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Sample records for direct acoustic profiling

  1. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  2. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  3. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  4. Compressive acoustic sound speed profile estimation.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Michael; Gerstoft, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Ocean acoustic sound speed profile (SSP) estimation requires the inversion of acoustic fields using limited observations. Compressive sensing (CS) asserts that certain underdetermined problems can be solved in high resolution, provided their solutions are sparse. Here, CS is used to estimate SSPs in a range-independent shallow ocean by inverting a non-linear acoustic propagation model. It is shown that SSPs can be estimated using CS to resolve fine-scale structure. PMID:27036293

  5. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  6. Profiling of molecular interactions in real time using acoustic detection.

    PubMed

    Godber, Benjamin; Frogley, Mark; Rehak, Marian; Sleptsov, Alexander; Thompson, Kevin S J; Uludag, Yildiz; Cooper, Matthew A

    2007-04-15

    Acoustic sensors that exploit resonating quartz crystals to directly detect the binding of an analyte to a receptor are finding increasing utility in the quantification of clinically relevant analytes. We have developed a novel acoustic detection technology, which we term resonant acoustic profiling (RAP). This technology builds on the fundamental basics of the "quartz crystal microbalance" or "QCM" with several key additional features including two- or four-channel automated sample delivery, in-line referencing and microfluidic sensor 'cassettes' that are pre-coated with easy-to-use surface chemistries. Example applications are described for the quantification of myoglobin concentration and its interaction kinetics, and for the ranking of enzyme-cofactor specificities. PMID:17129723

  7. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Likun

    2015-08-31

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  8. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Likun; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-08-01

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  9. Acoustic thermometric reconstruction of a time-varying temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sharakshane, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The time-varying temperature profiles were reconstructed in an experiment using a thermal acoustic radiation receiving array containing 14 sensors. The temperature was recovered by performing similar experiments using plasticine, as well as in vivo with a human hand. Plasticine preliminarily heated up to 36.5°C and a human hand were placed into water for 50 s at a temperature of 20°C. The core temperature of the plasticine was independently measured using thermocouples. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction in the lateral direction was determined by the distance between neighboring sensors and was equal to10 mm; the averaging time was 10 s. The error in reconstructing the core temperature determined in the experiment with plasticine was 0.5 K. The core temperature of the hand changed with time (in 50 s it decreased from 35 to 34°C) and space (the mean square deviation was 1.5 K). The experiment with the hand revealed that multichannel detection of thermal acoustic radiation using a compact 45 × 36 mm array to reconstruct the temperature profile could be performed during medical procedures.

  10. Statistical Inversion of Acoustic Backscatter Profile Data with Sediment-Induced Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; Hay, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-frequency acoustic backscatter inversion is a proven technique for measuring profiles of suspended sediment size and concentration. However, current inversion techniques tend to become inaccurate when sediment-induced acoustic attenuation is high (e.g., large suspended concentrations). In such cases, statistical fluctuations cause an accumulation of errors along the observed profile, which leads to an ill-posed inverse problem, even if the intrinsic properties of the scatterers are exactly known. Here, a statistical inversion methodology is introduced in which the ill-posed problem is regularized by explicitly considering the uncertainty of the observational data. The method uses the Extended Kalman Filter to estimate the propagation of uncertainty through the profile, followed by a variational smoothing step. This approach is shown to successfully estimate concentration and size profiles in cases where direct inversion fails. The method is also applied to laboratory experiments involving a multi-frequency megahertz acoustic profiler (MFDop) measuring a sediment-laden jet.

  11. Assessment of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the functional results of a new, active, acoustic-mechanical hearing implant, the Direct Acoustic Cochlear Stimulation Partial Implant (DACS PI), in a preclinical study. The DACS PI is an electromagnetic device fixed to the mastoid by screws and coupled to a standard stapes prosthesis by an artificial incus (AI). The function of the DACS PI-aided reconstruction was assessed by determining: (1) the maximum equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) of the implant, which was obtained from measurements of the volume displacement at the round window in normal and implanted ears, and (2) the quality at the coupling interface between the AI of the DACS and the stapes prosthesis, which was quantified from measurements of relative motions between the AI and the prosthesis. Both measurements were performed with fresh temporal bones using a scanning laser Doppler interferometry system. The expected maximum equivalent SPL with a typical driving voltage of 0.3 V was about 115-125 dB SPL up to 1.5 kHz in reconstruction with the DACS PI, and decreased with a roll-off slope of about 65 dB/decade, reaching 90 dB SPL at 8 kHz. The large roll-off relative to a normal ear was presumed to be a relatively high inductive impedance of the coil of the DACS PI actuator at higher frequencies. Good coupling quality between the AI and the prosthesis was achieved below the resonance (∼1.5 kHz) of the DACS PI for all tested stapes prostheses. Above the resonance, the SMart Piston, which is composed of a shape-memory alloy, had the best coupling quality. PMID:22739432

  12. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  13. Directional Electrostatic Accretion Process Employing Acoustic Droplet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for manufacturing a free standing solid metal part. In the present invention, metal droplets are ejected in a nozzleless fashion from a free surface pool of molten metal by applying focused acoustic radiation pressure. The acoustic radiation pressure is produced by high intensity acoustic tone bursts emitted from an acoustic source positioned at the bottom of the pool which directs the acoustic energy at the pool surface. The metal droplets are electrostatically charged so their trajectory can be controlled by electric fields that guide the droplets to predetermined points on a target. The droplets impinge upon the target and solidify with the target material. The accretion of the electrostatically directed solidified droplets forms the free standing metal part.

  14. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-05-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determinetemperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle,that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gasvolume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple,rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process controlapplications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outsidetemperature profile is tranferred to a chosen gas contained inside theguide.

  15. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  16. An Acoustic Profile of Right-Dislocations in French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an acoustic profile of the prosody of right-dislocations in French, using the CECIL computer hardware and software package to analyze 28 right-dislocations occurring in a corpus of natural French discourse. It was found that, although right-dislocations appear to fulfill various functional roles in discourse, no correlation appears…

  17. Tracking beaked whales with a passive acoustic profiler float.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Haru; Jones, Christopher; Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Dziak, Robert P; Meinig, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic methods are frequently used to monitor endangered marine mammal species. Advantages of acoustic methods over visual ones include the ability to detect submerged animals, to work at night, and to work in any weather conditions. A relatively inexpensive and easy-to-use acoustic float, the QUEphone, was developed by converting a commercially available profiler float to a mobile platform, adding acoustic capability, and installing the ERMA cetacean click detection algorithm of Klinck and Mellinger [(2011). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129(4), 1807-1812] running on a high-power DSP. The QUEphone was tested at detecting Blainville's beaked whales at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), a Navy acoustic test range in the Bahamas, in June 2010. Beaked whale were present at AUTEC, and the performance of the QUEphone was compared with the Navy's Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges (M3R) system. The field tests provided data useful to evaluate the QUEphone's operational capability as a tool to detect beaked whales and report their presence in near-real time. The range tests demonstrated that the QUEphone's beaked whale detections were comparable to that of M3R's, and that the float is effective at detecting beaked whales. PMID:23363092

  18. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  19. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  20. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2013-05-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals. The acoustic signals (of nominal frequency 200 kHz) are forward scattered from the underside of surface waves that are generated in a wave tank and scaled to model smooth ocean swell. An inverse processing algorithm is designed and implemented to reconstruct the surface displacement profiles of the waves over one complete period. The inverse processing uses the surface scattered pulses collected at the receiver, an initial wave profile (two are considered), and a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to iteratively adjust the surface until it is considered optimized or reconstructed. Two physical length scales over which information can be known about the surface are confirmed. An outer length scale, the Fresnel zone surrounding each specular reflection point, is the only region where optimized surfaces resulting from each initial profile converge within a resolution set by the inner length scale, a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse. The statistical confidence of each optimized surface is also highest within a Fresnel zone. Future design considerations are suggested such as an array of receivers that increases the region of surface reconstruction by a factor of 2 to 3. PMID:23654368

  1. Directional electrostatic accretion process employing acoustic droplet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for manufacturing a free standing solid metal part. In the present invention metal droplets are produced from a free surface pool of molten metal is when an acoustic wave impacts an acoustic lens that is contiguous with the free standing pool of molten metal. The metal droplets are then charged and deflected toward a target. The build up of the metal droplets combine to form the free standing solid metal part.

  2. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  3. Tracking sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) dive profiles using a towed passive acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-07-01

    A passive acoustic method is presented for tracking sperm whale dive profiles, using two or three hydrophones deployed as either a vertical or large-aperture towed array. The relative arrival times between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic paths are used to obtain the ranges and depths of animals with respect to the array, provided that the hydrophone depths are independently measured. Besides reducing the number of hydrophones required, exploiting surface reflections simplifies automation of the data processing. Experimental results are shown from 2002 and 2003 cruises in the Gulf of Mexico for two different towed array deployments. The 2002 deployment consisted of two short-aperture towed arrays separated by 170 m, while the 2003 deployment placed an autonomous acoustic recorder in tandem with a short-aperture towed array, and used ship noise to time-align the acoustic data. The resulting dive profiles were independently checked using single-hydrophone localizations, whenever multipath reflections from the ocean bottom could be exploited to effectively create a large-aperture vertical array. This technique may have applications for basic research and for real-time mitigation for seismic airgun surveys.

  4. Tracking sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) dive profiles using a towed passive acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-07-01

    A passive acoustic method is presented for tracking sperm whale dive profiles, using two or three hydrophones deployed as either a vertical or large-aperture towed array. The relative arrival times between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic paths are used to obtain the ranges and depths of animals with respect to the array, provided that the hydrophone depths are independently measured. Besides reducing the number of hydrophones required, exploiting surface reflections simplifies automation of the data processing. Experimental results are shown from 2002 and 2003 cruises in the Gulf of Mexico for two different towed array deployments. The 2002 deployment consisted of two short-aperture towed arrays separated by 170 m, while the 2003 deployment placed an autonomous acoustic recorder in tandem with a short-aperture towed array, and used ship noise to time-align the acoustic data. The resulting dive profiles were independently checked using single-hydrophone localizations, whenever multipath reflections from the ocean bottom could be exploited to effectively create a large-aperture vertical array. This technique may have applications for basic research and for real-time mitigation for seismic airgun surveys. PMID:15295984

  5. Data Quality Control for Vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Application for the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Gorriz, E.; Front, J.; Candela, J.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic Data Quality Checking Protocol for vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations is proposed. Previous-to-acquisition conditions are considered along with simultaneous ones.

  6. Angular dependence of fluctuations in acoustic transmissions relative to tidal direction in the SWAT environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jacob; Field, Robert L.

    2003-10-01

    Recently, fluctuations in continuous wave acoustic transmissions through internal tides that are periodic and have a constant amplitude in range have been studied [J. George and R. L. Field, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2333 (2003)]. It was demonstrated through WKB/Pekeris calculations that the fluctuations are significantly greater when the transmission is nearly perpendicular to the tidal direction, and decrease when the transmission becomes more parallel to the tidal direction. Testing the validity of the above results in the realistic ocean provided the motivation for the present work. This was done through simulation using the NRL Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) fitted to experimental data. The NCOM output provided the sound speed profile as a function of space and time. Results of the simulation will be presented. [Work supported by ONR (PE-62435N), and administered by NRL.

  7. Acoustic basis of directional acuity in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Amanda M; Slee, Sean J; May, Bradford J

    2011-10-01

    The acoustic basis of auditory spatial acuity was investigated in CBA/129 mice by relating patterns of behavioral errors to directional features of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Behavioral performance was assessed by training the mice to lick a water spout during sound presentations from a "safe" location and to suppress the response during presentations from "warning" locations. Minimum audible angles (MAAs) were determined by delivering the safe and warning sounds from different locations in the inter-aural horizontal and median vertical planes. HRTFs were measured at the same locations by implanting a miniature microphone and recording the gain of sound energy near the ear drum relative to free field. Mice produced an average MAA of 31° when sound sources were located in the horizontal plane. Acoustic measures indicated that binaural inter-aural level differences (ILDs) and monaural spectral features of the HRTF change systematically with horizontal location and therefore may have contributed to the accuracy of behavioral performance. Subsequent manipulations of the auditory stimuli and the directional properties of the ear produced errors that suggest the mice primarily relied on ILD cues when discriminating changes in azimuth. The MAA increased beyond 80° when the importance of ILD cues was minimized by testing in the median vertical plane. Although acoustic measures demonstrated a less robust effect of vertical location on spectral features of the HRTF, this poor performance provides further evidence for the insensitivity to spectral cues that was noted during behavioral testing in the horizontal plane. PMID:21717290

  8. Direct Intracochlear Acoustic Stimulation Using a PZT Microactuator.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Manson, Robert; Robbins, Carol; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Cao, Guo Zhong; Shen, I Y; Hume, Clifford R

    2015-01-01

    Combined electric and acoustic stimulation has proven to be an effective strategy to improve hearing in some cochlear implant users. We describe an acoustic microactuator to directly deliver stimuli to the perilymph in the scala tympani. The 800 µm by 800 µm actuator has a silicon diaphragm driven by a piezoelectric thin film (e.g., lead-zirconium-titanium oxide or PZT). This device could also be used as a component of a bimodal acoustic-electric electrode array. In the current study, we established a guinea pig model to test the actuator for its ability to deliver auditory signals to the cochlea in vivo. The actuator was placed through the round window of the cochlea. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds, peak latencies, and amplitude growth were calculated for an ear canal speaker versus the intracochlear actuator for tone burst stimuli at 4, 8, 16, and 24 kHz. An ABR was obtained after removal of the probe to assess loss of hearing related to the procedure. In some animals, the temporal bone was harvested for histologic analysis of cochlear damage. We show that the device is capable of stimulating ABRs in vivo with latencies and growth functions comparable to stimulation in the ear canal. Further experiments will be necessary to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this modality in long-term auditory stimulation and its ability to be integrated with conventional cochlear implant arrays. PMID:26631107

  9. Direct Intracochlear Acoustic Stimulation Using a PZT Microactuator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Manson, Robert; Robbins, Carol; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Cao, Guo Zhong; Hume, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    Combined electric and acoustic stimulation has proven to be an effective strategy to improve hearing in some cochlear implant users. We describe an acoustic microactuator to directly deliver stimuli to the perilymph in the scala tympani. The 800 µm by 800 µm actuator has a silicon diaphragm driven by a piezoelectric thin film (e.g., lead-zirconium-titanium oxide or PZT). This device could also be used as a component of a bimodal acoustic-electric electrode array. In the current study, we established a guinea pig model to test the actuator for its ability to deliver auditory signals to the cochlea in vivo. The actuator was placed through the round window of the cochlea. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds, peak latencies, and amplitude growth were calculated for an ear canal speaker versus the intracochlear actuator for tone burst stimuli at 4, 8, 16, and 24 kHz. An ABR was obtained after removal of the probe to assess loss of hearing related to the procedure. In some animals, the temporal bone was harvested for histologic analysis of cochlear damage. We show that the device is capable of stimulating ABRs in vivo with latencies and growth functions comparable to stimulation in the ear canal. Further experiments will be necessary to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this modality in long-term auditory stimulation and its ability to be integrated with conventional cochlear implant arrays. PMID:26631107

  10. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages. PMID:19206824

  11. Polarization independent, integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filters/switches with tapered acoustical directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H.; Schaefer, K.; Sohler, W.

    1994-11-01

    Enhanced sidelobe suppression of the filter characteristics of tunable acousto-optical mode converters in LiNbO3 has been achieved using for the first time tapered acoustical directional couplers. A sidelobe suppression of more than 15.5 dB could be demonstrated in a single stage device. By combining the mode converter with two integrated optical polarization splitters a polarization independent filter/wavelength selective switch has been fabricated with less than 3 dB intrinsic insertion loss, a polarization dependence of less than 1 dB, and a sidelobe suppression exceeding 14 dB.

  12. Acoustic interpretation of the voice range profile (phonetogram).

    PubMed

    Titze, I R

    1992-02-01

    The voice range profile (VRP) is a display of vocal intensity range versus fundamental frequency (F0). Past measurements have shown that the intensity range is reduced at the extremes of the F0 range, that there is a gradual upward tilt of the high- and low-intensity boundaries with increasing F0, and that a ripple exists at the boundaries. The intensity ripple, which results from tuning of source harmonics to the formants, is more noticeable at the upper boundary than the lower boundary because higher harmonics are not energized as effectively near phonation threshold as at maximum lung pressure. The gradual tilt of the intensity boundaries results from more effective transmission and radiation of acoustic energy at higher fundamental frequencies. This depends on the spectral distribution of the source power, however, At low F0, a smaller spectral slope (more harmonic energy) produces greater intensity. At high F0, on the other hand, a shift of energy toward the fundamental results in greater intensity. This dependence of intensity on spectral distribution of source power seems to explain the reduced intensity range at higher F0. An unrelated problem of reduced intensity range at low F0 stems from the inherent difficulty of keeping F0 from rising when subglottal pressure is increased. PMID:1735970

  13. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  14. Acoustic profiles of distinct emotional expressions in laughter.

    PubMed

    Szameitat, Diana P; Alter, Kai; Szameitat, André J; Wildgruber, Dirk; Sterr, Annette; Darwin, Chris J

    2009-07-01

    Although listeners are able to decode the underlying emotions embedded in acoustical laughter sounds, little is known about the acoustical cues that differentiate between the emotions. This study investigated the acoustical correlates of laughter expressing four different emotions: joy, tickling, taunting, and schadenfreude. Analysis of 43 acoustic parameters showed that the four emotions could be accurately discriminated on the basis of a small parameter set. Vowel quality contributed only minimally to emotional differentiation whereas prosodic parameters were more effective. Emotions are expressed by similar prosodic parameters in both laughter and speech. PMID:19603892

  15. Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performances of a scoop inlet were studied. The scoop inlet is designed with a portion of the lower cowling extended forward to direct upward any noise that is propagating out the front of the engine toward the ground. The tests were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel facility at free stream velocities of 0, 18, 41, and 61 m/sec and angles of attack from -10 deg to 120 deg. Inlet throat Mach number was varied from 0.30 to 0.75. Aerodynamically, at a free stream velocity of 41 m/sec, the design throat Mach number (0.63), and an angle of attack of 50 deg, the scoop inlet total pressure recovery was 0.989 and the total pressure distortion was 0.15. The angles of attack where flow separation occurred with the scoop inlet were higher than those for a conventional symmetric inlet. Acoustically, the scoop inlet provided a maximum noise reduction of 12 to 15 db below the inlet over the entire range of throat Mach number and angle of attack at a free-stream velocity of 41 m/sec.

  16. Enhanced directional sensitivity of a biomimetic MEMS acoustic localization sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Danny; Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Yu, Miao

    2010-04-01

    We present an improved microfabricated sound localization sensor for unobtrusive surveillance systems inspired by the tympanic membranes of the parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea. The device consists of two silicon diaphragms mechanically coupled by a suspended beam that amplifies the difference in time response, dependent on the incident angle of the sound source. Fabrication techniques were modified to reduce residual stresses and improve device uniformity. Enhanced acoustic cues for devices with central pivoting anchors were measured with laser Doppler vibrometry. Device responses to weak excitations demonstrated good sensitivity over environmental noise. An order of magnitude in time difference amplification was measured at 90° incident angles with a directional sensitivity of .39μs/degree. These results provide a foundation for realizing an accurate bio-inspired MEMS directional microphone.

  17. Tapered acoustical directional couplers for integrated acousto-optical mode converters with weighted coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Harald; Rust, Ulrich; Schafer, Klaus

    1995-03-01

    Weighted coupling for strong sidelobe suppression of integrated acoustooptical mode converters in LiNbO3 using acoustical directional couplers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A parameter free model for the propagation of surface acoustic waves in guiding structures has been developed based on a step-like variation of the acoustic velocity. Comparisons of theoretical results with experimental ones for acoustic waveguides and directional coupler structures confirm the applicability of the model. A coupled mode description of the acousto-optical polarization conversion in converters with acoustical directional couplers has been developed and applied to several tapered acoustical directional couplers. The model reveals that the conversion characteristics are usually strongly asymmetric. If the directional coupler is appropriately designed, a sidelobe suppression of about 30 dB can be achieved. First experimental results with tapered directional couplers confirm within some limits the theoretical predictions.

  18. Automated acoustic intensity measurements and the effect of gear tooth profile on noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atherton, William J.; Pintz, Adam; Lewicki, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic intensity measurements were made at NASA Lewis Research Center on a spur gear test apparatus. The measurements were obtained with the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System developed by Cleveland State University. This system provided dense spatial positioning, and was calibrated against a high quality acoustic intensity system. The measured gear noise compared gearsets having two different tooth profiles. The tests evaluated the sound field of the different gears for two speeds and three loads. The experimental results showed that gear tooth profile had a major effect on measured noise. Load and speed were found to have an effect on noise also.

  19. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  20. Accuracy of a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler in a wave-dominated flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of velocities measured by a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) in the bottom boundary layer of a wave-dominated inner-shelf environment is evaluated. The downward-looking PCADP measured velocities in eight 10-cm cells at 1 Hz. Velocities measured by the PCADP are compared to those measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter for wave orbital velocities up to 95 cm s-1 and currents up to 40 cm s-1. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors using the resolution velocities was developed. Instrument bias, measured as the average error in burst mean speed, is -0.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 0.8). The accuracy (root-mean-square error) of instantaneous velocities has a mean of 8.6 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 6.5) for eastward velocities (the predominant direction of waves), 6.5 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 4.4) for northward velocities, and 2.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 1.6) for vertical velocities. Both burst mean and root-mean-square errors are greater for bursts with ub ??? 50 cm s-1. Profiles of burst mean speeds from the bottom five cells were fit to logarithmic curves: 92% of bursts with mean speed ??? 5 cm s-1 have a correlation coefficient R2 > 0.96. In cells close to the transducer, instantaneous velocities are noisy, burst mean velocities are biased low, and bottom orbital velocities are biased high. With adequate blanking distances for both the profile and resolution velocities, the PCADP provides sufficient accuracy to measure velocities in the bottom boundary layer under moderately energetic inner-shelf conditions.

  1. A PARALIND Decomposition-Based Coherent Two-Dimensional Direction of Arrival Estimation Algorithm for Acoustic Vector-Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Min; Li, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the acoustic vector-sensor array parameter estimation problem with the parallel profiles with linear dependencies (PARALIND) model, which was originally applied to biology and chemistry. Exploiting the PARALIND decomposition approach, we propose a blind coherent two-dimensional direction of arrival (2D-DOA) estimation algorithm for arbitrarily spaced acoustic vector-sensor arrays subject to unknown locations. The proposed algorithm works well to achieve automatically paired azimuth and elevation angles for coherent and incoherent angle estimation of acoustic vector-sensor arrays, as well as the paired correlated matrix of the sources. Our algorithm, in contrast with conventional coherent angle estimation algorithms such as the forward backward spatial smoothing (FBSS) estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT) algorithm, not only has much better angle estimation performance, even for closely-spaced sources, but is also available for arbitrary arrays. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:23604030

  2. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  3. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Carson, D; Boris, L; Mabary, J; Lin, Z; Nicodème, F; Cuttica, M; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E

    2014-01-01

    Cough and throat clearing might be difficult to differentiate when trying to detect them acoustically or manometrically. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing, and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Ten asymptomatic volunteers (seven females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high-resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and two blinded reviewers were compared. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour. There were 50 cough and 50 throat-clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of automated acoustic analysis was 84% and 50% for cough, while the blinded analysis using sound revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 92%. The manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing was similar in terms of qualitative findings; however, cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations and a more vigorous upper esophageal sphincter contraction compared with throat clearing. The acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and poor specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more vigorous pressure changes and a greater rate of repetitive pressurizations in cough. PMID:23442178

  4. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  5. RGB representation of two-dimensional multi-spectral acoustic data for object surface profile imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinhua; Wada, Yuji; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-10-01

    Conventionally, acoustic imaging has been performed using a single frequency or a limited number of frequencies. However, the rich information on surface profiles, structures hidden under surfaces and material properties of objects may exhibit frequency dependence. In this study, acoustic imaging on object surface was conducted over a wide frequency range with a fine frequency step, and a method for displaying the acquired multi-spectral acoustic data was proposed. A complicated rigid surface with different profiles was illuminated by sound waves sweeping over the frequency range from 1 to 20 kHz with a 30 Hz step. The reflected sound was two-dimensionally recorded using a scanning microphone, and processed using a holographic reconstruction method. The two-dimensional distributions of obtained sound pressure at each frequency were defined as ‘multi-spectral acoustic imaging data’. Next, the multi-spectral acoustic data were transformed into a single RGB-based picture for easy understanding of the surface characteristics. The acoustic frequencies were allocated to red, green and blue using the RGB filter technique. The depths of the grooves were identified by their colours in the RGB image.

  6. Irony as a game of implicitness: acoustic profiles of ironic communication.

    PubMed

    Anolli, L; Ciceri, R; Infantino, M G

    2000-05-01

    Irony, as "quotation" and "fencing game," consists of an interactive script, grounded on a focal event "trigger," in which the dialogic comment shows the ironist's intention through an antiphrastic process and syncoding to "hit" the victim of the irony (blame by praise or praise by blame). Through acoustic analysis of the suprasegmental profiles of standard phrases inserted into inductors expressly composed and read by 50 naive subjects, the presence and nature of significant differences between sarcastic and kind irony in low- and high-context utterances (contextualization effect--Experiments 1 and 2) have been verified. It has also been observed that, where more "specific weight" is given to the linguistic stream (corrective irony hypothesis), a markedness of suprasegmental features emerges (correctivity effect--Experiment 3). Finally, comparison between sarcastic irony and blame and between kind irony and praise shows that there exists a precise manner of contrastive syncoding, whereby the voices of irony do not coincide with those of direct blame or praise, but assume a specific caricature and emphatic profile (contrastivity effect--Experiment 4). PMID:10937366

  7. Diversity of acoustic tracheal system and its role for directional hearing in crickets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sound localization in small insects can be a challenging task due to physical constraints in deriving sufficiently large interaural intensity differences (IIDs) between both ears. In crickets, sound source localization is achieved by a complex type of pressure difference receiver consisting of four potential sound inputs. Sound acts on the external side of two tympana but additionally reaches the internal tympanal surface via two external sound entrances. Conduction of internal sound is realized by the anatomical arrangement of connecting trachea. A key structure is a trachea coupling both ears which is characterized by an enlarged part in its midline (i.e., the acoustic vesicle) accompanied with a thin membrane (septum). This facilitates directional sensitivity despite an unfavorable relationship between wavelength of sound and body size. Here we studied the morphological differences of the acoustic tracheal system in 40 cricket species (Gryllidae, Mogoplistidae) and species of outgroup taxa (Gryllotalpidae, Rhaphidophoridae, Gryllacrididae) of the suborder Ensifera comprising hearing and non hearing species. Results We found a surprisingly high variation of acoustic tracheal systems and almost all investigated species using intraspecific acoustic communication were characterized by an acoustic vesicle associated with a medial septum. The relative size of the acoustic vesicle - a structure most crucial for deriving high IIDs - implies an important role for sound localization. Most remarkable in this respect was the size difference of the acoustic vesicle between species; those with a more unfavorable ratio of body size to sound wavelength tend to exhibit a larger acoustic vesicle. On the other hand, secondary loss of acoustic signaling was nearly exclusively associated with the absence of both acoustic vesicle and septum. Conclusion The high diversity of acoustic tracheal morphology observed between species might reflect different steps in the evolution

  8. Profiles of Material Properties in Induction-Hardened Steel Determined through Inversion of Resonant Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.L.; Kim, S.A.; Norton, S.J.

    2005-04-09

    Electromagnetic-acoustic measurements of resonant frequencies of induction-hardened steel shafts were used in an inverse calculation to determine parameters of the radial variations in the shear constant and density, including the effects of material variations and residual stress. Parameters determined for the profile of the shear constant were consistent with independent measurements on cut specimens and estimates of the acoustoelastic contribution. The profiles determined for material variations were close to those of the measured hardness.

  9. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  10. The directional sensitivity of the acoustic radiation force to particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Ran, W; Saylor, J R

    2015-06-01

    When viscous corrections to the inviscid acoustic radiation force theory are implemented and applied to a standing wave field, the direction of the acoustic radiation force on particles varies from theory to theory. Specifically, some theories predict that the direction of the force depends on the particle diameter, while others reveal that the direction of the force is independent of particle diameter. The present study is an experimental investigation of the direction of the acoustic radiation force which suggests that particle diameter does affect the direction. Experiments were conducted in air using an ultrasonic standing wave field with a nominal frequency of 30 kHz. Smoke particles and fine water droplets having a range of diameters were flowed into the region of a standing wave field. The direction of the acoustic radiation force was determined by observing whether the particles accumulated in the nodes or the anti-nodes of the standing wave. Results show a change in the direction of the acoustic radiation force at a particle diameter of 0.3±0.1 μm, which corresponds to a particle diameter to acoustic-boundary-layer thickness ratio of 0.023±0.008. PMID:26093419

  11. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  12. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Carlson, Dustin; Boris, Lubomyr; Mabary, Jerry; Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Cuttica, Michael; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough may coexist with throat clearing and it is possible that these two entities may be difficult to differentiate on acoustic monitoring and ambulatory manometry. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Methods Ten asymptomatic volunteers (7 females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and a blinded reviewer were compared against the scripted protocol. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour to determine whether distinct patterns could be identified. Results In total, there were 50 cough and 50 throat clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of acoustic cough monitoring was 84% and 50% for cough; while the blinded analysis based on sound alone revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 90%. The pressure topography manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing began with a decrease in esophageal pressure, followed by a distal excursion of the esophagogastric junction high-pressure zone and an increase in EGJ and UES contractile pressure that was followed immediately by a simultaneous abrupt increase in gastric and esophageal pressure. Cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations, a more pronounced EGJ shift and a more vigorous augmentation of the UES pressure compared with throat clearing. Conclusions The automated acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more

  13. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses using multiple receivers.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2014-08-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals collected at multiple receivers. The transmitted signals are of nominal frequency 300 kHz and are reflected off surface gravity waves that are paddle-generated in a wave tank. An inverse processing algorithm reconstructs 50 surface wave shapes over a length span of 2.10 m. The inverse scheme uses a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to determine wave shapes. The surface reconstruction algorithm is self-starting in that source and receiver geometry and initial estimates of wave shape are determined from the same acoustic signals used in the inverse processing. A high speed camera provides ground-truth measurements of the surface wave field for comparison with the acoustically derived surface waves. Within Fresnel zone regions the statistical confidence of the inversely optimized surface profile exceeds that of the camera profile. Reconstructed surfaces are accurate to a resolution of about a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse only within Fresnel zones associated with each source and receiver pair. Multiple isolated Fresnel zones from multiple receivers extend the spatial extent of accurate surface reconstruction while overlapping Fresnel zones increase confidence in the optimized profiles there. PMID:25096095

  14. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 1. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Jet noise spectra obtained at static conditions from an acoustic wind tunnel and an outdoor facility are compared. Data curves are presented for (1) the effect of relative velocity on OASPL directivity (all configurations); (2) the effect of relative velocity on noise spectra (all configurations); (3) the effect of velocity on PNL directivity (coannular nozzle configurations); (4) nozzle exhaust plume velocity profiles; and (5) the effect of relative velocity on aerodynamic performance.

  15. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  16. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  17. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  18. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-04-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  19. Scanning probe acoustic microscopy of extruded starch materials: direct visual evidence of starch crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongdong; Liu, Boxiang; Li, Mengxing; Wei, Min; Li, Hua; Liu, Peng; Wan, Tuo

    2013-10-15

    Scanning probe acoustic microscopy (SPAM) has been successfully used to study inorganic and keratin biomaterials. However, few studies have attempted to apply SPAM to structural study of non-keratin organic materials such as starch based materials. This study investigated hardness and surface finish to establish sample preparation method suitable for SPAM imaging and acquired clear acoustic images of extruded starch materials. Acquired acoustic images directly exhibited certain structure of starch materials and provided visual evidence of starch material components and aggregates. In addition, through correlating acoustic images with X-ray diffraction data, crystal-structural information in nano-scale was obtained and acoustic image contrast showed a linear relationship with starch amylose content in extruded starch materials. PMID:23987357

  20. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  1. Aquatic Habitat Mapping with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler: Considerations for Data Quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, David; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    When mounted on a boat or other moving platform, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be used to map a wide range of ecologically significant phenomena, including measures of fluid shear, turbulence, vorticity, and near-bed sediment transport. However, the instrument movement necessary for mapping applications can generate significant errors, many of which have not been inadequately described. This report focuses on the mechanisms by which moving-platform errors are generated, and quantifies their magnitudes under typical habitat-mapping conditions. The potential for velocity errors caused by mis-alignment of the instrument?s internal compass are widely recognized, but has not previously been quantified for moving instruments. Numerical analyses show that even relatively minor compass mis-alignments can produce significant velocity errors, depending on the ratio of absolute instrument velocity to the target velocity and on the relative directions of instrument and target motion. A maximum absolute instrument velocity of about 1 m/s is recommended for most mapping applications. Lower velocities are appropriate when making bed velocity measurements, an emerging application that makes use of ADCP bottom-tracking to measure the velocity of sediment particles at the bed. The mechanisms by which heterogeneities in the flow velocity field generate horizontal velocities errors are also quantified, and some basic limitations in the effectiveness of standard error-detection criteria for identifying these errors are described. Bed velocity measurements may be particularly vulnerable to errors caused by spatial variability in the sediment transport field.

  2. Direct Observation of Gigahertz Coherent Guided Acoustic Phonons in Free-Standing Single Copper Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jean, Cyril; Belliard, Laurent; Cornelius, Thomas W; Thomas, Olivier; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Cassinelli, Marco; Becerra, Loïc; Perrin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We report on gigahertz acoustic phonon waveguiding in free-standing single copper nanowires studied by femtosecond transient reflectivity measurements. The results are discussed on the basis of the semianalytical resolution of the Pochhammer and Chree equation. The spreading of the generated Gaussian wave packet of two different modes is derived analytically and compared with the observed oscillations of the sample reflectivity. These experiments provide a unique way to independently obtain geometrical and material characterization. This direct observation of coherent guided acoustic phonons in a single nano-object is also the first step toward nanolateral size acoustic transducer and comprehensive studies of the thermal properties of nanowires. PMID:26278939

  3. Direct calculation of acoustic streaming including the boundary layer phenomena in an ultrasonic air pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Direct finite difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on the fine-meshed three-dimensiona model by graphics processing unit (GPU)-oriented calculation array is discussed. Airflows due to the acoustic traveling wave are induced when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. Calculation results showed good agreement with the measurements in the pressure distribution. In addition to that, several flow-vortices were observed near the boundary of the reflector and the transducer, which have been often discussed in acoustic tube near the boundary, and have never been observed in the calculation in the ultrasonic air pump of this type.

  4. Acoustic profiles and images of the Palos Verdes Margin: Implications concerning deposition from the White's Point outfall

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, M A.; Karl, H; Murray, Christopher J. )

    2001-12-01

    Subbottom profiles and sidescan-sonar images collected on and around the Palos Verdes shelf show a surficial deposit interpreted to contain effluent from the White's Point diffusers, as well as showing several geologic features that affect the deposit's distribution. The effluent-affected deposit is visible in high-resolution subbottom profiles on the shelf and the adjacent San Pedro basin slope to water depths of 170 m. It has a maximum thickness of 75 cm and was mapped acoustically over an area of 10.8 km{sup 2}, which encompasses a volume of about 3.2 million m{sup 3}. The deposit's basal reflector is acoustically distinct over most of the mapped area, implying that the deposit has not been extensively mixed across its base, perhaps being relatively free of reworking since its initial deposition. Nearshore, the basal reflector is weak and fades away toward land, which could result from syndepositional intermixing of coarse native sediment (particularly from the Portuguese Bend landslide) with effluent in the high-energy nearshore zone, or postdepositionally by physical (wave) or biological mixing across the interface. The geometry of the deposit implies that effluent is dispersed primarily in a northwesterly and seaward direction from the diffusers. Dispersal across the shelf break is in some places strongly affected by topography, particularly by submarine canyons. The deposit overlies stratified and unstratified Quaternary sediment, up to 30 m thick, that in turn overlies the irregular erosional surface of deformed Miocene bedrock that crops out in places on the shelf and upper basin slope. The effluent-affected deposit rests on potentially unstable landslide deposits on the San Pedro basin slope. The acoustic profiles and side-scan images show evidence for active and inactive vents, probably of hot water and gas, some of which are within the boundary of the effluent-affected sediment deposit and could disrupt it if seepage occurs.

  5. Acoustic profiles and images of the Palos Verdes margin: Implications concerning deposition from the White's Point outfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Murray, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Subbottom profiles and sidescan-sonar images collected on and around the Palos Verdes Shelf show a surficial deposit interpreted to contain effluent from the White's Point diffusers, as well as showing several geologic features that affect the deposit's distribution. The effluent-affected deposit is visible in high-resolution subbottom profiles on the shelf and the adjacent San Pedro basin slope to water depths of 170 m. It has a maximum thickness of 75 cm and was mapped acoustically over an area of 10.8 km2, which encompasses a volume of about 3.2 million m3. The deposit's basal reflector is acoustically distinct over most of the mapped area. implying that the deposit has not been extensively mixed across its base, perhaps being relatively free of reworking since its initial deposition. Nearshore, the basal reflector is weak and fades away toward land, which could result from syndepositional intermixing of coarse native sediment (particularly from the Portuguese Bend landslide) with effluent in the high-energy nearshore zone, or postdepositionally by physical (wave) or biological mixing across the interface. The geometry of the deposit implies that effluent is dispersed primarily in a northwesterly and seaward direction from the diffusers. Dispersal across the shelf break is in some places strongly affected by topography, particularly by submarine canyons. The deposit overlies stratified and unstratified Quaternary sediment, up to 30m thick, that in turn overlies the irregular erosional surface of deformed Miocene bedrock that crops out in places on the shelf and upper basin slope. The effluent-affected deposit rests on potentially unstable landslide deposits on the San Pedro basin slope. The acoustic profiles and side-scan images show evidence for active and inactive vents, probably of hot water and gas, some of which are within the boundary of the effluent-affected sediment deposit and could disrupt it if seepage occurs. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights

  6. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  7. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters. [for jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) were used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range of 90-130 db, spectral components, and two-point cross correlation functions for acoustic noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. It was concluded that directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet aircraft noise.

  8. Directional decomposition of the acoustic wave equation for fluids and metafluids in spherical geometries, with application to transformational acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-03-01

    A new directional decomposition of the acoustic 3D wave equation is derived for spherically symmetric geometries, where the wave fields do not need to possess such a symmetry. This provides an alternative basis for various applications of techniques like invariant embedding and time domain Green functions in spherically symmetric geometries. Contrary to previous results on spherical wave splittings, the new decomposition is given in a very explicit form. The wave equation considered incorporates effects from radially varying compressibility and density, but also from anisotropic density, a property of certain so called metafluids. By applying the new spherical wave splitting, we show that all spherically symmetric acoustic metafluid cloaks are diffeomorphic images of a homogeneous and isotropic spherical ball of perfect fluid.

  9. Investigations of incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models to improve auralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.

    Room acoustics computer modeling and auralizations are useful tools when designing or modifying acoustically sensitive spaces. In this dissertation, the input parameter of source directivity has been studied in great detail to determine first its effect in room acoustics computer models and secondly how to better incorporate the directional source characteristics into these models to improve auralizations. To increase the accuracy of room acoustics computer models, the source directivity of real sources, such as musical instruments, must be included in the models. The traditional method for incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models involves inputting the measured static directivity data taken every 10° in a sphere-shaped pattern around the source. This data can be entered into the room acoustics software to create a directivity balloon, which is used in the ray tracing algorithm to simulate the room impulse response. The first study in this dissertation shows that using directional sources over an omni-directional source in room acoustics computer models produces significant differences both in terms of calculated room acoustics parameters and auralizations. The room acoustics computer model was also validated in terms of accurately incorporating the input source directivity. A recently proposed technique for creating auralizations using a multi-channel source representation has been investigated with numerous subjective studies, applied to both solo instruments and an orchestra. The method of multi-channel auralizations involves obtaining multi-channel anechoic recordings of short melodies from various instruments and creating individual channel auralizations. These auralizations are then combined to create a total multi-channel auralization. Through many subjective studies, this process was shown to be effective in terms of improving the realism and source width of the auralizations in a number of cases, and also modeling different

  10. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  11. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  12. Direct aeroacoustic simulation of acoustic feedback phenomena on a side-view mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Hannes M.; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    The flow around a side-view mirror and its noise generation are investigated using large eddy simulation and direct acoustic simulation. To this end, we use the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method on non-conforming curved elements. Tonal noise is observed, which originates at the trailing edge downstream of laminar separation, coinciding with experimental results. In order to determine the nature of the tonal noise generation mechanism, we perform a linear stability analysis and employ a global perturbation approach in combination with dynamic mode decomposition. The perturbation analysis based on the whole flow field demonstrates the existence of a global instability involving convective disturbance growth, acoustic scattering at the trailing edge and acoustic receptivity at a rounded edge slightly upstream of separation. The results clearly show the tonal noise to be caused by the so-called acoustic feedback loop known from airfoil aeroacoustics. This phenomenon has been simulated here for the first time for a complex geometry.

  13. Turbulent Fluxes of Suspended Sediment from Coupled Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Sassi, M.; Vermeulen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent diffusion is a cornerstone in geophysical fluid mechanics, controlling the exchange of momentum, heat and mass in surface flows occurring in the atmosphere, in rivers and in the ocean. In fluvial and coastal systems, modeling turbulent diffusion of momentum and suspended sediment requires knowledge about turbulent diffusivities, which is generally derived from parameterizations based on laboratory experiments. Field determinations of momentum and sediment diffusivities are cumbersome, requiring an instrumental array to simultaneously sample turbulence and mean flow quantities in time and in space. Recently, a new technique to analyze geophysical surface flow turbulence was introduced, appropriate for large scale systems, based on coupling of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). Here, we extend this approach to obtain collocated profiles of both the Reynolds stress tensor and eddy covariance fluxes, to derive vertical profiles of turbulent momentum and sediment diffusivity in a tidal river. Shear and normal stresses are obtained by combining the variances in radial velocities measured by the ADCP beams. The covariances between radial velocities and calibrated acoustic backscatter allow to determine the three Cartesian components of the turbulent flux of suspended sediment. The main advantage of this new approach is that flow velocity and sediment concentration measurements are exactly collocated, and that it allows to profile over longer ranges, in comparison to existing techniques. Results show that vertical profiles of the inverse turbulent Prandtl-Schmidt number is coherent with corresponding profiles of the sediment diffusivity, rather than with profiles of the eddy viscosity. This implies modelling suspended sediment dynamics requires knowledge about the sediment diffusivity, as the Prandtl-Schmidt number cannot be estimated from the eddy viscosity alone.

  14. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  15. The average direct current offset values for small digital audio recorders in an acoustically consistent environment.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bruce E; Lacey, Douglas S

    2014-07-01

    In this research project, nine small digital audio recorders were tested using five sets of 30-min recordings at all available recording modes, with consistent audio material, identical source and microphone locations, and identical acoustic environments. The averaged direct current (DC) offset values and standard deviations were measured for 30-sec and 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 10-, 15-, and 30-min segments. The research found an inverse association between segment lengths and the standard deviation values and that lengths beyond 30 min may not meaningfully reduce the standard deviation values. This research supports previous studies indicating that measured averaged DC offsets should only be used for exclusionary purposes in authenticity analyses and exhibit consistent values when the general acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations were held constant. Measured average DC offset values from exemplar recorders may not be directly comparable to those of submitted digital audio recordings without exactly duplicating the acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations. PMID:24502252

  16. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-01-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy. PMID:27440657

  17. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-07-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  18. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-01-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy. PMID:27440657

  19. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  1. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  2. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  3. Quality assurance plan for discharge measurements using broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipscomb, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) as an instrument for measuring velocities and discharge in the riverine and estuarine environment promises to revolutionize the way these data are collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. The ADCP and associated software, however, compose a complex system and should be used only by qualifies personnel. Standard procedures should be rigorously followed to ensure that the quality of data collected is commensurate with the standards set by the Water Resources Division for all its varied activities in hydrologic investigations.

  4. Measuring two-phase particle flux with a multi-frequency acoustic Doppler profiler.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gregory W; Hay, Alex E

    2015-12-01

    A methodology is developed and tested for simultaneously extracting time-resolved one-dimensional profiles of the mass-concentration and velocity of two different particle types in a mixed suspension, using a multi-frequency pulse-to-pulse coherent Doppler instrument. The technique involves inversion of a model for frequency-dependent acoustic backscatter amplitude and phase. Results are presented from a laboratory settling column experiment, measuring a mixture of polystyrene beads (slowly-settling, strongly-scattering) and glass beads (quickly-settling, weakly-scattering) in a vertical pipe section. PMID:26723335

  5. Measurement of bioelectric and acoustic profile of breast tissue using hybrid magnetoacoustic method for cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Salim, M I Mohamad; Supriyanto, E; Haueisen, J; Ariffin, I; Ahmad, A H; Rosidi, B

    2013-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel hybrid magnetoacoustic measurement (HMM) system aiming at breast cancer detection. HMM combines ultrasound and magnetism for the simultaneous assessment of bioelectric and acoustic profiles of breast tissue. HMM is demonstrated on breast tissue samples, which are exposed to 9.8 MHz ultrasound wave with the presence of a 0.25 Tesla static magnetic field. The interaction between the ultrasound wave and the magnetic field in the breast tissue results in Lorentz Force that produces a magnetoacoustic voltage output, proportional to breast tissue conductivity. Simultaneously, the ultrasound wave is sensed back by the ultrasound receiver for tissue acoustic evaluation. Experiments are performed on gel phantoms and real breast tissue samples harvested from laboratory mice. Ultrasound wave characterization results show that normal breast tissue experiences higher attenuation compared with cancerous tissue. The mean magnetoacoustic voltage results for normal tissue are lower than that for the cancerous tissue group. In conclusion, the combination of acoustic and bioelectric measurements is a promising approach for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:23238828

  6. Relationships between preference ratings, sensory profiles, and acoustical measurements in concert halls.

    PubMed

    Kuusinen, Antti; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    Preferences of concert hall acoustics are explored with preference mapping. The investigation is performed on previously gathered data from individual vocabulary profiling of nine concert halls and three pieces of symphonic music, namely, excerpts of compositions by Beethoven, Bruckner, and Mozart. Individual preferences are regressed onto a latent three-dimensional sensory space obtained by multiple factor analysis of descriptive sensory data. Overlaying individually estimated preference surfaces onto one another produces preference maps which illustrates both the overall preference of the stimuli as well as differences between individual listeners. A comparison of the maps between music motifs illustrates how each music signal affects the weighting of different acoustical qualities in preference judgments. Differences in preferences between individuals are pronounced in the excerpts of Beethoven and Bruckner, while the responses are more homogeneous for Mozart music motif. Overall, proximity is identified as the main aspect associated with preference, but also loudness, envelopment, and bass are important. A correlation analysis of objective parameters and subjective perceptions substantiates the importance of lateral sound energy for good concert hall acoustics. Particularly, the lateral early energy fraction at high frequencies is found to be associated with the perception of proximity, and hence, also with preference. PMID:24437764

  7. Production of Local Acoustic Radiation Force to Constrain Direction of Microcapsules in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohji Masuda,; Nobuyuki Watarai,; Ryusuke Nakamoto,; Yusuke Muramatsu,

    2010-07-01

    We have ever reported our attempt to control the direction of microcapsules in flow by acoustic radiation force. However, the diameter of capsules was too large to be applied in vivo. Furthermore, the acoustic radiation force affected only the focal area because focused ultrasound was used. Thus, we have improved our experiment by using microcapsules as small as blood cells and introducing a plane wave of ultrasound. We prepared an artificial blood vessel including a Y-form bifurcation established in two observation areas. Then, we newly defined the induction index to evaluate the difference in capsule density in two downstream paths. As a result, the optimum angle of ultrasound emission to induct to the desired path was derived. The induction index increased in proportion to the central frequency of ultrasound, which is affected by the aggregation of capsules to receive more acoustic radiation force.

  8. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Survey of Flow Velocities in Detroit River, a Connecting Channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  9. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  10. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  11. Mesoscale current fields observed with a shipboard profiling acoustic current meter

    SciTech Connect

    Regier, L.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of the near-surface currents obtained with a shipboard acoustic current meter during the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment are discussed. The large-scale spatial structure of the directly measured currents is very similar to that obtained from simultaneous hydrographic observations assuming geostrophic dynamics. The vertical shear of geostrophic currents is half that observed directly, and the two are poorly correlated. Vertical shear is dominated by currents having spatial scales shorter than about 180 km and having no geostrophic signature. Although the shear of the ageostrophic component is clearly evident, estimation of the ageostrophic current is hampered by large experimental uncertainties.

  12. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: Measurements of directional transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from ∼16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 μs, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 μs; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20–40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  13. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: measurements of directional transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from approximately 16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 mus, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 mus; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20-40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  14. Birds adjust acoustic directionality to beam their antipredator calls to predators and conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Yorzinski, Jessica L.; Patricelli, Gail L.

    2010-01-01

    Animals in many vertebrate species vocalize in response to predators, but it is often unclear whether these antipredator calls function to communicate with predators, conspecifics or both. We evaluated the function of antipredator calls in 10 species of passerines by measuring the acoustic directionality of these calls in response to experimental presentations of a model predator. Acoustic directionality quantifies the radiation pattern of vocalizations and may provide evidence about the receiver of these calls. We predicted that antipredator calls would have a lower directionality if they function to communicate with surrounding conspecifics, and a higher directionality and aimed at the receiver if they function to communicate with the predator. Our results support both of these functions. Overall, the birds produce antipredator calls that have a relatively low directionality, suggesting that the calls radiate in many directions to alert conspecifics. However, birds in some species increase the directionality of their calls when facing the predator. They can even direct their calls towards the predator when facing lateral to it—effectively vocalizing sideways towards the predator. These results suggest that antipredator calls in some species are used to communicate both to conspecifics and to predators, and that birds adjust the directionality of their calls with remarkable sophistication according to the context in which they are used. PMID:19923125

  15. Discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended-sand in rivers using side-looking acoustic profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Williams, Cory A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques rely on measurements of ancillary properties that correlate with suspended-sediment concentration and particle size and thus require the collection of traditional samples for calibration. Through in situ deployments, these methods can provide the high temporal resolution that cannot be achieved through traditional sampling. Here we focus on the evaluation of acoustic profiling techniques (e.g. acoustic-Doppler sideways-looking profilers, or ADPs). One major advantage of acoustic profiling is the ability to concurrently measure water velocity (using Doppler-shift methods) and suspended-sediment concentration such that suspended-sediment flux can be directly computed using data from a single instrument. Acoustic-Doppler profilers have become popular for measuring water velocity and discharge in rivers, through both moving-boat operations and from fixed deployments such as bank-mounted sideways-looking instruments (Hirsch and Costa, 2004, Muste et al., 2007). The method presented herein is most suited to sideways-looking applications as a complement to the "index velocity" technique, whereby an index velocity from a sideways-looking instrument is related to the cross-section average velocity (determined from moving-boat discharge measurements) as a means for developing a continuous water-discharge record (Ruhl and Simpson, 2005). Topping et al. (2007) presented a method for discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended sand, using single frequency ADPs. This method takes advantage of the relations among acoustic backscatter, sediment-induced acoustic attenuation, suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), and particle size distribution (PSD). Backscatter is the amount of sound scattered back and received at the transducer while sediment-induced attenuation is the amount of sound scattered in other directions and absorbed by the sediment particles. Both of these parameters can be measured with an ADP, and their different dependencies on SSC and PSD allow for the

  16. Directivity patterns and pulse profiles of ultrasound emitted by laser action on interface between transparent and opaque solids: Analytical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergey M. E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Tournat, Vincent; Chigarev, Nikolay; Castagnede, Bernard; Gusev, Vitalyi E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Bulou, Alain; Zerr, Andreas

    2014-01-28

    The analytical theory for the directivity patterns of ultrasounds emitted from laser-irradiated interface between two isotropic solids is developed. It is valid for arbitrary combinations of transparent and opaque materials. The directivity patterns are derived both in two-dimensional and in three-dimensional geometries, by accounting for the specific features of the sound generation by the photo-induced mechanical stresses distributed in the volume, essential in the laser ultrasonics. In particular, the theory accounts for the contribution to the emitted propagating acoustic fields from the converted by the interface evanescent photo-generated compression-dilatation waves. The precise analytical solutions for the profiles of longitudinal and shear acoustic pulses emitted in different directions are proposed. The developed theory can be applied for dimensional scaling, optimization, and interpretation of the high-pressure laser ultrasonics experiments in diamond anvil cell.

  17. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  18. Long-term horizontal vocal directivity of opera singers: effects of singing projection and acoustic environment.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Densil; Davis, Pamela J; Connolly, Anna

    2011-11-01

    Vocal directivity refers to how directional the sound is that comes from a singer's mouth, that is, whether the sound is focused into a narrow stream of sound projecting in front of the singers or whether it is spread out all around the singer. This study investigates the long-term vocal directivity and acoustic power of professional opera singers and how these vary among subjects, among singing projections, and among vastly different acoustic environments. The vocal sound of eight professional opera singers (six females and two males) was measured in anechoic and reverberant rooms and in a recital hall. Subjects sang in four different ways: (1) paying great attention to intonation; (2) singing as in performance, with all the emotional connection intended by the composer; (3) imagining a large auditorium; and (4) imagining a small theatre. The same song was sung by all singers in all conditions. A head and torso simulator (HATS), radiating sound from its mouth, was used for comparison in all situations. Results show that individual singers have quite consistent long-term average directivity, even across conditions. Directivity varies substantially among singers. Singers are more directional than the standard HATS (which is a physical model of a talking person). The singer's formant region of the spectrum exhibits greater directivity than the lower-frequency range, and results indicate that singers control directivity (at least, incidentally) for different singing conditions as they adjust the spectral emphasis of their voices through their formants. PMID:20728309

  19. High performance distributed acoustic sensor using cyclic pulse coding in a direct detection coherent-OTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muanenda, Yonas; Oton, Claudio J.; Faralli, Stefano; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a Distributed Acoustic Sensor exploiting cyclic Simplex coding in a phase-sensitive OTDR on standard single mode fibers based on direct detection. Suitable design of the source and use of cyclic coding is shown to improve the SNR of the coherent back-scattered signal by up to 9 dB, reducing fading due to modulation instability and enabling accurate long-distance measurement of vibrations with minimal post-processing.

  20. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  1. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  2. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  3. Discharge measurements using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of unsteady or tidally affected flow has been a problem faced by hydrologists for many years. Dynamic discharge conditions impose an unreasonably short time constraint on conventional current-meter discharge-measurement methods, which typically last a minimum of 1 hour. Tidally affected discharge can change more than 100 percent during a 10-minute period. Over the years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed moving-boat discharge-measurement techniques that are much faster but less accurate than conventional methods. For a bibliography of conventional moving-boat publications, see Simpson and Oltmann (1993, page 17). The advent of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) made possible the development of a discharge-measurement system capable of more accurately measuring unsteady or tidally affected flow. In most cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is dramatically faster than conventional discharge-measurement systems, and has comparable or better accuracy. In many cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is the only choice for use at a particular measurement site. ADCP systems are not yet ?turnkey;? they are still under development, and for proper operation, require a significant amount of operator training. Not only must the operator have a rudimentary knowledge of acoustic physics, but also a working knowledge of ADCP operation, the manufacturer's discharge-measurement software, and boating techniques and safety.

  4. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  5. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  6. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  7. Variance of discharge estimates sampled using acoustic Doppler current profilers from moving boats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Carlos M.; Tarrab, Leticia; Oberg, Kevin; Szupiany, Ricardo; Cantero, Mariano I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model for quantifying the random errors (i.e., variance) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving boats for different sampling times. The model focuses on the random processes in the sampled flow field and has been developed using statistical methods currently available for uncertainty analysis of velocity time series. Analysis of field data collected using ADCP from moving boats from three natural rivers of varying sizes and flow conditions shows that, even though the estimate of the integral time scale of the actual turbulent flow field is larger than the sampling interval, the integral time scale of the sampled flow field is on the order of the sampling interval. Thus, an equation for computing the variance error in discharge measurements associated with different sampling times, assuming uncorrelated flow fields is appropriate. The approach is used to help define optimal sampling strategies by choosing the exposure time required for ADCPs to accurately measure flow discharge.

  8. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  9. Effects of spatially correlated acoustic-tactile information on judgments of auditory circular direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Annabel J.; Lamothe, M. J. Reina; Toms, Ian D.; Fleming, Richard A. G.

    2002-05-01

    Cohen, Lamothe, Fleming, MacIsaac, and Lamoureux [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2460 (2001)] reported that proximity governed circular direction judgments (clockwise/counterclockwise) of two successive tones emanating from all pairs of 12 speakers located at 30-degree intervals around a listeners' head (cranium). Many listeners appeared to experience systematic front-back confusion. Diametrically opposed locations (180-degrees-theoretically ambiguous direction) produced a direction bias pattern resembling Deutsch's tritone paradox [Deutsch, Kuyper, and Fisher, Music Percept. 5, 7992 (1987)]. In Experiment 1 of the present study, the circular direction task was conducted in the tactile domain using 12 circumcranial points of vibration. For all 5 participants, proximity governed direction (without front-back confusion) and a simple clockwise bias was shown for 180-degree pairs. Experiment 2 tested 9 new participants in one unimodal auditory condition and two bimodal auditory-tactile conditions (spatially-correlated/spatially-uncorrelated). Correlated auditory-tactile information eliminated front-back confusion for 8 participants and replaced the ``paradoxical'' bias for 180-degree pairs with the clockwise bias. Thus, spatially correlated audio-tactile location information improves the veridical representation of 360-degree acoustic space, and modality-specific principles are implicated by the unique circular direction bias patterns for 180-degree pairs in the separate auditory and tactile modalities. [Work supported by NSERC.

  10. DNA profiles from clothing fibers using direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Renée; Taylor, Duncan; Linacre, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We report on the successful use of direct PCR amplification of single fibers from items of worn clothing. Items of clothing were worn throughout the course of a day, with the individual commencing regular activities. Single fibers were taken from the cuff of the clothing at regular intervals and amplified directly. The same areas were subjected to tape-lifting, and also amplified directly for comparison. The NGM™ kit that amplifies 15 STR loci plus amelogenin was used. A total of 35 single fiber samples were processed and analyzed from five items of clothing, with 81 % of samples returning a profile of 14 alleles or more. All tape-lift samples amplified directly produced DNA profiles of 15 alleles or more. The aim was to develop a simple, operational method that could be used routinely in forensic science casework and that has the potential to generate more complete profiles, which would not be detected using standard extraction methods on this type of sample. For ease of implementation, the process also adheres to standard methods with no increase in the cycle number. PMID:27421265

  11. The development of a biomimetic acoustic direction finding system for use on multiple platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligeorges, Socrates; Anderson, David; Browning, Cassandra A.; Cohen, Howard; Freedman, David; Gore, Tyler; Karl, Christian; Kelsall, Sarah; Mountain, David; Nourzad, Marianne; Pu, Yirong; Sandifer, Matt; Xue, Shuwan; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Hubbard, Allyn

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the flow of scientific and technological achievements beginning with a stationary "small, smart, biomimetic acoustic processor" designed for DARPA that led to a program aimed at acoustic characterization and direction finding for multiple, mobile platforms. ARL support and collaboration has allowed us to adapt the core technology to multiple platforms including a Packbot robotic platform, a soldier worn platform, as well as a vehicle platform. Each of these has varying size and power requirements, but miniaturization is an important component of the program for creating practical systems which we address further in companion papers. We have configured the system to detect and localize gunfire and tested system performance with live fire from numerous weapons such as the AK47, the Dragunov, and the AR15. The ARL-sponsored work has led to connections with Natick Labs and the Future Force Warrior program, and in addition, the work has many and obvious applications to homeland defense, police, and civilian needs.

  12. Per-survivor processing for underwater acoustic communications with direct-sequence spread spectrum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoka; Zhou, Shengli; Morozov, Andrey K; Preisig, James C

    2013-05-01

    This paper proposes a receiver for direct-sequence spread spectrum transmissions in underwater acoustic channels, which combines a per-survivor processing (PSP) structure with sparse channel estimation. Specifically, the PSP structure establishes the trellis on the symbol level to render a small to moderate number of states, thus reducing the computational complexity. Meanwhile, the sparse channel estimation is performed on the chip level, where the orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is used and a two-dimensional grid of path delay and Doppler scaling factor is incorporated in the dictionary construction. The effective combination of the PSP detection and sparse channel estimation achieves a good tradeoff between performance and complexity. Simulation and experiment results show that the proposed receiver outperforms the conventional RAKE receiver considerably, and most importantly, the proposed PSP receiver with an exact wideband dictionary maintains an excellent performance even for challenging underwater acoustic channels with large Doppler disparities on different paths. PMID:23654382

  13. Numerical simulations of acoustics problems using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanford, Amanda Danforth

    In the current study, real gas effects in the propagation of sound waves are simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for a wide range of systems. This particle method allows for treatment of acoustic phenomena for a wide range of Knudsen numbers, defined as the ratio of molecular mean free path to wavelength. Continuum models such as the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations break down for flows greater than a Knudsen number of approximately 0.05. Continuum models also suffer from the inability to simultaneously model nonequilibrium conditions, diatomic or polyatomic molecules, nonlinearity and relaxation effects and are limited in their range of validity. Therefore, direct simulation Monte Carlo is capable of directly simulating acoustic waves with a level of detail not possible with continuum approaches. The basis of direct simulation Monte Carlo lies within kinetic theory where representative particles are followed as they move and collide with other particles. A parallel, object-oriented DSMC solver was developed for this problem. Despite excellent parallel efficiency, computation time is considerable. Monatomic gases, gases with internal energy, planetary environments, and amplitude effects spanning a large range of Knudsen number have all been modeled with the same method and compared to existing theory. With the direct simulation method, significant deviations from continuum predictions are observed for high Knudsen number flows.

  14. Application of acoustic doppler current profilers for measuring three-dimensional flow fields and as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been in use in the riverine environment for nearly 20 years. Their application primarily has been focused on the measurement of streamflow discharge. ADCPs emit high-frequency sound pulses and receive reflected sound echoes from sediment particles in the water column. The Doppler shift between transmitted and return signals is resolved into a velocity component that is measured in three dimensions by simultaneously transmitting four independent acoustical pulses. To measure the absolute velocity magnitude and direction in the water column, the velocity magnitude and direction of the instrument must also be computed. Typically this is accomplished by ensonifying the streambed with an acoustical pulse that also provides a depth measurement for each of the four acoustic beams. Sediment transport on or near the streambed will bias these measurements and requires external positioning such as a differentially corrected Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Although the influence of hydraulic structures such as spur dikes and bridge piers is typically only measured and described in one or two dimensions, the use of differentially corrected GPS with ADCPs provides a fully three-dimensional measurement of the magnitude and direction of the water column at such structures. The measurement of these flow disturbances in a field setting also captures the natural pulsations of river flow that cannot be easily quantified or modeled by numerical simulations or flumes. Several examples of measured three-dimensional flow conditions at bridge sites throughout Alaska are presented. The bias introduced to the bottom-track measurement is being investigated as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport. By fixing the position of the ADCP for a known period of time the apparent velocity of the streambed at that position can be determined. Initial results and comparison to traditionally measured bedload values are presented. These initial

  15. Measurements of the horizontal directionality of the ambient acoustic noise in Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, M. J.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of some of the horizontal characteristics of acoustic ambient noise were carried out in the south-eastern parts of Monterey Bay, California, at a limited number of stations and for a limited number of ambient conditions. Directional hydrophones on buoys located at ranges of two to four miles from shore were used which have a steerable, cardioid-shaped pattern. The beam was successively aimed along the four cardinal directions and the frequency spectrum of the output was obtained. The frequency range of the system response was from 10 to 2500 Hz. Results are presented in the form of differences between the spectral energy bins in each direction and the average over all directions. Experimental difficulties with sonobuoy reliability prevented collection of extensive data. Some tentative conclusions are drawn from the results.

  16. Comment on "Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(5), 2597-2611 (2013)].

    PubMed

    Choo, Youngmin; Song, H C

    2016-05-01

    A computationally efficient, time-domain Helmholtz-Kirchhoff (H-K) integral was derived and applied to reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses [Walstead and Deane, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2597-2611 (2013)]. However, the final form of the integral equation incorporating a stationary phase approximation contained a complex phase term exp(iπ/4), which cannot be treated as a simple time delay. In this work, a real time-domain H-K integral is presented that includes an additional Hilbert transform of the time-derivative of the transmitted pulse. Numerical simulation with a sinusoidal surface shows good agreement between the real time-domain formulation and exact H-K integral, while achieving a significant improvement in computational speed (e.g., 2 orders of magnitude). PMID:27250135

  17. A direct link between microstructure and acoustical macro-behavior of real double porosity foams.

    PubMed

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    The acoustical macro-behavior of mineral open-cell foam samples is modeled from microstructure morphology using a three-dimensional idealized periodic unit-cell (3D-PUC). The 3D-PUC is based on a regular arrangement of spheres allowed to interpenetrate during the foaming process. Identification and sizing of the 3D-PUC is made from x-ray computed microtomography and manufacturing process information. In addition, the 3D-PUC used allows to account for two scales of porosity: The interconnected network of bubbles (meso-porosity) and the inter-crystalline porosity of a gypsum matrix (micro-porosity). Transport properties of the micro- and the meso-scales are calculated from first principles, and a hybrid micro-macro method is used to determine the frequency-dependent visco-thermal dissipation properties. Olny and Boutin found that the double porosity theory provides the visco-thermal coupling between the meso- and micro-scales [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 73-89 (2003)]. Finally, the results are successfully compared with experiments for two different mineral foam samples. The main originality of this work is to maintain a direct link between the microstructure morphology and the acoustical macro-behavior all along the multi-scale modeling process, without any adjusted parameter. PMID:25669280

  18. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  19. Acoustic Attenuation and Backscatter Properties of a River Water Column Derived from Laser Diffraction Profiles of Particle Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Y. C.; Hanes, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    In a river column, does acoustic attenuation depend solely on fines while backscatter is determined by coarse grains alone? Does a single, monotonic relationship exist between acoustic backscatter and suspended sediment concentration in a bi-modal size distribution (PSD) at some sound frequency? These questions are addressed in this paper. In-situ vertical profiles of PSD, measured with a laser diffraction instrument LISST-SL are used to compute vertical profiles of acoustic attenuation and backscattering properties. Two sets of data taken one-year apart are examined. The data are from the Cowlitz river in Washington State. Data from one day in March, 2011 reveal a bi-modal PSD that is all washload at surface, but is dominated by Rouse-like suspended sand mode lower to bottom. In this case, at low frequencies, attenuation is indeed set by the washload, while scattering is determined by sand mode except near the surface. A monotonic relationship between backscatter and suspended sediment concentration is also found, offering a calibration for a single frequency system, and rendering inversion of acoustic profiles explicit. A year later, March 2012, the water column had very little wash load, instead only a Rouse-like suspended mode existed. In this uni-modal case, both attenuation and scattering profiles were determined by the suspended load, making inversions implicit. In this latter case, the backscatter-suspended concentration had a much tighter relationship than the bi-modal earlier case, associated with a narrow size distribution of sands. These views emphasize the dramatic variability of acoustic properties of a river column in different flow regimes.

  20. Direct Acoustic Stimulation at the Lateral Canal: An Alternative Route to the Inner Ear?

    PubMed Central

    Walraevens, Joris; Desloovere, Christian; Wouters, Jan; Gérard, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Severe to profound mixed hearing loss is associated with hearing rehabilitation difficulties. Recently, promising results for speech understanding were obtained with a direct acoustic cochlear implant (DACI). The surgical implantation of a DACI with standard coupling through a stapedotomy can however be regarded as challenging. Therefore, in this experimental study, the feasibility of direct acoustic stimulation was investigated at an anatomically and surgically more accessible inner ear site. DACI stimulation of the intact, blue-lined and opened lateral semicircular canal (LC) was investigated and compared with standard oval window (OW) coupling. Additionally, stapes footplate fixation was induced. Round window (RW) velocity, as a measure of the performance of the device and its coupling efficiency, was determined in fresh-frozen human cadaver heads. Using single point laser Doppler vibrometry, RW velocity could reliably be measured in low and middle frequency range, and equivalent sound pressure level (LE) output was calculated. Results for the different conditions obtained in five heads were analyzed in subsequent frequency ranges. Comparing the difference in RW membrane velocity showed higher LE in the LC opened condition [mean: 103 equivalent dB SPL], than in LC intact or blue-lined conditions [63 and 74 equivalent dB SPL, respectively]. No difference was observed between the LC opened and the standard OW condition. Inducing stapes fixation, however, led to a difference in the low frequency range of LE compared to LC opened. In conclusion, this feasibility study showed promising results for direct acoustic stimulation at this specific anatomically and surgically more accessible inner ear site. Future studies are needed to address the impact of LC stimulation on cochlear micromechanics and on the vestibular system like dizziness and risks of hearing loss. PMID:27500399

  1. Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-23

    In accordance with the Department of Energy Organization Act, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares an annual report for the Secretary of Energy and for transmittal to Congress. This report summarizes the activities in the United States by foreign-affiliated companies that own or control US energy sources and supplies. Presented in this 1986 report are profiles of foreign direct investment in US petroleum (including natural gas production); foreign-affiliated companies' energy production, processing, distribution, and reserves; and foreign-affiliated energy companies' financial performance and investment activity in 1986. Additionally, profiles of US companies' energy operations abroad and comparisons of foreign-affiliated companies to US energy companies are presented. The information is intended for use by the Congress, Government agencies, energy industry analysts, international trade and finance analysts, and the public. 13 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

  2. Direct measurements of the ionization profile in krypton helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.; Gulbrandsen, N.

    2012-12-15

    Helicons are efficient plasma sources, capable of producing plasma densities of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} with only 100 s W of input rf power. There are often steep density gradients in both the neutral density and plasma density, resulting in a fully ionized core a few cm wide surrounded by a weakly ionized plasma. The ionization profile is usually not well known because the neutral density is typically inferred from indirect spectroscopic measurements or from edge pressure gauge measurements. We have developed a two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) diagnostic capable of directly measuring the neutral density profile. We use TALIF in conjunction with a Langmuir probe to measure the ionization fraction profile as a function of driving frequency, magnetic field, and input power. It is found that when the frequency of the driving wave is greater than a critical frequency, f{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 3f{sub lh}, where f{sub lh} is the lower hybrid frequency at the antenna, the ionization fraction is small (0.1%) and the plasma density low (10{sup 17} m{sup -3}). As the axial magnetic field is increased, or, equivalently, the driving frequency decreased, a transition is observed. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 or more, the plasma density profile becomes strongly peaked, the neutral density profile becomes strongly hollow, and the ionization fraction in the core approaches 100%. Neutral depletion in the core can be caused by a number of mechanisms. We find that in these experiments the depletion is due primarily to plasma pressure and neutral pumping.

  3. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  4. Tokamak profile prediction using direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, Jeff; Holland, Chris; Waltz, R. E.; Fahey, Mark R; Belli, E

    2009-01-01

    okamak transport modeling scenarios, including ITER ITER Physics Basis Editors, Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 1999 performance predictions, are based exclusively on reduced models for core thermal and particle transport. The reason for this is simple: computational cost. A typical modeling scenario may require the evaluation of thousands of individual transport fluxes local transport models calculate the energy and particle fluxes across a specified flux surface given fixed profiles . Despite continuous advances in direct gyrokinetic simulation, the cost of an individual simulation remains so high that direct gyrokinetic transport calculations have been avoided. By developing a steady-state iteration scheme suitable for direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulations, we can now compute steady-state temperature profiles for DIII-D J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 2002 plasmas given known plasma sources. The new code, TGYRO, encapsulates the GYRO J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 2003 code, for turbulent transport, and the NEO E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 2008 code, for kinetic neoclassical transport. Results for DIII-D L-mode discharge 128913 are given, with computational and experimental results consistent in the region 0 <= r/a <= 0.8.

  5. Tokamak profile prediction using direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Belli, E.; Holland, C.; Fahey, M. R.

    2009-06-15

    Tokamak transport modeling scenarios, including ITER [ITER Physics Basis Editors, Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 (1999)] performance predictions, are based exclusively on reduced models for core thermal and particle transport. The reason for this is simple: computational cost. A typical modeling scenario may require the evaluation of thousands of individual transport fluxes (local transport models calculate the energy and particle fluxes across a specified flux surface given fixed profiles). Despite continuous advances in direct gyrokinetic simulation, the cost of an individual simulation remains so high that direct gyrokinetic transport calculations have been avoided. By developing a steady-state iteration scheme suitable for direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulations, we can now compute steady-state temperature profiles for DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] plasmas given known plasma sources. The new code, TGYRO, encapsulates the GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] code, for turbulent transport, and the NEO[E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)] code, for kinetic neoclassical transport. Results for DIII-D L-mode discharge 128913 are given, with computational and experimental results consistent in the region 0{<=}r/a{<=}0.8.

  6. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  7. Parallel direct numerical simulation of wake vortex detection using monostatic and bistatic radio acoustic sounding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan Esfahaani, Said

    A parallel two-dimensional code is developed in this thesis to numerically simulate wake vortex detection using a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The Maxwell equations for media with non-uniform permittivity and the linearized Euler equations for media with non-uniform mean flow are the main framework for the simulations. The code is written in Fortran 90 with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for parallel implementation. The main difficulty encountered with a time accurate simulation of a RASS is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift in the scattered electromagnetic signal. Even for a 1D simulation with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond currently available computer resources. Two solutions that overcome this problem are described. In the first the actual electromagnetic wave propagation speed is replaced with a much lower value. This allows an explicit, time accurate numerical scheme to be used. In the second the governing differential equations are recast in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift using an implicit scheme with large time steps. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting discretized equation with complex coefficients are examined. A number of cases for both the monostatic and bistatic configurations are considered. First, a uniform mean flow is considered and the RASS simulation is performed for two different types of incident acoustic field, namely a short single frequency acoustic pulse and a continuous broadband acoustic source. Both the explicit and implicit schemes are examined and the mean flow velocity is determined from the spectrum of the backscattered electromagnetic signal with very good accuracy. Second, the Taylor and Oseen vortex models are considered and their velocity field along the incident electromagnetic beam is retrieved. The Abel transform is then applied to the velocity profiles determined by both

  8. Direct-to-PCR tissue preservation for DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Amy; Berry, Clare; Bruce, David; Gahan, Michelle Elizabeth; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-05-01

    Disaster victim identification (DVI) often occurs in remote locations with extremes of temperatures and humidities. Access to mortuary facilities and refrigeration are not always available. An effective and robust DNA sampling and preservation procedure would increase the probability of successful DNA profiling and allow faster repatriation of bodies and body parts. If the act of tissue preservation also released DNA into solution, ready for polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the DVI process could be further streamlined. In this study, we explored the possibility of obtaining DNA profiles without DNA extraction, by adding aliquots of preservative solutions surrounding fresh human muscle and decomposing human muscle and skin tissue samples directly to PCR. The preservatives consisted of two custom preparations and two proprietary solutions. The custom preparations were a salt-saturated solution of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) and TENT buffer (Tris, EDTA, NaCl, Tween 20). The proprietary preservatives were DNAgard (Biomatrica(®)) and Tissue Stabilising Kit (DNA Genotek). We obtained full PowerPlex(®) 21 (Promega) and GlobalFiler(®) (Life Technologies) DNA profiles from fresh and decomposed tissue preserved at 35 °C for up to 28 days for all four preservatives. The preservative aliquots removed from the fresh muscle tissue samples had been stored at -80 °C for 4 years, indicating that long-term archival does not diminish the probability of successful DNA typing. Rather, storage at -80 °C seems to reduce PCR inhibition. PMID:26530406

  9. The upper-ocean response to typhoons as measured at a moored acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Hou, Yijun; Xie, Qiang; Hu, Po; Liu, Yahao

    2015-09-01

    A moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data, satellite-derived sea surface wind data, and the chlorophyll- a concentration were used to examine the influence of typhoon events on the upper ocean in the central Luzon Strait. The data were collected between August 27 and October 6, 2011. Large changes in ocean dynamics and marine life were recorded in the upper layers over the short term during the transit of each of the three violent typhoons that passed over the region during the study period. The geostrophic flow during the period of ADCP monitoring was comparable to the Ekman flow, recently shown to be prominent in the upper layer. Based on the influence of the three typhoon events that swept the Luzon Strait or traversed Luzon Island on their way to the South China Sea, we postulated a typhoon-induced upwelling around the ADCP and found that upward isothermal displacements reached 11.8-39.0 m, which was confirmed by the sea-level anomaly data recorded at the same time. This variability in the upper ocean may play an important role in biological activity, especially in offshore deep-sea regions.

  10. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  11. Disentangling preference ratings of concert hall acoustics using subjective sensory profiles.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Pätynen, Jukka; Kuusinen, Antti; Tervo, Sakari

    2012-11-01

    Subjective evaluation of acoustics was studied by recording nine concert halls with a simulated symphony orchestra on a seat 12 m from the orchestra. The recorded music was spatially reproduced for subjective listening tests and individual vocabulary profiling. In addition, the preferences of the assessors and objective parameters were gathered. The results show that concert halls were discriminated using perceptual characteristics, such as Envelopment/Loudness, Reverberance, Bassiness, Proximity, Definition, and Clarity. With these perceptual dimensions the preference ratings can be explained. Seventeen assessors were divided into two groups based on their preferences. The first group preferred concert halls with relatively intimate sound, in which it is quite easy to hear individual instruments and melody lines. In contrast, the second group preferred a louder and more reverberant sound with good envelopment and strong bass. Even though all halls were recorded exactly at the same distance, the preference is best explained with subjective Proximity and with Bassiness, Envelopment, and Loudness to some extent. Neither the preferences nor the subjective ratings could be fully explained by objective parameters (ISO3382-1:2009), although some correlations were found. PMID:23145600

  12. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. The investigation of sediment processes in rivers by means of the Acoustic Doppler Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.

    2014-09-01

    The measurement of sediment processes at the scale of a river cross-section is desirable for the evaluation of many issues related to river hydro-morphodynamics, such as the calibration and validation of numerical models for predicting the climate change impacts on water resources and efforts of maintenance of the navigation channel and other hydraulic works. Suspended- and bed-load have traditionally been measured by cumbersome techniques that are difficult to apply in large rivers. The acoustics for the investigation of small-scale sedimentological processes gained acceptance in the marine community because of its ability to simultaneously profile sediment concentration and size distribution, non-intrusively, and with high temporal and spatial resolution. The application of these methods in true riverine case studies presents additional difficulties, mainly related to water depths and stream currents that limit sound propagation into water and challenge the instruments deployment, especially during floods. This article introduces the motivations for using the ADCP for sediment processes investigation other than for flow discharge measurement, summarizes the developed methods and indicates future desirable improvements. In addition, an application on the Po River in Italy is presented, focusing on the calibration of the existing software by means of ADCP recordings. The calibrated model will assist in planning the dredging activities to maintain the navigation channel and the intake of a pump station for irrigation that is periodically obstructed with a sandbar.

  14. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  15. Acoustic-Emergent Phonology in the Amplitude Envelope of Child-Directed Speech

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Victoria; Goswami, Usha

    2015-01-01

    When acquiring language, young children may use acoustic spectro-temporal patterns in speech to derive phonological units in spoken language (e.g., prosodic stress patterns, syllables, phonemes). Children appear to learn acoustic-phonological mappings rapidly, without direct instruction, yet the underlying developmental mechanisms remain unclear. Across different languages, a relationship between amplitude envelope sensitivity and phonological development has been found, suggesting that children may make use of amplitude modulation (AM) patterns within the envelope to develop a phonological system. Here we present the Spectral Amplitude Modulation Phase Hierarchy (S-AMPH) model, a set of algorithms for deriving the dominant AM patterns in child-directed speech (CDS). Using Principal Components Analysis, we show that rhythmic CDS contains an AM hierarchy comprising 3 core modulation timescales. These timescales correspond to key phonological units: prosodic stress (Stress AM, ~2 Hz), syllables (Syllable AM, ~5 Hz) and onset-rime units (Phoneme AM, ~20 Hz). We argue that these AM patterns could in principle be used by naïve listeners to compute acoustic-phonological mappings without lexical knowledge. We then demonstrate that the modulation statistics within this AM hierarchy indeed parse the speech signal into a primitive hierarchically-organised phonological system comprising stress feet (proto-words), syllables and onset-rime units. We apply the S-AMPH model to two other CDS corpora, one spontaneous and one deliberately-timed. The model accurately identified 72–82% (freely-read CDS) and 90–98% (rhythmically-regular CDS) stress patterns, syllables and onset-rime units. This in-principle demonstration that primitive phonology can be extracted from speech AMs is termed Acoustic-Emergent Phonology (AEP) theory. AEP theory provides a set of methods for examining how early phonological development is shaped by the temporal modulation structure of speech across

  16. Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Modulation for Utility Packet Transmission in Underwater Acoustic Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Peter S.

    2002-09-01

    This thesis investigates the feasibility and performance of using Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum (DSSS) modulation for utility-packet transmission in Seaweb underwater wireless acoustic communications networks, Seaweb networks require robust channel-tolerant utility packets having a low probability of detection (LPD) and allowing for multi-user access, MATLAB code simulated the DSSS transmitter and receiver structures and a modeled channel impulse response represented the underwater environment, The specific modulation scheme implemented is direct-sequence, differentially encoded binary phase-shift keying (DS-DBPSK) with quadrature spreading, Performance is examined using Monte Carlo simulation Bit error rates and packet error rates for various signal-to-noise ratios and channel conditions are presented and the use of a RAKE receiver, forward error-correction coding and symbol interleaving are examined for improving system performance.

  17. Performance assessment and calibration of a profiling lab-scale acoustic Doppler velocimeter for application over mixed sand-gravel beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimetry has made high-resolution turbulence measurements in sediment-laden flows possible. Recent developments have resulted in a commercially available lab-scale acoustic Doppler profiling device, a Nortek Vectrino II, that allows for three-dimensional velocity data to be colle...

  18. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C.; Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A.

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  19. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the

  20. Acoustic-Phonetic Differences between Infant- and Adult-Directed Speech: The Role of Stress and Utterance Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Seidl, Amanda; Cristia, Alejandrina

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that infant-directed speech (IDS) differs from adult-directed speech (ADS) on a variety of dimensions. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether acoustic differences between IDS and ADS in English are modulated by prosodic structure. We compared vowels across the two registers (IDS, ADS) in both stressed…

  1. Inference of tidal elevation in shallow water using a vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Atkinson, Larry P.; Royer, Tom C.

    2000-11-01

    Vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been widely used to measure velocity profiles. Since the instrument is usually mounted on a catamaran floating on the surface, previous studies have used the water surface as the reference level from which the vertical coordinate for the velocity profile is defined. However, because of the tidal oscillation, the vertical coordinate thus defined is time-dependent in an Earth-coordinate system, which introduces an error to the estimated harmonic constants for the velocity. As a result, the total transport will also be in error. This is particularly a problem in shallow waters where the tidal elevation is relatively large. Therefore tidal elevation needs to be resolved to make a correct harmonic analysis for the velocity. The present study is aimed at resolving the tidal elevation change in shallow water using a vessel-towed ADCP. Semidiurnal and diurnal tidal elevations across the lower Chesapeake Bay have been determined using a vessel-towed ADCP. Data from four cruises ranging from 25 to 92 hours in 1996 and 1997 are used. Water depth averaged every 30 s by the ADCP is studied by harmonic and statistical analysis. By selecting only the data within a narrow band (˜320 m) over the planned transect, we are able to improve the reliability of the data. We then grid the depth data along the 16 km transect into 200 equal segments and use harmonic analysis to resolve the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations within each segment. We find that (1) the depth data from the ADCP contain both semidiurnal and diurnal signals that can be resolved, from which the surface elevation can be inferred, (2) the major error appears to come from spatial variation of the depth, (3) the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations of elevation inferred over flat bottom topography account for almost 100% of the total variability, while those measurements over large bottom slopes account for a much lower percentage of the total

  2. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  3. Acoustic communication in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) an examination into vocal sacs, sound propagation, and signal directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantzker, Marc Steven

    The thesis is an inquiry into the acoustic communication of a very unusual avian species, the Greater Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus. One of the most outstanding features of this animal's dynamic mating display is its use of paired air sacs that emerge explosively from an esophageal pouch. My first line of inquiry into this system is a review of the form and function of similar vocal apparatuses, collectively called vocal sacs, in birds. Next, with a combination of mathematical models and field measurements, My collaborator and I investigate the acoustic environment where the Greater Sage-Grouse display. The complexities of this acoustic environment are relevant both to the birds and to the subsequent examinations of the display's properties. Finally, my collaborators and I examine a cryptic component of the acoustic display --- directionality --- which we measured simultaneously from multiple locations around free moving grouse on their mating grounds.

  4. A General-applications Direct Global Matrix Algorithm for Rapid Seismo-acoustic Wavefield Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, H.; Tango, G. J.; Werby, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    A new matrix method for rapid wave propagation modeling in generalized stratified media, which has recently been applied to numerical simulations in diverse areas of underwater acoustics, solid earth seismology, and nondestructive ultrasonic scattering is explained and illustrated. A portion of recent efforts jointly undertaken at NATOSACLANT and NORDA Numerical Modeling groups in developing, implementing, and testing a new fast general-applications wave propagation algorithm, SAFARI, formulated at SACLANT is summarized. The present general-applications SAFARI program uses a Direct Global Matrix Approach to multilayer Green's function calculation. A rapid and unconditionally stable solution is readily obtained via simple Gaussian ellimination on the resulting sparsely banded block system, precisely analogous to that arising in the Finite Element Method. The resulting gains in accuracy and computational speed allow consideration of much larger multilayered air/ocean/Earth/engineering material media models, for many more source-receiver configurations than previously possible. The validity and versatility of the SAFARI-DGM method is demonstrated by reviewing three practical examples of engineering interest, drawn from ocean acoustics, engineering seismology and ultrasonic scattering.

  5. Simulation of a hot coaxial jet: Direct noise prediction and flow-acoustics correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Barré, Sébastien; Juvé, Daniel; Bailly, Christophe

    2009-03-01

    A coaxial jet originating from parallel coplanar pipe nozzles is computed by a compressible large eddy simulation (LES) using low-dissipation and low-dispersion schemes in order to determine its acoustic field and to study noise generation mechanisms. The jet streams are at high velocities, the primary stream is heated, and the Reynolds number based on the primary velocity and the secondary diameter is around 106. High levels of turbulence intensity are also specified at the nozzle exit. The jet aerodynamic field and the near-pressure field are both obtained directly from the LES. The far-field noise is calculated by solving the linear acoustic equations, from the unsteady LES data on a cylindrical surface surrounding the jet. A good agreement is observed in terms of directivity, levels, and narrow-band spectra with noise measurements carried out during the EU project CoJeN for a coaxial jet displaying same stream velocities and temperatures, coplanar nozzle outlets with identical area ratio, and a high Reynolds number. However, certainly due to differences in the properties of the nozzle-exit boundary layers with respect to the experiment, some unexpected peaks are noticed in the simulation spectra. They are attributed to the development of a Von Kármán street in the inner mixing layer and to vortex pairings in the outer shear layer. High correlation levels are also calculated between the pressure waves radiated in the downstream direction and flow quantities such as axial velocity, vorticity norm, density, and temperature, taken around the end of the primary and secondary potential cores. Noise generation in the coaxial jet therefore appears significant around the end of the two potential cores. These flow regions are characterized by intermittency, a dominant Strouhal number, and variations in the convection velocity as similarly found in single jets. The use of density or temperature to compute flow-noise correlations finally seems appropriate for a heated

  6. Oxygen profiling of the unsaturated zone using direct push drilling.

    PubMed

    Sopilniak, A; Elkayam, R; Lev, O; Elad, T

    2015-09-01

    A methodology for oxygen profile measurements in the unsaturated zone is developed based on direct push drilling using sampling liners equipped with homemade silicone septa. The oxygen measurement is carried out by puncturing the septum with a commercial retractable optode needle fitted with a fluorescent tip. Metrological characteristics and method validation were carried out under laboratory conditions using different levels of oxygen and various water contents. The relative standard deviations under dry and water saturated soil conditions were less than 0.3% and 5% for 0.5 mg L(-1) of oxygen and less than 2% and 3% for 9 mg L(-1). Field demonstrations in a calcareous-sandstone soil aquifer treatment system with a layered clayey, marl and sandstone lithology of widely different water contents provided down to 30 m deep profiles of the dissolved oxygen level with less than 1.5 m spatial resolution. A single sensor was used for over 50 field measurements, though recalibration was required after approximately 30 measurements due to the deterioration of the fluorescent tip. PMID:26245519

  7. Direct opto-acoustic in vitro measurement of the spatial distribution of laser radiation in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Belov, Sergej A; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2006-12-31

    The problem of opto-acoustic (AO) diagnostics of light scattering and absorption in biological media is considered. The objects under study were milk, bovine and porcine liver, and bovine muscle tissue. The forward and backward schemes for recording acoustic signals were used in experiments. The spatial distribution of the light intensity was measured for each biological medium from the temporal profile of the excited OA pulse and the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient were determined. Opto-acoustic signals were excited by a 1064-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 779 nm. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for obtaining a priori information on a biological medium in problems of optical and AO tomography. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  8. Acoustic signals generated in piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate elements by direct bombardment with xenon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M. N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Mori, K.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic signals were observed with a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element that was directly irradiated with a 368 MeV/n xenon beam. Using an array comprising PZT elements, the energy loss in the PZT was studied. These elements are sensitive to an energy deposit of 100 nJ. A series of values of output voltage vs. integrated thickness of PZT was represented along a line similar to the ionization loss calculated by the Bethe-Bloch formula. The induced voltage was attributed to several processes—ionization, thermal, elastic, and piezoelectric processes. This study describes the possible applications of the PZT element as an active medium for calorimeters and a monitor for hypervelocity impact of space dust.

  9. Acoustic parameters of infant-directed singing in mothers with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    de l'Etoile, Shannon K; Leider, Colby N

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between mothers' depressive symptoms and the acoustic parameters of infant-directed (ID) singing. Participants included 80 mothers and their 3- to 9-month-old infants. A digital recording was made of each mother's voice while singing to her infant. Extraction and analyses of vocal data revealed a main effect of tempo, meaning that as mothers reported more depressive symptoms, they tended to sing faster to their infants. Additionally, an interaction effect indicated that mothers with depressive symptoms were more likely to sing with tonal key clarity to their male infants. These findings suggest that as mothers experience depressive symptoms, their ID singing may lack the sensitivity and emotional expression that infants need for affect regulation. An intervention that combines interaction coaching and ID singing may help mothers with depressive symptoms to engage in sensitive and emotionally synchronized interactions with their infants. PMID:21255845

  10. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency. PMID:27475210

  11. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  12. A wideband FMBEM for 2D acoustic design sensitivity analysis based on direct differentiation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leilei; Zheng, Changjun; Chen, Haibo

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a wideband fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM) for two dimensional acoustic design sensitivity analysis based on the direct differentiation method. The wideband fast multipole method (FMM) formed by combining the original FMM and the diagonal form FMM is used to accelerate the matrix-vector products in the boundary element analysis. The Burton-Miller formulation is used to overcome the fictitious frequency problem when using a single Helmholtz boundary integral equation for exterior boundary-value problems. The strongly singular and hypersingular integrals in the sensitivity equations can be evaluated explicitly and directly by using the piecewise constant discretization. The iterative solver GMRES is applied to accelerate the solution of the linear system of equations. A set of optimal parameters for the wideband FMBEM design sensitivity analysis are obtained by observing the performances of the wideband FMM algorithm in terms of computing time and memory usage. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  14. Acoustic Noise Alters Selective Attention Processes as Indicated by Direct Current (DC) Brain Potential Changes

    PubMed Central

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts—which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation—of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest—besides some limitations—that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested “attention shift”. Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed. PMID:25264675

  15. Validation of HF radar probing of the vertical shear of surface currents by acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivonin, Dmitry V.; Broche, Pierre; Devenon, Jean-Luc; Shrira, Victor I.

    2004-04-01

    There exists no practical way of measuring vertical shear in the water just below the air/sea interface that contains information on air/water momentum fluxes. The paper is concerned with the validation of a recently proposed method of remote sensing of sea subsurface shear by means of a commonly used single-frequency HF radar based on the use of the second-order Bragg echo. To this end a dedicated field experiment was carried out off the French Mediterranean coast. In parallel with the HF radar probing, the independent simultaneous measurements of the subsurface shear profile were obtained by means of acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a floating platform, whose position was monitored by GPS. The comparison shows a fairly good agreement of the results (the discrepancy does not exceed 15%) and suggests a higher accuracy of the HF probing.

  16. Low probability of detection underwater acoustic communications using direct-sequence spread spectrum.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Yang, Wen-Bin

    2008-12-01

    Direct-sequence spread spectrum is used for underwater acoustic communications between nodes, at least one of which is moving. At-sea data show that the phase change due to source motion is significant: The differential phase between two adjacent symbols is often larger than the phase difference between symbols. This poses a challenge to phase-detection based receiver algorithms when the source or receiver is moving. A pair of energy detectors that are insensitive to the phase fluctuations is proposed, whose outputs are used to determine the relationship between adjacent symbols. Good performance is achieved for a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as low as -10 dB based on at-sea data. While the method can be applied to signaling using short code sequences, the focus in this paper is on long code sequences for the purpose of achieving a high processing gain (at the expense of a low data rate), so that communications can be carried out at a low input SNR to minimize the probability of detection (P(D)) by an interceptor. P(D) is calculated for a typical shallow water environment as a function of range for several source levels assuming a broadband energy detector with a known signal bandwidth. PMID:19206792

  17. Chelyabinsk meteoroid entry: analysis of acoustic signals in the area of direct sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnaya, Elena; Popova, Olga; Glazachev, Dmitry; Rybnov, Yurij; Shuvalov, Valery; Jenniskens, Peter; Kharlamov, Vladimir

    E.Podobnaya, Yu.Rybnov, O.Popova, V. Shuvalov, P. Jenniskens, V.Kharlamov, D.Glazachev The Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013, was exceptional because of the large kinetic energy of the impacting body and the airburst that was generated, creating significant damage and injuries in a populated area. The meteor and the effects of the airburst were extraordinarily well documented. Numerous video records provided an accurate record of the trajectory and orbit of the cosmic body as well as features of its interaction with the atmosphere (Borovicka et al., 2013; Popova et al. 2013). In this presentation, we discuss the information on shock wave arrival times. Arrival times of the shock wave were derived from the shaking of the camera, the movement of smoke or car exhaust, and the movement of cables in the field of view, as well as directly from the audio record. From the analysis of these shock wave arrival times, the altitudes of the energy deposition were derived (Popova et al. 2013). Borovicka et al (2013) suggested that subsequent acoustic arrivals corresponded to separate fragmentation events. The observed arrival times will be compared with model estimates taking into account the real wind and atmospheric conditions (i.e. sound velocity changes with altitude). Results of numerical simulations will be compared with recorded sound signals. References Borovicka J. et al., 2013, Nature 503, 235 Popova O. et al., 2013, Science, 342, 1096

  18. Use of a 600-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure estuarine bottom type, relative abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation, and eelgrass canopy height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Joseph D.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2007-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity signal from a high-frequency (600 kHz) Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to categorize four different types of bottom habitat (sand, mud, sparse and dense vegetation) in a shallow-water estuary (Shinnecock Bay, NY, USA). A diver survey of the bay measured sediment and bottom vegetation characteristics at 85 sites within the bay. These data were used to groundtruth the acoustic data. Acoustic data were collected at four sites with known bottom types and used to develop an algorithm that could categorize the bottom type. The slope of the echo intensity profile close to the bottom was used to determine the bottom type and the relative numerical density (sparse or dense) of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV). In areas where eelgrass ( Zostera marina) was the dominant SAV species, the intensity profile data were analyzed to measure the height of the vegetation canopy. An acoustic survey which categorized the bottom type of the bay was conducted from a small vessel. The percentage of sampled sites categorized as each bottom habitat type from the acoustic survey was similar to those obtained by the diver survey. These methods may provide a means to rapidly survey estuarine habitats and measure spatial and temporal variations in SAV populations, as well as changes in the height of the eelgrass canopy.

  19. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—User’s manual for version 2.8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The software program, QRev computes the discharge from moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements using data collected with any of the Teledyne RD Instrument or SonTek bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The computation of discharge is independent of the manufacturer of the acoustic Doppler current profiler because QRev applies consistent algorithms independent of the data source. In addition, QRev automates filtering and quality checking of the collected data and provides feedback to the user of potential quality issues with the measurement. Various statistics and characteristics of the measurement, in addition to a simple uncertainty assessment are provided to the user to assist them in properly rating the measurement. QRev saves an extensible markup language file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. The user interacts with QRev through a tablet-friendly graphical user interface. This report is the manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  20. Klamath River Water Quality and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data from Link River Dam to Keno Dam, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Deas, Michael L.; Asbill, Jessica; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Butler, Kenna; Stewart, Marc A.; Wellman, Roy W.; Vaughn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, Watercourse Engineering, and the Bureau of Reclamation began a project to construct and calibrate a water quality and hydrodynamic model of the 21-mile reach of the Klamath River from Link River Dam to Keno Dam. To provide a basis for this work, data collection and experimental work were planned for 2007 and 2008. This report documents sampling and analytical methods and presents data from the first year of work. To determine water velocities and discharge, a series of cross-sectional acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were made on the mainstem and four canals on May 30 and September 19, 2007. Water quality was sampled weekly at five mainstem sites and five tributaries from early April through early November, 2007. Constituents reported here include field parameters (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, specific conductance); total nitrogen and phosphorus; particulate carbon and nitrogen; filtered orthophosphate, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, iron, silica, and alkalinity; specific UV absorbance at 254 nm; phytoplankton and zooplankton enumeration and species identification; and bacterial abundance and morphological subgroups. The ADCP measurements conducted in good weather conditions in May showed that four major canals accounted for most changes in discharge along the mainstem on that day. Direction of velocity at measured locations was fairly homogeneous across the channel, while velocities were generally lowest near the bottom, and highest near surface, ranging from 0.0 to 0.8 ft/s. Measurements in September, made in windy conditions, raised questions about the effect of wind on flow. Most nutrient and carbon concentrations were lowest in spring, increased and remained elevated in summer, and decreased in fall. Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and nitrite had a different seasonal cycle and were below detection or at low concentration in summer. Many nutrient and

  1. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  2. Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-16

    The report reviews the patterns of foreign ownership interest in US energy enterprises, exclusive of portfolio investment (<10% ownership of a US enterprise). It profiles the involvement of foreign-affiliated US companies in the following areas: domestic petroleum production (including natural gas), reserve holdings, refining and marketing activities, coal production, and uranium exploration and development.

  3. The direct and inverse problems of an air-saturated porous cylinder submitted to acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2010-09-01

    Gas-saturated porous skeleton materials such as geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams, or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss are still few. Accurate acoustic methods of characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we develop an acoustic method for the recovery of the material parameters of a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam cylinder. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field shows that it is also dependent on the intrinsic acoustic parameters of the porous cylinder, namely, porosity, tortuosity, and flow resistivity (permeability). The inverse problem of the recovery of the flow resistivity and porosity is solved by seeking the minima of the objective functions consisting of the sum of squared residuals of the differences between the experimental and theoretical scattered field data.

  4. Dispersion of interface waves in sediments with power-law shear speed profiles. II. Experimental observations and seismo-acoustic inversions.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D M; Godin, O A

    2001-10-01

    The propagation of seismic interface waves is investigated in soft marine sediments in which the density is constant, the shear modulus is small, and the profile of shear speed c(s) versus depth z is of the power-law form c(s) (z) = c0z(v), in which c0 and v are constants (0< v < 1). Both the phase speed V and the group speed U of interface waves scale with frequency as f(v/(v -1)) and they obey the simple relation U= (1 - v) V. These relations are derived in a simple way using ray theory and the WKB method; a companion paper [O. A. Godin and D. M. F. Chapman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 1890 (2001)] rigorously derives the same result from the solutions to the equations of motion. The frequency scaling is shown to exist in experimental data sets of interface wave phase speed and group speed. Approximate analytical formulas for the dispersion relations (phase and group speed versus frequency) enable direct inversion of the profile parameters c0 and v from the experimental data. In cases for which there is multi-mode dispersion data, the water-sediment density ratio can be determined as well. The theory applies to vertically polarized (P-SV) modes as well as to horizontally polarized (SH) modes (that is, Love waves). PMID:11681371

  5. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  6. Flight effects on the aero/acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of simulated flight speed on the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of coannular nozzles is examined. The noise and aerodynamic performance of the coannular nozzle exhaust systems over a large range of operating flight conditions is presented. The jet noise levels of the coannular nozzles are discussed. The impact of fan to primary nozzle area ratio and the presence of an ejector on flight effects are investigated. The impact of flight speed on the individual components of the coannular jet noise was ascertained.

  7. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  8. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  9. Application of the loop method for correcting acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment near the streambed-an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. This systematic bias leads to an underestimation of measured velocity and discharge. The integration of a differentially corrected Global Positioning System (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS systems, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  10. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  11. Methodological considerations of acoustic playbacks to test the behavioral significance of call directionality in male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Insley, Stephen J.; Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.

    2005-09-01

    While attempting to gain access to receptive females, male northern elephant seals form dominance hierarchies through multiple dyadic interactions involving visual and acoustic signals. These signals are both highly stereotyped and directional. Previous behavioral observations suggested that males attend to the directional cues of these signals. We used in situ vocal playbacks to test whether males attend to directional cues of the acoustic components of a competitors calls (i.e., variation in call spectra and source levels). Here, we will focus on playback methodology. Playback calls were multiple exemplars of a marked dominant male from an isolated area, recorded with a directional microphone and DAT recorder and edited into a natural sequence that controlled call amplitude. Control calls were recordings of ambient rookery sounds with the male calls removed. Subjects were 20 marked males (10 adults and 10 subadults) all located at An~o Nuevo, CA. Playback presentations, calibrated for sound-pressure level, were broadcast at a distance of 7 m from each subject. Most responses were classified into the following categories: visual orientation, postural change, calling, movement toward or away from the loudspeaker, and re-directed aggression. We also investigated developmental, hierarchical, and ambient noise variables that were thought to influence male behavior.

  12. Depression Diagnoses and Fundamental Frequency-Based Acoustic Cues in Maternal Infant-Directed Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, Laura L.; Zinser, Michael C.; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Kaplan, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    F[subscript 0]-based acoustic measures were extracted from a brief, sentence-final target word spoken during structured play interactions between mothers and their 3- to 14-month-old infants and were analyzed based on demographic variables and DSM-IV Axis-I clinical diagnoses and their common modifiers. F[subscript 0] range (?F[subscript 0]) was…

  13. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  14. Dental hygiene practice: international profile and future directions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P M

    1992-12-01

    Results of an international survey on dental hygiene are reported. The survey was conducted in 1988 through the International Dental Hygienists' Federation as part of a project to establish and maintain an international database on the profession. Information was collected by mail from national dental hygienist associations, using a 40-item questionnaire developed for the purpose; preliminary tabulations were validated by the associations. Information is presented for 13 countries-Australia, Canada, Denmark, Italy, Japan, Korea, The Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and the United Kingdom. Characteristics include historical development, numbers and distribution, education, regulation, scope of practice, employment settings and conditions, professional organisation, and perceived oral health and professional issues. The profiles and issues are examined in the light of broader socio-economic, demographic, epidemiological, technological and policy-related trends and changes. Implications for future health and organisational planning are noted. PMID:1286929

  15. Evaluation of the resolution of a metamaterial acoustic leaky wave antenna.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Rogers, Jeffery S; Guild, Matthew D; Rohde, Charles A; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic antennas have long been utilized to directionally steer acoustic waves in both air and water. Typically, these antennas are comprised of arrays of active acoustic elements, which are electronically phased to steer the acoustic profile in the desired direction. A new technology, known as an acoustic leaky wave antenna (LWA), has recently been shown to achieve directional steering of acoustic waves using a single active transducer coupled to a transmission line passive aperture. The LWA steers acoustic energy by preferential coupling to an input frequency and can be designed to steer from backfire to endfire, including broadside. This paper provides an analysis of resolution as a function of both input frequency and antenna length. Additionally, the resolution is compared to that achieved using an array of active acoustic elements. PMID:27369149

  16. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  17. Making direct use of canopy profiles in vegetation - atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, James; Polcher, Jan; Peylin, Philippe; Ottlé, Catherine; Chen, Yiying; van Gorsel, Eva; Haverd, Vanessa; McGrath, Matthew; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Most coupled land-surface regional models use the 'big-leaf' approach for simulating the sensible and latent heat fluxes of different vegetation types. However, there has been a progression in the types of questions being asked of these models, such as the consequences of land-use change or the behaviour of BVOCs and aerosol. In addition, recent years has seen growth in the availability of in-canopy datasets across a broaded range of species, with which to calibrate these simulations. Hence, there is now an argument for transferring some of the techniques and processes previously used in local, site-based land surface models to the land surface components of models which operate on a regional or even global scale. We describe here the development and evaluation of a vertical canopy energy budget model (Ryder, J et al., 2014) that can be coupled to an atmospheric model such as LMDz. Significantly, the model preserves the implicit coupling of the land-surface to atmosphere interface, which means that run-time efficiences are preserved. This is acheived by means of an interface based on the approach of Polcher et al. (1998) and Best et al. (2004), but newly developed for a canopy column. The model makes use of techniques from site-based models, such as the calculation of vertical turbulence statistics using a second-order closure model (Massman & Weil, 1999), and the distribution of long-wave and short-wave radiation over the profile, the latter using an innovate multilayer albedo scheme (McGrath et al., in prep.). Complete profiles of atmospheric temperature and specific humidity are now calculated, in order to simulate sensible and latent heat fluxes, as well as the leaf temperature at each level in the model. The model is shown to perform stably, and reproduces well flux measurements at an initial test site, across a time period of several days, or over the course of a year. Further applications of the model might be to simulate mixed canopies, the light

  18. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  19. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity. PMID:26843283

  20. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  1. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity. PMID:26843283

  2. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  3. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  4. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Half-year-long measurements with a buoy-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler in the Somali Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Johns, William

    1987-05-01

    A self-contained, upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), mounted in the top float of a subsurface mooring was deployed in the Somali Current at 2°14'N, 45°55'E from September 17, 1985, to April 25, 1986. The instrument operated at a frequency of 150 kHz, with a vertical beam angle of 20°. Vector-averaged profiles of horizontal and vertical velocity were recorded every 4 hours, using 200 pings per ensemble at a vertical bin length of 8.7 m. The mooring was deployed in very rough topography, settling in a trough at 337 m depth with the ADCP located at 267 m depth. Data retrieval over the entire recording period was complete, with Doppler biasing from side lobe reception of vertically traveling rays affecting only the top 20 m below the surface. Over the 7-month deployment the instrument recorded current profiles encompassing the end of the 1985 summer monsoon and entire winter monsoon and also through the spring transition into the early onset phase of the 1986 summer monsoon. Significant echo amplitude variations of week-to-month-long duration were observed, which were only partially related to horizontal flow variations associated with the monsoons. Projection of the strong horizontal currents (exceeding 150 cm/s at times) into the vertical component was not observed, attesting to fairly exact orientation of the four beams and tilt meters. This indicates that the vertical current measurement from ADCPs can be potentially useful for phenomena with vertical velocities exceeding a few millimeters per second. However, an analysis of echo amplitude and vertical current variations at the diurnal period suggests that the measured vertical velocity is, at least at that period, probably dominated by active vertical migration of biological scatterers through the water column.

  6. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of forward flight on the jet noise of coannular exhaust nozzles, suitable for Variable Stream Control Engines (VSCE), was investigated in a series of wind tunnel tests. The primary stream properties were maintained constant at 300 mps and 394 K. A total of 230 acoustic data points was obtained. Force measurement tests using an unheated air supply covered the same range of tunnel speeds and nozzle pressure ratios on each of the nozzle configurations. A total of 80 points was taken. The coannular nozzle OASPL and PNL noise reductions observed statically relative to synthesized values were basically retained under simulated flight conditions. The effect of fan to primary stream area ratio on flight effects was minor. At take-off speed, the peak jet noise for a VSCE was estimated to be over 6 PNdB lower than the static noise level. High static thrust coefficients were obtained for the basic coannular nozzles, with a decay of 0.75 percent at take-off speeds.

  7. Ultrasound tomography for simultaneous reconstruction of acoustic density, attenuation, and compressibility profiles.

    PubMed

    Mojabi, Pedram; LoVetri, Joe

    2015-04-01

    A fast and efficient forward scattering solver is developed for use in ultrasound tomography. The solver is formulated so as to enable the calculation of scattering from large and relatively high-contrast objects with inhomogeneous physical properties that vary simultaneously in acoustic attenuation, compressibility, and density. It is based on the method of moments in conjunction with a novel implementation of the conjugate gradient algorithm which requires the use of the adjoints of the scattering operators. The solver takes advantage of the symmetric block Toeplitz matrix with symmetric Toeplitz blocks property of the Green's function matrix to increase efficiency and only stores the first row of this matrix to reduce memory requirements. This row is then used for the matrix-vector multiplication using the fast Fourier transform technique, thus, resulting in the computational complexity of O(n log n). The marching-on-source technique is also used to provide a good initial guess which allows the conjugate gradient technique to converge faster than initializing with an arbitrary guess. This feature is important in tomographic inversion algorithms which require that the object to be imaged be interrogated via several incident fields. Forward scattering and inversion examples, based on the Conjugate Gradient Least Squares regularized Born Iterative Method, are shown, in two-dimensions, for objects varying in all three physical properties. PMID:25920834

  8. Hybrid distributed acoustic and temperature sensor using a commercial off-the-shelf DFB laser and direct detection.

    PubMed

    Muanenda, Yonas; Oton, Claudio J; Faralli, Stefano; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid distributed acoustic and temperature sensor (DATS) using a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) distributed feedback (DFB) laser, a single-mode optical fiber, and a common receiver block. We show that the spectral and frequency noise characteristics of the laser, combined with a suitable modulation scheme, ensure the inter-pulse incoherence and intra-pulse coherence conditions required for exploiting the fast denoising benefits of cyclic Simplex pulse coding in the hybrid measurement. The proposed technique enables simultaneous, distributed measurement of vibrations and temperature, with key industrial applications in structural health monitoring and industrial process control systems. The sensor is able to clearly identify a 500 Hz vibration at 5 km distance along a standard single-mode fiber and simultaneously measure the temperature profile along the same fiber with a temperature resolution of less than 0.5°C with 5 m spatial resolution. PMID:26907430

  9. Sounding out erosion on the Mekong river banks: insights from combined terrestrial laser scanning, multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of bank erosion processes and rates along very large rivers remains incomplete, primarily due to the difficulties of obtaining morphological and flow data close to the bank across various flow stages. Moreover, obtaining such process information through the entire flow and bank depth has also proved challenging. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Multibeam Echo Sounder) and flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) surveys undertaken on the Mekong River, Cambodia, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of a series of embayments on the outer bank of a large meander. These techniques yield unique data that reveal how the flow field responds to the morphology of the outer bank and subaqueous slump blocks. Specifically, we show that in the early stage of embayment growth, deposited slump blocks induce flow upwelling and bank-directed flow that enhances bank erosion. Our data also suggest that as the initial erosion process continues, a threshold embayment size is reached. Below this threshold, flow separation acts to enhance embayment growth along with the fluid dynamic effects of slump blocks, but above the threshold size, the separation zone in the embayments acts as a protective layer, thus slowing erosion. This field data allows proposition of a new conceptual model of embayment evolution.

  10. Direct measurement of coherent subterahertz acoustic phonons mean free path in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, R.; Huynh, A.; Jusserand, B.; Perrin, B.; Lemaître, A.

    2016-05-01

    The phonon mean free path is generally inferred from the measurement of thermal conductivity and we are still lacking precise information on this quantity. Recent advances in the field of high-frequency phonons transduction using semiconductor superlattices give the opportunity to fill this gap. We present experimental results on the attenuation of longitudinal acoustic phonons in GaAs in the frequency and temperature ranges 0.2-1 THz and 10-80 K respectively. Surprisingly, we observe a plateau in the frequency dependence of the attenuation above 0.7 THz, that we ascribe to a breakdown of Herring processes.

  11. Direct laboratory observation of fluid distribution and its influence on acoustic properties of patchy saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Clennell, B.; Pervukhina, M.; Shulakova, V.; Mueller, T.; Gurevich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Porous rocks in hydrocarbon reservoirs are often saturated with a mixture of two or more fluids. Interpretation of exploration seismograms requires understanding of the relationship between distribution of the fluids patches and acoustic properties of rocks. The sizes of patches as well as their distribution affect significantly the seismic response. If the size of the fluid patch is smaller than the diffusion wavelength then pressure equilibration is achieved and the bulk modulus of the rock saturated with a mixture is defined by the Gassmann equations (Gassmann, 1951) with the saturation-weighted average of the fluid bulk modulus given by Wood's law (Wood, 1955, Mavko et al., 1998). If the fluid patch size is much larger than the diffusion wavelength then there is no pressure communication between different patches. In this case, fluid-flow effects can be neglected and the overall rock may be considered equivalent to an elastic composite material consisting of homogeneous parts whose properties are given by Gassmann theory with Hill's equation for the bulk modulus (Hill, 1963, Mavko et al., 1998). At intermediate values of fluid saturation the velocity-saturation relationship is significantly affected by the fluid patch distribution. In order to get an improved understanding of factors influencing the patch distribution and the resulting seismic wave response we performed simultaneous measurements of P-wave velocities and rock sample CT imaging. The CT imaging allows us to map the fluid distribution inside rock sample during saturation (water imbibition). We compare the experimental results with theoretical predictions. In this paper we will present results of simultaneous measurements of longitudinal wave velocities and imaging mapping of fluid distribution inside rock sample during sample saturation. We will report results of two kinds of experiments: "dynamic" and "quasi static" saturation. In both experiments Casino Cores Otway Basin sandstone, Australia core

  12. Design and implementation of an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem based on a low-power micro-controller unit.

    PubMed

    Won, Tae-Hee; Park, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    For decades, underwater acoustic communication has been restricted to the point-to-point long distance applications such as deep sea probes and offshore oil fields. For this reason, previous acoustic modems were typically characterized by high data rates and long working ranges at the expense of large size and high power consumption. Recently, as the need for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) has increased, the research and development of compact and low-power consuming communication devices has become the focus. From the consideration that the requisites of acoustic modems for UWSNs are low power consumption, omni-directional beam pattern, low cost and so on, in this paper, we design and implement an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem satisfying these requirements. In order to execute fast digital domain signal processing and support flexible interfaces with other peripherals, an ARM Cortex-M3 is embedded in the micro-modem. Also, for the realization of small and omni-directional properties, a spherical transducer having a resonant frequency of 70 kHz and a diameter of 34 mm is utilized for the implementation. Physical layer frame format and symbol structure for efficient packet-based underwater communication systems are also investigated. The developed acoustic micro-modem is verified analytically and experimentally in indoor and outdoor environments in terms of functionality and performance. Since the modem satisfies the requirements for use in UWSNs, it could be deployed in a wide range of applications requiring underwater acoustic communication. PMID:22438765

  13. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  14. Continuous measurements of suspended sediment loads using dual frequency acoustic Doppler profile signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Alessandro; Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Stokseth, Siri

    2016-04-01

    A huge thread to Hydropower plants (HPP) is incoming sediments in suspension from the rivers upstream. The sediments settle in the reservoir and reduce the effective head as well as the volume and reduce consequently the lifetime of the reservoir. In addition are the fine sediments causing severe damages to turbines and infrastructure of a HPP. For estimating the amount of in-coming sediments in suspension and the consequent planning of efficient counter measures, it is essential to monitor the rivers within the catchment of the HPP for suspended sediments. This work is considerably time consuming and requires highly educated personnel and is therefore expensive. Surrogate-indirect methods using acoustic and optic devices have bee developed since the last decades that may be efficiently applied for the continuous monitoring of suspended sediment loads. The presented study proposes therefore to establish a research station at a cross section of a river which is the main tributary to a reservoir of a HPP and equip this station with surrogate as well as with common method of measuring suspended load concentrations and related flow discharge and level. The logger at the research station delivers data automatically to a server. Therefore it is ensured that also large flood events are covered. Data during flood are of high interest to the HPP planners since they carried the most part of the sediment load in a hydrological year. Theses peaks can hardly be measured with common measurement methods. Preliminary results of the wet season 2015/2016 are presented. The data gives insight in the applicable range, in terms of scattering particles concentration-average size and corresponding flow discharge and level, eventually enabling the study of suspended sediment load-water flow correlations during peak events. This work is carried out as part of a larger research project on sustainable hydro power plants exposed to high sediment yield, SediPASS. SediPASS is funded by the

  15. Observations of near-inertial waves in acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements made during the Mixed Layer Dynamics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereskin, T. K.; Levine, M. D.; Harding, A. J.; Regier, L. A.

    1989-06-01

    Measurements of upper ocean shear made during the Mixed Layer Dynamics Experiment (MILDEX) provide evidence of large horizontal scale motion at near-inertial frequency. The measurements consist of shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiles. Four large-scale spatial surveys of 2-4 days duration were made by the R/V Wecoma as a set of boxes approximately 60 km per side around a drifting current meter buoy. Velocity time series from the drifting buoy and from sonar measurements made from FLIP also indicated the presence of motions at near-inertial frequency. Horizontal length and time scales of the motion are estimated from the phase of the shear vector measured during the spatial surveys. Estimates of the length scale of the waves range from 500 to 1000 km, and the frequency is approximately 1.1f. The behavior of the phase is found to be consistent with a model of narrow-band inertial waves with vertical structure such that there is a zero crossing in velocity at the base of the mixed layer (40-60 m).

  16. Diel vertical migrations of Meganyctiphanes norvegica in the Kattegat: Comparison of net catches and measurements with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, F.; Buchholz, C.; Reppin, J.; Fischer, J.

    1995-03-01

    Diel vertical migration of a stable and well-defined population of Nordic krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica (Crustacea, Euphausiacea) was investigated during eight days in August 1989, in the Läsö-Deep, East of the Danish island Läsö. Net catches with a multi-net (MOCNESS) and measurements with a moored and a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) were compared. Backscattered energy as a measure for biomass gave good correlations to the dry weight of M. norvegica and smaller zooplankton from net catches. Diel migratory patterns matched well, as determined, parallel with both methods. Migratory vertical velocity was determined with ADCP at 2 3 cm sec-1. The potential for the use of ADCPs for biological investigation is discussed. Vertical migration was dependent on environmental parameters. The krill did not cross a temperature barrier of 14°C, although rich food sources were situated beyond it. Differences in salinity did not play a role. Currents were involved in plankton distribution. Light was an important Zeitgeber (synchronizer) and determined the density of the krill aggregations. Feeding behaviour did not interfere with the light-induced migratory pattern of Nordic krill at the Läsö-Deep.

  17. Shipboard acoustic doppler current profiler data collected during the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) 1991. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Routt, J.A.; Wilson, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The long-term goal of ongoing and future research in the western tropical Atlantic is to estimate the cross-equatorial transport of water and heat. The overall goals of those involved in the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) are (a) to describe the annual cycle in the large-scale structure of the velocity and hydrographic properties over the full water column in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean between the equator and 15 degrees N, and (b) to compare data and models in order to better understand the physics of the regional circulation in the broader context of Atlantic basin thermohaline circulation. The results of this combined effort will greatly improve our understanding of this complex boundary current region and establish the basis for efficient long-term climatic monitoring of the critical meridional fluxes of mass and heat across the tropical Atlantic. This report presents the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data obtained during (ACCP) Atlantic Climate Change Program cruises in the western subtropical and tropical Atlantic in January, June and September 1991.

  18. Comparison of acoustic doppler current profiler and Price AA mechanical current meter measurements made during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, Patrick; Mueller, David; Pratt, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River and Tributaries project performed as designed during the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood, with many of the operational decisions based on discharge targets as opposed to stage. Measurement of discharge at the Tarbert Landing, Mississippi range provides critical information used in operational decisions for the floodways located in Louisiana. Historically, discharge measurements have been made using a Price AA current meter and the mid-section method, and a long record exists based on these types of measurements, including historical peak discharges. Discharge measurements made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat have been incorporated into the record since the mid 1990's, and are used along with the Price AA mid-section measurements. During the 2011 flood event, both methods were used and appeared to provide different results at times. The apparent differences between the measurement techniques are due to complex hydrodynamics at this location that created large spatial and temporal fluctuations in the flow. The data and analysis presented herein show the difference between the two methods to be within the expected accuracy of the measurements when the measurements are made concurrently. The observed fluctuations prevent valid comparisons of data collected sequentially or even with different observation durations.

  19. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Yan

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. They are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JGOFS cruise designated TN039. Table 1 lists start and end dates of each cruise with its mission. All but the first cruise have been or will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Each cruise is scheduled for a duration of between two weeks and one month. Seven of the cruises, referred to as process cruises, follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipments and towing of a SeaSoar. ADCP data are collected using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises, named the AutoADCP system. The system is an extension of RD instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with {open_quotes}user-exit{close_quotes} programs. It makes it possible to collect ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and insures constant data coverage and uniform data quality.

  20. Irregular reflection of weak acoustic shock pulses on rigid boundaries : Schlieren experiments and direct numerical simulation based on a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjouy, Cyril; Ollivier, Sébastien; Marsden, Olivier; Karzova, Maria; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The local interactions occurring between incident and reflected shock waves in the vicinity of rigid surfaces are investigated. Both regular and irregular — also called von Neumann — regimes of reflection are studied, via experimental and numerical simulations. Shock waves are produced experimentally with a 20 kV electrical spark source which allows the generation of spherically diverging acoustic shocks. The behaviour of the resulting weak acoustic shocks near rigid boundaries is visualized with a Schlieren optical technique which allows the spatial structure of the shocks to be studied. In particular, the evolution of the Mach stem forming above a flat surface is examined, and its height is observed to be directly linked to the angle of incidence and the pressure amplitude of the incident shock. The propagation of an acoustic shock between two parallel rigid boundaries is also studied. It is shown that the strong interactions between the Mach stems emerging from the two boundaries can lead to a drastic modification of the morphology of the acoustic field in the waveguide. Experimental results are compared to numerical results obtained from high-order finite-difference based simulations of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations. The good agreement between the experimental distribution of the acoustic field and numerical results suggests that numerical simulations are promising as a predictive tool to study nonlinear acoustic propagation of acoustic waves in complex geometrical configurations with rigid boundaries.

  1. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G. Jackson; Campana, Maria I.; Walko, Donald A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz. PMID:26751616

  2. Specific Features of Destabilization of the Wave Profile During Reflection of an Intense Acoustic Beam from a Soft Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryabin, M. S.; Kasyanov, D. A.; Kurin, V. V.; Garasyov, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that a significant energy redistribution occurs in the spectrum of reflected nonlinear waves, when an intense acoustic beam is reflected from an acoustically soft boundary, which manifests itself at short wave distances from a reflecting boundary. This effect leads to the appearance of extrema in the distributions of the amplitude and intensity of the field of the reflected acoustic beam near the reflecting boundary. The results of physical experiments are confirmed by numerical modeling of the process of transformation of nonlinear waves reflected from an acoustically soft boundary. Numerical modeling was performed by means of the Khokhlov—Zabolotskaya—Kuznetsov (KZK) equation.

  3. Specific Features of Destabilization of the Wave Profile During Reflection of an Intense Acoustic Beam from a Soft Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryabin, M. S.; Kasyanov, D. A.; Kurin, V. V.; Garasyov, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a significant energy redistribution occurs in the spectrum of reflected nonlinear waves, when an intense acoustic beam is reflected from an acoustically soft boundary, which manifests itself at short wave distances from a reflecting boundary. This effect leads to the appearance of extrema in the distributions of the amplitude and intensity of the field of the reflected acoustic beam near the reflecting boundary. The results of physical experiments are confirmed by numerical modeling of the process of transformation of nonlinear waves reflected from an acoustically soft boundary. Numerical modeling was performed by means of the Khokhlov—Zabolotskaya—Kuznetsov (KZK) equation.

  4. Novel applications of motif-directed profiling to identify disease resistance genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular profiling of gene families is a versatile tool to study diversity between individual genomes in sexual crosses and germplasm. Nucleotide binding site (NBS) profiling, in particular, targets conserved nucleotide binding site-encoding sequences of resistance gene analogs (RGAs), and is widely used to identify molecular markers for disease resistance (R) genes. Results In this study, we used NBS profiling to identify genome-wide locations of RGA clusters in the genome of potato clone RH. Positions of RGAs in the potato RH and DM genomes that were generated using profiling and genome sequencing, respectively, were compared. Largely overlapping results, but also interesting discrepancies, were found. Due to the clustering of RGAs, several parts of the genome are overexposed while others remain underexposed using NBS profiling. It is shown how the profiling of other gene families, i.e. protein kinases and different protein domain-coding sequences (i.e., TIR), can be used to achieve a better marker distribution. The power of profiling techniques is further illustrated using RGA cluster-directed profiling in a population of Solanum berthaultii. Multiple different paralogous RGAs within the Rpi-ber cluster could be genetically distinguished. Finally, an adaptation of the profiling protocol was made that allowed the parallel sequencing of profiling fragments using next generation sequencing. The types of RGAs that were tagged in this next-generation profiling approach largely overlapped with classical gel-based profiling. As a potential application of next-generation profiling, we showed how the R gene family associated with late blight resistance in the SH*RH population could be identified using a bulked segregant approach. Conclusions In this study, we provide a comprehensive overview of previously described and novel profiling primers and their genomic targets in potato through genetic mapping and comparative genomics. Furthermore, it is shown how

  5. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  6. Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Jimenez, C.

    2010-08-15

    Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

  7. Surface acoustic wave amplification by direct current-voltage supplied to graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Emelin, E.; Kononenko, O.; Roshchupkin, D. V.; Tnyshtykbayev, K. B.; Baigarin, K. A.

    2015-01-12

    Using a high-resolution X-Ray diffraction measurement method, the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of a Ca{sub 3}TaGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} (CTGS) piezoelectric crystal was investigated, where an external current was driven across the graphene film. Here, we show that the application of the DC field leads to a significant enhancement of the SAW magnitude and, as a result, to amplification of the diffraction satellites. Amplification of 33.2 dB/cm for the satellite +1, and of 13.8 dB/cm for the satellite +2, at 471 MHz has been observed where the external DC voltage of +10 V was applied. Amplification of SAW occurs above a DC field much smaller than that of a system using bulk semiconductor. Theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with our measurements and analysis of experimental data for other materials.

  8. Using a fibre-optic cable as Distributed Acoustic Sensor for Vertical Seismic Profiling - Overview of various field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Julia; Lüth, Stefan; Henninges, Jan; Reinsch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fibre-optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) or Distributed Vibration Sensing (DVS) is a technology, where an optical fibre cable is used as a sensor for acoustic signals. An ambient seismic wavefield, which is coupled by friction or pressure to the optical fibre, induces dynamic strain changes along the cable. The DAS/DVS technology offers the possibility to record an optoelectronic signal which is linearly related to the time dependent local strain. The DAS/DVS technology is based on the established technique of phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (phi-OTDR). Coherent laser pulses are launched into the fibre to monitor changes in the resulting elastic Rayleigh backscatter with time. Dynamic strain changes lead to small displacements of the scattering elements (non-uniformities within the glass structure of the optical fibre), and therefore to variations of the relative phases of the backscattered photons. The fibre behaves as a series of interferometers whose output is sensitive to small changes of the strain at any point along its length. To record the ground motion not only in space but also in time, snapshots of the wavefield are created by repeatedly firing laser pulses into the fibre at sampling frequencies much higher than seismic frequencies. DAS/DVS is used e.g. for continuous monitoring of pipelines, roads or borders and for production monitoring from within the wellbore. Within the last years, the DAS/DVS technology was further developed to record seismic data. We focus on the recording of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data with DAS/DVS and present an overview of various field tests published between 2011 and 2014. Here, especially CO2 storage pilot sites provided the opportunity to test this new technology for geophysical reservoir monitoring. DAS/DVS-VSP time-lapse measurements have been published for the Quest CO2 storage site in Canada. The DAS/DVS technology was also tested at the CO2 storage sites in Rousse (France), Citronelle

  9. Direct evidence for anisotropic He diffusivity in zircon provided by laser depth profiling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K.; van Soest, M. C.; Monteleone, B. D.; Boyce, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    While zircon (U-Th)/He dating has become an increasingly popular tool for studies of the thermal evolution of orogenic systems, several issues complicate interpretations of the geologic significance of zircon “dates”. Zircons frequently exhibit complex U-Th zoning, which makes corrections for alpha ejection loss uncertain. It has been known for decades that radiation damage enhances the rate of diffusive loss of helium in zircon, sometimes making the unique assignment of a (U-Th)/He closure temperature difficult. Here we consider another complicating factor: the proposal by Reich et al. (2007) - based on computer simulations - that He diffusion is anisotropic in zircon, which also may have significant implications regarding (U-Th)/He closure temperature. We present, for the first time, direct measurements of crystallographically controlled, anisotropic diffusion profiles in zircon that appear to support the conclusions of Reich et al. (2007). For this study, we conducted replicate vacuum heating experiments on slices from euhedral crystals of Cretaceous De Beers zircon from South Africa and Proterozoic Mud Tank zircon from Australia. (All slices were cut from the central portions of very large crystals in order to avoid natural alpha ejection profiles near crystal margins.) In each experiment, we heated slices of the two zircons cut both parallel and perpendicular to their c-axes for 24 hours at 415° C. Depth profiling of the resulting 4He diffusion profiles using an ArF excimer laser revealed extremely similar c-axis parallel diffusion profiles for both zircons, and extremely similar c-axis perpendicular diffusion profiles for both zircons. However, the c-axis parallel and perpendicular profiles were markedly different. The loss profiles parallel to c extended over twice as far into the crystals as did the perpendicular profiles, implying much more rapid thermally activated diffusion parallel to the c direction, as predicted by the Reich et al. models

  10. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukna, Vytautas; Jarnac, Amélie; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort terawatt laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum.

  11. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Jukna, Vytautas; Jarnac, Amélie; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort terawatt laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum. PMID:27415357

  12. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Seasonal suspended particles distribution patterns in Western South Yellow Sea based on Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchao; Li, Guangxue; Xu, Jishang; Qiao, Lulu; Dong, Ping; Ding, Dong; Liu, Shidong; Sun, Pingkuo

    2015-06-01

    An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) observation site was set up in the Western South Yellow Sea from 2012 to 2013 to study the local suspended particle matters (SPM) distribution pattern. The SPM concentration could be semi-quantitatively represented by backscatter intensity (Sv), converted by the echo intensity (EI) of ADCP. Results show two types of SPM in the water column: the quasi-biological SPM and quasi-mineral SPM. The quasi-biological SPM mainly exists in summer half year and is concentrated above the thermocline. It has periodically diurnal variations with high concentration at night and low concentration in the daytime. The quasi-mineral SPM is located in lower part of the water column, with similar relation to monthly tidal current variation all year round. However, the daily quasi-mineral SPM distribution patterns vary between summer and winter half year. The sunlight is thought to be the origin factor leading to the diurnally vertical motion of the biological features, which might cause the diurnal Sv variation. Unlike in winter half year when tidal current is relatively single driving force of the monthly SPM pattern, the high speed current near the thermocline is also responsible for the concentration of quasi-mineral SPM in summer half year. The sediment input difference between summer and winter half year contribute to the varied daily variation of quasi-mineral SPM with re-suspended SPM in winter and sediments from Yellow Sea Mud Area (YSMA) in summer. The seasonal variations in hydrodynamics, water structure and heavy-wind incidents are the primary factors influencing the differential seasonal SPM distribution patterns.

  14. Acoustic doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. The first of these cruises, a transit of the R/V THOMPSON into the northern Arabian Sea area from Singapore, was a calibration and training cruise that took place between September 18 and October 7, 1994. (The cruises on the THOMPSON are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JOGFS cruise designated TN039.) The remaining cruises have been and will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Seven of these cruises, referred to as process cruises, will follow a set cruise track, making hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The remainder of the cruises while not restricted to the set cruise track, will generally stay within the region defined by the track during the deployment and retrieval of moored equipment and the towing of a SeaSoar. Each cruise will last between two weeks and one month. ADCP data will be collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. The AutoADCP system is an extension of RD Instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with ``user exit`` programs. This data report presents ADCP results from the first four JGOFS cruises, TN039 through TN042, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods.

  15. The Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (adcp) as a Tool for Ocean Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, H. T.; Flagg, C. N.; Ortner, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    Although the ADCP has been around for three decades it remains somewhat underappreciated for its excellent exploratory potential in several areas. First and perhaps foremost because oceanographers have always been handicapped in their ability to resolve horizontal patterns below the surface, the ADCP opens up a powerful and very cost-effective window into the ocean water column to explore the meso- and submesoscale velocity field at very high resolution. This is particularly true when ADCP data are collected from just a single instrument mounted on a vessel operating repeatedly over an extended period of time in an area or along a route. The ADCP greatly expands upon hydrographic and XBT information by directly measuring the velocity field accurately without any assumptions about geostrophy or the velocity of reference layers. Second, vessels in transit can characterize currents and eddy activities across contrasting oceanic regimes and highlight their relation to the steering role of bottom topography. Third, even though the ADCP is a single frequency device the backscatter signal recorded by the ADCP is showing considerable skill in revealing space-time patterns of biomass variability. Here, through data we have taken over the past ten years, we survey the ADCP’s future as a tool of exploration across several dimensions: space, time, and parameter (physics and biology). Today, thanks to the ADCP we have a far more accurate picture of the velocity and vorticity structure of fronts and eddies. At the surface a front is simply a transition between different water masses, but the actual transition will often consist a water-mass and potential vorticity jump on a significantly smaller scale within the frontal feature. The same applies to the boundaries of rings and lenses. Commercial vessels equipped with ADCPs operating on a repeat schedule can document underlying patterns that single transects or cruises cannot detect due to inherent eddy activity. Newly

  16. Performance assessment of bi-directional knotless tissue-closure devices in juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2013-07-02

    Acoustic transmitters used in survival and telemetry studies are often surgically implanted in fish. While this is a well-established method, it has the potential to affect health, behavior, and survival, thus affecting study results. Much research has been done to try to minimize the harmful effects caused by the transmitter and tagging process. In 2009, we first investigated the use of a bi-directional knotless (barbed) suture material in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We found that it resulted in higher tag retention than the simple interrupted suture pattern; however, the occurrence of ulceration and redness increased. The objective of this study was to refine the suturing patterns of the bi-directional knotless suture and retest suture performance in juvenile Chinook salmon. We tested the bi-directional suture using 3 different suture patterns and two needle types: 6-Point (12-mm needle circumference), Wide “N” (12-mm needle circumference), Wide “N” Knot 12 (12-mm needle circumference), and Wide “N” Knot 18 (18-mm needle circumference).

  17. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  18. No direct coupling between bending of galaxy disc stellar age and light profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Florido, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husemann, B.; Kehrig, C.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Papaderos, P.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, C. J.; Zibetti, S.; CALIFA Team

    2016-02-01

    We study the stellar properties of 44 face-on spiral galaxies from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey via full spectrum fitting techniques. We compare the age profiles with the surface brightness distribution in order to highlight differences between profile types (type I, exponential profile; and II, down-bending profile). We observe an upturn (`U-shape') in the age profiles for 17 out of these 44 galaxies with reliable stellar information up to their outer parts. This `U-shape' is not a unique feature for type II galaxies but can be observed in type I as well. These findings suggest that the mechanisms shaping the surface brightness and stellar population distributions are not directly coupled. This upturn in age is only observable in the light-weighted profiles while it flattens out in the mass-weighted profiles. Given recent results on the outer parts of nearby systems and the results presented in this Letter, one of the most plausible explanations for the age upturn is an early formation of the entire disc (˜10 Gyr ago) followed by an inside-out quenching of the star formation.

  19. Sub-seafloor acoustic characterization of seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone in the western Pacific using chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.-G.; Hein, J.R.; Lee, Kenneth; Moon, J.-W.; Ko, Y.-T.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles and bathymetry was performed on data collected from seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the western Pacific. The OFZ, which is a 150 km wide rift zone showing 600 km of right-lateral movement in a NW-SE direction, is unique among the fracture zones of the Pacific in that it includes many old seamounts (e.g., Magellan Seamounts and seamounts on Dutton Ridge). Sub-seafloor acoustic echoes on the seamounts are classified into nine specific types based on the nature and continuity of the echoes, subbottom structure, and morphology of the seafloor: (1) distinct echoes (types I-1, I-2, I-3), (2) indistinct echoes (types II-1, II-2, II-3), and (3) hyperbolic echoes (types III-1, III-2, III-3). Type I-2 pelagic sediments, characterized by thin and intermittent coverage, were probably deposited in topographically sheltered areas when bottom currents were strong, whereas type I-1 pelagic sediments accumulated during continuous and widespread sedimentation. Development of seamount flank rift zones in the OFZ may have been influenced by preexisting structures in the transform fracture zone at the time of volcanism, whereas those on Ita Mai Tai seamount in the Pigafetta Basin originated solely by edifice-building processes. Flank rift zones that formed by dike intrusions and eruptions played an important role in mass wasting. Mass-wasting processes included block faulting or block slides around the summit margin, sliding/slumping, debris flows, and turbidites, which may have been triggered by faulting, volcanism, dike injection, and weathering during various stages in the evolution of the seamounts. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sub-seafloor acoustic characterization of seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone in the western Pacific using chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Gook; Hein, James R.; Lee, Kiehwa; Moon, Jai-Woon; Ko, Young-Tak

    2005-10-01

    A detailed analysis of chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles and bathymetry was performed on data collected from seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the western Pacific. The OFZ, which is a 150 km wide rift zone showing 600 km of right-lateral movement in a NW-SE direction, is unique among the fracture zones of the Pacific in that it includes many old seamounts (e.g., Magellan Seamounts and seamounts on Dutton Ridge). Sub-seafloor acoustic echoes on the seamounts are classified into nine specific types based on the nature and continuity of the echoes, subbottom structure, and morphology of the seafloor: (1) distinct echoes (types I-1, I-2, I-3), (2) indistinct echoes (types II-1, II-2, II-3), and (3) hyperbolic echoes (types III-1, III-2, III-3). Type I-2 pelagic sediments, characterized by thin and intermittent coverage, were probably deposited in topographically sheltered areas when bottom currents were strong, whereas type I-1 pelagic sediments accumulated during continuous and widespread sedimentation. Development of seamount flank rift zones in the OFZ may have been influenced by preexisting structures in the transform fracture zone at the time of volcanism, whereas those on Ita Mai Tai seamount in the Pigafetta Basin originated solely by edifice-building processes. Flank rift zones that formed by dike intrusions and eruptions played an important role in mass wasting. Mass-wasting processes included block faulting or block slides around the summit margin, sliding/slumping, debris flows, and turbidites, which may have been triggered by faulting, volcanism, dike injection, and weathering during various stages in the evolution of the seamounts.

  1. Profiles of foreign direct investment in U.S. energy 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-05

    Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1993 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy resources. This report also looks at the investment patterns of US energy companies in other countries. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment activities.

  2. Profiling Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Children Involved in Direct and Indirect Bullying Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H.; Polenik, K.; Nakasita, S.; Jones, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Being involved in bullying places a child at risk of poor psychosocial and educational outcomes. This study aimed to examine the profile of behavioural, emotional and social functioning for two subtypes of bullying: direct and indirect (relational). Pupils aged between 7 and 11 years completed sociometric measures of social inclusion and bullying…

  3. Bathymetric surveys of Morse and Geist Reservoirs in central Indiana made with acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system technology, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.; Morlock, S.E.; Baker, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technology were used to map the bathymetry of Morse and Geist Reservoirs, two artificial lakes used for public water supply in central Indiana. The project was a pilot study to evaluate the use of the technologies for bathymetric surveys. Bathymetric surveys were last conducted in 1978 on Morse Reservoir and in 1980 on Geist Reservoir; those surveys were done with conventional methods using networks of fathometer transects. The 1996 bathymetric surveys produced updated estimates of reservoir volumes that will serve as base-line data for future estimates of storage capacity and sedimentation rates.An acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system receiver were used to collect water-depth and position data from April 1996 through October 1996. All water-depth and position data were imported to a geographic information system to create a data base. The geographic information system then was used to generate water-depth contour maps and to compute the volumes for each reservoir.The computed volume of Morse Reservoir was 22,820 acre-feet (7.44 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,484 acres. The computed volume of Geist Reservoir was 19,280 acre-feet (6.29 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,848 acres. The computed 1996 reservoir volumes are less than the design volumes and indicate that sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs. Cross sections were constructed from the computer-generated surfaces for 1996 and compared to the fathometer profiles from the 1978 and 1980 surveys; analysis of these cross sections also indicates that some sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs.The acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technologies described in this report produced bathymetric maps and volume estimates more efficiently and with comparable or greater resolution than conventional

  4. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Naify, Christina J. Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.; Guild, Matthew D.

    2015-09-28

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  5. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Guild, Matthew D.; Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-09-01

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  6. Direct and quantitative comparison of pixelated density profiles to high resolution X-ray reflectivity data.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenter, Paul; Lee, S. S.; Skelton, A A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    A method for comparing pixelated density profiles (e.g. obtained from molecular dynamics or other computational techniques) with experimental X-ray reflectivity data both directly and quantitatively is described. The conditions under which such a comparison can be made quantitatively (e.g. with errors <1%) are determined theoretically by comparing calculated structure factors for an intrinsic continuous density profile with those obtained from density profiles that have been binned into regular spatial increments. The accuracy of the X-ray reflectivity calculations for binned density profiles is defined in terms of the inter-relationships between resolution of the X-ray reflectivity data (i.e. its range in momentum transfer), the chosen bin size and the width of the intrinsic density profile. These factors play a similar role in the application of any structure-factor calculations that involve the use of pixelated density profiles, such as those obtained from iterative phasing algorithms for inverting structures from X-ray reflectivity and coherent diffraction imaging data. Finally, it is shown how simulations of a quartz water interface can be embedded into an exact description of the bulk phases (including the substrate crystal and the fluid water, below and above the actual interface) to quantitatively reproduce the experimental reflectivity data of a solid liquid interface.

  7. Derivation of the anisotropy profile, constraints on the local velocity dispersion, and implications for direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    We study the implications of a pseudo-phase-space density power-law for the anisotropy profile of a Milky Way-like dark matter halo. Requiring that the anisotropy parameter does not take non-physical values within the virial radius places a maximum value on the local radial velocity dispersion. For a plausible range of halo parameters, it is possible to take a local total velocity dispersion of up to about 300 km/s. Making this choice uniquely specifies the anisotropy and dispersion profiles. We introduce a way to model the local velocity distribution that incorporates this anisotropy and study the impact on direct detection.

  8. Wind Profiles Obtained with a Molecular Direct Detection Doppler Lidar During IHOP-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huai-Lin; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Dobler, Jeremy; Hasselbrack, William; Comer, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile direct detection Doppler lidar system which uses the double edge technique to measure the Doppler shift of the molecular backscattered laser signal at a wavelength of 355 nm. In the spring of 2002 GLOW was deployed to the western Oklahoma profiling site (36 deg 33.500 min. N, 100 deg. 36.371 min. W) to participate in the International H2O Project (IHOP). During the IHOP campaign over 240 hours of wind profiles were obtained with the GLOW lidar in support of a variety of scientific investigations.

  9. Long-term ferry-based observations of the suspended sediment fluxes through the Marsdiep inlet using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauw, J. J.; Merckelbach, L. M.; Ridderinkhof, H.; van Aken, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    Long-term measurements with a hull mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) under the ferry, crossing the Marsdiep inlet between the mainland and the island of Texel (the Netherlands), were used to determine the volume flux and the flux of suspended particulate matter (SPM) through this inlet for the period 2003-2005. Profiles of the SPM concentration were estimated from profiles of the acoustic backscatter intensity in which the shift between the low and the high turbulent regime is taken into account. Calibration constants and tuning parameters were estimated by using data collected during 7 different 13 hour anchor stations. The residual (water) volume flux through the inlet appears to vary strongly on a variety of time scales from daily to inter-annual. A regression analysis indicates that the daily residual volume transport correlates well with the daily mean wind component from the south; the latter likely drives the residual flow along the coast of Holland. The observed residual SPM transport of 7 to 11 Mton/yr is dominated by the correlation between tidal velocity and SPM concentration variations. This leads to an import as currents and SPM concentrations during flood were higher than those during ebb, a process generally known as tidal asymmetry. Our analysis has shown that regular observations with a ferry mounted ADCP is an effective method to monitor the volume and SPM transport processes in an estuary.

  10. The Physical Context of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment as Observed by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, J.; Pierce, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment in January-February 2002 involved three ships making numerous measurements to help quantify and study two iron-infused patches of water. The main purpose of the study was to investigate the biological and chemical effects of iron fertilization on phytoplankton productivity. Physical processes in the Southern Ocean play a large role in the formation, evolution, and eventual dispersion of natural phytoplankton patches. The Northern (56 S) and Southern (66.5 S) patches were infused with iron sulfate three and four times, respectively, and tracked over a seven week period. Two of the ships, the R/V Revelle and the R/V Melville, were outfitted with 150 kHz narrowband acoustic Doppler current profilers. Good quality velocity data between 20 and 300 m depths are available continuously along the shiptracks. The available transects running south in the vicinity of 170 W, from 52-66.5 S, reveal the zonally banded velocity structure characteristic of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. To the north of the 59-61 S Polar Frontal zone, mesoscale bands of eastward currents up to 0.4 m/s alternate with generally smaller westward bands. Farther south, the alternating structure continues but with smaller eastward velocities of about 0.2 m/s. The Northern iron patch was successfully created in a relatively low-velocity region amidst strong velocities immediately north and south. The overall mean velocity during the initial Northern patch occupation by the R/V Revelle (12-19 January) was small and northward at 0.1 m/s. By the second Revelle occupation of the Northern patch (8-10 February), however, the mean patch velocity was 0.2 m/s to the east-northeast. Significantly, the patch at this time extended across the flank of a strong eastward jet, associated with a sharp surface temperature change from 8-11 C. Whereas the northern end of the North patch experienced a strong 0.5 m/s northeast velocity, the southern end remained in a low-velocity region

  11. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  12. Comment on "The directionality of acoustic T-phase signals from small magnitude submarine earthquakes" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 3669-3675 (2006)].

    PubMed

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R

    2007-03-01

    In a recent paper, Chapman and Marrett [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 3669-3675 (2006)] examined the tertiary (T-) waves associated with three subduction-related earthquakes within the South Fiji Basin. In that paper it is argued that acoustic energy is radiated into the sound channel by downslope propagation along abyssal seamounts and ridges that lie distant to the epicenter. A reexamination of the travel-time constraints indicates that this interpretation is not well supported. Rather, the propagation model that is described would require the high-amplitude T-wave components to be sourced well to the east of the region identified, along a relatively flat-lying seafloor. PMID:17407863

  13. A directional microphone array for acoustic studies of wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Noble, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    An end-fire microphone array that utilizes a digital time delay system has been designed and evaluated for measuring noise in wind tunnels. The directional response of both a four- and eight-element linear array of microphones has enabled substantial rejection of background noise and reverberations in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. In addition, it is estimated that four- and eight-element arrays reject 6 and 9 dB, respectively, of microphone wind noise, as compared with a conventional omnidirectional microphone with nose cone. Array response to two types of jet engine models in the wind tunnel is presented. Comparisons of array response to loudspeakers in the wind tunnel and in free field are made.

  14. Effect of diffusive direction across the skin on the penetration profile of chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Morofuji, Ryo; Hikima, Tomohiro; Tojo, Kakuji

    2013-01-01

    Skin has various types of transporters and is a biochemically active organ. These aspects of skin influence the distribution of chemicals in skin and their elimination from skin. The biochemical and histological variations of the skin must be taken into account when conducting transdermal penetration research. Here we used hairless mouse skin to investigate the percutaneous absorption of chemicals in vitro from the stratum corneum (SC) side to the viable skin (VS) side (forward direction) and from the VS side to the SC side (backward direction). We examined the effects of molecular weight, lipophilicity (Log Ko/w), electric charge, and the molecular structure of penetrants. The penetration flux of verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) for the backward direction was 3.2 times larger than that for the forward direction. The flux values of benzoic acid (BA) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) for the forward direction were 2.1 and 4.6 times larger than those for the backward direction, respectively. This directional difference was caused by the active transporter for VRP, the histological distribution of BA solubility, and the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between pHBA and skin tissue in the stripped skin. Across intact skin, in contrast, there was no difference in the skin penetration profile between the forward direction and backward directions. PMID:24189420

  15. Direct analysis of fatty acid profile from milk by thermochemolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomes Reis, Mariza; dos Reis, Marlon Martins; Leath, Shane; Stelwagen, Kerst

    2011-01-14

    The fatty acid composition of milk is of considerable interest due to their nutritional and functional properties. Although rapid milk fat separation and transesterification procedures have been developed, the overall procedure remains time consuming, specially, for the analysis of a large number of samples. In this work, a fast and simple method for direct profiling of fatty acids from milk using thermochemolysis has been developed. This method has the capability of directly analyse fatty acids from one drop of milk without fat extraction or cleanup. Our approach for thermochemolysis is based on thermal desorption integrated with a cold trap inlet. The optimized method does not present isomerisation/degradation of polyunsaturated fatty acid and shows milk fatty acid profiles comparable to the conventional method based on fat extraction and alkaline transesterification. Overall, this method has demonstrated significant potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in milk. PMID:21144530

  16. Gap-Prepulse Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle Reflex (GPIAS) for Tinnitus Assessment: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Galazyuk, Alexander; Hébert, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The progress in the field of tinnitus largely depends on the development of a reliable tinnitus animal model. Recently, a new method based on the acoustic startle reflex modification was introduced for tinnitus screening in laboratory animals. This method was enthusiastically adopted and now widely used by many scientists in the field due to its seeming simplicity and a number of advantages over the other methods of tinnitus assessment. Furthermore, this method opened an opportunity for tinnitus assessment in humans as well. Unfortunately, multiple modifications of data collection and interpretation implemented in different labs make comparisons across studies very difficult. In addition, recent animal and human studies have challenged the original “filling-in” interpretation of the paradigm. Here, we review the current literature to emphasize on the commonalities and differences in data collection and interpretation across laboratories that are using this method for tinnitus assessment. We also propose future research directions that could be taken in order to establish whether or not this method is warranted as an indicator of the presence of tinnitus. PMID:25972836

  17. Direction-of-arrival estimation of passive acoustic sources in reverberant environments based on the Householder transformation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gongping; Chen, Jingdong; Benesty, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an approach to the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problem in acoustic environments using microphone arrays. It works in the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) domain. It first transforms the noisy speech signals received at the array into the STFT domain. A Householder transformation is then constructed and applied to the multichannel STFT coefficients in each subband. This transformation converts the multichannel STFT coefficients into two components: one is a single coefficient that is dominated by the signal of interest and the other consists of the M - 1 coefficient that is dominated by noise (or even consists of noise-only if there is no reverberation), where M is the number of sensors. A cost function is then formed from the outputs of the Householder transformation and the DOA information can subsequently be obtained by searching the extremum value of this cost function in the angle range between 0° and 180°. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the performance of this approach. PMID:26627779

  18. Gap-Prepulse Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle Reflex (GPIAS) for Tinnitus Assessment: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Galazyuk, Alexander; Hébert, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The progress in the field of tinnitus largely depends on the development of a reliable tinnitus animal model. Recently, a new method based on the acoustic startle reflex modification was introduced for tinnitus screening in laboratory animals. This method was enthusiastically adopted and now widely used by many scientists in the field due to its seeming simplicity and a number of advantages over the other methods of tinnitus assessment. Furthermore, this method opened an opportunity for tinnitus assessment in humans as well. Unfortunately, multiple modifications of data collection and interpretation implemented in different labs make comparisons across studies very difficult. In addition, recent animal and human studies have challenged the original "filling-in" interpretation of the paradigm. Here, we review the current literature to emphasize on the commonalities and differences in data collection and interpretation across laboratories that are using this method for tinnitus assessment. We also propose future research directions that could be taken in order to establish whether or not this method is warranted as an indicator of the presence of tinnitus. PMID:25972836

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  20. Directional pair distribution function for diffraction line profile analysis of atomistic models

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Alberto; Leoni, Matteo; Scardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the directional pair distribution function is proposed to describe line broadening effects in powder patterns calculated from atomistic models of nano-polycrystalline microstructures. The approach provides at the same time a description of the size effect for domains of any shape and a detailed explanation of the strain effect caused by the local atomic displacement. The latter is discussed in terms of different strain types, also accounting for strain field anisotropy and grain boundary effects. The results can in addition be directly read in terms of traditional line profile analysis, such as that based on the Warren–Averbach method. PMID:23396818

  1. Direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric peptide profiling of neuroendocrine tissue of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Christian; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric peptide profiling is increasingly used to analyze the peptide complement in the nervous system of a variety of invertebrate animals, from leech to Aplysia and many arthropod species, especially insects and crustaceans. Proper sample preparation is often the most crucial step to obtain the necessary data. Here, we describe protocols for the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to directly analyze the peptidome of neuroendocrine tissues of insects, particularly Drosophila melanogaster, by MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:20013204

  2. Quantitative Profiling of DNA Damage and Apoptotic Pathways in UV Damaged Cells Using PTMScan Direct

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Jia, Xiaoying; Lee, Kimberly A.; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Comb, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for analysis of peptides using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) lack the specificity to comprehensively monitor specific biological processes due to the inherent duty cycle limitations of the MS instrument and the stochastic nature of the analytical platform. PTMScan Direct is a novel, antibody-based method that allows quantitative LC-MS/MS profiling of specific peptides from proteins that reside in the same signaling pathway. New PTMScan Direct reagents have been produced that target peptides from proteins involved in DNA Damage/Cell Cycle and Apoptosis/Autophagy pathways. Together, the reagents provide access to 438 sites on 237 proteins in these signaling cascades. These reagents have been used to profile the response to UV damage of DNA in human cell lines. UV damage was shown to activate canonical DNA damage response pathways through ATM/ATR-dependent signaling, stress response pathways and induce the initiation of apoptosis, as assessed by an increase in the abundance of peptides corresponding to cleaved, activated caspases. These data demonstrate the utility of PTMScan Direct as a multiplexed assay for profiling specific cellular responses to various stimuli, such as UV damage of DNA. PMID:23344034

  3. The Codacs™ Direct Acoustic Cochlear Implant Actuator: Exploring Alternative Stimulation Sites and Their Stimulation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~ 5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5–141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6–143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6–131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3–128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~ 5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented. PMID:25785860

  4. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits. PMID:20853746

  5. Description and evaluation of the Acoustic Profiling of Ocean Currents (APOC) system used on R. V. Oceanus cruise 96 on 11-22 May 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Rintoul, S. R., Jr.; Barbour, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The underway current profiling system which consists of a microprocessor controlled data logger that collects and formats data from a four beam Ametek-Straza 300 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, heading from the ship's gyrocompass, and navigation information from a Loran-C receiver and a satellite navigation unit is discussed. Data are recorded on magnetic tape and real time is calculated. Time averaging is required to remove effects of ship motion. An intercomparison is made with a moored vector measuring current meter (VMCM). The mean difference in hourly averaged APOC and VMCM currents over the four hour intercomparison is a few mm s minus including: two Gulf Stream crossings, a warm core ring survey, and shallow water in a frontal zone to the east of Nantucket Shoals.

  6. Profile measurements and data from the 2011 Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) project at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Coastal Model Applications and Field Measurements project under the auspices of the U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) Project. The objective of the measurements was to relate optical and acoustic properties of suspended particles to changes in particle size, concentration, and vertical distribution in the bottom boundary layer near the seafloor caused by wave- and current-induced stresses. This information on the physics of particle resuspension and aggregation and light penetration and water clarity will help improve models of sediment transport, benthic primary productivity, and underwater visibility. There is well-established technology for acoustic profiling, but optical profiles are more difficult to obtain because of the rapid attenuation of light in water. A specially modified tripod with a moving arm was designed to solve this problem by moving instruments vertically in the bottom boundary layer, between the bottom and about 2 meters above the seafloor. The profiling arm was designed, built, and tested during spring and summer 2011 by a team of USGS scientists, engineers, and technicians. To accommodate power requirements and the large data files recorded by some of the optical instruments, the tripod was connected via underwater cable to the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). This afforded real-time Internet communication with the embedded computers aboard the tripod. Instruments were mounted on the profiling arm, and additional instruments were mounted elsewhere on the tripod and nearby on the seafloor. The tripod and a small mooring for a profiling current meter were deployed on September 17, 2011, at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory 12-meter-deep underwater node about 2 kilometers south of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. Divers assisted in the

  7. Direct Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Profiling of Real-World Samples via a Solid Sampling Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhan; Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-10-01

    This study presents a novel direct analysis strategy for rapid mass spectrometric profiling of biochemicals in real-world samples via a direct sampling probe (DSP) without sample pretreatments. Chemical modification is applied to a disposable stainless steel acupuncture needle to enhance its surface area and hydrophilicity. After insertion into real-world samples, biofluid can be attached on the DSP surface. With the presence of a high DC voltage and solvent vapor condensing on the tip of the DSP, analyte can be dissolved and electrosprayed. The simplicity in design, versatility in application aspects, and other advantages such as low cost and disposability make this new method a competitive tool for direct analysis of real-world samples.

  8. The role of emergence profile in papilla maintenance after diastema closure with direct composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Sobrinho, Kleyver Nascimento; Lima, Liliane Motta de; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Silva, Luciana Mendonça da; Martins, Leandro Moura; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The dental morphology usually determines the shape and volume of the interdental space, which must be filled by a dense connective tissue covered by oral epithelium to achieve pleasant esthetics. When composite resin restorations are placed to solve esthetic problems, the restorative procedure must be designed to allow the formation of healthy interdental papilla. This case report discusses aspects that should be considered when composite resin restorations are proposed for diastema closure. A 23-year-old man sought treatment for variations of space in the anterior dentition after orthodontic treatment. Direct composite resin restorations were placed in a way that respected the emergence profile, even though "black triangles" were evident immediately after the procedure. At the 45-day follow-up, complete closure of the interdental spaces by healthy papillae was observed. The emergence profile should be identified and respected when restorations are placed to obtain diastema closure because healthy periodontal tissues and acceptable esthetics depend on it. PMID:27148664

  9. Acoustic profiling in a complexly social species, the American crow: caws encode information on caller sex, identity, and behavioural context

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Exu Anton; Tarter, Robin R.; Ha, James C.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on inter-individual variation in the calls of corvids has largely been restricted to single call types, such as alarm or contact calls, and has rarely considered the effects of age on call structure. This study explores structural variation in a contextually diverse set of “caw” calls of the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), including alarm, foraging recruitment and territorial calls, and searches for structural features that may be associated with behavioural context and caller sex, age, and identity. Automated pitch detection algorithms are used to generate 23 pitch-related and spectral parameters for a collection of caws from 18 wild, marked crows. Using principal component analysis and mixed models, we identify independent axes of acoustic variation associated with behavioural context and with caller sex, respectively. We also have moderate success predicting caller sex and identity from call structure. However, we do not find significant acoustic variation with respect to caller age. PMID:25419053

  10. Permeability profiles in granular aquifers using flowmeters in direct-push wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paradis, D.; Lefebvre, R.; Morin, R.H.; Gloaguen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical hydrogeological models should ideally be based on the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K), a property rarely defined on the basis of sufficient data due to the lack of efficient characterization methods. Electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements during pumping in uncased wells can effectively provide a continuous vertical distribution of K in consolidated rocks. However, relatively few studies have used the flowmeter in screened wells penetrating unconsolidated aquifers, and tests conducted in gravel-packed wells have shown that flowmeter data may yield misleading results. This paper describes the practical application of flowmeter profiles in direct-push wells to measure K and delineate hydrofacies in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers having low-to-moderate K (10-6 to 10-4 m/s). The effect of direct-push well installation on K measurements in unconsolidated deposits is first assessed based on the previous work indicating that such installations minimize disturbance to the aquifer fabric. The installation and development of long-screen wells are then used in a case study validating K profiles from flowmeter tests at high-resolution intervals (15 cm) with K profiles derived from multilevel slug tests between packers at identical intervals. For 119 intervals tested in five different wells, the difference in log K values obtained from the two methods is consistently below 10%. Finally, a graphical approach to the interpretation of flowmeter profiles is proposed to delineate intervals corresponding to distinct hydrofacies, thus providing a method whereby both the scale and magnitude of K contrasts in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers may be represented. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  11. Direct simulation of flows with suspended paramagnetic particles using one-stage smoothed profile method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Suh, Y. K.

    2011-02-01

    The so-called smoothed profile method, originally suggested by Nakayama and Yamamoto and further improved by Luo et al. in 2005 and 2009, respectively, is an efficient numerical solver for fluid-structure interaction problems, which represents the particles by a certain smoothed profile on a fixed grid and constructs some form of body force added into the momentum (Navier-Stokes) equation by ensuring the rigidity of particles. For numerical simulations, the method first advances the flow and pressure fields by integrating the momentum equation except the body-force (momentum impulse) term in time and next updates them by separately taking temporal integration of the body-force term, thus requiring one more Poisson-equation solver for the extra pressure field due to the rigidity of particles to ensure the divergence-free constraint of the total velocity field. In the present study, we propose a simplified version of the smoothed profile method or the one-stage method, which combines the two stages of velocity update (temporal integration) into one to eliminate the necessity for the additional solver and, thus, significantly save the computational cost. To validate the proposed one-stage method, we perform the so-called direct numerical simulations on the two-dimensional motion of multiple inertialess paramagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic fluid subjected to an external uniform magnetic field and compare their results with the existing benchmark solutions. For the validation, we develop the finite-volume version of the direct simulation method by employing the proposed one-stage method. Comparison shows that the proposed one-stage method is very accurate and efficient in direct simulations of such magnetic particulate flows.

  12. Direct-push hydrostratigraphic profiling: Coupling electrical logging and slug tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sellwood, S.M.; Healey, J.M.; Birk, S.; Butler, J.J., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) can significantly affect the transport of contaminants in ground water. Conventional field methods, however, rarely provide a description of these variations at the level of detail necessary for reliable transport predictions and effective remediation designs. A direct-push (DP) method, hydrostratigraphic profiling, has been developed to characterize the spatial variability of both electrical conductivity (EC) and hydraulic conductivity in unconsolidated formations in a cost-effective manner. This method couples a dual-rod approach for performing slug tests in DP equipment with high-resolution EC logging. The method was evaluated at an extensively studied site in the Kansas River floodplain. A series of profiles was performed on a surface grid, resulting in a detailed depiction of the three-dimensional distribution of EC and K. Good agreement was found between K estimates obtained from this approach and those obtained using other methods. The results of the field evaluation indicate that DP hydrostratigraphic profiling is a promising method for obtaining detailed information about spatial variations in subsurface properties without the need for permanent wells.

  13. A simple desalting method for direct MALDI mass spectrometry profiling of tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hay-Yan J; Liu, Cheng Bin; Wu, Hsuan-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Direct MALDI-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) profiling of tissue lipids often observes isobaric phosphatidylcholine (PC) species caused by the endogenous alkali metal ions that bias the relative abundance of tissue lipids. Fresh rat brain cryosections were washed with 70% ethanol (EtOH), water (H₂O), or 150 mM ammonium acetate (NH₄Ac), and the desalting effectiveness of each fluid was evaluated by MALDI-MS profiling of PC and sphingomyelin (SM) species in tissue and in the washing runoff. The results indicated that EtOH and H₂O only partially desalted the tissue lipids, yet both substantially displaced the tissue lipids to the washing runoffs. On the other hand, NH₄Ac effectively desalted the tissue lipids and produced a runoff containing no detectable PCs or SMs. NH₄Ac wash also unveiled the underlying changes of PCs and SMs in the infarcted rat cortex previously masked by edema-caused increase of tissue sodium. The MS/MS of an isobaric PC in the infarcted cortex revealed the precursor change as the result of NH₄Ac wash and confirmed the desalting effectiveness of such wash. Other than desalting, NH₄Ac wash also removes contaminants in tissue, enhances the overall spectral quality, and benefits additionally in profiling of biological molecules in tissue. PMID:21266365

  14. Direct measurement of relative permeability in rocks from unsteady-state saturation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method to measure liquid relative permeability in rocks directly from transient in situ saturation profiles during gravity drainage experiments. Previously, similar methods have been used for sandpacks; here, this method is extended to rocks by applying a slight overpressure of gas at the inlet. Relative permeabilities are obtained in a 60 cm long vertical Berea sandstone core during gravity drainage, directly from the measured unsteady-state in situ saturations along the core at different times. It is shown that for obtaining relative permeability using this method, if certain criteria are met, the capillary pressure of the rock can be neglected. However, it is essential to use a correct gas pressure gradient along the core. This involves incorporating the pressure drop at the outlet of the core due to capillary discontinuity effects. The method developed in this work obtains relative permeabilities in unsteady-state fashion over a wide range of saturations quickly and accurately.

  15. Profiling of K0 lateral stress coefficient in soils using paired directional G0 ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Taeseo; Mayne, Paul W.

    2013-07-01

    Using a special database compiled from directional shear wave velocity measurements at 12 well-documented sites, the geostatic stress state and stress history are evaluated from shear stiffness ratios. At each site, a benchmark profile of lateral stress coefficient (K0) was detailed using direct in-situ methods (i.e., self-boring pressuremeter, total stress cells, and/or hydraulic fracture), and/or laboratory methods (i.e., suction, consolidometer, and/or triaxial stress path testing). Also, the yield stress ratio (YSR), or more common parameter: overconsolidation ratio (OCR), was available either from series of consolidation tests on undisturbed samples procured from various depths and/or engineering geology studies, or both. Statistical expressions are derived to relate both K0 and OCR in terms of the ratio G0,HH/G0,VH as well as other factors.

  16. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  17. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  18. Tropospheric and stratospheric wind profiling with a direct detection Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Barnes, John E.; Fischer, Ken W.; Skinner, Wilbert R.; Mcgill, Matt J.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Physics Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan has been operating a direct detection, high resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) to measure winds in the boundary layer, free troposphere and lower stratosphere. A direct detection Doppler lidar measures the Doppler shift of the aerosol or Rayleigh backscattered signal, from which the wind velocity vector can be retrieved (Benedetti-Michelangeli et al, 1972, 1974; Chanin et al., 1989; Abreu et al., 1992). The system components are shown. The transmitting system is a Continuum NY-60 Nd:YAG laser frequency doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm. The laser is injection seeded for single line mode operation yielding a linewidth of 0.0045 cm(exp -1) (135 MHz) with excellent shot-to-shot frequency stability. The laser produces 60 mJ pulses and operates at a 50 Hz repetition rate for an effective output power of 3.0 W. A description of the University of Michigan's Doppler lidar is given with examples of wind profiles for the boundary layer, free troposphere, and for the lower stratosphere. The system provides a reliable method of remotely measuring the wind. The wind error is smallest in regions of high aerosols. The system also produces aerosol extinction profiles versus altitude which can be determined by the shape of the spectra. The system has been installed in a trailor so that measurements can be made for field campaigns. Winds and aerosol data are available immediately at the site for use in forecasting.

  19. Predicting link directionality in gene regulation from gene expression profiles using volatility-constrained correlation.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Tomoshiro; Nacher, Jose C

    2016-07-01

    To uncover potential disease molecular pathways and signaling networks, we do not only need undirected maps but also we need to infer the directionality of functional or physical interactions between cellular components. A wide range of methods for identifying functional interactions between genes relies on correlations between experimental gene expression measurements to some extent. However, the standard Pearson or Spearman correlation-based approaches can only determine undirected correlations between cellular components. Here, we apply a volatility-constrained correlation method for gene expression profiles that offers a new metric to capture directionality of interactions between genes. To evaluate the predictions we used four datasets distributed by the DREAM5 network inference challenge including an in silico-constructed network and three organisms such as S. aureus, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. The predictions performed by our proposed method were compared to a gold standard of experimentally verified directionality of genetic regulatory links. Our findings show that our method successfully predicts the genetic interaction directionality with a success rate higher than 0.5 with high statistical significance. PMID:27164307

  20. Acoustic Measurements in a Hexamethyldisiloxane-Loaded Low-Temperature Direct Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Effluent: Nozzle Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Paa, W.

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) measurements as well as laser light scattering experiments were performed during SiO2 layer deposition. SiO2 was generated in low-temperature atmospheric plasma torches (≤500 W), which were seeded with hexamethyldisiloxane. These AE measurements can be used to detect the necessity for nozzle cleaning online. The plasma torches were used to obtain high-quality SiO2 coatings. For electrical power of less than 350 W, we observed parasitic SiO2 deposition in the burner nozzle, which decreases the nozzle aperture within several hours of operation time. No parasitic SiO2 deposition inside the burner nozzle was observed when the plasma source was operated at more than 350 W. The reduced nozzle aperture causes increased plasma velocities and acoustic noise. Especially burst-like increases of this acoustic emission were assumed to be correlated to the ejection of particles. This hypothesis could be confirmed by measurements of scattered light from a sheet of laser light at 248 nm. The obtained correlations suggest using a microphone as a low-cost monitor for the degree of parasitic deposition inside the plasma burner nozzle. The threshold for acoustic noise detection has to be chosen low enough to avoid burst-like emission of particles.

  1. The direct problem of acoustic diffraction of an audible probe radiation by an air-saturated porous cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Gas-saturated, solid skeleton, porous media like geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss, are still few. Accurate acoustic methods for the characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we have developed a method based on the theory and experiment of diffraction of acoustic waves by a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam in cylindrical form in the audible frequency regime. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field show that it is also dependent on the intrinsic microstructural parameters of the porous cylinder namely, porosity, tortuosity, and the flow resistivity (related to permeability).

  2. Source localization corrections for airborne acoustic platforms based on a climatological assessment of temperature and wind velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, W. C. Kirkpatrick, II

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors oer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. The performance of both ground and airborne sensors is aected by environmental factors, such as atmospheric turbulence and wind and temperature proles. For airborne sensors, the eects of refraction must be accounted for in order to determine the source coordinates. Such a method for ground-to-air applications has been developed and is further rened here. Ideally, knowledge of the exact atmospheric proles will allow for the most accurate mitigation of refractive eects. However, acoustic sensors deployed in theater are rarely supported by atmospheric sensing systems that retrieve real-time temperature and wind elds. Atmospheric conditions evolve through seasons, time of day, and are strongly location dependent. Therefore, the development of an atmospheric proles database based on a long time series climatological assessment will provide knowledge for use in physics-based bearing estimation algorithms, where otherwise no correction would have been performed. Long term atmospheric data sets from weather modeling systems are used for a climatological assessment of the refraction corrections and localization errors over selected sites.

  3. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  4. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible with a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-10-01

    Locating sequences compatible with a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6 to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significantly better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surface. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. PMID:24898915

  5. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible to a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Locating sequences compatible to a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6% to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significant better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surfaces. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. PMID:24898915

  6. Acoustic remote probing of the environment. [atmospheric and underwater acoustic data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic probes located either at shore locations near the Chesapeake Bay or on large surface buoys could obtain profiles of wind velocity and turbulence and the temperature and humidity of the atmosphere. At or near the buoy locations, underwater probes located on the bottom could be used to profile current velocity, density, and turbulence and also to determine tide level, wave height, spectrum, and direction. The physical parameter profiles at these earth-surface stations could be used with surface observations by satellite. The most obvious use of data from such a network is to verify and calibrate models of energy exchange between the water of the Bay and the atmosphere.

  7. Sediment distribution and dynamics inferred by integrated electromagnetic, optical and acoustic benthic profiling in the western Bay of Plenty (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulgemeyer, T.; von Dobeneck, T. F.; Müller, H.; Bryan, K. R.; de Lange, W. P.; Battershill, C.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2011, New Zealand experienced a marine pollution disaster after the MV RENA ran aground in the western Bay of Plenty. To estimate the transport and burial potential of contaminants, local sediment distribution and dynamics had to be assessed quickly. Our study made use of the benthic profiler NERIDIS III of the University of Bremen. 33 cross-shore profiles, each ca. 8 km long, have been surveyed. The main instrument is a controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) sensor, which is measuring the electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the seafloor. High-resolution, overlapping seafloor photos have been taken by a bow-mounted digital camera. An on-board CTD with turbidity sensor complete the sensor arrangement. From the EM data, porosity and magnetite concentrations have been calculated and interpolated. The resulting maps show specific zones of magnetite enrichment, higher concentrations are correlated to low porosity. Photos have been used along with acoustic backscatter measured by a sidescan sonar to sketch out a preliminary map of sediment facies. Based on this, sides for grab sampling were selected. By taking grain size and mineralogy into account, a detailed map of the regional lithofacies could be created. Local sediment dynamics have been inferred by the observation of bedforms, the turbidity of bottom water and lithofacies. The results show two anti-parallel longshore transport paths dependent on differing weather conditions and water depths. The longshore magnetite distribution indicates that the heavy mineral fraction is mainly affected by storm-induced sediment transport. Our study demonstrates how integrated benthic profiling adds to the interpretability of data obtained by established methods. By bridging the gap between area-covering, but indirect data from hydroacoustics and precise, but punctual data from samples, benthic profiling enables fast and detailed assessment of sediment distribution and dynamics on a large scale.

  8. Differential profiles of direct and indirect modification of vector feeding behaviour by a plant virus.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Bo; Li, Jie; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses interact with their insect vectors directly and indirectly via host plants, and this tripartite interaction may produce fitness benefits to both the vectors and the viruses. Our previous studies show that the Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex improved its performance on tobacco plants infected by the Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which it transmits, although virus infection of the whitefly per se reduced its performance. Here, we use electrical penetration graph recording to investigate the direct and indirect effects of TYLCCNV on the feeding behaviour of MEAM1. When feeding on either cotton, a non-host of TYLCCNV, or uninfected tobacco, a host of TYLCCNV, virus-infection of the whiteflies impeded their feeding. Interestingly, when viruliferous whiteflies fed on virus-infected tobacco, their feeding activities were no longer negatively affected; instead, the virus promoted whitefly behaviour related to rapid and effective sap ingestion. Our findings show differential profiles of direct and indirect modification of vector feeding behaviour by a plant virus, and help to unravel the behavioural mechanisms underlying a mutualistic relationship between an insect vector and a plant virus that also has features reminiscent of an insect pathogen. PMID:25567524

  9. Vector Sensor Arrays in Underwater Acoustic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Paulo; Felisberto, Paulo; Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Traditionally, ocean acoustic signals have been acquired using hydrophones, which measure the pressure field and are typically omnidirectional. A vector sensor measures both the acoustic pressure and the three components of particle velocity. Assembled into an array, a vector sensor array (VSA) improves spatial filtering capabilities when compared with arrays of same length and same number of hydrophones. The objective of this work is to show the advantage of the use of vector sensors in underwater acoustic applications such as direction of arrival (DOA) estimation and geoacoustic inversion. Beyond the improvements in DOA estimation, it will be shown the advantages of using the VSA in bottom parameters estimation. Additionally, is tested the possibility of using high frequency signals (say 8-14 kHz band), acquired during the MakaiEx 2005, to allow a small aperture array, reducing the cost of actual sub-bottom profilers and providing a compact and easy-to-deploy system.

  10. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  11. Design of acoustic beam aperture modifier using gradient-index phononic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the design concept of a novel acoustic beam aperture modifier using butt-jointed gradient-index phononic crystals (GRIN PCs) consisting of steel cylinders embedded in a homogeneous epoxy background. By gradually tuning the period of a GRIN PC, the propagating direction of acoustic waves can be continuously bent to follow a sinusoidal trajectory in the structure. The aperture of an acoustic beam can therefore be shrunk or expanded through change of the gradient refractive index profiles of the butt-jointed GRIN PCs. Our computational results elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed acoustic beam aperture modifier. Such an acoustic device can be fabricated through a simple process and will be valuable in applications, such as biomedical imaging and surgery, nondestructive evaluation, communication, and acoustic absorbers. PMID:22807585

  12. Temporal characteristics of coherent flow structures generated over alluvial sand dunes, Mississippi River, revealed by acoustic doppler current profiling and multibeam echo sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, John A.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Best, Jim L.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Simmons, S. M.; Johnson, K.K.; Malzone, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the flow in the lee of a large sand dune located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, USA. Stationary profiles collected from an anchored boat using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were georeferenced with data from a real-time kinematic differential global positioning system. A multibeam echo sounder was used to map the bathymetry of the confluence and provided a morphological context for the ADCP measurements. The flow in the lee of a low-angle dune shows good correspondence with current conceptual models of flow over dunes. As expected, quadrant 2 events (upwellings of low-momentum fluid) are associated with high backscatter intensity. Turbulent events generated in the lower lee of a dune near the bed are associated with periods of vortex shedding and wake flapping. Remnant coherent structures that advect over the lower lee of the dune in the upper portion of the water column, have mostly dissipated and contribute little to turbulence intensities. The turbulent events that occupy most of the water column in the upper lee of the dune are associated with periods of wake flapping.

  13. Estimating sea-ice coverage, draft, and velocity in Marguerite Bay (Antarctica) using a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Visbeck, Martin; Beardsley, Robert C.; Brechner Owens, W.

    2008-02-01

    A technique for the analysis of data from a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to determine ice coverage, draft and velocity is presented and applied to data collected in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf. This method provides sea-ice information when no dedicated upward-looking sonar (ULS) data are available. Ice detection is accomplished using windowed variances of ADCP vertical velocity, vertical error velocity, and surface horizontal speed. ADCP signal correlation and backscatter intensity were poor indicators of the presence of ice at this site. Ice draft is estimated using a combination of ADCP backscatter data, atmospheric and oceanic pressure data, and information about the thermal stratification. This estimate requires corrections to the ADCP-derived range for instrument tilt and sound speed profile. Uncertainties of ±0.20 m during midwinter and ±0.40 m when the base of the surface mixed layer is above the ADCP for ice draft are estimated based on: (a) a Monte Carlo simulation, (b) uncertainty in the sound speed correction, and (c) performance of the zero-draft estimate during times of known open water. Ice velocity is taken as the ADCP horizontal velocity in the depth bin specified by the range estimate.

  14. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  15. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  16. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  17. Vertical profiles of BC direct radiative effect over Italy: high vertical resolution data and atmospheric feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Ferrero, Luca; Castelli, Mariapina; Ferrini, Barbara S.; Moscatelli, Marco; Grazia Perrone, Maria; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Rovelli, Grazia; D'Angelo, Luca; Moroni, Beatrice; Scardazza, Francesco; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Petitta, Marcello; Cappelletti, David

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), and its vertical distribution, affects the climate. Global measurements of BC vertical profiles are lacking to support climate change research. To fill this gap, a campaign was conducted over three Italian basin valleys, Terni Valley (Appennines), Po Valley and Passiria Valley (Alps), to characterize the impact of BC on the radiative budget under similar orographic conditions. 120 vertical profiles were measured in winter 2010. The BC vertical profiles, together with aerosol size distribution, aerosol chemistry and meteorological parameters, have been determined using a tethered balloon-based platform equipped with: a micro-Aethalometer AE51 (Magee Scientific), a 1.107 Grimm OPC (0.25-32 μm, 31 size classes), a cascade impactor (Siuotas SKC), and a meteorological station (LSI-Lastem). The aerosol chemical composition was determined from collected PM2.5 samples. The aerosol absorption along the vertical profiles was measured and optical properties calculated using the Mie theory applied to the aerosol size distribution. The aerosol optical properties were validated with AERONET data and then used as inputs to the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Vertical profiles of the aerosol direct radiative effect, the related atmospheric absorption and the heating rate were calculated. Vertical profile measurements revealed some common behaviors over the studied basin valleys. From below the mixing height to above it, a marked concentration drop was found for both BC (from -48.4±5.3% up to -69.1±5.5%) and aerosol number concentration (from -23.9±4.3% up to -46.5±7.3%). These features reflected on the optical properties of the aerosol. Absorption and scattering coefficients decreased from below the MH to above it (babs from -47.6±2.5% up to -71.3±3.0% and bsca from -23.5±0.8% up to -61.2±3.1%, respectively). Consequently, the Single Scattering Albedo increased above the MH (from +4.9±2.2% to +7.4±1.0%). The highest aerosol absorption was

  18. Acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Tribikram

    2014-01-01

    In this article different techniques for localizing acoustic sources are described and the advantages/disadvantages of these techniques are discussed. Some source localization techniques are restricted to isotropic structures while other methods can be applied to anisotropic structures as well. Some techniques require precise knowledge of the direction dependent velocity profiles in the anisotropic body while other techniques do not require that knowledge. Some methods require accurate values of the time of arrival of the acoustic waves at the receivers while other techniques can function without that information. Published papers introducing various techniques emphasize the advantages of the introduced techniques while ignoring and often not mentioning the limitations and weaknesses of the new techniques. What is lacking in the literature is a comprehensive review and comparison of the available techniques; this article attempts to do that. After reviewing various techniques the paper concludes which source localization technique should be most effective for what type of structure and what the current research needs are. PMID:23870388

  19. Cell spreading analysis with directed edge profile-guided level set active contours.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, I; Bunyak, F; Palaniappan, K; Sun, M; Forgacs, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading within the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in cell motility, cell growth and tissue organization. Measuring cell spreading dynamics enables the investigation of cell mechanosensitivity to external mechanical stimuli, such as substrate rigidity. A common approach to measure cell spreading dynamics is to take time lapse images and quantify cell size and perimeter as a function of time. In our experiments, differences in cell characteristics between different treatments are subtle and require accurate measurements of cell parameters across a large population of cells to ensure an adequate sample size for statistical hypothesis testing. This paper presents a new approach to estimate accurate cell boundaries with complex shapes by applying a modified geodesic active contour level set method that directly utilizes the halo effect typically seen in phase contrast microscopy. Contour evolution is guided by edge profiles in a perpendicular direction to ensure convergence to the correct cell boundary. The proposed approach is tested on bovine aortic endothelial cell images under different treatments, and demonstrates accurate segmentation for a wide range of cell sizes and shapes compared to manual ground truth. PMID:18979769

  20. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  1. Metabolic profiling directly from the Petri dish using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Jeramie; Roach, Patrick; Heath, Brandi; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-11-01

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin. PMID:24047514

  2. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  3. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by acoustic cavitation. Part 1: Pressure and temperature profiles around a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the inertial cavitation of a single gas bubble in a liquid submitted to an ultrasonic wave. The aim was to calculate accurately the pressure and temperature at the bubble wall and in the liquid adjacent to the wall just before and just after the collapse. Two different approaches were proposed for modeling the heat transfer between the ambient liquid and the gas: the simplified approach (A) with liquid acting as perfect heat sink, the rigorous approach (B) with liquid acting as a normal heat conducting medium. The time profiles of the bubble radius, gas temperature, interface temperature and pressure corresponding to the above models were compared and important differences were observed excepted for the bubble size. The exact pressure and temperature distributions in the liquid corresponding to the second model (B) were also presented. These profiles are necessary for the prediction of any physical phenomena occurring around the cavitation bubble, with possible applications to sono-crystallization. PMID:26044460

  4. Direct-path acoustic ranging across the Japan Trench axis, Adjacent to the Large Shallow Thrusting in the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Ito, Y.; Iinuma, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Hino, R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodetic data, i.e. GPS/acoustic measurement and continuous seafloor pressure monitoring, brought important evidences showing that the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) caused huge (> 50 m) coseismic slip near the Japan Trench. The postseismic behavior of the large slipped area is required to clarify to understand why large amount seismic slip could occur there. We started making direct-path acoustic ranging across the trench axis to reveal the convergence rate between the subducting Pacific and overriding continental plates. We expect the change of the baseline length across the trench axis, the plate boundary, reflects the slip rate at the shallow megathrust, which is difficult to estimate only from other geodetic observations largely affected by intraplate deformation caused by the postseismic viscoelastic relaxation process.  To this end, we developed an ultra-deep seafloor acoustic ranging system. Our previous ranging systems have been designed to measure baseline length ~ 1 km and to be deployed up to 7,000 m water-depth (Osada et al., 2008, 2012). In order to realize the measurement across the Japan Trench, we improved this system to enhance range of acoustic ranging as well as operational depth of instruments. The improved system was designed to allow acoustic ranging up to 3 km and to be durable under the high-pressure equivalent to water depth of 9,000 m. In May 2013, we carried out a test deployment of the new ranging system. The system is composed of three seafloor instruments equipped with precision transponder (PXPs). Two of the PXPs were set on the landward slope of the Japan Trench, where large coseismic slip happened in 2011. Another PXP was deployed on the seaward side of the trench so that the baseline change associated with the slip on the plate boundary fault, if any, can be detected. Continuous records of baseline lengths were successfully obtained for four months. The repeatability of the distance measurements was about 20 mm for

  5. Introducing DIASCoPE: Directly Integrated Acoustic System Combined with Pressure Experiments — Changing the Paradigm from Product to Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.; Tercé, N.; Bejina, F.; Bystricky, M.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature is vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situexperimental techniques using synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. Synchrotron-based ultrasonic interferometry measurements have proven to be especially important in determining acoustic velocities and thermoelastic properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. However, due to relatively slow data collection times, it has been difficult to measure the effects of processes as they occur, and instead the measurement is made on the end product of these processes. DIASCoPE is an important step toward addressing this problem.Over the last three years, we have designed and developed an on-board ultrasonic acoustic velocity measurement system that cuts data collection time down by over an order of magnitude. We can now measure P- and S-wave travel times in samples at extreme conditions in less than one second. Moreover, the system has been fully integrated with the multi-anvil apparatus and the EPICS control system at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, allowing for greater ease of control andfull automation of experimental data collection. The DIASCoPE has completed the testing and commissioning phase, and the first data collected using this powerful new system will be presented here.DIASCoPE represents a major step forward in acoustic velocity collection time reduction that will finally allow us to begin to witness what effects various processes in the deep Earth may have on the physical properties of materials at extreme conditions as they occur. These new capabilities will allow us to change the focus of study from the product to the process itself and will lead to a greater understanding of the

  6. Reflected wavefront manipulation based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Gu, Zhong-ming; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metasurfaces has renewed the Snell's law and opened up new degrees of freedom to tailor the optical wavefront at will. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the generalized Snell's law can be achieved for reflected acoustic waves based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces. The metasurfaces are constructed with eight units of a solid structure to provide discrete phase shifts covering the full 2π span with steps of π/4 by coiling up the space. By careful selection of the phase profiles in the transverse direction of the metasurfaces, some fascinating wavefront engineering phenomena are demonstrated, such as anomalous reflections, conversion of propagating waves into surface waves, planar aberration-free lens and nondiffracting Bessel beam generated by planar acoustic axicon. Our results could open up a new avenue for acoustic wavefront engineering and manipulations. PMID:23986034

  7. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  8. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  9. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  10. Electrophysiological Profiles of Induced Neurons Converted Directly from Adult Human Fibroblasts Indicate Incomplete Neuronal Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Koppensteiner, Peter; Boehm, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The direct conversion of human fibroblasts to neuronal cells, termed human induced neuronal (hiN) cells, has great potential for future clinical advances. However, previous studies have not provided an in-depth analysis of electrophysiological properties of adult fibroblast-derived hiN cultures. We have examined the electrophysiological profile of hiN cells by measuring passive and active membrane properties, as well as spontaneous and evoked neurotransmission. We found that hiN cells exhibited passive membrane properties equivalent to perinatal rodent neurons. In addition, 30% of hiN cells were incapable of action potential (AP) generation and did not exhibit rectifying membrane currents, and none of the cells displayed firing patterns of typical glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Finally, hiN cells exhibited neither spontaneous nor evoked neurotransmission. Our results suggest that current methods used to produce hiN cells provide preparations in which cells do not achieve the cellular properties of fully mature neurons, rendering these cells inadequate to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25437871

  11. Direct Mapping of Magnetic and Structural Profiles of Electric Field Moderated Oxygen Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Borchers, Julie A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Arenholz, Elke; Liu, Kai

    Recent studies on metal/oxide heterostructures have demonstrated control of interfacial magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetization in ultrathin (5 ML) Co films through electric-field controlled oxygen migration. This approach presents a promising route to realizing next-generation, ultralow power sensor and data-storage technologies. Here we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling moderated by electrically-driven oxygen migration in much thicker AlOx(1 um)/GdOx(2 nm)/Co (15 nm) heterostructures. Using polarized neutron reflectometry, we present direct, quantitative depth profiling of the magnetization and oxygen concentration in these systems. Electro-thermal conditioning moves oxygen from AlOx and GdOx base-layers throughout the entire thickness of the 15 nm Co layer, resulting in a suppressed magnetization. Switching the electric field polarity semi-reversibly ejects oxygen preferentially from the GdOX/Co interface, partially recovering the magnetization and establishing a practical limit to this approach. First order reversal curve diagrams show that the conditioned samples exhibit two distinct magnetic phases, while the as-grown samples are single phase, suggesting that the treatments alters the Co film microstructure. X-ray spectroscopy confirms the oxidation states of the Co and Gd, and suggest that the GdOX acts to transmit oxygen but does not source or sink it.

  12. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  13. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  14. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  15. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  16. Interest Profile Elevation, Big Five Personality Traits, and Secondary Constructs on the Self-Directed Search: A Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Emily E.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The study used the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and the NEO-FFI to explore profile elevation, four secondary constructs, and the Big Five personality factors in a sample of college students in a career course. Regression model results showed that openness, conscientiousness, differentiation high-low, differentiation Iachan, and consistency accounted…

  17. Transcriptome profiles of chicken intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes altered by the intake of a multi-strain direct-fed microbials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of the direct-fed microbials (DFM) including three Bacillus subtilis strains on the modulation of transcriptional profile in chicken intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). The multiple-strain DFM product modified 453 probes from 1,98...

  18. Preliminary evaluation of turbofan cycle parameters and acoustical suppression on the noise and direct operating cost of a commercial Mach 0.85 transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of turbofan cycle parameters and the use of acoustic noise suppression material to quiet 200 passenger, Mach 0.85 trijets having design ranges of 2778, 4630, and 9260 kilometers (1500, 2500, and 5000 n. mi). Aircraft gross weight and direct operating cost, which varied with amount of suppression and cycle selection, are presented as functions of both EPNdB traded and 90 EPNdB contour footprint area. Noise levels 10.9 EPNdB below FAR 36 requirements result in a 5 percent increase in DOC for an aircraft designed for a range of 9260 kilometers (5000 n. mi.). An aircraft designed for a 2778 kilometer (1500 n. mi.) range would have an EPNdB level 14 below FAR 36 for this same economic penalty. In this range of noise level, fan-machinery noise is the principal source.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  20. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 2. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Data from the acoustic tests of the convergent reference nozzle and the 0.75 area ratio coannular nozzle are presented in tables. Data processing routines used to scale the acoustic data and to correct the data for atmospheric attenuation are included.

  1. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  2. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  3. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  4. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  6. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to Measure Discharge at New York Power Authority's Niagara Power Project, Niagara Falls, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajd, Henry J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The need for accurate real-time discharge in the International Niagara River hydro power system requires reliable, accurate and reproducible data. The U.S. Geological Survey has been widely using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) to accurately measure discharge in riverine channels since the mid-1990s. The use of the ADCP to measure discharge has remained largely untested at hydroelectric-generation facilities such as the New York Power Authority's (NYPA) Niagara Power Project in Niagara Falls, N.Y. This facility has a large, engineered diversion channel with the capacity of high volume discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Facilities such as this could benefit from the use of an ADCP, if the ADCP discharge measurements prove to be more time effective and accurate than those obtained from the flow-calculation techniques that are currently used. Measurements of diversion flow by an ADCP in the 'Pant Leg' diversion channel at the Niagara Power Project were made on November 6, 7, and 8, 2006, and compared favorably (within 1 percent) with those obtained concurrently by a conventional Price-AA current-meter measurement during one of the ADCP measurement sessions. The mean discharge recorded during each 2-hour individual ADCP measurement session compared favorably with (3.5 to 6.8 percent greater than) the discharge values computed by the flow-calculation method presently in use by NYPA. The use of ADCP technology to measure discharge could ultimately permit increased power-generation efficiency at the NYPA Niagara Falls Power Project by providing improved predictions of the amount of water (and thus the power output) available.

  7. Using Principal Component and Tidal Analysis as a Quality Metric for Detecting Systematic Heading Uncertainty in Long-Term Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, M. G.; Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Jeffries, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates the NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled ocean observatories to collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological ocean conditions over multi-year time periods. Researchers can download real-time and historical data from a large variety of instruments to study complex earth and ocean processes from their home laboratories. Ensuring that the users are receiving the most accurate data is a high priority at ONC, requiring quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) procedures to be developed for all data types. While some data types have relatively straightforward QAQC tests, such as scalar data range limits that are based on expected observed values or measurement limits of the instrument, for other data types the QAQC tests are more comprehensive. Long time series of ocean currents from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), stitched together from multiple deployments over many years is one such data type where systematic data biases are more difficult to identify and correct. Data specialists at ONC are working to quantify systematic compass heading uncertainty in long-term ADCP records at each of the major study sites using the internal compass, remotely operated vehicle bearings, and more analytical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) to estimate the optimal instrument alignments. In addition to using PCA, some work has been done to estimate the main components of the current at each site using tidal harmonic analysis. This paper describes the key challenges and presents preliminary PCA and tidal analysis approaches used by ONC to improve long-term observatory current measurements.

  8. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-01

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  9. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  10. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  11. Al2C Monolayer Sheet and Nanoribbons with Unique Direction-Dependent Acoustic-Phonon-Limited Carrier Mobility and Carrier Polarity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuehua; Dai, Jun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-21

    The intrinsic acoustic-phonon-limited carrier mobility (μ) of Al2C monolayer sheet and nanoribbons are investigated using ab initio computation and deformation potential theory. It is found that the polarity of the room-temperature carrier mobility of the Al2C monolayer is direction-dependent, with μ of electron (e) and hole (h) being 2348 and 40.77 cm(2)/V/s, respectively, in the armchair direction and 59.95 (e) and 705.8 (h) in the zigzag direction. More interestingly, one-dimensional Al2C nanoribbons not only can retain the direction-dependent polarity but also may entail even higher mobility, in contrast to either the graphene nanoribbons which tend to exhibit lower μ compared to the two-dimensional graphene or the MoS2 nanoribbons which have reversed polarity compared to the MoS2 sheet. As an example, the Al-terminated zigzag nanoribbon with a width of 4.1 nm exhibits μ of 212.6 (e) and 2087 (h) cm(2)/V/s, while the C-terminated armchair nanoribbon with a width 2.6 nm exhibits μ of 1090 (e) and 673.9 (h) cm(2)/V/s; the C-terminated zigzag nanoribbon with a width 3.7 nm exhibits μ of 177.6 (e) and 1889 (h) cm(2)/V/s, and the Al-terminated armchair nanoribbon with a width 2.4 nm exhibits μ of 6695 (e) and 518.4 (h) cm(2)/V/s. The high carrier mobility, μ, coupled with polarity and direction dependence endows the Al2C sheet and nanoribbons with unique transport properties that can be exploited for special applications in nanoelectronics. PMID:26722716

  12. The research and preparation of a bi-layer biodegradable external sheath with directional drug release profiles for vein graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenjie; Guo, Zhenying; Si, Yi; Zhang, Xiangman; Shi, Zhenyu; Chen, Feng; Fu, Weiguo

    2013-11-01

    External sheath has been suggested for autologous vein grafts to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia and prevent anastomosis stricture. In this study, we prepared a bi-layer biodegradable paclitaxel-loaded sheaths with a synthetic copolymer poly(ethylene carbonate-ɛ-caprolactone) at room temperature. The bi-layer drug release profiles of the Paclitaxel-loaded (PTX-loaded) sheath significantly slow down the paclitaxel (PTX) release rates and result in a directional drug release way. Moreover, the nanofibrous layer of PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheaths reduced the cytotoxicity and provided a better support for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation than the PTX-loaded layer of the sheaths. Thus, this study demonstrates that the bi-layer PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheath with directional drug release profiles have a promising application for vein graft to against neointimal hyperplasia and anastomotic stricture.

  13. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 3. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic data from tests of the 0.75 area ratio coannular nozzle with ejector and the 1.2 area ratio coannular are presented in tables. Aerodynamic data acquired for the four test configurations are included.

  14. Small-Scale Trial for Evaluating Directional Resolution of Single Spherical Biconcave Acoustic Lens in Designing of Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Ambient noise imaging (ANI) is the revolutionary idea of detecting objects by using natural ocean background noise. From the analysis results obtained by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in our previous studies, it was supposed that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz) for realizing an ANI system. In this study, to confirm the analysis results, we performed a small-scale trial of one-fifth space in a water tank. The lens, made of acrylic resin, has an aperture diameter of 400 mm and a radius of curvature of 500 mm. A burst pulse of 25 cycles at 300 kHz, whose frequency increases 5 times, was radiated from the sound source. The sound pressure after passage through the acoustic lens was measured by moving the receiver around the image point. Results show that the shapes of -3 dB areas are similar to the FDTD analysis results at small incidence angles. It was verified that this lens has a sufficient directional resolution for use in the ANI system, because -3 dB areas do not overlap each other.

  15. Shadow mask assisted direct growth of ZnO nanowires as a sensing medium for surface acoustic wave devices using a thermal evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achath Mohanan, Ajay; Parthiban, R.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were directly synthesized on high temperature stable one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made of LiNbO3 substrate and Pt/Ti electrodes using a self-seeding catalyst-free thermal evaporation method. To enhance post-growth device functionality, one half of an SAW resonator was masked along the interdigital transducer aperture length during the nanowire growth process using a stainless steel shadow mask, while the other half was used as the ZnO nanowire growth site. This was achieved by employing a precisely machined stainless steel sleeve to house the chip and mask in the reaction chamber during the nanowire growth process. The ZnO nanowire integrated SAW resonator exhibited ultraviolet radiation sensing abilities which indicated that the ZnO nanowires grown on the SAW device were able to interact with SAW propagation on the substrate even after the device was exposed to extremely harsh conditions during the nanowire growth process. The use of a thermal evaporation method, instead of the conventionally used solution-grown method for direct growth of ZnO nanowires on SAW devices, paves the way for future methods aimed at the fabrication of highly sensitive ZnO nanowire-LiNbO3 based SAW sensors utilizing coupled resonance phenomenon at the nanoscale.

  16. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  17. Organised Coherent Motion in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow in the Proximity to Tall Plant Canopies as Detected in Acoustic Doppler Profiler and Tower-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Thomas, C. K.

    2007-12-01

    We investigated coherent structures above and in a tall plant canopy during a field campaign at a mountainous site in Germany (WALDATEM-2003). Data from a remote sensing acoustic Doppler system in concert with in-situ point measurements of turbulence in flow velocity and scalars deployed on towers yielded continuous observations from the forest ground to 200 m above the ground with a vertical resolution of 10 m at a sampling frequency of 0.4 and 20 Hz respectively. Coherent structures were extracted from time series utilizing wavelet transform techniques allowing for single structure analysis and averaged statistics of detected events. In addition to their spatiotemporal scales, we focused on the identification of generating mechanisms and surface parameters affecting coherent structures. Time scales were on the order of 20 to 36 s depending on the upstream topography and canopy morphology. Lateral transport dominated scalar coherent exchange. Vertical profiles of time scales in longitudinal and vertical velocities were mirror images showing an increase/ decrease, respectively, with height. Time scales in scalars were nearly height-constant. The ratio of the contribution of coherent structures to total vertical exchange was 0.2 for momentum and 0.25 to 0.4 for sensible heat. Analysis of power spectra confirmed an interaction between inactive eddies of atmospheric boundary layer scale and the horizontal flow in 4 % of all studied cases only, mainly under near-neutral stratification. Evaluation of the Mixing-Layer Analogy suggested that vertical shear caused by the immense canopy drag was the dominant generating mechanism. However, daytime coherent structures were found to be a superposition of shear generated events and convectional eddies. The latter led to an increase of vertical coherency in the flow around noon. At night, terrain induced linear gravity waves showed similar time scales as coherent structures emphasizing the need to differentiate between these two

  18. Holocene lake level changes at a lowland lake in northeastern Germany inferred from acoustic sub-bottom profiling and a transect of sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Elisabeth; Zawiska, Izabela; Słowiński, Michał; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Holocene lake level changes were studied at Lake Fürstenseer See, a typical lake with complex basin morphology in northeastern German sandur area. An acoustic sub-bottom profile and a transect of four long sediment cores in the deepest lake sub-basin were analyzed. The cores were dated with AMS-14C and correlated with multiple proxies (sediment facies, μ-XRF, macrofossils, subfossil Cladocera, carbonate isotopes). At sites in 10 and 15 m water depth, shifts in the sand-mud boundary, i.e. sediment limit sensu Digerfeldt (1986), allowed quantitative estimates of the absolute amplitude of lake level changes. At sites in 20 and 23 m water depth, the negative correlation of Ca and Ti reflect lake level changes qualitatively. During high lake stands massive organic muds were deposited. Lower lake levels isolated the lake sub-basins which reduced the overall water circulation and lead to the deposition of Ti-poor carbonate muds. Furthermore, macrofossil and subfossil Cladocera analyses were used as proxies for the intense reworking at the slope and for the trophic state of the lake, respectively. Lake levels were up to 4 m higher, e.g. around 5000 cal. yrs BP and during the Medieval time period (see also Kaiser et al., 2014). During the early to mid-Holocene (between 9400 and 6400 cal. yrs BP), Lake Fürstenseer See fluctuated at an at least 3-m lower level. Further water level changes can be related to known climatic events and regional human impact. Digerfeldt, G., 1986. Studies on past lake-level fluctuations. In Berglund, B. (ed.), Handbook of Holocene Palaeoecology and Palaeohydrology: 127-144. John Wiley & Sons, New York. Kaiser, K., Küster, M., Fülling, A., Theuerkauf, M., Dietze, E., Graventein, H., Koch, P.J., Bens, O., Brauer, A., 2014. Littoral landforms and pedosedimentary sequences indicating late Holocene lake-level changes in northern central Europe ' A case study from northeastern Germany. Geomorphology 216, 58-78.

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  20. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  1. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  2. Effect of the laser intensity profile on the shock non-uniformity in a directly driven spherical target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Garbett, Warren J.; Ramis, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    > An axially symmetric laser beam configuration irradiating a spherical capsule has been considered in the context of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The laser beams are located at co-latitudes 49° and 131° and mimic the quad positions in the second cone of the Laser Mégajoule Facility. The capsule is directly irradiated by the laser beams whose energy deposition generates a nearly spherical shock wave. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations have been performed to analyse the non-uniformity of the shock wavefront launched inward throughout the target. Different laser intensity profiles, calculated by the illumination model, have been tested. The performance, in terms of shock non-uniformity, has been compared, and it is found that with an appropriate choice of the laser intensity profile it is possible to control the shock non-uniformity at early times.

  3. Direct current resistivity profiling to study distribution of water in the unsaturated zone near the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abraham, Jared D.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of water in the unsaturated zone and potential for ground-water recharge near the Amargosa Desert Research Site south of Beatty, Nevada, the U.S. Geological Survey collected direct-current resistivity measurements along three profiles in May 2003 using an eight-channel resistivity imaging system. Resistivity data were collected along profiles across the ADRS, across a poorly incised (distributary) channel system of the Amargosa River southwest of the ADRS, and across a well-incised flood plain of the Amargosa River northwest of the ADRS. This report describes results of an initial investigation to estimate the distribution of water in the unsaturated zone and to evaluate the shallow subsurface stratigraphy near the ADRS. The geophysical method of dc resistivity was employed by using automated data collection with numerous electrodes. 'Cross sections' of resistivity, produced by using an inversion algorithm on the field data, at the three field sites are presented and interpreted.

  4. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  5. Field Comparison of Direct-Push Approaches for Determination of K-Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, P.; Butler, J. J.; Yaramanci, U.; Wittig, V.; Tiggelmann, L.; Schoofs, S.

    2003-12-01

    A large body of theoretical and experimental research has shown that spatial variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) are a significant factor in determining how groundwater and accompanying contaminants move in the subsurface. Therefore, a wide variety of direct and indirect techniques have been developed for the characterization of K variations at a site. Methods based on direct-push technology have much potential for use in shallow unconsolidated settings. However, the various direct-push methods differ in their expense, in terms of time, money, and effort, and the nature (qualitative vs. quantitative) of the information that they can provide. A field study was carried out at a test site near Nauen, Germany to evaluate and compare several direct-push methods for determination of spatial variations in K. The test site was established by the Department of Applied Geophysics of the Technical University of Berlin in collaboration with the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Extensive geophysical surface measurements (surface nuclear magnetic resonance, georadar, refraction seismic, and 2D dc geoelectrics), as well as data from a continuously cored borehole, are available. These data provide a controlled framework for the evaluation of different direct-push methods for the characterization of spatial variations in hydraulic conductivity. The following direct-push methods were investigated in this study: electrical conductivity (EC) and cone penetrometer (CPT) logging, slug tests, injection logging, and the direct-push permeameter (DPP). In addition, natural gamma (NG) logging was performed in pipe installed with direct-push technology. EC, CPT, and NG logging are very fast, but do not provide direct estimates of K. Their successful use for site characterization depends on the appropriateness of the applied empirical relationships. As shown by the results from Nauen, EC, CPT, and NG logging are often limited to the delineation of major

  6. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  7. Direct amplification, sequencing and profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis strains in single and mixed infection clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sandeep J; Li, Ben; Ghonasgi, Tanvi; Haase, Chad P; Qin, Zhaohui S; Dean, Deborah; Read, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing bacterial genomes from DNA isolated directly from clinical samples offers the promise of rapid and precise acquisition of informative genetic information. In the case of Chlamydia trachomatis, direct sequencing is particularly desirable because it obviates the requirement for culture in mammalian cells, saving time, cost and the possibility of missing low abundance strains. In this proof of concept study, we developed methodology that would allow genome-scale direct sequencing, using a multiplexed microdroplet PCR enrichment technology to amplify a 100 kb region of the C. trachomatis genome with 500 1.1-1.3 kb overlapping amplicons (5-fold amplicon redundancy). We integrated comparative genomic data into a pipeline to preferentially select conserved sites for amplicon design. The 100 kb target region could be amplified from clinical samples, including remnants from diagnostics tests, originating from the cervix, urethra and urine, For rapid analysis of these data, we developed a framework for whole-genome based genotyping called binstrain. We used binstrain to estimate the proportion of SNPs originating from 14 C. trachomatis reference serotype genomes in each sample. Direct DNA sequencing methods such as the one described here may have an important role in understanding the biology of C. trachomatis mixed infections and the natural genetic variation of the species within clinically relevant ecological niches. PMID:24971628

  8. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  9. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  10. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  11. Cancer Therapy Directed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling: A Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David S; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-07-01

    Innovative molecular diagnostics deployed in the clinic enable new ways to stratify patients into appropriate treatment regimens. These approaches may resolve a major challenge for early-phase clinical trials, which is to recruit patients who, while having failed previous treatments, may nevertheless respond to molecularly targeted drugs. We report the findings of a prospective, single-center study conducted in patients with diverse refractory cancers who underwent comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP; next-generation sequencing, 236 genes). Of the 500 patients enrolled, 188 (37.6%) received either matched (N = 122/188, 65%) or unmatched therapy (N = 66/188, 35%). The most common reasons that patients were not evaluable for treatment included insufficient tissue, death, or hospice transfer. The median number of molecular alterations per patient was five (range, 1-14); median number of prior therapies, four. The most common diagnoses were ovarian cancer (18%), breast cancer (16%), sarcoma (13%), and renal cancer (7%). Of the 339 successfully profiled patients, 317 (93.5%) had at least one potentially actionable alteration. By calculating matching scores, based on the number of drug matches and genomic aberrations per patient, we found that high scores were independently associated with a greater frequency of stable disease ≥6 months/partial/complete remission [22% (high scores) vs. 9% (low scores), P = 0.024], longer time-to-treatment failure [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.36-0.74; P = 0.0003], and survival (HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.43-1.0; P = 0.05). Collectively, this study offers a clinical proof of concept for the utility of CGP in assigning therapy to patients with refractory malignancies, especially in those patients with multiple genomic aberrations for whom combination therapies could be implemented. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3690-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197177

  12. Polariton Condensation in Dynamic Acoustic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Wouters, M.; Bradley, R.; Biermann, K.; Guda, K.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.; Sarkar, D.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that the tunable potential introduced by a surface acoustic wave on a homogeneous polariton condensate leads to fragmentation of the condensate into an array of wires which move with the acoustic velocity. Reduction of the spatial coherence of the condensate emission along the surface acoustic wave direction is attributed to the suppression of coupling between the spatially modulated condensates. Interparticle interactions observed at high polariton densities screen the acoustic potential, partially reversing its effect on spatial coherence.

  13. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurements of Prosody Production on the Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems in Children by Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Joshua John; Paul, Rhea

    2013-01-01

    Prosody production atypicalities are a feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but behavioral measures of performance have failed to provide detail on the properties of these deficits. We used acoustic measures of prosody to compare children with ASDs to age-matched groups with learning disabilities and typically developing peers. Overall,…

  14. A Molecular Imaging Paradigm to Rapidly Profile Response to Angiogenesis-directed Therapy in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Xie, Jingping; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Gore, John C.; Manning, H. Charles

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The development of novel angiogenesis-directed therapeutics is hampered by the lack of non-invasive imaging metrics capable of assessing treatment response. We report the development and validation of a novel molecular imaging paradigm to rapidly assess response to angiogenesis-directed therapeutics in preclinical animal models. Procedures A monoclonal antibody-based optical imaging probe targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) expression was synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo via multispectral fluorescence imaging. Results The optical imaging agent demonstrated specificity for the target receptor in cultured endothelial cells and in vivo. The agent exhibited significant accumulation within 4T1 xenograft tumors. Mice bearing 4T1 xenografts and treated with sunitinib exhibited both tumor growth arrest and decreased accumulation of NIR800-αVEGFR2ab compared to untreated cohorts (p=0.0021). Conclusions Molecular imaging of VEGFR2 expression is a promising non-invasive biomarker for assessing angiogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of angiogenesis-directed therapies. PMID:19130143

  15. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  16. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  17. [The profile direction toward right and left as seen from a historical study of cultural development. A dominance problem (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hufschmidt, H J

    1980-01-01

    Eighty percent of right handers drawing a human profile, direct it towards the left. The neurophysiological basis for this fact and the dominant role that the right hemisphere plays in higher visual performances is discussed. The preference for the left profile direction is traced back to the early Greek period in paintings, drawings, coin portraits, gems, cameos, and vase portraits. Fifty thousand objects have been analyzed. A 60% prevalence of face direction towards the right occurs in the cultural centers of the Mediterranean before 600 B.C. Before the early Greek period: the Assyrian, Egyptian, and Sumerian cultures faced more profiles to the right. This tendency for right profile direction can be traced back to Stone Age cave drawings. The profile shift from right to left occurs in the early Greek period and is related to a shift in script and in letter profile at the same time. This profile shift occurs simultaneously with an acceleration of intellectual and cultural development which also influenced our present culture. Although the percentage of right handers might not have changed considerably since the Stone Age, the profile shift from right to left suggests a hypothetical change in dominance of the cerebral hemispheres for the higher visual perception which may have induced a left preference in the period around 600 B.C. PMID:7004398

  18. Direct Tandem Mass Spectrometric Profiling of Sulfatides in Dry Urinary Samples for Screening of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuchař, Ladislav; Asfaw, Befekadu; Poupětová, Helena; Honzíková, Jitka; Tureček, František; Ledvinová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Background Prediagnostic steps in suspected metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) rely onclinical chemical methods other than enzyme assays. We report a new diagnostic method which evaluates changes in the spectrum of molecular types of sulfatides (3-O-sulfogalactosyl ceramides) in MLD urine. Methods The procedure allows isolation of urinary sulfatides by solid-phase extraction on DEAE-cellulose membranes, transportation of a dry membrane followed by elution and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis in the clinical laboratory. Major sulfatide isoforms are normalized to the least variable component of the spectrum, which is the indigenous C18:0 isoform. This procedure does not require the use of specific internal standards and minimizes errors caused by sample preparation and measurement. Results Urinary sulfatides were analyzed in a set of 21 samples from patients affected by sulfatidosis. The combined abundance of the five most elevated isoforms, C22:0, C22:0-OH, C24:0, C24:1-OH, and C24:0-OH sulfatides, was found to give the greatest distinction between MLD-affected patients and a control group. Conclusions The method avoids transportation of liquid urine samples and generates stable membrane-bound sulfatide samples that can be stored at ambient temperature. MS/MS sulfatide profiling targeted on the most MLD-representative isoforms is simple with robust results and is suitable for screening. PMID:23838369

  19. Direct profiling of myelinated and demyelinated regions in mouse brain by imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuppens, Ruben; Dumont, Debora; van Brussel, Leen; van de Plas, Babs; Daniels, Ruth; Noben, Jean-Paul; Verhaert, Peter; van der Gucht, Estel; Robben, Johan; Clerens, Stefan; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2007-02-01

    One of the newly developed imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) technologies utilizes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry to map proteins in thin tissue sections. In this study, we evaluated the power of MALDI IMS as we developed it in our (Bruker) MALDI TOF (Reflex IV) and TOF-TOF (Ultraflex II) systems to study myelin patterns in the mouse central nervous system under normal and pathological conditions. MALDI IMS was applied to assess myelin basic protein (MBP) isoform-specific profiles in different regions throughout the mouse brain. The distribution of ions of m/z 14,144 and 18,447 displayed a striking resemblance with white matter histology and were identified as MBP isoform 8 and 5, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the MBP-8 peak intensity upon MALDI IMS analysis of focal ethidium bromide-induced demyelinated brain areas. Our MS images were validated by immunohistochemistry using MBP antibodies. This study underscores the potential of MALDI IMS to study the contribution of MBP to demyelinating diseases.

  20. Direct Detection 1.6?m DIAL / Doppler Lidar for Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2013-12-01

    wind vector profiles were obtained up to 5 km altitude with 1 km altitude resolution with two azimuth angles. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References [1] Y. Shibata, C. Nagasawa and M. Abo, '1.5 μm incoherent Doppler lidar using an FBG filter', Proceedings of 25th International Laser Radar Conference (ILRC25), pp. 338-340 (2010). [2] C. Nagasawa, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, T. Nagai and M. Tsukamoto, 'Direct detection 1.6μm DIAL for measurements of CO2 concentration profiles in the troposphere', Proc. SPIE 8182, 81820G, 2011. doi: 10.1117/12.898794 [3] D. Sakaisawa, C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and photon-counting detector for the vertical CO2 profile, Applied Optics, Vol.48, No.4, pp.748-757, 2009.

  1. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  2. Direct detection and drug-resistance profiling of bacteremias using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhattacharyya, Roby P.; Hung, Deborah T.; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Detection of bacteria in bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns is critical to guide therapeutic decision-making for optimal patient care. Current culture-based assays are too slow (>48 hrs), leading to excessive up-front use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and/or incorrect antibiotic choices due to resistant bacteria, each with deleterious consequences for patient care and public health. To approach this problem, we describe a method to rapidly isolate bacteria from whole blood using inertial microfluidics and directly determine pathogen identity and antibiotic susceptibility with hybridization-based RNA detection. Using the principle of Dean flow fractionation, bacteria are separated from host blood cells in a label-free separation method with efficient recovery of even low abundance bacteria. Ribosomal RNA detection can then be applied for direct identification of low abundance pathogens (~100/mL) from blood without culturing or enzymatic amplification. Messenger RNA detection of antibiotic-responsive transcripts after brief drug exposure permits rapid susceptibility determination from bacteria with minimal culturing (~105/mL). This unique coupling of microfluidic cell separation with RNA-based molecular detection techniques represents significant progress towards faster diagnostics (~8 hours) to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25882432

  3. Deregulated Direct Targets of the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Protein, HBx, Identified through Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Expression Microarray Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Wing-Kin; Lu, Yiwei; Lee, Charlie W. H.; Zhang, Dongwei; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Lee, Caroline G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The hepatitis B-X (HBx) protein is strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. It is implicated not to directly cause cancer but to play a role in hepatocellular carcinoma as a co-factor. The oncogenic potential of HBx primarily lies in its interaction with transcriptional regulators resulting in aberrant gene expression and deregulated cellular pathways. Utilizing ultraviolet irradiation to simulate a tumor-initiating event, we integrated chip-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip) with expression microarray profiling and identified 184 gene targets directly deregulated by HBx. One-hundred forty-four transcription factors interacting with HBx were computationally inferred. We experimentally validated that HBx interacts with some of the predicted transcription factors (pTF) as well as the promoters of the deregulated target genes of these pTFs. Significantly, we demonstrated that the pTF interacts with the promoters of the deregulated HBx target genes and that deregulation by HBx of these HBx target genes carrying the pTF consensus sequences can be reversed using pTF small interfering RNAs. The roles of these deregulated direct HBx target genes and their relevance in cancer was inferred via querying against biogroup/cancer-related microarray databases using web-based NextBioTM software. Six pathways, including the Jak-STAT pathway, were predicted to be significantly deregulated when HBx binds indirectly to direct target gene promoters. In conclusion, this study represents the first ever demonstration of the utilization of ChIP-chip to identify deregulated direct gene targets from indirect protein-DNA binding as well as transcriptional factors directly interacting with HBx. Increased knowledge of the gene/transcriptional factor targets of HBx will enhance our understanding of the role of HBx in hepatocellular carcinogenesis and facilitate the design of better strategies in combating hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:19439406

  4. Deregulated direct targets of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) protein, HBx, identified through chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression microarray profiling.

    PubMed

    Sung, Wing-Kin; Lu, Yiwei; Lee, Charlie W H; Zhang, Dongwei; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Lee, Caroline G L

    2009-08-14

    The hepatitis B-X (HBx) protein is strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. It is implicated not to directly cause cancer but to play a role in hepatocellular carcinoma as a co-factor. The oncogenic potential of HBx primarily lies in its interaction with transcriptional regulators resulting in aberrant gene expression and deregulated cellular pathways. Utilizing ultraviolet irradiation to simulate a tumor-initiating event, we integrated chip-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip) with expression microarray profiling and identified 184 gene targets directly deregulated by HBx. One-hundred forty-four transcription factors interacting with HBx were computationally inferred. We experimentally validated that HBx interacts with some of the predicted transcription factors (pTF) as well as the promoters of the deregulated target genes of these pTFs. Significantly, we demonstrated that the pTF interacts with the promoters of the deregulated HBx target genes and that deregulation by HBx of these HBx target genes carrying the pTF consensus sequences can be reversed using pTF small interfering RNAs. The roles of these deregulated direct HBx target genes and their relevance in cancer was inferred via querying against biogroup/cancer-related microarray databases using web-based NextBio(TM) software. Six pathways, including the Jak-STAT pathway, were predicted to be significantly deregulated when HBx binds indirectly to direct target gene promoters. In conclusion, this study represents the first ever demonstration of the utilization of ChIP-chip to identify deregulated direct gene targets from indirect protein-DNA binding as well as transcriptional factors directly interacting with HBx. Increased knowledge of the gene/transcriptional factor targets of HBx will enhance our understanding of the role of HBx in hepatocellular carcinogenesis and facilitate the design of better strategies in combating hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID

  5. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  6. Strong acoustic wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  7. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  9. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  10. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, Keith C.; Kippenham, Dean O.; Purgalis, Peter; Moussa, David; Williams, Malcom D.; Wilde, Stephen B.; West, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB.sub.6) cathode system (10) is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB.sub.6 cathode element (11) generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element (11) has a head (21) with an upper substantially planar emission surface (23), and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion (26) which diminishes in cross-section from the head (21) towards the base (22) of the cathode element (11). A central rod (14) is connected to the base (22) of the cathode element (11) and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers (37) are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface (24) of the head end (21) to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element (11).

  11. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, K.C.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Purgalis, P.; Moussa, D.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.; West, M.W.

    1987-10-16

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathode system is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB/sub 6/ cathode element generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element has a head with an upper substantially planar emission surface, and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion which diminishes in cross-section from the head towards the base of the cathode element. A central rod is connected to the base of the cathode element and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface of the head end to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element. 7 figs

  12. Zonal Flow Velocimetry in Spherical Couette Flow using Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Mautino, Anthony R.; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Santiago A.; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-11-01

    We present studies of spherical Couette flows using the technique of acoustic mode Doppler velocimetry. This technique uses rotational splittings of acoustic modes to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of a rotating flow, and is of special interest in experiments where direct flow visualization is impractical. The primary experimental system consists of a 60 cm diameter outer spherical shell concentric with a 20 cm diameter sphere, with air or nitrogen gas serving as the working fluid. The geometry of the system approximates that of the Earth's core, making these studies geophysically relevant. A turbulent shear flow is established in the system by rotating the inner sphere and outer shell at different rates. Acoustic modes of the fluid volume are excited using a speaker and measured via microphones, allowingdetermination of rotational splittings. Preliminary results comparing observed splittings with those predicted by theory are presented. While the majority of these studies were performed in the 60 cm diameter device using nitrogen gas, some work has also been done looking at acoustic modes in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Prospects for measuring zonal velocity profiles in a wide variety of experiments are discussed.

  13. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  14. Enzyme Profiles in Seedling Development and the Effect of Itaconate, an Isocitrate Lyase-directed Reagent.

    PubMed

    Khan, F R; McFadden, B A

    1979-08-01

    Changes in levels of isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, and catalase have been investigated during germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) in the presence and absence of itaconate. Germination was accompanied by a rapid increase in these enzymes during the first 3 days. The presence of 38 millimolar itaconate inhibited the incidence of seed germination and the growth of embryo axes as well as the appearance of isocitrate lyase but did not alter the levels of malate synthase, catalase, or NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase. The specific activity for the latter enzyme was constant throughout germination. Oxalate or succinate, each at 38 millimolar, had no effect upon germination of flax seeds. Itaconate did not inhibit the activities of malate synthase, catalase, or NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase in vitro but was a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (K(i):17 micromolar at 30 C, pH 7.6). Itaconate (at 38 millimolar) did not alter the appearance of malate synthase but reduced the incidence of germination, onset of germination, and growth of the embryo axis as well as the specific activity of isocitrate lyase in seedlings of Zea mays, Vigna glabra, Glycine hispida, Vigna sinensis, Trigonella foenumgraecum, Lens culinaris, and Medicago sativa. The incidence and onset of germination of wheat seeds were unaltered by the same concentration of itaconate but seedlings did not contain isocitrate lyase or malate synthase. The data suggest that itaconate may be isocitrate lyase-directed in inhibiting the germination of fatty seeds. PMID:16660938

  15. Adsorption behaviour of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic profile.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Sallam, H B; Abo Farha, S A; Gamal, A M; Mahmoud, G E A

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber from aqueous solution by using parameters, such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial dye concentration and the effect of sodium sulphate, tetrasodium edate and trisodium citrate. The extent of dye adsorption increased with increasing contact time, temperature and solution concentration. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. It was found that the Langmuir equation fit better than the Freundlich equation. The results show that the presence of SE and SC significantly enhance the dye adsorption onto cotton fiber. In addition, the adsorption data obtained at different temperatures of DY50 onto cotton fiber were applied to pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to pseudo second-order kinetics with good correlation. Also, free energy of adsorption (ΔG(#)), enthalpy (ΔH(#)), and entropy (ΔS(#)) changes were determined to predict the nature of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The activation energy, Ea, is ranged between 1.9 and 3.9kJmol(-1) indicated that the adsorption process is a physisorption. This low value of Ea generally indicates diffusion controlled process. PMID:24882703

  16. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. PMID:25565074

  17. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; George, Nibu A.; Qiu, Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K.

    2009-07-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents—for the first time—a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  18. The Direct Calculation of Fluxes and Profiles in the Marine Surface Layer Using Measurements from a Single Atmospheric Level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou-Fang Lo, Aloysius

    1993-12-01

    This study presents a method that can directly determine the boundary-layer fluxes of heat and momentum, as well as both extrapolated wind and temperature profiles to the surface of a water body. The only input information that is required is a single level of wind and temperature in addition to the water surface skin temperature. The present study features a method that enables one to determine boundary-layer flux parameters directly without having to resort to the use of tabulations or nomograms. Therefore, the present method can be a valuable tool in many practical applications especially for marine boundary layer studies using buoy data as input. In essence, the present method determines the Monin-Obukhov length directly from the bulk Richardson number instead of indirectly through nomograms or being considered as a known input. Thus, the present method is an improvement over the conventional bulk method. Results of the present study agree well with those that appear in the literature.

  19. Helioseismology in a bottle: modal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, Santiago Andrés; Zimmerman, Daniel S.; Nataf, Henri-Claude; Thorette, Aurélien; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of the differential rotation of the Sun's interior is one of the great achievements of helioseismology, providing important constraints for stellar physics. The technique relies on observing and analyzing rotationally-induced splittings of p-modes in the star. Here, we demonstrate the first use of the technique in a laboratory setting. We apply it in a spherical cavity with a spinning central core (spherical-Couette flow) to determine the mean azimuthal velocity of the air filling the cavity. We excite a number of acoustic resonances (analogous to p-modes in the Sun) using a speaker and record the response with an array of small microphones on the outer sphere. Many observed acoustic modes show rotationally-induced splittings, which allow us to perform an inversion to determine the air's azimuthal velocity as a function of both radius and latitude. We validate the method by comparing the velocity field obtained through inversion against the velocity profile measured with a calibrated hot film anemometer. This modal acoustic velocimetry technique has great potential for laboratory setups involving rotating fluids in axisymmetric cavities. It will be useful especially in liquid metals where direct optical methods are unsuitable and ultrasonic techniques very challenging at best.

  20. Isomorphic surface acoustic waves on multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.

    2001-03-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years over the investigation of bulk acoustic waves (BAWs) which propagate along certain directions in anisotropic crystals with a minimum of diffraction. One application of these BAWs is for multichannel acousto-optic devices. The fact that the beams propagate with the minimum diffraction implies that the channels in such a device can be closely packed. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are constrained to be within roughly one acoustic wavelength from the surface, the possibility exists to deposit thin films of isotropic or anisotropic material on the substrate and embue the aggregate multilayer structure with properties not present in the beginning substrate material. The characteristic investigated in this article is the velocity anisotropy which, as is known, predominates SAW diffraction. Specifically, we present a method whereby self-collimating SAWs can be generated on surfaces even though the substrate material itself does not exhibit this behavior. We discuss the particular case of a ZnO layer on (001)-cut <110>-propagating GaAs for which a fair amount of slowness surface data exists. Finally, using angular spectrum of plane waves diffraction theory, we present data which substantiate the claim that self-collimating can more accurately be viewed as isomorphic because the SAW beam profile can propagate without changing its shape.

  1. Direct Molecular Diagnosis of Aspergillosis and CYP51A Profiling from Respiratory Samples of French Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanan; Garnaud, Cécile; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Thiébaut-Bertrand, Anne; Saint-Raymond, Christel; Camara, Boubou; Hamidfar, Rebecca; Cognet, Odile; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Microbiological diagnosis of aspergillosis and triazole resistance is limited by poor culture yield. To better estimate this shortcoming, we compared culture and molecular detection of A. fumigatus in respiratory samples from French patients at risk for aspergillosis. Methods: A total of 97 respiratory samples including bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL), bronchial aspirates (BA), tracheal aspirates, sputa, pleural fluids, and lung biopsy were collected from 33 patients having invasive aspergillosis (n = 12), chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (n = 3), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (n = 7), or colonization (n = 11) and 28 controls. Each specimen was evaluated by culture, pan-Aspergillus qPCR, and CYP51A PCR and sequencing. Results: One A. flavus and 19 A. fumigatus with one multiazole resistant strain (5.3%) were cultured from 20 samples. Culture positivity was 62.5, 75, 42.9, and 15.8% in ABPA, CPA, IA, and colonized patients, respectively. Aspergillus detection rate was significantly higher by pan-Aspergillus qPCR than by culture in IA (90.5 vs. 42.9%; P < 0.05) and colonization group (73.7 vs. 15.8%; P < 0.05). The CYP51A PCR found one TR34/L98H along with 5 novel cyp51A mutations (4 non-synonymous and 1 promoter mutations), yet no association can be established currently between these novel mutations and azole resistance. The analysis of 11 matched pairs of BA and BAL samples found that 9/11 BA carried greater fungal load than BAL and CYP51A detection was more sensitive in BA than in BAL. Conclusion: Direct molecular detection of Aspergillus spp. and azole resistance markers are useful adjunct tools for comprehensive aspergillosis diagnosis. The observed superior diagnostic value of BAs to BAL fluids warrants more in-depth study. PMID:27524978

  2. Change of Direction Ability Performance in Cerebral Palsy Football Players According to Functional Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Raúl; Sarabia, Jose M.; Yanci, Javier; García-Vaquero, María P.; Campayo-Piernas, María

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the validity and reliability of the two different change of direction ability (CODA) tests in elite football players with cerebral palsy (CP) and to analyse the differences in performance of this ability between current functional classes (FT) and controls. The sample consisted of 96 international cerebral palsy football players (FPCP) and 37 football players. Participants were divided into four different groups according to the International Federation of Cerebral Palsy Football (IFCPF) classes and a control group (CG): FT5 (n = 8); FT6 (n = 12); FT7 (n = 62); FT8 (n = 14); and CG (n = 37). The reproducibility of Modified Agility Test (MAT) and Illinois Agility Test (IAT) (ICC = 0.82–0.95, SEM = 2.5–5.8%) showed excellent to good values. In two CODA tests, CG performed faster scores compared with FPCP classes (p < 0.01, d = 1.76–3.26). In IAT, FT8 class comparisons regarding the other classes were: FT5 (p = 0.047, d = 1.05), FT6 (p = 0.055, d = 1.19), and FT7 (p = 0.396, d = 0.56). With regard to MAT, FT8 class was also compared with FT5 (p = 0.006, d = 1.30), FT6 (p = 0.061, d = 0.93), and FT7 (p = 0.033, d = 1.01). No significant differences have been found between FT5, FT6, and FT7 classes. According to these results, IAT and MAT could be useful and reliable and valid tests to analyse CODA in FPCP. Each test (IAT and MAT) could be applied considering the cut point that classifiers need to make a decision about the FT8 class and the other FT classes (FT5, FT6, and FT7). PMID:26779037

  3. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  4. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  5. A study of the effect of a boundary layer profile on the dynamic response and acoustic radiation of flat panels. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The response of a thin, elastic plate to a harmonic force which drives the plate from below and a compressible air stream with a viscous boundary layer flowing parallel to the upper surface along the length was investigated. Equations governing the forced response of the coupled plate-aerodynamic system are derived along with appropriate boundary conditions. Calculations of basic solution parameters for a linear velocity profile and for a Blasius profile showed that the same system response could be obtained from each profile if appropriate values of boundary layer thickness were chosen for each profile.

  6. Hydrostratigraphic analysis of the MADE site with full-resolution GPR and direct-push hydraulic profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dogan, M.; Van Dam, R. L.; Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J., Jr.; Hyndman, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Full-resolution 3D Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data were combined with high-resolution hydraulic conductivity (K) data from vertical Direct-Push (DP) profiles to characterize a portion of the highly heterogeneous MAcro Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site. This is an important first step to better understand the influence of aquifer heterogeneities on observed anomalous transport. Statistical evaluation of DP data indicates non-normal distributions that have much higher similarity within each GPR facies than between facies. The analysis of GPR and DP data provides high-resolution estimates of the 3D geometry of hydrostratigraphic zones, which can then be populated with stochastic K fields. The lack of such estimates has been a significant limitation for testing and parameterizing a range of novel transport theories at sites where the traditional advection-dispersion model has proven inadequate. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Direct detection of peptides and small proteins in fingermarks and determination of sex by MALDI mass spectrometry profiling.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Leesa Susanne; Wulfert, Florian; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Fonville, Judith Marlou; Clench, Malcolm Ronald; Carolan, Vikki Amanda; Francese, Simona

    2012-10-21

    Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) can detect and image a variety of endogenous and exogenous compounds from latent fingermarks. This opportunity potentially provides investigators with both an image for suspect identification and chemical information to be used as additional intelligence. The latter becomes particularly important when the fingermark is distorted or smudged or when the suspect is not a previously convicted offender and therefore their fingerprints are not present in the National Fingerprint Database. One of the desirable pieces of intelligence would be the sex of the suspect from the chemical composition of a fingermark. In this study we show that the direct detection of peptides and proteins from fingermarks by MALDI MS Profiling (MALDI MSP), along with the multivariate modeling of the spectra, enables the determination of sex with 85% accuracy. The chemical analysis of the fingermark composition is expected to additionally provide information on traits such as nutritional habits, drug use or hormonal status. PMID:22950080

  8. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector N.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

  9. Direct measurement of solids: High temperature sensing Final report Experimental development and testing of high temperature pulsed EMATs (electromagnetic acoustic transducer):

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.; Spanner, G.E.; Sperline, P.D.

    1988-04-01

    A pulsed laser/pulsed EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) receiver system has been demonstrated for measuring the time of flight of acoustic signals in hot steel samples. Attenuation and signal-to-noise ratio are important parameters to be monitored. A continuous contact EMAT application was not achieved; thermal analysis found that contact times of 5 seconds with cooling times of 45 seconds are required at 1300/degree/C. The equipment requires field hardening and improved packaging before system reliability can be assessed. 22 refs., 35 figs. (DLC)

  10. Imaging marine geophysical environments with vector acoustics.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Dennis

    2006-09-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine geoacoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones enables one to acquire three-dimensional (3D) survey data with instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the sound wave direction directly without the cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that had a well-controlled environment with a few targets. Using vector acoustic data from a single line of sources, the three-dimensional tank environment was imaged by directly locating the source and all reflectors. PMID:17004497

  11. Multichannel analysis of surface-waves and integration of downhole acoustic televiewer imaging, ultrasonic Vs and Vp, and vertical seismic profiling in an NEHRP-standard classification, South of Concordia, Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Gad, Sabreen; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Seismic site characteristics, as pertaining to earthquake hazard reduction, are a function of the subsurface elastic moduli and the geologic structures. This study explores how multiscale (surface, downhole, and laboratory) datasets can be utilized to improve "constrained" average Vs30 (shear-wave velocity to a 30-meter depth). We integrate borehole, surface and laboratory measurements for a seismic site classification based on the standards of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). The seismic shear-wave velocity (Vs30) was derived from a geophysical inversion workflow that utilized multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) and downhole acoustic televiewer imaging (DATI). P-wave and S-wave velocities, based on laboratory measurements of arrival times of ultrasonic-frequency signals, supported the workflow by enabling us to calculate Poisson's ratio, which was incorporated in building an initial model for the geophysical inversion of MASW. Extraction of core samples from two boreholes provided lithology and thickness calibration of the amplitudes of the acoustic televiewer imaging for each layer. The MASW inversion, for calculating Vs sections, was constrained with both ultrasonic laboratory measurements (from first arrivals of Vs and Vp waveforms at simulated in situ overburden stress conditions) and the downhole acoustic televiewer (DATV) amplitude logs. The Vs30 calculations enabled categorizing the studied site as NEHRP-class "C" - very dense soil and soft rock. Unlike shallow fractured carbonates in the studied area, S-wave and P-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequency for the deeper intact shale core-samples from two boreholes were in better agreement with the corresponding velocities from both a zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and inversion of Rayleigh-wave velocity dispersion curves.

  12. Direct-Current Resistivity Profiling at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project Study Site near Mentone, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teeple, Andrew P.; McDonald, Alyson K.; Payne, Jason D.; Kress, Wade H.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Texas A&M University AgriLife, did a surface geophysical investigation at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project study site near Mentone in West Texas intended to determine shallow (to about 14 meters below the water [river] surface) subsurface composition (lithology) in and near treated (eradicated of all saltcedar) and control (untreated) riparian zone sites during June-August 2006. Land-based direct-current resistivity profiling was applied in a 240-meter section of the riverbank at the control site, and waterborne direct-current continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) was applied along a 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both sites to collect shallow subsurface resistivity data. Inverse modeling was used to obtain a nonunique estimate of the true subsurface resistivity from apparent resistivity calculated from the field measurements. The land-based survey showed that the sub-surface at the control site generally is of relatively low resis-tivity down to about 4 meters below the water surface. Most of the section from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface is of relatively high resistivity. The waterborne CRP surveys convey essentially the same electrical representation of the lithology at the control site to 10 meters below the water surface; but the CRP surveys show considerably lower resistivity than the land-based survey in the subsection from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface. The CRP surveys along the 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both the treated and control sites show the same relatively low resistivity zone from the riverbed to about 4 meters below the water surface evident at the control site. A slightly higher resistivity zone is observed from about 4 to 14 meters below the water surface along the upstream approximately one-half of the profile than along the downstream one-half. The variations in resistivity could not be matched to variations in lithology because

  13. Direct-current resistivity profiling at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project study site near Mentone, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teeple, Andrew P.; McDonald, Alyson K.; Payne, Jason D.; Kress, Wade H.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Texas A&M University AgriLife, did a surface geophysical investigation at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project study site near Mentone in West Texas intended to determine shallow (to about 14 meters below the water [river] surface) subsurface composition (lithology) in and near treated (eradicated of all saltcedar) and control (untreated) riparian zone sites during June-August 2006. Land-based direct-current resistivity profiling was applied in a 240-meter section of the riverbank at the control site, and waterborne direct-current continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) was applied along a 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both sites to collect shallow subsurface resistivity data. Inverse modeling was used to obtain a nonunique estimate of the true subsurface resistivity from apparent resistivity calculated from the field measurements. The land-based survey showed that the sub-surface at the control site generally is of relatively low resis-tivity down to about 4 meters below the water surface. Most of the section from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface is of relatively high resistivity. The waterborne CRP surveys convey essentially the same electrical representation of the lithology at the control site to 10 meters below the water surface; but the CRP surveys show considerably lower resistivity than the land-based survey in the subsection from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface. The CRP surveys along the 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both the treated and control sites show the same relatively low resistivity zone from the riverbed to about 4 meters below the water surface evident at the control site. A slightly higher resistivity zone is observed from about 4 to 14 meters below the water surface along the upstream approximately one-half of the profile than along the downstream one-half. The variations in resistivity could not be matched to variations in lithology because

  14. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  15. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  16. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments with water-air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ˜100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ˜30 μm in diameter can be "pushed" away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  17. Unattended acoustic sensor simulation of TG25 trials using CHORALE workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozard, Patrick; Le Goff, Alain; Naz, Pierre; Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean; Dupuy, Yann

    2004-08-01

    The simulation workshop CHORALE of the French DGA is used by government services and industrial companies for weapon system validation and qualification trials in the infrared domain, and detection of moving vehicles in the acoustic domain. Recently, acoustic simulation tests were performed on the 3D geometrical database of the DGA/DCE/ETBS proving ground. Results have been compared to the acoustic measurements of the NATO-TG25 trials. This article describes the trials, the modeling of the 3D geometrical database and the comparison between acoustic simulation results and measurements. The 3D scene is described by a set of polygons. Each polygon is characterized by its acoustic resistivity or its complex impedance. Sound sources are associated with moving vehicles and are characterized by their spectra and directivities. A microphone sensor is defined by its position, its frequency band and its directivity. For each trial, atmospheric profiles (air temperature, pressure and humidity according to altitude), trajectories and sound spectrum of moving objects were measured. These data were used to prepare the scenario for the acoustic simulation.

  18. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no models have been proposed that take into account non-sinusoidal stimuli for rotational motions. In this work, the influence of both the period length and the specific time course of an inertial stimulus is investigated. Thresholds for three acceleration profile shapes (triangular, sinusoidal, and trapezoidal) were measured for three period lengths (0.3, 1.4, and 6.7 s) in ten participants. A two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task was used where participants had to judge if a yaw rotation around an earth-vertical axis was leftward or rightward. The peak velocity of the stimulus was varied, and the threshold was defined as the stimulus yielding 75 % correct answers. In accordance with previous research, thresholds decreased with shortening period length (from ~2 deg/s for 6.7 s to ~0.8 deg/s for 0.3 s). The peak velocity was the determining factor for discrimination: Different profiles with the same period length have similar velocity thresholds. These measurements were used to fit a novel model based on a description of the firing rate of semi-circular canal neurons. In accordance with previous research, the estimates of the model parameters suggest that velocity storage does not influence perceptual thresholds. PMID:22623095

  19. Quantitative Profiling of Major Neutral Lipid Classes in Human Meibum by Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Green, Kari B.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to better understand lipid composition in human meibum. Methods. Intact lipids in meibum samples were detected by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in positive detection mode using sodium iodide (NaI) as an additive. The peak intensities of all major types of lipid species, that is, wax esters (WEs), cholesteryl esters (CEs), and diesters (DEs) were corrected for peak overlapping and isotopic distribution; an additional ionization efficiency correction was performed for WEs and CEs, which was simplified by the observation that the corresponding ionization efficiency was primarily dependent on the specific lipid class and saturation degree of the lipids while independent of the carbon chain length. A set of WE and CE standards was spiked in meibum samples for ionization efficiency determination and absolute quantitation. Results. The absolute amount (μmol/mg) for each of 51 WEs and 31 CEs in meibum samples was determined. The summed masses for 51 WEs and 31 CEs accounted for 48 ± 4% and 40 ± 2%, respectively, of the total meibum lipids. The mass percentages of saturated and unsaturated species were determined to be 75 ± 2% and 25 ± 1% for CEs and 14 ± 1% and 86 ± 1% for WEs. The profiles for two types of DEs were also obtained, which include 42 α,ω Type II DEs, and 21 ω Type I-St DEs. Conclusions. Major neutral lipid classes in meibum samples were quantitatively profiled by ESI-MS analysis with NaI additive. PMID:23847307

  20. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    Underwater acoustic networks (UWANs) have applications in environmental state monitoring, oceanic profile measurements, leak detection in oil fields, distributed surveillance, and navigation. For these applications, sets of nodes are employed to collaboratively monitor an area of interest and track certain events or phenomena. In addition, it is common to find autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) acting as mobile sensor nodes that perform search-and-rescue missions, reconnaissance in combat zones, and coastal patrol. These AUVs are to work cooperatively to achieve a desired goal and thus need to be able to, in an ad-hoc manner, establish and sustain communication links in order to ensure some desired level of quality of service. Therefore, each node is required to adapt to environmental changes and be able to overcome broken communication links caused by external noise affecting the communication channel due to node mobility. In addition, since radio waves are quickly absorbed in the water medium, it is common for most underwater applications to rely on acoustic (or sound) rather than radio channels for mid-to-long range communications. However, acoustic channels pose multiple challenging issues, most notably the high transmission delay due to slow signal propagation and the limited channel bandwidth due to high frequency attenuation. Moreover, the inhomogeneous property of the water medium affects the sound speed profile while the signal surface and bottom reflections leads to multipath effects. In this dissertation, we address these networking challenges by developing protocols that take into consideration the underwater physical layer dynamics. We begin by introducing a novel surface-based reflection scheme (SBR), which takes advantage of the multipath effects of the acoustic channel. SBR works by using reflections from the water surface, and bottom, to establish non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communication links. SBR makes it possible to incorporate both line

  1. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  2. Acoustic Facies Analysis of Side-Scan Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwan, Fa Shu

    Acoustic facies analysis methods have allowed the generation of system-independent values for the quantitative seafloor acoustic parameter, backscattering strength, from GLORIA and (TAMU) ^2 side-scan sonar data. The resulting acoustic facies parameters enable quantitative comparisons of data collected by different sonar systems, data from different environments, and measurements made with survey geometries. Backscattering strength values were extracted from the sonar amplitude data by inversion based on the sonar equation. Image processing products reveal seafloor features and patterns of relative intensity. To quantitatively compare data collected at different times or by different systems, and to ground truth-measurements and geoacoustic models, quantitative corrections must be made on any given data set for system source level, beam pattern, time-varying gain, processing gain, transmission loss, absorption, insonified area contribution, and grazing angle effects. In the sonar equation, backscattering strength is the sonar parameter which is directly related to seafloor properties. The GLORIA data used in this study are from the edge of a distal lobe of the Monterey Fan. An interfingered region of strong and weak seafloor signal returns from a flat seafloor region provides an ideal data set for this study. Inversion of imagery data from the region allows the quantitative definition of different acoustic facies. The (TAMU) ^2 data used are from a calibration site near the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Acoustic facies analysis techniques were implemented to generate statistical information for acoustic facies based on the estimates of backscattering strength. The backscattering strength values have been compared with Lambert's Law and other functions to parameterize the description of the acoustic facies. The resulting Lambertian constant values range from -26 dB to -36 dB. A modified Lambert relationship, which consists of both intercept and slope

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  4. Direct transverse load profile determination using the polarization-dependent loss spectral response of a chirped fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Frédéric; Bette, Sébastien; Kinet, Damien; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The determination of stress profiles created by transverse loads was proved to be important in different domains, such as structural health monitoring and biomechanics, and, more specifically, in the prostheses domain. In this paper, we report an original method to estimate the transverse load profile from the polarization-dependent loss (PDL) spectrum of a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG). This method makes use of the relationship between the integration of the PDL of a CFBG, and the force profile has the advantage of not requiring any iterative method to estimate the transverse load profile. The relationship linking the integration of the PDL and the force profile is demonstrated using an analytical approximation of the transmission spectrum of CFBGs. The validity of this method for the determination of non-uniform load profiles is then shown using a numerical analysis. An experimental demonstration is finally reported using a 48 mm-long CFBG subject to different step transverse load profiles. PMID:27411174

  5. A semi-quantitative approach for the rapid screening and mass profiling of naphthenic acids directly in contaminated aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kyle D; Letourneau, Dane R; Vandergrift, Gregory W; Jobst, Karl; Reiner, Eric; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of a direct sampling, online analytical approach for the determination of acid extractable naphthenic acids in complex aqueous samples, known as condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS). The technique employs a capillary hollow fibre semi-permeable membrane probe configured for immersion into a pH adjusted sample. A continuously flowing methanol acceptor phase transfers naphthenic acids to an electrospray ionization source, operated in negative ion mode, whereupon they are analysed by mass spectrometry as [M-H](-) ions. High-resolution mass spectrometry is used to characterize the influence of sample pH on membrane transport of multiple components of complex naphthenic acid mixtures. We demonstrate the use of CP-MIMS for semi-quantitative analysis of real-world samples using selected ion monitoring and full scan mass spectra at unit mass resolution. The technique has also been employed to continuously monitor the temporal evolution in the mass profile and concentrations of individual naphthenic acid isomer classes in heterogeneous solutions during adsorption processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26757071

  6. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  7. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  8. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  9. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  10. Experimental study of the potential of multichannel acoustic thermotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Eugene V.; Xenophontov, S. Y.; Mansfeld, Anatoly D.; Reyman, Alexander M.; Sanin, A. G.

    2001-06-01

    The results of experimental studies of 2D temperature profiles reconstruction inside soft tissues are presented. The 2D images are obtained as the result of mathematical data processing in multichannel scanning acoustic thermotomograph (AT). Operation of this device is based on the receiving of weak acoustic emission produced by thermal motion of medium particles. The intensity of received signal is proportional to the acoustical brightness temperature of emitting object, i.e. to its temperature and sound absorption. Some evident applications of this method are related with early tumor detection and internal temperature measurement during hyperthermal treatment. This kind of passive scanning provides great safety of investigation combined with rather good spatial resolution due to short wavelength and high directivity of AT antenna. Our experiments demonstrated localization of overheated phantom objects inside tissue-like absorbing media with temperature contrast about 0.4 K and 2 mm resolution at 2D images with area size 210x40 mm. The advantages and possible applications of this kind of clinical investigations are illustrated by the results of in vivo experiments on the variation of acoustic brightness temperature of human limbs and liver during some physiological tests. This work was supported by RFBR (project #00-02-16600).

  11. Transcriptome microRNA profiling of bovine mammary epithelial cells challenged with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus bacteria reveals pathogen directed microRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and have been shown to be critical regulators to the fine-tuning of epithelial immune responses. However, the role of miRNAs in bovine responses to E. coli and S. aureus, two mastitis causing pathogens, is not well understood. Results The global expression of miRNAs in bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T cells) challenged with and without heat-inactivated Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) or Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria at 0, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr was profiled using RNA-Seq. A total of 231 known bovine miRNAs were identified with more than 10 counts per million in at least one of 13 libraries and 5 miRNAs including bta-miR-21-5p, miR-27b, miR-22-3p, miR-184 and let-7f represented more than 50% of the abundance. One hundred and thirteen novel miRNAs were also identified and more than one third of them belong to the bta-miR-2284 family. Seventeen miRNAs were significantly (P < 0.05) differentially regulated by the presence of pathogens. E. coli initiated an earlier regulation of miRNAs (6 miRNAs differentially regulated within the first 6 hrs post challenge as compared to 1 miRNA for S. aureus) while S. aureus presented a delayed response. Five differentially expressed miRNAs (bta-miR-184, miR-24-3p, miR-148, miR-486 and let-7a-5p) were unique to E. coli while four (bta-miR-2339, miR-499, miR-23a and miR-99b) were unique to S. aureus. In addition, our study revealed a temporal differential regulation of five miRNAs (bta-miR-193a-3p, miR-423-5p, miR-30b-5p, miR-29c and miR-un116) in unchallenged cells. Target gene predictions of pathogen differentially expressed miRNAs indicate a significant enrichment in gene ontology functional categories in development/cellular processes, biological regulation as well as cell growth and death. Furthermore, target genes were significantly enriched in several KEGG pathways including immune system, signal transduction, cellular process

  12. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  13. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  15. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  16. Pitch (F0) and formant profiles of human vowels and vowel-like baboon grunts: The role of vocalizer body size and voice-acoustic allometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendall, Drew; Kollias, Sophie; Ney, Christina; Lloyd, Peter

    2005-02-01

    Key voice features-fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies-can vary extensively between individuals. Much of the variation can be traced to differences in the size of the larynx and vocal-tract cavities, but whether these differences in turn simply reflect differences in speaker body size (i.e., neutral vocal allometry) remains unclear. Quantitative analyses were therefore undertaken to test the relationship between speaker body size and voice F0 and formant frequencies for human vowels. To test the taxonomic generality of the relationships, the same analyses were conducted on the vowel-like grunts of baboons, whose phylogenetic proximity to humans and similar vocal production biology and voice acoustic patterns recommend them for such comparative research. For adults of both species, males were larger than females and had lower mean voice F0 and formant frequencies. However, beyond this, F0 variation did not track body-size variation between the sexes in either species, nor within sexes in humans. In humans, formant variation correlated significantly with speaker height but only in males and not in females. Implications for general vocal allometry are discussed as are implications for speech origins theories, and challenges to them, related to laryngeal position and vocal tract length. .

  17. The use of tunnel concentration profile data to determine the ratio of NO2/NOx directly emitted from vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X.; Lau, N. T.; Chan, C. K.; Fang, M.

    2005-12-01

    Recently, it is reported that primary vehicular NO2/NOx ratio to be 10-30% and primary vehicular NO2 has raised much interest and concern in the control of NO2 in urban areas. In this study, primary vehicular NO2/NOx ratio in Hong Kong was investigated based on intensive long tunnel (3.7-4 km in length) experiments where concentration profiles of air pollutants along the entire lengths of the tunnels were obtained. Long tunnels were selected because of the inherent low O3 concentrations in the partially enclosed environment. In addition the concentrations of pollutants from vehicles are high. Thus, the NO2 measured inside long tunnels would be more representative of the primary NO2 emitted by vehicles and contribution due to atmospheric transformation would be limited. This dataset was supported by a long-term on-road air quality dataset (June 2002-August 2003). Both datasets were obtained using the Mobile Real-time Air Monitoring Platform (MAP). The primary on-road vehicular NO2/NOx ratio was less than 2%, detected in the mid sections of tunnels investigated, where O3 concentration was at a minimum. In sections of the tunnels (entrance and exit) where O3 concentrations were relatively high, the NO2/NOx ratio could be as high as 19%. Long-term (annual average) on-road air quality data in open air yielded NO2/NOx ratios up to 28%. Thus, it is apparent that directly emitted NO2 from vehicles is not significant in atmospheric NO2 concentration. A simple model was used to segregate the contribution of background NO2 and transformed NO2 measured in vehicle plumes.

  18. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  19. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  20. Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center, Alchemitron Corp. is developing the Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Process (AEEP), a new technique of employing nonlinear ultrasonics to enhance electroplating. The applications range from electroplating full-panel electronic circuit boards to electroplating microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. In a conventional plating process, the surface area to be plated is separated from the nonplated areas by a temporary mask. The mask may take many forms, from a cured liquid coating to a simple tape. Generally, the mask is discarded when the plating is complete, creating a solid waste product that is often an environmental hazard. The labor and materials involved with the layout, fabrication, and tooling of masks is a primary source of recurring and nonrecurring production costs. The objective of this joint effort, therefore, is to reduce or eliminate the need for masks. AEEP improves selective plating processes by using directed beams of high-intensity acoustic waves to create nonlinear effects that alter the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of the plating process. It relies on two effects: acoustic streaming and acoustic heating. Acoustic streaming is observed when a high-intensity acoustic beam creates a liquid current within the beam. The liquid current can be directed as the beam is directed and, thus, users can move liquid around as desired without using pumps and nozzles. The current of the electroplating electrolyte, therefore, can be directed at distinct target areas where electroplating is desired. The current delivers fresh electrolyte to the target area while flushing away the spent electrolyte. This dramatically increases the plating rate in the target area. In addition, acoustic heating of both the liquid in the beam and the target surface increases the chemical reaction rate, which further increases the plating rate. The combined effects of acoustic streaming and

  1. Acoustic nonlinearity in fluorinert FC-43

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N; Osterhoudt, Curtis F; Mombourquette, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Fluorinert FC-43 nonlinearity was investigated using two approaches: (i) a finite amplitude method with harmonic production; and (ii) a nonlinear frequency mixing in the fluid with consequent beam profile measurement of the difference frequency. The finite amplitude method provides information on the coefficient of nonlinearity, {beta}, through the amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic, at a certain transmitter-receiver distance. A calibrated hydrophone was used as a receiver, in order to obtain direct pressure measurements of the acoustic waves in the fluid. The role of transmitter-receiver distance in {beta} determination is investigated. In the second approach, a single transducer is used to provide two high-frequency beams. The collinear high-frequency beams mix nonlinearly in the fluid resulting in a difference frequency beam and higher order harmonics of the primaries. The difference frequency beam profite is investigated at lengths beyond the mixing distance. The experimental data are compured with the KZK theory.

  2. The ion acoustic decay instability in a large scale, hot plasma relevant to direct drive laser fusion -- Application to a critical surface diagnostic. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have studied the ion acoustic decay instability in a large ({approximately} 1 mm) scale, hot ({approximately} 1 keV) plasma, which is relevant to a laser fusion reactor target. They have shown that the instability threshold is low. They have developed a novel collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at a 90{degree} scattering angle. The scattering is nonetheless coherent, because of the modest ratio of the frequency of the probe laser to that of the pump laser, such that even for such a large angle, (k{lambda}{sub De}){sup 2} is much less than one. With this system they have measured the electron plasma wave excited by the ion acoustic decay instability near the critical density (n{sub e} {approximately} 0.86 n{sub c}). This allows them to use the frequency of the detected wave to measure the electron temperature in the interaction region, obtaining a result reasonably close to that predicted by the SAGE computer code.

  3. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  4. Acoustics of a broadcast center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2003-04-01

    A broadcast system in Mexico City had to change facilities in order to concentrate in a single site all related broadcast stations and production studios in order to facilitate its normal operation. This led to a design which included the acoustic noise isolation and the interior acoustics of every studio and control room, together with the audio interconection, the electricity layout, the air conditioning system, the office building, etc. This paper presents the acoustics profile of the center, including final results of the construction as they were measured on completion of the installation. The complex has seven AM and FM broadcast stations, plus seven production studios for news, commercials and radio-novels plus an audio master control room, and everything was completed within four months.

  5. Tracking marine mammals using passive acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2007-12-01

    It is difficult to study the behavior and physiology of marine mammals or to understand and mitigate human impact on them because much of their lives are spent underwater. Since sound propagates for long distances in the ocean and since many cetaceans are vocal, passive acoustics is a valuable tool for studying and monitoring their behavior. After a brief introduction to and review of passive acoustic tracking methods, this dissertation develops and applies two new methods. Both methods use widely-spaced (tens of kilometers) bottom-mounted hydrophone arrays, as well as propagation models that account for depth-dependent sound speed profiles. The first passive acoustic tracking method relies on arrival times of direct and surface-reflected paths. It is used to track a sperm whale using 5 at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) and gives position estimates that are accurate to within 10 meters. With such accuracy, the whale's pitch and yaw are estimated by assuming that its main axis (which points from the tail to the rostrum) is parallel to its velocity. Roll is found by fitting the details of the pulses within each sperm whale click to the so-called bent horn model of sperm whale sound production. Finally, given the position and orientation of the whale, its beam pattern is reconstructed and found to be highly directional with an intense forward directed component. Pair-wise spectrogram (PWS) processing is the second passive acoustic tracking method developed in this dissertation. Although it is computationally more intensive, PWS has several advantages over arrival-time tracking methods, especially in shallow water environments, for long duration calls, and for multiple-animal datasets, as is the case for humpback whales on Hawaiian breeding grounds. Results of simulations with realistic noise conditions and environmental mismatch are given and compared to other passive localization techniques. When applied to the AUTEC sperm whale dataset, PWS

  6. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  7. Data analysis results of the second sea trial of ambient noise imaging with acoustic lens in 2014: Two-dimensional target images affected by direction of field of view and spatial noise distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    An aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m has been designed and fabricated to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). A sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay in November 2010. It was verified that targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps. Recently, we have built a second prototype ANI system using an acoustic lens with a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array with 127 elements corresponding to a field of view (FOV) spanning 15° horizontally by 9° vertically. In this study, we investigated the effects of the direction of the FOV and the spatial noise distribution on the 2D target image obtained by ANI. Here, the noise sources in front of the target are called “front light”, and those at the rear of the target are called “back light”. The second sea trial was conducted to image targets arranged in the FOV and measure the positions of noise sources at Uchiura Bay in November 10–14, 2014. For front light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were greater than those in other directions owing to the dominant target scatterings. Reversely, for back light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were lower than those in other directions owing to the dominant direct noises such as “silhouette”.

  8. Acoustic effects of single electrostatic discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Łukasz

    2015-10-01

    Electric discharges, depending on their character, can emit different types of energy, resulting in different effects. Single electrostatic discharges besides generation of electromagnetic pulses are also the source of N acoustic waves. Their specified parameters depending on amount of discharging charge enable determination of value of released charge in a function of acoustic descriptor (e.g. acoustic pressure). Presented approach is the basics of acoustic method for measurement of single electrostatic discharges, enabling direct and contactless measurement of value of charge released during ESD. Method for measurement of acoustic effect of impact of a single electrostatic discharge on the environment in a form of pressure shock wave and examples of acoustic descriptors in a form of equation Q=f(pa) are described. The properties of measuring system as well as the results of regression static analyses used to determine the described relationships are analysed in details.

  9. Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Device in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2010 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Christa M.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2012-09-10

    In 2010, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) conducted a compliance monitoring study—the Lower Columbia River Acoustic Transmitter Investigations of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics 2010 (Carlson et al. in preparation)—for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District. The purpose of the compliance study was to evaluate juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) passage routes and survival through the lower three Columbia River hydroelectric facilities as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp; NOAA Fisheries 2008) and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords; 3 Treaty Tribes and Action Agencies 2008).

  10. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  11. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  13. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the activities during the fifth six month period of the investigation of acoustic propagation in the atmosphere with a realistic temperature profile. Progress has been achieved in two major directions: comparisons between the lapse model and experimental data taken by NASA during the second tower experiment, and development of a model propagation in an inversion. Data from the second tower experiment became available near the end of 1984 and some comparisons have been carried out, but this work is not complete. Problems with the temperature profiler during the experiment have produced temperature profiles that are difficult to fit the assumed variation of temperature with height, but in cases where reasonable fits have been obtained agreement between the model and the experiments are close. The major weaknesses in the model appear to be the presence of discontinuities in some regions, the low sound levels predicted near the source height, and difficulties with the argument of the Hankel function being outside the allowable range. Work on the inversion model has progressed slowly, and the rays for that case are discussed along with a simple energy conservation model of sound level enhancement in the inversion case.

  14. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation. PMID:26827343

  16. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  17. Acoustical coupling of lizard eardrums.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2008-12-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct and indirect sound components on the eardrum. The ensuing pressure-difference characteristics generate the highest directionality of any similar-sized terrestrial vertebrate ear. The aim of the present study was to measure the gain of the direct and indirect sound components in three lizard species: Anolis sagrei and Basiliscus vittatus (iguanids) and Hemidactylus frenatus (gekkonid) by laser vibrometry, using either free-field sound or a headphone and coupler for stimulation. The directivity of the ear of these lizards is pronounced in the frequency range from 2 to 5 kHz. The directivity is ovoidal, asymmetrical across the midline, but largely symmetrical across the interaural axis (i.e., front-back). Occlusion of the contralateral ear abolishes the directionality. We stimulated the two eardrums with a coupler close to the eardrum to measure the gain of the sound pathways. Within the frequency range of maximal directionality, the interaural transmission gain (compared to sound arriving directly) is close to or even exceeds unity, indicating a pronounced acoustical transparency of the lizard head and resonances in the interaural cavities. Our results show that the directionality of the lizard ear is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit. PMID:18648878

  18. Acoustical Coupling of Lizard Eardrums

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct and indirect sound components on the eardrum. The ensuing pressure-difference characteristics generate the highest directionality of any similar-sized terrestrial vertebrate ear. The aim of the present study was to measure the gain of the direct and indirect sound components in three lizard species: Anolis sagrei and Basiliscus vittatus (iguanids) and Hemidactylus frenatus (gekkonid) by laser vibrometry, using either free-field sound or a headphone and coupler for stimulation. The directivity of the ear of these lizards is pronounced in the frequency range from 2 to 5 kHz. The directivity is ovoidal, asymmetrical across the midline, but largely symmetrical across the interaural axis (i.e., front–back). Occlusion of the contralateral ear abolishes the directionality. We stimulated the two eardrums with a coupler close to the eardrum to measure the gain of the sound pathways. Within the frequency range of maximal directionality, the interaural transmission gain (compared to sound arriving directly) is close to or even exceeds unity, indicating a pronounced acoustical transparency of the lizard head and resonances in the interaural cavities. Our results show that the directionality of the lizard ear is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit. PMID:18648878

  19. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-01

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM.

  20. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM. PMID:27472113

  1. Observation of vertcal CO2 concentration profiles in the lower-atmosphere using a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial profile and their variation in time is one of the essential informations for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moewover, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, the CO2 concentration measurement techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in the lower atmosphere. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and the 25 cm telescope. We have succeeded in observing the daytime temporal change of vertical CO2 concentration profiles for the range from 0.25 to 2.5 km with integration time of 30 minutes and range resolution of 300 m. This compact direct detection CO2 DIAL is usefull for the estimation of CO2 flux. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  2. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  4. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  5. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  6. Misinterpretation of lateral acoustic variations on high-resolution seismic reflection profiles as fault offsets of Holocene bay mud beneath the southern part of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marlow, M. S.; Hart, P.E.; Carlson, P.R.; Childs, J. R.; Mann, D. M.; Anima, R.J.; Kayen, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We collected high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in the southern part of San Francisco Bay in 1992 and 1993 to investigate possible Holocene faulting along postulated transbay bedrock fault zones. The initial analog records show apparent offsets of reflection packages along sharp vertical boundaries. These records were originally interpreted as showing a complex series of faults along closely spaced, sharp vertical boundaries in the upper 10 m (0.013 s two-way travel time) of Holocene bay mud. A subsequent survey in 1994 was run with a different seismic reflection system, which utilized a higher power source. This second system generated records with deeper penetration (max. 20 m, 0.026 s two-way travel time) and demonstrated that the reflections originally interpreted as fault offsets by faulting were actually laterally continuous reflection horizons. The pitfall in the original interpretations was caused by lateral variations in the amplitude brightness of reflection events, coupled with a long (greater than 15 ms) source signature of the low-power system. These effects combined to show apparent offsets of reflection packages along sharp vertical boundaries. These boundaries, as shown by the second system, in fact occur where the reflection amplitude diminishes abruptly on laterally continuous reflection events. This striking lateral variation in reflection amplitude is attributable to the localized presence of biogenic(?) gas.

  7. Mitigation of two-plasmon decay in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion through the manipulation of ion-acoustic and Langmuir wave damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, J. F.; Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.; Zhang, J.; Short, R. W.; Maximov, A. V.

    2013-05-01

    The extended Zakharov model of the two-plasmon decay instability in an inhomogeneous plasma [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3983 (1995); D. A. Russell and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 428 (2001)] is further generalized to include the evolution of the electron distribution function in the quasi-linear approximation [cf., e.g., K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al. Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000); D. A. Russell et al., paper presented at the Workshop on SRS/SBS Saturation, Wente Vineyards, Livermore, CA, 2-5 April 2002]. This makes it possible to investigate anomalous absorption of laser light and hot electron production due to the two-plasmon decay instability of multiple overlapping electromagnetic waves. Scalings of hot-electron production in the (stationary) nonlinearly saturated regime relevant to recent experiments [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 012704 (2012); D. H. Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165003 (2012)] have been obtained. They indicate a sensitivity to ion-acoustic wave (IAW) damping and to the collisional absorption of Langmuir waves. Such a sensitivity might be exploited in inertial confinement fusion target design by the use of mid-Z ablators.

  8. Mitigation of two-plasmon decay in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion through the manipulation of ion-acoustic and Langmuir wave damping

    SciTech Connect

    Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Maximov, A. V.; Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.; Zhang, J.

    2013-05-15

    The extended Zakharov model of the two-plasmon decay instability in an inhomogeneous plasma [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3983 (1995); D. A. Russell and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 428 (2001)] is further generalized to include the evolution of the electron distribution function in the quasi-linear approximation [cf., e.g., K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al. Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000); D. A. Russell et al., paper presented at the Workshop on SRS/SBS Saturation, Wente Vineyards, Livermore, CA, 2–5 April 2002]. This makes it possible to investigate anomalous absorption of laser light and hot electron production due to the two-plasmon decay instability of multiple overlapping electromagnetic waves. Scalings of hot-electron production in the (stationary) nonlinearly saturated regime relevant to recent experiments [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 012704 (2012); D. H. Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165003 (2012)] have been obtained. They indicate a sensitivity to ion-acoustic wave (IAW) damping and to the collisional absorption of Langmuir waves. Such a sensitivity might be exploited in inertial confinement fusion target design by the use of mid-Z ablators.

  9. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  10. A Decade of Ocean Acoustic Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, G. L.

    2002-12-01

    Studies of the properties of low frequency acoustic fields in the ocean continue to benefit from the use of manned, stable offshore platforms such as R/P FLIP. A major benefit is providing the at-sea stability required for deployment of extremely large aperture line arrays, line arrays composed of both acoustic motion and acoustic pressure sensors, and arrays that provide measurements in all 3 spatial dimensions. In addition, FLIP provides a high-profile (25 m) observation post with 360 deg coverage for simultaneous visual observations of marine mammals. A few examples of the scientific results that have been achieved over this past decade with ocean acoustic data collected on FLIP are presented. These results include the normal mode decomposition of earthquake T phases to study their generation and water/land coupling characteristics using a 3000 m vertical aperture hydrophone array, simultaneous vertical and horizontal directional information on the underwater sound field from line arrays of hydrophones and geophones, the strange nightime chorusing behavior of fish measured by 3D array aperture, the mirage effect caused by bathymetry changes in inversions for source location in shallow water, and the diving behavior of blue whales determined from 1D recordings of their vocalizations. Presently, FLIP serves as the central data recording platform in ocean acoustic studies using AUV's.

  11. Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutor, Malinda; Cowles, Timothy J.; Peterson, William T.; Lamb, Jesse

    2005-10-01

    An analysis was conducted of the strengths and limitations of acoustic methods to determine biomass and taxonomic distribution patterns over the Oregon continental shelf. Measurements of volume backscatter from two different acoustic instruments were compared with each other and with predicted volume backscatter calculated from a coincident net tow. Spatially and temporally coincident data were collected from a six-frequency bioacoustic system (Tracor Acoustic Profiling System (TAPS)) and from a 1 m2 Multiple Opening Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). The combined net/acoustic tows were conducted over the Oregon continental shelf in August 2001, during both day and night. The TAPS was mounted on the upper frame of the MOCNESS and ensonified a volume of water directly in front of the net mouth. A four-frequency echosounder (Hydroacoustic Technologies Inc. (HTI)) with downward looking transducers was towed off the port side of the ship during the MOCNESS/TAPS tows. Fine-scale vertical distributions of zooplankton that were resolved acoustically were not apparent within the integrated depth strata of the individual MOCNESS net samples. The taxonomic and size composition of the zooplankton community had strong effects on volume backscatter (SV), although the magnitude of SV was not linearly related to zooplankton biomass. Predicted SV calculated from scattering models and the contents of the MOCNESS nets agreed best (sometimes within 5 dB) with measured SV from the TAPS at 420 and 700 kHz and measured SV at 420 kHz from the HTI.

  12. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solution have been considered the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point force where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  13. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  14. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  15. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  16. First images of thunder: Acoustic imaging of triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N. D.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trevino, J.; Ramaekers, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    An acoustic camera comprising a linear microphone array is used to image the thunder signature of triggered lightning. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, FL, during the summer of 2014. The array was positioned in an end-fire orientation thus enabling the peak acoustic reception pattern to be steered vertically with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution. On 14 July 2014, a lightning event with nine return strokes was successfully triggered. We present the first acoustic images of individual return strokes at high frequencies (>1 kHz) and compare the acoustically inferred profile with optical images. We find (i) a strong correlation between the return stroke peak current and the radiated acoustic pressure and (ii) an acoustic signature from an M component current pulse with an unusual fast rise time. These results show that acoustic imaging enables clear identification and quantification of thunder sources as a function of lightning channel altitude.

  17. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  18. A direct dynamical measurement of the Milky Way's disk surface density profile, disk scale length, and dark matter profile at 4 kpc ≲ R ≲ 9 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-12-20

    We present and apply rigorous dynamical modeling with which we infer unprecedented constraints on the stellar and dark matter mass distribution within our Milky Way (MW), based on large sets of phase-space data on individual stars. Specifically, we model the dynamics of 16,269 G-type dwarfs from SEGUE, which sample 5 kpc < R{sub GC} < 12 kpc and 0.3 kpc ≲ |Z| ≲ 3 kpc. We independently fit a parameterized MW potential and a three-integral, action-based distribution function (DF) to the phase-space data of 43 separate abundance-selected sub-populations (MAPs), accounting for the complex selection effects affecting the data. We robustly measure the total surface density within 1.1 kpc of the mid-plane to 5% over 4.5 kpc < R{sub GC} < 9 kpc. Using metal-poor MAPs with small radial scale lengths as dynamical tracers probes 4.5 kpc ≲ R{sub GC} ≲ 7 kpc, while MAPs with longer radial scale lengths sample 7 kpc ≲ R{sub GC} ≲ 9 kpc. We measure the mass-weighted Galactic disk scale length to be R{sub d} = 2.15 ± 0.14 kpc, in agreement with the photometrically inferred spatial distribution of stellar mass. We thereby measure dynamically the mass of the Galactic stellar disk to unprecedented accuracy: M {sub *} = 4.6 ± 0.3 + 3.0 (R {sub 0}/ kpc – 8) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and a total local surface density of Σ{sub R{sub 0}}(Z=1.1 kpc)=68 ± 4 M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} of which 38 ± 4 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} is contributed by stars and stellar remnants. By combining our surface density measurements with the terminal velocity curve, we find that the MW's disk is maximal in the sense that V {sub c,} {sub disk}/V {sub c,} {sub total} = 0.83 ± 0.04 at R = 2.2 R{sub d} . We also constrain for the first time the radial profile of the dark halo at such small Galactocentric radii, finding that ρ{sub DM}(r; ≈R {sub 0})∝1/r {sup α} with α < 1.53 at 95% confidence. Our results show that action-based DF modeling of complex stellar data sets is now a feasible

  19. The Chirp - High Resolution, Quantitative Subbottom Profiler.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Steven Gregory

    The chirp sonar is a quantitative subbottom profiler that can generate wide dynamic range, artifact-free seismograms in real time. These high quality seismograms, can be used for quantitative analyses, such as reflectivity and attenuation measurements, and sediment classification. Key features of the chirp sonar include (1) a computer-generated FM pilot signal with a large time-bandwidth product that contains amplitude and phase compensation providing exact control of the transmitted acoustic pulse (2) directional arrays with low backlobe levels and (3) a towed vehicle designed to scatter bottom multiples. Subbottom profiles, acquired in Narragansett Bay, R.I., demonstrated 20 cm vertical resolution, 62 meter subbottom penetration and significant bottom multiple reduction. A new time domain technique for estimating acoustic attenuation, called the autocorrelation method, is described and compared to well known attenuation measurement techniques. The spectral ratio method is most accurate, followed by the autocorrelation and wavelet matching methods for estimating the acoustic attenuation coefficient of sediments from reflection profiles. However, the autocorrelation method is the only technique efficient enough to provide an attenuation measurement for every depth increment in each acoustic return in real time. Multiple reflections, gradual impedance changes and windowing sidelobes degrade the attenuation estimates. Chirp sonar remote measurements off Hope Island were used to estimate the attenuation coefficient for clayey silts (0.091 dB/m/kHz by spectral ratio and 0.125 dB/m/kHz by autocorrelation), values which agree with in situ measurements made by Hamilton, but are significantly higher than the attenuation coefficient (0.019 dB/m/kHz, n = 1.50) calculated from laboratory measurements (250-750 kHz) on a core from the Hope Island site. More ground truth measurements are required to establish the accuracy of remote attenuation measurements using the chirp sonar.

  20. Separation of Yeast Cells from MS2 Viruses Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K A; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27

    conditions for comparison. The surface plot in Figure 2 illustrates the two-dimensional pressure field orthogonal to the flow direction (x-direction) from the simulation. The superimposed vector plot shows the acoustic radiation force in this plane. The dark regions and the light regions respectively represent the nodes and anti-nodes of the acoustic pressure field. The corresponding force field predicts acoustic focusing at the center of the microchannel, which is confirmed by the experimental results shown in Figure 1. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (typical cell size of 4-6 {micro}m depending on the cell growth stage, measured using a Coulter counter) and MS2 bacteriophage (typical diameter {approx}30 nm [5]) using acoustic focusing (Figure 3). A mixture of S. cerevisiae and MS2 labeled with Ribogreen was prepared and injected into one inlet of the microchip (i.e., half of the microchannel was filled with the sample). We varied driving voltages from 1.96 to 4.76 V, while fixing the driving frequency at 1.459 MHz and flow rate at 20 {micro}l/min. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. Increased driving voltages enhanced the acoustic focusing of the yeast cells thereby achieving good separation. We are able to achieve yields of > 80% and sample purities of > 90% in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  1. Direct high-resolution ion beam-profile imaging using a position-sensitive Faraday cup array

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2009-11-15

    Ion sources have wide-spread use in a multitude of applications. For many, an accurate knowledge, or better, an accurate imaging, of the beam profile and intensity is an important criterion. We are developing an ion source to calibrate instruments for space-based measurements of solar wind and suprathermal particles in the energy range from below 1 keV/nuc to above 200 keV/nuc. In order to establish accurate beam profiles for calibration purposes, we have developed a new method based on an array of very small (diameter = 0.3 mm) Faraday cups. Here, we describe the experimental setup and discuss how to achieve several requirements such as a large thermal load due to the {approx}40W of beam power.

  2. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  4. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology.

    PubMed

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero(®) anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  5. My 65 years in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  6. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akoto, Lawrence; Vreuls, René J J; Irth, Hubertus; Pel, Roel; Stellaard, Frans

    2008-04-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal desorption (DTD) interface was used to profile the fatty acid composition of human plasma and whole human blood of eight volunteers in a procedure omitting the usual lipid extraction steps that precede sample methylation in the traditional (off-line) protocols. Trimethylsulfonium hydroxide (TMSH) was used as reagent for thermally assisted methylation. In a fully automated manner, the liner of the GC injector is used as a sample-and-reaction container with the aid of the DTD interface. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles obtained using this novel approach, were very identical to those obtained when the traditional off-line protocol was applied. FAME yields obtained in the at-line DTD method were found to be very similar for saturated fatty acids, but significantly higher for polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to off-line yields. As a result of the contribution of circulating cell membranes in blood, substantial differences were observed when the amount of FAMEs obtained in whole human blood and human plasma samples were compared after their analysis. Thanks to the fully automated operation of this novel procedure, large series of analyses can easily be performed. PMID:17889883

  7. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transgenic plant and somaclone production through direct and indirect regeneration from leaves in Stevia rebaudiana with their glycoside profile.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Ur Rahman, Laiq; Shanker, Karuna; Singh, Manju

    2014-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (EHA-105 harboring pCAMBIA 1304)-mediated transgenic plant production via direct regeneration from leaf and elite somaclones generation through indirect regeneration in Stevia rebaudiana is reported. Optimum direct regeneration frequency along with highest transformation frequency was found on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 1 mg/l NAA, while indirect regeneration from callus was obtained on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 2 mg/l NAA. Successful transfer of GUS-positive (GUS assay and PCR-based confirmation) transgenic as well as four somaclones up to glasshouse acclimatization has been achieved. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) profiling of transgenic and somaclonal plants showed a total of 113 bands, out of which 49 were monomorphic (43.36 %) and 64 were polymorphic (56.64 %). Transgenic plant was found to be closer to mother plant, while on the basis of steviol, stevioside, and rebaudioside A profile, somaclone S2 was found to be the best and showed maximum variability in ISSR profiling. PMID:24154495

  9. Zooplankton size and distribution within mesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel: A comparative approach using the TAPS acoustic profiler, a multiple net sampler and ZooScan image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Huggett, J.; Ockhuis, S.; Roudaut, G.; Josse, E.; Verheye, H.

    2014-02-01

    Two surveys were conducted in the Mozambique Channel in November 2009 and April/May 2010 to study the influence of mesoscale eddies on the zooplanktonic component of the ecosystem. Three complementary methods were used to sample zooplankton: (1) hydro-acoustics with a TAPS™ multi-frequency zooplankton profiler; (2) in situ biological sampling using a Multinet with samples processed via the classical settled biovolume technique; (3) ZooScan image analysis which determines biovolume, size and taxonomic composition. This approach presented an ideal opportunity to compare the results of these different methods which highlighted a large overlap in their detectable size range. Each method favoured a particular size fraction of the population, i.e. TAPS for the microzooplankton (<0.1 mm ESR) and the Multinet and ZooScan for larger sizes (>3 mm ESR). In the case of the 2009 cruise, a well-established cyclone-anticyclone dipole was sampled, with results clearly indicating a higher concentration of zooplankton in the cyclonic eddy compared to the anticyclonic counterpart. The TAPS also detected high surface (0-22 m) concentrations of what appeared to be microzooplankton or marine snow in the cyclone. In 2010, the eddy field was less defined and more spatially variable compared to that in 2009. Two cyclonic and anticyclonic features were sampled during the cruise, each with different life histories and levels of stability. Results were inconsistent compared to those of 2009 and dependent on the size component of the population, with both cyclonic and anticyclonic features capable of having higher planktonic biomass. Differences in species composition between these mesoscale features were not too different and mainly a matter of relative biovolume. Less well formed eddy fields, particularly in the mid-Mozambique Channel, therefore appear to result in indistinct vertical and horizontal zooplankton distribution patterns.

  10. A Direct Detection 1.6μm DIAL with Three Wavelengths for Measurements of Vertical CO2 Concentration and Temperature Profiles in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagai, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report the new 1.6 μm DIAL system that can measure the temperature profiles with the CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere because of improvement of measurement accuracy of the CO2 density and mixing ratio (ppm). We have developed a direct detection 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to perform range-resolved measurements of vertical CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere [Sakaizawa et al. 2009]. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode and the telescope with larger aperture than that of the coherent detection method. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line is transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature profiles. Moreover, a few retrieval algorithms of CO2-DIAL are also performed for improvement of measurement accuracy. The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes [Stephens et al. 2007]. In comparison with the ground-based monitoring network, CO2 measurements for vertical profiles in the troposphere have been limited to campaign-style aircraft and commercial airline observations with the limited spatial and temporal coverage. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References Sakaizawa, D., C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and photon-counting detector for the vertical

  11. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea. PMID:25392033

  12. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea. PMID:25392033

  13. Viscous flow drag reduction by acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Robert T.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break up (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. Acoustic waves are generated in response to the incident large scale eddies and directed at the blade trailing edge through the test surface floor below the manipulator blade. The acoustic input is phase locked to the incident flow. Control of the acoustic input apparently allows enhancement of the large eddy cancellation process leading to a decrease of skin friction coefficient. Control of this process with acoustic excitation indicates that vortex unwinding is the mechanism for large eddy destruction in the boundary layer. A deeper understanding of this phenomena could lead to better drag reduction technology and further understanding of the physics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. Analysis of the ozone profile specifications in the WRF-ARW model and their impact on the simulation of direct solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montornès, A.; Codina, B.; Zack, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Although ozone is an atmospheric gas with high spatial and temporal variability, mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models simplify the specification of ozone concentrations used in their shortwave schemes by using a few ozone profiles. In this paper, a two-part study is presented: (i) an evaluation of the quality of the ozone profiles provided for use with the shortwave schemes in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model and (ii) an assessment of the impact of deficiencies in those profiles on the performance of model simulations of direct solar radiation. The first part compares simplified data sets used to specify the total ozone column in six schemes (i.e., Goddard, New Goddard, RRTMG, CAM, GFDL and Fu-Liou-Gu) with the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis data set during the period 1979-2008 examining the latitudinal, longitudinal and seasonal limitations in the ozone profile specifications of each parameterization. The results indicate that the maximum deviations are over the poles and show prominent longitudinal patterns in the departures due to the lack of representation of the patterns associated with the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the quasi-stationary features forced by the land-sea distribution, respectively. In the second part, the bias in the simulated direct solar radiation due to these deviations from the simplified spatial and temporal representation of the ozone distribution is analyzed for the New Goddard and CAM schemes using the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law and for the GFDL using empirical equations. For radiative applications those simplifications introduce spatial and temporal biases with near-zero departures over the tropics throughout the year and increasing poleward with a maximum in the high middle latitudes during the winter of each hemisphere.

  16. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  17. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  18. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    PubMed

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured. PMID:25769144

  19. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  20. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  1. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  2. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  3. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  4. Broadband acoustic quantification of stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Andone C; Geyer, W Rockwell; Scully, Malcolm E

    2013-07-01

    High-frequency broadband acoustic scattering techniques have enabled the remote, high-resolution imaging and quantification of highly salt-stratified turbulence in an estuary. Turbulent salinity spectra in the stratified shear layer have been measured acoustically and by in situ turbulence sensors. The acoustic frequencies used span 120-600 kHz, which, for the highly stratified and dynamic estuarine environment, correspond to wavenumbers in the viscous-convective subrange (500-2500 m(-1)). The acoustically measured spectral levels are in close agreement with spectral levels measured with closely co-located micro-conductivity probes. The acoustically measured spectral shapes allow discrimination between scattering dominated by turbulent salinity microstructure and suspended sediments or swim-bladdered fish, the two primary sources of scattering observed in the estuary in addition to turbulent salinity microstructure. The direct comparison of salinity spectra inferred acoustically and by the in situ turbulence sensors provides a test of both the acoustic scattering model and the quantitative skill of acoustical remote sensing of turbulence dissipation in a strongly sheared and salt-stratified estuary. PMID:23862783

  5. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  6. Comments on computational underwater acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.

    1993-04-01

    Two fundamental facts control the choice of computational methods in underwater acoustics. One is that over most of the ocean the sound speed varies much more rapidly with depth than in the horizontal directions. The other is that upon going down from the surface, the sound speed usually decreases to a minimum and then increases from there to the bottom. These properties of the medium imply that the ocean often acts as a waveguide, with energy trapped in a depth-band about the sound-speed minimum. One consequence of these facts is that approximation by normal modes is valid over large regions of the ocean, particularly if correction is made for the slow variation of the modes caused by variation in bottom depth and horizontal variation in sound speed. In portions of the ocean where approximation by normal modes is not valid, we may still often use a paraxial approximation. Paraxial approximations may be used when the wave motion is primarily in a single direction, with slow variation of the signal in directions tangent to the wave front. They are often called ``parabolic`` equations in ocean acoustics, but the term ``paraxial`` is standard in other branches of physics, inducting optics and seismology. Finite-difference approximations are also sometimes used in underwater acoustics, but they are much more computationally intensive than normal modes or paraxial approximations. Finite differences are therefore ordinarily used only where these other methods are not valid, such as in shallow water with rapidly varying depth. One could also use finite elements in these instances, but for acoustics problems finite elements are a special class of finite-difference methods. We discuss finite differences only briefly in this report, because they are not generally used in long-range acoustics.

  7. Comments on computational underwater acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.

    1993-04-01

    Two fundamental facts control the choice of computational methods in underwater acoustics. One is that over most of the ocean the sound speed varies much more rapidly with depth than in the horizontal directions. The other is that upon going down from the surface, the sound speed usually decreases to a minimum and then increases from there to the bottom. These properties of the medium imply that the ocean often acts as a waveguide, with energy trapped in a depth-band about the sound-speed minimum. One consequence of these facts is that approximation by normal modes is valid over large regions of the ocean, particularly if correction is made for the slow variation of the modes caused by variation in bottom depth and horizontal variation in sound speed. In portions of the ocean where approximation by normal modes is not valid, we may still often use a paraxial approximation. Paraxial approximations may be used when the wave motion is primarily in a single direction, with slow variation of the signal in directions tangent to the wave front. They are often called parabolic'' equations in ocean acoustics, but the term paraxial'' is standard in other branches of physics, inducting optics and seismology. Finite-difference approximations are also sometimes used in underwater acoustics, but they are much more computationally intensive than normal modes or paraxial approximations. Finite differences are therefore ordinarily used only where these other methods are not valid, such as in shallow water with rapidly varying depth. One could also use finite elements in these instances, but for acoustics problems finite elements are a special class of finite-difference methods. We discuss finite differences only briefly in this report, because they are not generally used in long-range acoustics.

  8. Structure of basement and its N-S direction transformation in Qiangtang basin:discovered by a long seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Gao, R.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.; Deng, G.

    2011-12-01

    Qiangtang basin is located between the Bangong suture and the Jinsha suture. It is very hard to do geophysical work because of most difficult condition. There have been a number of attempts to probe the deep structure of both the suture and its flanking terranes with refraction and teleseismic (e.g. receiver function) methods. Here we report the upper crustal results of the first multichannel seismic reflection profile across this critical region acquired by SinoProbe-02 from October 2009 to May 2010. The SINOPROBE 310 km profile starts west of Silin Co in the northern Lhasa block, crosses the Bangong-Nujiang suture west of Lunpola, skirts the eastern extension of the central Qiantang anticline and ends at Dogai Coring just of south of Jinsha suture. In the southern part of the profile, small shots of 50kg explosive placed at 30m depth were placed at 250m spacing, augmented by larger shots of 200kg t 50m depth spaced every 1km. In addition, large shots of 1000kg were placed every 50km. In the middle and north part, only 200 kg shots at 500m spacing along with the big shots. A linear array of receivers was used with a group interval of 50 m. The data was acquired by Sercel 408 XL using 720 channels. For discovering clear upper crustal structure, we use Sinoprobe data and Oil company data together in data process. The oil company data were acquired with small shots of 8kg t 12m depth spaced every 80m and recorded in 6s TWT in 1990s. We build new geometry to joint profiles, Tomo statics, multi-zone denoising , predictive deconvolution, velolcity analysis and NMO, prestack time migration in data process. By collecting and reprocessing current reflection seismic profiles, we get a long profile across the Qiangtang basin at S-N direction. Profile shows: there are probably precambrian crystal basement in Qiangtang basin. The depth of the basement is changeable, it is deeper in South Qiangtang basin and shallower in North Qiangtang basin. Shallow crustal deformations

  9. Influence of a forest edge on acoustical propagation: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Michelle E; White, Michael J; Guertin, Patrick J; Albert, Donald G; Tunick, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic propagation through a forest edge can produce complicated pressure time histories because of scattering from the trees and changes in the microclimate and ground parameters of the two regions. To better understand these effects, a field experiment was conducted to measure low-frequency acoustic pulses propagating in an open field, a forest, and passing through a forest edge in both directions. Waveforms measured in the open field were simple impulses with very low scattering, whereas waveforms at the edge and within the forest had stronger reverberations after the direct arrival. The direct wave pulse shapes increased in duration in accordance with the path length in the forest, which had an effective flow resistivity 12 to 13 that of the grassy open field. The measurements exhibit different rates of attenuation in the two regions, with relatively lower attenuation in the open field than higher rates in the forest. Decay of SEL transmitted into the forest was 4 dB more per tenfold distance than for outbound transmission. Stronger attenuation in the 1-2 kHz range occurs when propagating into the forest. While the measured meteorological profiles revealed three distinct microclimates, meteorological effects are not sufficient to explain the apparent non-reciprocal propagation. PMID:23654365

  10. Upper ocean carbon cycling inferred from direct pH observations made by profiling floats and estimated alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J. N.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.; Sakamoto, C.; Riser, S.

    2015-12-01

    The annual cycle of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key tracer of net community production and carbon export in the upper ocean. In particular, the DIC concentration is much less sensitive to air-sea gas exchange, when compared to oxygen, another key tracer of upper ocean metabolism. However, the annual DIC cycle is observed with a seasonal resolution at only a few time-series stations in the open ocean. Here, we consider the annual carbon cycle that has been observed using profiling floats equipped with pH sensors. Deep-Sea DuraFET pH sensors have been deployed on profiling floats for over three years and they can provide temporal and spatial resolution of 5 to 10 days and 5 to 10 m in the upper ocean over multi-year periods. In addition to pH, a second carbon system parameter is required to compute DIC. Total alkalinity can be derived from the float observations of temperature, salinity and oxygen using equations in these variables that are fitted to shipboard observations of alkalinity obtained in the global repeat hydrography programs (e.g., Juranek et al., GRL, doi:10.1029/2011GL048580, 2011), as the relationships should be stable in time in the open ocean. Profiling floats with pH have been deployed from Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) cruises since late 2012 and an array of floats with pH have been deployed since early 2014 in the Southern Ocean as part of the SOCCOM program. The SOCCOM array should grow to nearly 200 floats over the next 5 years. The sensor data was quality controlled and adjusted by comparing observations at 1500 m depth to the deep climatology of pH (derived from DIC and alkalinity) computed with the GLODAP data set. After adjustment, the surface DIC concentrations were calculated from pH and alkalinity. This yields a data set that is used to examine annual net community production in the oligotrophic North Pacific and in the South Pacific near 150 West from 40 South to 65 South.

  11. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  12. More than Money: We Profile Three Corporate Foundations Bringing Technology-Based Programs Directly to Schools' Doorsteps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Philanthropy provides billions of dollars to schools and educational programs each year. Much of this cash comes from corporate America, who views contributing to education as an important way to give back to the community. While many companies support education directly via equipment, money grants, and professional development, other companies…

  13. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  14. Analysis of Acoustic Wave and Current Data Offshore of Mytle Beach, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, K. A.; Wren, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two bottom boundary layer (BBL) instrument frames have been deployed on the shoreface and inner-shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina offshore of Myrtle Beach as part of a South Carolina Sea Grant funded project to measure sediment transport over two hardbottom habitats. The inshore instrument frame is located on an extensive hardbottom surface 850 meters offshore. The second instrumented frame is secured to a hardbottom surface on the inner-shelf at a distance of approximately 2.5 km offshore. The nearshore BBL observing system is composed of a downward-looking RDI/ Teledyne 1200 kHz Pulse-Coherent Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, an upward-looking Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler (AWAC), and an Aquatec Acoustic Backscatter Sensor. As part of this larger study, the wave and current data from the AWAC have been analyzed. Long-term continuous time series data include wave height, wave period, directional wave spectra, and the magnitude and direction of currents in the water column. Within the data set are several wave events, including several frontal passages and Tropical Storm Hanna which hit the Myrtle Beach area in early September. Wave data have been correlated with meteorological data, and a comparison of shoreface wave characteristics during each type of event are presented.

  15. Weather observations through oceanic acoustic noise recorded by gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchy, Pierre; Testor, Pierre; Guinet, Christophe; Gervaise, Cedric; Di Oro, Lucia; Ioana, Cornel; Mortier, Laurent; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Beguery, Laurent; Klein, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Offshore estimates of the meteorological parameters are unfortunately spurious when considering in-situ observtions only due to obvious observational limitations while their use would allow to calibrate satellite observations and to have better weather forecasts, if assimilated in numerical weather forecasting systems. The WOTAN (Weather Observations through Acoustic Noise) approach may be used to fill these gaps if coupled to the Global Ocean Observing Sytem which has now a global coverage thanks to many autonomous observing platforms. In this study we show first results from acoustic records collected by gliders deployed in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea in the framework of MOOSE. We show that using 3 descriptors at 5kHz, 8kHz, and 20kHz allows to extract the intensity of the wind and the precipitation when the glider is at depth. This approach based on the method presented by Barry & Nuysten (2004) is compared with meterological data from coastal weather stations and the offshore meteorological buoys from Meteo-France. We also show that there is a vane effect with the tail of the glider while at surface which allows to estimate the direction of the wind every so often. These observations coupled with the in-situ profiles on temperature and salinity profiles can allow to better study air-sea interactions.

  16. Acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method of creating acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array. The boundary of the arc-shaped area is treated as the envelope of the tangent lines that can be formed by manipulating the phase profile of the loudspeakers in the array. When compared with the existing acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method is able to generate sound field inside an arc-shaped area and achieve a trade-off between acoustic uniformity and acoustic contrast. The acoustic contrast created by the proposed method increases while the acoustic uniformity decreases with frequency. PMID:25698035

  17. Analyzing Acoustic Interactions in Natural Bullfrog Choruses

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Simmons, James A.; Bates, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of acoustic interactions between animals in active choruses is complex because of the large numbers of individuals present, their high calling rates, and the considerable numbers of vocalizations that either overlap or show close temporal alternation. The authors describe a methodology for recording chorus activity in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) using multiple, closely-spaced acoustic sensors that provide simultaneous estimates of sound direction and sound characteristics. This method provides estimates of location of individual callers, even under conditions of call overlap. This is a useful technique for understanding the complexity of the acoustic scene faced by animals vocalizing in groups. PMID:18729655

  18. At-line gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of fatty acid profiles of green microalgae using a direct thermal desorption interface.

    PubMed

    Blokker, Peter; Pel, Roel; Akoto, Lawrence; Brinkman, Udo A Th; Vreuls, René J J

    2002-06-14

    Thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation-gas chromatography (THM-GC) is an important tool to analyse fatty acid in complex matrices. Since THM-GC has major drawbacks such as isomerisation when applied to fatty acids in natural matrices, a direct thermal desorption (DTD) interface and an incubation time of 30 min were used to circumvent these problems. Using vegetable oils such as sunflower oil and triarachidonin, the conversion of triglycerides into their fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) was investigated. The yields using a DTD (and trimethylsulfonium hydroxide as a reagent) were found to be similar or even higher than when applying a conventional off-line method, while the FAME profiles were identical. When the procedure was applied to analyse the FAME profiles of microbial cells in a methanolic or aqueous suspension, it was found that accurate profiles are obtained for such samples. Thus, the present approach opens the route to analyse fatty acids in microbial cells in a fully automated fashion, which will allow high sample throughput. PMID:12141545

  19. A comparison of the fixed bin method with the floating bin and direct count methods: effect of VNTR profile frequency estimation and reference population.

    PubMed

    Monson, K L; Budowle, B

    1993-09-01

    When the results of a forensic comparison of highly polymorphic variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci fail to exclude a suspect as a possible contributor of biological evidence, it is desirable to convey to the trier of fact the significance of the match. Furthermore, in a forensic context, it is desirable that the estimated frequency of occurrence be conservative, that is, that any uncertainty in the estimate will favor the accused. Using an empirical approach with a data base of 2046 individuals belonging to one of four population groups, this study examined the effect of the method used to estimate frequency of occurrence of a VNTR profile from a reference data base, and the consequences of using a data base that may not represent the circumstances of the crime. The fixed bin method was at least as conservative as the floating bin and genotype counting (direct counting) methods. Secondly, for forensic purposes, profile frequency estimates from different reference populations do not deviate greatly. VNTR profiles are rare in any of the data bases. PMID:8228875

  20. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  1. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  2. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hailong; Zhang, Qinghai; Zeng, Jia

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenous Ldlr gene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr(-/-)) by lentiviral gene transfer system. The results showed that the Ldlr gene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers.We found that, although, the content of high density lipoprotein in serum was not significantly affected by the Ldlr gene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reduced by 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjected Ldlr(-/-) mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression of Ldlr significantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver and reduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression of Ldlr gene strikingly lowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:27350674

  3. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  4. Performance testing of a semi-automatic card punch system, using direct STR profiling of DNA from blood samples on FTA™ cards.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Samantha J; Horton, Jeffrey K; Stubbs, Simon L; Tatnell, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The 1.2 mm Electric Coring Tool (e-Core™) was developed to increase the throughput of FTA(™) sample collection cards used during forensic workflows and is similar to a 1.2 mm Harris manual micro-punch for sampling dried blood spots. Direct short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling was used to compare samples taken by the e-Core tool with those taken by the manual micro-punch. The performance of the e-Core device was evaluated using a commercially available PowerPlex™ 18D STR System. In addition, an analysis was performed that investigated the potential carryover of DNA via the e-Core punch from one FTA disc to another. This contamination study was carried out using Applied Biosystems AmpflSTR™ Identifiler™ Direct PCR Amplification kits. The e-Core instrument does not contaminate FTA discs when a cleaning punch is used following excision of discs containing samples and generates STR profiles that are comparable to those generated by the manual micro-punch. PMID:25407399

  5. Analysis of the ozone profile specifications in the WRF-ARW model and their impact on the simulation of direct solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montornès, A.; Codina, B.; Zack, J. W.

    2014-08-01

    Although ozone is an atmospheric gas with high spatial and temporal variability, mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models simplify the specification of ozone concentrations used in their shortwave schemes by using a few ozone profiles. In this paper, a two-part study is presented: (i) an assessment of the quality of the ozone profiles provided for use with the shortwave schemes in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model and (ii) the impact of deficiencies in those profiles on the performance of model simulations of direct solar radiation. The first part compares simplified datasets used to specify the total ozone column in five schemes (i.e. Goddard, New Goddard, RRTMG, CAM and Fu-Liou-Gu) with the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis dataset during the period 1979-2008 examining the latitudinal, longitudinal and seasonal limitations in the ozone modeling of each parameterization. The results indicate that the maximum deviations are over the poles due to the Brewer-Dobson circulation and there are prominent longitudinal patterns in the departures due to quasi-stationary features forced by the land-sea distribution. In the second part, the bias in the simulated direct solar radiation due to these deviations from the simplified spatial and temporal representation of the ozone distribution is analyzed for the New Goddard and CAM schemes using the Beer-Lambert-Bouger law. For radiative applications those simplifications introduce spatial and temporal biases with near-zero departures over the tropics during all the year and increasing poleward with a maximum in the high middle latitudes during the winter of each hemisphere.

  6. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  7. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  8. Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Devices in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2009 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Bryson, Amanda J.

    2012-11-09

    The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of bi-directional knotless tissue-closure devices for use in tagging juvenile salmon. This study is part of an ongoing effort at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to reduce unwanted effects of tags and tagging procedures on the survival and behavior of juvenile salmonids, by assessing and refining suturing techniques, suture materials, and tag burdens. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the knotless (barbed) suture, using three different suture patterns (treatments: 6-point, Wide “N”, Wide “N” Knot), to the current method of suturing (MonocrylTM monofilament, discontinuous sutures with a 2×2×2×2 knot) used in monitoring and research programs with a novel antiseptic barrier on the wound (“Second Skin”).

  9. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  10. Acoustic radiation stress in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation-induced static strains associated with acoustic waves propagating in solids are obtained directly from the virial theorem for an elastic continuum and that the radiation stresses result from combining the virial theorem with the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance. The experimental confirmation of critical theoretical predictions in solids is reported. The implications of the results for the fundamental thermal properties of crystals are addressed.

  11. Acoustic shadows help gleaning bats find prey, but may be defeated by prey acoustic camouflage on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clare, Elizabeth L; Holderied, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual abilities of animals, like echolocating bats, are difficult to study because they challenge our understanding of non-visual senses. We used novel acoustic tomography to convert echoes into visual representations and compare these cues to traditional echo measurements. We provide a new hypothesis for the echo-acoustic basis of prey detection on surfaces. We propose that bats perceive a change in depth profile and an 'acoustic shadow' cast by prey. The shadow is more salient than prey echoes and particularly strong on smooth surfaces. This may explain why bats look for prey on flat surfaces like leaves using scanning behaviour. We propose that rather than forming search images for prey, whose characteristics are unpredictable, predators may look for disruptions to the resting surface (acoustic shadows). The fact that the acoustic shadow is much fainter on rougher resting surfaces provides the first empirical evidence for 'acoustic camouflage' as an anti-predator defence mechanism. PMID:26327624

  12. Maternal depression and the learning-promoting effects of infant-directed speech: Roles of maternal sensitivity, depression diagnosis, and speech acoustic cues.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter S; Danko, Christina M; Cejka, Anna M; Everhart, Kevin D

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis that the associative learning-promoting effects of infant-directed speech (IDS) depend on infants' social experience was tested in a conditioned-attention paradigm with a cumulative sample of 4- to 14-month-old infants. Following six forward pairings of a brief IDS segment and a photographic slide of a smiling female face, infants of clinically depressed mothers exhibited evidence of having acquired significantly weaker voice-face associations than infants of non-depressed mothers. Regression analyses revealed that maternal depression was significantly related to infant learning even after demographic correlates of depression, antidepressant medication use, and extent of pitch modulation in maternal IDS had been taken into account. However, after maternal depression had been accounted for, maternal emotional availability, coded by blind raters from separate play interactions, accounted for significant further increments in the proportion of variance accounted for in infant learning scores. Both maternal depression and maternal insensitivity negatively, and additively, predicted poor learning. PMID:26311468

  13. Laser Acoustic Imaging of Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator (FBAR) Lateral Mode Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-07-01

    A laser acoustic imaging microscope has been developed that measures acoustic motion with high spatial resolution without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates and heterodyne principles are used to allow operation at any frequency from Hz to GHz. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a direct quantitative determination of excited mode wavenumbers at any frequency. Results are presented at frequencies near the first longitudinal thickness mode (~ 900 MHz) demonstrating simultaneous excitation of lateral modes with nonzero wavenumbers in an electrically driven AlN thin film acoustic resonator. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode dispersion relations for the device under test allowing mode identification and a direct measure of specific lateral mode properties. Discussion and analysis of the results are presented in comparison with plate wave modeling of these devices taking account for material anisotropy and multilayer films.

  14. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  15. Investigation of the nature of thermal stimulation of acoustic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Muravin, G.B.; Ship, V.V.; Lezvinskaya, L.M.

    1988-12-01

    The nature of thermal stimulation of acoustic emission was investigated. Data are given on the distribution of the density of the energy of deformation at a crack tip and the parameters of acoustic emission with different combinations of mechanical and thermal action. It was established that thermal stimulation of acoustic emission is related to advance and growth of a crack under the action of thermoelastic shear stresses. An increases in heating power causes an increase in the energy of deformation, shear stresses at the crack edges, and acoustic emission energy. The position of the minimum in the density of the energy of deformation and of the maximum in acoustic emission energy coincides with the direction of crack advance, which with the use of the method of thermally stimulated acoustic emission makes it possible to not only reveal crack-like defects but also to determine potentially dangerous directions of their development.

  16. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths. PMID:26723331

  17. Enzyme Profiles in Seedling Development and the Effect of Itaconate, an Isocitrate Lyase-directed Reagent 1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, F. R.; McFadden, Bruce A.

    1979-01-01

    Changes in levels of isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, and catalase have been investigated during germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) in the presence and absence of itaconate. Germination was accompanied by a rapid increase in these enzymes during the first 3 days. The presence of 38 millimolar itaconate inhibited the incidence of seed germination and the growth of embryo axes as well as the appearance of isocitrate lyase but did not alter the levels of malate synthase, catalase, or NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase. The specific activity for the latter enzyme was constant throughout germination. Oxalate or succinate, each at 38 millimolar, had no effect upon germination of flax seeds. Itaconate did not inhibit the activities of malate synthase, catalase, or NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase in vitro but was a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (Ki:17 micromolar at 30 C, pH 7.6). Itaconate (at 38 millimolar) did not alter the appearance of malate synthase but reduced the incidence of germination, onset of germination, and growth of the embryo axis as well as the specific activity of isocitrate lyase in seedlings of Zea mays, Vigna glabra, Glycine hispida, Vigna sinensis, Trigonella foenumgraecum, Lens culinaris, and Medicago sativa. The incidence and onset of germination of wheat seeds were unaltered by the same concentration of itaconate but seedlings did not contain isocitrate lyase or malate synthase. The data suggest that itaconate may be isocitrate lyase-directed in inhibiting the germination of fatty seeds. PMID:16660938

  18. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  19. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  20. Suspended particulate matter estimates using optical and acoustic sensors: application in Nestos River plume (Thracian Sea, North Aegean Sea).

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Sotiria; Sylaios, Georgios K; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigates the use of combined methods of optical and acoustic sensors, in collaboration with direct in situ measurements, for the calibration and validation of a model transforming acoustic backscatter intensity series into suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration datasets. The model follows previously elaborated techniques, placing particular attention to the parameterization of the acoustic absorption index as a function of water physical properties. Results were obtained from the annual deployment (during 2007-2008) of an upward-facing acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) (307 kHz), equipped with a Wave Array, and an optical backscatter sensor (OBS), at the bottom of Thassos Passage near Nestos River plume (Thracian Sea, Northern Greece). The OBS was calibrated through linear regression, using 2007 and 2012 field sampling data, exhibiting an error of 13-14 % due to chlorophyll presence. The ADCP signal was calibrated through simultaneous measurements of backscatter intensity and turbidity profiles. Harmonic analysis on the model-produced SPM concentrations explained the tidal influence on their variability, especially during the summer. Empirical orthogonal functions analysis revealed the impact of waves and wave-induced currents on SPM variability. Finally, Nestos River sediment load was found uncorrelated to the SPM change in Thassos Passage, due to the dispersal and sediment deposition near the river mouth. PMID:26026846