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Sample records for direct chill casting

  1. Cold Cracking Development in AA7050 Direct Chill-Cast Billets under Various Casting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-09-01

    Cold cracking is a potentially catastrophic phenomenon in direct chill (DC) casting of 7 xxx series aluminum alloys that leads to safety hazards and loss of production. The relatively low thermal conductivity and wide solidification temperature range in these alloys results in accumulation of residual thermal stress under nonuniform cooling conditions of the billets. In addition, such alloys show a severe loss in ductility below a critical temperature of 573 K (300 °C). This brittleness along with high stress concentration at the tips of voids and microcracks can lead to catastrophic failure. Casting process parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of stresses in the billet and increase the susceptibility of the material to cold cracking. In order to investigate the effect of casting process parameters such as casting speed, billet size, and water flow rate, thermomechanical simulations were applied using ALSIM5 casting simulation software. Among the studied casting process parameters, the increased billet size and high casting speed resulted in the most dramatic increase in residual stress level. Critical crack sizes that led to catastrophic failure were also calculated and are reported against process parameters.

  2. Centerline Depletion in Direct-Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys: The Avalanche Effect and Its Consequence for Turbulent Jet Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Samuel R.; Allanore, Antoine

    2016-07-01

    Avalanche dynamics of sedimenting grains in direct-chill casting of aluminum ingots is investigated as a primary driving force for centerline segregation. An analytical model predicting the importance of avalanche events as a function of casting parameters is proposed and validated with prior art results. New experimental results investigating the transient and steady-state centerline segregation of DC casting with a turbulent jet are reported.

  3. Microstructure and fatigue characteristics of direct chill cast and electromagnetic cast 2024 Al alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sug Won; Hao, Hai

    2003-07-01

    The distinct advantages of the electromagnetic casting (EMC) process consist in the presence of stirring motions in the melt, which lead to significant grain size reduction in solidified ingot. Furthermore, surface and subsurface qualities are improved due to the absence of ingot mold. However, it is impossible to achieve the aforementioned advantages in conventional direct chill casting (DCC). In order to contrast the before and after heat treatments of the microstructural and mechanical characteristics of EMC and DCC 2024 aluminium alloys, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractions (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), etc. were carried out. Compared with the DCC ingot, the EMC ingot has better mechanical properties not only in the ascast condition but also in the as-aged condition. The DSC curves show that the EMC specimens have high enthalpy, i.e., the thermal kinetic energy to form precipitates during the aging treatment process. Despite heat treatments applied to the DCC ingot, it fails to attain the same mechanical properties as the EMC ingot. Moreover, considering the expernsive scalping operation for DCC ingots, the EMC technique, which offers a lower manufacturing cost, is one of the best manufacturing methods used in obtaining the ingots of wrought aluminum alloys.

  4. Simulation Study of Al-1Mn/Al-10Si Circular Clad Ingots Prepared by Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fu, Ying; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-02-01

    A modified direct chill casting process based on Novelis FusionTM Technology co-casting process was used recently to prepare Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots. In the current study, a comprehensive simulation model was developed to investigate the direct chill casting process for preparing the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots, and a parametric study and experimental research of the direct chill casting process was conducted to explore potential success and failure casting conditions. The simulation results revealed the bonding mechanism of the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si interface in the direct chill casting process and identified the effect of certain parameters on casting performance. The results indicated that the effect of casting speed and Al-1Mn casting temperature on the variations of the minimum solid fraction of Al-1Mn at the interface is stronger than that of cooling water flow rate in inner mold, while Al-10Si casting temperature is the weakest of the four casting parameters. The corresponding experimental results verified that Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingot with acceptable metallurgical bonding can be successfully prepared by direct chill casting process under the proper casting parameters. The thickness of diffusion zone is about 40 μm, and the fractured position in tensile test was located in the Al-1Mn alloy side which indicated the strength of the interfacial region is higher than that of Al-1Mn alloy.

  5. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  6. Coolant Characteristics and Control in Direct Chill Casting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This project focuses on understanding the fundamentals of coolant behavior and developing strategies to control the cooling rate of DC casting of aluminum ingots. Project partners will conduct a fundamental study to identify various parameters affecting critical heat flux and boiling transition and evaluate the effects of various additives (impurity particulates, sodium and calcium salts, carbonates, bicarbonates, surfactants, etc.).

  7. Scale Rules for Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Dmitry G.; Du, Qiang; Katgerman, Laurens

    2008-05-01

    An analysis of published experimental and numerical results shows that there is a scaling relationship between the magnitude and direction of centerline segregation in direct-chill (DC) cast billets from aluminum alloys and the process parameters, i.e., billet diameter and casting speed. It seems that there is always a range of these process parameters where the centerline segregation is positive, and there is a threshold when the centerline segregation vanishes. Numerical simulations of macrosegregation during DC casting of a binary Al-Cu alloy were performed at different ratios of casting speed and billet diameter. The macrosegregation model takes into account only two mechanisms of macrosegregation, i.e., thermosolutal convection and shrinkage-induced flow. The results of these computer simulations fit well to the dependence obtained using numerous reference data. The results are discussed in terms of the contribution of different mechanisms of macrosegregation and the shape of the billet sump.

  8. Macrosegregation in horizontal direct chill casting of ternary Al alloys: Investigation of solid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vušanović, I.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Macrosegregation in direct chill casting processes is controlled by fluid flow due to the thermosolutal natural and forced convection, shrinkage, and transport of unattached solid grains. Because grain refinement is usually used in aluminum direct chill casting, some effort must be made to model free-floating solid grains, and their attachment to a rigid mushy zone. Criteria for attachment vary, but many are based on using a critical solid packing fraction, which is treated as uniform and constant throughout the domain. In the case of horizontal casting (HDC), gravity acts perpendicularly to the casting direction, and the assumption of a uniform packing fraction cannot be applied because the solid particles attach to some surfaces by settling and others by being swept into the rigid solid from below. In this simulation of HDC casting of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy, the rigid and unattached solid is tracked separately, and a rule set is developed to determine the attachment of free-floating solid. Comparison between cases with and without unattached solid movement shows qualitatively different results, particularly in bottom part of slab. Non-uniform packing fractions cause very different segregation patterns in the lower half of the ingot compared to the cases with no solid movement, less segregation near centerline compared to uniform packing fraction cases, and positive segregation near the place where inlet jet impinges on the mushy zone.

  9. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  10. Characterisation and modelling of defect formation in direct-chill cast AZ80 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, D.; Robson, J.D.; Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.

    2015-06-15

    Wrought magnesium alloys for demanding structural applications require high quality defect free cast feedstock. The aim of this study was to first identify and characterise typical defects in direct chill cast magnesium–aluminium–zinc (AZ) alloy billet and then use modelling to understand the origins of these defects so they can be prevented. Defects were first located using ultrasonic inspection and were then characterised using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and serial sectioning, establishing the presence of oxide films and intermetallic particles Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} in all defects. A model was developed to predict the flow patterns and growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases during casting, which influence the formation of defects. Simulation of the growth of the intermetallic particles demonstrated that precipitation from the liquid occurs in the mould. The combination of the entrained oxide films and intermetallic particles recirculates in the liquid metal and continues to grow, until large enough to settle, which is predicted to occur at the centre of the mould where the flow is the slowest. Based on these predictions, strategies to reduce the susceptibility to defect formation are suggested. - Highlights: • Casting defects in magnesium direct chill casting have been imaged and characterised in 3-dimensions. • The occurrences of co-located clusters of particles and oxide films have been characterised and explained. • A coupled model has been developed to help interpret the observed trend for defects located towards the centre of billets.

  11. Secondary Cooling in the Direct-Chill Casting of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, E.; Wells, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Secondary cooling information is critical when modeling the direct-chill (DC) casting process of magnesium alloys. However, accurate data for the heat flux in the secondary cooling zone are scarce, and most reported research is concerned with the DC casting of aluminum alloys. Cooling experiments that simulated the secondary cooling of magnesium AZ31 were conducted in order to observe the influence of various parameters on the different boiling-water heat-transfer phenomena. The heat flux in each boiling regime was quantified as a function of the cooling-water flow rate, water temperature, and initial sample temperature. Equations developed from the cooling experiments could be combined to build “idealized” boiling curves for a given set of DC casting conditions.

  12. Comparison of unextruded air slip direct chill cast 6061 ingot with bar stock extruded from conventional direct chill cast 6061 ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, S. C.; Kassner, M. E.

    1997-08-01

    Air Slip direct chill cast 6061 small diameter ingots (Direct Forge) were compared with 6061 extruded bar stock. The T6 mechanical properties were compared for both the Direct Forge ingot and the extruded bar stock, as well as cold impact extruded cylinders produced from Direct Forge small diameter ingot and extruded stock. It was found that the tensile and fatigue properties of Direct Forge ingot and cylinders from this ingot were significantly superior to those of extruded stock and cylinder produced from this stock. The improved properties are a result of higher solidification rates leading to smaller alloy-constituent dispersed particles and, thus, the production of smaller and more stable grain sizes. Direct Forge has the additional advantages of (a) not requiring hot or cold work prior to forming impacted extruded or forged parts, (b) being utilized in the T6 temper without any prior deformation, (c) having isotropic and consistent properties, (d) not requiring machining to remove surface segregation or defects, and (e) having more consistent and refined grain sizes.

  13. Heat-Transfer Measurements in the Primary Cooling Phase of the Direct-Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, Harry; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal modeling of the direct-chill casting process requires accurate knowledge of (1) the different boundary conditions in the primary mold and secondary direct water-spray cooling regimes and (2) their variability with respect to process parameters. In this study, heat transfer in the primary cooling zone was investigated by using temperature measurements made with subsurface thermocouples in the mold as input to an inverse heat conduction algorithm. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the primary cooling of AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloy ingots cast at speeds ranging between 1.58 and 2.10 mm/s. The average heat flux values were calculated for the steady-state phase of the casting process, and an effective heat-transfer coefficient for the global primary cooling process was derived that included convection at the mold surfaces and conduction through the mold wall. Effective heat-transfer coefficients were evaluated at different points along the mold height and compared with values from a previously derived computational fluid dynamics model of the direct-chill casting process that were based on predictions of the air gap thickness between the mold and ingot. The current experimental results closely matched the values previously predicted by the air gap models. The effective heat-transfer coefficient for primary cooling was also found to increase slightly with the casting speed and was higher near the mold top (up to 824 W/m2·K) where the molten aluminum first comes in contact with the mold than near the bottom (as low as 242 W/m2·K) where an air gap forms between the ingot and mold because of thermal contraction of the ingot. These results are consistent with previous studies.

  14. Modeling of ingot development during the start-up phase of direct chill casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. J.; Croft, T. N.; Cross, M.

    2003-10-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting is a core primary process in the production of aluminum ingots. However, its operational optimization is still under investigation with regard to a number of features, one of which is the issue of curvature at the base of the ingot. Analysis of these features requires a computational model of the process that accounts for the fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification phase change, and thermomechanical anlaysis. This article describes an integrated approach to the modeling of all the preceding phenomena and their interactions

  15. Experimental investigation of thermomechanical effects during direct chill and electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.; Carrupt, B.; Plata, M.

    1995-08-01

    The deformation and the temperature field within direct chill (DC) and electromagnetic (EM) cast aluminum ingots have been measured in situ using a simple experimental setup. The deformation of the cross section of the cold ingots has also been characterized as a function of the casting speed, alloy composition, and inoculation condition. The pull-in of the lateral rolling faces has been found to occur in two sequences for DC cast ingots, whereas that associated with electromagnetic casting (EMC) was continuous. The pull-in was maximum at the center of these faces (about 7 to 9 pct) and strongly depended upon the casting speed. Near the short sides of the ingots, the deformation was only about 2 pct and was nearly independent of the casting parameters and alloy composition. Based upon these measurements, it was concluded that the pull-in of the rolling faces was mainly due to the bending of the ingots induced by the thermal stresses. This conclusion was further supported by a simple two-dimensional thermoelastic model.

  16. Modeling Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Multicomponent Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2007-01-01

    A macrosegregation model for direct chill casting of multicomponent aluminum alloys is implemented using the macroscopic transfer model, microsegregation model, and phase diagram calculation module, and applied to an Al-Cu-Mg alloy. The phase diagram calculation module is based on the TQ-Interface of CALPHAD software THERMO-CALC and the mapping technique initially proposed by Dore et al. This mapping technique is modified in arranging the mapping axes where the tabulation is performed to increase the access efficiency. This strategy provides a practical solution for quick access to phase diagram data in modeling macrosegregation of multicomponent alloys. It is found from our simulation that the contribution of each of the solute elements to the solutal buoyancy affects the final segregation pattern. The appropriate choice of the solidification path is important for the shrinkage-induced macrosegregation. The model is applied to a real direct-chill (DC) casting experiment and a reasonable semiquantitative agreement with experimental data has been obtained, though the model does not take into account the possible contribution of floating grains and exudation.

  17. Microstructure, Macrosegregation, and Thermal Analysis of Direct Chill Cast AA5182 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, N.; Haghdadi, N.; Phillion, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    The variation in microstructure, macrosegregation, and solidification behavior during aluminum alloy Direct Chill casting is investigated with respect to geometry. Optical microscopy, energy-dispersive analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study the grain size evolution, distribution of alloying elements, and solidification sequence across the cross section of DC cast AA5182 aluminum alloy. The results show that (1) grain size increases from the surface to center of the ingot, corresponding to a decrease in the heat extraction rate; (2) there is a considerable macrosegregation of Mg, Mn, and Cr, with Mg showing negative segregation at the center and positive segregation at the surface, Mn showing negative segregation both at center and surface and positive segregation elsewhere, and Cr showing positive segregation at the center and negative segregation at the surface; (3) the solidus and the reaction temperatures vary as a function of position due to the local chemical composition and cooling rate. These findings, which show the interconnectivity of grain size, segregation, and solidification sequence, are useful in further analysis of the DC casting process and in predicting casting-related defects, specifically hot tear formation.

  18. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subodh K.

    2006-01-09

    A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the

  19. The Deformation of Clad Aluminum Sheet Produced By Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; Gallerneault, Mark; Wagstaff, Robert B.

    2010-08-01

    The tensile and bending response of AA3003/AA6111 sheet produced by direct chill casting has been investigated. It is shown that the interface strength of the clad sheet has a minimum value of 175 MPa, and failure does not occur in the interface. The yield strength of the clad sheet obeys the rule of mixtures, and up to a cladding thickness of 100 μm—which was the thickest investigated—the work hardening behavior and tensile response are essentially unaffected by the presence of the cladding. The bending response of the sheet is improved greatly by the presence of ductile cladding, which was the case for prestrained and aged sheet. Under bending, failure is initiated in the lower bendability core and then eventually propagates through the more ductile cladding, which yields the final bend failure.

  20. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  1. Characterization of the flow in the molten metal sump during direct chill aluminum casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Jason M.

    1997-06-01

    A recent analytical model for the liquid aluminum flow in a direct chill (DC) casting sump has been investigated and the scaling coefficients evaluated. The magnitudes of flow-field features, such as the depth of the temperature stratification in the sump and the velocity of the metal in the thermal boundary layer close to the solidification front, have been calculated. The results broadly agree with recent full numerical calculations of the flow in the sump. The variation of these essential flow features has been investigated across a range of typical ingot sizes, casting speeds, and superheats, and critical macro-casting-parameter combinations have been identified. The limitations of the model are discussed and the possible effects the identified structure has on macrosegregation are briefly explored. Finally, the influence on the flow field of the method of feeding the ingot is investigated, and it is concluded that the model and these results are not invalidated if the feeding is nonuniform over the top surface of the sump.

  2. A Numerical Study of the Direct-Chill Co-Casting of Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baserinia, Amir R.; Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2013-08-01

    For the last 70 years, direct-chill (DC) casting has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of monolithic sheet and extruded products. Traditionally, clad aluminum sheet products have been made from separate core and clad DC cast ingots by an expensive roll-bonding process; however, in 2005, Novelis unveiled an innovative variant of the DC casting process called the Fusion™ Technology process that allows the production of multialloy ingots that can be rolled directly into laminated or clad sheet products. Of paramount importance for the successful commercialization of this new technology is a scientific and quantitative understanding of the Fusion™ casting process that will facilitate process optimization and aid in the future development of casting methodology for different alloy combinations and ingot and clad dimensions. In the current study, a numerical steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology casting process was developed and used to simulate the casting of rectangular bimetallic ingots made from the typical brazing sheet combination of AA3003 core clad with an AA4045 aluminum alloy. The analysis is followed by a parametric study of the process. The influence of casting speed and chill-bar height on the steady-state thermal field within the ingot is investigated. According to the criteria developed with the thermofluids model, the AA3003/AA4045 combination of aluminum alloys can be cast successfully with casting speeds up to 2.4 mm s-1. The quality of the metallurgical bond between the core and the clad is decreased for low casting speeds and chill-bar heights >35 mm. These results can be used as a guideline for improving the productivity of the Fusion™ Technology process.

  3. On Vertical Drag Defects Formation During Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Aluminum Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Torbjörn; Jarfors, Anders E. W.

    2013-12-01

    During air-slip direct chill casting of aluminum billets, one of the major defects occurring includes traces along the billet called vertical drags (VDs). If the VDs are too deep or too many, then they cause scraping of the billets. As in the subsequent extrusion process, the surface quality is known to impair both the productivity and quality of the profiles. In cast-house practice, many theories circulate about the causes of VD defects and how to avoid them, but in the literature, no thorough treatments have been made to explain this phenomenon. In the current study, the outer appearance, structure around, and compositions at the defects are analyzed. A theory for the formation of the defects, their cause, and how their appearance is coupled to different alloy types is presented. The segregation in the vicinity of the defects is discussed based on deformation of semisolid materials and coupled to Reynolds dilatancy in granular materials. The theory can explain differences between 6063 and 6005 alloys.

  4. Modeling of ingot distortions during direct chill casting of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical model based upon the ABAQUS software has been developed for the computation of the thermomechanical state of the solidifying strand during direct chill (DC) casting of rolling sheet ingots and during subsequent cooling. Based upon a finiteelement formulation, the model determines the temperature distribution, the stresses, and the associated deformations in the metal. For that purpose, the thermomechanical properties of the alloy have been measured up to the coherency temperature using creep and indentation tests. The thermophysical properties as well as the boundary conditions associated with the lateral water spray have been determined using inverse modeling. The predicted ingot distortions, mainly, “butt curl,” “butt swell,” and lateral faces pull-in, are compared with experimental measurements performed during solidification and after complete cooling of the ingot. Particular emphasis is placed on the nonuniform contraction of the lateral faces. The influence of the mold shape and the contributions to this contraction are assessed as a function of the casting conditions.

  5. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J.

    2006-08-15

    Approximately 68% of the aluminum produced in the United States is first cast into ingots prior to further processing into sheet, plate, extrusions, or foil. The direct chill (DC) semi-continuous casting process has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of ingots due largely to its robust nature and relative simplicity. Though the basic process of DC casting is in principle straightforward, the interaction of process parameters with heat extraction, microstructural evolution, and development of solidification stresses is too complex to analyze by intuition or practical experience. One issue in DC casting is the formation of stress cracks [1-15]. In particular, the move toward larger ingot cross-sections, the use of higher casting speeds, and an ever-increasing array of mold technologies have increased industry efficiencies but have made it more difficult to predict the occurrence of stress crack defects. The Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap [16] has recognized the challenges inherent in the DC casting process and the control of stress cracks and selected the development of 'fundamental information on solidification of alloys to predict microstructure, surface properties, and stresses and strains' as a high-priority research need, and the 'lack of understanding of mechanisms of cracking as a function of alloy' and 'insufficient understanding of the aluminum solidification process', which is 'difficult to model', as technology barriers in aluminum casting processes. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks from the current level of 5% to 2%. Decreasing stress crack incidence is important for improving product quality and consistency as well as for saving resources and energy, since considerable amounts of cast metal could be saved by eliminating ingot cracking, by reducing the scalping thickness of the ingot before rolling, and by

  6. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  7. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  8. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  9. A multiphysics and multiscale model for low frequency electromagnetic direct-chill casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košnik, N.; Guštin, A. Z.; Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Simulation and control of macrosegregation, deformation and grain size in low frequency electromagnetic (EM) direct-chill casting (LFEMC) is important for downstream processing. Respectively, a multiphysics and multiscale model is developed for solution of Lorentz force, temperature, velocity, concentration, deformation and grain structure of LFEMC processed aluminum alloys, with focus on axisymmetric billets. The mixture equations with lever rule, linearized phase diagram, and stationary thermoelastic solid phase are assumed, together with EM induction equation for the field imposed by the coil. Explicit diffuse approximate meshless solution procedure [1] is used for solving the EM field, and the explicit local radial basis function collocation method [2] is used for solving the coupled transport phenomena and thermomechanics fields. Pressure-velocity coupling is performed by the fractional step method [3]. The point automata method with modified KGT model is used to estimate the grain structure [4] in a post-processing mode. Thermal, mechanical, EM and grain structure outcomes of the model are demonstrated. A systematic study of the complicated influences of the process parameters can be investigated by the model, including intensity and frequency of the electromagnetic field. The meshless solution framework, with the implemented simplest physical models, will be further extended by including more sophisticated microsegregation and grain structure models, as well as a more realistic solid and solid-liquid phase rheology.

  10. Process-scale modelling of microstructure in direct chill casting of aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedel, M.; Heyvaert, L.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; Daloz, D.; Lesoult, G.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of an alloy being related to its microstructure, the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the grain structure formation in direct chill casting is crucial. However, the grain size prediction by modelling is difficult since a variety of multi-scale coupled phenomena have to be considered. Nucleation and growth of the grains are interrelated, and the macroscopic transport phenomena such as the motion of grains and inoculant particles with the flow impact the nucleation-gowth competition. Thus we propose to study the grain size distribution of a 5182 alloy industrial scale slab of 510 mm thickness, both non-inoculated and inoculated with Al-3Ti-1B, for which experimental grain size measurements are available. We use a volume-averaged two-phase multi-scale model that describes nucleation from inoculant particles and grain growth, fully coupled with macroscopic transport phenomena: fluid flow induced by natural convection and solidification shrinkage, heat, mass and solute mass transport, grains and inoculant particles motion. We analyze the effect of liquid and grain motion as the effect of grain morphology on microstructure formation and we show in which extent those phenomena are responsible for the grain size distribution observed experimentally. The effect of the refiner level is also studied.

  11. Structural Homogeneity of Direct-Chill Cast Ingots of Aluminum Alloy EN AW-5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolić, Natalija; Markotić, Ante; Unkić, Faruk

    2007-06-01

    Structural homogeneity of direct-chill (DC) cast ingots of aluminum alloy EN AW-5083 was investigated in terms of grain size and grain distribution using the Latin square experimental design. The ingot cross-sectional homogeneity, the grain sizes, and the mean grain number per unit area were determined at precise, statistically defined locations in the slice by means of a semiautomatic method for measuring mean lineal intercept lengths. Based on the analysis of the differences in the number and distribution of grains between the slices cut from the ingot front and those from its rear, a general assessment of the ingot structural homogeneity was made. Analysis of variance showed the highly significant differences, in grain number in specimens taken from the ingot front section to be related to slice height/ingot depth and in those taken from the ingot rear section to individual charges and slice height. The grand means of the mean number of grains per unit area for the ingot front and rear sections show relatively high values with respect to ingot size. The obtained correlation coefficient, which suggests a good agreement between the number and distribution of grains at the ingot front and those at its rear, is indicative of good structural homogeneity of the ingot in general.

  12. Surface Structure Formation in Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Nazlin; Carlberg, Torbjörn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of the surface zone formation during direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum billets produced by the air slip technology. The depth of the shell zone, with compositions deviating from the bulk, is of large importance for the subsequent extrusion productivity and quality of final products. The surface microstructures of 6060 and 6005 aluminum alloys in three different surface appearances—defect free, wavy surface, and spot defects—were studied. The surface microstructures and outer appearance, segregation depth, and phase formation were investigated for the mentioned cases. The results were discussed and explained based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone and the fact that the exudated liquid is contained within a surface oxide skin. Outward solidification in the surface layer was quantitatively analyzed, and the oxide skin movements explained meniscus line formation. Phases forming at different positions in the segregation zone were analyzed and coupled to a cellular solidification in the exudated layer.

  13. Differences in microstructure and texture of Al-Mg sheets produced by twin-roll continuous casting and by direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Slamova, M.; Karlik, M.; Robaut, F.; Slama, P.; Veron, M

    2002-10-15

    Over the last two decades, the use of aluminum sheets in automotive applications has increased. Aluminum sheets are currently produced from direct-chill (DC) cast plates. The need for low-cost aluminum sheets is a challenge for the development of new materials produced by twin-roll continuous (TRC) casting and cold rolling. It is expected that the sheets produced from these different casting procedures can differ in their microstructure. Therefore, they can exhibit different formability behavior. The paper presents the results of the microstructural characterization and texture evaluation of aluminum sheets produced by both technologies. Sheets produced from twin-roll cast materials have much finer and more numerous second-phase particles, the grain structures of both types of materials are similar. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for texture evaluation and both confirmed the presence of stronger cube texture in the strips produced from DC-cast plates.

  14. Microstructural characterization of Ti-44Al-11Nb in the chill-cast and directionally solidified configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Halladay, T.R.

    1998-12-01

    The microstructural evolution in chill-cast and directionally solidified Ti-44Al-11Nb (at.%) was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. From this data, the microstructural distribution and formation sequences of various phases like Al3Ti, TiAl, and Ti3Al were established. The elemental and phase distributions were determined by TEM with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and spectrum imaging. Both casting techniques produced the same phases, (Al3Ti, TiAl, and Ti3Al with some Nb in solid solution), but the microstructural distribution was markedly different. The chill-casting technique resulted in a coarser microstructure, with large gamma crystals and duplex regions of either (gamma + alpha2) or (gamma + Al3Ti) interspersed throughout the alloy. The directional solidification technique resulted in a much more uniform microstructure with fine lamellar grains in a dendritic macrostructure. Both casting techniques showed enrichment of niobium in interdendritic regions.

  15. A comparison of microstructure, texture and formability of direct chill cast versus continuous cast aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yumin

    In this dissertation, microstructure and texture evolution of Al-Mg alloys produced by direct chill (DC) cast and continuous cast processes (CC) during thermo-mechanical processing were compared and the differences in formability between DC and CC alloys were identified. At the same time, the underlining mechanisms that cause the difference in structure, texture and formability between DC and CC alloys were analyzed. The recrystallization temperature of the DC AA5052 hot band was about 55°C lower than that of the CC AA5052 hot band. After complete recrystallization, DC AA5052 hot band possessed a stronger cube component than the CC AA5052 hot band. This result was associated with the particle structures of DC and CC AA5052 hot bands. Two different phase particles, Al6((Mn,Fe) and Mg2Si, existed in the DC and CC AA5052 hot bands. CC AA5052 hot band contained more Mg2Si particles than did the DC AA5052 hot band due to the absence of homogenization of the CC material before hot rolling. Mg2Si particles were easily dissolved at high treatment temperatures. After preheating at 454°C for 4 hours, the particle density in the preheated CC AA5052 hot band is closer to that in DC AA5052 alloy due to the dissolution of the Mg2Si particles. Therefore, the differences on recrystallization behaviors of the 80% cold rolled materials decreased, if the DC and CC materials were preheated at 454°C for 4 hours before cold rolling. If the as-received DC and CC AA5052 hot bands were directly cold rolled to 80% reduction, the cold rolled CC AA5052 alloy had a higher recrystallization temperature and a weaker cube recrystallization texture than the cold rolled DC AA5052 alloy. There still existed differences in texture evolution during cold rolling and isothermal annealing between DC and CC AA5052 and AA5182 materials, although the preheat treatment decreased the differences in particle structures and recrystallization temperature between DC and CC materials. Texture evolution during

  16. Effect of electromagnetic vibration on the microstructure of direct chill cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Y.; Fu, X.; Zhu, Q.; Li, L.; Wang, P.; Cui, J.

    2016-03-01

    An electromagnetic vibration was achieved by the combined application of an alternating magnetic field and a stationary magnetic field during direct chill (DC) casting process. The ingots with 200 mm in diameter were prepared under the influence of electromagnetic vibration. The effect of electromagnetic vibration on the microstructure of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The results showed that electromagnetic vibration has a significant effect on the solidification behaviour, under the influence of electromagnetic vibration during DC casting process, the microstructure is significantly refined and the uniformity of microstructure is evidently improved. This paper introduces the DC casting technology with the application of electromagnetic vibration, presents these results and gives corresponding discussions.

  17. Hot tearing criteria evaluation for direct-chill casting of an Al-4.5 pct Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2005-06-01

    Predicting the occurrence of hot tears in the direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloys by numerical simulation is a crucial step for avoiding such defects. In this study, eight hot tearing criteria proposed in the literature have been implemented in a finite-element method simulation of the DC casting process and have been evaluated. These criteria were based on limitations of feeding, mechanical ductility, or both. It is concluded that six criteria give a higher cracking sensitivity for a higher casting velocity and that five criteria give a higher cracking sensitivity for the center location of the billet. This is considered in qualitative accordance with casting practice. Seven criteria indicate that use of a ramping procedure (lower casting speed during start-up phase) does not make a significant difference. However, in industrial practice, this is a common procedure, needed for avoiding hot cracking. Only one criterion is in qualitative accordance with casting practice, but it fails to quantitatively predict the hot tearing occurrence during DC casting.

  18. Modeling of metal delivery systems used in electromagnetic and direct-chill semicontinuous casting of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William Kinzy, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The flow of liquid metal in the upper region of an EM (electromagnetic) or DC (direct chill) caster significantly contributes to the solidification behavior and subsequently the final ingot properties (e.g., average grain size and macrosegregation). The characterization of such a flow is a complicated task due to the high operating temperatures and the inherent opacity of the metal. However, as the demand for improved quality and reduced operational costs continues, understanding the mechanics of the flow becomes increasingly important. Hazardous, and often catastrophic, casting defects, such as hot cracks and tears, have been linked to non-uniformities in the solidification front that occur due to improper flow in the liquid pool. A novel technique to measure the flow, using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), has been incorporated into a laboratory scale physical model of an aluminum caster. The instantaneous vector plots reveal valuable information regarding the turbulent nature and the intrinsic flow oscillations. However, time-averaged vector plots (TAV), obtained by ensemble averaging instantaneous plots, detail information regarding the average features of the flow. The results show that the method of metal delivery into the ingot significantly effected the flow patterns observed. Computational studies of the model geometry reproduce the same flow profiles adding to the validity of the PIV method. Based on the information obtained through physical modeling, an experimental campaign, on production size ingots, was conducted to determine the influence of the liquid pool velocities on the sump profile. Furthermore, a 3D coupled fluid flow-solidification finite element model was developed as a tool to predict the fluid flow/solid front interaction in an attempt to anticipate non-uniformities in the solid. The study has shown that the method of metal delivery into the mold, the upper region where solidification initiates, is critical in determining the flow of

  19. A Simple Model of the Mold Boundary Condition in Direct-Chill (DC) Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, H.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.; Barker, S.; Gallerneault, M.

    2012-08-01

    An accurate thermofluids model of aluminum direct-chill (DC) casting must solve the heat-transfer equations in the ingot with realistic external boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are typically separated into two zones: primary cooling, which occurs inside the water-cooled mold, and secondary cooling, where a film of water contacts the ingot surface directly. Here, a simple model for the primary cooling boundary condition of the steady-state DC casting process was developed. First, the water-cooled mold was modeled using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, and its effective heat-transfer coefficient was determined. To predict the air-gap formation between the ingot and mold and to predict its effect on the primary cooling, a simple density-based shrinkage model of the solidifying shell was developed and compared with a more complex three-dimensional (3-D) thermoelastic model. DC casting simulations using these two models were performed for AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloys at two different casting speeds. A series of experiments was also performed using a laboratory-scale rectangular DC caster to measure the thermal history and sump shape of the DC cast ingots. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental results suggested that both models provide good agreement for the liquid sump profiles and the temperature distributions within the ingot. The density-based shrinkage model, however, is significantly easier to implement in a CFD code and is more computationally efficient.

  20. Modelling of macrosegregation in direct chill casting considering columnar-to-equiaxed transition using 3-phase Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, J.; Lin, Y. J.; Nie, Y.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-06-01

    A 3-phase Eulerian approach is used to model the macrosegregation during solidification in direct chill (DC) casting of binary bronze (Cu-Sn). The three phases are the melt, the solidifying columnar dendrites and the equiaxed grains. The thermodynamic information of Cu-Sn is included based on published thermodynamic data, which are coupled with the 3-phase solidification model. The occurrence of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET), phase interactions, feeding flow, equiaxed sedimentation and their influence on macrosegregation are considered in the model. The model is applied to a laboratory DC casting process of bronze as a benchmark to demonstrate the model potentials. The simulation results of mixed columnar and equiaxed solidification as well as the formation of macrosegregation are presented. The focus of this work is to analyze and discuss the macrosegregation mechanisms by different flow including feeding flow and crystal sedimentation.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of rolling faces pull-in during direct chill casting of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.M.; Rappaz, M.; Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1995-12-31

    During direct chill (DC) casting, aluminum ingots contract in a non-uniform manner. The use of rectangular moulds would produce ingots with a concave cross-section (bone shape). In order to compensate for the non-uniform contraction of the rolling faces, moulds are designed with a convex shape by trials and errors. The numerical simulation of ingot distortion during DC-casting can be a valuable help for the optimization of the design of a mould capable of producing flat ingots. The transient thermomechanical model presented here predicts the deformation and the temperature field evolutions during DC-casting. Deformation in the solid is assumed to obey a viscoplastic law and the evolutive domain (liquid plus solid) is modeled by the successive activation of element layers. The cooling conditions on the lateral faces of the ingot are deduced from temperature measurements, using an inverse method. The mechanical properties of the alloys have been determined up to, and even above, the solidus temperature using various mechanical tests. The numerical computations have been implemented in the finite element package Abaqus. The simulation results are validated on the basis of measurements of profiles of DC-cast ingots after complete cooling. The present model enables to predict the influence of casting parameters on butt curl and swell, rolling faces pull-in and residual stress state.

  2. Effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during direct-chill casting of an Al-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Savran, V. I.; Katgerman, L.

    2005-07-01

    A thorough experimental investigation of the effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during the steady and nonsteady stages of direct-chill (DC) casting of an Al-2.8 pct Cu alloy is performed. In addition, the temperature and melt-flow distributions in the sump of billets cast at different melt temperatures are numerically simulated and used in the discussion on the experimental results. Apart from already known phenomena such as the coarsening of the structure, deepening of the sump, and increased probability of bleed-outs during DC casting with increased casting temperature, a few new observations are made. The increased melt temperature is shown to increase the severity of subsurface segregation, whereas the macrosegregation in the rest of the billet remains virtually unaffected. Hot-tearing susceptibility is strongly diminished by an increased melt superheat. The amount and distribution of “floating” grains is demonstrated to depend on both the melt temperature and the casting speed. The porosity was found to only slightly depend on the melt temperature. The amount of nonequilibrium eutectic in the center of the billet increases with increasing melt temperature. The effects of melt temperature on the dimensions of the sump, transition region, and mushy zone and on the melt-flow pattern in the sump are discussed and used in the interpretation of experimentally observed phenomena.

  3. Thermal expansion study of a "Direct Chill Casting" AlMgSi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemini, R.; Boubertakh, A.; Hamamda, S.

    2001-03-01

    This work is concerned with the study of thermal expansion coefficient of Al-0.59 wt.% Mg- 0.88 wt.% Si-0.30 wt.% Fe-0.44 wt.% Mn alloy. The presence of the anisotropy was concluded on the basis of the thermal expansion coefficient α(T) which depends up on the two directions: radial (1) and axial (2). However α(T) measured along the axial direction (2) appeared to be inferior to the measured one along the radial direction (1) in both as-cast and homogenised alloy.

  4. Effects of alloy composition and casting speed on structure formation and hot tearing during direct-chill casting of Al-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Savran, V. I.; Katgerman, L.; Eskin, D. G.

    2004-11-01

    Effects of casting speed and alloy composition on structure formation and hot tearing during direct-chill (DC) casting of 200-mm round billets from binary Al-Cu alloys are studied. It is experimentally shown that the grain structure, including the occurrence of coarse grains in the central part of the billet, is strongly affected by the casting speed and alloy composition, while the dendritic arm spacing is mostly dependent on the casting speed. The hot cracking pattern reveals the maximum hot-tearing susceptibility in the range of low-copper alloys (1 to 1.5 pct) and at high casting speeds (180 to 200 mm/min). The clear correlation between the amount of nonequilibrium eutectics (representing the reserve of liquid phase in the last stage of solidification) and hot tearing is demonstrated. A casting speed-copper concentration-hot-tearing susceptibility chart is constructed experimentally for real-scale DC casting. Computed dimensions of the solidification region in the billet are used to explain the experimentally observed structure patterns and hot cracking. Thermomechanical finite-element simulation of the solidifying billet was used as a tool for testing the applicability to DC casting of several hot-tearing criteria based on different principles. The results are compared to the experimentally observed hot tearing. It is noted that hot-tearing criteria that account for the dynamics of the process, e.g., strain rate, actual stress-strain situation, feeding rate, and melt flow, can be successfully used for the qualitative prediction of hot tearing.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-8 pct Si Alloy Prepared by Direct Chill Casting Under Electromagnetic and Ultrasonic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubo; Jie, Jinchuan; Wu, Li; Fu, Ying; Li, Mu; Lu, Yiping; Li, Tingju

    2014-04-01

    The intermediate frequency electromagnetic field and power ultrasonic field were applied during the direct chill (DC) casting process of Al-8 pct Si alloy. The effects of different physical fields on the solidification microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that compared to the conventional casting without any treatments, refined microstructures and improved mechanical properties can be obtained when the electromagnetic or ultrasonic field is applied individually. For the case of compound fields, the electromagnetic field can increase the ultrasonic treated region, while the ultrasonic field can enhance the refinement effect of electromagnetic field. Owing to the advantages of both electromagnetic and ultrasonic fields, the microstructure obtained under the compound fields is fine and uniform, leading to a remarkable enhancement of mechanical properties. The interaction mechanism between intermediate frequency electromagnetic field and power ultrasonic field was discussed. The present study may be useful for grain refinement and improvement of mechanical properties of alloys during the DC casting process which is now widely used in industry.

  6. A mathematical model of the heat and fluid flows in direct-chill casting of aluminum sheet ingots and billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Dag

    1999-02-01

    A finite-element method model for the time-dependent heat and fluid flows that develop during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of aluminium ingots is presented. Thermal convection and turbulence are included in the model formulation and, in the mushy zone, the momentum equations are modified with a Darcy-type source term dependent on the liquid fraction. The boundary conditions involve calculations of the air gap along the mold wall as well as the heat transfer to the falling water film with forced convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling. The mold wall and the starting block are included in the computational domain. In the start-up period of the casting, the ingot domain expands over the starting-block level. The numerical method applies a fractional-step method for the dynamic Navier-Stokes equations and the “streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin” (SUPG) method for mixed diffusion and convection in the momentum and energy equations. The modeling of the start-up period of the casting is demonstrated and compared to temperature measurements in an AA1050 200×600 mm sheet ingot.

  7. Surface formation in direct chill (DC) casting of 6082 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface defects in aluminium billet production are a real problem for the subsequent extrusion procedure. Extrusion productivity can be influenced by the surface properties, which is defined as surface appearance, surface segregation zone depth and large Mg2Si and β-particles (Al5FeSi). In this research the surface formation during DC casting of 6082 aluminium billets produced by the air slip technology is studied. The surface microstructures of 6082 aluminium alloys with smooth and wavy surface appearances were investigated, including segregation zone depths and phase formation. The results were discussed based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone. The specific appearance of the wavy surface of 6082 alloys was correlated to how the oxide skin adheres to the underlying mushy zone and coupled to the dendritic coherency and surface tension of the skin. The occurrence of different phases at the very surface and in the layer just below was explained by variations in solidification directions and subsequent segregation patterns.

  8. Experimental investigation of the start-up phase during direct chill and low frequency electromagnetic casting of 6063 aluminum alloy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangjie; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Zhihao; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Gaosong; Jiang, Huixue; Cui, Jianzhong

    2010-06-01

    On the basis of conventional hot-top casting and Casting, Refining and Electromagnetic process, a lower frequency electromagnetic field was applied during the conventional hot-top casting process. Nine thermocouples (type K) were introduced into the metal to study the temperature profile in the ingot during the start-up phase of casting process. The experimental results show that under the effect of the low frequency electromagnetic filed, the heat transfer is changed greatly and the film boiling disappears, which could restrain the formation of fine subsurface cracks; the sump is shallow, and the macrostructure of the ingot butt is fine during the start-up phase of direct chill casting process.

  9. Effect of Sc on Aging Kinetics in a Direct Chill Cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Senkova, S. V.; Shagiev, M. R.

    2008-05-01

    The effect of Sc additions on precipitation strengthening in a direct chill (DC) cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied after natural and artificial aging. The microhardness, room temperature (RT) mechanical properties, and phase composition of the alloys were determined after different steps of aging. The strengthening mechanisms were discussed. It was shown that minor additions of Sc increased the strength of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy after casting and solution heat treatment, due to the precipitation of fine coherent Al3(Sc,Zr) particles. An analysis of the aging kinetics revealed that Sc had no effect on the natural aging, which was controlled by the formation and growth of Guinier-Preston (GP) I zones. On the other hand, the Sc additions accelerated the aging process at 120 °C and 150 °C within a period of time of the formation and growth of GP II zones and η' particles. It was concluded that the presence of Sc accelerated the formation and growth of GP II zones in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, which led to the earlier precipitation of the η' phase. However, at longer aging times at 120 °C and 150 °C, the aging response of the Sc-containing alloys slowed down, due to faster coarsening of the η' particles and their transformation into η particles. A model of the formation of vacancy-rich clusters (VRCs), precursors to GP zones, in the Al-Zn-Mg-based alloys was proposed. According to this model, the observed effects of Sc on aging are the result of the Sc-induced increase in the number density of the GP II clusters and the concentration of quenched-in solute-bound excess vacancies.

  10. Quantitative analysis of texture evolution of cold-rolled direct-chill-cast and continuous-cast AA5052 and AA5182 aluminum alloys during isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Liu, W. C.; Morris, J. G.

    2004-11-01

    The as-received direct-chill-cast (DC) and continuous-cast (CC) AA5052 and AA5182 hot bands were preheated at 454 °C for 4 hours, followed by cold rolling to an 80 pct reduction in thickness. The texture evolution of these cold-rolled samples during isothermal annealing was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The variation in texture volume fractions with annealing time was quantitatively analyzed by using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. The differences in recrystallization textures between the AA5052 and AA5182 alloys and between the DC and CC alloys were compared. It was found that the AA5052 alloy possessed a stronger cube recrystallization texture than the AA5182 alloy for the DC and CC materials. The recrystallization textures of the AA5182 alloy were affected strongly by the annealing temperature. As the annealing temperature increased, the cube recrystallization texture strengthened, whereas the R texture weakened. The annealing temperature had little influence on the recrystallization textures of the AA5052 alloy. The DC AA5052 and 5182 alloys also exhibited stronger cube recrystallization textures than the corresponding CC alloys. For the DC and CC AA5052 alloys, the n value in the JMAK-type equation increased with an increase in the annealing temperature, while the n values varied only slightly with the annealing temperature for the DC and CC AA5182 alloys.

  11. Direct-Chill Co-Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Pelayo, Rosa E. Ortega; Baserinia, Amir R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to cast AA3003/AA4045 clad ingots via Fusion™ Technology, a novel process developed by Novelis Inc. for the production of aluminum clad materials such as brazing sheet. Experimental results were used to validate a steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology co-casting process. The numerical model was able to accurately predict the temperature field within the AA3003/AA4045 clad ingot as well as the shape of the AA3003 liquid sump. The model was also used to quantify the temperature, fraction solid, and velocity fields in a clad ingot cast with an asymmetrical molten metal-feeding system. Feeding of core and clad molten metals at opposite corners of the mold was found to reduce the risks of hot spots and liquid metal breakthrough from the core sump to the clad side of the Fusion™ Technology mold. The use of a diffuser for the AA3003 core molten metal and of a vertical feeding tube for the AA4045 clad produced different flow patterns and liquid sump shapes on either side of the mold. The quality of the metallurgical bond at the core/clad interface appeared good near the clad inlet and at the ingot centerline, but poor near the edges of the ingot. SEM-EDS analysis of the chemical composition across the interface showed that a 1 to 20- μm-deep penetration of silicon from the AA4045 clad into the AA3003 core had occurred at visually acceptable interfaces, whereas silicon diffusion across poor interfaces was very limited. A study of the model-predicted fraction solid history at different points along the interface indicated that reheating of the AA3003 core is not required to form a visually acceptable metallurgical bond. However, a sufficient amount of interaction time between the solid AA3003 core shell and the silicon-rich AA4045 clad liquid is required to chemically dissolve the surface of the core and form a good metallurgical bond. An approximate dissolution depth of 750 to 1000 μm was observed along

  12. Interdendritic Strain and Macrosegregation-Coupled Phenomena for Interdendritic Crack Formation in Direct-Chill Cast Sheet Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2012-06-01

    In a study of the early stages of dendritic solidification in the direct-chill cast sheet ingots, the coupled effect of interdendritic strain and macrosegregation on the interdendritic cracks formation in dendritic equiaxed structure has been investigated by the metallographic study of ingot samples and by performing a set of mathematical analyses for AA-6061 and AA-1050 aluminum alloys. The metallographic investigation contains microstructure examinations and macrosegregation measurements of collected samples from plant trials. The mathematical analysis consists of a two-dimensional (2-D) fluid flow, heat flow, interdendritic strain, and macrosegregation-coupled model. Also, a simple approach to measure interdendritic crack has been developed based on the accumulative interdendritic strain criterion, local dendritic phases, and the crystal distortion correlation factor resulting from steep positive local segregation. The model predications have clarified the effect of high positive macrosegregation on the surface and subsurface interdendritic crack formation. It has been revealed that interdendritic strain starts to generate just below the liquidus temperature, resulting from shrinkage of liquid→solid phase transformation and contraction of dendritic solid in the incoherent mushy region. In this region, the coupled effect of the shrinkage/contraction mechanism increases the interdendritic distances between equiaxed crystals and the interdendritic crack begins to nucleate. Subsequently, in the coherent mushy region, the different interdendritic strain sources start to affect significantly the distances between equiaxed crystals in a diverse way, and therefore, the final morphology of interdendritic crack begins to form. The mechanism of interdendritic crack formation during dendritic equiaxed structure solidification and the possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  13. Finite element method simulation of mushy zone behavior during direct-chill casting of an Al-4.5 pct Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2004-09-01

    In this article, the stresses, strains, sump depth, mushy zone length, and temperature fields are calculated through the simulation of the direct-chill (DC) casting process for a round billet by using a finite-element method (FEM). Focus is put on the mushy zone and solid region close to it. In the center of the billet, circumferential stresses and strains (which play a main role in hot cracking) are tensile close to the solidus temperature, whereas they are compressive near the surface of the billet. The stresses, strains, depth of sump, and length of mushy zone increase with increasing casting speed. They are maximum in the start-up phase and are reduced by applying a ramping procedure in the start-up phase. Stresses, strains, depth of sump, and length of mushy zone are highest in the center of the billet for all casting conditions considered.

  14. Cold-Cracking Assessment in AA7050 Billets during Direct-Chill Casting by Thermomechanical Simulation of Residual Thermal Stresses and Application of Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2009-12-01

    Thermally induced strains and stresses developed during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of high strength aluminum alloys can result in formation of micro-cracks in different locations of the billet. Rapid propagation of such micro-cracks in tensile thermal stress fields can lead to catastrophic failure of ingots in the solid state called cold cracking. Numerical models can simulate the thermomechanical behavior of an ingot during casting and after solidification and reveal the critical cooling conditions that result in catastrophic failure, provided that the constitutive parameters of the material represent genuine as-cast properties. Application of fracture mechanics, on the other hand, can help to derive the critical crack length leading to failure. In the present research work, the state of residual thermal stresses was determined in an AA7050 billet during DC casting by means of ALSIM5. Simulation results showed that in the steady-state conditions, large compressive stresses form near the surface of the billet in the circumferential direction, whereas in the center, the stresses are tensile in all directions. Magnitudes of von Mises effective stresses, the largest component of principal stresses and the fracture mechanics concepts, were then applied to investigate the crack susceptibility of the billet.

  15. Effect of Grain Refinement on Structure Evolution, ``Floating'' Grains, and Centerline Macrosegregation in Direct-Chill Cast AA2024 Alloy Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadella, R.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2008-02-01

    Direct-chill (DC) cast billets 192 mm in diameter of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy were examined in detail with the aim to reveal the effects of grain refining (GR) and casting speed on structure, “floating” grains, and centerline macrosegregation. Experimental results show that grain size and dendrite arm spacing (DAS) tend to coarsen toward the billet center with a local refinement DAS in the center. In GR billets, grain size does not change much with the cooling rate, casting speed, and grain refiner amount. Coarse-DAS (floating) grains are observed around the billet axis regardless of GR and the amount of Ti, though their amount is significantly higher in GR billets. Macrosegregation profiles show a negligible influence of GR, while the effect of casting speed is large. The concept of solute-depleted floating grains contributing to the centerline macrosegregation is substantiated by microsegregation measurements, which show that, independent of GR, coarse dendrite branches have a depleted concentration plateau in contrast to the fine dendrite arms.

  16. Stress-Strain Predictions of Semisolid Al-Mg-Mn Alloys During Direct Chill Casting: Effects of Microstructure and Process Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, Nasim; Phillion, A. B.; Drezet, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of hot tearing during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process results in significant quality issues and a reduction in productivity. In order to investigate their occurrence, a new semisolid constitutive law (Phillion et al.) for AA5182 that takes into account cooling rate, grain size, and porosity has been incorporated within a DC casting finite element process model for round billets. A hot tearing index was calculated from the semisolid strain predictions from the model. This hot tearing index, along with semisolid stress-strain predictions from the model, was used to perform a sensitivity analysis on the relative effects of microstructural features ( e.g., grain size, coalescence temperature) as well as process parameters ( e.g., casting speed) on hot tearing. It was found that grain refinement plays an important role in the formation of hot cracks. In addition, the combination of slow casting speeds and a low temperature for mechanical coalescence was found to improve hot tearing resistance.

  17. Influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer during direct-chill casting of commercial aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. A.; Li, D.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2001-10-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on as-cast samples from three commercially significant aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3004, and AA5182) to quantify the influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer under conditions similar to those experienced in the direct-chill (DC) casting process. The study involved characterization of the as-cast surface morphology using a laser profilometer and quantification of the sample surface temperature and heat extraction to the cooling water using a DC casting simulator in combination with an inverse heat-conduction (IHC) analysis. The results from the study indicate that alloy’s thermal conductivity, surface morphology, and sample initial temperature all dramatically influence the calculated “boiling curve.” The intensity of the heat extraction was found to be enhanced at high heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling regime as the thermal conductivity was increased and was also found to increase as the surface of the sample became rougher, presumably through promotion of nucleation, growth, and/or detachment of bubbles. The heat transfer was also found to increase with increasing sample starting temperature, resulting in a series of boiling curves dependent on initial sample temperature. Finally, the effect of the water flow rate on heat transfer was found to be comparatively moderate and was limited to the sample with the smooth (machined) surface.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the evolution of thermal field during start-up phase of the direct chill casting process for AA5182 sheet ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Joydeep

    The control of the thermal cooling conditions at the start-up phase of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process for aluminum sheet ingots is difficult, and is critical from the standpoint of defect formation. Firstly, boiling water heat transfer governs the secondary cooling experienced by the ingot surfaces as they emerge from the mould. This results in varying rates of heat transfer from the ingot faces as the surface temperature of the ingot changes with time during the start-up phase. Moreover, if the ingot surface temperature at locations below the point of water impingement is high enough to promote film boiling, the water is ejected away from the surface. This can result in a sudden decrease in heat transfer and the formation of local hot spots. Also, the chill water may enter into the gap formed between the ingot base and the bottom block with the evolution of the butt curl. This process of water incursion alters the heat transfer from the base of the ingot, and in turn affects the surface temperature of the ingot faces. A comprehensive mathematical model has been developed to describe heat transfer during the start-up phase of the D.C. casting process. The model, based on the commercial finite element package ABAQUS, includes primary cooling to the mould, secondary cooling to water, and ingot base cooling. The algorithm used to account for secondary cooling to the water includes boiling curves that are a function of surface temperature, water flow rate, impingement point temperature, and position relative to the point of water impingement. In addition, the secondary cooling algorithm accounts for water ejection, which can occur at low water flow rates (low heat extraction rates). The algorithm used to describe ingot base cooling includes the drop in contact heat transfer due to base deformation (butt curl), and also the increase in heat transfer due to the process of water incursion between the ingot base and bottom block. The model has been extensively

  19. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  20. Comparison of residual stresses in sand- and chill casting of ductile cast iron wind turbine main shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonne, M. R.; Frandsen, J. O.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, simulations of pouring, solidification and cooling, and residual stress evolution of sand and chill cast wind turbine main shafts is performed. The models are made in the commercial software MAGMAsoft. As expected, the cooling rate of the sand casting is shown to be much lower than for the chill casting, resulting in a very course microstructure. From the simulations the nodule count is found to be 17 nodules per mm2 and 159 nodules per mm2 for the sand and chill casting, respectively, in the critical region of the main bearing seat. This is verified from nodule counts performed on the real cast main shafts. Residual stress evaluations show an overall increase of the maximum principal stress field for the chill casting, which is expected. However, the stresses are found to be in compression on the surface of the chill cast main shaft, which is unforeseen.

  1. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Triin

    2015-11-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning.

  2. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Triin

    2016-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning.

  3. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Saue, Triin

    2016-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning. PMID:26585350

  4. The effect of hot-rolling on chill-cast AI-AI3Ni, chill-cast AI-AI2Cu, and Unidirectionally Solidified AI-AI3Ni Eutectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, F. S. J.; Cantor, B.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of hot-rolling on the mechanical properties and microstructures of chill-cast Al-Al3Ni, chill-cast Al-Al2Cu, and unidirectionally solidified Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloys has been studied. The chill-cast eutectic alloys were produced by casting into preheated mild steel molds placed on copper chills. This system promoted growth along the length of the ingot and not radially from the mold wall. Cellular microstructures resulted with good alignment of Al3Ni fibers or Al2Cu lamellae within the cells and an interfiber/lamellar spacing of ~ 1 /urn. In contrast, the Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy was also unidirectionally solidified at a growth rate of 3 x 10-1 m s-1 in a conventional horizontal crystal grower. This produced well-aligned Al3Ni fibers with an interfiber spacing of 1.2 ώm. Both the unidirectionally solidified and chill-cast Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy can be hot-rolled at 773 K to reductions in area of greater than 95 pct. Deformation was achieved by Al3Ni fiber fracturing followed by separation of the broken fiber fragments in the rolling direction. Additionally, for the chill-cast eutectic the cellular microstructure disappeared and the Al3Ni fibers were homogeneously distributed throughout the matrix, after area reductions of 60 to 70 pct. In both cases, the eutectic microstructure was deformed with a constant volume fraction of Al3Ni/unit volume being maintained during rolling. The chill-cast Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy can be hot-rolled at 773 K to an area reduction of ~50 pct, after the continuous brittle Al2Cu phase within the cells has been ‘broken up’ by coarsening at high temperature. The variations of room temperature tensile properties for the chill-cast and unidirectionally solidified eutectic alloys were measured as a function of reduction of thickness during hot-rolling and the results were compared with predicted strengths from discontinuous fiber reinforcement theory.

  5. Chills

    MedlinePlus

    ... of rest. Evaporation cools the skin and reduces body temperature. Sponging with lukewarm water (about 70°F [21. ... you actually shaking? What has been the highest body temperature connected with the chills? Did the chills happen ...

  6. Chills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or an increase in the body's core temperature. Chills are an important symptom with certain diseases ... rest. Evaporation cools the skin and reduces body temperature. Sponging with lukewarm water (about 70°F [21. ...

  7. A 3-D numerical study of turbulent flow and solidification of a direct chill caster fitted with a channel bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Latifa; Hasan, Mainul

    2015-06-01

    3-D CFD simulations were carried out for a vertical direct chill slab caster for an aluminum-alloy AA-1050. The code was verified with an experimental study and reasonably good agreements were obtained. The casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient were varied from 40 to 100 mm/min and from 750 to 3,000 W/m2 K), respectively. The velocity field, temperature contours and important quantities for different casting speeds are predicted.

  8. Determination of heat transfer coefficients at metal/chill interface in the casting solidification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liqiang; Li, Luoxing

    2013-08-01

    The present work focuses on the determination of interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTCs) between the casting and metal chill during casting solidification. The proposed method is established based on the least-squares technique and sequential function specification method and can be applied to calculate heat fluxes and IHTCs for other alloys. The accuracy and stability of the method has been investigated by using a typical profile of heat fluxes simulating the practical conditions of casting solidification. In the test process, the effects of various calculation parameters in the inverse algorithm are also analyzed. Moreover, numerically calculated and experimental results are compared by applying the determined IHTCs into the forward heat conduction model with the same boundary conditions. The results show that the numerically calculated temperatures are in good agreement with those measured experimentally. This confirms that the proposed method is a feasible and effective tool for determination of the casting-mold IHTCs.

  9. Analysis of chill-cast NiAl intermetallic compound with copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J.; Gonzalez, C.; Herrera, R.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    2002-10-01

    This study carried out a characterization of chill-cast NiAl alloys with copper additions, which were added to NiAl, such that the resulting alloy composition occurred in the β-field of the ternary NiAlCu phase diagram. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and casted in copper chill molds to produce ingots 0.002 m thick, 0.020 m wide, and 0.050 m long. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) performed in chill-cast ingots identified mainly the presence of the β-(Ni,Cu)Al phase. As-cast ingots showed essentially no ductility at room temperature except for the Ni50Al40Cu10 alloy, which showed 1.79% of elongation at room temperature. Ingots with this alloy composition were then heat treated under a high-purity argon atmosphere at 550 °C (24 h) and cooled either in the furnace or in air, until room temperature was reached. β-(Ni,Cu)Al and γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al were present in specimens cooled in the furnace and β-(Ni,Cu)Al, γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al plus martensite-(Ni,Cu)Al were present in specimens cooled in air. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that martensite transformation was the result of a solid-state reaction with M s ˜ 470 and M f ˜ 430 °C. Tensile tests performed on bulk heat-treated ingots showed room-temperature ductility between 3 and 6%, depending on the cooling media.

  10. Rapid-Chill Cryogenic Coaxial Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James; Castor, Jim; Sheller, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A commercially available cryogenic direct- acting solenoid valve has been modified to incorporate a rapid-chill feature. The net effect of the modifications is to divert some of the cryogenic liquid to the task of cooling the remainder of the cryogenic liquid that flows to the outlet. Among the modifications are the addition of several holes and a gallery into a valve-seat retainer and the addition of a narrow vent passage from the gallery to the atmosphere.

  11. Application of Internal Fusible Chills in Thick-Walled Castings Made of EN-GJS with an Optimized Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Wojciech; Tonn, Babette

    2011-01-01

    The degeneration of graphite in thick-walled components made of ductile iron due to slower solidification affects the mechanical properties and is unacceptable for all safety-relevant components. The inoculation of the melt no longer leads to a fine microstructure. After exceeding the critical solidification time, degenerated shapes of graphite are to be expected. The external cooling with a chill-mould does not eliminate graphite degeneration in the thermal centres. The positive effect of these chills is also limited by the wall thickness. The aim of this study was to increase the heat dissipation of the melt by positioning the internal fusible chills in the thermal centre of the mould cavity. This should lead to accelerated solidification. The plate-shaped chills were placed in the middle of rectangular samples. The solidification processes were first simulated with Magmasoft in order to optimize the size and shape of the fusible chills and to thus guarantee a complete dissolving of the chills. A reduction in the solidification time of approximately 15% was achieved. In the experiments thick-walled samples were cast with and without internal fusible chills and compared. Areas with degenerated graphite, including chunky graphite, were found in the centres of the cast samples without internal cooling. Placing fusible chills in castings increased the number of graphite spheroids in the microstructure and exhibited no graphite degeneration. A homogenous microstructure was developed—no residues of the chills were found. Differences in microstructure and mechanical properties between the edges and centres of the casting could be nullified. The optimized graphite morphology of the casting with internal cooling led to an increase in tensile strength in the thermal centre of about 30 MPa (8%). This process was successfully implemented in an industrial environment. Blocks out of EN-GJS-400 for use in hydraulic engineering with a total weight of eight tonnes were cast in

  12. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.; Hackman, L.E.; Hsiao, Yu-Hsian; Daehn, G.

    1990-03-30

    The three goals of this research project were to demonstrate the feasibility of casting steel strip up to 2 mm (0.079 in) thick on a textured chill roll, to develop the thermal-mechanical processing to optimize the properties of the steel strip and to measure the properties of the steel strip as a function of casting and metalworking variables. Each of these goals have been realized. Type 304 stainless strip measuring up to 329 mm (12.9 in) wide and up to 1.98 mm (0.078 in) thick was cast on a 600 mm (24 in) copper chill roll with a 14 pitch, 60 degree diamond knurl pattern machined on it`s circumference. The casting speed was 0.15 m/s and the depth of liquid steel in contact with the chill roll was approximately 127 m (5 in). The most important process variables are the texture on the chill roll, the chemistry and temperature of the liquid steel, the depth of liquid in contact with the chill roll and the casting speed. It has been shown that thermal mechanical treatment can significantly improve both the surface finish and mechanical properties of Type 304 stainless steel. Cold rolling in excess of 30% reduction serves to completely eliminate the textured pattern from direct cast Type 304 stainless steel strips. Furthermore, cold rolling followed by annealing can produce commercial ingot metallurgy steels. Specifically, for Type 304 stainless steel, 30% cold rolling followed by a 40 minute anneal at 1100 {degree}C (2012 {degree}F) produced equiaxed austenite grains with an average diameter of approximately 20 {mu}m (0.0008 in), and this material gives approximately 45% elongation to failure with and ultimate tensile strength of 660 MPa (96 ksi). 27 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Effects of MC-Type Carbide Forming and Graphitizing Elements on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Indefinite Chilled Cast Iron Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Choi, Won-Doo; Suh, Yongchan; Lee, Young-Kook; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of indefinite chilled cast iron rolls with various V+Nb contents and Si/Cr ratios was evaluated. Increasing the ratio of Si/Cr prolonged the life of the rolls by reducing brittle cementites. Higher V+Nb addition also increased the life through the formation of carbides that refined and toughened the martensite matrix and reduced the thermal expansion mismatch in the microstructure.

  14. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  15. Thin sheet casting with electromagnetic pressurization

    DOEpatents

    Walk, Steven R.; Slepian, R. Michael; Nathenson, Richard D.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus, method and system for the casting of thin strips or strips of metal upon a moving chill block that includes an electromagnet located so that molten metal poured from a reservoir onto the chill block passes into the magnetic field produced by the electromagnet. The electromagnet produces a force on the molten metal on said chill block in the direction toward said chill block in order to enhance thermal contact between the molten metal and the chill block.

  16. Casting uniform ceramics with direct coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Graule, T.J.; Baader, F.H.; Gauckler, L.J.

    1995-06-01

    Today complex-shaped ceramic parts are mass fabricated by many different methods, two of which are slip casting and injection molding. The selection of the appropriate technique is governed by the geometric shape, the number of pieces to be manufactured, and the chemistry of the ceramic. Both slip casting and injection molding introduce imperfections in the green part, which lead to inhomogeneous microstructures in the sintered parts. A new fabrication method, direct coagulation casting (DCC), may be suitable for the mass production of complex ceramic parts with high strength and reliability. In DCC, an aqueous suspension is coagulated by a change in pH or an increase in ionic strength after casting, producing a rigid green body. The use of DCC can avoid most of the limitations of conventional shaping techniques, and it can be applied to a large variety of ceramic powders, sols, and polymers, alone or in combination.

  17. Dormancy release and flowering time in Ziziphus jujuba Mill., a "direct flowering" fruit tree, has a facultative requirement for chilling.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michal; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Raveh, Eran; Barak, Simon; Tel-Zur, Noemi; Zaccai, Michele

    2016-03-15

    In deciduous fruit trees, the effect of chilling on flowering has mostly been investigated in the "indirect flowering" group, characterized by a period of rest between flower bud formation and blooming. In the present study, we explored the effects of chilling and chilling deprivation on the flowering of Ziziphus jujuba, a temperate deciduous fruit tree belonging to the "direct flowering" group, in which flower bud differentiation, blooming and fruit development occur after dormancy release, during a single growing season. Dormancy release, vegetative growth and flowering time in Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li were assessed following several treatments of chilling. Chilling treatments quantitatively decreased the timing of vegetative bud dormancy release, thereby accelerating flowering, but had no effect on the time from dormancy release to flowering. Trees grown at a constant temperature of 25°C, without chilling, broke dormancy and flowered, indicating the facultative character of chilling in this species. We measured the expression of Z. jujuba LFY and AP1 homologues (ZjLFY and ZjAP1). Chilling decreased ZjLFY expression in dormant vegetative buds but had no effect on ZjAP1expression, which reached peak expression before dormancy release and at anthesis. In conclusion, chilling is not obligatory for dormancy release of Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li vegetative buds. However, the exposure to chilling during dormancy does accelerate vegetative bud dormancy release and flowering. PMID:26949231

  18. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  19. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  20. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of end-chill cast Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeshvaghani, R. Arabi; Ghahvechian, H.; Pirnajmeddin, H.; Shahverdi, H. R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content. In order to study the relationship between microstructure features and wear behavior, the alloys prepared by an end-chill cast apparatus and then heat treated. Heat treatment procedure involved solutionizing at temperature of 350 °C for 72 h followed by cooling within the furnace to room temperature. Microstructural characteristics of as-cast and heat-treated alloys at different distances from the chill were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk test machine. To determine the wear mechanisms, the worn surfaces of the samples were also examined by SEM and EDS. Results showed that heat treatment led to the complete dissolution of as-cast dendritic microstructure and formation of a fine lamellar structure with well-distributed microconstituents. Moreover, addition of copper up to 1 wt% had no significant change in the microstructure, while addition of 2 and 4 wt% copper resulted in formation of ɛ (CuZn4) particle in the interdendritic regions. The influence of copper content on the wear behavior of the alloys was explained in terms of microstructural characteristics. Delamination was proposed as the dominant wear mechanism.

  1. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  2. The effects of novel surface treatments on the wear and fatigue properties of steel and chilled cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jason William

    Contact fatigue driven wear is a principal design concern for gear and camshaft engineering of power systems. To better understand how to engineer contact fatigue resistant surfaces, the effects of electroless nickel and hydrogenated diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings on the fatigue life at 108 cycles of SAE 52100 steel were studied using ultrasonic fatigue methods. The addition of DLC and electroless nickel coatings to SAE 52100 bearing steel had no effect on the fatigue life. Different inclusion types were found to affect the stress intensity value beyond just the inclusion size, as theorized by Murakami. The difference in stress intensity values necessary to propagate a crack for Ti (C,N) and alumina inclusions was due to the higher driving force for crack extension at the Ti (C,N) inclusions and was attributed to differences in the shape of the inclusion: rhombohedral for the Ti (C,N) versus spherical for the oxides. A correction factor was added to the Murakami equation to account for inclusion type. The wear properties of DLC coated SAE 52100 and chilled cast iron were studied using pin-on-disk tribometry and very high cycle ultrasonic tribometry. A wear model that includes sliding thermal effects as well as thermodynamics consistent with the wear mechanism for DLCs was developed based on empirical results from ultrasonic wear testing to 108 cycles. The model fit both ultrasonic and classic tribometer data for wear of DLCs. Finally, the wear properties of laser hardened steels - SAE 8620, 4140, and 52100 - were studied at high contact pressures and low numbers of cycles. A design of experiments was conducted to understand how the laser processing parameters of power, speed, and beam size, as well as carbon content of the steel, affected surface hardness. A hardness maximum was found at approximately 0.7 wt% carbon most likely resulting from increased amounts of retained austenite. The ratcheting contact fatigue model of Kapoor was found to be useful in

  3. A metallographic study of porosity and fracture behavior in relation to the tensile properties in 319.2 end chill castings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    A metallographic study of the porosity and fracture behavior in unidirectionally solidified end chill castings of 319.2 aluminum alloy (Al-6.2 pct Si-3.8 pct Cu-0.5 pct Fe-0.14 pct Mn-0.06 pct Mg-0.073 pct Ti) was carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their relationship with the tensile properties. The parameters varied in the production of these castings were the hydrogen ({approximately}0.1 and {approximately}0.37 mL/100 g Al), modifier (0 and 300 ppm Sr), and grain refiner (0 and 0.03 wt pct Ti) concentrations, as well as the solidification time, which increased with decreasing distance from the end chill bottom of the casting, giving dendrite arm spacings (DASs) ranging from {approximately}15 to {approximately}95 {micro}m. Image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were employed for quantification of porosity/microstructural constituents and fracture surface analysis (phase identification), respectively. The results showed that the local solidification time (viz. DAS) significantly influences the ductility at low hydrogen levels; at higher levels, however, hydrogen has a more pronounced effect (porosity related) on the drop in ductility. Porosity is mainly observed in the form of elongated pores along the grain boundaries, with Sr increasing the porosity volume percent and grain refining increasing the probability for pore branching. The beneficial effect of Sr modification, however, improves the alloy ductility. Fracture of the Si, {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, {alpha}-Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}Cu phases takes place within the phase particles rather than at the particle/Al matrix interface. Sensitivity of tensile properties to DAS allows for the use of the latter as an indicator of the expected properties of the alloy.

  4. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  5. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1989-07-14

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issues on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  6. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1988-10-21

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issued on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless steel and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  7. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system. PMID:26782108

  8. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system. PMID:26782108

  9. A Direct Numerical Simulation of Axisymmetric Cryogenic Chill Down in a Pipe in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Alpana; Chung, J. N.

    2015-05-01

    Cryogenic two-phase flow with phase change heat transfer, consisting of a saturated liquid slug translating in its own superheated vapor in a circular pipe, was numerically simulated. The cryogenic chill down process was simplified by assuming ideal inverted annular flow regime. The method used is based on a sharp interface concept and developed on an Eulerian Cartesian fixed-grid with a cut-cell scheme and marker points to track the moving interface. The unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in both liquid and vapor phases are solved separately and used to compute the velocity, pressure, and temperature fields and the deformation of the liquid core very accurately. Three most common cryogenic fluids, viz. nitrogen, oxygen, and argon were included in the study. The influence of non-dimensional parameters like Reynolds number Weber number , and Jakob number on flow characteristics was studied by systematically varying only one at a time. was found to affect the mass flow rates, but did not have a significant influence on the wall cooling or the Nusselt number. affected the interface shape at the leading edge of the liquid slug, also influencing the heat transfer and velocity field there. affects all three quantities of interest, i.e., mass flow rate, wall cooling, and the Nusselt number.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  11. Direct Isosurface Ray Casting of NURBS-Based Isogeometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schollmeyer, Andre; Froehlich, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    In NURBS-based isogeometric analysis, the basis functions of a 3D model's geometric description also form the basis for the solution space of variational formulations of partial differential equations. In order to visualize the results of a NURBS-based isogeometric analysis, we developed a novel GPU-based multi-pass isosurface visualization technique which performs directly on an equivalent rational Bézier representation without the need for discretization or approximation. Our approach utilizes rasterization to generate a list of intervals along the ray that each potentially contain boundary or isosurface intersections. Depth-sorting this list for each ray allows us to proceed in front-to-back order and enables early ray termination. We detect multiple intersections of a ray with the higher-order surface of the model using a sampling-based root-isolation method. The model's surfaces and the isosurfaces always appear smooth, independent of the zoom level due to our pixel-precise processing scheme. Our adaptive sampling strategy minimizes costs for point evaluations and intersection computations. The implementation shows that the proposed approach interactively visualizes volume meshes containing hundreds of thousands of Bézier elements on current graphics hardware. A comparison to a GPU-based ray casting implementation using spatial data structures indicates that our approach generally performs significantly faster while being more accurate. PMID:26357373

  12. Morphological Study of Directionally Freeze-Cast Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hyungyung; Kim, Min Jeong; Choi, Hyelim; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman; Dunand, David C.

    2016-03-01

    Nickel foams, consisting of 51 to 62 pct aligned, elongated pores surrounded by a network of Ni walls, were fabricated by reduction and sintering of directionally cast suspensions of nanometric NiO powders in water. Use of dispersant in the slurry considerably affected the foam morphology and microstructure at both the micro- and macro-scale, most likely by modifying ice solidification into dendrites (creating the aligned, elongated macro-pores) and NiO powder accumulation in the inter-dendritic space (creating the Ni walls with micro-pores). The mean width of the Ni walls, in foams solidified with and without dispersant, was 21 ± 5 and 75 ± 13 µm, respectively. Additionally, the foams with the dispersant showed less dense walls and rougher surfaces than those without the dispersant. Moreover, the fraction of closed pores present in the foam walls with the dispersant was higher than that of the samples without dispersant. We finally verified the potential energy application of the Ni foam produced in this study by carrying out a preliminary single-cell performance test with the Ni foam sample as the gas diffusion layer on the anode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  13. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here. PMID:27264892

  14. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Directional Solidification Process of Turbine Blade Casting with MCA Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qingyan; Zhang, Hang; Qi, Xiang; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-04-01

    Nickel-based superalloy turbine blade castings are widely used as a key part in aero engines. However, due to the complex manufacturing processes, the complicated internal structure, and the interaction between different parts of the turbine blade, casting defects, such as stray grains, often happen during the directional solidification of turbine blade castings, which causes low production yield and high production cost. To improve the quality of the directionally solidified turbine blade castings, modeling and simulation technique has been employed to study the microstructure evolution as well as to optimize the casting process. In this article, a modified cellular automaton (MCA) method was used to simulate the directional solidification of turbine blade casting. The MCA method was coupled with macro heat transfer and micro grain growth kinetics to simulate the microstructure evolution during the directional solidification. In addition, a ray tracing method was proposed to calculate the heat transfer, especially the heat radiation of multiple blade castings in a Bridgman furnace. A competitive mechanism was incorporated into the grain growth model to describe the grain selection behavior phenomena of multiple columnar grains in the grain selector. With the proposed models, the microstructure evolution and related defects could be simulated, while the processing parameters optimized and the blade casting quality guaranteed as well. Several experiments were carried out to validate the proposed models, and good agreement between the simulated and experimental results was achieved.

  15. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  16. Characteristics of high-quality Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) ejaculates and in vitro sperm quality after prolonged chilled storage and directional freezing.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J K; Steinman, K J; Montano, G A; Love, C C; Saiers, R L; Robeck, T R

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro quality of spermatozoa from one elephant (Elephas maximus) was examined after chilled storage and directional freezing (DF). High-quality, non-contaminated ejaculates (77.6±6.0% progressive motility, 3.9±1.5 µg creatinine mL(-1) raw semen, 2.7±0.6% detached heads) were cryopreserved after 0 (0hStor), 12 (12hStor) and 24 h (24hStor) of chilled storage. At 0 h and 6h post-thawing, total motility, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome integrity, mitochondrial activity and normal morphology were similar (P>0.05) across treatments. In contrast, progressive motility, rapid velocity and several kinematic parameters were lower (P<0.05) for 24Stor compared with 0hStor at 0 h post-thaw. By 6 h post-thaw, amplitude of lateral head displacement and velocity parameters (average pathway, straight-line and curvilinear velocity) were lower (P<0.05) for 24hStor compared with 0hStor and 12hStor. DNA integrity was high and remained unchanged (P>0.05) across all groups and processing stages (1.6±0.6% of cells contained fragmented DNA). Results indicate that DF after up to 12 h of chilled storage results in a post-thaw sperm population of acceptable quality for artificial insemination. These findings have implications for the cryopreservation of sex-sorted spermatozoa, which typically undergo more than 12 h of chilled storage prior to sorting and preservation. PMID:22951419

  17. Modeling of grain selection during directional solidification of single crystal superalloy turbine blade castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng; Li, Jiarong; Yuan, Hailong; Jin, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades are currently widely used as key components in gas turbine engines. The single crystal turbine blade casting’s properties are quite sensitive to the grain orientation determined directly by the grain selector geometry of the casting, A mathematical model was proposed for the grain selection during directional solidification of turbine blade casting. Based on heat transfer modeling of the directional withdrawing process, the competitive grain growth within the starter block and the spiral of the grain selector were simulated by using the cellular automaton method (CA). Validation experiments were carried out, and the measured results were compared quantitatively with the predicted results. The model could be used to predict the grain morphology and the competitive grain evolution during solidification, together with the distribution of grain orientation of primary <001> dendrite growth direction, with respect to the longitudinal axis of the turbine blade casting.

  18. Soft capacitive tactile sensing arrays fabricated via direct filament casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Gao, Yang; Fontecchio, Adam; Visell, Yon

    2016-07-01

    Advances in soft electronics are enabling the development of mechanical sensors that can conform to curved surfaces or soft objects, allowing them to interface seamlessly with the human body. In this paper, we report on intrinsically deformable tactile sensing arrays that achieve a unique combination of high spatial resolution, sensitivity, and mechanical stretchability. The devices are fabricated via a casting process that yields arrays of microfluidic channels in low modulus polymer membranes with thickness as small as one millimeter. Using liquid metal alloy as a conductor, we apply matrix-addressed capacitive sensing in order to resolve spatially distributed strain with millimeter precision over areas of several square centimeters. Due to the use of low-modulus polymers, the devices readily achieve stretchability greater than 500%, making them well suited for novel applications in wearable tactile sensing for biomedical applications.

  19. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Interdendritic Strain for Exuded Surface Segregation Layer in the Direct Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-02-01

    This investigation on the formation of exuded surface segregation layer " ESSL" is intended to provide experimental and simulated comparison to verify the model developed previously by El-Bealy. Preliminary verification and calibration of the previous 2D mathematical model are demonstrated by quantitative errors between the previous measurements and predictions of temperature and macrosegregation. Also, the results from these comparisons reveal that the errors are in the reasonable and within allowable limits. These comparisons lead to the fact that the exuded surface segregation layer mostly forms on the middle slice of broad sheet ingot face and in the early stages of mold zone. The model predictions point out also that the different interdendritic strain hypotheses associated with fluctuations of mold cooling conditions. This affects the interdendritic liquid flow between the equiaxed crystals which influences the severity of ESSL formation and its macrosegregation level. The mechanism of ESSL with heat flow and interdendritic strain generation has been analyzed and discussed. The quantitative comparisons between the pervious experimental results and numerical simulation in this investigation reveal also several solutions to prevent this defect for future work.

  20. DM-2 Chilling

    NASA Video Gallery

    How do you chill down 1.4 million pounds of solid rocket fuel in the hot Utah desert? Lots of air conditioning! Learn how ATK chilled down DM-2, the second Ares first stage development motor in adv...

  1. [Music-induced chills as a strong emotional experience].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    While enjoying music and other works of art, people sometimes experience "chills," a strong emotional response characterized by a sensation of goose bumps or shivers. Such experiences differ from having goose bumps as a defense response or from shivering in reaction to cold temperatures. The current paper presents the phenomenon of music-induced chills and reviews the chill-related emotional response, autonomic nervous system activity, and brain activity. It also reviews the musico-acoustic features, listening contexts, and individual differences that cause chills. Based on the review, we propose a hypothetical model regarding the evocation of music-induced chills. Furthermore, we investigate the strong emotional response associated with chills by exploring the relationship between music-related chills and non-music-related chills, and discuss future research directions. PMID:25639033

  2. Refinement of Promising Coating Compositions for Directionally Cast Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Felten, E. J.; Benden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The successful application of high creep strength, directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta (Ni-19.7Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) eutectic superalloy turbine blades requires the development of suitable coatings for airfoil, root and internal blade surfaces. In order to improve coatings for the gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy, the current investigation had the goals of (1) refining promising coating compositions for directionally solidified eutectics, (2) evaluating the effects of coating/ substrate interactions on the mechanical properties of the alloy, and (3) evaluating diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surfaces. Burner rig cyclic oxidation, furnace cyclic hot corrosion, ductility, and thermal fatigue tests indicated that NiCrAlY+Pt(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y + 6 micron Pt) and NiCrAlY(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y) coatings are capable of protecting high temperature gas path surfaces of eutectic alloy airfoils. Burner rig (Mach 0.37) testing indicated that the useful coating life of the 127 micron thick coatings exceeded 1000 hours at 1366 K (2000 deg F). Isothermal fatigue and furnance hot corrosion tests indicated that 63 micron NiCrAlY, NiCrAlY + Pt and platinum modified diffusion aluminide (Pt + Al) coating systems are capable of protecting the relatively cooler surfaces of the blade root. Finally, a gas phase coating process was evaluated for diffusion aluminizing internal surfaces and cooling holes of air-cooled gamma/gamma prime-delta turbine blades.

  3. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  4. Effect of casting/mould interfacial heat transfer during solidification of aluminium alloys cast in CO2-sand mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. N.; Radhakrishna, D. K.

    2011-06-01

    The ability of heat to flow across the casting and through the interface from the casting to the mold directly affects the evolution of solidification and plays a notable role in determining the freezing conditions within the casting, mainly in foundry systems of high thermal diffusivity such as chill castings. An experimental procedure has been utilized to measure the formation process of an interfacial gap and metal-mould interfacial movement during solidification of hollow cylindrical castings of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand mould. Heat flow between the casting and the mould during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy in CO2-sand mould was assessed using an inverse modeling technique. The analysis yielded the interfacial heat flux ( q), heat transfer coefficient ( h) and the surface temperatures of the casting and the mould during solidification of the casting. The peak heat flux was incorporated as a dimensionless number and modeled as a function of the thermal diffusivities of the casting and the mould materials. Heat flux transients were normalized with respect to the peak heat flux and modeled as a function of time. The heat flux model proposed was to estimate the heat flux transients during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand moulds.

  5. The chilling of carcasses.

    PubMed

    Savell, J W; Mueller, S L; Baird, B E

    2005-07-01

    Biochemical processes and structural changes that occur in muscle during the first 24h postmortem play a great role in the ultimate quality and palatability of meat and are influenced by the chilling processes that carcasses are subjected to after slaughter. For beef and lamb, employing chilling parameters that minimize cold shortening is of greatest importance and can be best addressed by ensuring that muscle temperatures are not below 10°C before pH reaches 6.2. For pork, because of the impact of high muscle temperatures and low pH on the development of pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) pork, a more rapid chilling process is needed to reduce PSE with the recommended internal muscle temperature of 10°C at 12h and 2-4°C at 24h. Spray chilling, a system whereby chilled water is applied to carcasses during the early part of postmortem cooling, is used to control carcass shrinkage and to improve chilling rates through evaporative cooling. Delayed chilling can be used to reduce or prevent the negative effects of cold shortening; however, production constraints in high-volume facilities and food safety concerns make this method less useful in commercial settings. Electrical stimulation and alternative carcass suspension programs offer processors the opportunity to negate most or all of the effects of cold shortening while still using traditional chilling systems. Rapid or blast chilling can be an effective method to reduce the incidence of PSE in pork but extreme chilling systems may cause quality problems because of the differential between the cold temperatures on the outside of the carcass compared to the warm muscle temperatures within the carcass (i.e., muscles that are darker in color externally and lighter in color internally). PMID:22063744

  6. Real-time video monitoring of ingot casting

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, R.T.; Adomaitis, P.R.; Hildeman, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    During start-up and steady-state casting of ingots, a number of effects related to ingot casting variables can be observed on the surface of the ingot. For example, the amount of curl at the bottom of the ingot, surface laps, liquation, cracks, and folds, as well as extreme events such as bleed-outs when molten metal melts through the shell of the ingot crater, are significant events which could be viewed. Unfortunately, observation of these surface effects is difficult since the as-cast surface is hidden below the casting table and direct visual observations of ingot surfaces are limited due to the proximity of the molds, cooling water sprays, and the ability of the casting operators to safely view ingot surface details at close range. The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique video monitoring capability which is being used as Alcoa`s Advanced Vertical Casting facility, to observe in real-time, surface effects of an ingot during casting. A description of the development of the video monitoring system, including camera, lighting, and video recording capability will be presented. Examples of various surface conditions on direct chill (DC) and electromagnetic cast (EMC) ingots will also be discussed.

  7. Ductility improvement of direct-cast gamma TiAl-based alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Keizo

    1997-12-31

    For improving the room temperature tensile ductility of direct-cast gamma TiAl sheets without affecting their high-temperature strength, direct sheet casting with TiB{sub 2} particle dispersion is employed and conducted. The TiB{sub 2} addition and rapid cooling results in the formation of a fine equiaxed grain microstructure with an average grain size of {approximately}10{micro}m, contributing to the increase in the room temperature ductility to 2.1% with the high-temperature tensile strength kept at about 200 MPa. This improvement of room-temperature ductility is attributable to the following fact. The high oxygen content of this material, about 2,500 wt.ppm, is not harmful to the tensile ductility when the oxygen is in the solid solution of the {alpha}{sub 2} lamellar phase or in oxide particles, which are fine enough not to cause brittleness to the matrix. From these findings, a principle is proposed that oxygen is not harmful to the ductility of gamma TiAl when its microstructure containing oxygen is fine enough.

  8. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  9. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  10. Chilling temperatures affect flavor quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomatoes are harvested green in Florida and gassed with ethylene, then stored at chilling temperatures. These chilled temperatures of 12-13ºC can cause a decrease in aroma. Green fruit are more susceptible to chilling injury (CI) which manifests as a pitting of the peel through which decay organisms...

  11. Microstructure and properties of cast ingots of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys modified with Sc and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Bhat, R. B.; Senkova, S. V.; Schloz, J. D.

    2005-08-01

    The effect of combined additions of Sc and Zr on the microstructure and tensile properties of the direct chill (DC) cast ingots of developmental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys has been evaluated in this work. The properties in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were determined in as-cast and cast-plus-heat-treated conditions, at room temperature (RT) and cryogenic temperature (CT). Extensive microstructural evaluation was carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, including orientation image microscopy (OIM) by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The Sc-containing developmental cast alloys showed the tensile properties, which are much better than the properties of commercial cast Al alloys and are similar or even superior to the properties of 7075-T6 alloy forgings. The microstructural evolution, the strengthening mechanisms, the optimum content of the dispersoid-forming elements, and the processing-structure-property correlations are discussed.

  12. Bioreactor-free tissue engineering: directed tissue assembly by centrifugal casting.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-02-01

    Casting is a process by which a material is introduced into a mold while it is liquid, allowed to solidify in a predefined shape inside the mold, and then removed to give a fabricated object, part or casing. Centrifugal casting could be defined as a process of molding using centrifugal forces. Although the centrifugal casting technology has a long history in metal manufacturing and in the plastics industry, only recently has this technology attracted the attention of tissue engineers. Initially, centrifugation was used to optimize cell seeding on a solid scaffold. More recently, centrifugal casting has been used to create tubular scaffolds and both tubular and flat multilayered, living tissue constructs. These newer applications were enabled by a new class of biocompatible in situ crosslinkable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix. Herein the authors summarize the state of the art of centrifugal casting technology in tissue engineering, they outline associated technological challenges, and they discuss the potential future for clinical applications. PMID:18194071

  13. A Chilling Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knill, George; Fawcett, George

    1982-01-01

    Wind chill is detailed and noted as an estimate of how cold the wind makes a person feel in cold weather. A worksheet master that provides a table of temperatures and wind speeds is provided along with a set of problems. Answers to the brief question set are provided. (MP)

  14. Chilling requirement of Ribes cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hamlyn G.; Gordon, Sandra L.; Brennan, Rex M.

    2015-01-01

    It is usually thought that adequate winter chill is required for the full flowering of many temperate woody species. This paper investigates the sensitivity of blackcurrant bud burst and flowering to natural weather fluctuations in a temperate maritime climate, and compares a range of chill models that have been proposed for assessing the accumulation of winter chill. Bud break for four contrasting cultivars are compared in an exceptionally cold and in a mild winter in Eastern Scotland. The results confirm the importance of chilling at temperatures lower than 0°C and demonstrate that no single chilling function applies equally to all blackcurrant cultivars. There is a pressing need for further model development to take into account the relationship between chilling temperatures and warming temperatures occurring both during and after the chill accumulation period. PMID:25610448

  15. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  16. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.X.; Karnezis, P.A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from {approximately}1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to {approximately}8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated conditions. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25 + Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of {approximately}6.5 pct, compared to that of {approximately}0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  17. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. X.; Karnezis, P. A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from ˜1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to ˜8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25+Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of ˜6.5 pct, compared to that of ˜0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  18. Growth directions of C8-BTBT thin films during drop-casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Naoki; Zanka, Tomohiko; Onishi, Yosuke; Fujieda, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Because charge transport in a single crystal is anisotropic, control of its orientation is important for enhancing electrical characteristics and reducing variations among devices. For growing an organic thin film, a solution process such as inkjet printing offers advantages in throughput. We have proposed to apply an external temperature gradient during drop-casting and to control the direction of solvent evaporation. In experiment, a temperature gradient was generated in a bare Si substrate by placing it on a Si plate bridging two heat stages. When a solution containing 2,7-dioctyl [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) was dropped on the substrate, evaporation started at the hotter side of the droplet and proceeded toward the colder side. The front line of the liquid was not pinned and the solution extended toward the colder region. As a result, a thin film was formed in a 7mm-long region. The peripheral region of the film was significantly thicker due to the coffee ring effect. The surface of the rest of the film was mostly smooth and terrace structures with 2.6nm steps were observed. The step roughly corresponds to the length of the C8-BTBT molecule. The film thickness varied from 20nm to 50nm over the distance of 3mm. Another film was grown on a glass substrate under a similar condition. Observation of the film with a polarizing microscope revealed that fan-shaped domains were formed in the film and that their optical axes were mostly along the directions of the solvent evaporation.

  19. Numerical Optimization of the Method of Cooling of a Massive Casting of Ductile Cast-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovska, Jana; Kavicka, Frantisek; Stransky, Karel; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stetina, Josef

    2010-06-01

    The numerical models of the temperature field of solidifying castings, according to various authors, have been observing two main goals—directed solidification as the basic assumption for the healthiness of a casting and the optimization of the technology while maintaining the optimal product properties. The achievement of these goals is conditioned by the ability to analyze and, successively, to control the effect of the deciding factors, which either characterize the process or accompany it. An original application of ANSYS simulated the forming of the temperature field of a massive casting from ductile cast-iron during the application various methods of its cooling using steel chills. The numerical model managed to optimize more than one method of cooling but, in addition to that, provided serious results for the successive model of structural and chemical heterogeneity, and so it also contributes to influencing the pouring structure. The file containing the acquired results from both models, as well as from their organic unification, brings new and, simultaneously, remarkable findings of causal relationships between the structural and chemical heterogeneity (i.e. between the sizes of the spheroids of graphite, the cells, density of the spheroids of graphite, etc.) and the local solidification time in any point of the casting. The determined relations therefore enable the prediction of the face density of the spheroids of graphite in dependence on the local solidification time. The calculated temperature field of a two-ton 500×500×1000 mm casting of ductile cast-iron with various methods of cooling has successfully been compared with temperatures obtained experimentally. The casting was cast in sand mould. The calculated model of the kinetics of the temperature field of the casting was verified during casting with temperature measurements in selected points. This has created a tool for the optimization of the structure with an even distribution of the

  20. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with advanced kidney disease and chronic kidney failure . White blood cell (WBC) casts are more common ... Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  1. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... The absence of cellular casts or presence of a few hyaline casts is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of ...

  2. Calculation of heat transfer coefficients at the ingot surface during DC casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwana, K.; Viswanathan, S.; Clark, John A, III; Sabau, A.; Hassan, M.; Saito, K.; Das, S.

    2005-02-01

    Surface heat transfer coefficients representing the various regimes of water cooling during the Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminum 3004 alloy ingots have been calculated using the inverse heat transfer technique. ProCAST, a commercial casting simulation package, which includes heat transfer, fluid flow, solidification, and inverse heat transfer, was used for this effort. Thermocouple data from an experimental casting run, and temperature-dependent thermophysical properties of the alloy were used in the calculation. The use of a structured vs. unstructured mesh was evaluated. The calculated effective heat transfer coefficient, which is a function of temperature and time, covers three water cooling regimes, i.e., convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling, and the change of water flow rate with time.

  3. Photosynthetic responses to chilling in a chilling-tolerant and chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrid.

    PubMed

    Friesen, P C; Sage, R F

    2016-07-01

    Miscanthus is a C4 perennial grass being developed for bioenergy production in temperate regions where chilling events are common. To evaluate chilling effects on Miscanthus, we assessed the processes controlling net CO2 assimilation rate (A) in Miscanthus x giganteus (M161) and a chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrid (M115) before and after a chilling treatment of 12/5 °C. The temperature response of A and maximum Rubisco activity in vitro were identical below 20 °C in chilled and unchilled M161, demonstrating Rubisco capacity limits or co-limits A at cooler temperatures. By contrast, A in M115 decreased at all measurement temperatures after growth at 12/5 °C. Rubisco activity in vitro declined in proportion to the reduction in A in chilled M115 plants, indicating Rubisco capacity is responsible in part for the decline in A. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase activities were also reduced by the chilling treatment when assayed at 28 °C, indicating this enzyme may also contribute to the reduction in A in M115. The maximum extractable activities of PEPCase and NADP-ME remained largely unchanged after chilling. The carboxylation efficiency of the C4 cycle was depressed in both genotypes to a similar extent after chilling. ΦP :ΦCO2 remained unchanged in both genotypes indicating the C3 and C4 cycles decline equivalently upon chilling. PMID:26714623

  4. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, E. J.; Zhao, S. C.; Wang, L. P.; Wu, T.; Xin, B. P.; Tan, J. J.; Jia, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills.

  5. Nucleation in Al Alloys Processed By MCDC Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Present work confines itself to discuss the mechanism responsible for the grain refinement of the melt conditioned direct-chill cast aluminum alloys. It has been found that the Al alloys processed by this process undergo grain refinement irrespective of their chemical composition. The forced convection caused during this process led to dendrite fragmentation which enhances the heterogeneous nucleation and result in grain refinement. It is suggested that owing to their favorable lattice matching with α-Al, these fragments serve as potent nuclei for α-Al grains.

  6. Continuous Casting for Aluminum Sheet: a Product Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert E.

    2012-02-01

    Continuous casting processes have been used successfully for more than 50 years to reduce the cost of manufacturing a variety of aluminum rolled products. Approximately 25% of North American flat-rolled sheet and foil is sourced from twin-roll cast or slab cast processes. Twin roll-casters provide a cost-effective solution for producing foil and light-gauge sheet from relatively low-alloyed aluminum (1xxx and 8xxx alloys). Slab casters, particularly Hazelett twin-belt machines, are well utilized in the production of 3xxx or 5xxx painted building products which require moderate strength and good corrosion resistance. Both foil and painted sheet are cost-sensitive commodity products with well-known metallurgical and quality requirements. There have been extensive trials and modest successes with continuous cast can stock and automotive sheet. However, they have not been widely adopted commercially due to generally lower levels of surface quality and formability compared with sheet produced from scalped direct chill (DC) cast ingot. The metallurgical requirements for can and auto sheet are considered in more detail with emphasis on the microstructural features which limit their application, e.g., particle distribution, grain size, and texture. Looking forward, slab casting offers the most viable opportunity for producing strong (i.e., higher alloy content), formable structural auto sheet with acceptable surface quality.

  7. Directional solidification of flake and spheroidal graphite cast iron in low and normal gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA KC-135 research aircraft, flying repeated low-g trajectories that yield 20-30 sec of 0.1-0.001 g microgravity, has been used to study microgravity solidification's elimination of sedimentation and convection (with formation of unique and advantageous microstructures) for the case of eutectic-composition cast irons. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons has been slowly advanced through a 4 mm-diameter rod sample. Sample solidification rates have been correlated with accelerometer data, while independently controlling thermal gradients and solidification rates.

  8. Photophosphorylation after Chilling in the Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Robert R.; Ort, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    inhibition in net photosynthesis observed after chilling in the light cannot, therefore, be attributed to any direct effect on photophosphorylation competence. PMID:16666824

  9. Fundamental insights on impact of non-condensible gas evolution from coating pyrolysis and intentional injection on molten-aluminum water explosion onset during direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Gulec, K.

    1998-05-01

    Explosive interactions between molten aluminum and water are being studied with a focus on fundamentals to determine what causes robust-enough triggers for explosion onset, to determine the extent of protection provided from various coatings and to develop a fundamentally-based simple, cost-effective novel methodology for prevention. The workscope includes experimentation and mathematical modeling of the interactions between molten metals and water at various different coated and uncoated surfaces. Phenomenological issues related to surface wettability, gas generation from coatings, charring of coatings, inertial constraint, melt temperature, water temperature, external shocks are being investigated systematically to gage their relative impact on the triggerability of surface-assisted steam explosions. The steam explosion triggering studies (SETS) facility was designed and constructed as a rapid-turnaround, cost-effective, and safe means to address these phenomenological issues. Data from SETS tests have indicated that, non-condensible gas (NCG) generation during paint pyrolysis plays a predominant role in explosion prevention. This paper describes results of studies on impact of deliberate NCG injection on explosion prevention, via molten melt drops free-falling into water, as well as from tests using the SETS facility for studying entrapment induced explosive boiling. SETS is also being used to obtain information on time-varying and integral amounts of NCGs generated from various paints. Relevant data are presented. Results of investigations, taken together provide compelling evidence on the positive role NCGs play on explosion prevention.

  10. Preliminary science report on the directional solidification of hypereutectic cast iron during KC-135 low-G maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An ADSS-P directional solidification furnace was reconfigured for operation on the KC-135 low-g aircraft. The system offers many advantages over quench ingot methods for study of the effects of sedimentation and convection on alloy formation. The directional sodification furnace system was first flown during the September 1982 series of flights. The microstructure of the hypereutectic cast iron sample solidified on one of these flights suggests a low-g effect on graphite morphology. Further experiments are needed to ascertain that this effect is due to low-gravity and to deduce which of the possible mechanisms is responsible for it.

  11. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  12. Prediction of Hot Tear Formation in Vertical DC Casting of Aluminum Billets Using a Granular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-09-01

    A coupled hydromechanical granular model aimed at predicting hot tear formation and stress-strain behavior in metallic alloys during solidification is applied to the semicontinuous direct chill casting of aluminum alloy round billets. This granular model consists of four separate three-dimensional (3D) modules: (I) a solidification module that is used for generating the solid-liquid geometry at a given solid fraction, (II) a fluid flow module that is used to calculate the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid, (III) a semisolid deformation module that is based on a combined finite element/discrete element method and simulates the rheological behavior of the granular structure, and (IV) a failure module that simulates crack initiation and propagation. To investigate hot tearing, the granular model has been applied to a representative volume within the direct chill cast billet that is located at the bottom of the liquid sump, and it reveals that semisolid deformations imposed on the mushy zone open the liquid channels due to localization of the deformation at grains boundaries. At a low casting speed, only individual pores are able to form in the widest channels because liquid feeding remains efficient. However, as the casting speed increases, the flow of liquid required to compensate for solidification shrinkage also increases and as a result the pores propagate and coalesce to form a centerline crack.

  13. Fabrication of Porous Copper with Directional Pores by Continuous Casting Technique Through Thermal Decomposition of Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Takuya; Tsunemi, Akihiro; Nakajima, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Lotus-type porous copper with aligned long cylindrical pores was fabricated by continuous casting technique through thermal decomposition method (TDM) in an argon atmosphere of 0.1 MPa. A pellet of titanium hydride was supplied into molten copper with adjusting the time interval to maintain the constant concentration of hydrogen to be dissolved in the melt, when the transfer velocity of the unidirectional solidification is changed. Long lotus-type porous copper slabs were fabricated with constant solidification velocity. The effect of the transfer velocity on the porosity and pore size was investigated. The average pore diameter was independent of the transfer velocity, but the porosity is slightly dependent on the velocity. It is apparent that the continuous casting technique can be applicable for production of lotus metals through TDM.

  14. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  15. A New Direct-Pour In-Mold (DPI) Technology for Producing Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Castings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Hitchings; Jay R. Hitchings

    2007-07-20

    A new "Direct Pour In-Mold" (DPI) Magnesium treatment technology has been developed that can produce both Nodular and Compacted Graphite iron. The DPI technology converts the standard horizontal runner system into a vertical one, by placing a Magnesium Ferrosilicon treatment alloy and molten metal filter into a specially designed container. The DPI container is easily placed into either vertically or horizontally parted molds, and then a base metal can be poured directly into it. The metal is treated and filtered as it passes through, and then proceeds directly into a runner or casting cavity. Various sizes of containers provide all of the necessary components required to deliver a range of weights of treated and filtered metal at accurate and consistent flow rates. The DPI containers provide energy savings over competing techniques, increased mold yields, very high Magnesium recovery, zero Magnesium fume, and no post inoculation is required. By treating the metal just prior to it entering a casting cavity many other benefits and advantages are also realized.

  16. Insights on the development, kinetics, and variation of photoinhibition using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of a chilled, variegated leaf.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The effect of chilling on photosystem II (PSII) efficiency was studied in the variegated leaves of Calathea makoyana, in order to gain insight into the causes of chilling-induced photoinhibition. Additionally, a relationship was revealed between (chilling) stress and variation in photosynthesis. Chilling treatments (5 degrees C and 10 degrees C) were performed for different durations (1-7 d) under a moderate irradiance (120 micromol m-2 s-1). The individual leaves were divided into a shaded zone and two illuminated, chilled zones. The leaf tip and sometimes the leaf base were not chilled. Measurements of the dark-adapted Fv/Fm were made on the different leaf zones at the end of the chilling treatment, and then for several days thereafter to monitor recovery. Chilling up to 7 d in the dark did not affect PSII efficiency and visual appearance, whereas chilling in the light caused severe photoinhibition, sometimes followed by leaf necrosis. Photoinhibition increased with the duration of the chilling period, whereas, remarkably, chilling temperature had no effect. In the unchilled leaf tip, photoinhibition also occurred, whereas in the unchilled leaf base it did not. Whatever the leaf zone, photoinhibition became permanent if the mean value dropped below 0.4, although chlorosis and necrosis were associated solely with chilled illuminated tissue. Starch accumulated in the unchilled leaf tip, in contrast to the adjacent chilled irradiated zone. This suggests that photoinhibition was due to a secondary effect in the unchilled leaf tip (sink limitation), whereas it was a direct effect of chilling and irradiance in the chilled illuminated zones. The PSII efficiency and its coefficient of variation showed a unique negative linearity across all leaf zones and different tissue types. The slope of this curve was steeper for chilled leaves than it was for healthy, non-stressed leaves, suggesting that the coefficient of variation may be an important tool for assessing stress in

  17. Micromechanical Characterization and Texture Analysis of Direct Cast Titanium Alloys Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This research was conducted to determine a post-processing technique to optimize mechanical and material properties of a number of Titanium based alloys and aluminides processed via Melt Overflow Solidification Technique (MORST). This technique was developed by NASA for the development of thin sheet titanium and titanium aluminides used in high temperature applications. The materials investigated in this study included conventional titanium alloy strips and foils, Ti-1100, Ti-24Al-11Nb (Alpha-2), and Ti-48Al-2Ta (Gamma). The methodology used included micro-characterization, heat-treatment, mechanical processing and mechanical testing. Characterization techniques included optical, electron microscopy, and x-ray texture analysis. The processing included heat-treatment and mechanical deformation through cold rolling. The initial as-cast materials were evaluated for their microstructure and mechanical properties. Different heat-treatment and rolling steps were chosen to process these materials. The properties were evaluated further and a processing relationship was established in order to obtain an optimum processing condition. The results showed that the as-cast material exhibited a Widmanstatten (fine grain) microstructure that developed into a microstructure with larger grains through processing steps. The texture intensity showed little change for all processing performed in this investigation.

  18. Comparison of directly compressed vitamin B12 tablets prepared from micronized rotary-spun microfibers and cast films.

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Bodai, Zsolt; Eke, Zsuzsanna; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Szabó, Péter; Zelkó, Romána

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-based dosage forms are potential alternatives of conventional dosage forms from the point of the improved extent and rate of drug dissolution. Rotary-spun polymer fibers and cast films were prepared and micronized in order to direct compress after homogenization with tabletting excipients. Particle size distribution of powder mixtures of micronized fibers and films homogenized with tabletting excipients were determined by laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. Powder rheological behavior of the mixtures containing micronized fibers and cast films was also compared. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied for the microstructural characterization of micronized fibers and films. The water-soluble vitamin B12 release from the compressed tablets was determined. It was confirmed that the rotary spinning method resulted in homogeneous supramolecularly ordered powder mixture, which was successfully compressed after homogenization with conventional tabletting excipients. The obtained directly compressed tablets showed uniform drug release of low variations. The results highlight the novel application of micronized rotary-spun fibers as intermediate for further processing reserving the original favorable powder characteristics of fibrous systems. PMID:25190153

  19. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  20. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  1. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  2. Process-directed self-assembly of multiblock copolymers: Solvent casting vs spray coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q.; Tang, J.; Müller, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using computer simulation of a soft, coarse-grained model and self-consistent field theory we investigate how collapsed, globular chain conformations in the initial stages of structure formation, which are produced by spray-coating, affect the single-chain structure and morphology of microphase-separated multiblock copolymers. Comparing spray-coated films with films that start from a disordered state of Gaussian chains, we observe that the collapsed molecular conformations in the initial stage give rise to (1) a smaller fraction of blocks that straddle domains (bridges), (2) a significant reduction of the molecular extension normal to the internal interfaces, and (3) a slightly larger lamellar domain spacing in the final morphology. The relaxation of molecular conformations towards equilibrium is very protracted for both processes - solvent casting and spray coating. These findings illustrate that the process conditions of the copolymer materials may significantly affect materials properties (such as mechanical properties) because the system does not reach thermal equilibrium on the relevant time scales.

  3. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  4. LLNL casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  5. Molecular basis of chill resistance adaptations in poikilothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Scott A L; Manso, Bruno; Cossins, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Chill and freeze represent very different components of low temperature stress. Whilst the principal mechanisms of tissue damage and of acquired protection from freeze-induced effects are reasonably well established, those for chill damage and protection are not. Non-freeze cold exposure (i.e. chill) can lead to serious disruption to normal life processes, including disruption to energy metabolism, loss of membrane perm-selectivity and collapse of ion gradients, as well as loss of neuromuscular coordination. If the primary lesions are not relieved then the progressive functional debilitation can lead to death. Thus, identifying the underpinning molecular lesions can point to the means of building resistance to subsequent chill exposures. Researchers have focused on four specific lesions: (i) failure of neuromuscular coordination, (ii) perturbation of bio-membrane structure and adaptations due to altered lipid composition, (iii) protein unfolding, which might be mitigated by the induced expression of compatible osmolytes acting as 'chemical chaperones', (iv) or the induced expression of protein chaperones along with the suppression of general protein synthesis. Progress in all these potential mechanisms has been ongoing but not substantial, due in part to an over-reliance on straightforward correlative approaches. Also, few studies have intervened by adoption of single gene ablation, which provides much more direct and compelling evidence for the role of specific genes, and thus processes, in adaptive phenotypes. Another difficulty is the existence of multiple mechanisms, which often act together, thus resulting in compensatory responses to gene manipulations, which may potentially mask disruptive effects on the chill tolerance phenotype. Consequently, there is little direct evidence of the underpinning regulatory mechanisms leading to induced resistance to chill injury. Here, we review recent advances mainly in lower vertebrates and in arthropods, but increasingly

  6. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  7. Pouring or chilling a bottle of wine: an fMRI study on the prospective planning of object-directed actions.

    PubMed

    van Elk, M; Viswanathan, S; van Schie, H T; Bekkering, H; Grafton, S T

    2012-04-01

    This fMRI study investigates the neural mechanisms supporting the retrieval of action semantics. A novel motor imagery task was used in which participants were required to imagine planning actions with a familiar object (e.g. a toothbrush) or with an unfamiliar object (e.g. a pair of pliers) based on either goal-related information (i.e. where to move the object) or grip-related information (i.e. how to grasp the object). Planning actions with unfamiliar compared to familiar objects was slower and was associated with increased activation in the bilateral superior parietal lobe, the right inferior parietal lobe and the right insula. The stronger activation in parietal areas for unfamiliar objects fits well with the idea that parietal areas are involved in motor imagery and suggests that this process takes more effort in the case of novel or unfamiliar actions. In contrast, the planning of familiar actions resulted in increased activation in the anterior prefrontal cortex, suggesting that subjects maintained a stronger goal-representation when planning actions with familiar compared to unfamiliar objects. These findings provide further insight into the neural structures that support action semantic knowledge for the functional use of real-world objects and suggest that action semantic knowledge is activated most readily when actions are planned in a goal-directed manner. PMID:22349497

  8. Influences of intergranular structure on the magnetic properties of directly cast nanocrystalline NdFeCoTiNbBC alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Hong, Y.; Jiao, D. L.; Qiu, Z. G.; Zhou, Q.; Hussain, M.; Liu, Z. W.; Greneche, J. M.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The millimeter-sized Nd9.5Fe61.5Co10Ti2.5Nb0.5B16‑x C x (x  =  0–1.25) alloy rods with various compositions were fabricated by direct casting. Nano-sized hard phase Nd2(FeCo)14B, soft phase ɑ-FeCo, and amorphous phase were observed in all alloys. An optimized amount of carbon additions improved the magnetic properties by enhancing the glass forming ability and forming near single domain-sized Nd2(FeCo)14B grains around the rod surface. Various intergranular structures were observed in the alloys with x  =  0.25–1. Micromagnetic simulation using the images obtained from the magnetic force microscope and transition electron microscope indicates that the distribution and magnetism of the intergranular phase have an important influence on the magnetic properties and demagnetization process of the alloys. A uniformly distributed nonmagnetic intergranular amorphous phase may enhance the magnetic properties, but the coercivity decreases when the amorphous phase is magnetic. It is important to modify the structure and distribution of the inter-grain amorphous phase in order to achieve high hard magnetic properties in these alloys.

  9. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  10. Minimization of Macrosegregation in DC Cast Ingots Through Jet Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Samuel R.; Allanore, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    With an increase in demand for aluminum alloys, industrial suppliers are seeking to increase the size and speed of casting processes. Unfortunately operating the existing Direct-Chill (DC) process in such conditions tends to enhance metallurgical defects. Perhaps the most recognized of these defects is macrosegregation, whose effects are permanent once the material is solidified. In order to facilitate the expansion of the DC process without increasing the presence of macrosegregation, a novel jet mixing method to distribute the liquid metal is presented. The governing equations for this process are derived and the operating parameters necessary to minimize the centerline macrosegregation are predicted. The results of commercial-scale tests are presented, validating the predictive equations and performance of this process.

  11. Semi-quantitative predictions of hot tearing and cold cracking in aluminum DC casting using numerical process simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, T.; Miroux, A.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking is one of the most critical defects that may occur during aluminum direct-chill (DC) casting. There are two types of cracking typical of DC casting: hot tearing and cold cracking. To study and predict such defects, currently we are using a process simulator, ALSIM. ALSIM is able to provide semi-quantitative predictions of hot tearing and cold cracking susceptibility. In this work, we performed benchmark tests using predictions of both types of cracks and experimental results of DC casting trials. The trials series resulted in billets with hot tearing as well as cold cracking. The model was also used to study the influence of several casting variables such as casting speed and inlet geometry with respect to the cracking susceptibility in the ingots. In this work, we found that the sump geometry was changed by the feeding scheme, which played an important role in hot tear occurrence. Moreover, increasing the casting speed also increased the hot tear and cold crack susceptibility. In addition, from the result of simulation, we also observed a phenomenon that supported the hypotheses of connection between hot tearing and cold cracking.

  12. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Bai, Ge; Wang, Shu; Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  13. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  14. Theoretical discussion of the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating field on the as-cast microstructures of DC Al Zn Mg Cu Zr ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Dong; Jianzhong, Cui; Wenjiang, Ding

    2006-10-01

    Within the framework of classical solidification theories, the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating field on the as-cast microstructures of direct chilling (DC) casting Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr ingots was discussed. In comparison with the conventional DC ingots, the microstructures of the low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating casting (LFEVC) ingots are gradually refined with increasing electromagnetic intensity. The increased number of nuclei is likely to be as a result of electromagnetic undercooling and forced convection. Grains were assumed to grow first into a global morphology and then into a dendritic one after exceeding a critical size. The unstable wavelength of a growing global grain was deduced to evaluate this transition from a global grain to a dendritic grain. Decreasing the electromagnetic frequency and/or increasing of electromagnetic intensity lead to a longer wavelength and therefore are suitable for less dendritic or net-global grains.

  15. High coercivity microcrystalline Nd-rich Nd-Fe-Co-Al-B bulk magnets prepared by direct copper mold casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Hong, Y.; Fang, X. G.; Qiu, Z. G.; Zhong, X. C.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, Z. W.

    2016-06-01

    High coercivity Nd25Fe40Co20Al15-xBx (x=7-15) hard magnets were prepared by a simple process of injection casting. Different from many previous investigations on nanocomposite compositions, the magnets in this work contain hard magnetic Nd2(FeCoAl)14B, Nd-rich, and Nd1+ε(FeCo)4B4 phases. The magnetic properties, phase evolution, and microstructure of the as-cast and annealed magnets were investigated. As the boron content increased from 7 to 11 at%, the intrinsic coercivity Hcj of the as-cast magnet increased from 816 to 1140 kA/m. The magnets annealed at 750 °C have shown more regular and smaller grains than the as-cast alloys, especially for the x=11 alloy. The high intrinsic coercivities for the annealed alloys with x=8~11 result from the presence of small-sized grains in the microstructure. The highest Hcj of 1427 kA/m was obtained for the heat treated alloy with x=10. This work provides an alternative approach for preparing fully dense Nd-rich bulk hard magnets with relatively good properties.

  16. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  17. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  18. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  19. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  20. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  1. Chill block melt spinning of nickel-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemker, Kevin J.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of Ni-Mo alloys ranging in composition from pure nickel to Ni-40 at. pct molybdenum were cast by the chill block melt-spinning rapid solidification technique and examined by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. Casting difficulties were encountered with lean alloys, but richer alloys spread more readily on the casting wheel. Alloy microstructures for 5 to 37.5 at. pct molybdenum ribbons were primarily cellular/dendritic; microstructure feature size decreased with increasing molybdenum content. Extended solubility of molybdenum in gamma-nickel, with fcc lattice parameter increasing with composition to the 1.05 power, was observed up to 37/5 at. pct molybdenum. Substoichiometric Ni-Mo (delta) nucleated on the wheel side of the ribbons of compositions 35, 37.5, and 40 at. pct molybdenum. The amount of partitionless delta-phase thus formed increased with increasing molybdenum content and quench rate. This substoichiometric delta transformed readily to a fine structure gamma-delta mixture.

  2. Preparation and characterization of microparticles of piroxicam by spray drying and spray chilling methods

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, M.; Kini, A.G.; Kulkarni, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, exhibits poor water solubility and flow properties, poor dissolution and poor wetting. Consequently, the aim of this study was to improve the dissolution of piroxicam. Microparticles containing piroxicam were produced by spray drying, using isopropyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 40:60 v/v as solvent system, and spray chilling technology by melting the drug and chilling it with a pneumatic nozzle to enhance dissolution rate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for in vitro dissolution and solubility. The prepared drug particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimeter, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dissolution profile of the spray dried microparticles was compared with spray-chilled microparticles, pure and recrystallized samples. Spray dried microparticles and spray chilled microparticles exhibited decreased crystallinity and improved micromeritic properties. The dissolution of the spray dried microparticle and spray chilled particles were improved compared with recrystallized and pure sample of piroxicam. Consequently, it was believed that spray drying of piroxicam is a useful tool to improve dissolution but not in case of spray chilling. This may be due to the degradation of drug or variations in the resonance structure or could be due to minor distortion of bond angles. Hence, this spray drying technique can be used for formulation of tablets of piroxicam by direct compression with directly compressible tablet excipients. PMID:21589797

  3. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which

  4. Technical development of double-clad process for thin strip casting of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.L.; Forkel, C.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    1984-08-01

    This report documents the technical development for a patent disclosure of a double-clad process for the continuous casting of thin-strip carbon steel. The fundamental idea of the disclosure is to form a product strip by depositing molten steel between two, cooled, clad strips of the same material. The claimed benefits include: (a) the conservation of energy in steel making through the elimination of soaking pits and reheat cycles, and (b) an improved surface on both sides of the as-cast product such that it will be suitable for direct feed to a cold-reduction mill. However, the process as conceived is not necessarily limited to the casting of carbon steel, but may be also applied to other metals and alloys. The work is described under three headings as follows. Preliminary Considerations and Scoping Analysis presents the basic idea of the double-clad, thin-strip casting process; the energy conservation potential; scoping heat transfer calculations for the casting process; and independent review of this work. Thermal Analysis for Roller Configuration of Double-Clad Process, presents the development, results, and independent review of a finite-element thermal analysis for the casting process as originally conceived (using only chilled rollers in direct contact with the clad material of the product strip). Further Considerations for Belt Configuration of Double-Clad Process deals with a modified equipment design which interposes two product support belts, one on each side of the product, between the clad strip and the rollers. In addition to the process description, this section presents the preliminary mechanical calculations for the endless metal belts and the work scope and results for the computer model revision and thermal analysis for the modified concept.

  5. Constitutive behavior of as-cast AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, W. M.; Magnin, B.; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2002-07-01

    Recent thermomechanical modeling to calculate the stress field in industrially direct-chill (DC) cast-aluminum slabs has been successful, but lack of material data limits the accuracy of these calculations. Therefore, the constitutive behavior of three aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182) was determined in the as-cast condition using tensile tests at low strain rates and from room temperature to solidus temperature. The parameters of two constitutive equations, the extended Ludwik equation and a combination of the Sellars-Tegart equation with a hardening law, were determined. In order to study the effect of recovery, the constitutive behavior after prestraining at higher temperatures was also investigated. To evaluate the quantified constitutive equations, tensile tests were performed simulating the deformation and cooling history experienced by the material during casting. It is concluded that both constitutive equations perform well, but the combined hardening-Sellars-Tegart (HST) equation has temperature-independent parameters, which makes it easier to implement in a DC casting model. Further, the deformation history of the ingot should be taken into account for accurate stress calculations.

  6. Modelling of stress fields during LFEM DC casting of aluminium billets by a meshless method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2015-06-01

    Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys is a widely established technology for efficient production of aluminium billets and slabs. The procedure is being further improved by the application of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (LFEM) in the area of the mold. Novel LFEM DC processing technique affects many different phenomena which occur during solidification, one of them being the stresses and deformations present in the billet. These quantities can have a significant effect on the quality of the cast piece, since they impact porosity, hot-tearing and cold cracking. In this contribution a novel local radial basis function collocation method (LRBFCM) is successfully applied to the problem of stress field calculation during the stationary state of DC casting of aluminium alloys. The formulation of the method is presented in detail, followed by the presentation of the tackled physical problem. The model describes the deformations of linearly elastic, inhomogeneous isotropic solid with a given temperature field. The temperature profile is calculated using the in-house developed heat and mass transfer model. The effects of low frequency EM casting process parameters on the vertical, circumferential and radial stress and on the deformation of billet surface are presented. The application of the LFEM appears to decrease the amplitudes of the tensile stress occurring in the billet.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Phosphatidylglycerol and Chilling Sensitivity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Roughan, P. Grattan

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that molecular species of thylakoid phosphatidylglycerol containing two saturated fatty acids (disaturated phosphatidylglycerol) confer chilling sensitivity upon plants was tested by analyzing the fatty acid composition of phosphatidylglycerols isolated from leaves of a range of plants expected to have different sensitivities to chilling temperatures. `Saturated' fatty acids (palmitate plus stearate plus hexadeca-trans-3-enoate) as a proportion of total phosphatidylglycerol fatty acids varied from 51 to 80 mole per cent in the plants analyzed but appeared to be rigidly fixed for a given plant species, being unaffected by leaf maturity or by environment. Hexadeca-trans-3-enoate occurred only at the sn-2 position, whereas C-18 fatty acids occurred only at the sn-1 position of thylakoid phosphatidylglycerol. Therefore, the proportion of disaturated molecular species could be predicted accurately from the total fatty acids of phosphatidylglycerol. Disaturated molecular species accounted for <25% of the total phosphatidylglycerol from leaves of chilling-resistant plants and for 50 to 60% of the phosphatidylglycerol in leaves from some of the most chilling-sensitive plants. However, not all chilling-sensitive plants contained high proportions of disaturated phosphatidylglycerol; solanaceous and other 16:3-plants and C4 grasses may be important exceptions. Nonetheless, proportions of disaturated phosphatidylglycerol increased concomitantly with increasing chilling sensitivity of plants within a genus. PMID:16664127

  9. In situ purification, alloying and casting methodology for metallic plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.; Blau, Michael S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    Plutonium metal that has been double ER (electrorefined/electrorefining) was further purified via zone refining, using a floating molten zone to minimize the introduction of impurities. The temperature of the molten zone was 750°C, and the atmosphere was 10 -5 Pa. A total of ten zone refining passes were made at a travel rate of 1.5 cm/h. There were 19 elements reduced to quantities below the minimum detectable limits (MDL) by zone refining, while P, K, and W were significantly reduced. The zone-refined metal was then used in an in situ distillation, alloying, and casting step to prepare tapered specimens for single-crystal growth experiments. Specifically, 241Am was distilled from Pu metal by levitating Pu metal with 1 wt% Ga in the melt in a Crystallox vertical electromagnetic levitation crucible at 10 -5 Pa. The Pu is alloyed with Ga to stabilize the δ phase (fcc symmetry) upon solidification. The Pu was chill-cast directly from the electromagnetic levitation field into 1- cm tapered specimens. A water-cooled ceramic mold was used, and the Pu metal was cooled at a rate of 100°C/min. A microstructure examination of the specimen showed 10 × 25 μm acicular grains with a density of 15.938 g/cm 3 (±0.002 g/cm 3).

  10. Suppression of volatile production in tomato fruit exposed to chilling temperature and alleviation of chilling injury by a pre-chilling heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomatoes to 5°C for longer than 6-8 days can cause surface pitting, irregular (blotchy) color development and other symptoms of chilling injury (CI). The objectives for this study were to investigate whether a 4-day exposure of tomato fruit to chilling at the mature green stage ...

  11. Suppression of volatile production in tomato fruit exposed to chilling temperature and alleviation of chilling injury by a pre-chilling heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomato fruit to 5 °C for less than 5 days at mature green stage does not cause visual symptom of chilling injury (CI), however, it is unknown whether such conditions would impact flavor quality (internal CI) after ripening, and if a pre-chilling heat treatment could alleviate in...

  12. Direct formation of L10 FePt in as-cast FePt-based magnetic nanocomposite ribbons without post-synthesis annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Crisan, O.

    2011-09-01

    A novel nanocomposite FePt-based exchange-coupled magnet has been synthesized and structurally and magnetically characterized. We report for the first time the direct formation of the L10 FePt phase without the need for post-synthesis annealing procedures in Fe-Pt-based melt-spun ribbons, obtained by a conventional melt spinning method. The structure and magnetic properties are investigated and the occurrence of the L10 ordered phase in the as-cast state of Fe-Pt-Ag-B melt-spun ribbons is confirmed by XRD and magnetic measurements. A microstructure consisting of fine, uniformly dispersed, 22-24 nm FePt grains dispersed within a soft magnetic matrix is observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. Coercive fields as high as 727 kA m-1, saturation magnetization of about 1.2 T and energy product around 87 kJ m-3 are determined from 270 K hysteresis loops of the as-cast ribbons, making one of the best FePt-based nanocomposite magnet ribbons even without further annealing treatments.

  13. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  14. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  15. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  16. Warming and Chilling: Assessing Aspects of Changing Plant Ecology with Continental-scale Phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. D.; Hanes, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Many recent ecological studies have concentrated on the direct impacts of climate warming, such as modifications to seasonal plant and animal life cycle events (phenology). There are many examples, with most indicating earlier onset of spring plant growth and delayed onset of autumn senescence. However, the implication of continued warming for plant species’ chilling requirements has received comparatively less attention. Temperate zone woody plants often require a certain level of cool season "chilling" (accumulated time at temperatures below a specific threshold) to break dormancy and prepare to respond to springtime warming. Thus, the potential impacts of insufficient chilling must be included in a comprehensive assessment of plant species' responses to climate warming. Vegetation phenological data, when collected for specific plant species at continental-scale, can be used to extract information relating to the combined impacts of reduced chilling and warming on plant species physiology. In a recent study, we demonstrated that common lilac first leaf and first bloom phenology (collected from multiple locations in the western United States and matched with air temperature records) can estimate the species' chilling requirement (in this case 1748 chilling hours, below a base temperature of 7.2°C) and highlight the changing impact of warming on the plant's phenological response in light of that requirement. Specifically, when chilling is above the requirement, lilac first leaf dates advance at a rate of -5.0 days per 100 hour chilling accumulation reduction, and lilac first bloom dates advance at a rate of -4.2 days per 100 hour chilling accumulation reduction. In contrast, when chilling is below the requirement, the lilac event dates advance at a much reduced rate of -1.6 days per 100 hour reduction for first leaf date and -2.2 days per 100 hour reduction for first bloom date. Overall, these encouraging results for common lilac suggest that similar continental

  17. Constitutive behaviour of an as-cast AA7050 alloy in the sub-solidus temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, T. A. S.; Miroux, A. G.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 7050 is of interest for aerospace industries due to its superior mechanical properties. However, its inherent solidification behaviour may augment the accumulation of residual stresses due to uneven cooling conditions upon direct-chill (DC) casting. This can increase the propensity of cold cracking (CC), which is a potentially catastrophic phenomenon in casting ingots. To predict the outcome of the aluminum casting process, ALSIM software is utilised. This software has the capability to predict CC susceptibility during the casting process. However, at the moment, ALSIM lacks the information regarding material constitutive behaviour in the sub-solidus temperature range, which is considered important for studying CC phenomenon. At the moment, ALSIM only has a partial constitutive database for AA7050 and misses data, especially in the vicinity of non-equilibrium solidus (NES) point. The present work presents measurements of tensile constitutive parameters in the temperature range between 400 °C and NES, which is for this alloy defined as 465 °C. The mechanical behaviour is tested in a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator. Constitutive parameters such as stress-strain curves, strain-rate sensitivity and ductility of the alloy have been measured at different test temperatures. With these constitutive data, we expect to improve the accuracy of ALSIM simulations in terms of CC prediction, and gain more insight into the evolution of mechanical properties of AA7050 in the temperature nearby the NES.

  18. The New Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature Chart.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osczevski, Randall; Bluestein, Maurice

    2005-10-01

    The formula used in the U.S. and Canada to express the combined effect of wind and low temperature on how cold it feels was changed in November 2001. Many had felt that the old formula for equivalent temperature, derived in the 1960s from Siple and Passel's flawed but quite useful Wind Chill Index, unnecessarily exaggerated the severity of the weather. The new formula is based on a mathematical model of heat flow from the upwind side of a head-sized cylinder moving at walking speed into the wind. The paper details the assumptions that were made in generating the new wind chill charts. It also points out weaknesses in the concept of wind chill equivalent temperature, including its steady-state character and a seemingly paradoxical effect of the internal thermal resistance of the cylinder on comfort and equivalent temperature. Some improvements and alternatives are suggested.

  19. Finite Element Modelling of the Sawing of DC Cast AA2024 Aluminium Alloy Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.-M.; Ludwig, O.; Heinrich, B.

    2007-04-07

    In the semi-continuous casting of large cross-section rolling sheet ingots of high-strength aluminum alloys (2xxx and 7xxx series), the control of the residual (internal) stresses generated by the non-uniform cooling becomes a necessity. These stresses must be relieved by a thermal treatment before the head and foot of the ingot can be cut. Otherwise, the saw can be caught owing to compressive stresses or cut parts may be ejected thus injuring people or damaging equipment. These high added-value ingots need to be produced in secure conditions. Moreover, a better control of the sawing procedure could allow the suppression of the thermal treatment and therefore save time and energy. By studying the stress build-up during casting and the stress relief during sawing, key parameters for the control and optimization of the processing steps, can be derived. To do so, the direct chill (DC) casting of the AA2024 alloy is modeled with ABAQUS 6.5 with special attention to the thermo-mechanical properties of the alloy. The sawing operation is then simulated by removing mesh elements so as to reproduce the progression of the saw in the ingot. Preliminary results showing the stress relief during sawing accompanied by the risk of saw blocking due to compression or initiating a crack ahead of the saw, are analyzed with an approach based on the rate of strain energy release.

  20. Finite Element Modelling of the Sawing of DC Cast AA2024 Aluminium Alloy Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Ludwig, O.; Heinrich, B.

    2007-04-01

    In the semi-continuous casting of large cross-section rolling sheet ingots of high-strength aluminum alloys (2xxx and 7xxx series), the control of the residual (internal) stresses generated by the non-uniform cooling becomes a necessity. These stresses must be relieved by a thermal treatment before the head and foot of the ingot can be cut. Otherwise, the saw can be caught owing to compressive stresses or cut parts may be ejected thus injuring people or damaging equipment. These high added-value ingots need to be produced in secure conditions. Moreover, a better control of the sawing procedure could allow the suppression of the thermal treatment and therefore save time and energy. By studying the stress build-up during casting and the stress relief during sawing, key parameters for the control and optimization of the processing steps, can be derived. To do so, the direct chill (DC) casting of the AA2024 alloy is modeled with ABAQUS 6.5 with special attention to the thermo-mechanical properties of the alloy. The sawing operation is then simulated by removing mesh elements so as to reproduce the progression of the saw in the ingot. Preliminary results showing the stress relief during sawing accompanied by the risk of saw blocking due to compression or initiating a crack ahead of the saw, are analyzed with an approach based on the rate of strain energy release.

  1. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-04

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  2. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  3. Chilling stress response of post-emergent cotton seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    • Early season development of cotton is often impaired by sudden episodes of chilling temperature. We determined the chilling response specific to post-emergent 13-d-old cotton seedlings. • Seedlings were gradually chilled during the dark period and rewarmed during the night-to-day transition. Fo...

  4. Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

    1998-11-23

    A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

  5. Dewaxing process using agitated heat exchanger to chill solvent-oil and wax slurry to wax filtration temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Th.E.

    1984-04-10

    In an improved process for dewaxing waxy hydrocarbon oils, wherein said waxy oil is cooled in an indirect chilling zone to a temperature greater than the wax separation temperature whereby wax is precipitated to form a wax-oil-solvent slurry, cooling the slurry to the wax separation temperature in an indirect chilling zone thereby precipitating a further portion of wax from said waxy oil and separating said precipitated wax from the wax-oil-solvent slurry in solid-liquid separation means, the improvement comprises using as the indirect chilling zone an indirect heat exchanger means operated at a high level of agitation. Expressed in terms of Impeller Reynolds Number the agitation is on the order of about 1,000 to 1,000,000. Alternatively, the direct chilling zone is totally replaced by the high agitation indirect heat exchanger means.

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water System Design Description (SYS 47-4)

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-06-13

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water (VPSCHW) system. The discussion that follows is limited to the VPSCHW system and its interfaces with associated systems. The reader's attention is directed to Drawings H-1-82162, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Process Equipment Skid P&ID Vacuum System, and H-1-82224, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Mechanical Utilities Process Chilled Water P&ID. Figure 1-1 shows the location and equipment arrangement for the VPSCHW system. The VPSCHW system provides chilled water to the Vacuum Purge System (VPS). The chilled water provides the ability to condense water from the multi-canister overpack (MCO) outlet gases during the MCO vacuum and purge cycles. By condensing water from the MCO purge gas, the VPS can assist in drying the contents of the MCO.

  7. Control of salmonella at the chill tank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Salmonella on poultry meat should be in the form of a continuous effort from the breeder farm to the fully processed and further processed product, as well as, consumer education. However, control is often measured at the chill tank and efforts are made to relate prevalence to processing...

  8. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  9. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  10. Quality assessment of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets during super chilling and chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Xiaochang; Luo, Yongkang; Gao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of super chilling (-3 °C) and chilled (3 °C) storage on the quality of rainbow trout fillets, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), drip loss, pH, electric conductivity (EC), total aerobic count (TAC), K and related values, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and related compounds, color and sensory score were determined and correlation between these indicators were analyzed. According to the comprehensive evaluation of TAC, K value and sensory score, the limit for acceptability of rainbow trout fillets was 5 days at 3 °C and 11 days at -3 °C. Additionally, the correlation coefficients between TVB-N and other freshness indicators (TAC, K value, sensory score) were relatively low. TVB-N may be inadequate for evaluating freshness changes of rainbow trout fillets compared with other indicators. Among the K and related values, H value was a better freshness indicator in rainbow trout fillets during chilled and super chilling storage for its better correlation coefficients with other freshness indicators. Super chilling storage could extend the shelf life of rainbow trout fillets by 6 days compared to chilled storage. PMID:26243943

  11. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  12. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Basic Casting from A to Z. Student's Instruction Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebco, Tulsa, OK.

    A profusely illustrated student instruction booklet contains step-by-step directions and diagrams for learning four basic casting techniques. Separate sections cover basic spin-casting, spinning, bait-casting, and fly-casting. Each section details recommended equipment (reel, rod, line, plug, tackle, lures, leaders, flies), describes specific…

  14. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  15. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  16. Exogenous Melatonin Treatment Increases Chilling Tolerance and Induces Defense Response in Harvested Peach Fruit during Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Song, Chunbo; Shao, Jiarong; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2016-06-29

    The effect of exogenous melatonin on chilling injury in peach fruit after harvest was investigated. To explore the optimum concentration of melatonin for chilling tolerance induction, peach fruit were treated with 50, 100, or 200 μM melatonin for 120 min and then stored for 28 days at 4 °C. The results showed that application of melatonin at 100 μM was most effective in reducing chilling injury of peach fruit after harvest. Peaches treated with melatonin at this concentration displayed higher levels of extractable juice rate and total soluble solids than the non-treated peaches. In addition, melatonin treatment enhanced expression of PpADC, PpODC, and PpGAD and consequently increased polyamines and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents. Meanwhile, the upregulated transcripts of PpADC and PpODC and inhibited PpPDH expression resulted in the higher proline content in melatonin-treated fruit compared to the control fruit. Our results revealed that melatonin treatment may be a useful technique to alleviate chilling injury in cold-stored peach fruit. The chilling tolerance of harvested peaches induced by melatonin treatment is associated with higher levels of polyamine, GABA, and proline. These data provided here are the first protective evidence of exogenous melatonin in harvested horticultural products in response to direct chilling stress. PMID:27281292

  17. Flow Analysis on a Limited Volume Chilled Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lin

    2012-07-31

    LANL Currently has a limited volume chilled water system for use in a glove box, but the system needs to be updated. Before we start building our new system, a flow analysis is needed to ensure that there are no high flow rates, extreme pressures, or any other hazards involved in the system. In this project the piping system is extremely important to us because it directly affects the overall design of the entire system. The primary components necessary for the chilled water piping system are shown in the design. They include the pipes themselves (perhaps of more than one diameter), the various fitting used to connect the individual pipes to form the desired system, the flow rate control devices (valves), and the pumps that add energy to the fluid. Even the most simple pipe systems are actually quite complex when they are viewed in terms of rigorous analytical considerations. I used an 'exact' analysis and dimensional analysis considerations combined with experimental results for this project. When 'real-world' effects are important (such as viscous effects in pipe flows), it is often difficult or impossible to use only theoretical methods to obtain the desired results. A judicious combination of experimental data with theoretical considerations and dimensional analysis are needed in order to reduce risks to an acceptable level.

  18. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  19. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  20. Direct Dating and Physico-Chemical Analyses Cast Doubts on the Coexistence of Humans and Dwarf Hippos in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lebon, Matthieu; Quiles, Anita; Reiche, Ina; Vigne, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    In the Mediterranean, the island dwarf megafaunas became extinct around the end of the Pleistocene, during a period of rapid and global climate change. In Cyprus, this coincided with the first human presence on the island, as attested by the rock shelter of Akrotiri-Aetokremnos where an Epipaleolithic anthropogenic layer (stratum 2) was found overlying a massive accumulation of pygmy hippopotamus (Phanourios minor (Desmarest, 1822)) [Boekschoten and Sondaar, 1972] bones (stratum 4). The relationship between the two layers is highly controversial and the role played by humans in hippo extinction remains fiercely debated. Here, we provide new, direct radiocarbon and physico-chemical analyses on calcined bones which elucidates the complex depositional history of the assemblage. Bone turquoise was identified using micro-PIXE analysis and depth-profiling together with Vis spectroscopy, demonstrating that these bones were not freshly burned. Bayesian modeling of the radiocarbon dates indicates that stratum 4 accumulated during the first half of the 13th mill cal BP and that calcination occurred several hundred years later. We conclude that accumulation occurred naturally during the beginning of the Younger Dryas and that Epipalaeolithic visitors subsequently used the bones as fuel, starting from the mid-13th mill cal BP. At that time, dwarf hippos were probably already extinct or at least highly endangered. Our results shed new light on the possible causes of hippo extinction, on the subsequent introduction of the wild boar and on the earliest occupation of the island by humans. PMID:26284623

  1. Direct Dating and Physico-Chemical Analyses Cast Doubts on the Coexistence of Humans and Dwarf Hippos in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lebon, Matthieu; Quiles, Anita; Reiche, Ina; Vigne, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    In the Mediterranean, the island dwarf megafaunas became extinct around the end of the Pleistocene, during a period of rapid and global climate change. In Cyprus, this coincided with the first human presence on the island, as attested by the rock shelter of Akrotiri-Aetokremnos where an Epipaleolithic anthropogenic layer (stratum 2) was found overlying a massive accumulation of pygmy hippopotamus (Phanourios minor (Desmarest, 1822)) [Boekschoten and Sondaar, 1972] bones (stratum 4). The relationship between the two layers is highly controversial and the role played by humans in hippo extinction remains fiercely debated. Here, we provide new, direct radiocarbon and physico-chemical analyses on calcined bones which elucidates the complex depositional history of the assemblage. Bone turquoise was identified using micro-PIXE analysis and depth-profiling together with Vis spectroscopy, demonstrating that these bones were not freshly burned. Bayesian modeling of the radiocarbon dates indicates that stratum 4 accumulated during the first half of the 13th mill cal BP and that calcination occurred several hundred years later. We conclude that accumulation occurred naturally during the beginning of the Younger Dryas and that Epipalaeolithic visitors subsequently used the bones as fuel, starting from the mid-13th mill cal BP. At that time, dwarf hippos were probably already extinct or at least highly endangered. Our results shed new light on the possible causes of hippo extinction, on the subsequent introduction of the wild boar and on the earliest occupation of the island by humans. PMID:26284623

  2. The use of water cooling during the continuous casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, J.; Thomas, B. G.; Wells, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    In both continuous casting of steel slabs and direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloy ingots, water is used to cool the mold in the initial stages of solidification, and then below the mold, where it is in direct contact with the newly solidified surface of the metal. Water cooling affects the product quality by (1) controlling the heat removal rate that creates and cools the solid shell and (2) generating thermal stresses and strains inside the solidified metal. This work reviews the current state-of-the-art in water cooling for both processes, and draws insights by comparing and contrasting the different practices used in each process. The heat extraction coefficient during secondary cooling depends greatly on the surface temperature of the ingot, as represented by boiling water-cooling curves. Thus, the heat extraction rate varies dramatically with time, as the slab/ingot surface temperature changes. Sudden fluctuations in the temperature gradients within the solidifying metal cause thermal stresses, which often lead to cracks, especially near the solidification front, where even small tensile stresses can form hot tears. Hence, a tight control of spray cooling for steel, and practices such as CO2 injection/pulse water cooling for aluminum, are now used to avoid sudden changes in the strand surface temperature. The goal in each process is to match the rate of heat removal at the surface with the internal supply of latent and sensible heat, in order to lower the metal surface temperature monotonically, until cooling is complete.

  3. Influence of transport mechanisms on nucleation and grain structure formation in DC cast aluminium alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedel, M.; Založnik, M.; Kumar, A.; Combeau, H.; Jarry, P.; Waz, E.

    2012-01-01

    The grain structure formation in direct chill (DC) casting is directly linked to nucleation, which is generally promoted by inoculation. Inoculation prevents defects, but also modifies the physical properties by changing the microstructure. We studied the coupling of the nucleation on inoculant particles and the grain growth in the presence of melt flow induced by thermosolutal convection and of the transport of free-floating equiaxed grains. We used a volume-averaged two-phase multiscale model with a fully coupled description of phenomena on the grain scale (nucleation on grain refiner particles and grain growth) and on the product scale (macroscopic transport). The transport of inoculant particles is also modeled, which accounts for the inhomogeneous distribution of inoculant particles in the melt. The model was applied to an industrial sized (350mm thick) DC cast aluminium alloy ingot. A discretised nuclei size distribution was defined and the impact of different macroscopic phenomena on the grain structure formation was studied: the zone and intensity of nucleation and the resulting grain size distribution. It is shown that nucleation in the presence of macroscopic transport cannot be explained only in terms of cooling rate, but variations of composition, nuclei density and grain density, all affected by transport, must be accounted for.

  4. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  5. Growth of Salmonella on chilled meat.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, B. M.; Roberts, T. A.; Mansfield, J.; Farkas, G.

    1980-01-01

    Growth rates of a mixture of Salmonella serotypes inoculated on beef from a commercial abattoir were measured at chill temperatures. The minimum recorded mean generation times were 8.1 h at 10 degrees C; 5.2 h at 12.5 degrees C and 2.9 h at 15 degrees C. Growth did not occur at 7-8 degrees C. From these data the maximum extent of growth of Salmonella during storage of meat for different times at chill temperatures was calculated. Criteria for deciding safe handling temperatures for meat are discussed. Maintaining an internal temperature below 10 degrees C during the boning operation would be sufficient to safeguard public health requirements. PMID:7052227

  6. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  7. Economic uncertainties in chilled water system design

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerud, R.; Gillespie, K.L. Jr.; Hydeman, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    The analysis described here examines how uncertainties in engineering and economic assumptions made during chilled water system design translate to uncertainty in commonly used design decision metrics. The metric used is the benefit-cost ratio based on discounted cash flow. This analysis was performed as part of a project that is developing engineering tools for use in selecting energy-efficient chilled water system components, controls, and operating strategies. These tools include cooling thermal load prediction capabilities and performance data and models for chillers and cooling towers. The purpose of this study is to estimate accuracy requirements for the load and performance data that will be provided as part of the chilled water system tools. The logic is that there is inherent uncertainty in the decision metric due to uncertainty in inputs other than load and equipment performance, and, consequently, there is a limit below which further improvements in the accuracy of the load and equipment performance do not appreciably improve the quality of information available to the decision maker.

  8. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  9. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction (ND) in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. In the present study, these measurements are used to show that a well-designed thermomechanical finite element (FE) process model can reproduce relatively well the experimental results. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out to determine the relative effect of the various mechanical parameters when computing the as-cast residual stresses in a cylindrical billet. Two model parameters have been investigated: the temperature when the alloy starts to thermally contract and the plasticity behavior. It is shown that the mechanical properties at low temperatures have a much larger influence on the residual stresses than those at high temperatures.

  10. Evolution of Fe Bearing Intermetallics During DC Casting and Homogenization of an Al-Mg-Si Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Grant, P. S.; O'Reilly, K. A. Q.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of iron (Fe) bearing intermetallics (Fe-IMCs) during direct chill casting and homogenization of a grain-refined 6063 aluminum-magnesium-silicon (Al-Mg-Si) alloy has been studied. The as-cast and homogenized microstructure contained Fe-IMCs at the grain boundaries and within Al grains. The primary α-Al grain size, α-Al dendritic arm spacing, IMC particle size, and IMC three-dimensional (3D) inter-connectivity increased from the edge to the center of the as-cast billet; both α c-AlFeSi and β-AlFeSi Fe-IMCs were identified, and overall α c-AlFeSi was predominant. For the first time in industrial billets, the different Fe-rich IMCs have been characterized into types based on their 3D chemistry and morphology. Additionally, the role of β-AlFeSi in nucleating Mg2Si particles has been identified. After homogenization, α c-AlFeSi predominated across the entire billet cross section, with marked changes in the 3D morphology and strong reductions in inter-connectivity, both supporting a recovery in alloy ductility.

  11. Evolution of Fe Bearing Intermetallics During DC Casting and Homogenization of an Al-Mg-Si Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Grant, P. S.; O'Reilly, K. A. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of iron (Fe) bearing intermetallics (Fe-IMCs) during direct chill casting and homogenization of a grain-refined 6063 aluminum-magnesium-silicon (Al-Mg-Si) alloy has been studied. The as-cast and homogenized microstructure contained Fe-IMCs at the grain boundaries and within Al grains. The primary α-Al grain size, α-Al dendritic arm spacing, IMC particle size, and IMC three-dimensional (3D) inter-connectivity increased from the edge to the center of the as-cast billet; both α c-AlFeSi and β-AlFeSi Fe-IMCs were identified, and overall α c-AlFeSi was predominant. For the first time in industrial billets, the different Fe-rich IMCs have been characterized into types based on their 3D chemistry and morphology. Additionally, the role of β-AlFeSi in nucleating Mg2Si particles has been identified. After homogenization, α c-AlFeSi predominated across the entire billet cross section, with marked changes in the 3D morphology and strong reductions in inter-connectivity, both supporting a recovery in alloy ductility.

  12. Study of twin-roll cast Aluminium alloys subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poková, M.; Cieslar, M.

    2014-08-01

    Aluminium alloys prepared by twin-roll casting method become widely used in industry applications. Their high solid solution supersaturation and finer grains ensure better mechanical properties when compared with the direct-chill cast ones. One of the possibilities how to enhance their thermal stability is the addition of zirconium. After heat treatment Al3Zr precipitates form and these pin moving grain boundaries when the material is exposed to higher temperatures. In the present work twin-roll cast aluminium alloys based on AA3003 with and without Zr addition were annealed for 8 hours at 450 °C to enable precipitation of Al3Zr phase. Afterwards they were subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing, which led to the reduction of average grain size under 1 μm. During subsequent isochronal annealing recovery and recrystallization took place. These processes were monitored by microhardness measurements, light optical microscopy and in-situ transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Zr stabilizes the grain size and increases the recrystallization temperature by 100 °C.

  13. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  14. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  15. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  16. Ethylene Production by Chilled Cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Adams, D O

    1980-11-01

    Chilling at 2.5 C accelerated the synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and C(2)H(4) production in cucumber fruit. Skin tissue contained higher levels of ACC and was more sensitive to chilling than was cortex tissue. Accumulation of ACC in chilled tissue was detected after 1 day of chilling and remained elevated even after C(2)H(4) production started to decline. These data suggest that ACC synthesis is readily stimulated by chilling, whereas the system that converts ACC to C(2)H(4) is vulnerable to chilling injury. Chilling-induced C(2)H(4) production was inhibited by amino-ethoxyvinylglycine, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and cycloheximide. The utilization of methionine for ACC formation and chilling-induced C(2)H(4) biosynthesis was established using l-[3,4-(14)C]methionine. Chilled tissue had a higher capacity to convert l-[3,4-(14)C]methionine to ACC and C(2)H(4) than did nonchilled tissue. PMID:16661538

  17. Ethylene Production by Chilled Cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien Yi; Adams, Douglas O.

    1980-01-01

    Chilling at 2.5 C accelerated the synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and C2H4 production in cucumber fruit. Skin tissue contained higher levels of ACC and was more sensitive to chilling than was cortex tissue. Accumulation of ACC in chilled tissue was detected after 1 day of chilling and remained elevated even after C2H4 production started to decline. These data suggest that ACC synthesis is readily stimulated by chilling, whereas the system that converts ACC to C2H4 is vulnerable to chilling injury. Chilling-induced C2H4 production was inhibited by amino-ethoxyvinylglycine, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and cycloheximide. The utilization of methionine for ACC formation and chilling-induced C2H4 biosynthesis was established using l-[3,4-14C]methionine. Chilled tissue had a higher capacity to convert l-[3,4-14C]methionine to ACC and C2H4 than did nonchilled tissue. PMID:16661538

  18. Center crack detection during continuous casting of aluminum by laser ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Hubert; Mitter, Thomas; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Crack detection during continuous direct chill casting of aluminum is a matter of economics. Determining cracks during production process saves money, energy and raw material. Of course, a non-destructive method is required for this evaluation. Because of temperature concerns conventional ultrasound is not applicable. One non-contact alternative is laser ultrasonics. In laser ultrasonics short laser pulses illuminate the sample. The electromagnetic energy gets absorbed at the surface of the sample and results in local heating followed by expansion. Thereby broadband ultrasonic waves are launched which propagate through the sample and get back reflected or scattered at interfaces (cracks, blowholes,…) like conventional ultrasonic waves. Therefore laser ultrasonics is an alternative thermal infrared technology. By using an interferometer also the detection of the ultrasonic waves at the sample surface is done in a remote manner. During preliminary examinations in the lab by scanning different aluminum studs it was able to distinguish between studs with and without cracks. The prediction of the dimension of the crack by evaluation of the damping of the broadband ultrasonic waves was possible. With simple image reconstruction methods one can localize the crack and give an estimation of its extent and even its shape. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  19. Tomato flavor changes at chilling and non-chilling temperatures as influenced by controlled atmospheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest temperatures recommended as safe to avoid chilling injury (CI) based on lack of visible symptoms suppress tomato aroma development. We investigated how temperatures at or above the putative CI threshold of 12.5°C affected aroma of pink ‘Tasti Lee’ tomatoes and if controlled atmosphere (C...

  20. Performance of a chill ATES system

    SciTech Connect

    Midkiff, K.C.; Song, Y.K.; Schaetzle, W.J.

    1989-03-01

    An aquifer air-conditioning system has been installed to cool the Student Recreation Center on the University of Alabama Campus. This research program encompasses the monitoring of the operation of the aquifer system and provision of emplacements to the system. The monitoring includes establishing the instrumentation, acquiring data, and analyzing the results. The instrumentation allows the measurement of water flow rates and corresponding temperatures, electrical energy input, aquifer temperatures at nineteen monitoring wells, and aquifer levels at six monitoring wells. Recent acquifer performance data indicate that 76% of the chill energy stored was recovered for the period Oct/86 - Sep/87 and 70% for the period Oct/87 - Sep/88. This is a substantial improvement over recoveries of 38% for the 1985 season and 55% for 1986. The overall coefficient of performance was 5.4 for Oct/86 - Sep/87 and 4.6 for Oct/87 - Sep/88. THe system has supplied 100% of the cooling with only about one-half of the energy input required by a conventional system. Some of the increased recovery of chilled water is a result of modifying the production well operation to reduce the regional flow of water toward the northwest. All warm water is withdrawn form the southeast wells, chilled, and injected in northwest wells. The cold water then withdrawn from the cold wells is used for air-conditioning but not reinjected into the aquifer. Additional flow control is provided by pumping (and discarding) water out of a southeast well, although the complete results of this new strategy are as yet unclear.

  1. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  2. Increasing chilling reduces heat requirement for floral budbreak in peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to chilling temperatures is a critical factor in the suitability of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] cultivars to moderate climates such as in the southeastern United States. Time of bloom depends on the innate chilling requirement of the cultivar as well as the timing and quantity of co...

  3. 76 FR 166 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... imports of fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway (56 FR 14920, 14921). Following five-year reviews... imports of fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway (71 FR 7512). The Commission is now conducting...), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ \\1\\ No response to this request...

  4. Quality and safety of broiler meat in various chilling systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling is a critical step in poultry processing to attain high quality meat and to meet the USDA-FSIS temperature standards. This study was conducted to determine the effects of commercially available chilling systems on quality and safety of broiler meat. A total of 300 carcasses in two replica...

  5. Chilling and heat requirements for flowering in temperate fruit trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Dai, Junhu; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Yu, Haiying; Xu, Jianchu; Luedeling, Eike

    2014-08-01

    Climate change has affected the rates of chilling and heat accumulation, which are vital for flowering and production, in temperate fruit trees, but few studies have been conducted in the cold-winter climates of East Asia. To evaluate tree responses to variation in chill and heat accumulation rates, partial least squares regression was used to correlate first flowering dates of chestnut ( Castanea mollissima Blume) and jujube ( Zizyphus jujube Mill.) in Beijing, China, with daily chill and heat accumulation between 1963 and 2008. The Dynamic Model and the Growing Degree Hour Model were used to convert daily records of minimum and maximum temperature into horticulturally meaningful metrics. Regression analyses identified the chilling and forcing periods for chestnut and jujube. The forcing periods started when half the chilling requirements were fulfilled. Over the past 50 years, heat accumulation during tree dormancy increased significantly, while chill accumulation remained relatively stable for both species. Heat accumulation was the main driver of bloom timing, with effects of variation in chill accumulation negligible in Beijing's cold-winter climate. It does not seem likely that reductions in chill will have a major effect on the studied species in Beijing in the near future. Such problems are much more likely for trees grown in locations that are substantially warmer than their native habitats, such as temperate species in the subtropics and tropics.

  6. Incidence of chilling injury in fresh-cut 'Kent' mangoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preferred storage temperature for fresh-cut fruits in terms of visual quality retention is around 5 °C, which is considered to be a chilling temperature for chilling sensitive tropical fruits like mango (Mangifera indica L.). Changes in visual and compositional quality factors, aroma volatile pr...

  7. EPA's ToxCast Project: Lessons learned and future directions for use of HTS in predicting in vivo toxicology -- A Chemical Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA’s ToxCast and the related Tox21 projects are employing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies to profile thousands of chemicals, which in turn serve as probes of a wide diversity of targets, pathways and mechanisms related to toxicity. Initial models relating ToxCa...

  8. The Chilled-Mirror Humidity Sensor: Improved Radiosonde Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    Chilled-mirror humidity sensor technology recently was adapted for use with the VIZ radiosonde. The principle of the chilled-mirror operation is to lower its temperature until dew forms on the mirror, at that point the dew point temperature is noted and the mirror is then heated to evaporate the moisture. The cycle is repeated. Research conducted from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility has provided comparisons between the chilled-mirror sensor and the carbon hygristor of VIZ, and the capacitive sensors of AIR Inc. and Vaisala Co. We believe the chilled-mirror sensor is accurate and would serve as a reference standard for evaluating operational radiosonde relative humidity sensors. Thus, differences seen in the comparisons are beginning to furnish insight into developing better humidity sensors. We discuss these comparison results as well as reproducibility results from a dual chilled-mirror measurement.

  9. Sugar metabolism in relation to chilling tolerance of loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chilling injury and sugar metabolism was investigated in loquat fruit stored at 1°C for 35days. No symptoms of chilling injury occurred in the fruit, of 'Ninghaibai' cultivar, during the whole storage whereas, in 'Dahongpao' fruit, severe chilling symptoms were observed after 20days of storage at 1°C. 'Ninghaibai' fruit had higher levels of glucose and fructose and higher activities of sucrose hydrolyzing enzymes, such as sucrose synthase-cleavage and invertase, than had 'Dahongpao'. Furthermore, the chilling resistant 'Ninghaibai' fruit also showed higher activities of hexokinase and fructokinase, involved in hexose phoshorylation and sugar signal generation. These results suggest that the higher content of hexoses and activities of hexose sensors were likely part of the mechanism for chilling tolerance of loquat fruit. PMID:23017404

  10. Diurnal variation of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balafoutis, Ch. J.

    1989-12-01

    The diurnal variations of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece, are considered using hourly data from January 1960 to December 1977. This is the first attempt in Greece to describe bioclimatic conditions using wind-chill data. The hourly values of wind-chill were calculated by Siple-Passel's formula which still appears to be most widely used. The values of wind-chill are discussed in terms of Terjung's scale. Thessaloniki does not experience “frost-bite” conditions during the coldest months but does experience “warm” conditions during the summer period. A comparison of hourly and daily mean values show that the means do not indicate the real range of wind-chill during the day.

  11. Effects of chilling on protein synthesis in tomato suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Matadial, B.; Pauls, K.P. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of chilling on cell growth, cell viability, protein content and protein composition in suspension cultures of L. esculentum and L. hirsutum was investigated. Cell growth for both species was arrested at 2{degrees}C but when cultures were transferred to 25{degree}C cell growth resumed. There was no difference in viability between control and chilled cultures of L. esculentum, however, L. hirsutum control cultures exhibited larger amounts of Fluorescein Diacetate induced fluorescence than chilled cultures. {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation into proteins was 2.5-2 times higher in L. hirsutum than in L. esculentum. Quantitative and qualitative differences, in {sup 35}S-methionine labelled proteins, between chilled and control cultures were observed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Protein content in chilled cultures decreased over time but then increased when cultures were transferred to 25{degrees}C.

  12. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  13. Nut crop yield records show that budbreak-based chilling requirements may not reflect yield decline chill thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pope, Katherine S; Dose, Volker; Da Silva, David; Brown, Patrick H; DeJong, Theodore M

    2015-06-01

    Warming winters due to climate change may critically affect temperate tree species. Insufficiently cold winters are thought to result in fewer viable flower buds and the subsequent development of fewer fruits or nuts, decreasing the yield of an orchard or fecundity of a species. The best existing approximation for a threshold of sufficient cold accumulation, the "chilling requirement" of a species or variety, has been quantified by manipulating or modeling the conditions that result in dormant bud breaking. However, the physiological processes that affect budbreak are not the same as those that determine yield. This study sought to test whether budbreak-based chilling thresholds can reasonably approximate the thresholds that affect yield, particularly regarding the potential impacts of climate change on temperate tree crop yields. County-wide yield records for almond (Prunus dulcis), pistachio (Pistacia vera), and walnut (Juglans regia) in the Central Valley of California were compared with 50 years of weather records. Bayesian nonparametric function estimation was used to model yield potentials at varying amounts of chill accumulation. In almonds, average yields occurred when chill accumulation was close to the budbreak-based chilling requirement. However, in the other two crops, pistachios and walnuts, the best previous estimate of the budbreak-based chilling requirements was 19-32 % higher than the chilling accumulations associated with average or above average yields. This research indicates that physiological processes beyond requirements for budbreak should be considered when estimating chill accumulation thresholds of yield decline and potential impacts of climate change. PMID:25119825

  14. Nut crop yield records show that budbreak-based chilling requirements may not reflect yield decline chill thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Katherine S.; Dose, Volker; Da Silva, David; Brown, Patrick H.; DeJong, Theodore M.

    2015-06-01

    Warming winters due to climate change may critically affect temperate tree species. Insufficiently cold winters are thought to result in fewer viable flower buds and the subsequent development of fewer fruits or nuts, decreasing the yield of an orchard or fecundity of a species. The best existing approximation for a threshold of sufficient cold accumulation, the "chilling requirement" of a species or variety, has been quantified by manipulating or modeling the conditions that result in dormant bud breaking. However, the physiological processes that affect budbreak are not the same as those that determine yield. This study sought to test whether budbreak-based chilling thresholds can reasonably approximate the thresholds that affect yield, particularly regarding the potential impacts of climate change on temperate tree crop yields. County-wide yield records for almond ( Prunus dulcis), pistachio ( Pistacia vera), and walnut ( Juglans regia) in the Central Valley of California were compared with 50 years of weather records. Bayesian nonparametric function estimation was used to model yield potentials at varying amounts of chill accumulation. In almonds, average yields occurred when chill accumulation was close to the budbreak-based chilling requirement. However, in the other two crops, pistachios and walnuts, the best previous estimate of the budbreak-based chilling requirements was 19-32 % higher than the chilling accumulations associated with average or above average yields. This research indicates that physiological processes beyond requirements for budbreak should be considered when estimating chill accumulation thresholds of yield decline and potential impacts of climate change.

  15. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  16. Casting Shadows in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Uses the metaphor of shadows in a critical exploration of what it means to know and how the cultures of classrooms have shaped these images of knowing. Directs attention to objects that cast shadows on the learning and knowing of mathematics and science through the voices of preservice teachers. Discusses shadow casting toward textbooks, teachers,…

  17. Modeling of Chill Down in Cryogenic Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Matthew F.; Majumdar, Alok K.; Bennett, John C., Jr.; Malla, Ramesh B.; Rodriquez, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model to predict chill down in cryogenic transfer lines has been developed. Three chill down cases using hydrogen as the working fluid are solved: 1) a simplified model amenable to analytical solution, 2) a realistic model of superheated vapor flow, and 3) a realistic model of initially subcooled liquid flow. The first case compares a numerical model with an analytical solution with very good agreement between the two. Additionally, the analytical solution provides a convenient way to look at parametric effects on the chill down. The second and third cases are numerical models which provide temperature histories of the fluid and solid tube wall during chill down as well as several other quantities of interest such as pressure and mass flow rate. Of great interest is the ability to predict accurate values of chill down time (the time required to achieve steady-state cryogenic flow). The models predict that a 26 in. long, 3/16 in. ID aluminum tube has a shorter chill down time (approx. equal to 100 sec) and uses less hydrogen with superheated vapor flow than with initially subcooled liquid flow (greater than 200 sec for chill down).

  18. The effects of blast chilling on pork quality.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk, Artur; Karamucki, Tadeusz; Pietruszka, Arkadiusz; Rybak, Kinga; Matysiak, Beata

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of blast chilling of pig carcasses on the physiochemical and sensory properties of the longissimus lumborum muscle. To this end, right half-carcasses were blast-chilled for 70min at -24°C and then for 22h and 50min at 1°C, while left half-carcasses were chilled conventionally at 1°C for 24h. At 2h and 6h post mortem, blast chilling had significantly reduced the temperature of the carcasses, as well as the rate of pH decrease and the rate of increase in EC. It had no significant effect on the ultimate pH or its range, or on EC at 24h post mortem, but it significantly lowered L*, b*, C* and drip loss compared to the conventionally chilled carcasses. Blast chilling adversely affected sensory characteristics such as tenderness and flavor. There were no significant differences between the effects of blast and conventional chilling systems on meat quality between conformation classes. PMID:25462383

  19. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  1. Temperature-Induced Leakage from Chilling-Sensitive and Chilling-Resistant Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    Leakage rates were determined from leaf cells loaded with rubidium and [3H]leucine. There was a differential response between leucine and rubidium leakage depending upon the species used. The rate of leucine leakage shows a small decline below 5 C for two altitudinal variants of Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl., whereas Lycopersicon esculentum L. showed a marked increase below 5 C. Rubidium showed a marked increase in leakage rate below 10 C with the altitudinal variants, with only a slight increase for the L. esculentum species. A rough relationship existed between rubidium leakage rate at 1 C and the altitude of origin of the L. hirsutum race, the low altitudinal forms having higher leakage rates than the higher altitudinal variants. The L. esculentum lines show a rubidium leakage response similar to that of the high altitude L. hirsutum variants. Higher leakage rates were obtained if the calcium concentration in the medium was less than 1 millimolar and upon addition of metabolic poisons and detergents. The results are consistent with the view that chilling injury causes changes in the membrane and that cell leakage is an early symptom of this change in some species. Some chilling-sensitive species have increased leakage within 1 hour of exposure to chilling temperature. PMID:16661859

  2. Mechanics of buried chilled gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Selvadurai, A.P.S.; Hu, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper examines the factors influencing the modelling of soil-pipeline interaction for a pipeline which is used to transport chilled gas. The soil-pipeline interaction is induced by the generation of discontinuous frost heave at a boundary between soils with differing frost susceptibility. The three-dimensional modelling takes into consideration the time-dependent evolution of frost heave due to moisture migration, the creep and elastic behavior of the frozen soil and flexural behavior of the embedded pipeline. The results of the computational model are compared with experimental results obtained from the frost heave induced soil-pipeline interaction test performed at the full scale test facilities in Caen, France.

  3. Cementite Solidification in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, J. J.; Sinatora, A.; Albertin, E.

    2014-06-01

    Two hypereutectic cast irons (5.01 pct Cr and 5.19 pct V) were cast and the polished surfaces of test pieces were deep-etched and analyzed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that graphite lamellae intersect the cementite and a thin austenite film nucleates and grows on the cementite plates. For both compositions, graphite and cementite can coexist as equilibrium phases, with the former always nucleating and growing first. The eutectic carbides grow from the austenite dendrites in a direction perpendicular to the primary plates.

  4. The Energy Savings in Reroll Casting From Primary Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. F.; Fitzpatrick, N. P.

    1981-11-01

    Recent developments in the continuous casting of strip by belt casting, associated with the primary production of aluminum, offer substantial advantages in energy saving, through the direct conversion of molten metal into strip and through the reduction of melt loss. The total energy content (electrical and thermal) of the continuous casting route is compared to that involved in the conventional ingot casting and hot-rolling route for a typical semi-fabricated product.

  5. Application of TRIZ Theory in Patternless Casting Manufacturing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Gan, Dequan; Jiang, Ping; Tian, Yumei

    The ultimate goal of Patternless Casting Manufacturing (referred to as PCM) is how to obtain the casts by casting the sand mold directly. In the previous PCM, the resin content of sand mold is much higher than that required by traditional resin sand, so the casts obtained are difficult to be sound and qualified products, which limits the application of this technique greatly. In this paper, the TRIZ algorithm is introduced to the innovation process in PCM systematically.

  6. Effects of chilling rate and spray-chilling on weight loss and tenderness in beef strip loin steaks.

    PubMed

    Prado, C S; de Felício, P E

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of chilling rate and the use of a spray-chilling system on the weight loss by evaporation on carcasses. We also evaluated the effects on meat purge in vacuum package, cooking losses, and on parameters related to the tenderness of strip loin steaks (M. longissimus lumborum). Forty non-castrated males of approximately 12 months old, finished in feed-lot were harvested in 16 Montana cattle (a composite breed), and 24 SimmentalxNellore crossbred cattle. After bleeding, the bodies were electrically stimulated and assigned to one of the four treatments: conventional air-chilling (CAC), conventional spray-chilling (CSC), slow air-chilling (SAC), and slow spray-chilling (SSC). Strip loin steaks (M. longissimus lumborum) of approximately 2.5 cm thick were removed, vacuum packed and aged for 7, 14, 30 or 60 days. Samples were analyzed for sarcomere length, myofibrillar fragmentation index, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and weight losses by purge and cooking. Spraying was efficient in reducing weight loss by evaporation (P<0.05). Effects of treatments and aging period on purge losses were observed, where samples from sprayed carcasses or aged cuts showed higher losses. Cooking losses were not affected either by spraying or aging. The slow chilling, with or without spraying, was more efficient in producing strip loin steaks with lower average shear force and longer sarcomere. The myofibrillar fragmentation index increased with aging time, but was not affected by carcasses spraying. PMID:20647150

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling of Chilling Stress Responsiveness in Two Contrasting Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wang, Wensheng; Pan, Yajiao; Huang, Liyu; Liu, Xiaoyue; Zong, Ying; Zhu, Linghua; Yang, Daichang; Fu, Binying

    2012-01-01

    Rice is sensitive to chilling stress, especially at the seedling stage. To elucidate the molecular genetic mechanisms of chilling tolerance in rice, comprehensive gene expressions of two rice genotypes (chilling-tolerant LTH and chilling-sensitive IR29) with contrasting responses to chilling stress were comparatively analyzed. Results revealed a differential constitutive gene expression prior to stress and distinct global transcription reprogramming between the two rice genotypes under time-series chilling stress and subsequent recovery conditions. A set of genes with higher basal expression were identified in chilling-tolerant LTH compared with chilling-sensitive IR29, indicating their possible role in intrinsic tolerance to chilling stress. Under chilling stress, the major effect on gene expression was up-regulation in the chilling- tolerant genotype and strong repression in chilling-sensitive genotype. Early responses to chilling stress in both genotypes featured commonly up-regulated genes related to transcription regulation and signal transduction, while functional categories for late phase chilling regulated genes were diverse with a wide range of functional adaptations to continuous stress. Following the cessation of chilling treatments, there was quick and efficient reversion of gene expression in the chilling-tolerant genotype, while the chilling-sensitive genotype displayed considerably slower recovering capacity at the transcriptional level. In addition, the detection of differentially-regulated TF genes and enriched cis-elements demonstrated that multiple regulatory pathways, including CBF and MYBS3 regulons, were involved in chilling stress tolerance. A number of the chilling-regulated genes identified in this study were co-localized onto previously fine-mapped cold-tolerance-related QTLs, providing candidates for gene cloning and elucidation of molecular mechanisms responsible for chilling tolerance in rice. PMID:22912843

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  10. Chemical additive to enhance antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine and control cross-contamination during immersion chill of broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Schambach, B T; Berrang, M E; Harrison, M A; Meinersmann, R J

    2014-09-01

    Immersion chilling of broiler carcasses can be a site for cross-contamination between the occasional highly contaminated carcass and those that are co-chilled. Chlorine is often used as an antimicrobial but can be overcome by organic material. A proprietary chlorine stabilizer (T-128) based on phosphoric acid-propylene glycol was tested as a chill tank additive in experiments simulating commercial broiler chilling. In bench-scale experiments, 0.5% T-128 was compared with plain water (control), 50 ppm of chlorine, and the combination of 0.5% T-128 with 50 ppm of chlorine to control transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter from inoculated wing drummettes to co-chilled uninoculated drummettes. Both chlorine and T-128 lessened cross-contamination with Salmonella (P < 0.05); T-128 and T-128 with chlorine were significantly more effective (P < 0.05) than the control or plain chlorine for control of Campylobacter. T-128 treatments were noted to have a pH of less than 4.0; an additional experiment demonstrated that the antimicrobial effect of T-128 was not due merely to a lower pH. In commercial broiler chilling, a pH close to 6.0 is preferred to maximize chlorine effectiveness, while maintaining water-holding capacity of the meat. In a set of pilot-scale experiments with T-128, a near-ideal pH of 6.3 was achieved by using tap water instead of the distilled water used in bench-scale experiments. Pilot-scale chill tanks were used to compare the combination of 0.5% T-128 and 50 ppm of chlorine with 50 ppm of plain chlorine for control of cross-contamination between whole carcasses inoculated with Salmonella and Campylobacter and co-chilled uninoculated carcasses. The T-128 treatment resulted in significantly less crosscontamination by either direct contact or water transfer with both organisms compared with plain chlorine treatment. T-128 may have use in commercial broiler processing to enhance the effectiveness of chlorine in processing water. PMID:25198851