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Sample records for direct borohydride fuel

  1. Catalytic polymeric electrodes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Peters, Alice; Talemi, Pejman

    2016-08-01

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a new class of fuel cells that produces non-toxic by-products and has a potential for a high voltage and high energy density. A major challenge in developing efficient DBFCs is the development of an efficient, stable, and economic catalyst for the oxidation of borohydride. In this paper, we report the use of conducting polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as electrocatalysts in DBFC. PEDOT electrodes prepared by vacuum phase polymerization exhibited electrocatalytic behavior towards oxidation of borohydride and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic analysis of samples showed that PEDOT can act as an interface for electron transfer from borohydride ions. Comparing the polarization curves of DBFCs with PEDOT coated on graphite electrodes and cells with bare graphite electrodes, demonstrated higher voltage, maximum power density, and stability.

  2. A comparison of sodium borohydride as a fuel for proton exchange membrane fuel cells and for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Jung-Ho

    Two types of fuel cell systems using NaBH 4 aqueous solution as a fuel are possible: the hydrogen/air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) which uses onsite H 2 generated via the NaBH 4 hydrolysis reaction (B-PEMFC) at the anode and the direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) system which directly uses NaBH 4 aqueous solution at the anode and air at the cathode. Recently, research on these two types of fuel cells has begun to attract interest due to the various benefits of this liquid fuel for fuel cell systems for portable applications. It might therefore be relevant at this stage to evaluate the relative competitiveness of the two fuel cells. Considering their current technologies and the high price of NaBH 4, this paper evaluated and analyzed the factors influencing the relative favorability of each type of fuel cell. Their relative competitiveness was strongly dependent on the extent of the NaBH 4 crossover. When considering the crossover in DBFC systems, the total costs of the B-PEMFC system were the most competitive among the fuel cell systems. On the other hand, if the crossover problem were to be completely overcome, the total cost of the DBFC system generating six electrons (6e-DBFC) would be very similar to that of the B-PEMFC system. The DBFC system generating eight electrons (8e-DBFC) became even more competitive if the problem of crossover can be overcome. However, in this case, the volume of NaBH 4 aqueous solution consumed by the DBFC was larger than that consumed by the B-PEMFC.

  3. Platinum-rare earth cathodes for direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, D. S. P.; Santos, D. M. F.; Šljukić, B.; Sequeira, C. A. C.; Macciò, D.; Saccone, A.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is being actively investigated as an oxidant for direct borohydride fuel cells. Herein, platinum-rare earth (RE = Sm, Dy, Ho) alloys are prepared by arc melting and their activity for hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction (HPRR) is studied in alkaline media. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements show that Pt-Sm electrode displays the highest catalytic activity for HPRR with the lowest activation energy, followed by Pt-Ho, while Pt-Dy alloys show practically no activity. Laboratory direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells (DBPFCs) are assembled using these alloys. The DBPFC with Pt-Sm cathode gives the highest peak power density of 85 mW cm-2, which is more than double of that obtained in a DBPFC with Pt electrodes.

  4. Which type of fuel cell is more competitive for portable application: Direct methanol fuel cells or direct borohydride fuel cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Jung-Ho

    The promise of fuel cell systems using liquid fuels, such as the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), to complement or substitute for existing batteries is becoming recognized, along with their potential as a future technology for mobile and portable power supplies. The key issue is which type of fuel cell is more competitive for such power supplies: DMFC or DBFC? To answer this question, the present study analyzes and discusses the relative competitiveness of these two systems given the current status of the technologies and assuming some generally accepted conditions. The findings confirm that the DBFC system is superior to the DMFC system in terms of cell size and fuel (or fuel solution) consumption. Thus, the DBFC system is better suited to applications that require small operational space. On the other hand, the total operating costs of DBFC systems are higher than those of DMFC systems. According to the total cost formulae derived in the analysis, the DBFC system becomes relatively uneconomic at higher power outputs and longer operation times, but may be more favourable in specific portable applications such as miniaturized or micro power systems with short operational time spans.

  5. Evaluation of anode (electro)catalytic materials for the direct borohydride fuel cell: Methods and benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Job, Nathalie; Chatenet, Marian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, different methods are discussed for the evaluation of the potential of a given catalyst, in view of an application as a direct borohydride fuel cell DBFC anode material. Characterizations results in DBFC configuration are notably analyzed at the light of important experimental variables which influence the performances of the DBFC. However, in many practical DBFC-oriented studies, these various experimental variables prevent one to isolate the influence of the anode catalyst on the cell performances. Thus, the electrochemical three-electrode cell is a widely-employed and useful tool to isolate the DBFC anode catalyst and to investigate its electrocatalytic activity towards the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in the absence of other limitations. This article reviews selected results for different types of catalysts in electrochemical cell containing a sodium borohydride alkaline electrolyte. In particular, propositions of common experimental conditions and benchmarks are given for practical evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity towards the BOR in three-electrode cell configuration. The major issue of gaseous hydrogen generation and escape upon DBFC operation is also addressed through a comprehensive review of various results depending on the anode composition. At last, preliminary concerns are raised about the stability of potential anode catalysts upon DBFC operation.

  6. High performance and eco-friendly chitosan hydrogel membrane electrolytes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Nurul A.; Ma, Jia; Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2012-07-01

    Novel, cost-effective, and environmentally benign polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) consisting of ionically cross-linked chitosan (CS) hydrogel is reported for direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs). The membranes have been prepared by ionic cross-linking of CS with sulfate and hydrogen phosphate salts of sodium. Use of Na2SO4 and Na2HPO4 as cross-linking agents in the preparation of ionically cross-linked CS hydrogel membrane electrolytes (ICCSHMEs) not only enhances cost-effectiveness but also environmental friendliness of fuel cell technologies. The DBFCs have been assembled with a composite of nickel and carbon-supported palladium as anode catalyst, carbon-supported platinum as cathode catalyst and ICCSHMEs as electrolytes-cum-separators. The DBFCs have been studied by using an aqueous alkaline solution of sodium borohydride as fuel in flowing mode using a peristaltic pump and oxygen as oxidant. A maximum peak power density of about 810 mW cm-2 has been achieved for the DBFC employing Na2HPO4-based ICCSHME and operating at a cell temperature of 70 °C.

  7. Electrocatalytic performance of Pt-Dy alloys for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šljukić, Biljana; Milikić, Jadranka; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Macciò, Daniele; Saccone, Adriana

    2014-12-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is systematically studied on platinum-dysprosium (Pt-Dy) alloys in alkaline media with respect to application in direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs). Using several different techniques, namely cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry, reaction parameters are evaluated for NaBH4 electrooxidation in 2 M NaOH supporting electrolyte. The values obtained for the number of electrons exchanged are comparable for the two alloys and close to 2.5. Dependence of Pt-Dy alloys activity for NaBH4 oxidation on the electrolyte composition and temperature is also investigated. Test fuel cell is assembled using Pt-Dy alloy as anode, reaching peak power density of 298 mW cm-2 at current density of 595 mA cm-2 and cell potential of 0.5 V at 25 °C. Pt-Dy alloys exhibit comparable behavior with pure Pt electrode at room temperature, while at higher temperature they exhibit improved Coulombic efficiency, with the advantage of significantly lower price.

  8. Investigation of the characteristics of a stacked direct borohydride fuel cell for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheolhwan; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Ha, Man Yeong

    To investigate the possibility of the portable application of a direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), weight reduction of the stack and high stacking of the cells are investigated for practical running conditions. For weight reduction, carbon graphite is adopted as the bipolar plate material even though it has disadvantages in tight stacking, which results in stacking loss from insufficient material strength. For high stacking, it is essential to have a uniform fuel distribution among cells and channels to maintain equal electric load on each cell. In particular, the design of the anode channel is important because active hydrogen generation causes non-uniformity in the fuel flow-field of the cells and channels. To reduce the disadvantages of stacking force margin and fuel maldistribution, an O-ring type-sealing system with an internal manifold and a parallel anode channel design is adopted, and the characteristics of a single and a five-cell fuel cell stack are analyzed. By adopting carbon graphite, the stack weight can be reduced by 4.2 times with 12% of performance degradation from the insufficient stacking force. When cells are stacked, the performance exceeds the single-cell performance because of the stack temperature increase from the reduction of the radiation area from the narrow stacking of cells.

  9. Investigation of carbon supported Pd-Cu nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmenyar, Gamze; Akın, Ayşe Nilgün

    2014-03-01

    Carbon supported Pd and bimetallic Pd-Cu nanoparticles with different compositions are prepared by a modified polyol method and used as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and fuel cell experiments. The results show that the carbon supported Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts have much higher catalytic activity for the direct oxidation of BH4- than the carbon supported pure nanosized Pd catalyst, especially the Pd50Cu50/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all as-prepared catalysts, and the DBFC using Pd50Cu50/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst gives the best performance, and the maximum power density is 98 mW cm-2 at a current density of 223 mA cm-2 at 60 °C.

  10. Direct synthesis of calcium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Ronnebro, Ewa Carin Ellinor; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2009-10-27

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing an alkaline earth metal borohydride, i.e. Ca(BH.sub.4).sub.2, from the alkaline earth metal hydride and the alkaline earth metal boride. The borohydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a metal chloride catalyst compound, such as RuCl.sub.3, TiCl.sub.3, or a mixture of TiCl.sub.3 and palladium metal. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen at about 70 MPa while heating the mixture to about 400.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  11. Intrinsic borohydride fuel cell/battery hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jian; Fang, Bin; Wang, Chunsheng; Currie, Kenneth

    The electrochemical oxidation behaviors of NaBH 4 on Zn, Zn-MH, and MH (metal-hydride) electrodes were investigated, and an intrinsic direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC)/battery hybrid power source using MH (or Zn-MH) as the anode and MnO 2 as the cathode was tested. Borohydride cannot be effectively oxidized on Zn electrodes at the Zn oxidation potential because of the poor electrocatalytic ability of Zn for borohydride oxidation and the high overpotential, even though borohydride has the same oxidation potential of Zn in an alkaline solution. The borohydride can be electrochemically oxidized on Ni and MH electrodes through a 4e reaction at a high overpotential. Simply adding borohydride into an alkaline electrolyte of a Zn/air or MH/air battery can greatly increase the capacity, while an intrinsic DBFC/MH(or Zn)-MnO 2 battery can deliver a higher peak power than regular DBFCs.

  12. Anodic behavior of carbon supported Cu@Ag core-shell nanocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Donghong; Liu, Huihong; You, Xiu; Wei, Huikai; Liu, Shibin

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-supported Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by a successive reduction method in an aqueous solution and are used as an anode electrocatalyst for the direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), and fuel cell tests. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed in 2 M NaOH/0.1 M NaBH4 to understand the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) mechanism by studying the intermediate reactions occurring on the Cu@Ag/C electrode. The TEM images show that the average size of the Cu1@Ag1/C particles is approximately 18 nm. Among the as-prepared catalysts, the Cu2@Ag1/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity. As shown by in situ FTIR, the oxidation reaction mechanism of BH4- is similar to that of Ag/C: BHn(OH)4-n- + 2OH- → BHn-1(OH)5-n- +H2 O + 2e . At 25 °C, the DBHFC with Cu2@Ag1/C as the anode electrocatalyst and Pt mesh (1 cm2) as the cathode electrode exhibits a maximum anodic power density of 17.27 mW mg-1 at a discharge current density of 27.8 mA mg-1.

  13. Investigation of platinum and palladium as potential anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and ammonia borane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Deschamps, Fabien; Caldarella, Giuseppe; Chatenet, Marian; Job, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Platinum and palladium are investigated as anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and direct ammonia borane fuel cells (DBFC and DABFC). Half-cell characterizations performed at 25 °C using NH3BH3 or NaBH4 alkaline electrolytes demonstrate the lowest open-circuit potential and highest electrocatalytic activity for the NH3BH3 alkaline electrolyte for Pd and Pt rotating disk electrodes, respectively. Voltammograms performed in fuel cell configuration at 25 °C confirm this trend: the highest open circuit voltage (1.05 V) and peak power density (181 mW·cm-2) are monitored for DABFC using Pd/C and Pt/C anodes, respectively. Increasing the temperature heightens the peak power density (that reaches 420 mW·cm-2 at 60 °C for DBFC using Pt/C anodes), but strongly generates gas from the fuel hydrolysis, hindering the overall fuel cells performances. The anode texture strongly influences the fuel cell performances, highlighting: (i) that an open anode texture is required to efficiently circulate the anolyte and (ii) the difficulty to compare potential anodic catalysts characterized using different fuel cell setups within the literature. Furthermore, TEM imaging of Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts prior/post DBFC and DABFC operation shows fast degradation of the carbon-supported nanoparticles.

  14. Direct synthesis of magnesium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Ronnebro, Ewa Carin Ellinor; Severa, Godwin; Jensen, Craig M.

    2012-04-03

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing an alkaline earth metal borohydride, i.e. Mg(BH.sub.4).sub.2, from the alkaline earth metal boride MgB.sub.2 by hydrogenating the MgB.sub.2 at an elevated temperature and pressure. The boride may also be doped with small amounts of a metal chloride catalyst such as TiCl.sub.3 and/or NiCl.sub.2. The process provides for charging MgB.sub.2 with high pressure hydrogen above at least 70 MPa while simultaneously heating the material to about 350.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides a reversible hydride compound having a hydrogen capacity of at least 11 wt %.

  15. Enhanced activity of Au-Fe/C anodic electrocatalyst for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lanhua; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Caixian; Tian, Li; Liu, Jing; Wang, Xianyou

    2015-07-01

    Carbon supported Au-Fe bimetallic nanocatalysts (Au-Fe/C) are facilely prepared via a modified NaBH4 reduction method in aqueous solution at room temperature, and used as the anode electrocatalyst of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the Au-Fe/C electrocatalysts are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disc electrode (RDE) voltammetry, chronoamperometry (CA), chronopotentiometry (CP), and fuel cell test. The results show that Au-Fe/C catalysts display higher catalytic activity for the direct electrooxidation of BH4- than carbon supported pure Au nanocatalyst (Au/C), especially Au50Fe50/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all as-prepared catalysts. Besides, the single DBHFC with Au50Fe50/C anode and Au/C cathode obtains the maximum power density as high as 34.9 mW cm-2 at 25 °C.

  16. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  17. Borohydride Ionic Liquids as Hypergolic Fuels: A Quest for Improved Stability.

    PubMed

    Chand, Deepak; Zhang, Jiaheng; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-09-14

    Hydrazine and its derivatives are used as fuels in rocket propellant systems; however, due to high vapor pressure, toxicity, and carcinogenicity, handling of such compounds is extremely hazardous. Hypergolic ionic liquids have shown great promise to become viable replacements for hydrazines as fuels. Borohydride-containing ionic liquids have now been synthesized using a more efficient synthetic pathway that does not require liquid ammonia and halide precursors. Among the eight new compounds, 1-allyl-3-n-butyl-imidazolium borohydride (1) and 1, 3-diallylimidazolium borohydride (5) exhibit very short ignition-delay times (ID) of 8 and 3 ms, respectively. The hydrolytic stability of borohydride compounds has been greatly improved by attaching long-chain alkyl substituents to the imidazole ring. 1,3-Di-(n-octyl)-imidazolium borohydride (3) is a water stable borohydride-containing ionic liquid. 1,3-Di-(n-butyl)-imidazolium borohydride (2) is a unique example of a borohydride liquid crystal. These ionic liquids have some unusual advantages, including negligible vapor pressures, good ignition delay (ID) times, and reduced synthetic and storage costs, thereby showing good application potential as environmentally friendly fuels in bipropellant formulations. In addition, they also have potential applications in the form of reducing agents and hydrogen storage materials. PMID:26223830

  18. Exploiting hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids as faster-igniting rocket fuels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianlin; Qi, Xiujuan; Huang, Shi; Jiang, Linhai; Li, Jianling; Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-02-01

    A family of hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids was developed, which exhibited the shortest ignition delay times of 1.7 milliseconds and the lowest viscosity (10 mPa s) of hypergolic ionic fluids, demonstrating their great potential as faster-igniting rocket fuels to replace toxic hydrazine derivatives in liquid bipropellant formulations. PMID:26687630

  19. Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

    2010-11-16

    We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

  20. Borohydride ionic liquids and borane/ionic-liquid solutions as hypergolic fuels with superior low ignition-delay times.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Gao, Haixiang; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-03-10

    In propellant systems, fuels of choice continue to be hydrazine and its derivatives, even though they comprise a class of acutely carcinogenic and toxic substances which exhibit rather high vapor pressures and require expensive handling procedures and costly safety precautions. Hypergolic ionic liquids tend to have low volatility and high thermal and chemical stability, and often exhibit wide liquid ranges, which could allow the use of these substances as bipropellant fuels under a variety of conditions. A new family of borohydride ionic liquids and borane-ionic-liquid solutions is described which meets nearly all of the desired important criteria for well-performing fuels. They exhibit ignition-delay times that are superior to that of any known hypergolic ionic liquid and may thus be legitimate replacements for hydrazine and its derivatives. PMID:24604814

  1. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita; Bowden, Mark; Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie; Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Tom

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH)3) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mole ratio of NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH4 hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by 11B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH)4. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the 11B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB3H8, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt% NaB3H8 solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 molar ratio of NaOH and B(OH)3 and releases >8 eq of H2. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B3O3(OH)52-, B4O5(OH)42-, B3O3(OH)4-, B5O6(OH)4- and B(OH)3, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB3H8 can provide a 40% increase in H2 storage density compared to the hydrolysis of NaBH4 given the decreased solubility of sodium metaborate. The authors would like to thank Jim Sisco and Paul Osenar of

  2. New direct 11B NMR-based analysis of organoboranes through their potassium borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jesus R; Cruz, Gabriel; Cabrera, Carlos R; Soderquist, John A

    2003-06-13

    Representative organoborane mixtures were quantitatively converted to their borohydrides through their reaction with activated KH (KH), permitting their detailed analysis by (11)B NMR. Through the treatment of commercial KH with a THF solution of lithium aluminum hydride (LAH), a dramatic change in the surface morphology results as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to reveal that the LAH treatment deposits a significant amount of an unknown aluminum-containing species on the surface of the KH, which imparts a unique reactivity to the KH. Even highly hindered organoboranes are quantitatively converted to their borohydrides by replacing electronegative groups (e.g., OR, halogen) with hydrogen, retaining only the carbon ligation. Through this simple KH treatment, complex organoborane reaction mixtures are converted to the corresponding borohydrides whose (11)B NMR spectra normally exhibit resolved signals for the individual species present. The integration of these signals provides quantitative information on the relative amounts of each component of the mixture. New generalities for the effect of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-substituents have also been determined that provide a new, simple technique for the determination of the isomeric distribution in organoborane mixtures resulting from common organoborane processes (e.g., hydroboration). Moreover, the (1)H-coupled (11)B NMR spectra of these mixtures reveal the extent of alkylation for each species present. Representative organoboranes were examined by this new technique permitting a simple and convenient quantitative analysis of the regio- and diastereomeric composition of a variety of asymmetric organoborane processes. Previously unknown details of pinene-based hydroborations and reductions are revealed for the first time employing the KH (11)B NMR technique. PMID:12790565

  3. Electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation: a review of density functional theory approach combined with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison Escaño, Mary Clare; Lacdao Arevalo, Ryan; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    The electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation is a complex, up-to-eight-electron transfer process, which is essential for development of efficient direct borohydride fuel cells. Here we review the progress achieved by density functional theory (DFT) calculations in explaining the adsorption of BH4- on various catalyst surfaces, with implications for electrocatalyst screening and selection. Wherever possible, we correlate the theoretical predictions with experimental findings, in order to validate the proposed models and to identify potential directions for further advancements.

  4. Three-dimensional nanostructured Ni-Cu foams for borohydride oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. M. F.; Eugénio, S.; Cardoso, D. S. P.; Šljukić, B.; Montemor, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) foams have been prepared by electrodeposition using a dynamic hydrogen template. These 3D materials were tested as electrodes for the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media for possible application as anodes of direct borohydride fuel cells. Their activity in BOR was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and chronopotentiometry and main reaction parameters and electrodes' stability were evaluated.

  5. Hydrogen Generation Via Sodium Borohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Richard M.; Wu, Ying

    2003-07-01

    Along with the technological challenges associated with developing fuel cells and hydrogen burning engines, a major issue that must be addressed to ensure the ultimate success of a hydrogen economy is the ability to store and transport hydrogen effectively. Millennium Cell has developed and patented a proprietary system for storing and generating hydrogen gas called Hydrogen on Demand™. The system releases the hydrogen stored in fuel solutions of sodium borohydride as needed through an easily controllable catalytic process. The fuel itself is water-based, rich in hydrogen content, and non-flammable. It can be stored in plastic containers under no pressure. After the hydrogen from the fuel is consumed, the remaining product, sodium metaborate (chemically similar to borax), can be recycled back into fresh fuel. In this paper, an overview of the Hydrogen on Demand™ technology is presented along with data showing the performance characteristics of practical hydrogen generation systems. A brief discussion of sodium borohydride regeneration chemistry is also provided.

  6. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  7. Method for producing a borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    2010-06-22

    A method for producing a borohydride is described that includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material that chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of the borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature that substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

  8. Electrochemical research in chemical hydrogen storage materials: Sodium borohydride and organotin hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLafferty, Jason

    Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from "spent fuel," i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. In this thesis, some research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this thesis, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described.

  9. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  10. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  11. On the purity assessment of solid sodium borohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botasini, Santiago; Méndez, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Since sodium borohydride has become extensively used as chemical hydrogen storage material in fuel cells, many techniques have been proposed to assess the purity of this substance. However, all of them are developed in aqueous media, where the reagent is unstable. In addition, its hygroscopic nature was difficults in any attempt to make precise quantifications. The present work compares three different methods, namely, voltammetric, titrimetric, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to assess the purity of sodium borohydride, using an expired and a new sodium borohydride samples as references. Our results show that only the FTIR measurements provide a simple and semi-quantitative means to assess the purity of sodium borohydride due to the fact that it is the only one that measures the sample in the solid state. A comparison between the experimental data and theoretical calculation reveals the identification of the absorption bands at 1437 cm-1 of sodium metaborate and 2291 cm-1 of sodium borohydride which represent a good fingerprint for the qualitative assessment of the sample quality.

  12. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  13. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Au, Ming

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  14. Direct pulverized fuel fired system

    SciTech Connect

    Musto, R.L.; Kai, N.

    1985-01-15

    A direct fired system includes pulverizer means, classifier means, burner means, as well as a defined fluid flow path that serves to interconnect the pulverizer means, and the classifier means, in fluid flow relation with the burner means. In accord with the mode of operation thereof, at the classifier means, a separation is had of the stream of the gaseous medium such that a portion of the gaseous medium is recirculated along with the oversize solid fuel particles back to the pulverizer means, while the remainder of the gaseous medium is operative to convey the solid fuel particles that are of the desired size from the classifier means, to the burner means, for burning, i.e., firing, in the latter.

  15. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  16. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  17. Formation mechanisms and aggregation behavior of borohydride reduced silver particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hyning, D.L. van; Zukoski, C.F.

    1998-11-24

    In this work, the authors examine the formation mechanisms of nanoscale silver particles produced by the reduction of silver perchlorate with sodium borohydride. Evidence is presented that the reaction pathway does not follow classical nucleation and growth theory, but is dominated by colloidal interactions. Upon injection of silver into a sodium borohydride solution, a molecular species absorbing at 220 nm is produced in less than 1 s. The authors suggest that this species contains borohydride nd small particles of reduced silver. The reaction mixture is initially dark as the result of the aggregation of the small silver particles into larger particles which have broad absorption spectra. During an intermediate stage, transmission electron microscopy and absorbance data show that even larger ({approximately}6--10 nm) particles grow at the expense of the monomeric silver particles. Later in the reaction, electrochemical potential measurements show that the borohydride concentration suddenly decreases. Direct measurement of interparticle forces demonstrate that this change in the solution conditions drives the particle surface potential toward zero and results in increased adhesive forces. The resulting aggregation manifests itself in a darkening of the solution temperatures, the increase is minimal. This effect can be linked to the number of monomeric silver particles remaining during the final transition.

  18. Dimethoxymethane: A Fuel For Direct-Oxidation Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, Surya G.; Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Vamos, Eugene; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Dimethoxymethane (DMM) identified as one of several high-energy fuels for direct-oxidation fuel cells. Found to undergo facile electro-oxidation to carbon dioxide and water, with methanol as possible intermediate product. Fuel electro-oxidized at sustained high rates without poisoning electrodes. Performance superior to that of methanol at same temperature. Synthesized from natural gas (methane) and is thus viable alternative to methanol in direct-oxidation fuel cells. Better performance expected at higher temperature and by use of Pt/Sn catalyst. Alternatively, low boiling temperature of DMM also makes it candidate for gas-feed operation.

  19. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  20. Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester. Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2008-09-23

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  1. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  2. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  3. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  4. DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-05-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  5. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  6. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  7. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  8. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  9. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  10. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  11. Modified borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Ming

    2005-08-29

    In attempt to develop lithium borohydrides as the reversible hydrogen storage materials with the high capacity, the feasibility to reduce dehydrogenation temperature of the lithium borohydride and moderate rehydrogenation condition has been explored. The commercial available lithium borohydride has been modified by ball milling with metal oxides and metal chlorides as the additives. The modified lithium borohydrides release 9 wt% hydrogen starting from 473K. The dehydrided modified lithium borohydrides absorb 7-9 wt% hydrogen at 873K and 7 MPa. The additive modification reduces dehydriding temperature from 673K to 473K and moderates rehydrogenation conditions to 923K and 15 MPa. XRD and SEM analysis discovered the formation of the intermediate compound TiB{sub 2} that may plays the key role in change the reaction path resulting the lower dehydriding temperature and reversibility. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of the oxide modified lithium borohydrides decreases gradually during hydriding-dehydriding cycling due to the lost of the boron during dehydrogenation. But, it can be prevented by selecting the suitable additive, forming intermediate boron compounds and changing the reaction path. The additives reduce dehydriding temperature and improve the reversibility, it also reduces the hydrogen storage capacity. The best compromise can be reached by optimization of the additive loading and introducing new process other than ball milling.

  12. Modified lithium borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Au, Ming; Jurgensen, Arthur

    2006-04-01

    In an attempt to develop lithium borohydrides as reversible hydrogen storage materials with high hydrogen storage capacities, the feasibility of reducing the dehydrogenation temperature of the lithium borohydride and moderating rehydrogenation conditions was explored. The lithium borohydride was modified by ball milling with metal oxides and metal chlorides as additives. The modified lithium borohydrides released 9 wt % hydrogen starting from 473 K. The dehydrided modified lithium borohydrides absorbed 7-9 wt % hydrogen at 873 K and 7 MPa. The modification with additives reduced the dehydriding starting temperature from 673 to 473 K and moderated the rehydrogenation conditions from 923 K/15 MPa to 873 K/7 MPa. XRD and SEM analysis revealed the formation of an intermediate compound that might play a key role in changing the reaction path, resulting in the lower dehydriding temperature and reversibility. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of the oxide-modified lithium borohydrides decreased gradually during hydriding/dehydriding cycling. One of the possible reasons for this effect might be the loss of boron during dehydrogenation, but this can be prevented by changing the dehydriding path using appropriate additives. The additives reduced the dehydriding temperature and improved the reversibility, but they also reduced the hydrogen storage capacity. The best compromise can be reached by selecting appropriate additives, optimizing the additive loading, and using new synthesis processes other than ball milling. PMID:16571023

  13. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  14. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-19

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

  15. Static Compression of Tetramethylammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Douglas Allen; Somayazulu, M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-11-15

    Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction are used to examine the high-pressure behavior of tetramethylammonium borohydride (TMAB) to 40 GPa at room temperature. The measurements reveal weak pressure-induced structural transitions around 5 and 20 GPa. Rietveld analysis and Le Bail fits of the powder diffraction data based on known structures of tetramethylammonium salts indicate that the transitions are mediated by orientational ordering of the BH{sub 4}{sup -} tetrahedra followed by tilting of the (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}N{sup +} groups. X-ray diffraction patterns obtained during pressure release suggest reversibility with a degree of hysteresis. Changes in the Raman spectrum confirm that these transitions are not accompanied by bonding changes between the two ionic species. At ambient conditions, TMAB does not possess dihydrogen bonding, and Raman data confirms that this feature is not activated upon compression. The pressure-volume equation of state obtained from the diffraction data gives a bulk modulus [K{sub 0} = 5.9(6) GPa, K'{sub 0} = 9.6(4)] slightly lower than that observed for ammonia borane. Raman spectra obtained over the entire pressure range (spanning over 40% densification) indicate that the intramolecular vibrational modes are largely coupled.

  16. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  17. Understanding oscillatory phenomena in molecular hydrogen generation via sodium borohydride hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Budroni, M A; Biosa, E; Garroni, S; Mulas, G R C; Marchettini, N; Culeddu, N; Rustici, M

    2013-11-14

    The hydrolysis of borohydride salts represents one of the most promising processes for the generation of high purity molecular hydrogen under mild conditions. In this work we show that the sodium borohydride hydrolysis exhibits a fingerprinting periodic oscillatory transient in the hydrogen flow over a wide range of experimental conditions. We disproved the possibility that flow oscillations are driven by supersaturation phenomena of gaseous bubbles in the reactive mixture or by a nonlinear thermal feedback according to a thermokinetic model. Our experimental results indicate that the NaBH4 hydrolysis is a spontaneous inorganic oscillator, in which the hydrogen flow oscillations are coupled to an "oscillophor" in the reactive solution. The discovery of this original oscillator paves the way for a new class of chemical oscillators, with fundamental implications not only for testing the general theory on oscillations, but also with a view to chemical control of borohydride systems used as a source of hydrogen based green fuel. PMID:24084866

  18. Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet

    DOEpatents

    Upatnieks, Ansis

    2006-05-30

    Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

  19. Detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates using sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2013-05-01

    Addition of sodium borohydride to a lignocellulose hydrolysate of Norway spruce affected the fermentability when cellulosic ethanol was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Treatment of the hydrolysate with borohydride improved the ethanol yield on consumed sugar from 0.09 to 0.31 g/g, the balanced ethanol yield from 0.02 to 0.30 g/g, and the ethanol productivity from 0.05 to 0.57 g/(L×h). Treatment of a sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate gave similar results, and the experiments indicate that sodium borohydride is suitable for chemical in situ detoxification. The model inhibitors coniferyl aldehyde, p-benzoquinone, 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone, and furfural were efficiently reduced by treatment with sodium borohydride, even under mild reaction conditions (20 °C and pH 6.0). While addition of sodium dithionite to pretreatment liquid from spruce improved enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, addition of sodium borohydride did not. This result indicates that the strong hydrophilicity resulting from sulfonation of inhibitors by dithionite treatment was particularly important for alleviating enzyme inhibition. PMID:23567704

  20. Volume reduction of spent fuel elements for direct disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserfuhr, I.C.

    1995-12-31

    The method of direct disposal of spent fuel elements provides the placing of fuel and non-fuel elements into the POLLUX final disposal casks. It is, however, necessary to disassemble the fuel elements into fuel rods and structural parts. While the fuel rods are condensed, the remaining structure is treated further with a 500-t skeleton press to minimize the volume.

  1. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-23

    In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

  2. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the

  7. Interleaved mesoporous copper for the anode catalysis in direct ammonium borane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Auxilia, Francis M; Tanabe, Toyokazu; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Ramesh, Gubbala V; Matsumoto, Futoshi; Ya, Xu; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Dakshanamoorthy, Arivuoli; Abe, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Mesoporous materials with tailored microstructures are of increasing importance in practical applications particularly for energy generation and/or storage. Here we report a mesoporous copper material (MS-Cu) can be prepared in a hierarchical microstructure and exhibit high catalytic performance for the half-cell reaction of direct ammonium borane (NH3BH3) fuel cells (DABFs). Hierarchical copper oxide (CuO) nanoplates (CuO Npls) were first synthesized in a hydrothermal condition. CuO Npls were then reduced at room temperature using water solution of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) to yield the desired mesoporous copper material, MS-Cu, consisting of interleaved nanoplates with a high density of mesopores. The surface of MS-Cu comprised high-index facets, whereas a macroporous copper material (MC-Cu), which was prepared from CuO Npls at elevated temperatures in a hydrogen stream, was surrounded by low-index facets with a low density of active sites. MS-Cu exhibited a lower onset potential and improved durability for the electro-oxidation of NH3BH3 than MC-Cu or copper particles because of the catalytically active mesopores on the interleaved nanoplates. PMID:24738410

  8. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  9. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  10. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  11. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  12. Further studies on vinamidinium salt amine exchange reactions, borohydride reductions and subsequent transformations

    PubMed Central

    Gupton, John T.; Telang, Nakul; Jia, Xin; Giglio, Benjamin C.; Eaton, James E.; Barelli, Peter J.; Hovaizi, Mona; Hall, Kayleigh E.; Welden, R. Scott; Keough, Matthew J.; Worrall, Eric F.; Finzel, Kara L.; Kluball, Emily J.; Kanters, Rene P.F.; Smith, Timothy M.; Smith, Stanton Q.; Nunes, Shane R.; Wright, Mathew T.; Birnstihl, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies directed at the amine exchange reaction of vinamidinium salts followed by sodium borohydride reduction to secondary and tertiary allylic amines are described. The tertiary allylic amines were alkylated and subjected to base mediated rearrangement to yield a variety of highly functionalized tertiary homoallylic amines. PMID:21113324

  13. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world's energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future. PMID:27384871

  14. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world’s energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future.

  15. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  16. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-22

    Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

  17. BIMETALLIC LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDES TOWARD REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2010-10-21

    Borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4} have been studied as candidates for hydrogen storage because of their high hydrogen contents (18.4 wt% for LiBH{sub 4}). Limited success has been made in reducing the dehydrogenation temperature by adding reactants such as metals, metal oxides and metal halides. However, full rehydrogenation has not been realized because of multi-step decomposition processes and the stable intermediate species produced. It is suggested that adding second cation in LiBH{sub 4} may reduce the binding energy of B-H. The second cation may also provide the pathway for full rehydrogenation. In this work, several bimetallic borohydrides were synthesized using wet chemistry, high pressure reactive ball milling and sintering processes. The investigation found that the thermodynamic stability was reduced, but the full rehydrogenation is still a challenge. Although our experiments show the partial reversibility of the bimetallic borohydrides, it was not sustainable during dehydriding-rehydriding cycles because of the accumulation of hydrogen inert species.

  18. Borohydrides: from sheet to framework topologies.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, P; Ley, M B; Jensen, T R; Smrčok, L'; Černý, R

    2014-06-01

    The five novel compounds ALiM(BH4)4 (A = K or Rb; M = Mg or Mn) and K3Li2Mg2(BH4)9 crystallizing in the space groups Aba2 and P2/c, respectively, represent the first two-dimensional topologies amongst homoleptic borohydrides. The crystal structures have been solved, refined and characterized by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, neutron powder diffraction and solid-state DFT calculations. Minimal energies of ordered models corroborate crystal symmetries retrieved from diffraction data. The layered Li-Mg substructure forms negatively charged uninodal 4-connected networks. It is shown that this connectivity cannot generate the long sought-after, bimetallic Li-Mg borohydrides without countercations when assuming preferred coordination polyhedra as found in Mg(BH4)2 and LiBH4. The general properties of the trimetallic compound series are analogous with the anhydrous aluminosilicates. Additionally, a relationship with zeolites is suggested, which are built from three-dimensional Al-Si-O networks with a negative charge on them. The ternary metal borohydride systems are of interest due to their potential as novel hydridic frameworks and will allow exploration of the structural chemistry of light-metal systems otherwise subject to eutectic melting. PMID:24699844

  19. Performance of 2-propanol in direct-oxidation fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhigang; Kaufman, Arthur

    A direct-oxidation fuel cell using 2-propanol as fuel has been evaluated. The cell performance, open circuit voltage (OCV), and alcohol crossover were measured at various alcohol concentration, cell temperature, and air/nitrogen flow rate. The cell shows much higher performance than a direct methanol fuel cell, especially at current densities less than ca. 200 mA/cm 2. This performance is the highest among any direct-liquid-oxidation fuel cells. The cell open circuit voltage can be as much as 0.27 V higher than that of a methanol cell, while the amount of 2-propanol crossing through the membrane can be as low as 1/7 of that of methanol. Therefore, a direct 2-propanol fuel cell can have much higher fuel and fuel cell efficiencies. One problem associated with using 2-propanol as fuel is the anode poisoning by reaction intermediates and a frequent cleaning of the electrode surface is needed.

  20. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  1. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-01-24

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  2. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  3. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2011-08-16

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  4. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  5. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  6. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  7. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  8. Liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells using neat 2-propanol as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhigang; Kaufman, Arthur

    Neat 2-propanol was used as the fuel in liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells. The fuel that was intentionally not mixed with any amount of water was oxidized directly at the fuel cell anode. The fuel cell showed very good performance. For example, at a cell temperature of 60 °C and an air flow rate of 970 ml/min, the cell output voltage was as high as 0.485 V at a current density of 200 mA/cm 2. This performance was among the highest numbers ever reported for liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells. The energy density of a fuel cell using a neat fuel is expected to be much higher than that of one using dilute fuel solutions because the latter needs to carry between 10 and 30 parts by weight of water for each part of alcohol.

  9. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells. PMID:23589385

  10. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  11. Quaternary ammonium borohydride adsorption in mesoporous silicate MCM-48

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, Michael J; Daemen, Luke L; Hartl, Monika A

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic borohydrides have a high gravimetric hydrogen density but release H2 only under energetically unfavorable conditions. Surface chemistry may help in lowering thermodynamic barriers, but inclusion of inorganic borohydrides in porous silica materials has proved hitherto difficult or impossible. We show that borohydrides with a large organic cation are readily adsorbed inside mesoporous silicates, particularly after surface treatment. Thermal analysis reveals that the decomposition thermodynamics of tetraalkylammonium borohydrides are substantially affected by inclusion in MCM-48. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data show that the compounds adsorb on the silica surface. Evidence of pore loading is supplemented by DSC/TGA, XRD, FTIR, and BET isotherm measurements. Mass spectrometry shows significant hydrogen release at lower temperature from adsorbed borohydrides in comparison with the bulk borohydrides. INS data measured for partially decomposed samples indicates that the decomposition of the cation and anion is likely simultaneous. Additionally, these data confirm the formation of Si-H bonds on the silica surface upon decomposition of adsorbed tetramethylammonium borohydride.

  12. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  13. Lean direct wall fuel injection method and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung J. (Inventor); Tacina, Robert (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fuel combustion chamber, and a method of and a nozzle for mixing liquid fuel and air in the fuel combustion chamber in lean direct injection combustion for advanced gas turbine engines, including aircraft engines. Liquid fuel in a form of jet is injected directly into a cylindrical combustion chamber from the combustion chamber wall surface in a direction opposite to the direction of the swirling air at an angle of from about 50.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a tangential line of the cylindrical combustion chamber and at a fuel-lean condition, with a liquid droplet momentum to air momentum ratio in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.12. Advanced gas turbines benefit from lean direct wall injection combustion. The lean direct wall injection technique of the present invention provides fast, uniform, well-stirred mixing of fuel and air. In addition, in order to further improve combustion, the fuel can be injected at a venturi located in the combustion chamber at a point adjacent the air swirler.

  14. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Methylammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Kathryn R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kemmitt, Tim

    2011-01-06

    A new borohydride, [CH3NH3]+[BH4]-, has been synthesised by the metathesis of CH3NH3X and MBH4 in methylamine in order to determine its behaviour in comparison to ammonium borohydride [NH4]+[BH4]-. The introduction of methyl groups is expected to disrupt the hydrogen bonding network of [NH4]+[BH4]- and in turn alter the hydrogen release properties. Room temperature X-ray diffraction studies have shown that [CH3NH3]+[BH4]- adopts a tetragonal unit cell with lattice parameters of a = 4.9486 Å and b = 8.9083 Å. The room temperature structure shows considerable hydrogen mobility similar to that observed in NH3BH3. The kinetics and thermodynamics of these reactions have been investigated and show hydrogen release follows a similar pathway to that of [NH4]+[BH4]-. Both compounds decompose slowly at room temperature and rapidly at ca. 40 °C to form the diammoniate of diborane or the methylated analogue [BH2(CH3NH2)2]+BH4-. The first stage of decomposition has been further investigated by means on in-situ X-ray diffraction and solid state 11B NMR spectroscopy, and appears to occur in the absence of any detectable intermediates to form crystalline [BH2(CH3NH2)2]+BH4-. [(CH3)2NH2]+[BH4]- and [BH2{(CH3)2NH}2]+BH4- have also been synthesised by analogous routes, indicating a more general applicability of the synthetic method.

  16. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  17. Parametric Design Studies on a Direct Liquid Feed Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Nakamura, B.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric design studies were carried out on a direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell employing 1 M MeOH fuel, air and oxygen as oxidant in a 2 inch x 2 inch cell employing polymeric electrolyte membranes. Measurements include voltage-current output parameters, methanol crossover rate, and impedance as a function of several design and operational variables. Design variables are described.

  18. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  19. Direct deposit of catalyst on the membrane of direct feed fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, William (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Linke, Juergen (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved direct liquid-feed fuel cell having a solid membrane electrolyte for electrochemical reactions of an organic fuel. Catalyst utilization and catalyst/membrane interface improvements are disclosed. Specifically, the catalyst layer is applied directly onto the membrane electrolyte.

  20. Control of hydrogen release and uptake in amine borane molecular complexes: Thermodynamics of ammonia borane, ammonium borohydride, and the diammoniate of diborane

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, Thomas; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.

    2011-05-23

    Molecular complexes of Lewis acid-base pairs can be used to activate molecular hydrogen for applications ranging from hydrogen storage for fuel cells to catalytic hydrogenation reactions. In this paper, we examine the factors that determine the thermodynamics of hydrogen activation of a Lewis acid-base pair using the pedagogical examples of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) and ammonium borohydride ([NH4][BH4], ABH2). At ambient temperatures, ABH2 loses hydrogen to form the Lewis acid-base complex AB, suggesting that free energy drives the reaction to release hydrogen. However, direct measurement of the reaction enthalpy is not straightforward given the complex decomposition pathways leading to the formation of the diammoniate of diborane ([NH3BH3NH3][BH4], DADB). In this work, we compare two approaches for deriving the thermodynamic relationships among AB, DADB, and ABH2.

  1. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, J.B.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  2. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  3. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  4. Regenerative Fuel Cells for Space Power and Energy Conversion (NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cell Development)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Miley, George H.; Luo, Nie; Burton, Rodney; Mather, Joseph; Hawkins, Glenn; Byrd, Ethan; Gu, Lifeng; Shrestha, Prajakti Joshi

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing hydrogen peroxide and sodium borohydride development is shown. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 4) MEA Optimization; 5) 500-Watt Stack Testing; 6) System Modeling: Fuel Cell Power Source for Lunar Rovers; and 7) Conclusions

  5. Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I.

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

  6. Fuel Cross Leak of Direct Di-methyl-ether Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Haraguchi, Tadao

    Fuel cross leak through a polymer electrolyte membrane of the direct dimethyl ether fuel cell (DDFC) was investigated and was found to be approximately one-tenth that of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Three phenomena known to appear in the DMFC were also observed in the DDFC. These were (1) fuel cross leak due to the diffusion which increases with the fuel concentration on an open circuit condition, (2) electro-osmotic cross leak, which increases with the current density and fuel concentration, and (3) decrease of fuel cross leak with the increase of the current density due to fuel consumption at low fuel concentration. The decreased fuel cross leak realized by using Nafion ®117 as a membrane and the low fuel concentration of 11% resulted in an increase of the Farady efficiency of the DDFC of up to 90% at a current density of 80mA/cm2. The CO2 quantity at the anode outlet of the operating DDFC was slightly less than 2 mol per 12 protons, as estimated from an electrochemical reaction on the anode. The CO2 quantity at the cathode outlet was also investigated. The CO2 cross leak increased with current density at every CO2 concentration and the diffusion appeared to be the dominant phenomenon of the CO2 cross leak.

  7. Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Harrison, Mark J; Soufli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

  8. Compact direct methanol fuel cells for portable application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icardi, U. A.; Specchia, S.; Fontana, G. J. R.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    Consumers' demand for portable audio/video/ICT products has driven the development of advanced power technologies in recent years. Fuel cells are a clean technology with low emissions levels, suitable for operation with renewable fuels and capable, in a next future, of replacing conventional power systems meeting the targets of the Kyoto Protocol for a society based on sustainable energy systems. Within such a perspective, the objective of the European project MOREPOWER (compact direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications) is the development of a low-cost, low temperature, portable direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC; nominal power 250 W) with compact construction and modular design for the potential market area of weather stations, medical devices, signal units, gas sensors and security cameras. This investigation is focused on a conceptual study of the DMFC system carried out in the Matlab/Simulink ® platform: the proposed scheme arrangements lead to a simple equipment architecture and a efficient process.

  9. Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Koji; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ogumi, Zempachi

    Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an OH-form anion exchange membrane and polyhydric alcohols were studied. A high open circuit voltage of ca. 800 mV was obtained for a cell using Pt-Ru/C (anode) and Pt/C (cathode) at 323 K, which was about 100-200 mV higher than that for a DMFC using Nafion ®. The maximum power densities were in the order of ethylene glycol > glycerol > methanol > erythritol > xylitol. Silver catalysts were used as a cathode catalyst to fabricate alkaline fuel cells, since silver catalyst is almost inactive in the oxidation of polyhydric alcohols. Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells using silver as a cathode catalyst gave excellent performance because higher concentrations of fuel could be supplied to the anode.

  10. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  11. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  12. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  13. Performance of miniaturized direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices using micropump for fuel delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming

    A fuel cell is a device that can convert chemical energy into electricity directly. Among various types of fuel cells, both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can work at low temperature (<80 °C). Therefore, they can be used to supply power for commercial portable electronics such as laptop computers, digital cameras, PDAs and cell phones. The focus of this paper is to investigate the performance of a miniaturized DMFC device using a micropump to deliver fuel. The core of this micropump is a piezoelectric ring-type bending actuator and the associated nozzle/diffuser for directing fuel flow. Based on the experimental measurements, it is found that the performance of the fuel cell can be significantly improved if enough fuel flow is induced by the micropump at anode. Three factors may contribute to the performance enhancement including replenishment of methanol, decrease of diffusion resistance and removal of carbon dioxide. In comparison with conventional mini pumps, the size of the piezoelectric micropump is much smaller and the energy consumption is much lower. Thus, it is very viable and effective to use a piezoelectric valveless micropump for fuel delivery in miniaturized DMFC power systems.

  14. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  15. DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS AT REDUCED CATALYST LOADINGS

    SciTech Connect

    P. ZELENAY; F. GUYON; SM. GOTTESFELD

    2001-05-01

    We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup {minus}2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

  16. Methods to Stabilize and Destabilize Ammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Besenbacher, Fleming; Jensen, Torben R.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a high hydrogen content of ρm = 24.5 wt% H2 and releases 18 wt% H2 below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH4BH4 at ambient temperatures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH4BH4 (ABH2) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH2 at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16 % upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH4BH4. However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH4BH4 and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ΔT = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature < -30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS 11B MAS NMR. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle.

  17. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  18. High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

    2002-01-02

    Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power

  19. A Study of the Combustion of Aluminum Borohydride in a Small Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Fletcher, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    The combustion of aluminum borohydride in the Mach 2 airstream of a 3.84- by 10-inch wind tunnel was studied by analyzing gas samples taken from the airstream. Gas mixture composition was determined with the aid of a vacuum apparatus and gas chromatograph. The overall combustion efficiency of the fuel was assumed to be good because the combustion efficiency of its hydrogen component was found to be high. The increase of the lateral surface area of the combustion region was dependent upon the degree of mixing of fuel and its combustion products with air. In the flame zone where there was insufficient oxygen for complete combustion, the metal components of the fuel appeared to burn preferentially to the hydrogen component.

  20. DIRECT THERMOCHEMICAL CONVERSION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE TO FUEL OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A disposal method for primary sewage sludge and industrial sludges which generates boiler fuel as a product and is energy self sufficient or energy-generating is described. The method involves direct liquefaction in a mild aqueous alkali above 250 degs. C and was demonstrated for...

  1. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Gray, Joshua; Stowe, Ashley C.; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2012-02-28

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

  2. Ultrafast and stable hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride in methanol and water over Fe-B nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocon, Joey D.; Tuan, Trinh Ngoc; Yi, Youngmi; de Leon, Rizalinda L.; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2013-12-01

    Use of environmentally friendly hydrogen as fuel on a massive scale requires efficient storage and generation systems. Chemical hydrides, such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), have the capacity to meet these needs as demonstrated by its high hydrogen storage efficiency. Here, we first report the catalytic activity of Fe-B nanoparticles supported on porous Ni foam - synthesized via a simple chemical reduction technique - for hydrogen generation from the mixtures of NaBH4, H2O, and CH3OH. Activation energies of the catalyzed hydrolysis (64.26 kJ mol-1) and methanolysis (7.02 kJ mol-1) are notably lower than other metal-boron catalysts previously reported. Methanol, in combination with a cheap but highly active Fe-B nanocatalysts, provides ultrafast rates of low temperature hydrogen generation from the sodium borohydride solutions.

  3. A direct 2-propanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dianxue; Bergens, Steven H.

    We report the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane direct 2-propanol fuel cell (DPFC). The cell consisted of a Pt-Ru (atomic ratio of 1:1) black anode, a Pt black cathode, and a Nafion ®-117 membrane electrolyte. The cell was operated at 90 °C with aqueous 2-propanol as fuel and with oxygen as oxidant. The performance of the cell operating on 2-propanol is substantially higher than when it was operating on methanol at current densities lower than ˜200 mA/cm 2. The electrical efficiency of the direct 2-propanol fuel cell is nearly 1.5 times that of the direct methanol fuel cell at power densities below 128 mW/cm 2. Studies on the effects of electrocatalyst loading, of 2-propanol concentration, and of oxygen pressure on cell performance indicate that the cells operating on 2-propanol require lower anode and cathode loadings than cells operating on methanol. Cathode poisoning by 2-propanol is less severe than by methanol. Hydrogen gas evolution observed at the anode at low current densities indicated that catalytic dehydrogenation of 2-propanol occurred over the anode catalyst. A rapid voltage drop occurred at high current densities and after operating the cell for extended periods of time at constant current. The rapid voltage drop is an anode phenomenon.

  4. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. PMID:25546700

  5. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl...

  6. Performance of direct formate-peroxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinshi; Wu, Hao; He, Yaling; Liu, Yue; Jin, Lei

    2015-08-01

    We report the high-performance direct formate-peroxide fuel cells (DFPFCs) that consist of a cation-exchange membrane sandwiched between an alkaline formate anode and an acid peroxide cathode. Much attention has been paid to investigate the effects of different composite parameters and operating parameters, including catalyst loadings at both anode and cathode electrodes, operating temperatures, as well as the concentrations of both formate and electrolyte solutions. It is demonstrated that the optimization of both the electrode composition (anode 2.0 mgPd cm-2, cathode 2.0 mgPt cm-2) and the solution concentration (1.0 M HCOONa-3.0 M NaOH) enables the DFPFC to yield a peak power density as high as 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is about one times higher than that of state-of-the-art anion-exchange membrane direct formate fuel cells.

  7. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  8. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  9. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  10. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  11. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  12. Performance of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Ryul; Jung, Doo Hwan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Chun, Young Gab

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) using polymer electrolyte membrane are promising candidate for application of portable power sources and transportation applications because they do not require any fuel processing equipment and can be operated at low temperature of 60{degrees}C - 130{degrees}C. Elimination of the fuel processor results in simpler design, higher operation reliability, lower weight volume, and lower capital and operating cost. However, methanol as a fuel is relatively electrochemical inert, so that kinetics of the methanol oxidation is too slow. Platinum and Pt-based binary alloy electrodes have been extensively studied for methanol electro-oxidation in acid electrolyte at ambient and elevated temperatures. Particularly, unsupported carbon Pt-Ru catalyst was found to be superior to the anode of DMFC using a proton exchange membrane electrolyte (Nafion). The objective of this study is to develop the high performance DNTC. This paper summarizes the results from half cell and single cell tests, which focus on the electrode manufacturing process, catalyst selection, and operating conditions of single cell such as methanol concentration, temperature and pressure.

  13. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products.

  14. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  15. Use of cermet fueled nuclear reactors for direct nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Carlson, L.W.; Kuczen, K.D.; Hanan, N.A.; Palmer, R.G.; Von Hoomissen, J.; Chiu, W.; Haaland, R.

    1988-07-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in Direct Nuclear Propulsion (DNP) because of the Air Force Forecast II recommendation for the development of the technology. Several nuclear concepts have been proposed to meet the Direct Nuclear Propulsion challenge. In this paper we will present results of an initial study of the potential of a cermet fueled nuclear system in providing the desired DNP capabilities and featuring a set of unique safety characteristics. The concept of cermet fuel for DNP applications was first developed by ANL and GE working independently more than 20 years ago. The two organizations came to several remarkably consistent conclusions. The present work has consisted of collecting a unified set of design parameters from the set of design results produced in the earlier work. The conclusion of this exercise was that a cermet-fueled DNP design looked extremely promising from performance and safety considerations and that it deserves serious consideration when the decision to develop one or more concepts for DNP is made.

  16. A passive fuel delivery system for portable direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Cao, Y.

    A passive device is utilized for transferring methanol into water through a wick material. The wick material preferentially has a higher wicking capability with respect to methanol than water, and operates in a siphon fashion with the intake end in contact with methanol and the discharge end in contact with water. Due to the difference of wicking capabilities, a net amount of methanol is pumped into water. The device described above is used as a fuel delivery component for a liquid-feed fuel cell system, such as a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), which directly utilizes a liquid fuel without an intermediate reforming process. In the present experimental study, methanol and water are stored separately in two containers and a wick is positioned between the containers as a siphon, with the aqueous methanol solution communicating with the anode of the DMFC. Methanol is siphoned from the methanol container to the water container in situ when the methanol in the water is consumed during the operation of the fuel cell. Through a proper selection of the wick and the containers, the methanol concentration near the anode of the DMFC was maintained within a preferred range.

  17. Facile solvothermal synthesis of highly active and robust Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn electrocatalyst towards direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Rajkumar; Dhiman, Shikha; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-08-01

    Ordered intermetallic Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn ternary electrocatalyst has been synthesized by sodium borohydride reduction of precursor salts Pd(acac)2, CuCl2.2H2O and SnCl2 using one-pot solvothermal synthesis method at 220 °C with a reaction time of 24 h. To the best of our knowledge, here for the first time we report surfactant free synthesis of a novel ordered intermetallic ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn nanoparticles. The ordered structure of the catalyst has been confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Composition and morphology of the nanoparticles have been confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry and TEM. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the ternary electrocatalyst towards ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. The catalyst is proved to be highly efficient and stable upto 500th cycle and even better than commercially available Pd/C (20 wt%) electrocatalysts. The specific and mass activity of the as synthesized ternary catalyst are found to be ∼4.76 and ∼2.9 times better than that of commercial Pd/C. The enhanced activity and stability of the ordered ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn catalyst can make it as a promising candidate for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell application.

  18. Zeolite-confined ruthenium(0) nanoclusters catalyst: record catalytic activity, reusability, and lifetime in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Ozkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, has been considered the most attractive hydrogen-storage material for portable fuel cell applications, as it provides a safe and practical means of producing hydrogen. In a recent communication (Zahmakiran, M.; Ozkar, S. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7065), we have reported a record total turnover number (TTON) of 103 200 mol H2/mol Ru and turnover frequency (TOF) up to 33 000 mol H2/mol Ru x h obtained by using intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride. Here we report full details of the kinetic studies on the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in both aqueous and basic solutions. Expectedly, the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters show unprecedented catalytic lifetime, TTON = 27 200 mol H2/mol Ru, and TOF up to 4000 mol H2/mol Ru x h in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in basic solution (5% wt NaOH) as well. More importantly, the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters are isolable, bottleable, redispersible, and yet catalytically active. They retain 76% or 61% of their initial catalytic activity at the fifth run with a complete release of hydrogen in aqueous and basic medium, respectively. The intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters were isolated as black powder and characterized by using a combination of advanced analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, TEM-EDX, SEM, XPS, ICP-OES, and N2 adsorption. PMID:19437749

  19. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  20. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J; Albright, B J; Dodd, E S; Hoffman, N M; McCall, G H; Ramsey, S D

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (∼10%). PMID:27391731

  1. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; McCall, G. H.; Ramsey, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 ×1014 W /cm2 ) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μ g of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (˜10 %).

  2. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  3. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  4. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  5. A Direct Carbon Fuel Cell with a Molten Antimony Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, Abhimanyu; Kungas, Rainer; Roy, Sounak; Javadekar, Ashay; Buttrey, Douglas J.; Vohs, John M.; Gorte, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    The direct utilization of carbonaceous fuels is examined in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten Sb anode at 973 K. It is demonstrated that the anode operates by oxidation of metallic Sb at the electrolyte interface, with the resulting Sb₂O₃ being reduced by the fuel in a separate step. Although the Nernst Potential for the Sb-Sb₂O₃ mixture is only 0.75 V, the electrode resistance associated with molten Sb is very low, approximately 0.06 Ωcm², so that power densities greater than 350 mW cm⁻² were achieved with an electrolyte-supported cell made from Sc-stabilized zirconia (ScSZ). Temperature programmed reaction measurements of Sb₂O₃ with sugar char, rice starch, carbon black, and graphite showed that the Sb₂O₃ is readily reduced by a range of carbonaceous solids at typical SOFC operating conditions. Finally, stable operation with a power density of 300 mW cm⁻² at a potential of 0.5 V is demonstrated for operation on sugar char.

  6. The borohydride oxidation reaction on La-Ni-based hydrogen-storage alloys.

    PubMed

    Paschoalino, Waldemir J; Thompson, Stephen J; Russell, Andrea E; Ticianelli, Edson A

    2014-07-21

    This work provides insights into the processes involved in the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media on metal hydride alloys formed by LaNi(4.7)Sn(0.2)Cu(0.1) and LaNi(4.78)Al(0.22) with and without deposited Pt, Pd, and Au. The results confirm the occurrence of hydrolysis of the borohydride ions when the materials are exposed to BH(4)(-) and a continuous hydriding of the alloys during BH(4)(-) oxidation measurements at low current densities. The activity for the direct BOR is low in both bare metal hydride alloys, but the rate of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis and the hydrogen-storage capacity are higher, while the rate of H diffusion is slower for bare LaNi(4.78) Al(0.22). The addition of Pt and Pd to both alloys results in an increase of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis, but the H(2) formed is rapidly oxidized at the Pt-modified catalysts. In the case of Au modification, a small increase in the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis is observed as compared to the bare alloys. The presence of Au and Pd also leads to a reduction of the rates of alloy hydriding/de-hydriding. PMID:24700670

  7. Novel Convenient Synthesis of (10)B-Enriched Sodium Borohydride.

    PubMed

    Safronov, Alexander V; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2016-06-01

    A convenient and efficient synthesis of (10)B-enriched sodium borohydride [Na(10)BH4] from commercially available (10)B-enriched boric acid [(10)B(OH)3] is described. The reaction sequence (10)B(OH)3 → (10)B(On-Bu)3 → (10)BH3·Et3N → Na(10)BH4 afforded the product in 60-80% yield. The reaction was successfully scaled to hundreds of gram per run. PMID:27195803

  8. Development of a direct ammonia-fueled molten hydroxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental study on direct ammonia fuel cells with a molten hydroxide electrolyte was conducted. The electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on Pt electrode in a molten NaOH-KOH electrolyte was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry. Ammonia was proved to be oxidized to N2 on the Pt electrode during anodic polarization in the molten hydroxide electrolyte. Furthermore, the direct ammonia fuel cell, i.e., Pt gas diffusion electrode|molten NaOH-KOH electrolyte|Pt gas diffusion electrode, was assembled and operated at 200-220 °C. The cell achieved the maximum power density of ca. 16 mW cm-2 at 220 °C with the supply of NH3 and humidified O2 to the anode and cathode, respectively. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation over Pt electrodes in a molten hydroxide electrolyte was discussed based on the results obtained.

  9. Ammine Calcium and Strontium Borohydrides: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Lars H; Lee, Young-Su; Černý, Radovan; Sarusie, Ram S; Cho, Young Whan; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-10-26

    A new series of solvent- and halide-free ammine strontium metal borohydrides Sr(NH3 )n (BH4 )2 (n=1, 2, and 4) and further investigations of Ca(NH3 )n (BH4 )2 (n=1, 2, 4, and 6) are presented. Crystal structures have been determined by powder XRD and optimized by DFT calculations to evaluate the strength of the dihydrogen bonds. Sr(NH3 )(BH4 )2 (Pbcn) and Sr(NH3 )2 (BH4 )2 (Pnc2) are layered structures, whereas M(NH3 )4 (BH4 )2 (M=Ca and Sr; P21 /c) are molecular structures connected by dihydrogen bonds. Both series of compounds release NH3 gas upon thermal treatment if the partial pressure of ammonia is low. Therefore, the strength of the dihydrogen bonds, the structure of the compounds, and the NH3 /BH4 (-) ratio for M(NH3 )n (BH4 )m have little influence on the composition of the released gasses. The composition of the released gas depends mainly on the thermal stability of the ammine metal borohydride and the corresponding metal borohydride. PMID:26364708

  10. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  11. A composite of borohydride and super absorbent polymer for hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Liu, B. H.; Liu, F. F.; Xu, D.

    To develop a hydrogen source for underwater applications, a composite of sodium borohydride and super absorbent polymer (SAP) is prepared by ball milling sodium borohydride powder with SAP powder, and by dehydrating an alkaline borohydride gel. When sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) is used as the SAP, the resulting composite exhibits a high rate of borohydride hydrolysis for hydrogen generation. A mechanism of hydrogen evolution from the NaBH 4-NaPAA composite is suggested based on structure analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of water and NiCl 2 content in the precursor solution on the hydrogen evolution behavior are investigated and discussed.

  12. Improved fullerene nanofiber electrodes used in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Miyazawa, K.; Kato, R.; Hotta, K.; Wakahara, T.

    2009-04-01

    Platinum supported on fullerene nanofibers as possible electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were studied. Fullerene nanofiber with 20 wt% Pt loading was mixed with 5 wt% Nafion solution. The mixture paste was coated on Nafion 117 membrane and sandwiched with silicon plates. To increase the surface reaction area of catalyst, nanoimprint was used to fabricate micro-patterns in the Nafion proton exchange membrane. Nanoimprint pattern consisted of dots of 500 nm-in-diameter, 140 nm-in-depth and 1 μm-in-spacing. The nanoimprint of the treated proton exchange membrane (PEM) was carried out in a desktop thermal nanoimprint system (NI273, Nano Craft Tech. Corp., Japan) at the optimized conditions of 130 °C and pressure of 3 MPa for 6 min. Then the Pt-coated PEM was sandwiched with micro-channelled silicon plates to form a micro-DMFC. With passively feeding of 1 M methanol solution and air at room temperature, the as-prepared cell had the open circuit voltage of 0.34 V and the maximum power density of 0.30 mW/cm2. Compared with a fresh cell, the results shows that nanofibers used in nanoimprinted PEM have an improvement on the performance of micro fuel cells.

  13. Ultrasonic radiation to enable improvement of direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoqun; Wu, Jiang; Luo, Hao; Wang, Sanwu; Chen, Tao

    2016-03-01

    To improve DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) performance, a new method using ultrasonic radiation is proposed and a novel DMFC structure is designed and fabricated in the present paper. Three ultrasonic transducers (piezoelectric transducer, PZT) are integrated in the flow field plate to form the ultrasonic field in the liquid fuel. Ultrasonic frequency, acoustic power, and methanol concentration have been considered as variables in the experiments. With the help of ultrasonic radiation, the maximum output power and limiting current of cell can be independently increased by 30.73% and 40.54%, respectively. The best performance of DMFC is obtained at the condition of ultrasonic radiation (30 kHz and 4 W) fed with 2M methanol solution, because both its limiting current and output power reach their maximum value simultaneously (222 mA and 33.6 mW, respectively) under this condition. These results conclude that ultrasonic can be an alternative choice for improving the cell performance, and can facilitate a guideline for the optimization of DMFC. PMID:26585016

  14. Evaluation of composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Roberts, E. P. L.; Holmes, S. M.

    The performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can be significantly affected by the transport of methanol through the membrane, depolarising the cathode. In this paper, the literature on composite membranes that have been developed for reduction of methanol crossover in DMFCs is reviewed. While such membranes can be effective in reducing methanol permeability, this is usually combined with a reduction in proton conductivity. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity are relatively straightforward, and these parameters (or a membrane 'selectivity' based on the ratio between them) are often used to characterize DMFC membranes. However, we have carried out one-dimensional simulations of DMFC performance for a wide range of membrane properties, and the results indicate that DMFC performance is normally either limited by methanol permeability or proton conductivity. Thus use of a 'selectivity' is not appropriate for comparison of membrane materials, and results from the model can be used to compare different membranes. The results also show that Nafion ® 117 has an optimum thickness, where DMFC performance is equally limited by both methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The model also indicates that new composite membranes based on Nafion ® can only offer significant improvement in DMFC performance by enabling operation with increased methanol concentration in the fuel. A number of composite membrane materials that have been reported in the literature are shown to deliver significant reduction in DMFC performance due to reduced proton conductivity, although improved performance at high methanol concentration may be possible.

  15. Direct and Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Wilson, Kyle; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2010-06-01

    Adding energy directly into the vibrational modes of automotive fuel may reduce the threshold energy required for combustion, without raising the combustion charge temperature. This energy can be supplied either directly via incident laser radiation or indirectly through collision with directly excited molecules. The most common chemical in commercial gasoline, isooctane, does not absorb infrared radiation sufficiently at any wavelength for which an infrared laser is readily available. However, CO2 lasers are relatively cheap, and are available at wavelengths which are absorbed by isopropanol as well as ethanol, which is also a component of commercial gasoline. In this study, the infrared absorption of isopropanol and ethanol in balance isooctane were measured at three wavelengths (10.6 m, 10.2 m, and 9.3 m) of incident CO2 laser radiation. Additional time-resolved emission measurements were performed for these mixtures. The data support the existence of the proposed collisional pathway for energy transfer from ethanol and isopropanol to isooctane.

  16. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  17. Power generation properties of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, S.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by small-jet flame on the power generation performance of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small flame and heated product gas is impinged toward it and this system is the simplest and smallest unit of the power generation device to be developed. Equivalence ratio (phi) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as main experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage (OCV) increases linearly with the increase of temperature in wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically at which the equivalence ratio became small (phi <= 2.0) showing inner flame clearly. This result suggests that OCV depends on not only cell temperature but also the species concentration exposed to the cell. It is suggested that Nernst equation might work satisfactory to predict OCV of DFFC.

  18. Micro-crack formation in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Spernjak, Dusan; Zelenay, Piotr; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the micro-crack formation of Nafion®-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) after extended direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operation. All electrodes, both with metal-black and carbon-supported catalysts, contain some micro-cracks initially; the area covered by these cracks increases both in the anode and cathode after 100-hours of DMFC test. X-ray tomography shows an increase in the crack area in both anode and cathode that correlates with methanol feed concentration and methanol crossover. The MEAs with carbon-supported catalysts and thicker membrane are more resistant to the formation of micro-cracks compared to those with metal-black catalysts and thinner membrane, respectively. The impact of the micro-crack formation on cell performance and durability is limited over the 100-hour DMFC operation, with the long-term impact remaining unknown.

  19. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  20. A novel membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qingfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Yang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-less fuel cell possesses such advantages as simplified design and lower cost. In this paper, a membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell is constructed by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) supported Pd and ternary PdSnNi composites as the anode catalysts and Fe/C-PANI composite, produced by direct pyrolysis of Fe-doped polyaniline precursor, as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The alcohols investigated in the present study are methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, iso-butanol and sec-butanol. The cathode catalyst Fe/C-PANI is electrochemically inactive to oxidation of the alcohols. The performance of the cell with various alcohols in 1 mol L-1 NaOH solution on either Pd/MWCNT or PdSnNi/MWCNT catalyst has been evaluated. In any case, the performance of the cell using the anode catalyst PdSnNi/MWCNT is considerably better than Pd/MWCNT. For the PdSnNi/MWCNT, the maximum power densities of the cell using methanol (0.5 mol L-1), ethanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), iso-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-butanol (0.2 mol L-1), iso-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) and sec-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) are 0.34, 1.03, 1.07, 0.44, 0.50, 0.31 and 0.15 mW cm-2, respectively.

  1. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  2. MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER

    SciTech Connect

    Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

    2005-04-01

    The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of

  3. Direct liquid-feed fuel cell with membrane electrolyte and manufacturing thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved direct liquid-feed fuel cell having a solid membrane electrolyte for electrochemical reactions of an organic fuel. Improvements in interfacing of the catalyst layer and the membrane and activating catalyst materials are disclosed.

  4. Direct oxidation of waste vegetable oil in solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Kumar, R.; Thakur, S. T.; Rudnick, L. R.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    Solid-oxide fuel cells with ceria, ceria-Cu, and ceria-Rh anode were demonstrated to generate stable electric power with waste vegetable oil through direct oxidation of the fuel. The only pre-treatment to the fuel was a filtration to remove particulates. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 100 h for the waste vegetable oil without dilution. The generated power was up to 0.25 W cm -2 for ceria-Rh fuel cell. This compares favorably with previously studied hydrocarbon fuels including jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil.

  5. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  6. Computational modeling of a direct propane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, H.; Bourgault, Y.; Ternan, M.

    2011-03-01

    The first two dimensional mathematical model of a complete direct propane fuel cell (DPFC) is described. The governing equations were solved using FreeFem software that uses finite element methods. Robin boundary conditions were used to couple the anode, membrane, and cathode sub-domains successfully. The model showed that a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane having its pores filled with zirconium phosphate (ZrP-PTFE), in a DPFC at 150 °C performed much the same as other electrolytes; Nafion, aqueous H3PO4, and H2SO4 doped polybenzimidazole, when they were used in DPFCs. One advantage of a ZrP-PTFE at 150 °C is that it operates without liquid phase water. As a result corrosion will be much less severe and it may be possible for non-precious metal catalysts to be used. Computational results showed that the thickness of the catalyst layer could be increased sufficiently so that the pressure drop between the reactant and product channels of the interdigitated flow fields is small. By increasing the width of the land and therefore the reactant's contact time with the catalyst it was possible to approach 100% propane conversion. Therefore fuel cell operation with a minimum concentration of propane in the product stream should be possible. Finally computations of the electrical potential in the ZrP phase, the electron flux in the Pt/C phase, and the overpotential in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers showed that serious errors in the model occurred because proton diffusion, caused by the proton concentration gradient, was neglected in the equation for the conservation of protons.

  7. Reactivity Descriptors for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand U.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, selfconsistent, density functional theory (DFT–GGA). This database, combined with a simple electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between the adsorption free energies of various intermediates in the reaction network, we find that the results determined with the full database of adsorption energies can be estimated by knowing only two key descriptors for each metal surface: the free energies of OH and CO on the surface. Two mechanisms for methanol oxidation to CO₂ are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO₂ without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non-group 11 transition metals; of these metals, Pt is predicted to be the most active. For methanol decomposition via the indirect mechanism, we find that the onset potential is limited either by the ability to activate methanol, by the ability to activate water, or by surface poisoning by CO* or OH*/O*. Among pure metals, there is no obvious candidate for a good anode catalyst, and in order to design a better catalyst, one has to look for bi-functional surfaces such as the well-studied PtRu alloy.

  8. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  9. Direct internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhongliang

    2005-07-01

    The direct operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) on hydrocarbon fuels is desired since it could reduce power plant size, weight and complexity. The primary challenge is to find effective means through which anode-coking could be suppressed or avoided. Throughout the research, conventional Ni-anode supported SOFCs were employed because they provide high power densities and are being actively developed for commercial applications. Various strategies were used to reduce or avoid anode-coking during the SOFC operation. Firstly, air or CO2/H2O was added to hydrocarbon fuels, such that coking was less thermodynamically favorable, and the resulting internal partial oxidation or dry/steam reforming reactions provided H 2 and CO to the fuel cell. For example, for low hydrocarbons like propane, coke-free operation was achieved on 8% yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte SOFCs via internal partial oxidation, yielding stable and high power densities, e.g. 0.7 W·cm-2 at 790°C. Secondly, a novel design for hydrocarbon fueled SOFCs was proposed, i.e. a separate supported catalyst (Ru-CeO2) layer was placed against the anode side. The catalyst layer provided good catalytic activity for the hydrocarbon reforming reactions, while the nickel-based anode was retained to provide excellent electrochemical activity for the oxidation of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide reforming products. For heavy hydrocarbons like iso-octane, the catalyst layer was crucial far allowing stable cell operation without coking. The lack of coking at the Ni-YSZ anode can be explained by reforming at the Ru-Ceria catalyst layer, which eliminated most of the hydrocarbon species before the fuel reached the anode. A key element of this strategy was the choice of a catalyst metal, Ru, that promotes hydrocarbon reforming but does not itself cause coking. Thirdly, reduced-temperature SOFCs with thin samarium-doped Ceria (SDC) electrolytes were developed; these devices have potentially improved

  10. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  11. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  12. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-07-01

    The United States Department of.Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technology in the areas of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles, and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic barrier filter, ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases, and is considering cleaning temperatures up to 2100{degrees}F. This document describes Phase II of the program, the design, construction, and shakedown of a bench-scale facility to test and confirm the feasibility of this ILEC technology.

  13. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  14. US Spent (Used) Fuel Status, Management and Likely Directions- 12522

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Leslie J.

    2012-07-01

    As of 2010, the US has accumulated 65,200 MTU (42,300 MTU of PWR's; 23,000 MTU of BWR's) of spent (irradiated or used) fuel from 104 operating commercial nuclear power plants situated at 65 sites in 31 States and from previously shutdown commercial nuclear power plants. Further, the Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for an additional 2458 MTU of DOE-owned defense and non defense spent fuel from naval nuclear power reactors, various non-commercial test reactors and reactor demonstrations. The US has no centralized large spent fuel storage facility for either commercial spent fuel or DOE-owned spent fuel. The 65,200 MTU of US spent fuel is being safely stored by US utilities at numerous reactor sites in (wet) pools or (dry) metal or concrete casks. As of November 2010, the US had 63 'independent spent fuel storage installations' (or ISFSI's) licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission located at 57 sites in 33 states. Over 1400 casks loaded with spent fuel for dry storage are at these licensed ISFSI's; 47 sites are located at commercial reactor sites and 10 are located 'away' from a reactor (AFR's) site. DOE's small fraction of a 2458 MTU spent fuel inventory, which is not commercial spent fuel, is with the exception of 2 MTU, being stored at 4 sites in 4 States. The decades old US policy of a 'once through' fuel cycle with no recycle of spent fuel was set into a state of 'mass confusion or disruption' when the new US President Obama's administration started in early 2010 stopping the only US geologic disposal repository at the Yucca Mountain site in the State of Nevada from being developed and licensed. The practical result is that US nuclear power plant operators will have to continue to be responsible for managing and storing their own spent fuel for an indefinite period of time at many different sites in order to continue to generate electricity because there is no current US government plan, schedule or policy for taking possession of

  15. DIRECT INVESTIGATIONS OF THE IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIONUCLIDES IN THE ALTERATION PHASES OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DOE is the custodian of several thousand tons of spent nuclear fuel that is intended for geological disposal. The direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel or of mixed oxide fuel (fabricated for the disposal of excess weapons plutonium) requires a careful analysis of the role of spen...

  16. The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartrom, Amy M.; Haan, John L.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an operating Direct Formate Fuel Cell employing formate salts as the anode fuel, air or oxygen as the oxidant, a polymer anion exchange membrane, and metal catalysts at the anode and cathode. Operation of the DFFC at 60 °C using 1 M KOOCH and 2 M KOH as the anode fuel and electrolyte and oxygen gas at the cathode produces 144 mW cm-2 of peak power density, 181 mA cm-2 current density at 0.6 V, and an open circuit voltage of 0.931 V. This performance is competitive with alkaline Direct Liquid Fuel Cells (DLFCs) previously reported in the literature and demonstrates that formate fuel is a legitimate contender with alcohol fuels for alkaline DLFCs. A survey of the literature shows that a formate-oxygen fuel cell has a high theoretical potential, and the safe, renewable formate fuel does not poison the anode catalyst.

  17. L-Ascorbic acid as an alternative fuel for direct oxidation fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoko; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Siroma, Zyun; Ioroi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Kazuaki

    L-Ascorbic acid (AA) was directly supplied to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as an alternative fuel. Only dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) was detected as a product released by the electrochemical oxidation of AA via a two-electron transfer process regardless of the anode catalyst used. The ionomer in the anode may inhibit the mass transfer of AA to the reaction sites by electrostatic repulsion. In addition, polymer resins without an ionic group such as poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(vinyl butyral) were also useful for reducing the contact resistance between Nafion membrane and carbon black used as an anode, although an ionomer like Nafion is needed for typical PEFCs. A reaction mechanism at the two-phase boundaries between AA and carbon black was proposed for the anode structure of DAAFCs, since lack of the proton conductivity was compensated by AA. There was too little crossover of AA through a Nafion membrane to cause a serious technical problem. The best performance (maximum power density of 16 mW cm -2) was attained with a Vulcan XC72 anode that included 5 wt.% Nafion at room temperature, which was about one-third of that for a DMFC with a PtRu anode.

  18. State of direct fuel cell/turbine systems development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Walzak, Jim; Patel, Dilip; Daly, Joseph; Maru, Hans; Sanderson, Robert; Livingood, William

    FuelCell Energy Inc. (FCE) is actively developing fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid systems, DFC/T ®, for generation of clean electric power with very high efficiencies. The gas turbine extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell without the need for supplementary fuel. Key features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas (60% on coal gas), minimal emissions, simple design, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed sub-MW scale proof-of-concept tests (pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant). The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. A small packaged natural gas fueled sub-MW unit is being developed for demonstrations (alpha and beta units). Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  19. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  20. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  1. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  2. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  3. Magnesium Borohydride as a Hydrogen Storage Material: Synthesis of Unsolvated Mg(BH4)2

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, G.; Andrus, M; Gao, Y; Zhao, J; Kniajanski, S

    2009-01-01

    Different methods for preparation of unsolvated magnesium borohydride, a promising material for hydrogen storage, based on exchange reaction of MgCl2 with lithium and sodium borohydride in different solvents have been evaluated. A convenient scalable method for synthesis of pure Mg(BH4)2 by ball milling a mixture of MgCl2 and NaBH4 in diethyl ether has been developed. Crystalline stable low and high temperature phases, as well as a new metastable phase of unsolvated magnesium borohydride have been prepared.

  4. Modified lithium borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage (2).

    PubMed

    Au, Ming; Jurgensen, Arthur; Zeigler, Kristine

    2006-12-28

    This paper reports the results of the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. Various metals, metal hydrides, and metal chlorides were selected and evaluated as destabilization agents for reducing dehydriding temperatures and improving dehydriding/rehydriding reversibility. The most effective material was LiBH4 + 0.2MgCl2 + 0.1TiCl3 which starts desorbing 5 wt % of hydrogen at 60 degrees C and can be rehydrogenated to 4.5 wt % at 600 degrees C and 70 bar. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic analysis show the interaction of LiBH4 with additives and the unusual change of B-H stretching. PMID:17181309

  5. Sodium borohydride/chloranil-based assay for quantifying total flavonoids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangjiu; Liu, Dong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2008-10-22

    A novel sodium borohydride/chloranil-based (SBC) assay for quantifying total flavonoids, including flavones, flavonols, flavonones, flavononols, isoflavonoids, flavanols, and anthocyanins, has been developed. Flavonoids with a 4-carbonyl group were reduced to flavanols using sodium borohydride catalyzed with aluminum chloride. Then the flavan-4-ols were oxidized to anthocyanins by chloranil in an acetic acid solution. The anthocyanins were reacted with vanillin in concentrated hydrochloric acid and then quantified spectrophotometrically at 490 nm. A representative of each common flavonoid class including flavones (baicalein), flavonols (quercetin), flavonones (hesperetin), flavononols (silibinin), isoflavonoids (biochanin A), and flavanols (catechin) showed excellent linear dose-responses in the general range of 0.1-10.0 mM. For most flavonoids, the detection limit was about 0.1 mM in this assay. The recoveries of quercetin from spiked samples of apples and red peppers were 96.5 +/- 1.4% (CV = 1.4%, n = 4) and 99.0 +/- 4.2% (CV = 4.2%, n = 4), respectively. The recovery of catechin from spiked samples of cranberry extracts was 97.9 +/- 2.0% (CV = 2.0%, n = 4). The total flavonoids of selected common fruits and vegetables were measured using this assay. Among the samples tested, blueberry had the highest total flavonoid content (689.5 +/- 10.7 mg of catechin equiv per 100 g of sample), followed by cranberry, apple, broccoli, and red pepper. This novel SBC total flavonoid assay can be widely used to measure the total flavonoid content of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, herbal products, dietary supplements, and nutraceutical products. PMID:18798633

  6. Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

  7. Engineering microbial fuels cells: recent patents and new directions.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental research into how microbes generate electricity within microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has far outweighed the practical application and large scale development of microbial energy harvesting devices. MFCs are considered alternatives to standard commercial polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology because the fuel supply does not need to be purified, ambient operating temperatures are maintained with biologically compatible materials, and the biological catalyst is self-regenerating. The generation of electricity during wastewater treatment using MFCs may profoundly affect the approach to anaerobic treatment technologies used in wastewater treatment as a result of developing this energy harvesting technology. However, the materials and engineering designs for MFCs were identical to commercial fuel cells until 2003. Compared to commercial fuel cells, MFCs will remain underdeveloped as long as low power densities are generated from the best systems. The variety of designs for MFCs has expanded rapidly in the last five years in the literature, but the patent protection has lagged behind. This review will cover recent and important patents relating to MFC designs and progress. PMID:19075862

  8. Investigation of chemical and electrochemical reactions mechanisms in a direct carbon fuel cell using olive wood charcoal as sustainable fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleuch, Amal; Halouani, Kamel; Li, Yongdan

    2015-05-01

    Direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is a high temperature fuel cell using solid carbon as fuel. The use of environmentally friendly carbon material constitutes a promising option for the DCFC future. In this context, this paper focuses on the use of biomass-derived charcoal renewable fuel. A practical investigation of Tunisian olive wood charcoal (OW-C) in planar DCFCs is conducted and good power density (105 mW cm-2) and higher current density (550 mA cm-2) are obtained at 700 °C. Analytical and predictive techniques are performed to explore the relationships between fuel properties and DCFC chemical and electrochemical mechanisms. High carbon content, carbon-oxygen groups and disordered structure, are the key parameters allowing the achieved good performance. Relatively complex chain reactions are predicted to explain the gas evolution within the anode. CO, H2 and CH4 participation in the anodic reaction is proved.

  9. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

  10. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  11. Synthesis, structure and gas-phase reactivity of the mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4 (LPh = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavras, Athanasios; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N.; White, Jonathan M.; Mulder, Roger J.; Canty, Allan J.; O'Hair, Richard A. J.

    2015-10-01

    Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(i) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (LMe) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (LPh). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and LPh, cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (LMe and LPh) and DFT calculations (LMe) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ provides a change in geometry that facilitates subsequent loss of BH3 to produce the dihydride clusters, [Ag3(H)2Ln]+ (n = 1 and 2). Together with the results of previous studies (Girod et al., Chem. - Eur. J., 2014, 20, 16626), this provides a direct link between mixed silver hydride/borohydride nanoclusters, silver hydride nanoclusters, and silver nanoclusters.Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(i) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (LMe) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (LPh). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and LPh, cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (LMe and LPh) and DFT calculations (LMe) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag

  12. Detailed Multi‐dimensional Modeling of Direct Internal Reforming Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseronis, K.; Fragkopoulos, I.S.; Bonis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and can be attributed to their high operating temperature. Here we consider a direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell setup in which a separate fuel reformer is not required. We construct a multidimensional, detailed model of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, where mass transport in the fuel channel is modeled using the Stefan‐Maxwell model, whereas the mass transport within the porous electrodes is simulated using the Dusty‐Gas model. The resulting highly nonlinear model is built into COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, and is validated against experimental data from the literature. A number of parametric studies is performed to obtain insights on the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell system behavior and efficiency, to aid the design procedure. It is shown that internal reforming results in temperature drop close to the inlet and that the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance can be enhanced by increasing the operating temperature. It is also observed that decreases in the inlet temperature result in smoother temperature profiles and in the formation of reduced thermal gradients. Furthermore, the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance was found to be affected by the thickness of the electrochemically‐active anode catalyst layer, although not always substantially, due to the counter‐balancing behavior of the activation and ohmic overpotentials. PMID:27570502

  13. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced. PMID:22948563

  14. A theoretical study of the structure and stability of borohydride on 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Escaño, Mary Clare Sison; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption of borohydride on 3d transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) was studied using first principles calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. Magnetic effect on the stability of borohydride is noted. Molecular adsorption is favorable on Co, Ni and Cu, which is characterized by the strong s-dzz hybridization of the adsorbate-substrate states. Dissociated adsorption structure yielding one or two H adatom fragments on the surface is observed for Cr, Mn and Fe.

  15. The crystal chemistry of inorganic metal borohydrides and their relation to metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Černý, Radovan; Schouwink, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of inorganic homoleptic metal borohydrides are analysed with respect to their structural prototypes found amongst metal oxides in the inorganic databases such as Pearson's Crystal Data [Villars & Cenzual (2015). Pearson's Crystal Data. Crystal Structure Database for Inorganic Compounds, Release 2014/2015, ASM International, Materials Park, Ohio, USA]. The coordination polyhedra around the cations and the borohydride anion are determined, and constitute the basis of the structural systematics underlying metal borohydride chemistry in various frameworks and variants of ionic packing, including complex anions and the packing of neutral molecules in the crystal. Underlying nets are determined by topology analysis using the program TOPOS [Blatov (2006). IUCr CompComm. Newsl. 7, 4-38]. It is found that the Pauling rules for ionic crystals apply to all non-molecular borohydride crystal structures, and that the latter can often be derived by simple deformation of the close-packed anionic lattices c.c.p. and h.c.p., by partially removing anions and filling tetrahedral or octahedral sites. The deviation from an ideal close packing is facilitated in metal borohydrides with respect to the oxide due to geometrical and electronic considerations of the BH4(-) anion (tetrahedral shape, polarizability). This review on crystal chemistry of borohydrides and their similarity to oxides is a contribution which should serve materials engineers as a roadmap to design new materials, synthetic chemists in their search for promising compounds to be prepared, and materials scientists in understanding the properties of novel materials. PMID:26634719

  16. ``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

  17. Compact bipolar plate-free direct methanol fuel cell stacks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Takahashi, Motohiro; Nagao, Masahiro; Hibino, Takashi

    2011-05-14

    Fuel cells with a PtAu/C anode and a Pr-doped Mn(2)O(3)/C cathode were stacked without using a bipolar plate, and their discharge properties were investigated in a methanol aqueous solution bubbled with air. A three-cell stack exhibited a stack voltage of 2330 mV and a power output of 21 mW. PMID:21451850

  18. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  19. Efficiency of non-optimized direct carbon fuel cell with molten alkaline electrolyte fueled by carbonized biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, A.; Kobyłecki, R.; Włodarczyk, R.; Bis, Z.

    2016-07-01

    The direct carbon fuel cells (DCFCs) belong to new generation of energy conversion devices that are characterized by much higher efficiencies and lower emission of pollutants than conventional coal-fired power plants. In this paper the DCFC with molten hydroxide electrolyte is considered as the most promising type of the direct carbon fuel cells. Binary alkali hydroxide mixture (NaOH-LiOH, 90-10 mol%) is used as electrolyte and the biochar of apple tree origin carbonized at 873 K is applied as fuel. The performance of a lab-scale DCFC with molten alkaline electrolyte is investigated and theoretical, practical, voltage, and fuel utilization efficiencies of the cell are calculated and discussed. The practical efficiency is assessed on the basis of fuel HHV and LHV and the values are estimated at 40% and 41%, respectively. The average voltage efficiency is calculated as roughly 59% (at 0.65 V) and it is in a relatively good agreement with the values obtained by other researchers. The calculated efficiency of fuel utilization exceeds 95% thus indicating a high degree of carbon conversion into the electric power.

  20. Direct power generation from waste coffee grounds in a biomass fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hansaem; Ocon, Joey D.; Lee, Seunghwa; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of direct power generation from waste coffee grounds (WCG) via high-temperature carbon fuel cell technology. At 900 °C, the WCG-powered fuel cell exhibits a maximum power density that is twice than carbon black. Our results suggest that the heteroatoms and hydrogen contained in WCG are crucial in providing good cell performance due to its in-situ gasification, without any need for pre-reforming. As a first report on the use of coffee as a carbon-neutral fuel, this study shows the potential of waste biomass (e.g. WCG) in sustainable electricity generation in fuel cells.

  1. Novel anode structure for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. G.; Lim, Chan; Yang, L. X.; Scott, K.; Roy, S.

    Pt-Ru catalysts have been made by a thermal decomposition and electrodeposition method onto a titanium mesh for the electrooxidation of methanol. Galvanostatic polarisations were used to assess and compare the relative activities of the electrodes. SEM and XRD are employed to study the morphology and structure of the catalyst layers. The performance of the anodes in fuel cell assemblies is also discussed. We can see that the mesh perform well in half and full cell tests despite significant apparent physical differences, which are yet to be explored.

  2. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification. PMID:25283435

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell in combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, F.; Dincer, I.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive steady state modelling and thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell integrated with Gas Turbine power cycle (DU-SOFC/GT). The use of urea as direct fuel mitigates public health and safety risks associated with the use of hydrogen and ammonia. The integration scheme in this study covers both oxygen ion-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-O) and hydrogen proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-H). Parametric case studies are carried out to investigate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance of the system. The results reveal that the fuel cell exhibited the highest level of exergy destruction among other system components. Furthermore, the SOFC-O based system offers better overall performance than that with the SOFC-H option mainly due to the detrimental reverse water-gas shift reaction at the SOFC anode as well as the unique configuration of the system.

  4. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  5. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in Phase 2 of the program. Progress in these areas is described.

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell system diagnosis based on the signed directed graph method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lu, Languang; Ouyang, Minggao; Li, Jianqiu; Xu, Liangfei

    The fuel-cell powered bus is becoming the favored choice for electric vehicles because of its extended driving range, zero emissions, and high energy conversion efficiency when compared with battery-operated electric vehicles. In China, a demonstration program for the fuel cell bus fleet operated at the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and the Shanghai Expo in 2010. It is necessary to develop comprehensive proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) diagnostic tools to increase the reliability of these systems. It is especially critical for fuel-cell city buses serving large numbers of passengers using public transportation. This paper presents a diagnostic analysis and implementation study based on the signed directed graph (SDG) method for the fuel-cell system. This diagnostic system was successfully implemented in the fuel-cell bus fleet at the Shanghai Expo in 2010.

  7. Sodium borohydride removes aldehyde inhibitors for enhancing biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    To enhance biohydrogen production from glucose and xylose in the presence of aldehyde inhibitors, reducing agent (i.e., sodium borohydride) was in situ added for effective detoxification. The detoxification efficiencies of furfural (96.7%) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 91.7%) with 30mM NaBH4 were much higher than those of vanillin (77.3%) and syringaldehyde (69.3%). Biohydrogen fermentation was completely inhibited without detoxification, probably because of the consumption of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by inhibitors reduction (R-CHO+2NADH→R-CH2OH+2NAD(+)). Addition of 30mM NaBH4 provided the reducing power necessary for inhibitors reduction (4R-CHO+NaBH4+2H2O→4R-CH2OH+NaBO2). The recovered reducing power in fermentation resulted in 99.3% recovery of the hydrogen yield and 64.6% recovery of peak production rate. Metabolite production and carbon conversion after detoxification significantly increased to 63.7mM and 81.9%, respectively. PMID:26342346

  8. Promoted dehydrogenation in ammine lithium borohydride supported by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyi; Li, Shaofeng; Guo, Yanhui; Yu, Xuebin

    2011-10-14

    In this paper, ammine lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)·NH(3)) was successfully impregnated into multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through a melting technique. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, and density measurements were employed to confirm the formation of the nanostructured LiBH(4)·NH(3)/CNTs composites. As a consequence, it was found that the dehydrogenation of the loaded LiBH(4)·NH(3) was remarkably enhanced, showing an onset dehydrogenation at temperatures below 100 °C, together with a prominent desorption of pure hydrogen at around 280 °C, with a capacity as high as 6.7 wt.%, while only a trace of H(2) liberation was present for the pristine LiBH(4)·NH(3) in the same temperature range. Structural examination indicated that the significant modification of the thermal decomposition route of LiBH(4)·NH(3) achieved in the present study is due to the CNT-assisted formation of B-N-based hydride composite, starting at a temperature below 100 °C. It is demonstrated that the formation of this B-N-based hydride covalently stabilized the [NH] groups that were weakly coordinated on Li cations in the pristine LiBH(4)·NH(3)via strong B-N bonds, and furthermore, accounted for the substantial hydrogen desorption at higher temperatures. PMID:21850349

  9. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  10. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Ismail B.

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  11. Combustion of Various Highly Reactive Fuels in a 3.84- by 10-inch Mach 2 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Fletcher, Edward A.

    1959-01-01

    The following fuels and fuel combinations injected from the top wall of a Mach 2 wind tunnel were successfully burned and gave associated pressure rises: aluminum borohydride, pentaborane, mixtures containing up to 41 percent JP-4 fuel in aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of JP-4 fuel and aluminum borohydride, trimethyl aluminum with water injections, and diethyl aluminum hydride with water injections. The following fuels could not be ignited at the tunnel conditions (static pressure, 5.6 in. Hg; static temperature, -148 F): trimethylborane, triethylborane, propylpentaborane, ethyl- decaborane, and vinylsilane. Studies in which the heated region was probed by water injections indicated that the flow downstream of the flame front is subsonic and recirculating.

  12. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C.

    1995-12-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  13. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.; Carlson, G.; Doyon, J.

    1995-08-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  14. Coal fueled ported kiln direct reduction process in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Rierson, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Allis Mineral Systems (AMS), formerly the minerals processing group at Allis-Chalmers Corporation, developed a ported kiln process in the 1960`s specifically for the direct reduction of iron ore. The process is called ACCAR. This ported kiln technology has more recently been coupled with AMS` GRATE-KILN System for iron oxide pelletizing into the GRATE-CAR Process, for minerals reduction. The GRATE-CAR Process can handle a fine grained ore concentrate through the steps of agglomeration, induration and reduction in a single production line.

  15. Effect of anode electrocatalyst for direct hydrazine fuel cell using proton exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Koji; Yasuda, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Miyazaki, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko

    Hydrazine was examined as a fuel in a direct-liquid-fueled fuel cell that uses proton exchange membrane (PEM) such as Nafion ®. Different kinds of noble metals were examined as anode electrocatalysts for direct hydrazine fuel cells (DHFCs). In DHFC using platinum or palladium as the anode electrocatalyst, more than 1 V of cell voltage was obtained in the low-current density region. The I- V characteristics changed drastically depending on the kind of anode electrocatalyst used. Compositions of the exhaust materials from each electrode were analyzed to investigate the reaction occurring at the electrodes. The analysis revealed that the catalytic decomposition reaction of hydrazine proceeded further than the electro-oxidation reaction on the anode side using rhodium or ruthenium.

  16. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  17. Solar-induced direct biomass-to-electricity hybrid fuel cell using polyoxometalates as photocatalyst and charge carrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Liu, Mengjie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Cai, Hongli; Deng, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The current polymer-exchange membrane fuel cell technology cannot directly use biomass as fuel. Here we present a solar-induced hybrid fuel cell that is directly powered with natural polymeric biomasses, such as starch, cellulose, lignin, and even switchgrass and wood powders. The fuel cell uses polyoxometalates as the photocatalyst and charge carrier to generate electricity at low temperature. This solar-induced hybrid fuel cell combines some features of solar cells, fuel cells and redox flow batteries. The power density of the solar-induced hybrid fuel cell powered by cellulose reaches 0.72 mW cm(-2), which is almost 100 times higher than cellulose-based microbial fuel cells and is close to that of the best microbial fuel cells reported in literature. Unlike most cell technologies that are sensitive to impurities, the cell reported in this study is inert to most organic and inorganic contaminants present in the fuels. PMID:24504242

  18. Solar-induced direct biomass-to-electricity hybrid fuel cell using polyoxometalates as photocatalyst and charge carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Liu, Mengjie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Cai, Hongli; Deng, Yulin

    2014-02-01

    The current polymer-exchange membrane fuel cell technology cannot directly use biomass as fuel. Here we present a solar-induced hybrid fuel cell that is directly powered with natural polymeric biomasses, such as starch, cellulose, lignin, and even switchgrass and wood powders. The fuel cell uses polyoxometalates as the photocatalyst and charge carrier to generate electricity at low temperature. This solar-induced hybrid fuel cell combines some features of solar cells, fuel cells and redox flow batteries. The power density of the solar-induced hybrid fuel cell powered by cellulose reaches 0.72 mW cm-2, which is almost 100 times higher than cellulose-based microbial fuel cells and is close to that of the best microbial fuel cells reported in literature. Unlike most cell technologies that are sensitive to impurities, the cell reported in this study is inert to most organic and inorganic contaminants present in the fuels.

  19. Synthesis and thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride ammoniates with controllable composition as hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjing; Liu, Yongfeng; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2013-02-01

    An ammonia-redistribution strategy for synthesizing metal borohydride ammoniates with controllable coordination number of NH(3) was proposed, and a series of magnesium borohydride ammoniates were easily synthesized by a mechanochemical reaction between Mg(BH(4))(2) and its hexaammoniate. A strong dependence of the dehydrogenation temperature and purity of the released hydrogen upon heating on the coordination number of NH(3) was elaborated for Mg(BH(4))(2)·xNH(3) owing to the change in the molar ratio of H(δ+) and H(δ-), the charge distribution on H(δ+) and H(δ-), and the strength of the coordinate bond N:→Mg(2+). The monoammoniate of magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH(4))(2)·NH(3)) was obtained for the first time. It can release 6.5% pure hydrogen within 50 minutes at 180 °C. PMID:23192895

  20. Hydrogenotitanates nanotubes supported platinum anode for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abida, Bochra; Chirchi, Lotfi; Baranton, Stève; Napporn, Teko Wilhelmin; Morais, Cláudia; Léger, Jean-Michel; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogenotitanates nanotubes (HTNs) are prepared from TiO2 powder via hydrothermal processing in 11.25 M NaOH aq. The reaction temperature is 130 °C for 20 h. Afterward a heat treatment is done during 2 h at 500 °C in air, to obtain calcined HTNs (HTNs-cal). The structural change on the molecular TiO2 during the hydrothermal treatment is investigated in detail by various analytic techniques such as XRD and TEM, which reveal that the crystal structure of the HTNs materials is similar to that of H2Ti2O5·H2O nanotubes with 160 nm in length and 10 nm in diameter. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms indicate that synthesized solids are mesoporous materials with a multiwalled nanotubular structure and high specific surface area. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on the HTNs by the impregnation method for a total noble metal loading of 10 wt%. The electrocatalytic activity of these electrocatalysts is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry in acid medium. Typical CO stripping voltammetry in acidic solutions is investigated. The results demonstrate that the HTNs can greatly enhance the catalytic activity of Pt for methanol oxidation. The CO stripping test shows that the Pt/HTNs can shift the CO oxidation potential to lower direction than Pt/C (XC72) and Pt/HTNs-cal catalysts.

  1. Low-Pt-Content Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial experiments have led to the discovery that a nanophase alloy of Pt, Ru, Ni, and Zr is effective as an anode catalyst material for direct methanol fuel cells. This discovery has practical significance in that the electronic current densities achievable by use of this alloy are comparable or larger than those obtained by use of prior Pt/Ru catalyst alloys containing greater amounts of Pt. Heretofore, the high cost of Pt has impeded the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. By making it possible to obtain a given level of performance at reduced Pt content (and, hence, lower cost), the discovery may lead to reduction of the economic impediment to commercialization.

  2. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  3. Development of CNG direct injection (CNGDI) clean fuel system for extra power in small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yusoff; Shamsudeen, Azhari; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan

    2012-06-01

    A new design of fuel system for CNG engine with direct injection (CNGDI) was developed for a demonstration project. The development of the fuel system was done on the engine with cylinder head modifications, for fuel injector and spark plug openings included in the new cylinder head. The piston was also redesigned for higher compression ratio. The fuel rails and the regulators are also designed for the direct injection system operating at higher pressure about 2.0 MPa. The control of the injection timing for the direct injectors are also controlled by the Electronic Control Unit specially designed for DI by another group project. The injectors are selected after testing with the various injection pressures and spray angles. For the best performance of the high-pressure system, selection is made from the tests on single cylinder research engine (SCRE). The components in the fuel system have to be of higher quality and complied with codes and standards to secure the safety of engine for high-pressure operation. The results of the CNGDI have shown that better power output is produced and better emissions were achieved compared to the aspirated CNG engine.

  4. Direct Carbon Conversion: Application to the Efficient Conversion of Fossil Fuels to Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Berry, G; Pasternak, A; Surles, T; Steinberg, M

    2001-03-07

    We introduce a concept for efficient conversion of fossil fuels to electricity that entails the decomposition of fossil-derived hydrocarbons into carbon and hydrogen, and electrochemical conversion of these fuels in separate fuel cells. Carbon/air fuel cells have the advantages of near zero entropy change and associated heat production (allowing 100% theoretical conversion efficiency). The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product are invariant, allowing constant EMF and full utilization of fuel in single pass mode of operation. System efficiency estimates were conducted for several routes involving sequential extraction of a hydrocarbon from the fossil resource by (hydro) pyrolysis followed by thermal decomposition. The total energy conversion efficiencies of the processes were estimated to be (1) 80% for direct conversion of petroleum coke; (2) 67% HHV for CH{sub 4}; (3) 72% HHV for heavy oil (modeled using properties of decane); (4) 75.5% HHV (83% LHV) for natural gas conversion with a Rankine bottoming cycle for the H{sub 2} portion; and (5) 69% HHV for conversion of low rank coals and lignite through hydrogenation and pyrolysis of the CH{sub 4} intermediate. The cost of carbon fuel is roughly $7/GJ, based on the cost of the pyrolysis step in the industrial furnace black process. Cell hardware costs are estimated to be less than $500/kW.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of temporally developing turbulent reacting liquid-fueled jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashank, Shashank; Pitsch, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Liquid fueled engines are ubiquitous in the transportation industry because liquid fuel minimizes the weight and volume of propulsion systems. The combustion that occurs in these engines is an inherently multi-physics process, involving fuel evaporation, reaction kinetics, and high levels of turbulence. A desire for high fidelity data that explains complex interaction between different physical mechanisms motivates the consideration of direct numerical simulation (DNS) as an investigation tool. In this study three-dimensional DNS of a reacting n-heptane liquid fueled temporal jet have been performed to study auto-ignition and subsequent burning in conditions that are representative of a diesel engine environment. In these simulations the continuous phase is described using an Eulerian representation whereas Lagrangian particle tracking is used to model the dispersed phase. The results of this study will demonstrate the importance of unsteady effects, and of accounting for the interaction between different modes of combustion, when simulating spray combustion.

  6. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

    2003-07-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

  7. Nickel-cobalt bimetallic anode catalysts for direct urea fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Gang; Wu, Zucheng

    2014-08-01

    Nickel is an ideal non-noble metal anode catalyst for direct urea fuel cell (DUFC) due to its high activity. However, there exists a large overpotential toward urea electrooxidation. Herein, NiCo/C bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared with various Co contents (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) to improve the activity. The best Co ratio was 10% in the aspect of cell performance, with a maximum power density of 1.57 mW cm-2 when 0.33 M urea was used as fuel, O2 as oxidant at 60°C. The effects of temperature and urea concentration on DUFC performance were investigated. Besides, direct urine fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 0.19 mW cm-2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V at 60°C.

  8. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  9. Nickel-cobalt bimetallic anode catalysts for direct urea fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Gang; Wu, Zucheng

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is an ideal non-noble metal anode catalyst for direct urea fuel cell (DUFC) due to its high activity. However, there exists a large overpotential toward urea electrooxidation. Herein, NiCo/C bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared with various Co contents (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) to improve the activity. The best Co ratio was 10% in the aspect of cell performance, with a maximum power density of 1.57 mW cm−2 when 0.33 M urea was used as fuel, O2 as oxidant at 60°C. The effects of temperature and urea concentration on DUFC performance were investigated. Besides, direct urine fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 0.19 mW cm−2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V at 60°C. PMID:25168632

  10. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  11. Mesoporous silica as a membrane for ultra-thin implantable direct glucose fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tushar; Hu, Ye; Stoller, Meryl; Feldman, Marc; Ruoff, Rodney S; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2011-07-21

    The design, fabrication and characterization of an inorganic catalyst based direct glucose fuel cell using mesoporous silica coating as a functional membrane is reported. The desired use of mesoporous silica based direct glucose fuel cell is for a blood vessel implantable device. Blood vessel implantable direct glucose fuel cells have access to higher continuous glucose concentrations. However, reduction in the implant thickness is required for application in the venous system as part of a stent. We report development of an implantable device with a platinum thin-film (thickness: 25 nm) deposited on silicon substrate (500 μm) to serve as the anode, and graphene pressed on a stainless steel mesh (175 μm) to serve as the cathode. Control experiments involved the use of a surfactant-coated polypropylene membrane (50 μm) with activated carbon (198 μm) electrodes. We demonstrate that a mesoporous silica thin film (270 nm) is capable of replacing the conventional polymer based membranes with an improvement in the power generated over conventional direct glucose fuel cells. PMID:21637881

  12. A Guided-Inquiry Approach to the Sodium Borohydride Reduction and Grignard Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The guided-inquiry approach is applied to the reactions of sodium borohydride and phenyl magnesium bromide with benzaldehyde, benzophenone, benzoic anhydride, and ethyl benzoate. Each team of four students receives four unknowns. Students identify the unknowns and their reaction products by using the physical state of the unknown, an…

  13. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  14. By-Product Carrying Humidified Hydrogen: An Underestimated Issue in the Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride.

    PubMed

    Petit, Eddy; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2016-07-21

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride generates up to four molecules of hydrogen, but contrary to what has been reported so far, the humidified evolved gas is not pure hydrogen. Elemental and spectroscopic analyses show, for the first time, that borate by-products pollute the stream as well as the vessel. PMID:27333077

  15. Tailoring the properties of ammine metal borohydrides for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Lars H; Ley, Morten B; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-04-24

    A series of halide-free ammine manganese borohydrides, Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅nNH3 , n=1, 2, 3, and 6, a new bimetallic compound Li2 Mn(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 , and the first ammine metal borohydride solid solution Mg1-x Mnx (BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 are presented. Four new crystal structures have been determined by synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction and the thermal decomposition is systematically investigated for all the new compounds. The solid-gas reaction between Mn(BH4 )2 and NH3 provides Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 . The number of NH3 per Mn has been varied by mechanochemical treatment of Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 -Mn(BH4 )2 mixtures giving rise to increased hydrogen purity for n/m≤1 for M(BH4 )m ⋅nNH3 . The structures of Mg(BH4 )2 ⋅3NH3 and Li2 Mg(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 have been revisited and new structural models are presented. Finally, we demonstrate that ammonia destabilizes metal borohydrides with low electronegativity of the metal (χp <∼1.6), while metal borohydrides with high electronegativity (χp >∼1.6) are generally stabilized. PMID:25821161

  16. Borohydride Reduction of Estrone: Demonstration of Diastereoselectivity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aditya, Animesh; Nichols, David E.; Loudon, G. Marc

    2008-01-01

    This experiment presents a guided-inquiry approach to the demonstration of diastereoselectivity in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Chiral hindered ketones such as estrone, undergo facile reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly diastereoselective manner. The diastereomeric estradiols produced in the reaction can be analyzed and…

  17. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a 'pen' for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the 'printed' borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  18. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications.

  19. A Microwave-Assisted Reduction of Cyclohexanone Using Solid-State-Supported Sodium Borohydride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lori L.; Kittredge, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of carbonyl groups by sodium borohydride though is a well-known reaction in most organic lab texts, a difficulty for an instructor adopting this reaction in a student lab is that it is too long. Using a microwave assisted organic synthesis solves this difficulty and one such reaction, which is the microwave-assisted reduction of…

  20. High efficiency direct fuel cell hybrid power cycle for near term application

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Direct carbonate fuel cells being developed by Energy Research Corporation can generate power at an efficiency approaching 60% LHV. This unique fuel cell technology can consume natural gas and other hydrocarbon based fuels directly without requiring an external reformer, thus providing a simpler and inherently efficient power generation system. A 2 MW power plant demonstration of this technology has been initiated at an installation in the city of Santa Clara in California. A 2.85 MW commercial configuration shown in Figure 1 is presently being developed. The complete plant includes the carbonate fuel cell modules, an inverter, transformer and switchgear, a heat recovery unit and supporting instrument air and water treatment systems. The emission levels for this 2.85 MW plant are projected to be orders of magnitude below existing or proposed standards. The 30 year levelized cost of electricity, without inflation, is projected to be approximately 5{cents}/kW-h assuming capital cost for the carbonate fuel cell system of $1000/kW.

  1. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  2. The effect of operation and design parameters on the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, S.F.; Cisar, A.; Franaszczuk, K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technology continues to receive considerable attention as a potential replacement for fossil fuels as a primary source of terrestrial power. Ideally, such power systems would operate at relatively low temperatures (< 100{degrees}C) which suggests strongly the use of cell technology based upon the proton exchange membrane (PEM). Without question, hydrogen is a very desirable fuel choice for these types of systems, because of its high energy density. However, the difficulties associated with the production and routine handling of hydrogen limit severely its commercial use at present. The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a particularly attractive alternative to the use of the hydrogen/oxygen cell. Although not as high as hydrogen, the energy density of methanol is the highest among the organic fuels. Furthermore, because of the similarity in liquid handling requirements between methanol and gasoline, a significant portion of the infrastructure necessary for the marketing and distribution of the fuel is already in place. Other inherent attributes of the DMFC which include rapid start-up and operation with little or no emission or noise signature have led to an intense DMFC research effort over the past twenty years and, indeed, the DMFC has even been referred to as {open_quotes}the electrochemist`s dream{close_quotes}.

  3. Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

    2004-01-28

    Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

  4. Direct oxidation solid oxide fuel cell: Aspects of anode performance optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Nunes, Olga

    I have examined the impact of high fuel utilization and anode catalyst stability for Cu-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). First, the performance of SOFC with Cu-ceria-YSZ anodes was studied in n-butane at 973 K as a function of fuel conversion. Conversion led to dilution of the fuel which resulted in a significant decrease in performance at higher fuel conversions. I demonstrated that the inclusion of a steam-reforming catalyst within the anode compartment of direct-oxidation SOFC improved performance at high fuel utilization. The performance of a Cu-CeO2-YSZ SOFC was compared to a conventional SOFC with Ni-YSZ anode while operating on H2, CO, and syngas fuels. Cells with Cu-CeO2-YSZ anodes exhibit similar performance when operating on H2 or CO fuels, while cells with Ni-YSZ anodes exhibited substantially lower performance when operating on CO compared to H2. My work demonstrated that dilution of H2 by H2O has little effect on the kinetics of H2 oxidation on both the Cu-CeO 2-YSZ and Ni-YSZ anodes. In addition, I have investigated the thermal stability of the anode catalyst, ceria, was using thin ceria films supported on YSZ. Special attention was given to the interactions between ceria and YSZ under high temperature treatments in reducing and oxidizing environments. My results have shown that ceria films on YSZ are highly mobile at relatively moderate temperatures and their morphology depends on the gas environment to which they have been exposed. Studies with alpha-Al2O3 assisted in clarifying the role of the substrate in the treatment effects on ceria.

  5. Promising Fuel Cycle Options for R&D – Results, Insights, and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wigeland, Roald Arnold

    2015-05-01

    The Fuel Cycle Options (FCO) campaign in the U.S. DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program conducted a detailed evaluation and screening of nuclear fuel cycles. The process for this study was described at the 2014 ICAPP meeting. This paper reports on detailed insights and questions from the results of the study. The comprehensive study identified continuous recycle in fast reactors as the most promising option, using either U/Pu or U/TRU recycle, and potentially in combination with thermal reactors, as reported at the ICAPP 2014 meeting. This paper describes the examination of the results in detail that indicated that there was essentially no difference in benefit between U/Pu and U/TRU recycle, prompting questions about the desirability of pursuing the more complex U/TRU approach given that the estimated greater challenges for development and deployment. The results will be reported from the current effort that further explores what, if any, benefits of TRU recycle (minor actinides in addition to plutonium recycle) may be in order to inform decisions on future R&D directions. The study also identified continuous recycle using thorium-based fuel cycles as potentially promising, in either fast or thermal systems, but with lesser benefit. Detailed examination of these results indicated that the lesser benefit was confined to only a few of the evaluation metrics, identifying the conditions under which thorium-based fuel cycles would be promising to pursue. For the most promising fuel cycles, the FCO is also conducting analyses on the potential transition to such fuel cycles to identify the issues, challenges, and the timing for critical decisions that would need to be made to avoid unnecessary delay in deployment, including investigation of issues such as the effects of a temporary lack of plutonium fuel resources or supporting infrastructure. These studies are placed in the context of an overall analysis approach designed to provide comprehensive information to

  6. Direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cell operating in gradual internal reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, S. D.; Galesco, M. V.; Girona, K.; de Florio, D. Z.; Steil, M. C.; Georges, S.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2012-09-01

    An electrolyte supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using standard electrodes, doped-lanthanum manganite cathode and Ni-cermet anode, was operated with direct (anhydrous) ethanol for more than 100 h, delivering essentially the same power output as running on hydrogen. A ceria-based layer provides the catalytic activity for the gradual internal reforming, which uses the steam formed by the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen for the decomposition of ethanol. Such a concept opens up the way for multi-fuel SOFCs using standard components and a catalytic layer.

  7. Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-12

    Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

  8. Analysis of ignition behavior in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine using propane and methane as primary fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-10-05

    This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (Ω pilot ∼ 0.2-0.6 and Ω overall ∼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant Ω pilot (> 0.5), increasing Ω overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing Ω overall (at constant Ω pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

  9. Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G.; Gray, D.

    1995-12-31

    For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

  10. Process analysis of a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrian, Stefanie v.; Meusinger, Josefin

    Recently, a greatly increasing interest in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) for a range of applications has been observed. The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) based on a PEFC uses methanol directly for electric power generation and promises technical advantages, for example, for power trains. This study analyses the interaction between a DMFC stack fed with a liquid aqueous methanol solution and the peripheral system equipment. A simulation model of a DMFC system for mobile applications (from methanol to net electricity) is presented to calculate system efficiencies on the basis of thermodynamic engineering calculations. Based on the simulation calculations, useful operating requirements can be specified. To optimise the performance of DMFC systems, it is necessary to consider the operational characteristics of all the components required in the system. There are worldwide activities to improve the performance of a DMFC stack, which depends on numerous operating parameters. But it is not sufficient to optimise only the current/potential curves of the fuel cell without taking all the consequences for the system into consideration. The results of the computer simulation presented here emphasise the difficulties in improving fuel cell performance without decreasing system efficiency and describes the consequences for the system's operation conditions. Priorities are additionally set concerning the heat management of the fuel cell stack. In the case of liquid fuel supply, the water crossover through the membrane and the ensuing vapourisation at the cathode side impairs the thermal balance. Key operating parameters, which influence these effects, are pressure, temperature, air flow and methanol permeation rate.