May to December 2012. The preferred time for surgical intervention was within 2 weeks for adult patients, porous polyethylene implant was the most popular choice, and most surgeons preferred the transconjunctival approach. Postoperatively, diplopia was the most commonly encountered complication and most oculofacial surgeons reviewed their patients regularly for up to 12 months. We report the results of the first survey of oculofacial surgeons within the Asia-Pacific region on the management of orbital floor blowout fractures. Compared with previous surveys (from year 2000 to 2004), the duration to surgical intervention was comparable but there was a contrasting change in preferred surgical approach and choice of orbital implant. PMID:25136408

  14. Transantral Orbital Floor Fracture Repair Using a Folded Silastic Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Gwan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages and limitations of using a silicon tube to support the fractured orbital floor by a transantral approach. Methods A retrospective study was conducted from January 2000 to December. 2011 in 51 patients with pure orbital floor fractures. The patients underwent reduction surgery via a transantral approach for inserting a folded silastic tube to support the fractured orbital floor in the maxillary sinus. A chart review of preoperative and postoperative ocular symptoms, operation records, and complications was maintained. Results In 18 out of 25 patients with diplopia, postoperative improvement was seen. In 13 out of 15 patients with extraocular muscle limitation, postoperative improvement was seen. Enophthalmos resolved postoperatively in four of five patients. Postsurgical complications occurred in three patients: an overcorrection, an infection in the maxillary sinus, and an implant extrusion, all of which were resolved by revision surgeries. Conclusion During the course of the study, we sensed reduction using a folded silastic tube via a transantral approach as an easy and effective technique with good postoperative results, and minimal implant related complications. This novel procedure is recommended as a surgical option for the reduction of orbital floor fractures. PMID:26330920

  15. Retrocaruncular Approach for the Repair of Medial Orbital Wall Fractures: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yun-Dun; Paskowitz, Daniel; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate a retrocaruncular approach for repairing medial orbital wall fractures. A total of 10 fresh cadaver orbits were dissected to investigate a transconjunctival approach to the orbit posterior to the caruncle. Medical records of consecutive patients with medial orbital wall fractures repaired via a retrocaruncular incision at Wilmer Eye Institute over a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution's Institutional Review Board. Feasibility of this approach was clearly demonstrated on all cadavers. Horner muscle was observed to be directly attached to the caruncle and remained undisturbed throughout the retrocaruncular approach. For each of the 174 patients reviewed, this approach allowed successful access to the fracture and proper implant placement. The origin of the inferior oblique muscle was divided in only 19 patients. Sutures were not used for conjunctival incision closure in any patient. For 120 patients who underwent acute repair, the percentage with enophthalmos (≥ 2 mm) decreased from 34% preoperatively to 4% postoperatively; extraocular motility deficit decreased from 41 to 11%. Postoperative complications included recurrence of the preexisting retrobulbar hemorrhage, conjunctival granuloma, and temporary torsional diplopia, each in one patient. The retrocaruncular transconjunctival incision is an effective and safe approach for repairing medial orbital wall fractures with minimal complications. The retrocaruncular incision offers advantages over dividing the caruncle because Horner muscle is left undisturbed, and the incision heals well without suturing. PMID:26000079

  16. A clinical analysis of bilateral orbital fracture.

    PubMed

    Roh, Joon Ho; Jung, Jee Woong; Chi, Mijung

    2014-03-01

    Although bilateral orbital fracture can cause serious eyeball and facial skeletal problems, few reports have been issued on the topic. We analyzed the clinical features of bilateral orbital fracture by reviewing the medical records of 147 patients and compared bilateral and unilateral fractures by reviewing the literature.Bilateral orbital fracture was most common in men aged between 50 and 59 years. A traffic accident was the leading cause of trauma, and average time between trauma and surgery was 12.2 days. Bilateral medial fracture accompanied by nasal fracture accounted for the overwhelming majority, and impure blowout fracture in at least 1 eye occurred in 69.4% of the 147 patients. Associated ocular injuries seemed to be similar for bilateral and unilateral fracture. Thirty-five patients (23.8%) had other multiple traumas affecting other than the eyes, and this significantly increased the need for surgery (P < 0.05). Of the 48 patients who underwent surgery, including 4 cases of bilateral surgery, 21 patients who had ocular motility restriction with central diplopia within 30 degrees almost completely recovered. No significant relation between the timing of surgery and improvement was found. Although unilateral surgery was performed in most cases, facial asymmetry related to enophthalmos was unclear at 6 months postoperatively.In summary, bilateral orbital fracture was found to be clinically distinguishable from unilateral fracture in several aspects. We hope these findings provide a reference guide to the approach and management of bilateral orbital fracture. PMID:24514894

  17. Flow diversion in vasculitic intracranial aneurysms? Repair of giant complex cavernous carotid aneurysm in polyarteritis nodosa using Pipeline embolization devices: first reported case.

    PubMed

    Martinez Santos, Jaime; Kaderali, Zul; Spears, Julian; Rubin, Laurence A; Marotta, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) are exceedingly rare lesions with unpredictable behavior that pose real challenges to microsurgical and endovascular interventions owing to their inflammatory nature. We introduce a safe and effective alternative for treating these aneurysms using Pipeline embolization devices (PEDs). A 20-year-old man presented with diplopia, headaches, chronic abdominal pain, and weight loss. Diagnostic evaluations confirmed PAN, including bilateral giant cavernous carotid aneurysms. Cyclophosphamide and steroids achieved significant and sustained clinical improvement, with a decision to follow the aneurysms serially. Seven years later the left unruptured aneurysm enlarged, causing a sudden severe headache and a cavernous sinus syndrome. Treatment of the symptomatic aneurysm was pursued using flow diversion (PED) and the internal carotid artery was successfully reconstructed with a total of four overlapping PEDs. At 6 months follow-up, complete exclusion of the aneurysm was demonstrated, with symptomatic recovery. This is the first description of using a flow-diverting technique in an inflammatory vasculitis. In this case, PEDs not only attained a definitive closure of the aneurysm but also reconstructed the damaged and fragile arterial segment affected with vasculitis. PMID:26041095

  18. Bilateral optic nerve edema presenting as initial manifestation of thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michelle E; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2016-10-01

    A 48-year-old smoker with a history of hyperthyroidism treated 10 years prior to presentation with radioactive iodine ablation of the thyroid gland presented to his ophthalmologist with a 2-week history of transient loss of vision in the right eye occurring for 1 to 2 hours each morning. He denied ocular pain, diplopia or change in the prominence of one or both eyes. Examination revealed 2 mm of relative proptosis on the right, bilateral temporal flare and lower lid retraction. There was minimal upper lid retraction and no evidence of lid lag. Ocular motility was full. Dilated fundoscopic examination revealed bilateral optic nerve edema, right more than left. CT of the orbit demonstrated enlargement of the extraocular muscles bilaterally with marked enlargement of the right medial rectus and left inferior rectus muscles resulting in crowding at the orbital apex bilaterally. Laboratory testing revealed the patient to be hyperthyroid. The patient was treated with high dose oral steroids followed by orbital radiation. Hyperthyroidism was managed by the patient's primary care physician. Visual symptoms rapidly improved with oral steroids and orbital radiation. Optic nerve edema completely resolved. Repeat CT imaging demonstrated a reduction in the enlargement of the extraocular muscles with relief of bilateral optic nerve compression. PMID:27486810

  19. Pineal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Concomitant With Pituitary Prolactinoma: Possible Correlation Between 2 Distinguished Pathologies: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Jung, Shin; Noh, Myung-Giun; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub

    2016-02-01

    This is the first reported case of pineal lymphoma with concomitant prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma.A 51-year-old male experienced worsening headaches accompanied by nausea, diplopia, and memory loss for 1 month. Cranial nerve examination revealed bilateral upward gaze limitation with convergence impairment, which is known as Parinaud syndrome. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass in the pineal gland with a coexisting mass within the enlarged sella fossa. Hormone analysis revealed hyperprolactinemia. The pineal mass was removed without injuring the hypothalamus, brain stem, or any neighboring vessels. Pathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the pineal gland. After further studies, the pineal lymphoma was determined to be a secondary tumor from a gastric primary tumor. The patient died 6 months after diagnosis due to systemic progression of DLBCL.Although the mechanistic link between hyperprolactinemia and lymphoma progression has not been clarified on a clinical basis, high prolactin levels may contribute to the rapid progression and therapeutic resistance of the lymphoma. PMID:26937937

  20. Extraocular mitochondrial myopathies and their differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Pongratz, Dieter

    2006-06-01

    The diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy depends upon a constellation of findings, family history, type of muscle involvement, specific laboratory abnormalities, and the results of histological, pathobiochemical and genetic analysis. In the present paper, the authors describe the diagnostic approach to mitochondrial myopathies manifesting as extraocular muscle disease. The most common ocular manifestation of mitochondrial myopathy is progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). To exclude myasthenia gravis, ocular myositis, thyroid associated orbitopathy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in patients with an early onset or long-lasting very slowly progressive ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia, almost without any diplopia, and normal to mildly elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and MRI of the orbits should be performed. A PEO phenotype forces one to look comprehensively for other multisystemic mitochondrial features (e.g., exercise induced weakness, encephalopathy, polyneuropathy, diabetes, heart disease). Thereafter, and presently even in familiar PEO, a diagnostic muscle biopsy should be taken. Histological and ultrastructural hallmarks are mitochondrial proliferations and structural abnormalities, lipid storage, ragged-red fibers, or cytochrome-C negative myofibers. In addition, Southern blotting may reveal the common deletion, or molecular analysis may verify specific mutations of distinct mitochondrial or nuclear genes. PMID:16760117

  1. A case of Miller Fisher syndrome during preoperative chemotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Yumiko; Ide, Yoshimi; Tajima, Shogo; Hosokawa, Yuko; Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Terada, Tatsuhiro; Waki, Michihiko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Shiiya, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman with breast cancer received FEC treatment (5FU: 500 mg/m2, epirubicin: 100 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide: 500 mg/m2) every 3 weeks as preoperative chemotherapy. Fifteen days after her third cycle of FEC, she developed a cold. Diplopia occurred 4 days after developing the cold, and progressive paresthesia of the hands and weakness of the limbs occurred. She had ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and are flexia and was diagnosed with Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS). The cause of MFS during chemotherapy is believed to be caused by an immunological response to infection, or drug neurotoxicity. In our case, since the patient underwent an antecedent upper respiratory infection in the period of myelosuppression, her MFS was probably induced by the immunoreaction associated with this infection. Our patient underwent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. After initiation of the treatment, her neurological symptoms improved, then, she received a fourth cycle of FEC and her remaining neurological symptoms did not worsen. Thus, we report a rare case of MFS developed in immunosuppression by chemotherapy and remind physicians of the alarming triad of MFS symptoms. PMID:26629243

  2. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  3. Ocular palsies of obscure origin in South East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, C. H.; Tan, Y. T.; Cheah, J. S.; Ransome, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings are presented of 14 patients who were recently found to have an obscure form of ocular palsy during a three year study in Singapore. The disease, which has no predilection for any age groups, races, occupations, or sex, often manifests with acute onset of unilateral or bilateral cranial nerve paralysis involving the 3rd, 4th, 6th, first two branches of the 5th, and sometimes, the 2nd cranial nerve in various combinations. Major symptoms were diplopia, ptosis, giddiness, headache, facial numbness, proptosis, retro-orbital pain, chemosis, conjunctival irritation, blurred vision, and/or progressive blindness. Systemic complications were rare. Except for a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate during the acute phase, exhaustive investigations—but short of a surgical exploration—were essentially noncontributory. All cleared up within two to four weeks, nine patients had spontaneous remission, while five improved only after a course of systemic corticosteroids. Two cases were left with some residual neurological deficits and one in this series had a relapse two years later. The relationship of this condition to those described outside South East Asia is discussed.

  4. The unilateral occipital transtentorial approach for pineal region meningiomas: a report of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shaowu; Guo, Zongze; Wang, Yunjie

    2014-10-01

    In the current study, we reviewed and re-evaluated the experiences of microsurgical management for pineal region meningiomas via the unilateral occipital transtentorial approach (Poppen's approach). Clinical data were obtained on 15 meningiomas of the pineal region, which underwent microsurgery via unilateral Poppen's approach from March 2009 to June 2012. These patients were hospitalized in our department; their data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The tumors were removed via the right Poppen's approach in 12 cases and left Poppen's approach in 3 cases, and intraoperative external ventricular drainage was performed for hydrocephalus in 3 cases. As a result, gross total resection was achieved in 11 cases, near total resection in 3 cases and subtotal resection in 1 case. All resected tumors were pathologically confirmed. The postoperative complications included two cases of homonymous hemianopia, and deteriorated Parinaud syndrome and diplopia in one case. Ten cases were followed up (range 1-4 years) and no death occurred. On the basis of the existing literature and our experiences, the unilateral Poppen's approach is appropriate for most meningiomas of the pineal region that are small or intermediate in size. However, gross total resection might be difficult via the unilateral Poppen's approach for large-sized meningiomas with much contralateral infratentorial extension due to limited exposure. For these cases, combined supra-infratentorial or bilateral Poppen's approaches are recommended. Preoperative or intraoperative external ventricular drainage can increase tumor exposure and improve microsurgical effects. PMID:24397496

  5. Vitamin B12 Deficiency due to Chlorofluorocarbon: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Hemlata; Chaudhary, Rekha

    2010-01-01

    Background. Vitamin B12 is vital for optimal functioning of various organ systems but more importantly the central nervous system and the hematological system. Deficiency of vitamin B12 clinically manifests as excessive daytime fatigue, memory difficulties, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and optic neuropathy. In occupational medicine, vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported with exposure to nitrous oxide in health care workers. However, not much is known about exposure to Freons in other industries and vitamin B12 deficiency. Aim. We are reporting a case of vitamin B12 deficiency in the setting of exposure to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. Case Report. A 55-year-old male refrigerator mechanic experienced recurrent visual symptoms, which included diplopia and blurring. A complete workup was done and was significant of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, his B12 levels were refractory to supplementation. Appropriate precautions at workplace improved patient's symptoms and were associated with significant improvement in B12 levels. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of vitamin B12 deficiency (that remains refractory to supplementation) in the setting of exposure to Freon gases. PMID:21461374

  6. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care. A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C. In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  7. Neurosurgical venous considerations for tumors of the pineal region resected using the infratentorial supracerebellar approach.

    PubMed

    Kodera, Toshiaki; Bozinov, Oliver; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Ulrich, Nils H; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-11-01

    The authors present a microsurgical technique for the resection of a heterogeneous group of pineal-region tumors and discuss the key points for successfully performing this surgery. Twenty-six consecutive patients with pineal-region tumors were resected by the senior author (H.B.) and analyzed retrospectively. For all 26 patients, the operation was conducted using the infratentorial supracerebellar (ITSC) approach in the sitting (23 patients) or Concorde (three patients) positions. Twenty-five patients had symptomatic obstructive hydrocephalus and were treated with ventricular drainage, a previously inserted ventriculoperitoneal shunt, or an endoscopic third ventriculostomy before undergoing resection of the pineal-region tumor. The gross total removal of the tumor was achieved in 23 patients and subtotal removal was achieved in three patients. The tumors were pathologically diagnosed mainly as pineocytomas (10), pilocytic astrocytomas (6), or pineal cysts (4). Twenty-five of the patients clinically improved after surgery, and there was no mortality. Two patients experienced transient postoperative neurological deterioration: one patient developed Parinaud syndrome, and one patient developed intermittent diplopia. Successful surgery and patient outcome when treating tumors of the pineal region using the ITSC approach requires: (i) preservation of the venous flow of the Galenic draining system; (ii) preservation of the thick bridging veins of the tentorial surface of the cerebellum, especially the hemispheric bridging veins; and (iii) minimizing retraction of the cerebellum during surgery to avoid adverse effects caused by both direct cerebellar compression and disturbance of the venous circulation. PMID:21917460

  8. Endoscopic surgery for hemorrhagic pineal cyst following antiplatelet therapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yoji; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Tucker, Adam; Ukita, Tohru; Tsuji, Masao; Miyake, Hiroji; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Pineal cysts of the third ventricle presenting with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to internal cystic hemorrhage are a rare clinical entity. The authors report a case of a 61-year-old man taking antiplatelet medication who suffered from a hemorrhagic pineal cyst and was treated with endoscopic surgery. One month prior to treatment, the patient was diagnosed with a brainstem infarction and received clopidogrel in addition to aspirin. A small incidental pineal cyst was concurrently diagnosed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging which was intended to be followed conservatively. The patient presented with a sudden onset of headache and diplopia. On admission, the neurological examination revealed clouding of consciousness and Parinaud syndrome. Computerized tomography (CT) scans demonstrated a hemorrhagic mass lesion in the posterior third ventricle. The patient underwent emergency external ventricular drainage with staged endoscopic biopsy and third ventriculostomy using a flexible videoscope. Histological examination revealed pineal tissue with necrotic change and no evidence of tumor cells. One year later MR imaging demonstrated no evidence of cystic lesion and a flow void between third ventricle and prepontine cistern. In patients with asymptomatic pineal cysts who are treated with antiplatelet therapy, it is important to be aware of the risk of pineal apoplexy. Endoscopic management can be effective for treatment of hemorrhagic pineal cyst with obstructive hydrocephalus. PMID:24067776

  9. [Myasthenia, from the internist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Eymard, B

    2014-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease due to specific antibodies inducing a neuromuscular transmission defect causing muscle fatigability. If onset of the disease may be at any age, myasthenia gravis concerns mostly young adults, in majority females. The disease characteristic features are the following: ocular symptoms (ptosis or diplopia) as main initial manifestation, extension to other muscles in 80 % of the cases, variability of the deficit, effort induced worsening, successive periods of exacerbation during the disease course, severity depending on respiratory and swallowing impairment (if rapid worsening, a myasthenic crisis is to be suspected), association with thymoma in 20 % of patients and with other various autoimmune diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease. Diagnosis relies on the clinical features, improvement with cholinesterase inhibitors, detection of specific autoantibodies (anti-AChR or anti-MuSK), and significant decrement evidenced by electrophysiological tests. The points concerning specifically the internist have been highlighted in this article: diagnostic traps, associated autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory myopathies that may mimic myasthenia gravis, adverse effects of medications commonly used in internal medicine, some of them inducing myasthenic syndromes. The treatment is well codified: the treatment is well codified: (1) respect of adverse drugs contra-indications, systematically use of cholinesterase inhibitors, (2) thymectomy if thymoma completed with radiotherapy if malignant, (3) corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agent in severe or disabling form, (4) intensive care unit monitoring, plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins for patients with myasthenic crisis. PMID:24112993

  10. Role of eslicarbazepine in the treatment of epilepsy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Martin E; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2010-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine is a new dibenzazepine antiepileptic agent. It is a high affinity antagonist of the voltage-gated sodium channel. It is closely related to both carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine. Eslicarbazepine has similar affinity to inactivated sodium channels (channels in just activated neurons) as carbamazepine, and greater efficacy in animal models of seizure than oxcarbazepine. In human placebo-controlled trials of a single daily dose of eslicarbazepine added to other anti-epileptic agents, significant seizure reductions occurred with 800 and 1200 mg daily, with nearly half of the patients experiencing a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in over 50% of patients receiving therapeutic doses of eslicarbazepine (compared to 31.4%–44.7% of placebo-treated subjects), but were generally mild or moderate. Eight to 19.6% of eslicarbazepine treated patients discontinued due to AEs (compared to 3.9%–8.5% of placebo-treated subjects). In these patients receiving combination anticonvulsant therapy, the most common AEs were dizziness, nausea and vomiting, somnolence, and diplopia. Eslicarbazepine is an effective and reasonably well-tolerated adjunct in patients with suboptimal control of their partial seizures. PMID:20421910

  11. Eslicarbazepine acetate: an update on efficacy and safety in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Loiacono, Giulia; Rossi, Alessandra; Zaccara, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder. Despite a broad range of commonly used antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy have drug resistance or encounter significant adverse effects. Eslicarbazepine acetate is a new central nervous system-active compound with anticonvulsant activity whose mechanism of action is by blocking the voltage-gated sodium channel. Eslicarbazepine acetate was approved by the European Medicines Agency and launched onto the European market in 2009 for adjunctive treatment in adult subjects of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. This article provides an overview on the recent studies on eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Efficacy and safety of this drug for partial-onset seizures were assessed in four randomized clinical trials with responder rates ranged between 17% and 43%. Adverse events were usually mild to moderate in intensity and the most common were dizziness, somnolence, nausea, diplopia, headache, vomiting, abnormal coordination, blurred vision, vertigo and fatigue. Eslicarbazepine acetate is not recommended below 18 years, but a published phase II trial had the main goal to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of this drug in pediatric population. Eslicarbazepine acetate appears to be a safe and effective drug with a linear pharmacokinetics, very low potential for drug-drug interactions and therefore it can offer a valid alternative to current antiepileptic drugs. Additionally, it is undergoing investigation for monotherapy in subjects with partial epilepsy, and other neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24225327

  12. Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

  13. Chondroblastoma of the Clivus: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jonathan; Ahmadpour, Arjang; Bewley, Arnaud F.; Lechpammer, Mirna; Bobinski, Matthew; Shahlaie, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    Background and Importance Chondroblastoma is a benign primary bone tumor that typically develops in the epiphyses of long bones. Chondroblastoma of the craniofacial skeleton is extremely rare, with most cases occurring in the squamosal portion of the temporal bone. In this report, we describe the first case of chondroblastoma of the clivus presenting with cranial neuropathy that was treated with endoscopic endonasal resection. We review the literature on craniofacial chondroblastomas with particular emphasis on extratemporal lesions. Case Presentation A 27-year-old woman presented with severe headache, left facial dysesthesias, and diplopia. Physical examination revealed hypesthesia in the left maxillary nerve dermatome, and complete left abducens nerve palsy. Imaging demonstrated an expansile intraosseous mass originating in the upper clivus with extension superiorly into the sella turcica and laterally to involve the medial wall of the left cavernous sinus. The tumor was completely resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach, with postoperative improvement in lateral gaze palsy. Histopathology was consistent with chondroblastoma. Conclusion Chondroblastoma is a rare tumor of the craniofacial skeleton that should be included in the differential diagnosis of an osteolytic lesion of the clivus. Complete surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment. PMID:26623238

  14. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies. PMID:26209844

  15. The use of 0.25% lidocaine with fentanyl and pancuronium for intravenous regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sztark, F; Thicoipé, M; Favarel-Garrigues, J F; Lassié, P; Petitjean, M E; Dabadie, P

    1997-04-01

    The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of fentanyl and pancuronium combined with dilute lidocaine solution for intravenous regional anesthesia of the arm. Forty adult patients undergoing upper limb surgery were randomly allocated to receive either 0.6 mL/kg of 0.5% lidocaine (3 mg/kg) or 0.6 mL/kg of 0.25% lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg) with 1 microg/kg of fentanyl and 0.5 mg of pancuronium. The onset of sensory and motor blocks was significantly shorter in the 0.5% lidocaine group (P < 0.05). However, no differences in analgesia or motor blockade were found between the two groups at 20 min tourniquet time. Regional anesthesia was considered successful in more than 85% of patients. One patient in the 0.25% lidocaine group experienced a transient diplopia after tourniquet release. Postoperative analgesia time was similar in the two groups. We conclude that the addition of fentanyl plus pancuronium to the lidocaine solution reduces the dose of the local anesthetic and possibly systemic toxicity. PMID:9085956

  16. [A case of relapsing polychondritis with oculobulbar symptoms and successful treatment of respiratory failure with BiPAP].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Yamazaki, M; Takei, Y; Miyazaki, A; Hanyu, N

    1999-10-01

    A 66-year-old man developed diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, and acute respiratory failure. The initial diagnosis was myasthenia gravis and prednisolone had been administrated for three years. Because of recurrent upper respiratory infections, prednisolone was tapered off. Two months later, auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis appeared. He was diagnosed as having relapsing polychondritis on the basis of histological findings of the ear lobe biopsy. Reinstituted prednisolone had the effect on the auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis, but no effect on dysphagia, hoarseness, and respiratory failure caused by the deformity of the pharynx and airway. Tracheal collapse usually causes rapid death, so early tracheostomy and the use of endotracheal prostheses have been recommended in patients with airway obstruction from relapsing polychondritis, but such surgical management can only partially open up the large airways and has no effect on smaller airways. In this case tracheostomy and endoluminal stent placement have helped improve the patient's respiratory failure, but have had little effect on its aggravation at night in the supine position. The use of BiPAP after surgical management can be an effective treatment for airway involvement in relapsing polychondritis probably because it keeps the narrowed airways from collapsing, especially at night. PMID:10655766

  17. A Novel Method of Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using Virtual Planning, 3-Dimensional Printing, and Autologous Bone.

    PubMed

    Vehmeijer, Maarten; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are often a result of traffic accidents or interpersonal violence. To date, numerous materials and methods have been used to reconstruct the orbital floor. However, simple and cost-effective 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies for the treatment of orbital floor fractures are still sought. This study describes a simple, precise, cost-effective method of treating orbital fractures using 3D printing technologies in combination with autologous bone. Enophthalmos and diplopia developed in a 64-year-old female patient with an orbital floor fracture. A virtual 3D model of the fracture site was generated from computed tomography images of the patient. The fracture was virtually closed using spline interpolation. Furthermore, a virtual individualized mold of the defect site was created, which was manufactured using an inkjet printer. The tangible mold was subsequently used during surgery to sculpture an individualized autologous orbital floor implant. Virtual reconstruction of the orbital floor and the resulting mold enhanced the overall accuracy and efficiency of the surgical procedure. The sculptured autologous orbital floor implant showed an excellent fit in vivo. The combination of virtual planning and 3D printing offers an accurate and cost-effective treatment method for orbital floor fractures. PMID:27137437

  18. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  19. Response to immunotherapy in a patient with adult onset Leigh syndrome and T9176C mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Govindarajan, Raghav; Peck, Dawn; Font-Montgomery, Esperanza

    2016-09-01

    Leigh syndrome is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in different genes, including ATP6A for which no known therapy is available. We report a case of adult-onset Leigh syndrome with response to immunotherapy. A twenty year-old woman with baseline learning difficulties was admitted with progressive behavioral changes, diplopia, headaches, bladder incontinence, and incoordination. Brain MRI and PET scan showed T2 hyperintensity and increased uptake in bilateral basal ganglia, respectively. Autoimmune encephalitis was suspected and she received plasmapheresis with clinical improvement. She was readmitted 4 weeks later with dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia. Plasmapheresis was repeated with resolution of her symptoms. Given the multisystem involvement and suggestive MRI changes, genetic testing was done, revealing a homoplasmic T9176C ATPase 6 gene mtDNA mutation. Monthly IVIG provided clinical improvement with worsening when infusions were delayed. Leigh syndrome secondary to mtDNA T9176C mutations could have an autoimmune mechanism that responds to immunotherapy. PMID:27408822

  20. [Johannes Kepler's contributions to ophthalmologic optics].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, W

    1986-02-01

    Until the beginning of the 17th century it was held that an image is formed in the eye on the anterior surface of the crystalline lens. Ophthalmological optics as a scientific discipline only began with a discovery made by Johannes Kepler. Without performing new experiments, and solely by application of the laws of light refraction, he analyzed the path of light through the eye and demonstrated that an image is formed on the retina and that it is inverted. Acceptance of this discovery was impeded by contemporary prejudices which could imagine nothing but an upright image in the eye, even though this attitude could not explain certain phenomena. Kepler's discovery of the path of light in the eye made it possible to explain the following physical phenomena: central visual acuity, visual field, dark adaptation, and errors of refraction. Physiological diplopia and the mechanism of accommodation were discovered later. The law stating that the intensity of light decreases with the square of distance was also formulated by Johannes Kepler; this law, too, could only be demonstrated after the path of light through the eye had been discovered. In recent years the Keplerian telescope has assumed a practical significance in ophthalmological optics. As a reading aid for individuals with impaired vision it offers a significantly higher magnification than any other optical visual aid. PMID:3520121

  1. Pseudotumor cerebri in a child treated with acitretin: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Das, Kapildev; Roychoudhury, Soumyajit; Shrimal, Arpit

    2013-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure in absence of any intra-cranial space-occupying lesion. It is mostly due to impairment of drainage of CSF from arachnoid villi. Clinically pseudotumor cerebri presents with headache, diplopia, nausea, vomiting, papilloedema and if treatment is delayed, may lead to blindness. Females of childbearing age group, endocrinal abnormalities and ingestion of certain drugs have been reported to be associated with pseudotumor cerebri. However, it's occurrence in relation to acitretin ingestion has not been reported on pubmed database. Here we present a case where significant temporal association of acitretin intake with PTC was found in a child who was being treated with this medication for recalcitrant pustular psoriasis. The case is reported for its rarity in occurrence and associated significant morbidity including visual loss if not diagnosed and treated immediately. According to Naranjo ADR Causality scale of adverse drug reaction, the association of PTC due to acitretin in our case was probable. PMID:23543097

  2. A negative cranial computed tomographic scan is not adequate to support a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Said, Rana R; Rosman, N Paul

    2004-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with daily headache for 1 month and intermittent diplopia for 1 week was found to have a unilateral partial abducens palsy and bilateral papilledema; otherwise, his neurologic examination showed no abnormalities. A cranial computed tomographic (CT) scan was normal. Lumbar puncture disclosed a markedly elevated opening pressure of > 550 mm of cerebrospinal fluid with normal cerebrospinal fluid. Medical therapy with acetazolamide for presumed pseudotumor cerebri was begun. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, done several days later because of continuing symptoms, unexpectedly showed multiple hyperintensities of cerebral white matter on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Despite high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone for possible demyelinating disease, he failed to improve. A left temporal brain biopsy followed and disclosed an anaplastic oligodendroglioma. In a patient with features indicating pseudotumor cerebri, a negative cranial CT scan is not adequate to rule out underlying pathology; thus, MRI of the brain should probably always be performed. A revised definition of pseudotumor cerebri could better include "normal MRI of the brain" rather than "normal neuroimaging." PMID:15605471

  3. Reversible coma and Duret hemorrhage after intracranial hypotension from remote lumbar spine surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert H; Bales, James W; Morton, Ryan P; Levitt, Michael R; Zhang, Fangyi

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition caused by spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leaks that alter normal CSF dynamics. Symptoms range from mild headaches to transtentorial herniation, coma, and death. Duret hemorrhages have been reported to occur in some patients with this condition and are traditionally believed to be associated with a poor neurological outcome. A 73-year-old man with a remote history of spinal fusion presented with syncope and was found to have small subdural hematomas on head CT studies. He was managed nonoperatively and discharged with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, only to return 3 days later with obtundation, fixed downward gaze, anisocoria, and absent cranial nerve reflexes. A CT scan showed Duret hemorrhages and subtle enlargement of the subdural hematomas, though the hematomas remained too small to account for his poor clinical condition. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a large lumbar pseudomeningocele in the area of prior fusion. His condition dramatically improved when he was placed in the Trendelenburg position and underwent repair of the pseudomeningocele. He was kept flat for 7 days and was ultimately discharged in good condition. On long-term follow-up, his only identifiable deficit was diplopia due to an internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition that can cause profound morbidity, including tonsillar herniation and brainstem hemorrhage. With proper identification and treatment of the CSF leak, patients can make functional recoveries. PMID:26588496

  4. Unilateral Eyelid Edema as Initial Sign of Orbital Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Petrarolha, Sílvia Miguéis Picado; Rodrigues, Bruna Suda; Filho, Flávio David Haddad; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Petrarolha, Samuel Brunini; Morais, Pedro Martins Tavares Scianni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcoidosis is a rare multisystemic granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting the respiratory system, skin, and eyes. Sarcoidosis outside the lacrimal gland is rare. The case study concerns a patient with a final diagnosis of orbital sarcoidosis. Case Report. A 37-year-old male patient went to the ophthalmic emergency room complaining of pain in the left eye, diplopia, and decreased visual acuity. An external eye examination showed hard and cold edema of the lower eyelid, ocular motility with limitation of adduction, and discreet ipsilateral proptosis. Magnetic resonance of the orbit showed left eye proptosis and thickening and increase of soft tissues associated with heterogeneous impregnation of contrast in the infralateral region of the left eyelid. A biopsy of the lesion showed a chronic inflammatory process, with numerous compact nonnecrotizing granulomas surrounded by lamellar hyaline collagen, providing histological confirmation of sarcoidosis. Discussion. A biopsy of the orbital tumor is essential for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, in addition to the search for systemic findings such as hilar adenopathy or parenchymal lung disease found in 90% of patients. PMID:27298746

  5. Presumed Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome After Withdrawal of Inhaled Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Joon; Allen, Julian L; Liu, Grant T; McCormack, Shana E

    2016-06-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure with normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid constituents. PTCS after withdrawal of systemic corticosteroids also has been described in children. In contrast, to our knowledge, PTCS after withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids has not previously been described. Here we report the case of an 8-year and 6-month-old girl who developed signs and symptoms consistent with PTCS after withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids. The patient had excellent adherence to inhaled glucocorticoid therapy for ∼1 year before presentation, after which the therapy was stopped for concern related to poor growth. The withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids was associated with the development of severe headaches and diplopia, and further clinical examination led to the patient's diagnosis of likely PTCS. Although its occurrence is likely rare, clinicians caring for the many children receiving inhaled glucocorticoid therapy should be aware of the potential for PTCS after abrupt withdrawal of such treatment, and consider ophthalmology evaluation if patients report suggestive symptoms, such as headaches or vision changes in this context. PMID:27244842

  6. Pseudotumour cerebri in acute promyelocytic leukemia on treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) - an experience from a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Tali, Manzoor; Bashir, Yasir; Bhat, Shuaeb; Manzoor, Fahim; Bashir, Nusrat; Geelani, Sajad; Rasool, Javid; Waheed Mir, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APML) is considered to be sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) which acts as a differentiating agent. ATRA is considered to be a well-tolerated agent and is known to achieve complete remission in acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, a few cases on long term all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) use can develop pseudotumor cerebri. Out of 32 patients with APML who were treated in our Centre over a 4-year-period, we encountered 6 patients who developed ATRA-related pseudotumor cerebri while on maintenance treatment. The patients ranged from 12 to 40 years of age. 3 patients complained of unbearable headache, 2 of diplopia and 1 of gross reduction in visual acuity. CT scans and MRI did not reveal any intracranial lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination was normal with CSF manometry revealing a high CSF pressure (average of 345mmH2O). Fundoscopy revealed papilledema in 5 patients and optic atrophy in 1 patient. The patients were successfully managed with decrease dose/discontinuation of ATRA, use of acetazolamide, corticosteroids and therapeutic CSF drainage. PMID:26277671

  7. Spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Rossana; Pollock, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Watch, wait, and rescan” (WWR) has an established place as a successful management option for a significant proportion of vestibular schwannomas (VS) as an alternative to microsurgical removal or stereotactic radiotherapy. VS may grow slowly and continuously, followed by stagnation or even shrinkage. We present two case reports of spontaneous shrinkage of VS along with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 29-year-old female presented with a progressive history of visual blurring and intermittent diplopia over 2 months. A 29 mm of maximum intracranial diameter (ICD) VS with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The patient underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt with resolution of her symptoms and opted for initial WWR management. Interval scanning between 2007 and 2014 showed progressive reduction in the maximum ICD together with reduction in the degree of central tumor enhancement. Maximum ICD at most recent follow up was 22 mm. A 28-year-old female was referred with right sensorineural deafness. A right VS of maximum ICD of 27 mm was diagnosed. Initial WWR management was planned after discussion. Serial imaging showed an initial increase in the size of the tumor followed by progressive reduction in size. The most recent follow up showed a maximum ICD of 20 mm. Conclusion: Early WWR management can be associated with spontaneous shrinkage of VS over time. Prospective clinical study of larger numbers of such cases using the UK VS database may help to identify predictive factors for the spontaneous regression of VS. PMID:27280055

  8. Myasthenia gravis with muscle specific kinase antibodies mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Niks, Erik H; Klooster, Rinse; de Visser, Marianne; Kuks, Jan B; Veldink, Jan H; Klarenbeek, Pim; Van Damme, Philip; de Baets, Marc H; van der Maarel, Silvère M; van den Berg, Leonard H; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2016-06-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG) is hallmarked by the predominant involvement of bulbar muscles and muscle atrophy. This might mimic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presenting with bulbar weakness. We encountered four cases of MuSK MG patients with an initial misdiagnosis of ALS. We analyzed the clinical data of the four misdiagnosed MuSK MG patients, and investigated the presence of MuSK autoantibodies in a group of 256 Dutch bulbar-onset ALS patients using a recombinant MuSK ELISA and a standard MuSK radioimmunorecipitation assay. Clues for changing the diagnosis were slow progression, clinical improvement, development of diplopia and absence of signs of upper motor neuron involvement. No cases of MuSK MG were identified among a group of 256 bulbar ALS patients diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria. A misdiagnosis of ALS in patients with MuSK MG is rare. We recommend to carefully consider the diagnosis of MuSK MG in patients presenting with bulbar weakness without clear signs of upper motor neuron dysfunction. PMID:27133662

  9. Microsurgical endonasal decompression in dysthyroid orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    May, A; Fries, U; Reimold, I; Weber, A

    1999-01-01

    Diagnosis of thyroid eye disease can be established by its history, signs, symptoms, clinical and laboratory findings of an autoimmune thyroid disease. Therapy for this disease is limited to a few options, which should be administered depending on its stage and inflammatory activity. When medication and radiation therapy fail indications for decompression are: loss of visual acuity or visual field defects, increasing strabism and severe keratopathy due to eyelid retraction. Numerous surgical decompression techniques have been described in endocrine orbitopathy. We have adopted endonasal microsurgery, because this technique gives the freedom to work bimanually, ensures a stereomicoscopic view of the intranasal landmarks of orbital walls and allows simultaneous decompression of the medial and inferior orbital wall as well as a good relief of pressure at the orbital apex. Decompressions were performed on 27 orbits in 17 patients, via the endonasal microsurgical, 3 via external approach. The microscopic approach was entirely comparable with regard to reduction of proptosis with a mean improvement of 4.1 mm against a mean of 4.7 mm by external approach and a mean 0.2 of better visual acuity in both procedures. The microsurgical technique is considered superior to an external approach avoiding external scars, neural pains and reportedly less diplopia. Also, trauma to the nalolacrimal and nasofrontal ducts are avoided. The healing phase and the hospitalization time is shorter. PMID:10687942

  10. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of strabismus. A review of its use and effects.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Lionel; Wong, Elaine; Yahalom, Claudia

    2007-12-15

    Botulinum Toxin as a medical therapy was introduced by Dr Alan Scott more than 20 years ago. The first clinical applications of Botulinum Toxin type A (BT-A) were for the treatment of strabismus and for periocular spasms. Botulinum Toxin type A is often effective in small to moderate angle convergent strabismus (esotropia) of any cause, and may be an alternative to surgery in these cases. Botulinum Toxin type A may have a role in acute or chronic fourth and sixth nerve palsy, childhood strabismus and thyroid eye disease. The use of BT-A for strabismus varies enormously in different cities and countries for no apparent reason. Botulinum Toxin type A may be particularly useful in situations where strabismus surgery is undesirable. This may be in elderly patients unfit for general anaesthesia, when the clinical condition is evolving or unstable, or if surgery has not been successful. Botulinum Toxin type A can give temporary symptomatic relief in many instances of bothersome diplopia irrespective of the cause. Ptosis and acquired vertical deviations are the commonest complications encountered. Vision-threatening complications are rare. Repeated use of BT-A is safe. PMID:18033607

  11. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care.A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C.In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  12. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases. PMID:26934901

  13. Reduction of Zygomatic Fractures Using the Carroll-Girard T-bar Screw

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Eun; Chung, Chan Min

    2012-01-01

    Zygomatic fractures are the second most common facial bone fractures encountered and treated by plastic surgeons. Stable fixation of fractured fragments after adequate exposure is critical for ensuring three-dimensional anatomic reduction. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 17 patients with zygomatic fractures were admitted to our hospital; there were 15 male and 2 female patients. The average age of the patients was 41 years (range, 19 to 75 years). We exposed the inferior orbital rim and zygomatic complex through a lateral brow, intraoral, and subciliary incisions, which allowed for visualization of the bone, and then the fractured parts were corrected using the Carroll-Girard T-bar screw. Postoperative complications such as malar asymmetry, diplopia, enophthalmos, and postoperative infection were not observed. Lower eyelid retraction and temporary ectropion occurred in 1 of the 17 patients. Functional and cosmetic results were excellent in nearly all of the cases. In this report, we describe using the Carroll-Girard T-bar screw for the reduction of zygomatic fractures. Because this instrument is easy to use and can rotate to any direction and vector, it can be used to correct displaced zygomatic bone more accurately and safely than other devices, without leaving facial scars. PMID:23094255

  14. Optic Neuritis as Isolated Manifestation of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: A Case Report and Systematic Review of Ocular Manifestations of Neoplastic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Basilico, Paola; Trezzi, Ilaria; Borellini, Linda; Franco, Giulia; Civelli, Vittorio; Bresolin, Nereo; Baron, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in about 5% of cancer patients. Ocular involvement is a common clinical manifestation and often the presenting clinical feature. Materials and Methods. We report the case of a 52-year old lady with optic neuritis as isolated manifestation of neoplastic meningitis and a review of ocular involvement in neoplastic meningitis. Ocular symptoms were the presenting clinical feature in 34 patients (83%) out of 41 included in our review, the unique manifestation of meningeal carcinomatosis in 3 patients (7%). Visual loss was the presenting clinical manifestation in 17 patients (50%) and was the most common ocular symptom (70%). Other ocular signs were diplopia, ptosis, papilledema, anisocoria, exophthalmos, orbital pain, scotomas, hemianopsia, and nystagmus. Associated clinical symptoms were headache, altered consciousness, meningism, limb weakness, ataxia, dizziness, seizures, and other cranial nerves involvement. All patients except five underwent CSF examination which was normal in 1 patient, pleocytosis was found in 11 patients, increased protein levels were observed in 16 patients, and decreased glucose levels were found in 8 patients. Cytology was positive in 29 patients (76%). Conclusion. Meningeal carcinomatosis should be considered in patients with ocular symptoms even in the absence of other suggestive clinical symptoms. PMID:24223306

  15. Optic neuritis as isolated manifestation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: a case report and systematic review of ocular manifestations of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lanfranconi, Silvia; Basilico, Paola; Trezzi, Ilaria; Borellini, Linda; Franco, Giulia; Civelli, Vittorio; Pallotti, Francesco; Bresolin, Nereo; Baron, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in about 5% of cancer patients. Ocular involvement is a common clinical manifestation and often the presenting clinical feature. Materials and Methods. We report the case of a 52-year old lady with optic neuritis as isolated manifestation of neoplastic meningitis and a review of ocular involvement in neoplastic meningitis. Ocular symptoms were the presenting clinical feature in 34 patients (83%) out of 41 included in our review, the unique manifestation of meningeal carcinomatosis in 3 patients (7%). Visual loss was the presenting clinical manifestation in 17 patients (50%) and was the most common ocular symptom (70%). Other ocular signs were diplopia, ptosis, papilledema, anisocoria, exophthalmos, orbital pain, scotomas, hemianopsia, and nystagmus. Associated clinical symptoms were headache, altered consciousness, meningism, limb weakness, ataxia, dizziness, seizures, and other cranial nerves involvement. All patients except five underwent CSF examination which was normal in 1 patient, pleocytosis was found in 11 patients, increased protein levels were observed in 16 patients, and decreased glucose levels were found in 8 patients. Cytology was positive in 29 patients (76%). Conclusion. Meningeal carcinomatosis should be considered in patients with ocular symptoms even in the absence of other suggestive clinical symptoms. PMID:24223306

  16. A Case of Fisher-Bickerstaff Syndrome Overlapped by Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Daiki; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahasi, Yosiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Abe, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old woman with overlapping Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE). She developed diplopia and unsteady gait a week after an upper respiratory infection on day 1. She had weakness of both upper limbs on day 3 and became drowsy, and her respiratory status worsened on day 5. Neurologic examination revealed ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, symmetrical weakness, areflexia, and consciousness disturbance. We diagnosed her with MFS on day 1, GBS on day 3 and overlapping BBE on day 5. She underwent immunoadsorption therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Ten months after onset, her symptoms had fully recovered. Anti-GM1 IgG, GD1a IgG, GQ1b IgG, and GT1a IgG antibodies were positive. Our case supports the notion that MFS, GBS, and BBE are all part of a continuous clinical spectrum, which is an antibody-mediated process. PMID:23275783

  17. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A injection in patients requiring temporary tarsorrhaphy to improve corneal epithelial defects

    PubMed Central

    Kasaee, Abolfazl; Musavi, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hashemian, Mohammad Nasser; Mohebbi, Shahrzad; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Taher Rajabi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (Dysport, (Ipsen Biopharm Ltd, Wrexham, UK)) injection in patients requiring temporary tarsorrhaphy to improve corneal epithelial defects. METHODS Thirty patients were enrolled into the prospective study between March 2007 and September 2009. Doses of 15 and 30U of Dysport were injected into the levator palpebrae superioris muscle through the eyelid. The patients were followed daily until completion of ptosis and then 1-2 weekly until complete resolution of levator function and improvement of corneal condition. RESULTS Ptosis took 2.64±1.85 days to be completed (range 1-9 days) and lasted for 12±2.19 weeks. For patients with seventh nerve palsy, 30U Dysport was appropriate to produce sufficient ptosis whereas in other patients 15U of toxin was sufficient. In 83.3% of patients ptosis was sufficient for complete recovery of corneal epithelium and 16.7% required a second procedure (Amniotic membrane transplantation, conjunctival flap). There was a direct correlation between age and duration of ptosis. In patients with seventh nerve palsy, the amount of resultant ptosis was significantly lower than that of other patients. The only adverse effects of injection were superior rectus underaction (33.3%) and diplopia (16.7%) which resolved in all patients without any intervention. CONCLUSION Dysport injection is a safe and effective substitute for surgical tasorrhaphy with fewer complications. PMID:22553562

  18. A Clinical Study of Miliary Brain Tuberculomas in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Yao, Yan; Tan, Qing-Che; Gao, Ting; Tian, Cheng-Lin; Huang, Xusheng; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-05-20

    Brain tuberculomas can exhibit many different clinical and radiological patterns. However, disseminated or miliary brain tuberculomas are very rare. Miliary brain tuberculomas have specific clinical prognostic implications. Seven patients diagnosed with miliary brain tuberculomas between December 2004 and August 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. Their clinical features, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were reviewed. The median patient age was 42 years (range, 22-66 years). Six patients presented with fever, 5 with headache, 4 with papilledema, and 3 with diplopia. MRI studies revealed multiple brain lesions. MRI showed 20-50 lesions at the same level. These lesions measured approximately 2-4 mm in diameter and exhibited ring or nodular enhancement after gadolinium injection. All patients began to recover within 2 weeks of initiating antitubercular therapy (ATT). The number of lesions visible on MRI scans was halved within a month, and all lesions had healed without sequelae after 18 months of regular ATT. Miliary brain tuberculoma is a rare form of central nervous system tuberculosis. Some special characteristics of miliary brain tuberculomas are as follows: First, the presence of mild atypical clinical manifestations and almost normal laboratory findings; second, severe radiological features and 20-50 lesions at the same level on MRI scans; and third, a good response to standard ATT. Finally, they are benign; for instance, no patients died in our study. Early diagnosis and treatment can result in full recovery. PMID:26255731

  19. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  20. Endoscopic transnasal approach for orbital tumors: A report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuhiro; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Yokoyama, Takaakira; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopic transnasal approach is an excellent technique for resecting orbital tumors located inferiorly and/or medially to the optic nerve. The aim of this study was to present four cases of orbital tumor which were, at least in part, resected by an endoscopic transnasal approach and to discuss both indications and limitations of this approach through a comparison of the location and tumor status, including the pathology, of these cases. In two cases with orbital tumor located in a medial-inferior quadrant, we were able to resect it only by an endoscopic transnasal approach. Because we experienced transient diplopia and dyschromatopsia after resecting intraconal tumors, a careful choice for the best approach is suggested in view of the location, size and properties of the tumor. In the third case, with tumor located in an inferior-lateral quadrant, it was eventually resected using a frontal-zygomatic approach because the medial and inferior borders of the tumor could not be identified and the lateral border was beyond the limits of manipulation by an endoscopic transnasal approach. In the last case with possible malignant tumor adhered to the lateral vital, the tumor was resected using a transantral approach. Based on these experiences, we introduce the indications for an endoscopic transnasal resection of orbital tumors. PMID:26642943

  1. Griscelli syndrome types 1 and 3: analysis of four new cases and long-term evaluation of previously diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Cağdaş, Deniz; Ozgür, Tuba Turul; Asal, Gülten Türkkanı; Tezcan, Ilhan; Metin, Ayşe; Lambert, Nathalie; de Saint Basile, Geneiveve; Sanal, Ozden

    2012-10-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by partial albinism. Three different types are caused by defects in three different genes. Patients with GS type 1 have primary central nervous system dysfunction, type 2 patients commonly develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and type 3 patients have only partial albinism. While hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is life saving in type 2, no specific therapy is required for types 1 and 3. Patients with GS types 1 and 3 are very rare. To date, only 2 patients with type 3 and about 20 GS type 1 patients, including the patients described as Elejalde syndrome, have been reported. The neurological deficits in Elejalde syndrome were reported as severe neurodevelopmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, and ophthalmological problems including nystagmus, diplopia, and retinal problems. However, none of these patients' clinical progresses were reported. We described here our two new type 1 and two type 3 patients along with the progresses of our previously diagnosed patients with GS types 1 and 3. Our previous patient with GS type I is alive at age 21 without any other problems except severe mental and motor retardation, patients with type 3 are healthy at ages 21 and 24 years having only pigmentary dilution; silvery gray hair, eye brows, and eyelashes. Since prognosis, treatment options, and genetic counseling markedly differ among different types, molecular characterization has utmost importance in GS. PMID:22711375

  2. Intrasphenoidal rathke cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Megdiche-Bazarbacha, H; Ben Hammouda, K; Aicha, A B; Sebai, R; Belghith, L; Khaldi, M; Touibi, S

    2006-05-01

    Symptomatic Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) are reported in the sellar and suprasellar regions, but no case of sphenoidal RCC has been reported. We report a case of sphenoidal RCC in a 41-year-old man. The lesion was revealed by headaches and diplopia. Symptoms disappeared transiently after a spontaneous rhinorrhea but relapsed 4 months later. MR imaging showed a cystic sphenoidal lesion, isointense on T1-weighted images (WI) with peripheral gadolinium enhancement and hyperintense on T2 WI. The patient underwent surgery through a transrhinoseptal approach. The wall of the sphenoid sinus was paper-thin. The cyst contained a motor-oil-like fluid and communicated widely with the nasal fossa. Its wall was partially extracted. Symptoms and signs ceased after surgery. MR imaging performed 1 year later showed the disappearance of the sphenoidal cyst. Embryological origin of RCCs is discussed. The hypothesis of a continuum between the different epithelial cystic lesions of the sellar and parasellar region is discussed. Imaging has an important impact on the diagnosis; nevertheless, the specific characterization remains difficult. PMID:16687551

  3. Transvenous approach for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula following Pipeline embolization of cavernous carotid aneurysm: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Mei; Colby, Geoffrey P; Jiang, Bowen; Pero, Guglielmo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Coon, Alexander L

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters are increasingly used for the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. A rare complication from flow diversion is delayed aneurysm rupture, which can lead to carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) in the setting of cavernous carotid aneurysms (CCAs). Direct CCFs pose unique management challenges, given the lack of transarterial access to the fistula. We present two cases of direct CCFs following treatment of CCAs with the Pipeline embolization device (PED). Case 1 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 10 mm wide-necked left CCA. Six weeks after PED treatment the patient developed diplopia secondary to direct CCF. Case 2 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 17 mm left CCA treated with PED. One-month follow-up angiography demonstrated a direct CCF. Both patients underwent successful coil embolization of the CCF through a transvenous approach. Direct CCF formation following PED deployment for CCA is a rare complication. Parent vessel sacrifice may be avoided with transvenous occlusion of the fistula. PMID:25073525

  4. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-01-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  5. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  6. Cranialization of the Frontal Sinus for Secondary Mucocele Prevention following Open Surgery for Benign Frontal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Gilad; Amit, Moran; Ben-Ari, Oded; Gil, Ziv; Abergel, Abraham; Margalit, Nevo; Cavel, Oren; Wasserzug, Oshri; Fliss, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare frontal sinus cranialization to obliteration for future prevention of secondary mucocele formation following open surgery for benign lesions of the frontal sinus. Study Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Patients Sixty-nine patients operated for benign frontal sinus pathology between 1994 and 2011. Interventions Open excision of benign frontal sinus pathology followed by either frontal obliteration (n = 41, 59%) or frontal cranialization (n = 28, 41%). Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of post-surgical complications and secondary mucocele formation were compiled. Results Pathologies included osteoma (n = 34, 49%), mucocele (n = 27, 39%), fibrous dysplasia (n = 6, 9%), and encephalocele (n = 2, 3%). Complications included skin infections (n = 6), postoperative cutaneous fistula (n = 1), telecanthus (n = 4), diplopia (n = 3), nasal deformity (n = 2) and epiphora (n = 1). None of the patients suffered from postoperative CSF leak, meningitis or pneumocephalus. Six patients, all of whom had previously undergone frontal sinus obliteration, required revision surgery due to secondary mucocele formation. Statistical analysis using non-inferiority test reveal that cranialization of the frontal sinus is non-inferior to obliteration for preventing secondary mucocele formation (P<0.0001). Conclusion Cranialization of the frontal sinus appears to be a good option for prevention of secondary mucocele development after open excision of benign frontal sinus lesions. PMID:24376760

  7. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD. PMID:16318371

  8. Low-grade oligodendroglioma of the pineal gland: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gliomas are a very rare subtype of pineal region tumours, whereas oligodendrogliomas of the pineal region are exceedingly rare, since there have been only 3 cases of anaplastic oligodedrogliomas reported this far. Methods-Results We present a case of a low-grade oligodendroglioma arising in the pineal gland of a 37 year-old woman. The patient presented with diplopia associated with a cystic pineal region mass demonstrated on MRI. Total resection was performed and histological examination showed that the cystic wall consisted of tumour cells with a central nucleus a perinuclear halo and minimal pleomorphism. Immnunohistochemical analysis showed that these cells were diffusely positive for CD57, and negative for GFAP, CD10, CD99, cytokeratins, neurofilaments and synaptophysin. FISH analysis was performed in a small number of neoplastic cells, which were not exhausted after immunohistochemistry and did not reveal deletion of 1p and 19q chromosome arms. However, the diagnosis of a low grade oligodendroglioma of the pineal gland was assigned. Conclusion Although the spectrum of tumours arising in the pineal gland is broad, the reports of oligodendrogliomas confined to this location are exceedingly rare, and to the best of our knowledge there is no report of a low-grade oligodendroglioma. However, they should be added in the long list of tumours arising in the pineal gland. PMID:20849631

  9. Malignant prolactinoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kars, Marleen; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Romijn, Johannes A; Pereira, Alberto M

    2006-10-01

    Pituitary carcinomas are extremely rare. In general, the initial clinical, biochemical, and histological characteristics are of minimal utility in distinguishing benign adenomas from pituitary carcinomas. We describe a 63-year-old woman with a macroprolactinoma, who presented with diplopia and blurred vision. This unusual initial presentation and the subsequent aggressive clinical course, with diffuse local and distant intramedullary metastases, prompted us in retrospect to make a detailed analysis of the therapeutic interventions and histology. In addition, we reviewed all available literature on published cases of malignant prolactinoma and detailed their epidemiological, clinical, and histopathological characteristics. In brief, it is postulated that pituitary carcinomas arise from the transformation of initially large, but benign, adenomas. Unusual and/or atypical clinical manifestations appear to occur more frequently. In vivo, the development of dopamine agonist resistance in invasive macroprolactinoma is indicative of malignancy and should prompt the clinician to perform a biopsy of the tumor. For pituitary tumors that exhibit high mitotic activity, increased Ki-67 and/or p53 immunoreactivity, it may be useful to denote these tumors as 'atypical' prolactinomas to raise the possibility of future malignant development. PMID:16990651

  10. Temporal Artery Calciphylaxis Presenting as Temporal Arteritis in a Case of Rhinoorbitocerebral Mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mijung; Kim, H Jane; Basham, Ryan; Yoon, Michael K; Vagefi, Reza; Kersten, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare often fatal opportunistic fungal infection. It is typically described in patients with diabetes in ketoacidotic status and is rare in renal transplant recipients. Calciphylaxis is a rare and highly morbid disease of vascular calcification affecting patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The first case of a renal transplant recipient who was inflicted with both rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis and calciphylaxis is reported. A 45-year-old man presented with 2-day history of left upper blepharoptosis, periorbital pain, left-sided headache, binocular diplopia, and left V2 numbness. He had undergone renal transplant for ESRD 7 months earlier with resultant immunosuppressive therapy. MRI and nasal biopsy confirmed rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis. Immunosuppressive therapy was stopped and antifungal therapy begun. He had orbital exenteration for progressive rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis. Two months later, the patient reported new-onset intermittent bitemporal headache and bilateral swollen, tender temporal arteries. Temporal artery biopsy revealed features consistent with calciphylaxis. Clinical presentation, treatment course, and follow up are discussed. PMID:24853118

  11. Thymectomy for myasthenia gravis: outcome of treatment in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Torres, M I; Danguilan, J L

    1998-08-01

    The clinical records of 24 of the 31 patients who underwent thymectomy for myasthenia gravis from January 1991 to December 1995 were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 36.5 years, with a male : female ratio of 1 : 5. The average duration of symptoms prior to consultation was 16.6 months. Most of the patients presented diplopia with clinical stage IIA prior to surgery. The most common procedure utilized was thymectomy via a median sternotomy under general anesthesia-epidural anesthesia. Five of the 24 patients (21%) were immediately extubated postoperatively while 19 remained intubated, with 12 patients attached to a ventilator. Extubation ranged from the first postoperative day up to more than two weeks postoperatively. The average length of ICU stay was 8.1 days and the average length of hospital stay was 31.1 days. The most common morbidity was pneumonia (38%). One patient had a brief reactive psychosis and another patient had phrenic nerve injury which manifested 2 weeks postoperatively. The average length of follow-up was 14.8 months and the mean follow-up period was 24.5 months. There was a general trend of decrease in the dose of medication. However, there was an increase in the medication in 3 patients with 2 showing clinical improvement. PMID:9738120

  12. Orbital apex syndrome and meningoencephalitis: a rare complication of herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zheman; Lu, Zuneng; Pan, Songqing; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Zhongchun

    2015-01-01

    Orbital apex syndrome is a rare manifestation of Herpes Zoster (HZ). HZ Mmeningoencephalitis are also rare in immunocompetent persons. We report a rare case that was considered to be HZ meningoencephalitis with orbital apex syndrome in an immunocompetent female. The patient initially manifested with HZ skin lesions and lose of her left sight, diplopia, ptosis, followed by headache, neck pain, and fever, dizziness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed elevation of lymphocytes and protein. A MRI abnormality was remarkable for the presence of a left cerebellum, occipital lobe as well as dura lesion. Head computed tomography and Magnetic resonance venography was normal. Corticosteroid therapy and antiviral therapy was effective to decrease the headache and skin pain. Symptoms were markedly improved after corticosteroid therapy. Three months later, we called the patient to follow up. Her meningoencephalitis symptom recovered. Her follow up brain MRI was normal. But left blindness and external ophthalmoplegia was persistent. This case suggested HZ could affect central nervous system and peripheral nervous system at the same time. PMID:26550408

  13. The Transconjunctival Transorbital Approach: A Keyhole Approach to the Midline Anterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shaan M.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lim, Michael; Owusu Boahene, Kofi D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report an initial experience with a medial transorbital approach to the midline skull base performed via a transconjunctival incision. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed their clinical experience with this approach in the management of benign cranial base pathology. Preoperative imaging, intraoperative records, hospitalization charts, and postoperative records were reviewed for relevant data. RESULTS During the period 2009–2011, six patients underwent a transconjunctival craniotomy performed by a neurosurgeon and otolaryngologist–head and neck surgeon working together. The indications for surgery were esthesioneuroblastoma in one patient, juvenile angiofibroma in one patient, Paget disease in one patient, and recalcitrant cerebrospinal fluid leaks in three patients. Three patients had prior cranial base surgery (either open craniotomy or an endonasal approach) done at another institution. The mean length of stay was 3.8 days; mean follow-up was 6 months. Surgery was considered successful in all cases (negative margins or no leak recurrence); diplopia was noted in one patient postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS The transconjunctival medial orbital craniectomy provides a minimally invasive keyhole approach to lesions located anteriorly along the anterior cranial fossa that are in the midline with lateral extension over the orbital roof. Based on our initial experience with this technique, the working space afforded limits complex surgical dissection; this approach is primarily well suited for less extensive pathology. PMID:22722037

  14. Barotraumatic orbital emphysema of rhinogenic origin in a breath-hold diver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, A; Delehaye, E; Cau, M; Cosso, L

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a well-recognized complication of fractures involving the orbit. Commonly, it occurs when high pressure develops in nasal cavity as during nose blowing, coughing or Valsalva's maneuver and usually occurs in the subcutaneous tissues. We report the case of a young breath-hold diver who developed spontaneous, non compressive orbital emphysema during underwater fishing, with a maximal depth of 25-30 meters in the Sardinian sea. He was otherwise healthy, without previous cranio-facial trauma and nasosinusal diseases or surgery were not present in the history. When he was referred to our attention the patient presented right eyelid ptosis but diplopia and vision impairment were absent. Computer tomography scans showed subcutaneous air in the right upper eyelid and around the eyeball, particularly near the orbit's roof but optic nerve area, intraconal, was free of air. A dehiscence in lamina papyracea was evident. In our opinion, this has been the point of air entry into the orbit. A supportive therapy was advised and two weeks later the emphysema was recovered completely and the subject was symptoms free. The literature has been revised and to our knowledge no previous cases of barotraumatic orbital emphysema, in a breath-hold diver, are referred. PMID:18619111

  15. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yepishin, Ilya V; Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  16. Biocular image misalignment tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalich, Melvyn E.; Rash, Clarence E.; van de Pol, Corina; Rowe, Terri L.; Lont, Lisa M.; Peterson, R. David

    2003-09-01

    Biocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) design flexibility and cost are directly related to image misalignment tolerance standards. Currently recommended tolerance levels are based on highly variable data from a number of studies. This paper presents progress of an ongoing study to evaluate optometric measures sensitive to misalignment in partial-overlap biocular optical systems like that proposed for the Comanche RAH-66 helicopter helmet integrated display sighting system (HIDSS). Horizontal divergent and relative vertical misalignments (offsets) of see-through biocular symbology viewed against a simulated daytime background were chosen for this study. Misalignments within and just beyond current tolerance recommendations were evaluated using pre, pre and post, and during measures of visual performance. Data were obtained from seven experimental and four control subjects. The diplopia responses from experimental and control subjects were essentially the same. However, accommodative facility showed a rate decrement following exposure to both types of misalignment. Horizontal heterophorias showed definite post-misalignment increases. Subject responses to questionnaires universally indicated increased adaptation to (ease with) visual tasks over the testing period.

  17. Materials used for reconstruction after orbital floor fracture.

    PubMed

    Avashia, Yash J; Sastry, Ananth; Fan, Kenneth L; Mir, Haaris S; Thaller, Seth R

    2012-11-01

    Advances in biotechnology continue to introduce new materials for reconstruction of orbital floor fractures. Which material is best fit for orbital floor reconstruction has been a controversial topic. Individual surgeon preferences have been supported by inconsistent inconclusive data. The purpose of this study was to assess and analyze published evidence supporting various materials used for orbital floor reconstruction and to develop a decision-making algorithm for clinical application. A systematic literature review was performed from which 48 studies were selected after primary and secondary screening based on set inclusion and exclusion criteria. This cumulatively included 3475 separate orbital floor reconstructions. Results revealed risk and benefit profiles for all materials. Autologous calvarial bone grafts, porous polyethylene, and polydioxanone (PDS) were most widely used for orbital floor reconstruction. Increased infection rates were reported with polyglactin 910/PDS composites and silastic rubber. Ocular motility was reduced most with lyophilized dura and PDS. Preoperative and postoperative rates for diplopia and enophthalmos varied among the materials. In conclusion, our results revealed continued inadequate evidence to exclusively support the use of any one biomaterial/implant for orbital floor reconstruction. Results have served to create a decision-making algorithm for clinical application. Our authors propose certain parameters for future studies seeking to demonstrate a comparison between 2 or more materials for orbital floor reconstruction. PMID:23154365

  18. Combined Orbital Fractures: Surgical Strategy of Sequential Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Su Won; Kim, Sung Eun; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of combined orbital floor and medial wall fractures with a comminuted inferomedial strut (IMS) is challenging and requires careful practice. We present our surgical strategy and postoperative outcomes. Methods We divided 74 patients who underwent the reconstruction of the orbital floor and medial wall concomitantly into a comminuted IMS group (41 patients) and non-comminuted IMS group (33 patients). In the comminuted IMS group, we first reconstructed the floor stably and then the medial wall by using separate implant pieces. In the non-comminuted IMS group, we reconstructed the floor and the medial wall with a single large implant. Results In the follow-up of 6 to 65 months, most patients with diplopia improved in the first-week except one, who eventually improved at 1 year. All patients with an EOM limitation improved during the first month of follow-up. Enophthalmos (displacement, 2 mm) was observed in two patients. The orbit volume measured on the CT scans was statistically significantly restored in both groups. No complications related to the surgery were observed. Conclusions We recommend the reconstruction of orbit walls in the comminuted IMS group by using the following surgical strategy: usage of multiple pieces of rigid implants instead of one large implant, sequential repair first of the floor and then of the medial wall, and a focus on the reconstruction of key areas. Our strategy of step-by-step reconstruction has the benefits of easy repair, less surgical trauma, and minimal stress to the surgeon. PMID:26217562

  19. Case report. Mycotic arteritis due to Aspergillus fumigatus in a diabetic with retrobulbar aspergillosis and mycotic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Kellermann, S; Horn, L C; Keiner, S; Bootz, F; Schneider, S; Haustein, U F

    2001-11-01

    A 74-year-old man with diabetes mellitus type II, retinopathy and polyneuropathy suffered from exophthalmus, ptosis and diplopia. Magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography showed a space-occupying process in the right orbital apex. An extranasal ethmoidectomy accompanied by an orbitotomia revealed the presence of septated hyphae. Aspergillus fumigatus was grown from the tissue. After surgical removal of the fungal masses, therapy with amphotericin B (1 mg kg(-1) body weight) plus itraconazole (Sempera, 200 mg per day) over 6 weeks was initiated. Five months later the patient's condition deteriorated again, with vomiting, nausea and pain behind the right eye plus increasing exophthalmus. Antifungal therapy was started again with amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine. Neutropenia did not occur. The patient became somnolent and deteriorated, a meningitis was suggested. Aspergillus antigen (titre 1:2, Pastorex) was detected in liquor. Anti-Aspergillus antibodies were not detectable. Both the right eye and retrobulbar fungal masses were eradicated by means of an exenteratio bulbi et orbitae. However, renal insufficiency and an apallic syndrome developed and the patient died. At autopsy, a mycotic aneurysm of the arteria carotis interna dextra was detected. The mycotic vasculitis of this aneurysm had caused a rupture of the blood vessel followed by a massive subarachnoidal haemorrhage. In addition, severe mycotic sphenoidal sinusitis and aspergillosis of the right orbit were seen, which had led to a bifrontal meningitis. PMID:11766108

  20. [A case of CNS aspergillosis developing orbital apex syndrome and causing mycotic aneurysm and the subsequent cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Ueki, Yoshino; Kazuta, Toshinari; Naitou, Eri; Hayashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kozue; Mizutani, Toshio; Hirai, Shunsaku

    2002-08-01

    A 79-year-old woman, with no immune deficit, had presented progressive visual disturbance, diplopia and ptosis of her left eye over 2 weeks. T1-weighted MR images with gadolinium showed a heterogeneously enhanced lesion extending from the left orbital apex along the optic nerve to the cavernous sinus. Although we could not detect fungus by a transsphenoidal biopsy, we suspected fungal infection because of high level of galactomanan antigen in serum. Despite antifungal chemotherapy, her symptoms did not improve. CT image on day 40 showed an aneurysm in the left internal carotid artery, on day 43 cerebral infarction in the left internal carotid artery distribution and on day 45 she died. Autopsy disclosed that aspergillus hyphae invaded the left sphenoid sinus, cavernous sinus and wall of the aneurysm. In this case, fungal infection in the frontal skull base including orbital apex caused mycotic aneurysm in the intracavernous portion of the left internal carotid artery. Skull base aspergillosis presenting orbital apex syndrome is itself rare and in addition, the occurrence of cerebral infarction in the mycotic aneurysm has hardly been reported. We should have cerebrovascular disease in mind as a complication of CNS aspergillosis. PMID:12701224

  1. Gait balance disorder by thalamic infarction with the disorder of interstitial nucleus of cajal.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, A; Hayashi, Y; Wada, K; Nagaoka, M

    2011-01-01

    The interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) is thought to play an important role in torsional/vertical eye position and head posture, and disorders of the INC induce abnormal ocular movements and head tilt. Our patients with ocular tilt reactions simultaneously also had disturbances in ambulatory balance, yet no reports address the loss of balance control induced by disorders of the INC. We examined the ambulatory disturbances induced by INC lesion. We experienced three patients with ocular movement disorders and abnormal head tilt due to thalamic infarction. We performed ophthalmic examinations on and checked the balance of them. With funduscopy, abnormal cycloduction was seen in the unaffected side and normal cycloduction was observed in the affected side. Nevertheless, Hess charts showed distortions in the visual image of both eyes. They all had disorders of balance control. We tried to treat them using the Bobath approach for improving their ambulatory balance. With subsequent improvements in balance control it was possible for them to take short walks, but it was difficult to make any improvements in their ocular movement. The INC is related to balance control of ambulation and disorders of the INC induce ambulatory disturbances. Cycloduction was only observed in the unaffected side, but Hess charts showed distortions of the visual image in both eyes. Ambulation was briefly improved, but diplopia persisted in these patients. PMID:21769260

  2. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack. PMID:24063522

  3. Frequent Ischemic Stroke as First Manifestation of Occult Colon Cancer: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Chan; Wu, Meng-Ni

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon Symptoms: Anemia • diplopia • hemiparesis • slurred speech Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Multi-detector computed tomography • colonoscopy Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: It is rare that occult cancer presents with frequent ischemic stroke as the sole manifestation. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old man with frequent stroke in different vascular areas, with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia identified as risk factors. The results of biochemistry, young stroke profiles, trans-cranial and extra-cranial carotid Doppler, and 24-h Holter electrocardiogram were within normal limits. The reports of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were unremarkable. Finally, a multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) demonstrated a thrombus in the posterior-lateral aspect of the left atrium and non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) was suspected. The results motivated the survey for occult cancer, and adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon was confirmed on colonoscopy pathology. Conclusions: We suggest that evaluating the possibility of occult cancer should be emphasized in patients of frequent stroke refractory to therapy, whether risk factors are already identified or not. Furthermore, we assume MDCT can be an alternative way to detect cardiogenic embolic sources in stroke patients. PMID:26460069

  4. Wernicke's Encephalopathy, Wet Beriberi, and Polyneuropathy in a Patient with Folate and Thiamine Deficiency Related to Gastric Phytobezoar.

    PubMed

    Huertas-González, Nuria; Hernando-Requejo, Virgilio; Luciano-García, Zaida; Cervera-Rodilla, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency. It is mainly related to alcohol abuse but it can be associated with other conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders. This vitamin deficiency can also present with cardiovascular symptoms, called "wet beriberi." Association with folate deficit worsens the clinical picture. Subject. A 70-year-old man with gastric phytobezoar presented with gait instability, dyspnoea, chest pain associated with right heart failure and pericarditis, and folate deficiency. Furosemide was administered and cardiac symptoms improved but he soon developed vertiginous syndrome, nystagmus, diplopia, dysmetria, and sensitive and motor deficit in all four limbs with areflexia. Results. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed typical findings of WE. He was immediately treated with thiamine. Neurological symptoms improved in a few days and abnormal signals disappeared in a follow-up MRI two weeks later. Conclusion. Patients with malabsorption due to gastrointestinal disorders have an increased risk of thiamine deficiency, and folate deficiency can make this vitamin malabsorption worse. An established deficiency mainly shows neurological symptoms, WE, or rarely cardiovascular symptoms, wet beriberi. Early vitamin treatment in symptomatic patients improves prognosis. We recommend administration of prophylactic multivitamins supplements in patients at risk as routine clinical practice. PMID:26697247

  5. Maxillary sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Madu, Chandra Sekhar; Talla, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is the fastest growing malignancy of the lymphoreticular system to affect humans and has a potential ability to double in size every day. A case of maxillary sporadic BL (sBL) associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male is presented. sBL initially presented as maxillary swelling with no obvious dental and periodontal changes. Histological specimen from incisional biopsy revealed a round cell malignant tumor and immunohistochemistry reactions favored nonHodgkin's lymphoma consistent with BL. Four weeks later, patient presented with orbital involvement as diplopia, sixth cranial nerve palsy, and medial rectus palsy. Chemotherapy regimen according to LMB 89 protocol was started. During chemotherapy regimen patient showed bradycardia and Babinski response, suggestive of central nervous system involvement. sBL associated with orbital involvement is extremely rare and only seven cases have been reported. Our case showed unusual presentation; despite the aggressive tumor did not show any common clinical, radiological, and hematological findings. We also discussed the role of oral medicine specialist, importance of early diagnosis, and prompt referral in management of maxillary sBL. PMID:24963253

  6. A case of primary central nervous system vasculitis diagnosed by second brain biopsy and treated successfully.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuri; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Maeda, Norihisa; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-03-30

    We report a case of primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) diagnosed by second brain biopsy. A 53-year-old man initially presented with left lateral gaze diplopia. Brain MRI revealed multiple enhanced lesions in the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral basal ganglia, left cerebellum and brainstem. An initial brain biopsy of the right frontal lobe suggested immune-related encephalitis with angiocentric accumulation of chronic inflammatory cells, while malignant lymphoma could not be completely ruled out. The patient deteriorated despite being treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. A second brain biopsy of the right temporal lobe was then performed. The biopsied specimens showed vascular wall disruption and fibrinoid necrosis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates, mainly composed of CD8-positive T cells, and PCNSV was diagnosed. He was treated with high dose corticosteroids, in combination with methotrexate (8 mg/week), which reduced the brain lesions. As brain biopsy is an essential investigation for the histological diagnosis of PCNSV; subsequent biopsies may be required when a histopathological diagnosis has not been obtained by the first biopsy, and further aggressive therapy is being considered. PMID:26960271

  7. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates. PMID:25828773

  8. Effect of Repetitive Sub-concussive Head Impacts on Ocular Near Point of Convergence.

    PubMed

    Kawata, K; Tierney, R; Phillips, J; Jeka, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study intended to examine effects of repetitive sub-concussive head impacts on ocular near point of convergence (NPC). 20 healthy young adult soccer players were assigned to either a heading or control group. Heading subjects completed 10 headers of soccer balls projected at a speed of 11.2 m/s. Control subjects did not perform heading. Linear head acceleration was measured with a triaxial accelerometer. The NPC assessment was performed at pre-, 0 h post-, and 24 h post-heading. During the NPC assessment participants were seated and a visual target was moved towards the eyes at 1cm/sec. The participant signaled when he/she experienced diplopia or deviation of the eye was observed, and the distance was recorded. The assessment was repeated twice and average NPC scores were used for further analysis. Soccer heading induced mean group head accelerations of 14.49±5.4 g. Mild head impacts led to an increased NPC distance, which was supported by a significant Group x Time interaction. In the heading group, 0 h post- and 24 h post-heading NPC scores were significantly receded compared to baseline. Conversely, NPC scores for the control group showed no difference over time. Our findings indicate that mild frontal head impacts affekt NPC for a minimum of 24 h-post heading, suggesting that oculomotor processes are disrupted, at least transiently, by repetitive mild head impact. PMID:26859643

  9. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in an HIV-infected child.

    PubMed

    Liptai, Z; Papp, E; Barsi, P; Mihály, I; Szalai, E; Csomor, J; Jelenik, Z

    2007-02-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is an infection of the immunosuppressed, especially of AIDS, patients. The disease is caused by the JC virus and is exceptionally rare in children. The diagnosis is based on MRI and on the detection of JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Progression is relentless in most cases. The only treatment of proven benefit is restoration of the immune system by highly active antiretroviral therapy. We report the case of a 15S-year-old HIV-infected boy. After several months of fatigue he developed apathy, head tilt, diplopia, motor apraxia and unsteady gait. Physical examination revealed mild cerebellar signs. MRI showed a 30-mm large, non-enhancing, hyper-intense area in the right cerebellar hemisphere and the middle cerebellar peduncle. JC virus DNA was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. Two weeks later the MRI showed progression. The patient's condition rapidly worsened and he died four months after the onset of the disease. Autopsy revealed widespread lesions of the cerebellar hemispheres and the brainstem. The case presented is peculiar owing to the young age of the patient, the unusual localization and the unifocal nature of the lesion. PMID:17607602

  10. Orthostatic mesodiencephalic dysfunction after decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Bijlenga, Philippe; Zumofen, Daniel; Yilmaz, Hasan; Creisson, Eric; de Tribolet, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    An extreme syndrome of the trephined after decompressive craniectomy is reported here. The most extensive clinical syndrome observed was established over 4 weeks and consisted of bradypsychia, dysartria, and limb rigidity with equine varus feet predominating on the right. The syndrome was aggravated when the patient was sitting with the sequential appearance over minutes of a typical parkinsonian levodopa-resistant tremor starting on the right side, extending to all four limbs, followed by diplopia resulting from a left abducens nerve palsy followed by a left-sided mydriasis. All signs recovered within 1-2 h after horizontalisation. It was correlated with an orthostatic progressive sinking of the skin flap, MRI and CT scan mesodiencephalic distortion without evidence of parenchymal lesion. Brain stem auditory evoked potential wave III latency increases were observed on the right side on verticalisation of the patient. EEG exploration excluded any epileptic activity. Symptoms were fully recovered within 2 days after cranioplasty was performed. The cranioplasty had to be removed twice due to infection. Bradypsychia, speech fluency, limb rigidity and tremor reappeared within a week after removal of the prosthesis. While waiting for sterilisation of the operative site, the symptoms were successfully prevented by a custom-made transparent suction-cup helmet before completion of cranioplasty. PMID:17119005

  11. Roller coaster-associated subarachnoid hemorrhage--report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Rutsch, Sebastian; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Meckel, Stephan; Reinhard, Matthias

    2012-04-15

    The most common neurological injuries associated with roller coaster rides are subdural hematoma and cervical artery dissection. We report two cases of roller-coaster associated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 40-year-old healthy man developed a strong, holocephalic headache during a roller coaster ride. SAH Hunt & Hess grade II and Fisher grade 3 was diagnosed. An underlying aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 41-year-old female (smoker, otherwise healthy) experienced a sudden, strong headache and diplopia during a roller coaster ride. A perimesencephalic SAH (Hunt & Hess grade II, Fisher grade 3) was disclosed by a CT scan. No aneurysm was detected on angiography. Both patients were discharged without neurological disability. In conclusion, SAH is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis in cases of acute headache during roller coaster rides. Both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal perimesencephalic SAH can occur. A combination of mechanical factors and excessive blood pressure rises in vulnerable persons is discussed. PMID:22177088

  12. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function. PMID:26228743

  13. Approach to the dizzy patient.

    PubMed

    Baloh, R W

    1994-11-01

    As dizziness can be caused by so many different pathophysiological mechanisms, it is crucial to determine the type of dizziness before proceeding with the diagnostic evaluation. Vertigo, defined as an illusion of movement, is an important subtype of dizziness that indicates a lesion somewhere within the vestibular system. Probably the most useful feature for differentiating between peripheral and central causes of vertigo is the associated symptoms. Vertigo of peripheral origin is typically associated with auditory symptoms such as hearing loss and tinnitus, while vertigo of central origin is nearly always associated with neurological symptoms such as diplopia, weakness, numbness and ataxia. Each of the common causes of vertigo has a characteristic clinical profile that should suggest a likely diagnosis after the history and examination are complete. Probably the most important treatment breakthrough is the positional manoeuvre that reliably cures benign positional vertigo (see Chapter 6). The treatment strategy for an acute peripheral vestibular lesion has evolved over the past few years. Patients are encouraged to return to normal physical activity as rapidly as possible. Repeated head, eye and body movements (vestibular rehabilitation) help the brain to recalibrate the relationship between visual, proprioceptive and vestibular signals (Chapter 9). PMID:7874402

  14. Acute hypervitaminosis A in a young lady.

    PubMed

    Khasru, M R; Yasmin, R; Salek, A K; Khan, K H; Nath, S D; Selim, S

    2010-04-01

    Acute vitamin A toxicity from a large dose has been reported to cause pseudotumour cerebri. Usually it is common in children. Herein we present the case of a young lady of 18 years old with the complaints of headache, vomiting, back pain and diplopia after ingestion of high dose (about 10 million international units) vitamin A capsule intentionally at a time due to some family problems. She gave no history of fever, convulsion, unconsciousness, pain in eyes, difficulties in walking and jaundice or any urinary problem during this illness. On query she gave no history of taking any other drugs including oral contraceptive and tetracycline & steroids. She also gave no history of sleep disorder. There was bilateral papilloedema, pupils were a bit dilated symmetrically but reacting to light, visual acuity 6/60 on left eye and 6/18 on right eye and bilateral 6th cranial nerve palsy more marked on left side. MRI of brain and orbits showed normal study. Patient improved after giving acetazolamide. PMID:20395929

  15. Orbital roof fracture and orbital cellulitis secondary to halo pin penetration: case report.

    PubMed

    Menon, K Venugopal; Al Rawi, Asif Esam; Taif, Sawsan; Al Ghafri, Khalifa; Mollahalli, Kishore Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report and discuss a rare complication after a patient was treated conservatively with a halo vest. Methods A 51-year-old man sustained a hangman's injury of the C2 vertebra following a motor vehicle collision. He was treated conservatively in a halo vest appliance and following mobilization was discharged from the hospital. Two weeks after discharge, the patient presented to the emergency department complaining of proptosis, ptosis, diplopia, and pin loosening. He was readmitted to the hospital, the halo vest was removed, and urgent imaging studies including computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. They revealed that one of the halo pins had penetrated the orbital roof with active infection of the extraocular soft tissues. In consultation with the ophthalmologist, he was treated conservatively with antibiotics for 10 days. Results His ophthalmologic complaints resolved gradually and his eye returned to normal appearance and function. In the meantime, he was immobilized in a sterno-occipital mandibular immobilizer brace. Conclusion Though rare, penetrating injuries after cranial pin insertion can occur. Halo devices must be applied by, or under close supervision of, experienced personnel to avoid such complications, and halo vests should be reviewed frequently to detect such incidents early. PMID:25648519

  16. Giant macroprolactinoma and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Joana; Gomes, Leonor; Paiva, Sandra; Ruas, Luisa; Carvalheiro, Manuela

    2013-10-01

    Prolactinomas are a common cause of gonadal dysfunction and infertility. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman with history of amenorrhea and infertility. At seven weeks of pregnancy she presented neuro-ophthalmologic complaints of headaches, diplopia, and right ptosis. The work-up study revealed an invasive pituitary macroadenoma with a maximum diameter of 9 cm and serum prolactin of 25,800 ng/mL (3-20). At 12 weeks, she was referred to the Endocrinology Department of the Coimbra University Hospital and started therapy with bromocriptine, initially 5 mg/day and then at crescent doses. Hyperprolactinemia was rapidly and drastically reduced to 254 ng/mL three weeks after taking bromocriptine 15 mg/day. Tumoral volume was reduced and there was improvement of III pair paresis. At 38 weeks, a male healthy baby was born. This is a relevant clinical case that illustrates the efficacy and safety of bromocriptine therapy during pregnancy, even in severe cases like this one. PMID:24232822

  17. Traumatic unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Doe, Joseph W; Jay, Walter M

    2006-01-01

    A 23-year-old man was admitted for a closed head injury following a fall from a height of 5 meters from a ladder. Because of a C-7 burst fracture, a halo and halo vest were applied approximately 9 hours following the fall. Approximately 21 hours after the accident, the patient complained of diplopia. On neuro-ophthalmology evaluation, a unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia was noted. MRI of the brain, performed 3 days after application of the halo and vest, showed a small infarct at the posterior aspect of the inferior midbrain, slightly left of midline. At 9.5 weeks there was 90% improvement of the internuclear ophthalmoplegia noted. Of the reported cases in the medical literature of traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, 30 (83.33%) cases were male and 6 (16.67%) were female. The mean age was 31.7. 54% of the cases were bilateral; 46% unilateral. Mechanisms include: motor vehicle accident: 28 (41.79%), fall: 7 (10.45%), blunt trauma: 11 (16.42%), penetrating trauma 1: (1.49%), bike accident 3: (4.48%), other: 1 (1.49%), Unknown: 16 (23.88%). PMID:17182412

  18. Anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis with prolonged remission.

    PubMed

    Bouwyn, Jean Paul; Magnier, Patrick; Bédat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Ahtoy, Patrick; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a rare disorder of neuromuscular transmission affecting preferentially bulbar, neck and respiratory muscles. We report the case of a 22-year-old man who presented with diplopia on lateral gaze to both sides, facial diplegia, nasal dysarthria and dysphagia. Repetitive nerve stimulation of the trapezius and orbicularis oculi muscles showed amplitude decrements of 19% and 41% respectively supporting the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. MUsK antibodies were positive. Corticosteroids were introduced and then tapered and discontinued at 6 months after initiation. The patient remained in remission and asymptomatic for 4 years without ongoing treatment or prior treatment with rituximab after this first relapse of MuSK-MG. MuSK- MG is considered a hard-to-treat condition and patients generally remain dependent on immunosuppression or prior treatment with rituximab. Our observation highlights that patients with MuSK-MG can have a benign course and that continued immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy may not always be required. PMID:27161384

  19. Direct oblique sagittal CT of orbital wall fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.B. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Direct oblique sagittal CT was used to evaluate trauma to 77 orbits. Sixty-seven orbital wall fractures with intact orbital rims (36 floor, 22 medial wall, nine roof) were identified in 47 orbits. Since persistent diplopia and/or enophthalmos may warrant surgical repair of orbital floor fractures, optimal imaging should include an evaluation of extraocular muscle status, the nature and amount of displaced orbital contents, and an accurate definition of fracture margins. For orbital floor fractures, a combination of the direct oblique sagittal and direct coronal projections optimally displayed all fracture margins, the fracture's relationship to the inferior orbital rim and medial orbital wall, and the amount of displacement into the maxillary sinus. Inferior rectus muscle status with 36 floor fractures was best seen on the direct oblique sagittal projection in 30 fractures (83.3%) and was equally well seen on sagittal and coronal projections in two fractures (5.5%). Floor fractures were missed on 100% of axial, 5.5% of sagittal, and 0% of coronal projections. Since the direct oblique sagittal projection complements the direct coronal projection in evaluating orbital floor fractures, it should not be performed alone. A technical approach to the CT evaluation or orbital wall fractures is presented.

  20. Multiple myeloma presenting with unilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Sushrut S; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Petrous apex masses can manifest with neurologic symptoms due to their involvement of various structures, including cranial nerves (CN) V and VI. The differential diagnosis of petrous masses is broad and includes a variety of both non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. We report a rare case of multiple myeloma confined to the right petrous apex, presenting with ipsilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies. A 63-year-old woman presented with a 6-8 week history of facial numbness and a 2 week history of diplopia, with examination showing right-sided facial hypoesthesia in the CN V1-V3 region and right-sided lateral rectus palsy. MRI of the brain showed a solitary 2.0 cm lesion confined to the right petrous apex involving the right cavernous internal carotid artery and Meckel's cave. A transnasal biopsy showed a proliferation of plasmacytoid cells, which showed diffuse immunoreactivity with antibodies to CD138 and kappa, consistent with a plasma cell dyscrasia. A bone scan subsequently revealed multiple lytic bone lesions involving the skull, left humerus, bilateral femurs and possibly the L4 vertebral body. Bone marrow biopsy and serum laboratory results confirmed the diagnosis of kappa-type multiple myeloma. Although rare, multiple myeloma may initially present with petrous involvement and associated cranial nerve deficits. PMID:26602603

  1. Development of myasthenia gravis after interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G; Morales, G; Aréchaga, O; Gállego, J

    1999-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) alpha is now used in the treatment of some malignant diseases and chronic viral hepatitis. There have been several reports of development of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases or the deterioration of preexisting disorders in patients under treatment. We enclose a case of myasthenia gravis (MG) which developed after six weeks of treatment as fluctuating bilateral ptosis, intermittent diplopia, and mild weakness of limb and neck muscles. A test dose of edrophonium chloride was administered, resulting in improved muscle strength. Elevated anti acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody titer was found. Single fiber electromyography showed an increased jitter from extensor digitorum communis, frequently accompanied by transmission blocking. Repetitive electric 3 Hz stimulation of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, revealed an abnormal decrement of 28% in compound motor action potential. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and the patient was given pyridostigmine, immunoglobulines and prednisone with benefit. Six months latter he developed an acute myasthenic crisis with severe respiratory failure and high anti AChR antibody titer. IFN-alpha can induce MG or simply manifests a preexisting subclinical disease, but otherwise its therapeutic efficacy in MG has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. Autoimmune mechanisms, as the release of different cytokines as IFN, by immunocompetent cells, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both MG and chronic active hepatitis. Autoantibody production against postsynaptic membrane structures by IFN-alpha could be the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:10207675

  2. [A case of severe hyponatremia in a patient suffering from epilepsy and using oxcarbazepine].

    PubMed

    Gumbrevicius, Gintautas; Sveikata, Audrius

    2006-01-01

    A 70-year-old patient treated with oxcarbazepine experienced severe hyponatremia. The patient used oxcarbazepine (600 mg twice a day) concomitantly with diuretics (torasemide 10 mg and indapamide 1.25 mg once per day), perindopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and amlodipine, a Ca(2+) channel blocker. The patient complained of a nausea, malaise, diplopia, drowsiness, apathy, decreased diuresis (creatinine clearance - 41.51 ml/min), and exacerbation of epileptic seizures. Sodium concentration in the plasma was 113 mmol/l. The patient was hospitalized. It was suggested that a decrease in plasma sodium concentration was caused by oxcarbazepine used together with diuretics for six months. Oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia is reported in 22.2-50% of patients, although symptoms are present only in 5.9% of patients. The most common symptoms of central nervous system injury, experienced by patients, are drowsiness, dizziness, decreased cognitive function, coordination impairment, etc. Physicians not always in time pay proper attention to undesirable antiepileptic drug-induced effects, which can be dangerous. PMID:16963831

  3. Posttraumatic craniofacial reconstruction using combined resorbable and nonresorbable fixation systems.

    PubMed

    Majewski, W Tomasz; Yu, Jack C; Ewart, Chris; Aguillon, Arturo

    2002-05-01

    The facial skeleton consists of high-stress-bearing buttresses and low-stress-bearing curved surfaces. The buttresses are like trusses made of beams, struts, and columns. They resist tensile, compressive, and shear loading. The thin, curved, planar surfaces provide for the support and partitioning of the soft tissue. The trusses are strong and one-dimensional whereas the planes are weak and two-dimensional. Ideally, strong one-dimensional fixation systems should be used for the former; weaker, two-dimensional systems should be used for the latter. The authors report their clinical experience of using such combined approaches to the treatment of facial fractures using rigid, titanium mini-plates and screws for the buttresses and polymeric resorbable meshes for the curved planes. For an 11-month period (August 2000 to June 2001), nine patients (7 males and 2 females) with a mean age of 33.7 years were treated in this fashion. The resorbable meshes were deployed for the reconstitution of the orbital walls and the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus. No enophthalmos, globe dystopia, or diplopia occurred during the short mean follow-up of 10 months (4-17 months). There were no infections or sterile abscess formations. This type of combined use of fixation systems appears to be safe and effective. More patients and more extensive follow-ups are obviously needed. PMID:11981185

  4. Juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaw: a retrospective study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Hu, L; Zhang, C; Yang, X; Tian, Z; Wang, Y; Zhu, L; Yang, C; Sun, J; Zhang, C; Li, J; Xu, L

    2016-03-01

    The management of patients with juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) remains controversial. To explore the correlations between different treatments and the patient prognosis, 15 cases of JOF of the jaw were reviewed. Five patients were male and 10 were female. Patient age at the time of disease onset ranged from 7 to 18 years (mean 10.9 years). Nine tumours were located in mandible and six in the maxilla. These cases typically manifested clinically as painless swelling of the jaw (9/15, 60%); 40% (6/15) of the cases were associated with pain, diplopia, stuffy nose, and/or rapid growth. Images of JOF can show a radiolucent, mixed, or ground glass-like appearance. Pathological examinations revealed 10 cases of juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma (JTOF) and five cases of juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma (JPOF). In terms of the treatment plan, six patients initially received radical surgery; nine patients underwent conservative treatment, among whom six (6/9, 66.7%) had one or more recurrence. At the end of the follow-up period, 12 patients had no evidence of tumour recurrence and three cases were alive with a tumour. In summary, surgeons should develop the surgical plan according to the extent of the lesion, relapse status, growth rate, and family choice, and these patients should be followed up closely. PMID:26740351

  5. Aggressive change of a carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Atsuhiro; Saga, Isako; Tomio, Ryosuke; Kosho, Tomoki; Hatamochi, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    The authors report a rare case of a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) secondary to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV which showed an aggressive angiographical change.A 59-year-old woman presented with headache, right pulsatile tinnitus, and diplopia on the right side. The diagnostic angiography demonstrated a right CCF. Accordingly transarterial embolization of the fistula was attempted 5 days later. The initial right internal carotid angiography showed an aneurysm on the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) which was not recognized in the diagnostic angiography. Spontaneous reduction of the shunt flow and long dissection of the ICA were also revealed. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with coils, and only minor shunt flow was shown on the final angiogram. EDS type IV was diagnosed with a skin biopsy for a collagen abnormality. After the operation, the stenosis of the right ICA gradually progressed, although there was no recurrence of the CCF.Interventional treatment for patients with EDS can cause devastating vascular complication. We should be aware of the possibility of EDS type IV when a spontaneous CCF shows unusual angiographical change because early diagnosis of EDS type IV is crucial for determination of the optimum treatment option. PMID:26015525

  6. New insights into the pathogenesis and therapeutics of episodic ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Hasan, Sonia; Guglielmi, Luca; Servettini, Ilenio; Cenciarini, Marta; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Franciolini, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a K+ channelopathy characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms. Generally, patients may experience constant myokymia and dramatic episodes of spastic contractions of the skeletal muscles of the head, arms, and legs with loss of both motor coordination and balance. During attacks additional symptoms may be reported such as vertigo, blurred vision, diplopia, nausea, headache, diaphoresis, clumsiness, stiffening of the body, dysarthric speech, and difficulty in breathing. These episodes may be precipitated by anxiety, emotional stress, fatigue, startle response or sudden postural changes. Epilepsy is overrepresented in EA1. The disease is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and genetic analysis of several families has led to the discovery of a number of point mutations in the voltage-dependent K+ channel gene KCNA1 (Kv1.1), on chromosome 12p13. To date KCNA1 is the only gene known to be associated with EA1. Functional studies have shown that these mutations impair Kv1.1 channel function with variable effects on channel assembly, trafficking and biophysics. Despite the solid evidence obtained on the molecular mechanisms underlying EA1, how these cause dysfunctions within the central and peripheral nervous systems circuitries remains elusive. This review summarizes the main breakthrough findings in EA1, discusses the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease, current therapies, future challenges and opens a window onto the role of Kv1.1 channels in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) functions. PMID:26347608

  7. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  8. [Ophthalmologist and "computer vision syndrome"].

    PubMed

    Barar, A; Apatachioaie, Ioana Daniela; Apatachioaie, C; Marceanu-Brasov, L

    2007-01-01

    The authors had tried to collect the data available on the Internet about a subject that we consider as being totally ignored in the Romanian scientific literature and unexpectedly insufficiently treated in the specialized ophthalmologic literature. Known in the specialty literature under the generic name of "Computer vision syndrome", it is defined by the American Optometric Association as a complex of eye and vision problems related to the activities which stress the near vision and which are experienced in relation, or during, the use of the computer. During the consultations we hear frequent complaints of eye-strain - asthenopia, headaches, blurred distance and/or near vision, dry and irritated eyes, slow refocusing, neck and backache, photophobia, sensation of diplopia, light sensitivity, and double vision, but because of the lack of information, we overlooked them too easily, without going thoroughly into the real motives. In most of the developed countries, there are recommendations issued by renowned medical associations with regard to the definition, the diagnosis, and the methods for the prevention, treatment and periodical control of the symptoms found in computer users, in conjunction with an extremely detailed ergonomic legislation. We found out that these problems incite a much too low interest in our country. We would like to rouse the interest of our ophthalmologist colleagues in the understanding and the recognition of these symptoms and in their treatment, or at least their improvement, through specialized measures or through the cooperation with our specialist occupational medicine colleagues. PMID:18064965

  9. Computer vision syndrome: a review of ocular causes and potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is the combination of eye and vision problems associated with the use of computers. In modern western society the use of computers for both vocational and avocational activities is almost universal. However, CVS may have a significant impact not only on visual comfort but also occupational productivity since between 64% and 90% of computer users experience visual symptoms which may include eyestrain, headaches, ocular discomfort, dry eye, diplopia and blurred vision either at near or when looking into the distance after prolonged computer use. This paper reviews the principal ocular causes for this condition, namely oculomotor anomalies and dry eye. Accommodation and vergence responses to electronic screens appear to be similar to those found when viewing printed materials, whereas the prevalence of dry eye symptoms is greater during computer operation. The latter is probably due to a decrease in blink rate and blink amplitude, as well as increased corneal exposure resulting from the monitor frequently being positioned in primary gaze. However, the efficacy of proposed treatments to reduce symptoms of CVS is unproven. A better understanding of the physiology underlying CVS is critical to allow more accurate diagnosis and treatment. This will enable practitioners to optimize visual comfort and efficiency during computer operation. PMID:21480937

  10. Unilateral Eyelid Edema as Initial Sign of Orbital Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Flávio David Haddad; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Petrarolha, Samuel Brunini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcoidosis is a rare multisystemic granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting the respiratory system, skin, and eyes. Sarcoidosis outside the lacrimal gland is rare. The case study concerns a patient with a final diagnosis of orbital sarcoidosis. Case Report. A 37-year-old male patient went to the ophthalmic emergency room complaining of pain in the left eye, diplopia, and decreased visual acuity. An external eye examination showed hard and cold edema of the lower eyelid, ocular motility with limitation of adduction, and discreet ipsilateral proptosis. Magnetic resonance of the orbit showed left eye proptosis and thickening and increase of soft tissues associated with heterogeneous impregnation of contrast in the infralateral region of the left eyelid. A biopsy of the lesion showed a chronic inflammatory process, with numerous compact nonnecrotizing granulomas surrounded by lamellar hyaline collagen, providing histological confirmation of sarcoidosis. Discussion. A biopsy of the orbital tumor is essential for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, in addition to the search for systemic findings such as hilar adenopathy or parenchymal lung disease found in 90% of patients. PMID:27298746

  11. The Role of Resorbable Plate and Artificial Bone Substitute in Reconstruction of Large Orbital Floor Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho; Kim, Ho Jun; Jeong, Yeon Jin; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to reduce and reconstruct bony defects adequately in large orbital floor fracture and defect. Among many reconstructive methods, alloplastic materials have attracted attention because of their safety and ease of use. We have used resorbable plates combined with artificial bone substitutes in large orbital floor defect reconstructions and have evaluated their long-term reliability compared with porous polyethylene plate. A total of 147 patients with traumatic orbital floor fracture were included in the study. Surgical results were evaluated by clinical evaluations, exophthalmometry, and computed tomography at least 12 months postoperatively. Both orbital floor height discrepancy and orbital volume change were calculated and compared with preoperative CT findings. The average volume discrepancy and vertical height discrepancies were not different between two groups. Also, exophthalmometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. No significant postoperative complication including permanent diplopia, proptosis, and enophthalmos was noted. Use of a resorbable plate with an artificial bone substitute to repair orbital floor defects larger than 2.5 cm2 in size yielded long-lasting, effective reconstruction without significant complications. We therefore propose our approach as an effective alternative method for large orbital floor reconstructions. PMID:27517041

  12. Postpartum valve thrombosis: a happy ending thriller.

    PubMed

    Bollati, Mario; Moretti, Claudio; Sciuto, Filippo; Omedè, PierLuigi; Marra, Walter Grosso; Morello, Mara; Grimaldi, Roberto; Rabbia, Claudio; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; Sheiban, Imad

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with two mechanical valve prostheses was referred to our institution for sudden and self-resolved diplopia 2 weeks after childbirth. From the beginning of pregnancy, nadroparin was started instead of warfarin. The echocardiogram performed at hospital admission revealed a severe aortic prosthesis regurgitation due to incomplete leaflet apposition with a prosthetic aortic transvalvular gradient increase. Three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a thrombus located between the two prostheses, causing intermittent aortic valve malfunction. Intravenous heparin was started. Three days later, a second transoesophageal echocardiogram revealed a decreased aortic transvalvular gradient, but an oval thrombus adhered to the mitral prosthesis and fluctuating through the prosthetic valve was detected. Tissue plasminogen activator infusion was started. To reduce cerebral embolization, carotid filters used during artery angioplasty were placed in common carotid arteries, left and right. No complication occurred during and after the procedure. With thrombus absence at 30-min transoesophageal echocardiography, filters were removed. The patient continued intravenous heparin until achievement of a therapeutic international normalized ratio range and she was asymptomatic on discharge. PMID:21157367

  13. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  14. Thyroid Stimulating but Not Blocking Autoantibodies Are Highly Prevalent in Severe and Active Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, E; Diana, T; Kanitz, M; Hoppe, D; Kahaly, G J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical utility of the functional TSH receptor autoantibodies was prospectively evaluated in patients with thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO). Ophthalmic, endocrine, and serological investigations were performed in 101 consecutive patients with severe and active TAO. Serum thyroid stimulating (TSAb) and blocking (TBAb) antibody levels were measured with two bioassays using cells that express a chimeric TSH receptor and CRE-dependent luciferase. TSAb results are expressed as percentage of specimen-to-reference ratio (SRR %). Blocking activity is defined as percent inhibition of luciferase expression relative to induction with bovine TSH alone. All 101 consecutively followed-up patients with severe and active TAO were TBAb negative. In contrast, 91 (90%) were TSAb positive of whom 90 had Graves' disease. Serum TSAb levels correlated with the diplopia score (P = 0.016), total severity eye score (P = 0.009), proptosis (P = 0.007), lid aperture (P = 0.003), upper lid retraction (P = 0.006), keratopathy (P = 0.04), and thyroid binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII, P < 0.001) and negatively with the duration of TAO (P = 0.002). Median serum values of TSAb were SRR% 418 (range 28% to 795%). TSAb, not TBAb, are highly prevalent in severe/active TAO and serum TSAb levels correlate with clinical disease severity. PMID:26221139

  15. Wernicke's Encephalopathy, Wet Beriberi, and Polyneuropathy in a Patient with Folate and Thiamine Deficiency Related to Gastric Phytobezoar

    PubMed Central

    Huertas-González, Nuria; Hernando-Requejo, Virgilio; Luciano-García, Zaida; Cervera-Rodilla, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency. It is mainly related to alcohol abuse but it can be associated with other conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders. This vitamin deficiency can also present with cardiovascular symptoms, called “wet beriberi.” Association with folate deficit worsens the clinical picture. Subject. A 70-year-old man with gastric phytobezoar presented with gait instability, dyspnoea, chest pain associated with right heart failure and pericarditis, and folate deficiency. Furosemide was administered and cardiac symptoms improved but he soon developed vertiginous syndrome, nystagmus, diplopia, dysmetria, and sensitive and motor deficit in all four limbs with areflexia. Results. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed typical findings of WE. He was immediately treated with thiamine. Neurological symptoms improved in a few days and abnormal signals disappeared in a follow-up MRI two weeks later. Conclusion. Patients with malabsorption due to gastrointestinal disorders have an increased risk of thiamine deficiency, and folate deficiency can make this vitamin malabsorption worse. An established deficiency mainly shows neurological symptoms, WE, or rarely cardiovascular symptoms, wet beriberi. Early vitamin treatment in symptomatic patients improves prognosis. We recommend administration of prophylactic multivitamins supplements in patients at risk as routine clinical practice. PMID:26697247

  16. Isolated neurosarcoidosis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Background: As an extremely rare subtype of sarcoidosis that develops exclusively in the nervous system, isolated neurosarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose. In addition, its exact clinical features are not known. Case Description: A 61-year-old man presented with right ear hearing loss, diplopia, and fever. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed mass lesions in the right cerebellum and left side body of the lateral ventricle. Neither systemic CT nor positron emission tomography revealed extracranial lesions. A neuroendoscopic biopsy was performed on the lateral ventricle lesion, and a histopathology analysis revealed epithelioid granulomatous inflammation. By systematic exclusion of other possible granulomatous diseases, isolated neurosarcoidosis was diagnosed. The lesions disappeared immediately upon corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) treatment and had not recurred as of a 12-month follow-up examination. Conclusions: Isolated neurosarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose. Successful diagnosis requires compatible clinical findings, histological demonstration of noncaseating granulomas, and exclusion of other granulomatous diseases. Isolated neurosarcoidosis has a relatively good clinical prognosis, which could be characteristic of the disease. PMID:27168947

  17. Sparing of coarse stereopsis in stereodeficient children with a history of amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Giaschi, Deborah; Lo, Ryan; Narasimhan, Sathyasri; Lyons, Christopher; Wilcox, Laurie M

    2013-01-01

    Stereoscopic depth perception may be obtained from small retinal disparities that can be fused for single vision (fine stereopsis), but reliable depth information is also obtained from larger disparities that produce double vision (coarse stereopsis). Here we assess the possibility that the early development of coarse stereopsis makes it resilient to the factors that cause amblyopia by comparing performance in children with a history of strabismic, anisometropic, or aniso-strabismic amblyopia and age-matched controls (5-12 years). The task was to indicate whether a cartoon character was nearer or farther away than a zero-disparity reference frame. Test disparities were grouped into fine and coarse ranges based on preliminary assessment of diplopia thresholds. In the fine range, accuracy increased with disparity for both groups, but children in the amblyopia group performed significantly worse than children in the control group, particularly when their amblyopia was associated with strabismus. In the coarse range, accuracy was constant across all disparities for both groups although performance appeared to be poorer in the aniso-strabismic group. These results suggest that, under some conditions, stereopsis for large disparities may be spared when stereopsis for small disparities is disrupted by early visual deprivation. This undetected residual binocular function has important clinical implications given recent efforts to improve amblyopia treatment outcomes by employing binocular treatment protocols. PMID:23986537

  18. Early Results of Slanted Recession of the Lateral Rectus Muscle for Intermittent Exotropia with Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Min

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of slanted recession of the lateral rectus muscle for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency. This prospective study included 31 patients who underwent slanted lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency between June 2010 and June 2012. Following parameters were recorded and analyzed: patient sex, age, preoperative and postoperative near and distance ocular alignment, and changes in stereopsis. The mean age of the patients was 9.2 years. The preoperative mean deviation angle was 32.4 PD at distance and 43.4 PD at near. After 6 months, slanted lateral rectus recession reduced the deviation angles to 2 PD at distance and 3.4 PD at near. In addition, the mean difference between distance and near deviation angles was significantly reduced from 11 PD to 1.4 PD at 6 months postoperatively. Slanted lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency in children successfully reduced the distance and near exodeviations and the near-distance difference without increasing the risk of long-term postoperative esotropia or diplopia. PMID:25688298

  19. Medical and Surgical Treatment in Pediatric Orbital Myositis Associated with Coxsackie Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Pedro; Gil, João; Paiva, Catarina; Castela, Guilherme; Castela, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of orbital myositis associated with Coxsackie virus and its medical and surgical approach. Methods. Complete ophthalmological examination and imaging and analytical investigation were performed. Results. A 6-year-old male presented with subacute painless binocular horizontal diplopia. Examination revealed bilateral best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/20 and right eye 45-prism-dioptre (PD) esotropia in near and distance fixations, with no motility restrictions. Serologic screening was positive for Coxsackie virus acute infection and computerized tomography (CT) suggested right eye medial rectus orbital myositis. An oral corticosteroid 1.0 mg/kg/day regimen was started. A new CT after two months showed symmetrical lesions in both medial rectus muscles. Corticosteroids were increased to 1.5 mg/kg/day. After imagiological resolution on the 4th month, alternating 45 PD esotropia persisted. Bilateral 7 mm medial rectus recession was performed after 1 year without spontaneous recovery. At 1-year follow-up, the patient is orthophoric with 200′′ stereopsis and bilateral 20/20 BCVA. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of orbital myositis associated with Coxsackie virus. This is also the first reported case of isolated strabismus surgery after orbital myositis in pediatric age, highlighting the favourable aesthetic and functional outcomes even in cases of late ocular motility disorders. PMID:26550508

  20. Quality of Life in Adults with Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melinda Y.; Velez, Federico G.; Demer, Joseph L.; Isenberg, Sherwin J.; Coleman, Anne L.; Pineles, Stacy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess relative quality of life in patients with strabismus. Design Retrospective cohort study Methods The 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was performed in 42 strabismic adults over the age of 50 years at a single institution. Subscale scores were compared with those of patients with other ocular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, cataract, cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, and low vision. Results Median visual acuity was 20/20 (range 20/12.5 to 20/50), and 34 patients (81%) reported diplopia. Strabismic patients performed the same or worse on nearly all vision-related subscales than did patients with diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract, and CMV retinitis. Additionally, strabismic patients reported significantly worse ocular pain than all comparison groups before any surgery was performed. Conclusions Strabismus impacts quality of life through both functional and psychosocial factors. Physicians treating strabismic patients should recognize these quality of life issues and address them accordingly. PMID:25498355

  1. Paranasal sinuses malignancies: A 12-year review of clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz, Alireza; Chamani, Mojtaba; Derakhshandeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate epidemiologic investigations of the paranasal sinuses malignancies prompted this retrospective study with special emphasis on a major group of 111 tumors. Material and Methods Clinical records of 111 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses were investigated retrospectively from April 2000 to January 2012. Collection of data included demographic information, clinical manifestations, treatment plans, and histopathology of the tumor. Results There were 69 (62.16%) male and 42 (37.83%) female patients (male-to-female ratio of 1.6:1), with a median age of 49±12.2 years (range 21 to 88 years). A high level of occurrence was noticed in the fifth (26.3%) decade of life. The most frequent histological types were squamous cell carcinoma (43.5%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (19%). Among clinical manifestations, nasal obstruction was the most frequent followed by diplopia, and facial swelling. Fifty three patients (47.74%) were treated with combined approach of surgery and radiation therapy. Conclusions Paranasal sinuses malignancies are rare conditions with nonspecific symptoms which make early diagnosis of the lesions more challenging. The optimal therapeutic protocol for patients suffering from these tumors is still a somewhat controversial entity and requires further studies. Key words:Paranasal sinuses, malignancy, surgery,radiotherapy. PMID:27475693

  2. A peculiar blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall complicated by extensive subcutaneous emphysema: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rzymska-Grala, Iwona; Palczewski, Piotr; Błaż, Marcin; Zmorzyński, Michał; Gołębiowski, Marek; Wanyura, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Blow-out fracture of the orbit is a common injury. However, not many cases are associated with massive subcutaneous emphysema. Even fewer cases are caused by minor trauma or are associated with barotrauma to the orbit due to sneezing, coughing, or vomiting. The authors present a case of blow-out fracture complicated by extensive subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema that occurred without any obvious traumatic event. Case Report: A 43-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a painful right-sided exophthalmos that he had noticed in the morning immediately after waking up. The patient also complained of diplopia. Physical examination revealed exophthalmos and crepitations suggestive of subcutaneous emphysema. The eye movements, especially upward gaze, were impaired. CT showed blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall with a herniation of the orbital soft tissues into the maxillary sinus. There was an extensive subcutaneous emphysema in the head and neck going down to the mediastinum. The patient did not remember any significant trauma to the head that could explain the above mentioned findings. At surgery, an inferior orbital wall fracture with a bony defect of 3×2 centimeter was found and repaired. Conclusions: Blow-out fractures of the orbit are usually a result of a direct trauma caused by an object with a diameter exceeding the bony margins of the orbit. In 50% of cases, they are complicated by orbital emphysema and in 4% of cases by herniation of orbital soft tissues into paranasal sinuses. The occurrence of orbital emphysema without trauma is unusual. In some cases it seems to be related to barotrauma due to a rapid increase in pressure in the upper airways during sneezing, coughing, or vomiting, which very rarely leads to orbital wall fracture. Computed tomography is the most accurate method in detecting and assessing the extent of orbital wall fractures. PMID:22844312

  3. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli. PMID:27580040

  4. The sub-clinical see-saw nystagmus embedded in infantile nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, L F; Jacobs, J B; Serra, A

    2007-02-01

    A transient, decompensated vertical phoria in an individual with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) resulted in two images that oscillated vertically-a diplopic oscillopsia. Ocular motor studies during the vertical oscillopsia recreated by vertical prisms, led to the identification of a sub-clinical see-saw nystagmus (SSN), present under the prism-induced diplopic condition. Retrospective analysis of ocular motor recordings made prior to the above episode of vertical diplopia revealed the presence of that same sub-clinical SSN. The SSN had not been detected previously despite extensive observations and recordings of this subject's pendular IN over a period of forty years. Three- dimensional search-coil data from fourteen additional INS subjects (with pendular and jerk waveforms) confirmed the existence of sub-clinical SSN embedded within the clinically detectable horizontal-torsional IN in seven of the fifteen and a sub-clinical, conjugate, vertical component in the remaining eight. Unlike the clinically visible SSN found in achiasma, the cause of this sub-clinical SSN is hypothesized to be due to a failure of the forces of the oblique muscles (responsible for the torsional component of the IN) to balance out the associated forces of the vertical recti; the net result is a small, sub-clinical SSN. Thus, so-called "horizontal" IN is actually a horizontal-torsional oscillation with a secondary, sub-clinical SSN or conjugate vertical component. The suppression of oscillopsia by efference copy in INS appears to be accomplished for each eye individually, even in a binocular individual. However, failure to fuse the two images results in oscillopsia of one of them. PMID:17045326

  5. Lookup Tables Versus Stacked Rasch Analysis in Comparing Pre- and Postintervention Adult Strabismus-20 Data

    PubMed Central

    Leske, David A.; Hatt, Sarah R.; Liebermann, Laura; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compare two methods of analysis for Rasch scoring pre- to postintervention data: Rasch lookup table versus de novo stacked Rasch analysis using the Adult Strabismus-20 (AS-20). Methods One hundred forty-seven subjects completed the AS-20 questionnaire prior to surgery and 6 weeks postoperatively. Subjects were classified 6 weeks postoperatively as “success,” “partial success,” or “failure” based on angle and diplopia status. Postoperative change in AS-20 scores was compared for all four AS-20 domains (self-perception, interactions, reading function, and general function) overall and by success status using two methods: (1) applying historical Rasch threshold measures from lookup tables and (2) performing a stacked de novo Rasch analysis. Change was assessed by analyzing effect size, improvement exceeding 95% limits of agreement (LOA), and score distributions. Results Effect sizes were similar for all AS-20 domains whether obtained from lookup tables or stacked analysis. Similar proportions exceeded 95% LOAs using lookup tables versus stacked analysis. Improvement in median score was observed for all AS-20 domains using lookup tables and stacked analysis (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Conclusions The Rasch-scored AS-20 is a responsive and valid instrument designed to measure strabismus-specific health-related quality of life. When analyzing pre- to postoperative change in AS-20 scores, Rasch lookup tables and de novo stacked Rasch analysis yield essentially the same results. Translational Relevance We describe a practical application of lookup tables, allowing the clinician or researcher to score the Rasch-calibrated AS-20 questionnaire without specialized software. PMID:26933524

  6. The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Chance; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an

  7. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tambucci, Renato; Basti, Claudia; Maresca, Maria; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine - a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic) neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency) and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration) as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea, diplopia, and vomiting. Adverse events can be minimized by appropriate titration. In conclusion, ESL seems to overcome some drawbacks of the previous antiepileptic drugs, suggesting a major role of ESL in the management of focal onset epilepsy for both new onset and

  8. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tambucci, Renato; Basti, Claudia; Maresca, Maria; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine – a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic) neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency) and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration) as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea, diplopia, and vomiting. Adverse events can be minimized by appropriate titration. In conclusion, ESL seems to overcome some drawbacks of the previous antiepileptic drugs, suggesting a major role of ESL in the management of focal onset epilepsy for both new onset and

  9. [A case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with dramatic improvement in consciousness immediately after intravenous infusion of thiamine].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, A; Chida, K; Misu, T; Okita, N; Nomura, H; Konno, H; Takase, S; Takeda, A; Itoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized on March 4, 1998 for disturbances in consciousness. In 1995, he had received proximal subtotal gastrectomy and reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition for gastric cancer. Thereafter he had been taking enough food without the habit of taking liquor. In October 1997, his short term memory was becoming gradually worse. On February 12, 1998, he suffered from numbness in the feet, and then dysphagia, unsteady gait, and diplopia developed gradually. On February 26, brain MRI showed no abnormalities. On March 3, he had a fever of 38.5 degrees C and his consciousness became unclear. Neurological examination revealed semi-coma, total ophthalmoplegia, and absence of doll's eye movement. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. The serum thiamine level was 9 ng/ml (normal range: 20-50). Brain MRI demonstrated symmetrical high intensity lesions in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, dorsomedial nuclei of bilateral thalami, and vestibular nuclei. About 30 seconds after intravenous infusion of thiamine, his consciousness improved dramatically, but returned to semi-coma after about two minutes. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually occurs acutely. In the present case, however, the disease showed slow onset, chronic progression, and then rapid worsening after fever. Reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition might have caused the slow onset of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and fever might have facilitated the rapid progression of the disease. An immediate high concentration of thiamine modifies the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor ion channels, thereby maintaining wakefulness, and the level of consciousness may change dramatically. PMID:10689693

  10. Is a black eye a useful sign of facial fractures in patients with minor head injuries? A retrospective analysis in a level I trauma centre over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Michael; Schlittler, Fabian Lukas; Michel, Chantal; Exadaktylos, Aris Konstantinos; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2014-07-01

    Orbital blunt trauma is common, and the diagnosis of a fracture should be made by computed tomographic (CT) scan. However, this will expose patients to ionising radiation. Our objective was to identify clinical predictors of orbital fracture, in particular the presence of a black eye, to minimise unnecessary exposure to radiation. A 10-year retrospective study was made of the medical records of all patients with minor head trauma who presented with one or two black eyes to our emergency department between May 2000 and April 2010. Each of the patients had a CT scan, was over 16 years old, and had a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 13-15. The primary outcome was whether the black eye was a valuable predictor of a fracture. Accompanying clinical signs were considered as a secondary outcome. A total of 1676 patients (mean (SD) age 51 (22) years) and minor head trauma with either one or two black eyes were included. In 1144 the CT scan showed a fracture of the maxillofacial skeleton, which gave an incidence of 68.3% in whom a black eye was the obvious symptom. Specificity for facial fractures was particularly high for other clinical signs, such as diminished skin sensation (specificity 96.4%), diplopia or occulomotility disorders (89.3%), fracture steps (99.8%), epistaxis (95.5%), subconjunctival haemorrhage (90.4%), and emphysema (99.6%). Sensitivity for the same signs ranged from 10.8% to 22.2%. The most striking fact was that 68.3% of all patients with a black eye had an underlying fracture. We therefore conclude that a CT scan should be recommended for every patient with minor head injury who presents with a black eye. PMID:24793410

  11. Incidence of Pituitary Apoplexy and Its Risk Factors in Chinese People: A Database Study of Patients with Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelan; Jiang, Cuiping; Zhang, Qiongyue; Jiang, Wenjuan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Haixia; Shou, Xuefei; Zhao, Yao; Li, Yiming; Li, Shiqi; Ye, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few studies of the incidence and clinical characteristics of pituitary apoplexy (PA) in pituitary adenoma patients, and the findings have been inconsistent. Objective The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the incidence, clinical presentation, surgical management and postoperative complications of PA in pituitary adenoma patients. Methods A database was specifically designed to collect clinical, therapeutic, prognostic and histological information about pituitary adenoma patients. Using multivariate logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to identify associated factors. Results A total of 2021 pituitary adenoma patients were recruited. 97 (4.8%) patients had PA. The incidence of PA was 10.11% in patients with pituitary macroadenoma, and 0.36% in patients with microadenoma. Variables for the logistic regression model independently associated with PA were sex (male vs. female, OR = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.59~4.07), tumor type (negative staining vs. positive staining, OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.29~3.23), and tumor size (macroadenoma vs. microadenoma, OR = 26.46, 95% CI = 9.66~72.46). Headache, visual deterioration, and vomiting were the most common symptoms in patients with pituitary adenoma. Patients with and without PA had similar frequency of visual deterioration, head trauma, acromegalic appearance, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance and Cushingoid appearance, but headache, vomiting, ptosis, diplopia, fever and blindness were significantly more common in patients with PA. Pearson Chi-Square tests revealed a significant difference in surgical approach between patients with and without PA (95.88% vs. 85.57%, P = 0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that PA is not a rare event. Male sex, non-functioning tumor, and macroadenoma are associated with an increased risk of PA. Compared with pituitary adenoma patients without PA, patients with PA have more severe symptoms. PMID:26407083

  12. Male patients presenting with rapidly progressive puberty associated with malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jung; Ko, A Ra; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    In males, precocious puberty (PP) is defined as the development of secondary sexual characteristics before age 9 years. PP is usually idiopathic; though, organic abnormalities including tumors are more frequently found in male patients with PP. However, advanced puberty in male also can be an important clinical manifestation in tumors. We report 2 cases of rapidly progressive puberty in males, each associated with a germ-cell tumor. First, an 11-year-old boy presented with mild fever and weight loss for 1 month. Physical examination revealed a pubertal stage of G3P3 with 10-mL testes. Investigations revealed advanced bone age (16 years) with elevated basal luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels. An anterior mediastinal tumor was identified by chest radiography and computed tomography, and elevated α-fetoprotein (AFP) and β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels were noted. Histopathologic analysis confirmed a yolk-sac tumor. Second, a 12-year-old boy presented with diplopia, polydipsia, and polyuria for 4 months. Physical examination revealed a pubertal stage of G3P3 with 8-mL testes. Bone age was advanced (16 years) and laboratory tests indicated panhypopituitarism with elevated testosterone level. A mixed germ-cell tumor was diagnosed with elevated AFP and β-hCG levels. Of course, these patients also have other symptoms of suspecting tumors, however, rapidly progressive puberty can be the more earlier screening sign of tumors. Therefore, in male patients with accelerated or advanced puberty, malignancy should be considered, with evaluation of tumor markers. In addition, advanced puberty in male should be recognized more widely as a unique sign of neoplasm. PMID:27104181

  13. Clinical utility of eslicarbazepine: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Cincotta, Massimo; Carelli, Alessia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a new antiepileptic drug whose mechanism of action is blockade of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). However, in respect to carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, the active ESL metabolite (eslicarbazepine) affects slow inactivation of VGSC and has a similar affinity for the inactivated state and a lower affinity for the resting state of the channel. This new antiepileptic drug has been recently approved in Europe (trade name Zebinix) and in the United States (trade name Stedesa) for adjunctive treatment in adult subjects with partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Following oral administration, ESL is rapidly and extensively metabolized by hepatic esterases to eslicarbazepine. This active metabolite has a linear pharmacokinetic profile, a low binding to plasma proteins (<40%), and a half-life of 20–24 hours and is mainly excreted by kidneys in an unchanged form or as glucuronide conjugates. ESL is administered once a day and has a low potential for drug–drug interactions. Efficacy and safety of this drug in patients with focal seizures have been assessed in four randomized clinical trials, and responder rates (percentage of patients with a ≥50% improvement of their seizures) ranged between 17% and 43%. Adverse events were usually mild to moderate, and the most common were dizziness, somnolence, diplopia, abnormal coordination, blurred vision, vertigo, headache, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. ESL may be considered an interesting alternative to current antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsies. Additionally, it is under investigation in children with focal epilepsies, in patients with newly diagnosed focal epilepsies, and also in other neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25709402

  14. Strabismus following retinal detachment repair: a comparison between scleral buckling and vitrectomy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, S A; Wong, V; Young, J; Stappler, T; Durnian, J M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a study to investigate: (1) deviations caused by retinal detachment (RD) repair; (2) correlation between visual acuity and the number of surgeries to deviation size; and (3) differences between deviations following scleral buckling (SB) and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with persistent binocular diplopia following RD repair. Magnitude of manifest deviation (∣dev∣) in the primary position (PP) and position of greatest deviation (maxDev) was calculated. LogMAR acuity and number of previous vitreoretinal procedures were correlated to ∣dev∣ in both PP and maxDev. Manifest ∣dev∣ were compared between SB and PPV groups. Results Twenty-five patients were identified. The median ∣dev∣ was 7 prism diopters (PD) in PP and 17 PD in maxDev. We found no association between number of surgeries or VA with ∣dev∣ in either the PP (r=−0.18 and r=0.08) or maxDev (r=−0.26 and r=−0.05). Twelve patients underwent PPV: median ∣dev∣ in PP 6 PD and maxDev 9 PD. In the SB group: median ∣dev∣ in PP 8 PD and in maxDev 22 PD. ∣dev∣ in PP showed no significant differences between PPV and SB (U=63, P=0.41); however, ∣dev∣ in maxDev, showed that SB have significantly greater deviations (U=36.0, P=0.02). Conclusion We report the largest cohort of patients with symptomatic ocular motility defects following PPV. We show no association between VA or number of procedures to strabismus magnitude. Ocular deviations in maxDev are significantly greater after SB procedures. PMID:21701526

  15. Orbital fractures in children: a review of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Barbara; Kiwanuka, Paul; Dhariwal, Daljit

    2013-12-01

    The third most common facial fractures in children are fractures of the orbit, and the medial wall and floor are the commonest sites affected. The aetiology, clinical presentation, and timing of operation all differ from those of adults. If there are few or no clinical signs, but oculocardiac reflex is present, it is highly suggestive of trapdoor injury. This retrospective study includes all consecutive children (younger than 18 years) referred with confirmed fractures of the orbital floor over a 5-year period (2005-2010). A total of 24 patients were identified with a mean age of 13.5 years, and most injuries were secondary to falls. Isolated injury to the orbital floor occurred in 14 (58%); the rest involved other fractures of the orbital wall or face, or both. There were 11 trapdoor fractures (46%), and 9 open blow-out fractures (38%). Overall, nausea and vomiting occurred in 13 patients (54%); 8 of these had trapdoor fractures. Most patients had operations (22, 92%), and the mean time to operation was 4 days. Complications increased with delays to theatre. Those operated on within 1 day had fewer complications than those who had operations after 3 days. Postoperatively, diplopia (n=6/11) and restricted eye movement (n=3/11) were associated with trapdoor injury, while enophthalmos (n=1/9) and paraesthesia (n=3/9) were related to open blow-out fractures. To reduce compromised outcomes, prompt operation is warranted in all children with fractures of the orbital floor regardless of the configuration. PMID:23915493

  16. Ophthalmic Features of Outpatient Children Diagnosed with Intracranial Space-Occupying Lesions by Ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Alswaina, Nayef; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Shammari, Mansour A.; Khan, Arif O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Brain tumors in children often involve the visual system, but most retrospective series are by neurologists or oncologists. In this study we highlight the ophthalmic findings of outpatient children with visual complaints and/or strabismus who, based on ophthalmic examination, were suspected to and confirmed to harbor intracranial space-occupying lesions by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Retrospective case series of children (less than 18 years) who for visual complaints and/or strabismus underwent cranial MRI at a referral eye hospital (2005–2012), which revealed intracranial space-occupying lesions. Exclusion criteria were known preexisting orbital or ocular trauma, ocular tumor, or neurological disease. Results: For 26 patients (3 months-17 years; mean 7 years; median 9 years; and 14 boys), the most common clinical presentation was decreased vision with disc pallor (10) or swelling (three). Other presentations were strabismus with disc pallor or swelling (four; two of which were left sixth nerve palsies), acquired esotropia with diplopia (three; one bilateral and two left sixth nerve palsies), acquired exotropia (four; two of which were bilateral third nerve palsies, one of which was left partial third nerve palsy, and one of which was associated with headache), nystagmus (one), and disc swelling with headache (one). Most lesions were in the sellar/suprasellar space (10), posterior fossa (six), or optic nerve/chasm (four). Conclusions: The majority of outpatient children diagnosed by ophthalmologists with intracranial space-occupying lesions presented with disc swelling or pallor in the context of decreased vision or strabismus. Two strabismus profiles that did not include disc swelling or pallor were acquired sixth nerve palsy and acquired exotropia (with ptosis (third nerve palsy), nystagmus, or headache). PMID:26180471

  17. [A case of myasthenia gravis with invasive thymoma associated with diffuse panbronchiolitis, alopecia, dysgeusia, cholangitis and myositis].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Risa; Shibuya, Hideki; Hideyama, Takuto; Shiio, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of diplopia, ptosis, and dysphagia that had begun three years previously. He was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) and invasive thymoma and treated with corticosteroid, thymectomy, and radiation therapy. Ten years after the thymectomy, computed tomography (CT) showed metastasis of the thymoma in the left lower lobe of the lung. Two years after this recurrence, when the patient was 55, respiratory symptoms such as wheezing, persistent cough, and dyspnea appeared. Chronic sinusitis, diffuse centrilobular opacities on CT, and positivity for HLA-B54 led to a diagnosis of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). Despite treatment with clarithromycin, the respiratory symptoms worsened. The patient developed alopecia and body hair loss at the age of 56 followed by dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis with positivity for anti-Kv1.4 antibodies. Although treatment with an increased dose of corticosteroid improved hair loss, dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis, he died of progression of DPB and serious respiratory infection at the age of 58. In this case, various autoimmune disorders occurred together with MG as complications of thymoma. Although alopecia, dysgeusia, and myositis are already known as complications of MG associated with thymoma, cholangitis is not well-recognized since there have been few reports suggesting a causal relationship between cholangitis and thymoma. Furthermore, DPB caused by immunodeficiency and respiratory tract hypersensitivity associated with thymoma and HLA-B54, respectively, is the distinctive feature of our case. Neurologists should be aware that various organs can be damaged directly and indirectly by abnormal T cells from thymoma in patients with MG. PMID:25283823

  18. Clinical utility of eslicarbazepine: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Cincotta, Massimo; Carelli, Alessia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a new antiepileptic drug whose mechanism of action is blockade of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). However, in respect to carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, the active ESL metabolite (eslicarbazepine) affects slow inactivation of VGSC and has a similar affinity for the inactivated state and a lower affinity for the resting state of the channel. This new antiepileptic drug has been recently approved in Europe (trade name Zebinix) and in the United States (trade name Stedesa) for adjunctive treatment in adult subjects with partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Following oral administration, ESL is rapidly and extensively metabolized by hepatic esterases to eslicarbazepine. This active metabolite has a linear pharmacokinetic profile, a low binding to plasma proteins (<40%), and a half-life of 20-24 hours and is mainly excreted by kidneys in an unchanged form or as glucuronide conjugates. ESL is administered once a day and has a low potential for drug-drug interactions. Efficacy and safety of this drug in patients with focal seizures have been assessed in four randomized clinical trials, and responder rates (percentage of patients with a ≥50% improvement of their seizures) ranged between 17% and 43%. Adverse events were usually mild to moderate, and the most common were dizziness, somnolence, diplopia, abnormal coordination, blurred vision, vertigo, headache, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. ESL may be considered an interesting alternative to current antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsies. Additionally, it is under investigation in children with focal epilepsies, in patients with newly diagnosed focal epilepsies, and also in other neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25709402

  19. Update on treatment of partial onset epilepsy: role of eslicarbazepine

    PubMed Central

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Partial epilepsy comprises simple partial seizures, complex partial seizures, and secondarily generalized seizures, and covers more than 60% of patients with epilepsy. Antiepileptic drugs are generally considered to be the major therapeutic intervention for epilepsy but, despite a broad range of commonly used antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of adult patients and approximately 25% of children with epilepsy have inadequate seizure control. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel voltage-gated sodium channel-blocking agent with presumed good safety and efficacy for adjunctive treatment of patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. ESL is a prodrug of eslicarbazepine (the active entity responsible for pharmacologic effects), and is rapidly and extensively hydrolyzed during first pass by liver esterases after oral administration. The half-life of eslicarbazepine at steady-state plasma concentrations is 20–24 hours, compatible with once-daily administration. ESL 800 mg and 1200 mg significantly reduces seizure frequency and shows a favorable safety profile in adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures, as demonstrated in previous Phase II and III trials. In children, ESL showed a clear dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency with good tolerability. The most commonly reported adverse events associated with ESL are dizziness, somnolence, nausea, diplopia, headache, vomiting, blurred vision, vertigo, and fatigue. In conclusion, these characteristics suggest that ESL might be a valid and well tolerated treatment option for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short, simple titration regimen would be of special interest for children, although conclusive published data are lacking to date. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population in the near future. PMID:21127691

  20. Update on treatment of partial onset epilepsy: role of eslicarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Partial epilepsy comprises simple partial seizures, complex partial seizures, and secondarily generalized seizures, and covers more than 60% of patients with epilepsy. Antiepileptic drugs are generally considered to be the major therapeutic intervention for epilepsy but, despite a broad range of commonly used antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of adult patients and approximately 25% of children with epilepsy have inadequate seizure control. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel voltage-gated sodium channel-blocking agent with presumed good safety and efficacy for adjunctive treatment of patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. ESL is a prodrug of eslicarbazepine (the active entity responsible for pharmacologic effects), and is rapidly and extensively hydrolyzed during first pass by liver esterases after oral administration. The half-life of eslicarbazepine at steady-state plasma concentrations is 20-24 hours, compatible with once-daily administration. ESL 800 mg and 1200 mg significantly reduces seizure frequency and shows a favorable safety profile in adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures, as demonstrated in previous Phase II and III trials. In children, ESL showed a clear dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency with good tolerability. The most commonly reported adverse events associated with ESL are dizziness, somnolence, nausea, diplopia, headache, vomiting, blurred vision, vertigo, and fatigue. In conclusion, these characteristics suggest that ESL might be a valid and well tolerated treatment option for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short, simple titration regimen would be of special interest for children, although conclusive published data are lacking to date. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population in the near future. PMID:21127691

  1. Sustained improvement of reading symptoms following botulinum toxin A injection for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Saunte, Jon Peiter; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated the use of botulinum toxin A in adults with convergence insufficiency in whom prior treatment had failed. Methods We studied 8 patients (median age 36 years, range 17 to 77 years) with reading symptoms due to convergence insufficiency defined as an exodeviation greater at near, not exceeding 10 PD in the distance measured by prism and alternate cover test, and either convergence near point >6 cm or reduced fusional amplitudes. All patients were still symptomatic after prior treatment by convergence exercises (n = 8), base-in prism glasses (n = 5) or strabismus surgery (n = 2). Five patients received injection of 5 IU botulinum toxin in 0.1 ml saline to one lateral rectus muscle, two received 2.5 IU, and one received 2.5 IU to both lateral rectus muscles. Results At 1 month post injection, all patients had an initial reduction of exodeviation from baseline (median 9 PD, p = 0.008) at near, although 2 patients had a temporary intermittent esotropia in the distance with diplopia associated with difficulty driving. At 6 months, when the pharmacological effect of botulinum toxin had completely worn off, patients still maintained a small reduction of exodeviation (median 4 PD, p = 0.3) at near. Reading symptoms improved in 7 of 8 patients at 1-month post injection, and in all patients at 6 months. Two patients had health-related quality of life assessed with the Adult Strabismus 20 Questionnaire, showing improved Reading Function scores at 6 months. Interestingly, 3 patients reported improved reading despite returning to the baseline angle at 6 months, and 2 of 4 with 12-month follow-up still reported improvement. Conclusions In adult convergence insufficiency, botulinum toxin injection to a lateral rectus muscle improves reading symptoms beyond the duration of the pure pharmacological effect. Botulinum toxin injection may be useful in management of adult convergence insufficiency, although repeat injections may be needed. PMID:24786379

  2. Vertical Rectus Muscles Transposition in Large Exotropia with Medial Rectus Muscle Transection Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonae A.; Rah, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Mi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of transposition procedures on the vertical rectus muscle (VRM) in the patients who underwent a medial rectus muscle (MR) transection after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Methods In 4 patients with exotropia (XT) and a lack of adduction after ESS, orbital CT or MRI revealed a complete transection of the midportion of the MR. Full-tendon VRM transposition was performed within 3 months after injury (early surgery) in 2 patients with 40Δ XT. Two patients with 70Δ and 85Δ XT underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure, which involved pulling each half-tendon and crossing it through the undersurface of the severed MR to the other end of the MR insertion, concurrently with an ipsilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession 11 months and 36 months after ESS, respectively. The adduction deficits were divided into -1 through to -8. The patients were followed up for more than than 1.5 years. Results Postoperatively, 3 patients showed orthophoria and no diplopia in the primary position. The adduction deficits improved to -3.5 or -4. One patient who underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure showed a residual XT of 25Δ. Conclusions VRM transposition is effective in correcting a large XT secondary to a MR transection after ESS. When a longstanding large-angle XT with severe contracture of the ipsilateral LR and massive scarring of the adjacent tissues is present, the X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure coupled with an ipsilateral LR recession had an augmenting effect. PMID:18612228

  3. Scapular Tip Free Flap for Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nayeon; Cho, Jae-Keun; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Cho, Jung Kyu; Cho, Young Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Head and neck reconstruction is still challenging in terms of esthetic and functional outcomes. This study investigated the feasibility of the angular branch-based scapular tip free flap (STFF). Methods This was a retrospective study of 17 patients undergoing maxillectomy and mandibulectomy and either primary or secondary reconstruction by STFF. This study included surgical, esthetic, and functional outcomes, and detailed data are presented regarding the flap, such as pedicle length, size of the harvested bone, and failure rate. Medical photographs were used to estimate the esthetic outcome, and computed tomography was used to check the flap status postoperatively. Results The data were collected from April 2013 to April 2014. Eight patients underwent maxillary reconstruction, and nine underwent mandibular reconstruction. Maxillary defects usually included unilateral alveolar structures and the palate; mandibular defects were usually those involving mandibular angle and short segment. Vein grafting was not required in any of the patients. Flap failure occurred in one of the 17 patients (5.9%) with successful reconstruction after revision. Of the eight maxillectomy patients, orbital revisions for diplopia after maxillary reconstruction were performed in two patients (25%), and oroantral fistula repair was performed in one patient (12.5%). Conclusion This study demonstrated the reconstructive advantages of the angular branch-based STFF, long pedicle, low flap failure, 3-dimensional nature of bone and soft tissues (chimeric flap), and small rate of donor site morbidity with free ambulation. This flap is an excellent option for use in complex three-dimensional head and neck reconstruction. PMID:26622965

  4. Use of angle kappa in myopic photorefractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Khakshoor, Hamid; McCaughey, Michael V; Vejdani, Amir Hossein; Daneshvar, Ramin; Moshirfar, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore utilization of the coaxially sighted corneal light reflex (CSCLR) for centration during myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for patients with relatively high angle kappa (κ) values. Methods Patients were stratified into two groups preoperatively, on the basis of angle κ values. Group A was composed of 166 eyes with an angle κ value <5°. Group B consisted of 182 eyes with an angle κ value >5°. Intraoperative centering of ablation was performed within group A by utilizing the pupillary center, and within group B by using the CSCLR. Visual acuities were evaluated and compared at 6 months and 12 months postoperatively between groups. Results Mean uncorrected visual acuities (UCVA) for all patients at 6 months and 12 months were −0.073 logMAR and −0.080 logMAR, respectively. A total of 98.9% of patients had a UCVA of 0.00 logMAR (≈20/20 Snellen) 12 months postoperatively. There was not a significant between-group difference in regard to residual refractive error at 6 months or 12 months (P=0.53 and P=0.97), or in UCVA at 6 months and 12 months (P=0.76 and P=0.17). There were no subjective complaints of monocular diplopia, glare, or haloes within either group at any time during follow-up. Conclusion Availing use of the CSCLR for centration of ablation within myopic patients with high angle κ values may aid in providing better refractive outcomes after performance of PRK. PMID:25678767

  5. Delayed manifestation of bilateral scleral thinning after I-BRITE® procedure and review of literature for cosmetic eye-whitening procedures

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; McCaughey, Michael V; Fenzl, Carlton R; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Kramer, Gregory D; Mamalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of delayed-onset bilateral scleral thinning and calcium deposition following a cosmetic ocular-whitening procedure (I-BRITE®). Methods A 33-year-old male patient with a history of right-sided ptosis repair and left-sided anterior uveitis had previously undergone bilateral I-BRITE treatment for chronic conjunctival hyperemia. Four years after the procedure, the patient was referred to our institution with bilateral scleral thinning and overlying calcific depositions. A literature review was performed through PubMed from 1980 through 2014 using the search terms ‘cosmetic’, ‘ocular’, ‘conjunctivectomy’, ‘regional conjunctivectomy’, ‘I-BRITE’, ‘eye-whitening’, ‘scleritis’, ‘necrotizing scleritis’, ‘anterior uveitis’, ‘mitomycin C’, ‘5-fluorouracil’, and ‘bevacizumab’, along with associated cross-referencing from relevant articles. Results Examination of the patient revealed bilateral necrotizing scleritis within the nasal region of both eyes. Calcified plaques were also present within the areas of scleromalacia, along with epithelial defects demonstrated with fluorescein staining. Although evidence of previous intraocular inflammation was apparent within the left eye, there were no active signs of inflammation evident within either eye on initial presentation. Complication rates reported in the literature include: scleral thinning (1.8%), calcific plaque formation (2.9%), fibrovascular proliferation (13%), diplopia (1.2%), elevation of intraocular pressure (4.2%), and recurrence of conjunctival hyperemia (2.1%). Conclusion Cosmetic ocular whitening procedures have an attendant high complication rate, and have been associated with several adverse postoperative complications, which have in turn generated several reservations regarding the veritable benefit of the procedure. Many postsurgical complications may demonstrate delayed apparition, varying from several months to several years after primary

  6. Short and long-term effects of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy on thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Wang, Shu; Qin, Li; Qiang, Wei; Dahal, Mahesh; Fan, Ping; Gao, Shan; Shi, Bingyin

    2016-01-01

    The majority of previous studies on high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse (IVMP) therapy have observed the clinical conditions of patients prior to and following treatment without any long-term follow-up, and these studies have predominantly focused on combined treatment. The present prospective clinical study aimed to assess the long-term effects and safety of high-dose IVMP therapy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), as well as the significance of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-l (sICAM-1) during IVMP therapy. A total of 58 patients with TAO were treated with high-dose IVMP therapy, and their clinical characteristics and indices were recorded before, during and after therapy, with a 12–57 month (mean, 28.4 months) follow-up. Before treatment and on the second day after each IVMP therapy, serum TRAb and sICAM-1 levels were evaluated in 23 patients with TAO via a competitive radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that the symptoms of eyelid swelling, ophthalmodynia, photophobia, lacrimation and diplopia, and visual acuity, ocular motility, proptosis and clinical activity score (CAS) indices were all significantly improved after IVMP therapy. In addition, analysis of covariance demonstrated that alterations in the levels of serum TRAb during the course of treatment were associated with CAS of TAO, whereas the change in serum sICAM-1 was not. In conclusion, high-dose IVMP therapy is an effective, safe, stable and well-tolerated treatment for TAO, which is associated with rare, minor adverse effects. Furthermore, serum TRAb levels are correlated with the CAS of TAO and may serve as a predictor of the response to methylprednisolone therapy. PMID:27446294

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Myasthenia Gravis with Thymoma and Thymic Hyperplasia Undergoing Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nazarbaghi, Surena; Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Arjmand, Nasim; Rezaei, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients, it has remained controversial as to whether this procedure is of a similar efficacy and clinical outcome among MG patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Aim: We sought to determine the long-term clinical outcomes of MG patients who received extended transsternal thymectomy associated with pyridostigmine and prednisolone postoperatively. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from January 1999 to December 2013, MG patients who underwent thymectomy were followed up. Out of 41 MG patients admitted in our center, 25 patients had undergone thymectomy adjunctive to pyridostigmine and prednisolone therapy postoperatively. The primary endpoints included improvement in individual diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysarthria, dyspnea, and limb weakness. In addition, according to the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) criteria, response to therapy was defined as complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacologic remission (PR), and minimal manifestation (MM) as secondary endpoints. Results: Majority of the patients were male (60%) and the mean age of the patients was 32.2 ± 13.9 years. Fifteen (60%) and 10 patients (40%) had thymoma and thymic hyperplasia, respectively. All the patients were followed up during a mean period of of 86.9 ± 50.3 months (minimum 10 months and maximum 168 months). The rates of CSR, PR, and MM were comparable between the thymoma and thymic hyperplasia groups (P = 0.584). Based on the Kaplan Meier analysis, the probabilities of CSR, PR, and MM were not significantly different between patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Conclusion: The extended transsternal thymectomy, along with the postoperative regimen of pyridostigmine and prednisolone was associated with a high rate of clinical improvement among MG patients with thymoma or thymic hyperplasia. PMID:26713298

  8. Comparable Botulinum Toxin Outcomes between Primary and Secondary Blepharospasm: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Giugni, Juan C.; Hastings, Erin; Shukla, Aparna Wagle; Malaty, Irene A.; Okun, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blepharospasm is a focal cranial dystonia, which could be idiopathic in origin or secondary to an underlying disorder that commonly impairs quality of life. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections have become the treatment of choice; however, a less favorable response to BoNT is expected in secondary blepharospasm. No studies have been conducted comparing outcomes between blepharospasm cohorts. We therefore aim to compare BoNT outcomes in primary and secondary blepharospasm subjects. Methods A retrospective review of 64 blepharospasm subjects receiving BoNT therapy was conducted. Demographics, BoNT treatment schedules, duration of BoNT therapy, and side effects were recorded. Outcome measures were duration of benefit, peak-dose benefit recorded with the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGIS), and related side effects. Results No difference was found between the two cohorts regarding duration of benefit from treatment (primary 9.47 weeks vs. secondary 9.63 weeks, p = 0.88). Perceived peak-dose benefit was more commonly reported as “very much improved” in secondary patients, but this was not significant (p = 0.13). Higher BoNT dosages were required in both groups over time, with a mean increase of 20.5% in primary and 26.5% in secondary blepharospasm. Ptosis (8%) and diplopia (6%) were the most common reported side effects. Mean follow-up in years was similar between groups, 3.6 years for primary vs. 2.4 years for secondary blepharospasm (p = 0.17). Discussion BoNT injections were effective with comparable benefits seen in both primary and secondary blepharospasm populations. Clinicians should be aware of the similar benefit from BoNT reported in secondary blepharospasm patients. The average duration of benefit in this cohort was comparable with previous reports. PMID:25562037

  9. DISCUSSION ON VERTIGO

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    Symptoms revealing a state of consciousness, attributable to incoördination of afferent impulses connected with the vestibular system—disturbances of muscle-sense—vestibular ocular tracks—vestibular-spinal tracks. Different Vertigo-Complexes. Destructive lesions of labyrinth, or of vestibular tracks, partial or complete.—Heterogeneous stimulations of the paired intact vestibular-end organs.—The hypersensitive labyrinth.—Clinical manifestations of vertigo, associated with nausea, headache, visual disturbances, nystagmus, diplopia, staggering gait, vasomotor and cardio-vascular symptoms, pallor, flushing, sweating, dyspnœa, fainting, vomiting and diarrhœa. Objective Examination. The tympanic membrane.—Middle-ear track.—Upper air passages.—Hearing tests.—Oculomotor tests.—Labyrinthine reactions.—Postural, caloric, galvanic tests.—Differentiation between destructive and non-destructive disturbances of labyrinth.—Discrimination between peripheral and central lesions.—Vertigo associated with acute, non-perforative otitis media, with chronic otitis media, with labyrinthine fistula, with otosclerosis, post-suppurative adhesions; with peripheral nerve deafness, gun deafness; with rhinitis, ethmoiditis, sinusitis, nasal polypi, postnasal catarrh and dental infections.—Influence of general health on recurrent vertigo and vice versa.—Other factors. Syphilis, malaria, etc. Principles of Treatment. Seek the cause, which, if peripheral, may be removed by operations on the ear, nose, throat, or even by extraction of dead teeth.—If central, by intracranial surgery, decompression, or by neuropathic medical treatment. Controversial Problems. (1) Medicinal treatment: Iodide, bromides, atropine, quinine. (2) Attention to upper air-passages. (3) Fenestration of tympanic membrane. (4) Possible value of Küster's operation in certain cases. (5) Exploration of the saccus-endolymphaticus. (6) Fenestration of the external semicircular canal. (7

  10. Amblyopia & Strabismus Questionnaire: design and initial validation.

    PubMed

    van de Graaf, E S; van der Sterre, G W; Polling, J R; van Kempen, H; Simonsz, B; Simonsz, H J

    2004-09-01

    Literature on the benefits of screening and treatment of amblyopia emphasizes the costs of insufficiently treated amblyopic patients who lose their better eye. However, patients with insufficiently treated amblyopia and strabismus who do not lose their better eye only experience a slight decrease in their quality of life, and such patients occur more frequently. We designed and validated a questionnaire for amblyopia and strabismus in order to assess the decrease in quality of life of such patients. Complaints were collected from outpatients and reduced to five domains, pertaining to distance estimation, visual disorientation, problems with social contacts and cosmetic problems, diplopia, and fear of losing the better eye. For these domains 26 questions were formulated that constitute the Amblyopia & Strabismus Questionnaire (A&SQ). The A&SQ, the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (VFQ-25) and the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12) were presented to 53 healthy controls, 68 outpatients and a cohort of 174 outpatients born between 1962 and 1972 and treated between 1968 and 1974 for amblyopia and strabismus. The quality of life was best in healthy controls and worst in current outpatients, not only on the SF-12 and the VFQ-25 but also on the A&SQ, demonstrating an acceptable construct validity of the A&SQ. The decrease in the quality of life as measured by the A&SQ was most outspoken in our outpatient group of amblyopia and strabismus patients, less in the cohort that had been treated 30 years previously and least in the healthy controls, demonstrating an acceptable discriminatory validity of the A&SQ. PMID:15370526

  11. Orbital decompression surgery and horse chestnut seed extract improved superior orbital vein blood flow in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Jie; Wei, Xin; Xiao, Man-Yi; Xiong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of orbital decomposition (OD) surgery in combination with horse chestnut seed extract (HCSE), as compared to OD alone, in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). METHODS Sixty-two orbits from 62 TAO patients were randomly assigned to OD or OD+HCSE at 1:1 ratio (31 received OD alone, 31 received OD+HCSE). Forty-two orbits from 21 healthy subjects were used as controls. Complete ophthalmic examination and color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) were performed before surgery and 3mo post-surgery on all 62 orbits from the TAO patients. CDFI were also performed on the 42 control orbits. The effect of OD+HCSE and OD alone on TAO orbits was compared on several endpoints, including superior ophthalmic vein blood flow (SOVBF) parameters, subjective assessment, soft tissue involvement, lid retraction, diplopia, eye movement restriction, degree of exophthalmos, and intraocular pressure. The control orbits were used as reference for the SOVBF parameters. RESULTS OD surgery with or without HCSE improved SOVBF, symptoms and soft tissue involvement, decreased degree of exophthalmos and intraocular pressure in orbits of TAO patients. The OD+HCSE combination led to significantly better improvement of SOVBF than OD alone. The differences between the reductions of SOVBF in the two groups are 1.26 cm/s in max-volecity and 0.52 cm/s in min-volecity (P<0.0001). CONCLUSION SOVBF is significantly reduced in the orbits affected with TAO, indicating that congestion may be an important factor contributing to TAO pathogenesis. OD surgery improves the SOVBF, and combination of HCSE medication and OD surgery further improved venous return than OD surgery alone. PMID:27366690

  12. Brain 'Embolism' Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Commissurotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Paulo; Qanadli, Salah D.; Strumza, Pierre; Kacher, Safia; Aberkane, Linda; Aubry, Pierre; Rigaud, Michel; Lacombe, Pascal; Raffestin, Bernadette

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: The common finding of thrombi between the bifoil balloons when they were extracted after mitral dilation prompted us to look for evidence of minor brain embolisms using the sensitive technique of BMRI (brain magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging). Methods: BMRI was performed within 48 hr before and after a percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy (PMBC) in each of the 63 patients in this study. Results: There was evidence (hyperintensity foci: HI) of a previous asymptomatic brain embolism in 38 of 63 patients before PMBC and a new HI appeared in 18 of 63 patients after the procedure. New HI signals were found exclusively in the white matter in 8 of 18 patients and in only 3 of 18 were HI signs larger than 1 cm. One patient, with an HI signal >1 cm in the thalamus and another <1 cm in the brain stem, presented diplopia accompanied by other minor clinical signs. The differences in HI rate among four subgroups (1, older vs younger than 43 years; 2, sinus rhythm vs atrial fibrillation; 3, echo score <8 vs >8; 4, patients from western countries vs the others) were not statistically significant, probably because the number of patients in each subgroup was low. Patients in atrial fibrillation had slightly more (not significant) HI before PMBC (15/20, 75%) than patients in sinus rhythm (23/43, 53%), but after PMBC their HI frequencies were similar (atrial fibrillation: 5/20, 25%; sinus rhythm: 13/43, 30%). Conclusion: Brain microembolism is frequent during PMBC, but is often anatomically limited and free from clinical signs in most cases. Brain embolism seems to be related mainly to the procedure itself and not the features of the patient.

  13. Orbital Metastases from Breast Cancer: Retrospective Analysis at an Academic Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Tiffany M; Tebit, Emaculate V; El Sayed, Ali; Smolkin, Mark E; Dillon, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    Orbital metastases from breast cancer (BC) are rare, but often debilitating. BC accounts for nearly half of metastases to the orbit. Orbital metastases may be discovered years after the initial diagnosis of BC, and are rare at initial presentation. A search of the institutional data base at an academic cancer center identified BC patients who developed or presented with orbital metastases from 2000 to 2013. Baseline characteristics, treatment modalities, survival and treatment responses were collected from the electronic medical record. There were 20 patients identified with orbital metastases (0.7% of all BC cases). The median age at diagnosis of BC was 49 years; 80% had estrogen positive disease. The interval between the initial diagnosis of BC and the presentation of orbital metastases was 8.5 years (0-19 years). Orbital disease was the initial presentation of BC in two cases. Three patients developed bilateral orbital metastases and seven had accompanying brain metastases. The most common presentation was decreased vision (55%), followed by diplopia (25%). The median survival after orbital metastases was 24 months. Thirteen patients (65%) received local radiation therapy. Of those radiated, 90% reported improvement of orbital symptoms. Other treatments included intraocular bevacizumab, surgery, and systemic therapy. Orbital metastases tend to occur in estrogen receptor positive disease and are often found years after BC onset. Orbital metastases may be associated with the development of brain metastases. Radiotherapy is the preferred local therapy and had high symptom control in this cohort. Oncologists should be aware of the signs of orbital metastases and the treatment options. PMID:27143519

  14. Comprehensive evaluation of latest 2D/3D monitors and comparison to a custom-built 3D mirror-based display in laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Reiser, Silvano; Kohn, Nils; Witte, Michael; Leiner, Ulrich; Mühlbach, Lothar; Ruschin, Detlef; Reiner, Wolfgang; Feussner, Hubertus

    2014-03-01

    Though theoretically superior, 3D video systems did not yet achieve a breakthrough in laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, visual alterations, such as eye strain, diplopia and blur have been associated with the use of stereoscopic systems. Advancements in display and endoscope technology motivated a re-evaluation of such findings. A randomized study on 48 test subjects was conducted to investigate whether surgeons can benefit from using most current 3D visualization systems. Three different 3D systems, a glasses-based 3D monitor, an autostereoscopic display and a mirror-based theoretically ideal 3D display were compared to a state-of-the-art 2D HD system. The test subjects split into a novice and an expert surgeon group, which high experience in laparoscopic procedures. Each of them had to conduct a well comparable laparoscopic suturing task. Multiple performance parameters like task completion time and the precision of stitching were measured and compared. Electromagnetic tracking provided information on the instruments path length, movement velocity and economy. The NASA task load index was used to assess the mental work load. Subjective ratings were added to assess usability, comfort and image quality of each display. Almost all performance parameters were superior for the 3D glasses-based display as compared to the 2D and the autostereoscopic one, but were often significantly exceeded by the mirror-based 3D display. Subjects performed the task at average 20% faster and with a higher precision. Work-load parameters did not show significant differences. Experienced and non-experienced laparoscopists profited equally from 3D. The 3D mirror system gave clear evidence for additional potential of 3D visualization systems with higher resolution and motion parallax presentation.

  15. An Approach to Some Aspects of Strabismus from Ocular and Orbital Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Anthony David Neil

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus caused by ocular or orbital trauma can be the result of localized acute soft tissue swelling or may follow orbital fractures, partial or complete loss of extraocular muscle (EOM) and/or cranial nerve function, or damage to surrounding tissues causing mechanical restriction. The strabismus is frequently incomitant and can be difficult, if not impossible to completely correct. The resulting diplopia can affect the individual's ability to function at work, in sports and in common tasks of daily living like driving. The preoperative evaluation should include an assessment of the degree of limitation, muscle function and the condition of the surrounding tissue. In most cases, high resolution computed tomography and/or surface coil dynamic magnetic resonance imaging are required to determine the extent and nature of suspected bony or EOM injury, as well as muscle contractility. If the scan reveals an intact but paretic muscle or only minor muscle injury, surgical intervention is based on the degree of muscle recovery 6 months after the initial insult. If a rectus muscle has been lacerated, and the proximal stump is functional, retrieval should be attempted, either by a direct conjunctival approach if located anteriorly, or by an anterior medial orbitotomy if located deep in the orbit. If a damaged muscle cannot be found, recovered or repaired at any time, then muscle transposition should be considered. If multiple muscles are damaged or scar tissue is excessive, a tether procedure may be indicated. This paper will present an approach to some aspects of strabismus in this setting. PMID:26180469

  16. Rapid-developed primary malignant myoepithelioma in the cavernous sinus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant myoepithelioma is a relatively rare malignant tumor occurring most frequently in the salivary glands. A few isolated cases have been described in other locations, including soft tissue, bone, lung, bronchus, oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx, and maxillary sinus. Malignant myoepithelioma, however, is uncommonly involved within the cavernous sinus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant myoepithelioma arising from within the cavernous sinus. Case presentation Herein, we report a case of a 48-year-old woman who presented a 1-month history of diplopia and blepharoptosis as well as radiological evidence of a rapidly developing cavernous sinus tumor. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal biopsy and a histological diagnosis indicated a malignant myoepithelioma. After diagnosis, the tumor grew rapidly and her clinical condition deteriorated progressively. Therefore, a pterional craniotomy with partial tumor removal was performed. The patient’s clinical state was worsened, and she died two months after the initial operation. Because the malignant myoepithelioma could not be traced to an organ of origin, other than the cavernous sinus, this case was diagnosed as a primary intracranial malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion The purpose of presenting this case report is to raise awareness among clinicians to consider malignant myoepithelioma as a differential diagnosis when a cavernous sinus mass is identified. Furthermore, an ideal management strategy for malignant myoepithelioma is not known and the prognosis seems to be unfavorable; therefore, more cases are needed to enhance our knowledge of the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this rare intracranial lesion. PMID:23642050

  17. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  18. Treatment of Graves' disease and the course of ophthalmopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sridama, V.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1989-07-01

    Contradictory results have been obtained with regards to the effect of various treatment modes on the exacerbation of Graves' ophthalmopathy, probably because the number of patients in each study was small and some studies were analyzed only in relation to one type of treatment. To circument these problems, we studied the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy after various modes of therapy for thyrotoxicosis among 537 patients with Graves' disease. A total of 537 patients with Graves' disease were prospectively studied over an 11-year period. Thirty-one patients were lost to follow-up during the first six months after treatment and were excluded from the study. Of those remaining, 426 received one form of treatment, 79 received two kinds of therapy, and one received three kinds of therapy. Thus, surgical treatments numbered 164, radioactive iodine-131 (/sup 13/1I) treatments numbered 241, and medical treatments numbered 182. Ocular signs were considered improved or exacerbated by the following criteria: decrement or increment of the exophthalmos of 2 mm or more, improvement or deterioration of visual acuity, and regression or progression of extraocular muscle involvement causing diplopia. Among patients who did not have infiltrative ophthalmopathy before treatment, there was no difference in the occurrence of posttreatment exophthalmos in the surgically, medically, and 131I-treated patients (7.1%, 6.7%, and 4.9%, respectively). The incidence and the degree of progression of ophthalmopathy in patients who already had exophthalmos before treatment were similar in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated groups (19.2%, 19.8%, and 22.7%, respectively). Most of the progression occurred in the posttreatment euthyroid stage. The incidence of improvement of ophthalmopathy was also similar 14.1%, 12.6%, and 12.3% in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated patients.

  19. Retroseptal Transconjunctival Approach for Blowout Fracture of the Orbital Floor: An Ideal Choice in East-Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chuman, Takahiro; Fujii, Tatsuya; Morikawa, Aya; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Watanabe, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To ask experts in the field to evaluate a surgeon’s experience with a retroseptal transconjunctival approach for the repair of the orbital floor damaged by blowout fracture that the surgeon encountered in 12 East-Asian patients. Methods: Patients were identified from a database, and a retrospective case note review was conducted. A total of 12 conjunctival procedures were conducted for the repair of blowout fracture with no other complicating fractures. All operative procedures were done by transconjunctival approach alone without lateral canthotomy or any other additional approach. Results: The repair of the orbital floor was successful in all the cases. Three patients had bone grafting to the orbital floor after reduction. The mean of overall surgical time was 48.8 minutes (range, 22–85 minutes) for orbit exposure by transconjunctival approach plus reduction and bone grafting when applicable. There were 6 urgent surgeries associated with missing or entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle, and its repair took an average of 32.0 minutes (range, 22–41 minutes). Postoperative diplopia recovered at an average of 12.4 weeks (range, 0–60 weeks); in urgent cases, it took an average of 5.3 weeks (range, 0–14 weeks) before recovery. Conclusions: A retroseptal transconjunctival approach in repairing the orbital floor is a simple, easily manageable, and effective procedure, leaving no conspicuous facial scars. It has proved to be an optimal choice in blowout fracture cases, especially when there was urgency to decompress the ischemic inferior rectus muscle in as short a surgery time as possible. PMID:27579249

  20. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis

  1. Imaging-Based Diagnosis of Wernicke Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Delavar Kasmaei, Hosein; Baratloo, Alireza; Soleymani, Maryam; Nasiri, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency characterized by ataxia, confusion, nystagmus and ophthalmoplegia resulting from thiamin deficiency. Alcoholism is the common cause for this disease. Case Presentation: A 41 year old man was brought to our emergency department (ED) complaining of confusion. One week earlier he had started to experience severe nausea and vomiting followed by diplopia, dysarthria and also dysphagia. One day later he had experienced gait disturbance and progressive ataxia accompanied with confusion, apathy and disorientation. He had no history of alcoholism, drug abuse or previous surgery but had history of untreated Crohn disease. Just before arrival to our emergency department, he had been hospitalized in another center for about a week but all investigations had failed to provide a conclusive diagnosis. Upon admission to our ED, he was dysarthric and replied with inappropriate answers. On physical examination, bilateral horizontal nystagmus in lateral gaze, left abducens nerve palsy and upward gaze palsy were seen. Gag reflex was absent and plantar reflexes were upwards bilaterally. After reviewing all the previously performed management measures, MRI was performed and was consistent with the diagnosis of WE. Treatment with thiamine led to partial resolution of his upward gaze palsy and nystagmus on the first day. At the end of the third day of treatment, except for gate ataxia, all other symptoms completely resolved and he was fully conscious. After the fifth day his gait became normal and after one week he was discharged in good general condition. Discussion: After reviewing the current literature, it seems that brain MRI can be helpful in the diagnosis of WE in patients with the classic clinical trial in the absence of clear risk factors. PMID:25717447

  2. Indications and clinical outcome of capsular tension ring (CTR) implantation: A review of 9528 cataract surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Tribus, Claudia; Alge, Claudia S; Haritoglou, Christos; Lackerbauer, Carlo; Kampik, Anselm; Mueller, Arthur; Priglinger, Siegfried G

    2007-01-01

    Background: To report the indications and clinical outcomes of all capsular tension ring (CTR) implantations in a large series of consecutive cataract surgeries during a five year interval in a university eye hospital. Methods: The study was designed as a restrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 9528 cataract surgeries. The records were checked for cases in which a CTR was implanted. The indications and clinical outcomes of CTR implantation were documented and an evaluation of posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) insertion, position, and centration. Results: In this series, a CTR was implanted in 69 eyes of 67 patients. The indications were advanced or mature cataract in 40, post-traumatic cataract in 23, pseudoexfoliation syndrome in 4 and subluxated lens in 2 eyes. PCIOL implantation in the capsular bag was possible in 61 (90%) of these 69 eyes. In 5 (7%) additional eyes, PCIOL implantation in the ciliary sulcus was accomplished. In one eye (1%) no IOL implantation was performed because of high myopia. In only two of 69 eyes (2%), an anterior chamber intraocular lens had to be inserted despite prior CTR implantation. In 5 eyes (5%), a slight dislocation of the IOL was noted postoperatively, but none of these patients complained of visually relevant symptoms (eg, monocular diplopia). Conclusions: According to our experience CTRs are used very infrequently (0.7%), but remain useful in cataract surgeries with difficult preoperative or intraoperative conditions. If zonulolysis is less than two quadrants in extent, implantation of a PCIOL was possible in 98% of cases. Implantation of CTRs with special designs may have additional advantages (eg, inhibition of posterior capsule opacity) and warrant further investigation. PMID:19668468

  3. Women with prolactinomas presented at the postmenopausal period.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Bronstein, Marcello D; Shapiro, Jonathan; Tsvetov, Gloria; Benbassat, Carlos; Barkan, Ariel

    2014-12-01

    In women, prolactinomas (mainly microprolactinomas) are commonly diagnosed between 20-40-year old. In postmenopausal women, prolactinomas are rarely encountered and usually do not present with hyperprolactinemia-related symptoms as these are dependent on intact ovarian function. Therefore, the true incidence of prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenomas in postmenopausal woman is unknown. Our study objective was to characterize these rare and unique pituitary tumors. A retrospective study including a consecutive group of postmenopausal women followed and treated at 3 Endocrine academic clinics. Baseline clinical characteristics (PRL and gonadotropins levels, other pituitary hormones, adenoma size and invasiveness, visual fields) and response to treatment are reported. The cohort included 14 postmenopausal women with prolactinomas (mean age at diagnosis, 63.6 ± 7.1 years; range, 54-75 years). Mean adenoma size at presentation was 25.6 ± 12.4 mm (range, 8-50 mm). Six out of the 14 women had significant visual fields damage. Mean baseline PRL level was 1,783 ng/ml, and median PRL was 827 ng/ml (range, 85-6,732 ng/ml). Medical treatment with cabergoline was given to twelve of the patients. Cabergoline normalized/near-normalized PRL in eleven women; one woman was dopamine agonist-resistant. Five of the six subjects with visual disturbances normalized or improved their vision, and a pre-treatment diplopia in another patient disappeared. Two large pituitary tumors disappeared on MRI following long-term dopamine agonist therapy. All other treated prolactinomas, except the resistant adenoma, shrank following medical treatment. Prolactinomas are rarely diagnosed in postmenopausal women. These women usually harbor large and invasive macroadenomas, secreting high PRL levels, and usually respond to dopamine agonist treatment. PMID:24711223

  4. Neurological, psychiatric, ophthalmological, and endocrine complications in giant male prolactinomas: An observational study in Algerian population

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Daffeur, Katia; Akkache, Lina; Zellagui, Hadjer; Haddad, Meriem; Kalafate, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prolactinomas are less frequent, but more invasive in males. Giant ones (≥4 cm) are extremely rare in literature. Their neurological, psychiatric and endocrine complications are life threatening. Our aim was to report the largest mono center series in order to analyze their frequency, their characteristics, and their complications. Subjects and Methods: All patients had clinical examination, hormonal, ophthalmological, and radiological assessment based on computed tomography scan and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Positive diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms, high prolactin ± immunohistochemy study. Mixed adenomas were excluded by hormonal exploration and immunohistochemy. For those who received medical treatment only, a reduction in tumor size was considered a supplementary positive point for the diagnosis. Results: Among 154 male prolactinomas seen between 1987 and 2013, we observed 44 giant tumors (28.5%). Median age = 36 years, and 38.3% were under 30. Median tumor height = 53.95 mm (40–130) and median prolactin = 15,715 ng/ml (n < 20). Solid and cystic aspect ± calcifications was observed in 25%. 42 had cavernous sinuses invasion. Other invasions were: Posterior= 65.9%, anterior= 63.6%, temporal= 15.9% and frontal = 9%. For endocrine complications: Hypogonadism = 98.4%, thyrotroph and corticotroph deficits were seen in respectively 34%, and 32%. Posterior pituitary insufficiency was observed in one case. For ophthalmological complications: Optic atrophy = 46%, Ptosis = 6.8%, diplopia/strabismus = 4.5%. Neurological complications were: Memory loss and/or unconsciousness = 18.2%, epilepsy = 15.9%, frontal syndrome = 9% and obstructive hydrocephalus = 6.8%. Conclusion: Giant prolactinomas account for 28% in our population. Severe neurological complications are frequent. But, obstructive hydrocephalus is rare, which argues for a slow progression. PMID:25932390

  5. IFN beta 1a as Glucocorticoids-Sparing Therapy in a Patient with CLIPPERS

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Villafani, Javier; Tuñón, Alberto; Mateos, Valentín; Oliva-Nacarino, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: CLIPPERS Symptoms: Ataxia • diplopia Medication: IFNbeta 1a Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, distinguished by brainstem- and spinal cord-centered lesions with a characteristic contrast enhancement on MRI, a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate on pathological exam, and a dramatic response to and dependence on steroids therapy. Since its initial description in 2010, different glucocorticoid-sparing agents, mostly immunosuppressant drugs, have been used to minimize the dosage, but these therapies also carry the risk of important secondary effects. We present the first reported case of CLIPPERS treated with interferon beta 1a as add-on therapy. Case Report: A previously healthy 31-year-old man presented with gait ataxia and dysarthria. MRI showed pons-centered hyperintense patchy lesions on T2-weighted images. Additional tests ruled out other possible diagnoses and symptoms reversed with intravenous methylprednisolone. Over the years the patient presented with several episodes of deterioration each year, which were partly reversed with glucocorticoid therapy, but leaving him with growing sequelae. Four years after the initial event, treatment with interferon-beta-1a was initiated, achieving reduced frequency of the relapses to 1 every 4 years, which were no longer associated to increasing disability. This allowed reducing glucocorticoids to 30 mg of Deflazacort every other day. Conclusions: Interferon beta-1a could be an alternative to corticosteroid-combined therapy in CLIPPERS and its more benign profile of secondary effects compared to immunosuppressants could make it an attractive choice. PMID:26813773

  6. [Adult-onset Hartnup disease presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms but without skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mori, E; Yamadori, A; Tsutsumi, A; Kyotani, Y

    1989-06-01

    Hartnup disease is an inborn abnormality of renal and intestinal transport involving the neutral amino acids. Intermittent pellagra-like rash, attacks of cerebellar ataxia and psychiatric disturbance are characteristic symptoms of this disease. We described here a patient with adult-onset Hartnup disease who presented unique neuropsychiatric symptoms but no dermatologic symptoms, and reported features of amino acids transport in this patient and his family. The patient, a man aged 37 years, was referred to us because of lasting daytime bruxism. He is the second child of healthy parents who are first cousin; his elder brother who has been mentally retarded became bed-ridden and died at 32 years of age. His younger brother is completely healthy. Although the patient's development in infancy has been slightly retarded, he completed compulsory 9-year education. At 29 years of age, he experienced episodes of diplopia, ataxic gait and insomnia, and at 33 years of age, of transient stupor. There had been no history of photosensitivity or dermatitis. On neurological examination, there were trunkal ataxia, increased muscular tone and decreased mental activity besides bruxism. These symptoms remained unchanged despite of several medications including trihexyphenidyl, diazepam, halloperidol, tiapride and sulpiride. Two months later, the patient became stuporous; bruxism and hypertonicity became exaggerated. Myerson's sign, sucking reflex and grasp reflex in both hand appeared. There was no dermal lesion. A cranial computed tomography revealed a small calcification in the right frontal subcortical region and a single photon emission tomography indicated possible bifrontal hypoperfusion. Electroencephalograms demonstrated non-specific slowing. Somatosensory evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocities were normal. There were constant indicanuria and amino-aciduria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2582682

  7. Symptomatology associated with accommodative and binocular vision anomalies

    PubMed Central

    García-Muñoz, Ángel; Carbonell-Bonete, Stela; Cacho-Martínez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the symptoms associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions and to assess the methods used to obtain the subjects’ symptoms. Methods We conducted a scoping review of articles published between 1988 and 2012 that analysed any aspect of the symptomatology associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions. The literature search was performed in Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, PsycINFO and FRANCIS. A total of 657 articles were identified, and 56 met the inclusion criteria. Results We found 267 different ways of naming the symptoms related to these anomalies, which we grouped into 34 symptom categories. Of the 56 studies, 35 employed questionnaires and 21 obtained the symptoms from clinical histories. We found 11 questionnaires, of which only 3 had been validated: the convergence insufficiency symptom survey (CISS V-15) and CIRS parent version, both specific for convergence insufficiency, and the Conlon survey, developed for visual anomalies in general. The most widely used questionnaire (21 studies) was the CISS V-15. Of the 34 categories of symptoms, the most frequently mentioned were: headache, blurred vision, diplopia, visual fatigue, and movement or flicker of words at near vision, which were fundamentally related to near vision and binocular anomalies. Conclusions There is a wide disparity of symptoms related to accommodative and binocular dysfunctions in the scientific literature, most of which are associated with near vision and binocular dysfunctions. The only psychometrically validated questionnaires that we found (n=3) were related to convergence insufficiency and to visual dysfunctions in general and there no specific questionnaires for other anomalies. PMID:25323640

  8. Ocular–visual defect and visual neglect in stroke patients – A report from Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Upadhyaya, Suraj; Sharma, Ananda Kumar; Gajurel, Bikram Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To find out the type of visual defects, ocular defects or visual neglect occurring in patients with stroke. Methods In this cross-sectional study including 40 subjects diagnosed as stroke, assessment included visual acuity with the Sheridan-Gardner chart, objective and subjective refraction, duction and version eye movement, cover test at distance and near, anterior segment examination with the slit lamp, posterior segment examination after pupil dilatation, color vision test with the Farnsworth D-15 test, diplopia charting, the Hess charting, and visual field examination on Goldmann perimetry. 33 subjects (82.5%) having stroke underwent star cancellation test for visual neglect evaluation. Chi-square test with Yate's correction was performed to evaluate associations between visual neglect and neurological findings. Results The mean age of the subjects was 52.1 ± 15.7 years with male/female ratio of 0.7. Neurological findings included hemiplegia/hemiparesis in 84.8%, ischemic stroke in 80%, left hemisphere involvement in 60%, and cortical area involvement in 65%. Ocular finding included extraocular muscle palsy in 17.5%, exotropia in 12.5%, and ptosis in 7.5%. Co-morbid ocular findings such as cataract, retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration were also reported. Visual neglect was present in 54.5% subjects predominantly affecting the left side. Conclusion This study reports the relationship between ocular–visual disorders and stroke. There should be a formal screening for visual problems in stroke patients in hospital and rehabilitation settings.

  9. Lapatinib plus capecitabine resolved human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Glück, Stefan; Castrellon, Aurelio

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases affect 25%-30% of women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer and are associated with a high burden of disease and poor prognosis. A 55-year-old woman presented with HER2-positive, hormone receptor-positive, locally advanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma. She received 4 cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel (75 mg/m) plus trastuzumab (6 mg/kg) on a 21-day cycle, resulting in complete pathologic response at the time of surgery. Trastuzumab (6 mg/kg every 21 days) plus anastrozole (1 mg/d) was continued for 1 year. Two years later, the patient progressed with pulmonary nodules and a large pleural effusion. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography revealed multiple lesions in the liver and thoracic spine but no evidence of brain metastases. The patient received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg), paclitaxel (80 mg/m), and carboplatin (area under the curve 2) for 6 months; her symptoms resolved and her disease stabilized. Seven months later, she developed diplopia and gait difficulties, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple brain lesions. Whole-brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with excellent clinical results. The patient remained progression free without symptoms for approximately 3 months. When she developed central nervous system symptoms, she was treated with lapatinib (1250 mg/d continuously) plus capecitabine (2000 mg/m given on days 1-14 of a 21-day cycle). Four months later, a brain computed tomography performed shortly before her death from progressive systemic disease revealed near complete resolution of brain metastases. Lapatinib plus capecitabine seems to have clinical activity in HER2-positive brain metastases. PMID:19287304

  10. Orbital blow-out fractures: correlation of preoperative computed tomography and postoperative ocular motility.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J; Garcia, G H; Logani, S C; Murphy, M L; Sheth, B P; Seth, A K

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Although the management of orbital blow-out fractures was controversial for many years, refined imaging with computed tomography (CT) helped to narrow the poles of the debate. Many orbital surgeons currently recommend repair if fracture size portends late enophthalmos, or if diplopia has not substantially resolved within 2 weeks of the injury. While volumetric considerations have been generally well-served by this approach, ocular motility outcomes have been less than ideal. In one series, almost 50% of patients had residual diplopia 6 months after surgery. A fine network of fibrous septa that functionally unites the periosteum of the orbital floor, the inferior fibrofatty tissues, and the sheaths of the inferior rectus and oblique muscles was demonstrated by Koornneef. Entrapment between bone fragments of any of the components of this anatomic unit can limit ocular motility. Based on the pathogenesis of blow-out fractures, in which the fibrofatty-muscular complex is driven to varying degrees between bone fragments, some measure of soft tissue damage might be anticipated. Subsequent intrinsic fibrosis and contraction can tether globe movement, despite complete reduction of herniated orbital tissue from the fracture site. We postulated that the extent of this soft tissue damage might be estimated from preoperative imaging studies. METHODS: Study criteria included: retrievable coronal CT scans; fractures of the orbital floor without rim involvement, with or without extension into the medial wall; preoperative diplopia; surgical repair by a single surgeon; complete release of entrapped tissues; and postoperative ocular motility outcomes documented with binocular visual fields (BVFs). Thirty patients met all criteria. The CT scans and BVFs were assessed by different examiners among the authors. Fractures were classified into 3 general categories and 2 subtypes to reflect the severity of soft tissue damage within each category. "Trap-door" injuries

  11. Evaluation of cases with cerebral thrombosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ünver, Olcay; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Kutlubay, Büşra Işın; Gülten, Thomas; Güneş, Sağer; Hacıfazlıoğlu, Nilüfer Eldeş; Türkdoğan, Dilşad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to evaluate the patients who were followed up in our clinic with a diagnosis of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in terms of age, sex, clinical findings, etiology, thrombophilic factors, imaging findings, treatment and prognosis. Material and Methods: The files of 11 patients who were followed up in our pediatric neurology clinic with a diagnosis of cerebral thrombosis between 1 December 2010 and 31 December 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Seven of 11 patients were male (63.6%). The median age was 14 years (2–17 years). Six (54%) of the patients presented with a complaint of headache. Other complaints at presentation included diplopia (n:3), weakness and difficulty in speaking (n:1) and seizure (n:1). A diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri was made in eight of the patients (72.7%). In the etiology, mastoiditis was found in three patients, mastoiditis and meningitis were found in combination in one patient, Behçet’s disease was found in three patients and head trauma was found in one patient. In 3 patients, only prothrombotic genetic risk factors were present; one patient had deficiency of protein C and S, one patient had deficiency of antithrombin III and one patient had hyperhomosisteinemia in association with vitamin B12 deficiency. 1A homozygous MTFHR A1298C mutation was detected in the patient who had mastoiditis and meningitis and protein S deficiency and lupus anticoagulant were found in another patient who had mastoiditis. All patients received anticoagulant treatment and all patients recovered without neurological sequelae except one. Conclusions: Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis should be considered in patients who present with headache and focal neurological deficits. Appropriate utilization of imaging studies is necessary for the diagnosis. Detailed ear, nose and throat examination should be performed to detect mastoiditis. It is recommended that genetic risk factors should be investigated, because hereditary thrombophilis factors

  12. [A case in which the subject was affected by Listeia meningoencephalitis during administration of infliximab for steroid-dependent adult onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Chie; Ohara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Nonaka, Michio; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-06-01

    The subject was a 22-year-old woman who developed high fever and arthralgias and eruptions in the extremities around June 2005. She sought medical advice at a nearby dermatology clinic, where hepatic dysfunction was noted on blood testing. The patient was thus hospitalized the next day. Although CRP levels were significantly high, no sign of infection was observed and bone marrow cell differentiation was normal. Adult onset Still's disease was diagnosed based on the observation of persistent high fever >39 degrees C, eruptions, increased leukocytes, pharyngeal pain, splenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, negative autoantibody results from blood testing, and high serum ferritin levels. Administration of prednisolone 30 mg/day was initiated, but proved ineffective. Steroid pulse therapy was conducted, and the subject was transferred to our medical facility for continued treatment. Attempts were made to control the disease using combined steroid and cyclosporine administration; but exacerbation of high serum ferritin levels and hepatic dysfunctions were observed, so a second course of steroid pulse therapy was conducted. Symptoms improved temporarily, but steroid levels were difficult to reduce. Cyclosporine was therefore replaced by methotrexate, and administration of infliximab was initiated. In the course of treatment, administration of a sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim combination was initiated, but was discontinued due to suspicion of drug-induced hepatic injury. A second administration of infliximab was conducted in late August, and rapid improvements in clinical symptoms and abnormal test values was observed. However, high fever and headache developed suddenly in early September. Based on the results of spinal fluid testing, blood and spinal fluid cultures and MRI of the head, Listeria meningoencephalitis was diagnosed. Diplopia and impaired consciousness occurred during the disease course, and formation of a brain abscess was observed on imaging. However, symptoms

  13. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  14. P08.19PRIMARY INTRATHECAL MELANOMA ARISING FROM MENINGEAL MELANOCYTOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Moser, W.; Thier, K.; Hafner, C.; Trautinger, F.; Ungersböck, K.; Sedivy, R.; Oberndorfer, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary melanocytic tumours of the leptomeninges are rare diseases. The WHO classification of 2007 described four entities: diffuse melanocytosis, melanocytoma, malignant melanoma and meningeal melanomatosis. Meningeal melanocytosis is a benign proliferation of melanocytes with a risk of malignant transformation and is often associated with neurocutaneos melanosis. CASE REPORT: A 65-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and disturbed micturition. Neurological examination revealed left sided S1- sensory radiculopathy. His medical history was unremarkable. MRI of the lumbar spine showed a contrast-enhancing intrathecal tumour of the conus medullaris and MRI of the brain was suspicious of neoplastic meningitis. Spinal surgery exhibited a brown tumour mass with diffuse spreading of pigmented lesions along the arachnoidea. Histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses showed an intrathecal melanoma with a wild-type BRAF genotype. Dermatological examination was unremarkable. Lumbar stereotactic radiotherapy was applied. Subsequently, 3 cycles of temozolomide (150mg/m2 on 5 days out of 28) and bi-weekly intrathecal liposomal cytarabine were administered. Despite the poor prognosis of neoplastic meningitis in melanoma, the patient survived without clinical for more than one year. 15 months after the initial diagnosis spinal MRI showed a local relapse and a second surgery was performed. This time molecular analysis of the tumor revealed the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation. Due to the initially slow tumor progression treatment with B-Raf inhibitors was withheld and immunotherapy with the anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was initiated together with stereotactic radiotherapy of the conus medullaris. Three months later, the patient complained about diplopia and dizziness. Neurological examination revealed oculomotor nerve palsy. MRI of the brain showed a meningeal contrast-enhancement in the brainstem area. The B-Raf inhibitor

  15. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Indonesia: epidemiology, incidence, signs, and symptoms at presentation

    PubMed Central

    Adham, Marlinda; Kurniawan, Antonius N.; Muhtadi, Arina Ika; Roezin, Averdi; Hermani, Bambang; Gondhowiardjo, Soehartati; Tan, I Bing; Middeldorp, Jaap M.

    2012-01-01

    Among all head and neck (H&N) cancers, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) represents a distinct entity regarding epidemiology, clinical presentation, biological markers, carcinogenic risk factors, and prognostic factors. NPC is endemic in certain regions of the world, especially in Southeast Asia, and has a poor prognosis. In Indonesia, the recorded mean prevalence is 6.2/100 000, with 13 000 yearly new NPC cases, but otherwise little is documented on NPC in Indonesia. Here, we report on a group of 1121 NPC patients diagnosed and treated at Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia between 1996 and 2005. We studied NPC incidence among all H&N cancer cases (n=6000) observed in that period, focusing on age and gender distribution, the ethnic background of patients, and the disease etiology. We also analyzed most prevalent signs and symptoms and staging of NPC patients at first presentation. In this study population, NPC was the most frequent H&N cancer (28.4%), with a male-to-female ratio of 2.4, and was endemic in the Javanese population. Interestingly, NPC appeared to affect patients at a relatively young age (20% juvenile cases) without a bimodal age distribution. Mostly, NPC initiated in the fossa of Rosenmuller and spreaded intracranially or locally as a mass in the head. Occasionally, NPC developed at the submucosal level spreading outside the anatomic limits of the nasopharynx. At presentation, NPC associated with hearing problems, serous otitis media, tinnitus, nasal obstruction, anosmia, bleeding, difficulty in swallowing and dysphonia, and even eye symptoms with diplopia and pain. The initial diagnosis is difficult to make because early signs and symptoms of NPC are not specific to the disease. Early-age Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection combined with frequent exposure to environmental carcinogenic co-factors is suggested to cause NPC development. Undifferentiated NPC is the most frequent histological type and is closely associated with EBV

  16. Clinical and neurophysiological changes in patients with pineal region expansions.

    PubMed

    Hajnsek, Sanja; Paladino, Josip; Gadze, Zeljka Petelin; Nanković, Sibila; Mrak, Goran; Lupret, Velimir

    2013-03-01

    In the last 20 years neurological and neurosurgical follow up of our patients with pineal region expansions (118 patients) pointed to certain clinical and neurophysiological regularities. We performed retrospective study which included 84 patients with pineal region expansions in the period from 1992 to 2009. The study included 55 women and 29 men, mean age 30.08 +/- 13.93 years, with positive brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)--70 patients (83.4%) had simple pineal gland cysts, and 14 patients (16.67%) had expansive process in pineal region with compressive effect. All patients had headache, while 32 patients (38%) had epileptic phenomena--primary generalized seizures. Patients had common electroencephalography (EEG) pattern with paroxysmal discharges of 3Hz (or more than 3 Hz) spike-and-wave complexes. Operation with supracerebellar infratentorial approach was performed in 70 patients. In most of our patients indication for the operation was established based on the size of the cyst (15 mm or more), with the signs of compression on the quadrigeminal plate and compression of the surrounding veins, which could result in seizures and EEG changes verified in our group of patients. Pathohistological analysis revealed pineocytomas in 11 cases (15.71%), pinealoblastomas in 2 cases (2.86%), one case of teratoma (1.43%), while 56 patients had pineal gland cysts (80%). Following surgery clinical condition improved in all patients--patients became seizure-free and headaches significantly decreased. Other symptoms including diplopiae, nausea, vomiting, vertigo as well as blurred vision also disappeared. There were no complications after surgical procedures. This study points to often appearance of seizures that clinically and neurophysiologically present as primary generalized epilepsy in patients with pineal region expansions. Our hypotheses are that mass effect on the surrounding veins that affects normal perfusion, compressive effect on the quadrigeminal plate and the

  17. 317 Myasthenia Gravis and Asthma, Relationship between Two Different Disorders of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease caused by absence of neuromuscular transmission due to antibodies directed against the nicotinic AChR located at the neuromuscular junction. The main symptoms include muscle weakness in the affected muscles, which is worse after its use. Diagnosis is made upon clinical manifestations and finding of IgG. Only 80 to 90% of patients with generalized disease are positive to these antibodies, and 30 to 50% with ophthalmologic manifestations. Other immunological alteration found in these patients is an overexpression of the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23). Asthma is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, wheezing and chest tightness caused by inflammation and a reversible contraction of bronchial smooth muscle. Immunologically is associated with a Th2 cytokine profile, mainly Il-4, Il-5, Il-13 and an increased IgE. Methods Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent an altered response of the immune system. Here we discuss the case of a patient who presented with an allergic disease at first then years later developed an autoimmune disease. Results Our patient had been diagnosed with persistent allergic rhinitis and asthma since 1992. He had been treated with inhaled corticosteroids, bronchodilators, intranasal corticosteroids, antihistamines and specific immunotherapy with control of symptoms. In June 2010 he noticed diplopia, palpebral ptosis and muscle weakness in upper extremities diagnosed with Myastenia gravis and started treatment with piridostigmine with adequate control of muscular symptoms. No thymoma was identified. Conclusions It has been noted the possible relationship between allergic and autoimmune diseases since in both there is an alteration in the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. In this patient, we found the association between asthma and 19 years later the development of myasthenia gravis. Some of the explanations for this kind of association is the expression of CD23 in myasthenia

  18. Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy in patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures: Results of a phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Michael R; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Harvey, Jay; Rogin, Joanne B; Biraben, Arnaud; Galimberti, Carlo A; Kowacs, Pedro A; Hong, Seung Bong; Cheng, Hailong; Blum, David; Nunes, Teresa; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, phase III study was conducted at 173 centers in 19 countries, including the United States and Canada. Eligible patients were aged ≥16 years and had uncontrolled partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). After an 8-week baseline period, patients were randomized to once-daily placebo (n = 226), ESL 800 mg (n = 216), or ESL 1,200 mg (n = 211). Following a 2-week titration period, patients received ESL 800 or 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. Seizure data were captured and documented using event-entry or daily entry diaries. Results Standardized seizure frequency (SSF) during the maintenance period (primary end point) was reduced with ESL 1,200 mg (p = 0.004), and there was a trend toward improvement with ESL 800 mg (p = 0.06), compared with placebo. When data for titration and maintenance periods were combined, ESL 800 mg (p = 0.001) and 1,200 mg (p < 0.001) both reduced SSF. There were no statistically significant interactions between treatment response and geographical region (p = 0.38) or diary version (p = 0.76). Responder rate (≥50% reduction in SSF) was significantly higher with ESL 1,200 mg (42.6%, p < 0.001) but not ESL 800 mg (30.5%, p = 0.07) than placebo (23.1%). Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and TEAEs leading to discontinuation increased with ESL dose. The most common TEAEs were dizziness, somnolence, nausea, headache, and diplopia. Significance Adjunctive ESL 1,200 mg once-daily was more efficacious than placebo in adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. The once-daily 800 mg dose showed a marginal effect on SSF, but did not reach statistical significance. Both doses were well tolerated. Efficacy assessment was not affected by

  19. Surgical Complications of Primary Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhiping; Li, Ying; Wu, Yongzhong; Qu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the surgical complications of scleral buckling (SB) and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) performed on primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and to discover which surgical procedures bring fewer complications. Methods An electronic literature search using the PubMed database, ISI Web of Knowledge and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing SB with PPV on primary RRD. Outcome measures included intra-operative complications and early and late post-operative complications. Results During the operation, significantly less subretinal hemorrhage occurred in the PPV group than in the SB group (OR = 4.71; 95%CI, 1.33–16.64; p = 0.02) and the hypotony incidence was significantly higher in the SB group (OR = 18.24; 95%CI, 2.37–140.44; p = 0.005); however, the occurrence of iatrogenic breaks was significantly lower in the SB group (OR = 0.05; 95%CI, 0.01–0.21; p<0.0001). In the early stage of post-operation, significantly higher incidence of choroidal detachment was identified in the SB group than in the PPV group (OR = 10.19; 95%CI, 2.36–44.09; p = 0.002); patients undergoing SB had significantly higher odds of residual subretinal fluid (OR = 14.71; 95%CI, 1.84–117.32; p = 0.01); the occurrence of high intraocular pressure was significantly lower in the SB group (OR = 0.46; 95%CI, 0.23–0.89; p = 0.02); and no significant difference was shown in the incidence of epithelia defect (p = 0.37) between the two groups. In the late stage of post-operation, the incidence of diplopia/extraocular muscle dysfunction was significantly higher in the SB group (OR = 4.04; 95%CI, 1.30–12.52; p = 0.02); and significantly less cataract was observed in the SB group (OR = 0.20; 95%CI, 0.14–0.30; p<0.00001); no significant difference was found in the incidences of cystoid macular edema (p = 0.65), macular pucker (p = 0.52), post-operative proliferative

  20. P09.03USE OF METHYLPREDNISOLONE IN LATE EFFECTS OF RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Moreno, J.; Gómez, L.; Jiménez de la Peña, M.; Alonso-Torres, A.; Maycas-Cepeda, T.; Barbero-Bordallo, N.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radiation therapy to the brain can cause problems months or years after treatment ends. Side effects can include memory loss, movement disorders, urinary incontinence, trouble thinking, or personality changes. There is no current treatment for this late complication. and it has been proved bevacizumab, steroids, hyperbaric O2 with different results. We present three cases in which the use of methylprednisolone, as in multiple sclerosis relapses, has had a very good response in terms of clinical and radiological evaluation. Case 1: 43 year-old-woman with recurrent vestibular schwannoma received radiation therapy on the tumour site after the second surgery. Six months later she consulted for diplopia, ataxia and worsening of her facial palsy since a few days ago. The neurological exam showed a right internuclear ophtalmoplegia, vertical nistagmus with upward gaze, right limbs dysmetria and ataxia. The MRI showed high-signal intensity lesions with contrast enhancement in the radiation field (bulbopontine region, right pons and cerebellar peduncle). The diagnosis was subacute rhombencephalitis. We started five days of 1 gr of methylprednisolone. The symptomatology and the MRI changes resolved completely one month after therapy. Case 2: A 60 year-old-man with temporal glioblastoma diagnosed in 2010. He was treated with Stupp regimen followed by temozolomide. Six months later the patient was getting worse of his neurological symptons with abulia and apathy. A MRI showed worsening in brain edema with an increase in contrast enhancement, with low relative cerebral blood volume. The diagnosis was late pseudoprogression and he received a cycle of 250 mg of methylprednisolone during five days with resolution of the clinical symptoms and significant improvement in MRI brain edema. Case 3: A 33 year-old-woman diagnosed in 1993 of temporal astrocytoma grade III. It was resected and afterwards radiotherapy. In 2012 started with instability and dizziness. Examination

  1. The epidemiologic characteristics and clinical course of ophthalmopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in Olmsted County, Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, G B

    1994-01-01

    Among incident cases of GO in Olmsted County, Minnesota: GO affected females six times more frequently than males (86% versus 14% of cases, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence rate was 16 cases per 100,000 population per year for females and 2.9 cases per 100,000 population for males. The peak incidence rates were bimodal, occurring in the age groups 40 to 44 years and 60 to 64 years in females and 45 to 49 years and 65 to 69 years in males. Among patients with GO, approximately 90% had Graves' hyperthyroidism, 1% had primary hypothyroidism, 3% had Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 5% were euthyroid. Eyelid retraction was the most common ophthalmic feature of autoimmune thyroid disease, being present either unilaterally or bilaterally in more than 90% of patients at some point in their clinical course. Exophthalmos of one or both eyes affected approximately 60% of patients, restrictive extraocular myopathy was apparent in about 40% of patients, and optic nerve dysfunction occurred in either one or both eyes in 6% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Only 5% of patients had the complete constellation of classic findings: eyelid retraction, exophthalmos, optic nerve dysfunction, extraocular muscle involvement, and hyperthyroidism. Upper eyelid retraction, either unilateral or bilateral, was documented in approximately 75% of patients at the time of diagnosis of GO. Lid lag also was a frequent early sign, being present either unilaterally or bilaterally in 50% of patients at the initial examination. At the time of diagnosis of GO, the most frequent ocular symptom was pain or discomfort, which affected 30% of patients. Some degree of diplopia was noted by approximately 17% of patients, lacrimation or photophobia was present in about 15% to 20% of patients, and 7.5% of patients complained of blurred vision. Decreased vision attributable to optic neuropathy was present in less than 2% of eyes at the time of diagnosis of GO. Thyroid dermopathy and acropachy

  2. The surgical treatment of fibrous dysplasia. With emphasis on recent contributions from cranio-maxillo-facial surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, M T; Persing, J A; Jane, J A

    1985-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a congenital, metabolic, nonfamilial disturbance that occurs in one or more bones, at times in association with skin pigmentations or endocrine abnormalities. The authors report on a large personal series of 23 patients with fibrous dysplasia involving the craniofacial skeleton. The etiology, clinical findings, pathology, and differential diagnosis of this condition are reviewed and a working hypothesis is offered for the pathophysiology of this disorder. Approximately one-third of patients with fibrous dysplasia have involvement of the cranial or facial bones. The authors describe how new techniques in craniofacial surgery have opened up additional options for this group of patients. Deformity, diplopia, proptosis, sinus infection, deafness, and loss of vision, are some of the clinical features that may require early surgical management. Evidence is given to support more complete resection of bony lesions with immediate reconstruction by several techniques. The removal, remodeling, and replacement of the dysplastic bone is advanced as a promising new method for the management of these complex problems. Successful use of this technique in four patients is reported. In a separate group of patients, continuing good experience is reported with cranio-orbital reconstruction by means of large methyl-methacrylate implants. Both of these surgical approaches eliminate donor site morbidity that results from the grafting of large amounts of autogenous bone. Both techniques also avoid the problems associated with postoperative absorption of bone grafting. Several patients are reported in whom serious disturbances in visual function appear to have been prevented or reversed by early treatment. Factors leading to malignant change in patients with fibrous dysplasia are reviewed. Images FIG. 1A. FIG. 1B. FIG. 1C. FIG. 1D. FIG. 1E. FIG. 1F. FIG. 2A. FIG. 2B. FIG. 2C. FIG. 2D. FIG. 2E. FIG. 2F. FIG. 2G. FIG. 2H. FIGS. 2I and J. FIG. 3A. FIG. 3B. FIG. 3C. FIG. 3

  3. Novel medications for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Cinzia; Perucca, Emilio

    2011-11-12

    eslicarbazepine can cause a significant decrease in the blood levels of ethinylestradiol, levonorgestrel and simvastatin. The approved effective dose ranges are 200-400 mg/day in two divided doses for lacosamide, 800-1200 mg/day once daily for eslicarbazepine acetate, and 600-1200 mg/day in three divided doses for retigabine. In phase III, randomized, double-blind, adjunctive therapy trials, responder rates (proportion of patients with ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency vs baseline) at the highest approved dose were comparable for the three drugs (eslicarbazepine acetate: 37-43% vs 13-20% for placebo; lacosamide: 38-41% vs 18-26% for placebo; retigabine: 33-44% vs 16-18% for placebo). The adverse events most commonly reported with active treatment compared with placebo included dizziness, diplopia and nausea for lacosamide; dizziness, somnolence and nausea for eslicarbazepine acetate; and dizziness, somnolence and fatigue for retigabine. The role of these agents in the treatment algorithm will be increasingly defined as clinical experience accumulates. At present, their use is largely restricted to the adjunctive treatment of focal seizures, with or without secondary generalization, in adults with epilepsy who failed to achieve seizure freedom after having tried two or more first-line agents. PMID:22035515

  4. Clinicopathologic, ophthalmic, visual profiles and management of mucoceles in blacks.

    PubMed

    Ajaiyeoba, Ayotunde; Kokong, Daniel; Onakoya, Adekunle

    2006-01-01

    The study aimed at finding out the clinicopathologic, ophthalmic and visual profiles, management and outcome of mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses in Nigerians. The study was a retrospective review of 20 cases of mucoceles who presented to the ENT clinic and referred to the eye clinic of the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria. These included nine males and 11 females with a male:female ratio of approximately 1:1. Mucoceles commonly involved more than one sinus on the same side. The sinuses commonly involved were the frontoethmoidal sinuses, frontal sinus and maxillary sinuses. The preoperative visual acuity in 16 (80%) patients was 6/4-6/9, three (15%) had between 6/9-6/18, and one (5%) patient was CF ("count fingers") in the affected eyes. The majority (90%) of our patients presented with multiple ophthalmic features; however, proptosis was the most popular and ophthalmic presentation and occurred in 15 (75%) patients. Proptosis was nonaxial in all cases with inferior, lateral or inferolateral displacement. Degree of proptosis ranged from 1-20 mm. Other presentations were squint (leading to diplopia) observed in one (5%) patient and epiphora in another [one (5%)] patient. Poor vision appeared to be the main problem in one (5%) patient, while in another [one (5%)] patient, the affected eye was completely immobilized. One (5%) patient presented with orbital cellulitis. Common radiological findings included classical expansive appearance with loss of the normal scalloping appearance with dehiscence of the wall of the affected sinus as was observed in nine (45%) of our patients. All 20 patients had excision of mucoceles (frontoethmoidectomies). At surgery, 11 (55%) patients had a combination of dehiscence of medial and/or posterior walls, and/or floor of the orbit. Materials evacuated were mucopurulent in 15 (75%) cases, moldy in three (15%) and cheesy in two (10%). Nine (45%) patients had intact walls. Three (15%) patients developed orbital cellulitis as

  5. Spectacle correction versus no spectacles for prevention of strabismus in hyperopic children

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa; Wang, Xue; Scherer, Roberta W; Mutti, Donald O

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperopia (far-sightedness) in infancy requires accommodative effort to bring images into focus. Prolonged accommodative effort has been associated with an increased risk of strabismus (eye misalignment). Strabismus makes it difficult for the eyes to work together and may result in symptoms of asthenopia (eye strain) and intermittent diplopia (double vision), and makes near work tasks difficult to complete. Untreated strabismus may result in the development of amblyopia (lazy eye). The prescription of spectacles to correct hyperopic refractive error is believed to prevent the development of strabismus. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of prescription spectacles compared with no intervention for the prevention of strabismus in infants and children with hyperopia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to April 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2014), PubMed (1966 to April 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 April 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index database in September 2013. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials investigating the assignment to spectacle intervention or no treatment for children with hyperopia. The definition of hyperopia remains subjective, but we required it to be at least greater than +2.00 diopters (D) of hyperopia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data using the standard