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Sample records for direct chill casting

  1. Cold Cracking Development in AA7050 Direct Chill-Cast Billets under Various Casting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-09-01

    Cold cracking is a potentially catastrophic phenomenon in direct chill (DC) casting of 7 xxx series aluminum alloys that leads to safety hazards and loss of production. The relatively low thermal conductivity and wide solidification temperature range in these alloys results in accumulation of residual thermal stress under nonuniform cooling conditions of the billets. In addition, such alloys show a severe loss in ductility below a critical temperature of 573 K (300 °C). This brittleness along with high stress concentration at the tips of voids and microcracks can lead to catastrophic failure. Casting process parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of stresses in the billet and increase the susceptibility of the material to cold cracking. In order to investigate the effect of casting process parameters such as casting speed, billet size, and water flow rate, thermomechanical simulations were applied using ALSIM5 casting simulation software. Among the studied casting process parameters, the increased billet size and high casting speed resulted in the most dramatic increase in residual stress level. Critical crack sizes that led to catastrophic failure were also calculated and are reported against process parameters.

  2. Centerline Depletion in Direct-Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys: The Avalanche Effect and Its Consequence for Turbulent Jet Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Samuel R.; Allanore, Antoine

    2016-07-01

    Avalanche dynamics of sedimenting grains in direct-chill casting of aluminum ingots is investigated as a primary driving force for centerline segregation. An analytical model predicting the importance of avalanche events as a function of casting parameters is proposed and validated with prior art results. New experimental results investigating the transient and steady-state centerline segregation of DC casting with a turbulent jet are reported.

  3. Microstructure and fatigue characteristics of direct chill cast and electromagnetic cast 2024 Al alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sug Won; Hao, Hai

    2003-07-01

    The distinct advantages of the electromagnetic casting (EMC) process consist in the presence of stirring motions in the melt, which lead to significant grain size reduction in solidified ingot. Furthermore, surface and subsurface qualities are improved due to the absence of ingot mold. However, it is impossible to achieve the aforementioned advantages in conventional direct chill casting (DCC). In order to contrast the before and after heat treatments of the microstructural and mechanical characteristics of EMC and DCC 2024 aluminium alloys, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractions (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), etc. were carried out. Compared with the DCC ingot, the EMC ingot has better mechanical properties not only in the ascast condition but also in the as-aged condition. The DSC curves show that the EMC specimens have high enthalpy, i.e., the thermal kinetic energy to form precipitates during the aging treatment process. Despite heat treatments applied to the DCC ingot, it fails to attain the same mechanical properties as the EMC ingot. Moreover, considering the expernsive scalping operation for DCC ingots, the EMC technique, which offers a lower manufacturing cost, is one of the best manufacturing methods used in obtaining the ingots of wrought aluminum alloys.

  4. Simulation Study of Al-1Mn/Al-10Si Circular Clad Ingots Prepared by Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fu, Ying; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-02-01

    A modified direct chill casting process based on Novelis FusionTM Technology co-casting process was used recently to prepare Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots. In the current study, a comprehensive simulation model was developed to investigate the direct chill casting process for preparing the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots, and a parametric study and experimental research of the direct chill casting process was conducted to explore potential success and failure casting conditions. The simulation results revealed the bonding mechanism of the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si interface in the direct chill casting process and identified the effect of certain parameters on casting performance. The results indicated that the effect of casting speed and Al-1Mn casting temperature on the variations of the minimum solid fraction of Al-1Mn at the interface is stronger than that of cooling water flow rate in inner mold, while Al-10Si casting temperature is the weakest of the four casting parameters. The corresponding experimental results verified that Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingot with acceptable metallurgical bonding can be successfully prepared by direct chill casting process under the proper casting parameters. The thickness of diffusion zone is about 40 μm, and the fractured position in tensile test was located in the Al-1Mn alloy side which indicated the strength of the interfacial region is higher than that of Al-1Mn alloy.

  5. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  6. Coolant Characteristics and Control in Direct Chill Casting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This project focuses on understanding the fundamentals of coolant behavior and developing strategies to control the cooling rate of DC casting of aluminum ingots. Project partners will conduct a fundamental study to identify various parameters affecting critical heat flux and boiling transition and evaluate the effects of various additives (impurity particulates, sodium and calcium salts, carbonates, bicarbonates, surfactants, etc.).

  7. Scale Rules for Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Dmitry G.; Du, Qiang; Katgerman, Laurens

    2008-05-01

    An analysis of published experimental and numerical results shows that there is a scaling relationship between the magnitude and direction of centerline segregation in direct-chill (DC) cast billets from aluminum alloys and the process parameters, i.e., billet diameter and casting speed. It seems that there is always a range of these process parameters where the centerline segregation is positive, and there is a threshold when the centerline segregation vanishes. Numerical simulations of macrosegregation during DC casting of a binary Al-Cu alloy were performed at different ratios of casting speed and billet diameter. The macrosegregation model takes into account only two mechanisms of macrosegregation, i.e., thermosolutal convection and shrinkage-induced flow. The results of these computer simulations fit well to the dependence obtained using numerous reference data. The results are discussed in terms of the contribution of different mechanisms of macrosegregation and the shape of the billet sump.

  8. Macrosegregation in horizontal direct chill casting of ternary Al alloys: Investigation of solid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vušanović, I.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Macrosegregation in direct chill casting processes is controlled by fluid flow due to the thermosolutal natural and forced convection, shrinkage, and transport of unattached solid grains. Because grain refinement is usually used in aluminum direct chill casting, some effort must be made to model free-floating solid grains, and their attachment to a rigid mushy zone. Criteria for attachment vary, but many are based on using a critical solid packing fraction, which is treated as uniform and constant throughout the domain. In the case of horizontal casting (HDC), gravity acts perpendicularly to the casting direction, and the assumption of a uniform packing fraction cannot be applied because the solid particles attach to some surfaces by settling and others by being swept into the rigid solid from below. In this simulation of HDC casting of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy, the rigid and unattached solid is tracked separately, and a rule set is developed to determine the attachment of free-floating solid. Comparison between cases with and without unattached solid movement shows qualitatively different results, particularly in bottom part of slab. Non-uniform packing fractions cause very different segregation patterns in the lower half of the ingot compared to the cases with no solid movement, less segregation near centerline compared to uniform packing fraction cases, and positive segregation near the place where inlet jet impinges on the mushy zone.

  9. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  10. Characterisation and modelling of defect formation in direct-chill cast AZ80 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, D.; Robson, J.D.; Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.

    2015-06-15

    Wrought magnesium alloys for demanding structural applications require high quality defect free cast feedstock. The aim of this study was to first identify and characterise typical defects in direct chill cast magnesium–aluminium–zinc (AZ) alloy billet and then use modelling to understand the origins of these defects so they can be prevented. Defects were first located using ultrasonic inspection and were then characterised using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and serial sectioning, establishing the presence of oxide films and intermetallic particles Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} in all defects. A model was developed to predict the flow patterns and growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases during casting, which influence the formation of defects. Simulation of the growth of the intermetallic particles demonstrated that precipitation from the liquid occurs in the mould. The combination of the entrained oxide films and intermetallic particles recirculates in the liquid metal and continues to grow, until large enough to settle, which is predicted to occur at the centre of the mould where the flow is the slowest. Based on these predictions, strategies to reduce the susceptibility to defect formation are suggested. - Highlights: • Casting defects in magnesium direct chill casting have been imaged and characterised in 3-dimensions. • The occurrences of co-located clusters of particles and oxide films have been characterised and explained. • A coupled model has been developed to help interpret the observed trend for defects located towards the centre of billets.

  11. Secondary Cooling in the Direct-Chill Casting of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, E.; Wells, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Secondary cooling information is critical when modeling the direct-chill (DC) casting process of magnesium alloys. However, accurate data for the heat flux in the secondary cooling zone are scarce, and most reported research is concerned with the DC casting of aluminum alloys. Cooling experiments that simulated the secondary cooling of magnesium AZ31 were conducted in order to observe the influence of various parameters on the different boiling-water heat-transfer phenomena. The heat flux in each boiling regime was quantified as a function of the cooling-water flow rate, water temperature, and initial sample temperature. Equations developed from the cooling experiments could be combined to build “idealized” boiling curves for a given set of DC casting conditions.

  12. Comparison of unextruded air slip direct chill cast 6061 ingot with bar stock extruded from conventional direct chill cast 6061 ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, S. C.; Kassner, M. E.

    1997-08-01

    Air Slip direct chill cast 6061 small diameter ingots (Direct Forge) were compared with 6061 extruded bar stock. The T6 mechanical properties were compared for both the Direct Forge ingot and the extruded bar stock, as well as cold impact extruded cylinders produced from Direct Forge small diameter ingot and extruded stock. It was found that the tensile and fatigue properties of Direct Forge ingot and cylinders from this ingot were significantly superior to those of extruded stock and cylinder produced from this stock. The improved properties are a result of higher solidification rates leading to smaller alloy-constituent dispersed particles and, thus, the production of smaller and more stable grain sizes. Direct Forge has the additional advantages of (a) not requiring hot or cold work prior to forming impacted extruded or forged parts, (b) being utilized in the T6 temper without any prior deformation, (c) having isotropic and consistent properties, (d) not requiring machining to remove surface segregation or defects, and (e) having more consistent and refined grain sizes.

  13. Heat-Transfer Measurements in the Primary Cooling Phase of the Direct-Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, Harry; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal modeling of the direct-chill casting process requires accurate knowledge of (1) the different boundary conditions in the primary mold and secondary direct water-spray cooling regimes and (2) their variability with respect to process parameters. In this study, heat transfer in the primary cooling zone was investigated by using temperature measurements made with subsurface thermocouples in the mold as input to an inverse heat conduction algorithm. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the primary cooling of AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloy ingots cast at speeds ranging between 1.58 and 2.10 mm/s. The average heat flux values were calculated for the steady-state phase of the casting process, and an effective heat-transfer coefficient for the global primary cooling process was derived that included convection at the mold surfaces and conduction through the mold wall. Effective heat-transfer coefficients were evaluated at different points along the mold height and compared with values from a previously derived computational fluid dynamics model of the direct-chill casting process that were based on predictions of the air gap thickness between the mold and ingot. The current experimental results closely matched the values previously predicted by the air gap models. The effective heat-transfer coefficient for primary cooling was also found to increase slightly with the casting speed and was higher near the mold top (up to 824 W/m2·K) where the molten aluminum first comes in contact with the mold than near the bottom (as low as 242 W/m2·K) where an air gap forms between the ingot and mold because of thermal contraction of the ingot. These results are consistent with previous studies.

  14. Modeling of ingot development during the start-up phase of direct chill casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. J.; Croft, T. N.; Cross, M.

    2003-10-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting is a core primary process in the production of aluminum ingots. However, its operational optimization is still under investigation with regard to a number of features, one of which is the issue of curvature at the base of the ingot. Analysis of these features requires a computational model of the process that accounts for the fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification phase change, and thermomechanical anlaysis. This article describes an integrated approach to the modeling of all the preceding phenomena and their interactions

  15. Experimental investigation of thermomechanical effects during direct chill and electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.; Carrupt, B.; Plata, M.

    1995-08-01

    The deformation and the temperature field within direct chill (DC) and electromagnetic (EM) cast aluminum ingots have been measured in situ using a simple experimental setup. The deformation of the cross section of the cold ingots has also been characterized as a function of the casting speed, alloy composition, and inoculation condition. The pull-in of the lateral rolling faces has been found to occur in two sequences for DC cast ingots, whereas that associated with electromagnetic casting (EMC) was continuous. The pull-in was maximum at the center of these faces (about 7 to 9 pct) and strongly depended upon the casting speed. Near the short sides of the ingots, the deformation was only about 2 pct and was nearly independent of the casting parameters and alloy composition. Based upon these measurements, it was concluded that the pull-in of the rolling faces was mainly due to the bending of the ingots induced by the thermal stresses. This conclusion was further supported by a simple two-dimensional thermoelastic model.

  16. Modeling Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Multicomponent Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2007-01-01

    A macrosegregation model for direct chill casting of multicomponent aluminum alloys is implemented using the macroscopic transfer model, microsegregation model, and phase diagram calculation module, and applied to an Al-Cu-Mg alloy. The phase diagram calculation module is based on the TQ-Interface of CALPHAD software THERMO-CALC and the mapping technique initially proposed by Dore et al. This mapping technique is modified in arranging the mapping axes where the tabulation is performed to increase the access efficiency. This strategy provides a practical solution for quick access to phase diagram data in modeling macrosegregation of multicomponent alloys. It is found from our simulation that the contribution of each of the solute elements to the solutal buoyancy affects the final segregation pattern. The appropriate choice of the solidification path is important for the shrinkage-induced macrosegregation. The model is applied to a real direct-chill (DC) casting experiment and a reasonable semiquantitative agreement with experimental data has been obtained, though the model does not take into account the possible contribution of floating grains and exudation.

  17. Microstructure, Macrosegregation, and Thermal Analysis of Direct Chill Cast AA5182 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, N.; Haghdadi, N.; Phillion, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    The variation in microstructure, macrosegregation, and solidification behavior during aluminum alloy Direct Chill casting is investigated with respect to geometry. Optical microscopy, energy-dispersive analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study the grain size evolution, distribution of alloying elements, and solidification sequence across the cross section of DC cast AA5182 aluminum alloy. The results show that (1) grain size increases from the surface to center of the ingot, corresponding to a decrease in the heat extraction rate; (2) there is a considerable macrosegregation of Mg, Mn, and Cr, with Mg showing negative segregation at the center and positive segregation at the surface, Mn showing negative segregation both at center and surface and positive segregation elsewhere, and Cr showing positive segregation at the center and negative segregation at the surface; (3) the solidus and the reaction temperatures vary as a function of position due to the local chemical composition and cooling rate. These findings, which show the interconnectivity of grain size, segregation, and solidification sequence, are useful in further analysis of the DC casting process and in predicting casting-related defects, specifically hot tear formation.

  18. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subodh K.

    2006-01-09

    A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the

  19. The Deformation of Clad Aluminum Sheet Produced By Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; Gallerneault, Mark; Wagstaff, Robert B.

    2010-08-01

    The tensile and bending response of AA3003/AA6111 sheet produced by direct chill casting has been investigated. It is shown that the interface strength of the clad sheet has a minimum value of 175 MPa, and failure does not occur in the interface. The yield strength of the clad sheet obeys the rule of mixtures, and up to a cladding thickness of 100 μm—which was the thickest investigated—the work hardening behavior and tensile response are essentially unaffected by the presence of the cladding. The bending response of the sheet is improved greatly by the presence of ductile cladding, which was the case for prestrained and aged sheet. Under bending, failure is initiated in the lower bendability core and then eventually propagates through the more ductile cladding, which yields the final bend failure.

  20. Characterization of the flow in the molten metal sump during direct chill aluminum casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Jason M.

    1997-06-01

    A recent analytical model for the liquid aluminum flow in a direct chill (DC) casting sump has been investigated and the scaling coefficients evaluated. The magnitudes of flow-field features, such as the depth of the temperature stratification in the sump and the velocity of the metal in the thermal boundary layer close to the solidification front, have been calculated. The results broadly agree with recent full numerical calculations of the flow in the sump. The variation of these essential flow features has been investigated across a range of typical ingot sizes, casting speeds, and superheats, and critical macro-casting-parameter combinations have been identified. The limitations of the model are discussed and the possible effects the identified structure has on macrosegregation are briefly explored. Finally, the influence on the flow field of the method of feeding the ingot is investigated, and it is concluded that the model and these results are not invalidated if the feeding is nonuniform over the top surface of the sump.

  1. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  2. A Numerical Study of the Direct-Chill Co-Casting of Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baserinia, Amir R.; Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2013-08-01

    For the last 70 years, direct-chill (DC) casting has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of monolithic sheet and extruded products. Traditionally, clad aluminum sheet products have been made from separate core and clad DC cast ingots by an expensive roll-bonding process; however, in 2005, Novelis unveiled an innovative variant of the DC casting process called the Fusion™ Technology process that allows the production of multialloy ingots that can be rolled directly into laminated or clad sheet products. Of paramount importance for the successful commercialization of this new technology is a scientific and quantitative understanding of the Fusion™ casting process that will facilitate process optimization and aid in the future development of casting methodology for different alloy combinations and ingot and clad dimensions. In the current study, a numerical steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology casting process was developed and used to simulate the casting of rectangular bimetallic ingots made from the typical brazing sheet combination of AA3003 core clad with an AA4045 aluminum alloy. The analysis is followed by a parametric study of the process. The influence of casting speed and chill-bar height on the steady-state thermal field within the ingot is investigated. According to the criteria developed with the thermofluids model, the AA3003/AA4045 combination of aluminum alloys can be cast successfully with casting speeds up to 2.4 mm s-1. The quality of the metallurgical bond between the core and the clad is decreased for low casting speeds and chill-bar heights >35 mm. These results can be used as a guideline for improving the productivity of the Fusion™ Technology process.

  3. Modeling of ingot distortions during direct chill casting of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical model based upon the ABAQUS software has been developed for the computation of the thermomechanical state of the solidifying strand during direct chill (DC) casting of rolling sheet ingots and during subsequent cooling. Based upon a finiteelement formulation, the model determines the temperature distribution, the stresses, and the associated deformations in the metal. For that purpose, the thermomechanical properties of the alloy have been measured up to the coherency temperature using creep and indentation tests. The thermophysical properties as well as the boundary conditions associated with the lateral water spray have been determined using inverse modeling. The predicted ingot distortions, mainly, “butt curl,” “butt swell,” and lateral faces pull-in, are compared with experimental measurements performed during solidification and after complete cooling of the ingot. Particular emphasis is placed on the nonuniform contraction of the lateral faces. The influence of the mold shape and the contributions to this contraction are assessed as a function of the casting conditions.

  4. On Vertical Drag Defects Formation During Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Aluminum Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Torbjörn; Jarfors, Anders E. W.

    2013-12-01

    During air-slip direct chill casting of aluminum billets, one of the major defects occurring includes traces along the billet called vertical drags (VDs). If the VDs are too deep or too many, then they cause scraping of the billets. As in the subsequent extrusion process, the surface quality is known to impair both the productivity and quality of the profiles. In cast-house practice, many theories circulate about the causes of VD defects and how to avoid them, but in the literature, no thorough treatments have been made to explain this phenomenon. In the current study, the outer appearance, structure around, and compositions at the defects are analyzed. A theory for the formation of the defects, their cause, and how their appearance is coupled to different alloy types is presented. The segregation in the vicinity of the defects is discussed based on deformation of semisolid materials and coupled to Reynolds dilatancy in granular materials. The theory can explain differences between 6063 and 6005 alloys.

  5. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J.

    2006-08-15

    Approximately 68% of the aluminum produced in the United States is first cast into ingots prior to further processing into sheet, plate, extrusions, or foil. The direct chill (DC) semi-continuous casting process has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of ingots due largely to its robust nature and relative simplicity. Though the basic process of DC casting is in principle straightforward, the interaction of process parameters with heat extraction, microstructural evolution, and development of solidification stresses is too complex to analyze by intuition or practical experience. One issue in DC casting is the formation of stress cracks [1-15]. In particular, the move toward larger ingot cross-sections, the use of higher casting speeds, and an ever-increasing array of mold technologies have increased industry efficiencies but have made it more difficult to predict the occurrence of stress crack defects. The Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap [16] has recognized the challenges inherent in the DC casting process and the control of stress cracks and selected the development of 'fundamental information on solidification of alloys to predict microstructure, surface properties, and stresses and strains' as a high-priority research need, and the 'lack of understanding of mechanisms of cracking as a function of alloy' and 'insufficient understanding of the aluminum solidification process', which is 'difficult to model', as technology barriers in aluminum casting processes. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks from the current level of 5% to 2%. Decreasing stress crack incidence is important for improving product quality and consistency as well as for saving resources and energy, since considerable amounts of cast metal could be saved by eliminating ingot cracking, by reducing the scalping thickness of the ingot before rolling, and by

  6. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  7. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  8. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  9. Process-scale modelling of microstructure in direct chill casting of aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedel, M.; Heyvaert, L.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; Daloz, D.; Lesoult, G.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of an alloy being related to its microstructure, the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the grain structure formation in direct chill casting is crucial. However, the grain size prediction by modelling is difficult since a variety of multi-scale coupled phenomena have to be considered. Nucleation and growth of the grains are interrelated, and the macroscopic transport phenomena such as the motion of grains and inoculant particles with the flow impact the nucleation-gowth competition. Thus we propose to study the grain size distribution of a 5182 alloy industrial scale slab of 510 mm thickness, both non-inoculated and inoculated with Al-3Ti-1B, for which experimental grain size measurements are available. We use a volume-averaged two-phase multi-scale model that describes nucleation from inoculant particles and grain growth, fully coupled with macroscopic transport phenomena: fluid flow induced by natural convection and solidification shrinkage, heat, mass and solute mass transport, grains and inoculant particles motion. We analyze the effect of liquid and grain motion as the effect of grain morphology on microstructure formation and we show in which extent those phenomena are responsible for the grain size distribution observed experimentally. The effect of the refiner level is also studied.

  10. Structural Homogeneity of Direct-Chill Cast Ingots of Aluminum Alloy EN AW-5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolić, Natalija; Markotić, Ante; Unkić, Faruk

    2007-06-01

    Structural homogeneity of direct-chill (DC) cast ingots of aluminum alloy EN AW-5083 was investigated in terms of grain size and grain distribution using the Latin square experimental design. The ingot cross-sectional homogeneity, the grain sizes, and the mean grain number per unit area were determined at precise, statistically defined locations in the slice by means of a semiautomatic method for measuring mean lineal intercept lengths. Based on the analysis of the differences in the number and distribution of grains between the slices cut from the ingot front and those from its rear, a general assessment of the ingot structural homogeneity was made. Analysis of variance showed the highly significant differences, in grain number in specimens taken from the ingot front section to be related to slice height/ingot depth and in those taken from the ingot rear section to individual charges and slice height. The grand means of the mean number of grains per unit area for the ingot front and rear sections show relatively high values with respect to ingot size. The obtained correlation coefficient, which suggests a good agreement between the number and distribution of grains at the ingot front and those at its rear, is indicative of good structural homogeneity of the ingot in general.

  11. Surface Structure Formation in Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Nazlin; Carlberg, Torbjörn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of the surface zone formation during direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum billets produced by the air slip technology. The depth of the shell zone, with compositions deviating from the bulk, is of large importance for the subsequent extrusion productivity and quality of final products. The surface microstructures of 6060 and 6005 aluminum alloys in three different surface appearances—defect free, wavy surface, and spot defects—were studied. The surface microstructures and outer appearance, segregation depth, and phase formation were investigated for the mentioned cases. The results were discussed and explained based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone and the fact that the exudated liquid is contained within a surface oxide skin. Outward solidification in the surface layer was quantitatively analyzed, and the oxide skin movements explained meniscus line formation. Phases forming at different positions in the segregation zone were analyzed and coupled to a cellular solidification in the exudated layer.

  12. A multiphysics and multiscale model for low frequency electromagnetic direct-chill casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košnik, N.; Guštin, A. Z.; Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Simulation and control of macrosegregation, deformation and grain size in low frequency electromagnetic (EM) direct-chill casting (LFEMC) is important for downstream processing. Respectively, a multiphysics and multiscale model is developed for solution of Lorentz force, temperature, velocity, concentration, deformation and grain structure of LFEMC processed aluminum alloys, with focus on axisymmetric billets. The mixture equations with lever rule, linearized phase diagram, and stationary thermoelastic solid phase are assumed, together with EM induction equation for the field imposed by the coil. Explicit diffuse approximate meshless solution procedure [1] is used for solving the EM field, and the explicit local radial basis function collocation method [2] is used for solving the coupled transport phenomena and thermomechanics fields. Pressure-velocity coupling is performed by the fractional step method [3]. The point automata method with modified KGT model is used to estimate the grain structure [4] in a post-processing mode. Thermal, mechanical, EM and grain structure outcomes of the model are demonstrated. A systematic study of the complicated influences of the process parameters can be investigated by the model, including intensity and frequency of the electromagnetic field. The meshless solution framework, with the implemented simplest physical models, will be further extended by including more sophisticated microsegregation and grain structure models, as well as a more realistic solid and solid-liquid phase rheology.

  13. Differences in microstructure and texture of Al-Mg sheets produced by twin-roll continuous casting and by direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Slamova, M.; Karlik, M.; Robaut, F.; Slama, P.; Veron, M

    2002-10-15

    Over the last two decades, the use of aluminum sheets in automotive applications has increased. Aluminum sheets are currently produced from direct-chill (DC) cast plates. The need for low-cost aluminum sheets is a challenge for the development of new materials produced by twin-roll continuous (TRC) casting and cold rolling. It is expected that the sheets produced from these different casting procedures can differ in their microstructure. Therefore, they can exhibit different formability behavior. The paper presents the results of the microstructural characterization and texture evaluation of aluminum sheets produced by both technologies. Sheets produced from twin-roll cast materials have much finer and more numerous second-phase particles, the grain structures of both types of materials are similar. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for texture evaluation and both confirmed the presence of stronger cube texture in the strips produced from DC-cast plates.

  14. Microstructural characterization of Ti-44Al-11Nb in the chill-cast and directionally solidified configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Halladay, T.R.

    1998-12-01

    The microstructural evolution in chill-cast and directionally solidified Ti-44Al-11Nb (at.%) was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. From this data, the microstructural distribution and formation sequences of various phases like Al3Ti, TiAl, and Ti3Al were established. The elemental and phase distributions were determined by TEM with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and spectrum imaging. Both casting techniques produced the same phases, (Al3Ti, TiAl, and Ti3Al with some Nb in solid solution), but the microstructural distribution was markedly different. The chill-casting technique resulted in a coarser microstructure, with large gamma crystals and duplex regions of either (gamma + alpha2) or (gamma + Al3Ti) interspersed throughout the alloy. The directional solidification technique resulted in a much more uniform microstructure with fine lamellar grains in a dendritic macrostructure. Both casting techniques showed enrichment of niobium in interdendritic regions.

  15. A comparison of microstructure, texture and formability of direct chill cast versus continuous cast aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yumin

    In this dissertation, microstructure and texture evolution of Al-Mg alloys produced by direct chill (DC) cast and continuous cast processes (CC) during thermo-mechanical processing were compared and the differences in formability between DC and CC alloys were identified. At the same time, the underlining mechanisms that cause the difference in structure, texture and formability between DC and CC alloys were analyzed. The recrystallization temperature of the DC AA5052 hot band was about 55°C lower than that of the CC AA5052 hot band. After complete recrystallization, DC AA5052 hot band possessed a stronger cube component than the CC AA5052 hot band. This result was associated with the particle structures of DC and CC AA5052 hot bands. Two different phase particles, Al6((Mn,Fe) and Mg2Si, existed in the DC and CC AA5052 hot bands. CC AA5052 hot band contained more Mg2Si particles than did the DC AA5052 hot band due to the absence of homogenization of the CC material before hot rolling. Mg2Si particles were easily dissolved at high treatment temperatures. After preheating at 454°C for 4 hours, the particle density in the preheated CC AA5052 hot band is closer to that in DC AA5052 alloy due to the dissolution of the Mg2Si particles. Therefore, the differences on recrystallization behaviors of the 80% cold rolled materials decreased, if the DC and CC materials were preheated at 454°C for 4 hours before cold rolling. If the as-received DC and CC AA5052 hot bands were directly cold rolled to 80% reduction, the cold rolled CC AA5052 alloy had a higher recrystallization temperature and a weaker cube recrystallization texture than the cold rolled DC AA5052 alloy. There still existed differences in texture evolution during cold rolling and isothermal annealing between DC and CC AA5052 and AA5182 materials, although the preheat treatment decreased the differences in particle structures and recrystallization temperature between DC and CC materials. Texture evolution during

  16. Effect of electromagnetic vibration on the microstructure of direct chill cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Y.; Fu, X.; Zhu, Q.; Li, L.; Wang, P.; Cui, J.

    2016-03-01

    An electromagnetic vibration was achieved by the combined application of an alternating magnetic field and a stationary magnetic field during direct chill (DC) casting process. The ingots with 200 mm in diameter were prepared under the influence of electromagnetic vibration. The effect of electromagnetic vibration on the microstructure of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The results showed that electromagnetic vibration has a significant effect on the solidification behaviour, under the influence of electromagnetic vibration during DC casting process, the microstructure is significantly refined and the uniformity of microstructure is evidently improved. This paper introduces the DC casting technology with the application of electromagnetic vibration, presents these results and gives corresponding discussions.

  17. Hot tearing criteria evaluation for direct-chill casting of an Al-4.5 pct Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2005-06-01

    Predicting the occurrence of hot tears in the direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloys by numerical simulation is a crucial step for avoiding such defects. In this study, eight hot tearing criteria proposed in the literature have been implemented in a finite-element method simulation of the DC casting process and have been evaluated. These criteria were based on limitations of feeding, mechanical ductility, or both. It is concluded that six criteria give a higher cracking sensitivity for a higher casting velocity and that five criteria give a higher cracking sensitivity for the center location of the billet. This is considered in qualitative accordance with casting practice. Seven criteria indicate that use of a ramping procedure (lower casting speed during start-up phase) does not make a significant difference. However, in industrial practice, this is a common procedure, needed for avoiding hot cracking. Only one criterion is in qualitative accordance with casting practice, but it fails to quantitatively predict the hot tearing occurrence during DC casting.

  18. Modeling of metal delivery systems used in electromagnetic and direct-chill semicontinuous casting of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William Kinzy, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The flow of liquid metal in the upper region of an EM (electromagnetic) or DC (direct chill) caster significantly contributes to the solidification behavior and subsequently the final ingot properties (e.g., average grain size and macrosegregation). The characterization of such a flow is a complicated task due to the high operating temperatures and the inherent opacity of the metal. However, as the demand for improved quality and reduced operational costs continues, understanding the mechanics of the flow becomes increasingly important. Hazardous, and often catastrophic, casting defects, such as hot cracks and tears, have been linked to non-uniformities in the solidification front that occur due to improper flow in the liquid pool. A novel technique to measure the flow, using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), has been incorporated into a laboratory scale physical model of an aluminum caster. The instantaneous vector plots reveal valuable information regarding the turbulent nature and the intrinsic flow oscillations. However, time-averaged vector plots (TAV), obtained by ensemble averaging instantaneous plots, detail information regarding the average features of the flow. The results show that the method of metal delivery into the ingot significantly effected the flow patterns observed. Computational studies of the model geometry reproduce the same flow profiles adding to the validity of the PIV method. Based on the information obtained through physical modeling, an experimental campaign, on production size ingots, was conducted to determine the influence of the liquid pool velocities on the sump profile. Furthermore, a 3D coupled fluid flow-solidification finite element model was developed as a tool to predict the fluid flow/solid front interaction in an attempt to anticipate non-uniformities in the solid. The study has shown that the method of metal delivery into the mold, the upper region where solidification initiates, is critical in determining the flow of

  19. A Simple Model of the Mold Boundary Condition in Direct-Chill (DC) Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, H.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.; Barker, S.; Gallerneault, M.

    2012-08-01

    An accurate thermofluids model of aluminum direct-chill (DC) casting must solve the heat-transfer equations in the ingot with realistic external boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are typically separated into two zones: primary cooling, which occurs inside the water-cooled mold, and secondary cooling, where a film of water contacts the ingot surface directly. Here, a simple model for the primary cooling boundary condition of the steady-state DC casting process was developed. First, the water-cooled mold was modeled using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, and its effective heat-transfer coefficient was determined. To predict the air-gap formation between the ingot and mold and to predict its effect on the primary cooling, a simple density-based shrinkage model of the solidifying shell was developed and compared with a more complex three-dimensional (3-D) thermoelastic model. DC casting simulations using these two models were performed for AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloys at two different casting speeds. A series of experiments was also performed using a laboratory-scale rectangular DC caster to measure the thermal history and sump shape of the DC cast ingots. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental results suggested that both models provide good agreement for the liquid sump profiles and the temperature distributions within the ingot. The density-based shrinkage model, however, is significantly easier to implement in a CFD code and is more computationally efficient.

  20. Modelling of macrosegregation in direct chill casting considering columnar-to-equiaxed transition using 3-phase Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, J.; Lin, Y. J.; Nie, Y.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-06-01

    A 3-phase Eulerian approach is used to model the macrosegregation during solidification in direct chill (DC) casting of binary bronze (Cu-Sn). The three phases are the melt, the solidifying columnar dendrites and the equiaxed grains. The thermodynamic information of Cu-Sn is included based on published thermodynamic data, which are coupled with the 3-phase solidification model. The occurrence of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET), phase interactions, feeding flow, equiaxed sedimentation and their influence on macrosegregation are considered in the model. The model is applied to a laboratory DC casting process of bronze as a benchmark to demonstrate the model potentials. The simulation results of mixed columnar and equiaxed solidification as well as the formation of macrosegregation are presented. The focus of this work is to analyze and discuss the macrosegregation mechanisms by different flow including feeding flow and crystal sedimentation.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of rolling faces pull-in during direct chill casting of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.M.; Rappaz, M.; Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1995-12-31

    During direct chill (DC) casting, aluminum ingots contract in a non-uniform manner. The use of rectangular moulds would produce ingots with a concave cross-section (bone shape). In order to compensate for the non-uniform contraction of the rolling faces, moulds are designed with a convex shape by trials and errors. The numerical simulation of ingot distortion during DC-casting can be a valuable help for the optimization of the design of a mould capable of producing flat ingots. The transient thermomechanical model presented here predicts the deformation and the temperature field evolutions during DC-casting. Deformation in the solid is assumed to obey a viscoplastic law and the evolutive domain (liquid plus solid) is modeled by the successive activation of element layers. The cooling conditions on the lateral faces of the ingot are deduced from temperature measurements, using an inverse method. The mechanical properties of the alloys have been determined up to, and even above, the solidus temperature using various mechanical tests. The numerical computations have been implemented in the finite element package Abaqus. The simulation results are validated on the basis of measurements of profiles of DC-cast ingots after complete cooling. The present model enables to predict the influence of casting parameters on butt curl and swell, rolling faces pull-in and residual stress state.

  2. Effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during direct-chill casting of an Al-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Savran, V. I.; Katgerman, L.

    2005-07-01

    A thorough experimental investigation of the effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during the steady and nonsteady stages of direct-chill (DC) casting of an Al-2.8 pct Cu alloy is performed. In addition, the temperature and melt-flow distributions in the sump of billets cast at different melt temperatures are numerically simulated and used in the discussion on the experimental results. Apart from already known phenomena such as the coarsening of the structure, deepening of the sump, and increased probability of bleed-outs during DC casting with increased casting temperature, a few new observations are made. The increased melt temperature is shown to increase the severity of subsurface segregation, whereas the macrosegregation in the rest of the billet remains virtually unaffected. Hot-tearing susceptibility is strongly diminished by an increased melt superheat. The amount and distribution of “floating” grains is demonstrated to depend on both the melt temperature and the casting speed. The porosity was found to only slightly depend on the melt temperature. The amount of nonequilibrium eutectic in the center of the billet increases with increasing melt temperature. The effects of melt temperature on the dimensions of the sump, transition region, and mushy zone and on the melt-flow pattern in the sump are discussed and used in the interpretation of experimentally observed phenomena.

  3. Thermal expansion study of a "Direct Chill Casting" AlMgSi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemini, R.; Boubertakh, A.; Hamamda, S.

    2001-03-01

    This work is concerned with the study of thermal expansion coefficient of Al-0.59 wt.% Mg- 0.88 wt.% Si-0.30 wt.% Fe-0.44 wt.% Mn alloy. The presence of the anisotropy was concluded on the basis of the thermal expansion coefficient α(T) which depends up on the two directions: radial (1) and axial (2). However α(T) measured along the axial direction (2) appeared to be inferior to the measured one along the radial direction (1) in both as-cast and homogenised alloy.

  4. Effects of alloy composition and casting speed on structure formation and hot tearing during direct-chill casting of Al-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Savran, V. I.; Katgerman, L.; Eskin, D. G.

    2004-11-01

    Effects of casting speed and alloy composition on structure formation and hot tearing during direct-chill (DC) casting of 200-mm round billets from binary Al-Cu alloys are studied. It is experimentally shown that the grain structure, including the occurrence of coarse grains in the central part of the billet, is strongly affected by the casting speed and alloy composition, while the dendritic arm spacing is mostly dependent on the casting speed. The hot cracking pattern reveals the maximum hot-tearing susceptibility in the range of low-copper alloys (1 to 1.5 pct) and at high casting speeds (180 to 200 mm/min). The clear correlation between the amount of nonequilibrium eutectics (representing the reserve of liquid phase in the last stage of solidification) and hot tearing is demonstrated. A casting speed-copper concentration-hot-tearing susceptibility chart is constructed experimentally for real-scale DC casting. Computed dimensions of the solidification region in the billet are used to explain the experimentally observed structure patterns and hot cracking. Thermomechanical finite-element simulation of the solidifying billet was used as a tool for testing the applicability to DC casting of several hot-tearing criteria based on different principles. The results are compared to the experimentally observed hot tearing. It is noted that hot-tearing criteria that account for the dynamics of the process, e.g., strain rate, actual stress-strain situation, feeding rate, and melt flow, can be successfully used for the qualitative prediction of hot tearing.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-8 pct Si Alloy Prepared by Direct Chill Casting Under Electromagnetic and Ultrasonic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubo; Jie, Jinchuan; Wu, Li; Fu, Ying; Li, Mu; Lu, Yiping; Li, Tingju

    2014-04-01

    The intermediate frequency electromagnetic field and power ultrasonic field were applied during the direct chill (DC) casting process of Al-8 pct Si alloy. The effects of different physical fields on the solidification microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that compared to the conventional casting without any treatments, refined microstructures and improved mechanical properties can be obtained when the electromagnetic or ultrasonic field is applied individually. For the case of compound fields, the electromagnetic field can increase the ultrasonic treated region, while the ultrasonic field can enhance the refinement effect of electromagnetic field. Owing to the advantages of both electromagnetic and ultrasonic fields, the microstructure obtained under the compound fields is fine and uniform, leading to a remarkable enhancement of mechanical properties. The interaction mechanism between intermediate frequency electromagnetic field and power ultrasonic field was discussed. The present study may be useful for grain refinement and improvement of mechanical properties of alloys during the DC casting process which is now widely used in industry.

  6. A mathematical model of the heat and fluid flows in direct-chill casting of aluminum sheet ingots and billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Dag

    1999-02-01

    A finite-element method model for the time-dependent heat and fluid flows that develop during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of aluminium ingots is presented. Thermal convection and turbulence are included in the model formulation and, in the mushy zone, the momentum equations are modified with a Darcy-type source term dependent on the liquid fraction. The boundary conditions involve calculations of the air gap along the mold wall as well as the heat transfer to the falling water film with forced convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling. The mold wall and the starting block are included in the computational domain. In the start-up period of the casting, the ingot domain expands over the starting-block level. The numerical method applies a fractional-step method for the dynamic Navier-Stokes equations and the “streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin” (SUPG) method for mixed diffusion and convection in the momentum and energy equations. The modeling of the start-up period of the casting is demonstrated and compared to temperature measurements in an AA1050 200×600 mm sheet ingot.

  7. Surface formation in direct chill (DC) casting of 6082 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface defects in aluminium billet production are a real problem for the subsequent extrusion procedure. Extrusion productivity can be influenced by the surface properties, which is defined as surface appearance, surface segregation zone depth and large Mg2Si and β-particles (Al5FeSi). In this research the surface formation during DC casting of 6082 aluminium billets produced by the air slip technology is studied. The surface microstructures of 6082 aluminium alloys with smooth and wavy surface appearances were investigated, including segregation zone depths and phase formation. The results were discussed based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone. The specific appearance of the wavy surface of 6082 alloys was correlated to how the oxide skin adheres to the underlying mushy zone and coupled to the dendritic coherency and surface tension of the skin. The occurrence of different phases at the very surface and in the layer just below was explained by variations in solidification directions and subsequent segregation patterns.

  8. Experimental investigation of the start-up phase during direct chill and low frequency electromagnetic casting of 6063 aluminum alloy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangjie; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Zhihao; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Gaosong; Jiang, Huixue; Cui, Jianzhong

    2010-06-01

    On the basis of conventional hot-top casting and Casting, Refining and Electromagnetic process, a lower frequency electromagnetic field was applied during the conventional hot-top casting process. Nine thermocouples (type K) were introduced into the metal to study the temperature profile in the ingot during the start-up phase of casting process. The experimental results show that under the effect of the low frequency electromagnetic filed, the heat transfer is changed greatly and the film boiling disappears, which could restrain the formation of fine subsurface cracks; the sump is shallow, and the macrostructure of the ingot butt is fine during the start-up phase of direct chill casting process.

  9. Effect of Sc on Aging Kinetics in a Direct Chill Cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Senkova, S. V.; Shagiev, M. R.

    2008-05-01

    The effect of Sc additions on precipitation strengthening in a direct chill (DC) cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied after natural and artificial aging. The microhardness, room temperature (RT) mechanical properties, and phase composition of the alloys were determined after different steps of aging. The strengthening mechanisms were discussed. It was shown that minor additions of Sc increased the strength of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy after casting and solution heat treatment, due to the precipitation of fine coherent Al3(Sc,Zr) particles. An analysis of the aging kinetics revealed that Sc had no effect on the natural aging, which was controlled by the formation and growth of Guinier-Preston (GP) I zones. On the other hand, the Sc additions accelerated the aging process at 120 °C and 150 °C within a period of time of the formation and growth of GP II zones and η' particles. It was concluded that the presence of Sc accelerated the formation and growth of GP II zones in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, which led to the earlier precipitation of the η' phase. However, at longer aging times at 120 °C and 150 °C, the aging response of the Sc-containing alloys slowed down, due to faster coarsening of the η' particles and their transformation into η particles. A model of the formation of vacancy-rich clusters (VRCs), precursors to GP zones, in the Al-Zn-Mg-based alloys was proposed. According to this model, the observed effects of Sc on aging are the result of the Sc-induced increase in the number density of the GP II clusters and the concentration of quenched-in solute-bound excess vacancies.

  10. Quantitative analysis of texture evolution of cold-rolled direct-chill-cast and continuous-cast AA5052 and AA5182 aluminum alloys during isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Liu, W. C.; Morris, J. G.

    2004-11-01

    The as-received direct-chill-cast (DC) and continuous-cast (CC) AA5052 and AA5182 hot bands were preheated at 454 °C for 4 hours, followed by cold rolling to an 80 pct reduction in thickness. The texture evolution of these cold-rolled samples during isothermal annealing was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The variation in texture volume fractions with annealing time was quantitatively analyzed by using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. The differences in recrystallization textures between the AA5052 and AA5182 alloys and between the DC and CC alloys were compared. It was found that the AA5052 alloy possessed a stronger cube recrystallization texture than the AA5182 alloy for the DC and CC materials. The recrystallization textures of the AA5182 alloy were affected strongly by the annealing temperature. As the annealing temperature increased, the cube recrystallization texture strengthened, whereas the R texture weakened. The annealing temperature had little influence on the recrystallization textures of the AA5052 alloy. The DC AA5052 and 5182 alloys also exhibited stronger cube recrystallization textures than the corresponding CC alloys. For the DC and CC AA5052 alloys, the n value in the JMAK-type equation increased with an increase in the annealing temperature, while the n values varied only slightly with the annealing temperature for the DC and CC AA5182 alloys.

  11. Direct-Chill Co-Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Pelayo, Rosa E. Ortega; Baserinia, Amir R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to cast AA3003/AA4045 clad ingots via Fusion™ Technology, a novel process developed by Novelis Inc. for the production of aluminum clad materials such as brazing sheet. Experimental results were used to validate a steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology co-casting process. The numerical model was able to accurately predict the temperature field within the AA3003/AA4045 clad ingot as well as the shape of the AA3003 liquid sump. The model was also used to quantify the temperature, fraction solid, and velocity fields in a clad ingot cast with an asymmetrical molten metal-feeding system. Feeding of core and clad molten metals at opposite corners of the mold was found to reduce the risks of hot spots and liquid metal breakthrough from the core sump to the clad side of the Fusion™ Technology mold. The use of a diffuser for the AA3003 core molten metal and of a vertical feeding tube for the AA4045 clad produced different flow patterns and liquid sump shapes on either side of the mold. The quality of the metallurgical bond at the core/clad interface appeared good near the clad inlet and at the ingot centerline, but poor near the edges of the ingot. SEM-EDS analysis of the chemical composition across the interface showed that a 1 to 20- μm-deep penetration of silicon from the AA4045 clad into the AA3003 core had occurred at visually acceptable interfaces, whereas silicon diffusion across poor interfaces was very limited. A study of the model-predicted fraction solid history at different points along the interface indicated that reheating of the AA3003 core is not required to form a visually acceptable metallurgical bond. However, a sufficient amount of interaction time between the solid AA3003 core shell and the silicon-rich AA4045 clad liquid is required to chemically dissolve the surface of the core and form a good metallurgical bond. An approximate dissolution depth of 750 to 1000 μm was observed along

  12. Interdendritic Strain and Macrosegregation-Coupled Phenomena for Interdendritic Crack Formation in Direct-Chill Cast Sheet Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2012-06-01

    In a study of the early stages of dendritic solidification in the direct-chill cast sheet ingots, the coupled effect of interdendritic strain and macrosegregation on the interdendritic cracks formation in dendritic equiaxed structure has been investigated by the metallographic study of ingot samples and by performing a set of mathematical analyses for AA-6061 and AA-1050 aluminum alloys. The metallographic investigation contains microstructure examinations and macrosegregation measurements of collected samples from plant trials. The mathematical analysis consists of a two-dimensional (2-D) fluid flow, heat flow, interdendritic strain, and macrosegregation-coupled model. Also, a simple approach to measure interdendritic crack has been developed based on the accumulative interdendritic strain criterion, local dendritic phases, and the crystal distortion correlation factor resulting from steep positive local segregation. The model predications have clarified the effect of high positive macrosegregation on the surface and subsurface interdendritic crack formation. It has been revealed that interdendritic strain starts to generate just below the liquidus temperature, resulting from shrinkage of liquid→solid phase transformation and contraction of dendritic solid in the incoherent mushy region. In this region, the coupled effect of the shrinkage/contraction mechanism increases the interdendritic distances between equiaxed crystals and the interdendritic crack begins to nucleate. Subsequently, in the coherent mushy region, the different interdendritic strain sources start to affect significantly the distances between equiaxed crystals in a diverse way, and therefore, the final morphology of interdendritic crack begins to form. The mechanism of interdendritic crack formation during dendritic equiaxed structure solidification and the possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  13. Finite element method simulation of mushy zone behavior during direct-chill casting of an Al-4.5 pct Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2004-09-01

    In this article, the stresses, strains, sump depth, mushy zone length, and temperature fields are calculated through the simulation of the direct-chill (DC) casting process for a round billet by using a finite-element method (FEM). Focus is put on the mushy zone and solid region close to it. In the center of the billet, circumferential stresses and strains (which play a main role in hot cracking) are tensile close to the solidus temperature, whereas they are compressive near the surface of the billet. The stresses, strains, depth of sump, and length of mushy zone increase with increasing casting speed. They are maximum in the start-up phase and are reduced by applying a ramping procedure in the start-up phase. Stresses, strains, depth of sump, and length of mushy zone are highest in the center of the billet for all casting conditions considered.

  14. Cold-Cracking Assessment in AA7050 Billets during Direct-Chill Casting by Thermomechanical Simulation of Residual Thermal Stresses and Application of Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2009-12-01

    Thermally induced strains and stresses developed during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of high strength aluminum alloys can result in formation of micro-cracks in different locations of the billet. Rapid propagation of such micro-cracks in tensile thermal stress fields can lead to catastrophic failure of ingots in the solid state called cold cracking. Numerical models can simulate the thermomechanical behavior of an ingot during casting and after solidification and reveal the critical cooling conditions that result in catastrophic failure, provided that the constitutive parameters of the material represent genuine as-cast properties. Application of fracture mechanics, on the other hand, can help to derive the critical crack length leading to failure. In the present research work, the state of residual thermal stresses was determined in an AA7050 billet during DC casting by means of ALSIM5. Simulation results showed that in the steady-state conditions, large compressive stresses form near the surface of the billet in the circumferential direction, whereas in the center, the stresses are tensile in all directions. Magnitudes of von Mises effective stresses, the largest component of principal stresses and the fracture mechanics concepts, were then applied to investigate the crack susceptibility of the billet.

  15. Effect of Grain Refinement on Structure Evolution, ``Floating'' Grains, and Centerline Macrosegregation in Direct-Chill Cast AA2024 Alloy Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadella, R.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2008-02-01

    Direct-chill (DC) cast billets 192 mm in diameter of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy were examined in detail with the aim to reveal the effects of grain refining (GR) and casting speed on structure, “floating” grains, and centerline macrosegregation. Experimental results show that grain size and dendrite arm spacing (DAS) tend to coarsen toward the billet center with a local refinement DAS in the center. In GR billets, grain size does not change much with the cooling rate, casting speed, and grain refiner amount. Coarse-DAS (floating) grains are observed around the billet axis regardless of GR and the amount of Ti, though their amount is significantly higher in GR billets. Macrosegregation profiles show a negligible influence of GR, while the effect of casting speed is large. The concept of solute-depleted floating grains contributing to the centerline macrosegregation is substantiated by microsegregation measurements, which show that, independent of GR, coarse dendrite branches have a depleted concentration plateau in contrast to the fine dendrite arms.

  16. Stress-Strain Predictions of Semisolid Al-Mg-Mn Alloys During Direct Chill Casting: Effects of Microstructure and Process Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, Nasim; Phillion, A. B.; Drezet, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of hot tearing during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process results in significant quality issues and a reduction in productivity. In order to investigate their occurrence, a new semisolid constitutive law (Phillion et al.) for AA5182 that takes into account cooling rate, grain size, and porosity has been incorporated within a DC casting finite element process model for round billets. A hot tearing index was calculated from the semisolid strain predictions from the model. This hot tearing index, along with semisolid stress-strain predictions from the model, was used to perform a sensitivity analysis on the relative effects of microstructural features ( e.g., grain size, coalescence temperature) as well as process parameters ( e.g., casting speed) on hot tearing. It was found that grain refinement plays an important role in the formation of hot cracks. In addition, the combination of slow casting speeds and a low temperature for mechanical coalescence was found to improve hot tearing resistance.

  17. Influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer during direct-chill casting of commercial aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. A.; Li, D.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2001-10-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on as-cast samples from three commercially significant aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3004, and AA5182) to quantify the influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer under conditions similar to those experienced in the direct-chill (DC) casting process. The study involved characterization of the as-cast surface morphology using a laser profilometer and quantification of the sample surface temperature and heat extraction to the cooling water using a DC casting simulator in combination with an inverse heat-conduction (IHC) analysis. The results from the study indicate that alloy’s thermal conductivity, surface morphology, and sample initial temperature all dramatically influence the calculated “boiling curve.” The intensity of the heat extraction was found to be enhanced at high heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling regime as the thermal conductivity was increased and was also found to increase as the surface of the sample became rougher, presumably through promotion of nucleation, growth, and/or detachment of bubbles. The heat transfer was also found to increase with increasing sample starting temperature, resulting in a series of boiling curves dependent on initial sample temperature. Finally, the effect of the water flow rate on heat transfer was found to be comparatively moderate and was limited to the sample with the smooth (machined) surface.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the evolution of thermal field during start-up phase of the direct chill casting process for AA5182 sheet ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Joydeep

    The control of the thermal cooling conditions at the start-up phase of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process for aluminum sheet ingots is difficult, and is critical from the standpoint of defect formation. Firstly, boiling water heat transfer governs the secondary cooling experienced by the ingot surfaces as they emerge from the mould. This results in varying rates of heat transfer from the ingot faces as the surface temperature of the ingot changes with time during the start-up phase. Moreover, if the ingot surface temperature at locations below the point of water impingement is high enough to promote film boiling, the water is ejected away from the surface. This can result in a sudden decrease in heat transfer and the formation of local hot spots. Also, the chill water may enter into the gap formed between the ingot base and the bottom block with the evolution of the butt curl. This process of water incursion alters the heat transfer from the base of the ingot, and in turn affects the surface temperature of the ingot faces. A comprehensive mathematical model has been developed to describe heat transfer during the start-up phase of the D.C. casting process. The model, based on the commercial finite element package ABAQUS, includes primary cooling to the mould, secondary cooling to water, and ingot base cooling. The algorithm used to account for secondary cooling to the water includes boiling curves that are a function of surface temperature, water flow rate, impingement point temperature, and position relative to the point of water impingement. In addition, the secondary cooling algorithm accounts for water ejection, which can occur at low water flow rates (low heat extraction rates). The algorithm used to describe ingot base cooling includes the drop in contact heat transfer due to base deformation (butt curl), and also the increase in heat transfer due to the process of water incursion between the ingot base and bottom block. The model has been extensively

  19. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  20. Comparison of residual stresses in sand- and chill casting of ductile cast iron wind turbine main shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonne, M. R.; Frandsen, J. O.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, simulations of pouring, solidification and cooling, and residual stress evolution of sand and chill cast wind turbine main shafts is performed. The models are made in the commercial software MAGMAsoft. As expected, the cooling rate of the sand casting is shown to be much lower than for the chill casting, resulting in a very course microstructure. From the simulations the nodule count is found to be 17 nodules per mm2 and 159 nodules per mm2 for the sand and chill casting, respectively, in the critical region of the main bearing seat. This is verified from nodule counts performed on the real cast main shafts. Residual stress evaluations show an overall increase of the maximum principal stress field for the chill casting, which is expected. However, the stresses are found to be in compression on the surface of the chill cast main shaft, which is unforeseen.

  1. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Saue, Triin

    2016-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning. PMID:26585350

  2. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Triin

    2015-11-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning.

  3. Directional distribution of chilling winds in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Triin

    2016-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) is used to define thermal discomfort in winter months. Directional distributions of winds, which are associated with uncomfortable weather, were composed of three climatologically different Estonian locations: Vilsandi, Kuusiku, and Jõhvi. Cases with wind chill equivalent temperature <-10 °C, which could be classified as "uncomfortable or worse," were investigated. Additional thresholds were used to measure weather risk. The 25th percentile of daily minimum WCET was tested to measure classical prevalent wind directions in Estonia: W, SW, and NW bring warm air in winter from the North Atlantic, while winds from the East-European plain (NE, E, and SE) are associated with cold air. The eastern prevalence was stronger when a lower threshold was used. A directional approach may find several applications, such as building, agricultural, landscape, or settlement planning.

  4. The effect of hot-rolling on chill-cast AI-AI3Ni, chill-cast AI-AI2Cu, and Unidirectionally Solidified AI-AI3Ni Eutectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, F. S. J.; Cantor, B.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of hot-rolling on the mechanical properties and microstructures of chill-cast Al-Al3Ni, chill-cast Al-Al2Cu, and unidirectionally solidified Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloys has been studied. The chill-cast eutectic alloys were produced by casting into preheated mild steel molds placed on copper chills. This system promoted growth along the length of the ingot and not radially from the mold wall. Cellular microstructures resulted with good alignment of Al3Ni fibers or Al2Cu lamellae within the cells and an interfiber/lamellar spacing of ~ 1 /urn. In contrast, the Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy was also unidirectionally solidified at a growth rate of 3 x 10-1 m s-1 in a conventional horizontal crystal grower. This produced well-aligned Al3Ni fibers with an interfiber spacing of 1.2 ώm. Both the unidirectionally solidified and chill-cast Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy can be hot-rolled at 773 K to reductions in area of greater than 95 pct. Deformation was achieved by Al3Ni fiber fracturing followed by separation of the broken fiber fragments in the rolling direction. Additionally, for the chill-cast eutectic the cellular microstructure disappeared and the Al3Ni fibers were homogeneously distributed throughout the matrix, after area reductions of 60 to 70 pct. In both cases, the eutectic microstructure was deformed with a constant volume fraction of Al3Ni/unit volume being maintained during rolling. The chill-cast Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy can be hot-rolled at 773 K to an area reduction of ~50 pct, after the continuous brittle Al2Cu phase within the cells has been ‘broken up’ by coarsening at high temperature. The variations of room temperature tensile properties for the chill-cast and unidirectionally solidified eutectic alloys were measured as a function of reduction of thickness during hot-rolling and the results were compared with predicted strengths from discontinuous fiber reinforcement theory.

  5. Chills

    MedlinePlus

    ... of rest. Evaporation cools the skin and reduces body temperature. Sponging with lukewarm water (about 70°F [21. ... you actually shaking? What has been the highest body temperature connected with the chills? Did the chills happen ...

  6. Chills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or an increase in the body's core temperature. Chills are an important symptom with certain diseases ... rest. Evaporation cools the skin and reduces body temperature. Sponging with lukewarm water (about 70°F [21. ...

  7. A 3-D numerical study of turbulent flow and solidification of a direct chill caster fitted with a channel bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Latifa; Hasan, Mainul

    2015-06-01

    3-D CFD simulations were carried out for a vertical direct chill slab caster for an aluminum-alloy AA-1050. The code was verified with an experimental study and reasonably good agreements were obtained. The casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient were varied from 40 to 100 mm/min and from 750 to 3,000 W/m2 K), respectively. The velocity field, temperature contours and important quantities for different casting speeds are predicted.

  8. Determination of heat transfer coefficients at metal/chill interface in the casting solidification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liqiang; Li, Luoxing

    2013-08-01

    The present work focuses on the determination of interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTCs) between the casting and metal chill during casting solidification. The proposed method is established based on the least-squares technique and sequential function specification method and can be applied to calculate heat fluxes and IHTCs for other alloys. The accuracy and stability of the method has been investigated by using a typical profile of heat fluxes simulating the practical conditions of casting solidification. In the test process, the effects of various calculation parameters in the inverse algorithm are also analyzed. Moreover, numerically calculated and experimental results are compared by applying the determined IHTCs into the forward heat conduction model with the same boundary conditions. The results show that the numerically calculated temperatures are in good agreement with those measured experimentally. This confirms that the proposed method is a feasible and effective tool for determination of the casting-mold IHTCs.

  9. Analysis of chill-cast NiAl intermetallic compound with copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J.; Gonzalez, C.; Herrera, R.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    2002-10-01

    This study carried out a characterization of chill-cast NiAl alloys with copper additions, which were added to NiAl, such that the resulting alloy composition occurred in the β-field of the ternary NiAlCu phase diagram. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and casted in copper chill molds to produce ingots 0.002 m thick, 0.020 m wide, and 0.050 m long. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) performed in chill-cast ingots identified mainly the presence of the β-(Ni,Cu)Al phase. As-cast ingots showed essentially no ductility at room temperature except for the Ni50Al40Cu10 alloy, which showed 1.79% of elongation at room temperature. Ingots with this alloy composition were then heat treated under a high-purity argon atmosphere at 550 °C (24 h) and cooled either in the furnace or in air, until room temperature was reached. β-(Ni,Cu)Al and γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al were present in specimens cooled in the furnace and β-(Ni,Cu)Al, γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al plus martensite-(Ni,Cu)Al were present in specimens cooled in air. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that martensite transformation was the result of a solid-state reaction with M s ˜ 470 and M f ˜ 430 °C. Tensile tests performed on bulk heat-treated ingots showed room-temperature ductility between 3 and 6%, depending on the cooling media.

  10. Rapid-Chill Cryogenic Coaxial Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James; Castor, Jim; Sheller, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A commercially available cryogenic direct- acting solenoid valve has been modified to incorporate a rapid-chill feature. The net effect of the modifications is to divert some of the cryogenic liquid to the task of cooling the remainder of the cryogenic liquid that flows to the outlet. Among the modifications are the addition of several holes and a gallery into a valve-seat retainer and the addition of a narrow vent passage from the gallery to the atmosphere.

  11. Application of Internal Fusible Chills in Thick-Walled Castings Made of EN-GJS with an Optimized Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Wojciech; Tonn, Babette

    2011-01-01

    The degeneration of graphite in thick-walled components made of ductile iron due to slower solidification affects the mechanical properties and is unacceptable for all safety-relevant components. The inoculation of the melt no longer leads to a fine microstructure. After exceeding the critical solidification time, degenerated shapes of graphite are to be expected. The external cooling with a chill-mould does not eliminate graphite degeneration in the thermal centres. The positive effect of these chills is also limited by the wall thickness. The aim of this study was to increase the heat dissipation of the melt by positioning the internal fusible chills in the thermal centre of the mould cavity. This should lead to accelerated solidification. The plate-shaped chills were placed in the middle of rectangular samples. The solidification processes were first simulated with Magmasoft in order to optimize the size and shape of the fusible chills and to thus guarantee a complete dissolving of the chills. A reduction in the solidification time of approximately 15% was achieved. In the experiments thick-walled samples were cast with and without internal fusible chills and compared. Areas with degenerated graphite, including chunky graphite, were found in the centres of the cast samples without internal cooling. Placing fusible chills in castings increased the number of graphite spheroids in the microstructure and exhibited no graphite degeneration. A homogenous microstructure was developed—no residues of the chills were found. Differences in microstructure and mechanical properties between the edges and centres of the casting could be nullified. The optimized graphite morphology of the casting with internal cooling led to an increase in tensile strength in the thermal centre of about 30 MPa (8%). This process was successfully implemented in an industrial environment. Blocks out of EN-GJS-400 for use in hydraulic engineering with a total weight of eight tonnes were cast in

  12. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.; Hackman, L.E.; Hsiao, Yu-Hsian; Daehn, G.

    1990-03-30

    The three goals of this research project were to demonstrate the feasibility of casting steel strip up to 2 mm (0.079 in) thick on a textured chill roll, to develop the thermal-mechanical processing to optimize the properties of the steel strip and to measure the properties of the steel strip as a function of casting and metalworking variables. Each of these goals have been realized. Type 304 stainless strip measuring up to 329 mm (12.9 in) wide and up to 1.98 mm (0.078 in) thick was cast on a 600 mm (24 in) copper chill roll with a 14 pitch, 60 degree diamond knurl pattern machined on it`s circumference. The casting speed was 0.15 m/s and the depth of liquid steel in contact with the chill roll was approximately 127 m (5 in). The most important process variables are the texture on the chill roll, the chemistry and temperature of the liquid steel, the depth of liquid in contact with the chill roll and the casting speed. It has been shown that thermal mechanical treatment can significantly improve both the surface finish and mechanical properties of Type 304 stainless steel. Cold rolling in excess of 30% reduction serves to completely eliminate the textured pattern from direct cast Type 304 stainless steel strips. Furthermore, cold rolling followed by annealing can produce commercial ingot metallurgy steels. Specifically, for Type 304 stainless steel, 30% cold rolling followed by a 40 minute anneal at 1100 {degree}C (2012 {degree}F) produced equiaxed austenite grains with an average diameter of approximately 20 {mu}m (0.0008 in), and this material gives approximately 45% elongation to failure with and ultimate tensile strength of 660 MPa (96 ksi). 27 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Effects of MC-Type Carbide Forming and Graphitizing Elements on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Indefinite Chilled Cast Iron Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Choi, Won-Doo; Suh, Yongchan; Lee, Young-Kook; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of indefinite chilled cast iron rolls with various V+Nb contents and Si/Cr ratios was evaluated. Increasing the ratio of Si/Cr prolonged the life of the rolls by reducing brittle cementites. Higher V+Nb addition also increased the life through the formation of carbides that refined and toughened the martensite matrix and reduced the thermal expansion mismatch in the microstructure.

  14. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  15. Thin sheet casting with electromagnetic pressurization

    DOEpatents

    Walk, Steven R.; Slepian, R. Michael; Nathenson, Richard D.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus, method and system for the casting of thin strips or strips of metal upon a moving chill block that includes an electromagnet located so that molten metal poured from a reservoir onto the chill block passes into the magnetic field produced by the electromagnet. The electromagnet produces a force on the molten metal on said chill block in the direction toward said chill block in order to enhance thermal contact between the molten metal and the chill block.

  16. Casting uniform ceramics with direct coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Graule, T.J.; Baader, F.H.; Gauckler, L.J.

    1995-06-01

    Today complex-shaped ceramic parts are mass fabricated by many different methods, two of which are slip casting and injection molding. The selection of the appropriate technique is governed by the geometric shape, the number of pieces to be manufactured, and the chemistry of the ceramic. Both slip casting and injection molding introduce imperfections in the green part, which lead to inhomogeneous microstructures in the sintered parts. A new fabrication method, direct coagulation casting (DCC), may be suitable for the mass production of complex ceramic parts with high strength and reliability. In DCC, an aqueous suspension is coagulated by a change in pH or an increase in ionic strength after casting, producing a rigid green body. The use of DCC can avoid most of the limitations of conventional shaping techniques, and it can be applied to a large variety of ceramic powders, sols, and polymers, alone or in combination.

  17. Dormancy release and flowering time in Ziziphus jujuba Mill., a "direct flowering" fruit tree, has a facultative requirement for chilling.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michal; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Raveh, Eran; Barak, Simon; Tel-Zur, Noemi; Zaccai, Michele

    2016-03-15

    In deciduous fruit trees, the effect of chilling on flowering has mostly been investigated in the "indirect flowering" group, characterized by a period of rest between flower bud formation and blooming. In the present study, we explored the effects of chilling and chilling deprivation on the flowering of Ziziphus jujuba, a temperate deciduous fruit tree belonging to the "direct flowering" group, in which flower bud differentiation, blooming and fruit development occur after dormancy release, during a single growing season. Dormancy release, vegetative growth and flowering time in Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li were assessed following several treatments of chilling. Chilling treatments quantitatively decreased the timing of vegetative bud dormancy release, thereby accelerating flowering, but had no effect on the time from dormancy release to flowering. Trees grown at a constant temperature of 25°C, without chilling, broke dormancy and flowered, indicating the facultative character of chilling in this species. We measured the expression of Z. jujuba LFY and AP1 homologues (ZjLFY and ZjAP1). Chilling decreased ZjLFY expression in dormant vegetative buds but had no effect on ZjAP1expression, which reached peak expression before dormancy release and at anthesis. In conclusion, chilling is not obligatory for dormancy release of Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li vegetative buds. However, the exposure to chilling during dormancy does accelerate vegetative bud dormancy release and flowering. PMID:26949231

  18. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  19. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  20. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of end-chill cast Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeshvaghani, R. Arabi; Ghahvechian, H.; Pirnajmeddin, H.; Shahverdi, H. R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content. In order to study the relationship between microstructure features and wear behavior, the alloys prepared by an end-chill cast apparatus and then heat treated. Heat treatment procedure involved solutionizing at temperature of 350 °C for 72 h followed by cooling within the furnace to room temperature. Microstructural characteristics of as-cast and heat-treated alloys at different distances from the chill were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk test machine. To determine the wear mechanisms, the worn surfaces of the samples were also examined by SEM and EDS. Results showed that heat treatment led to the complete dissolution of as-cast dendritic microstructure and formation of a fine lamellar structure with well-distributed microconstituents. Moreover, addition of copper up to 1 wt% had no significant change in the microstructure, while addition of 2 and 4 wt% copper resulted in formation of ɛ (CuZn4) particle in the interdendritic regions. The influence of copper content on the wear behavior of the alloys was explained in terms of microstructural characteristics. Delamination was proposed as the dominant wear mechanism.

  1. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  2. The effects of novel surface treatments on the wear and fatigue properties of steel and chilled cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jason William

    Contact fatigue driven wear is a principal design concern for gear and camshaft engineering of power systems. To better understand how to engineer contact fatigue resistant surfaces, the effects of electroless nickel and hydrogenated diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings on the fatigue life at 108 cycles of SAE 52100 steel were studied using ultrasonic fatigue methods. The addition of DLC and electroless nickel coatings to SAE 52100 bearing steel had no effect on the fatigue life. Different inclusion types were found to affect the stress intensity value beyond just the inclusion size, as theorized by Murakami. The difference in stress intensity values necessary to propagate a crack for Ti (C,N) and alumina inclusions was due to the higher driving force for crack extension at the Ti (C,N) inclusions and was attributed to differences in the shape of the inclusion: rhombohedral for the Ti (C,N) versus spherical for the oxides. A correction factor was added to the Murakami equation to account for inclusion type. The wear properties of DLC coated SAE 52100 and chilled cast iron were studied using pin-on-disk tribometry and very high cycle ultrasonic tribometry. A wear model that includes sliding thermal effects as well as thermodynamics consistent with the wear mechanism for DLCs was developed based on empirical results from ultrasonic wear testing to 108 cycles. The model fit both ultrasonic and classic tribometer data for wear of DLCs. Finally, the wear properties of laser hardened steels - SAE 8620, 4140, and 52100 - were studied at high contact pressures and low numbers of cycles. A design of experiments was conducted to understand how the laser processing parameters of power, speed, and beam size, as well as carbon content of the steel, affected surface hardness. A hardness maximum was found at approximately 0.7 wt% carbon most likely resulting from increased amounts of retained austenite. The ratcheting contact fatigue model of Kapoor was found to be useful in

  3. A metallographic study of porosity and fracture behavior in relation to the tensile properties in 319.2 end chill castings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    A metallographic study of the porosity and fracture behavior in unidirectionally solidified end chill castings of 319.2 aluminum alloy (Al-6.2 pct Si-3.8 pct Cu-0.5 pct Fe-0.14 pct Mn-0.06 pct Mg-0.073 pct Ti) was carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their relationship with the tensile properties. The parameters varied in the production of these castings were the hydrogen ({approximately}0.1 and {approximately}0.37 mL/100 g Al), modifier (0 and 300 ppm Sr), and grain refiner (0 and 0.03 wt pct Ti) concentrations, as well as the solidification time, which increased with decreasing distance from the end chill bottom of the casting, giving dendrite arm spacings (DASs) ranging from {approximately}15 to {approximately}95 {micro}m. Image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were employed for quantification of porosity/microstructural constituents and fracture surface analysis (phase identification), respectively. The results showed that the local solidification time (viz. DAS) significantly influences the ductility at low hydrogen levels; at higher levels, however, hydrogen has a more pronounced effect (porosity related) on the drop in ductility. Porosity is mainly observed in the form of elongated pores along the grain boundaries, with Sr increasing the porosity volume percent and grain refining increasing the probability for pore branching. The beneficial effect of Sr modification, however, improves the alloy ductility. Fracture of the Si, {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, {alpha}-Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}Cu phases takes place within the phase particles rather than at the particle/Al matrix interface. Sensitivity of tensile properties to DAS allows for the use of the latter as an indicator of the expected properties of the alloy.

  4. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  5. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1989-07-14

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issues on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  6. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1988-10-21

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issued on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless steel and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  7. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system. PMID:26782108

  8. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system. PMID:26782108

  9. A Direct Numerical Simulation of Axisymmetric Cryogenic Chill Down in a Pipe in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Alpana; Chung, J. N.

    2015-05-01

    Cryogenic two-phase flow with phase change heat transfer, consisting of a saturated liquid slug translating in its own superheated vapor in a circular pipe, was numerically simulated. The cryogenic chill down process was simplified by assuming ideal inverted annular flow regime. The method used is based on a sharp interface concept and developed on an Eulerian Cartesian fixed-grid with a cut-cell scheme and marker points to track the moving interface. The unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in both liquid and vapor phases are solved separately and used to compute the velocity, pressure, and temperature fields and the deformation of the liquid core very accurately. Three most common cryogenic fluids, viz. nitrogen, oxygen, and argon were included in the study. The influence of non-dimensional parameters like Reynolds number Weber number , and Jakob number on flow characteristics was studied by systematically varying only one at a time. was found to affect the mass flow rates, but did not have a significant influence on the wall cooling or the Nusselt number. affected the interface shape at the leading edge of the liquid slug, also influencing the heat transfer and velocity field there. affects all three quantities of interest, i.e., mass flow rate, wall cooling, and the Nusselt number.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  11. Morphological Study of Directionally Freeze-Cast Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hyungyung; Kim, Min Jeong; Choi, Hyelim; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman; Dunand, David C.

    2016-03-01

    Nickel foams, consisting of 51 to 62 pct aligned, elongated pores surrounded by a network of Ni walls, were fabricated by reduction and sintering of directionally cast suspensions of nanometric NiO powders in water. Use of dispersant in the slurry considerably affected the foam morphology and microstructure at both the micro- and macro-scale, most likely by modifying ice solidification into dendrites (creating the aligned, elongated macro-pores) and NiO powder accumulation in the inter-dendritic space (creating the Ni walls with micro-pores). The mean width of the Ni walls, in foams solidified with and without dispersant, was 21 ± 5 and 75 ± 13 µm, respectively. Additionally, the foams with the dispersant showed less dense walls and rougher surfaces than those without the dispersant. Moreover, the fraction of closed pores present in the foam walls with the dispersant was higher than that of the samples without dispersant. We finally verified the potential energy application of the Ni foam produced in this study by carrying out a preliminary single-cell performance test with the Ni foam sample as the gas diffusion layer on the anode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  12. Direct Isosurface Ray Casting of NURBS-Based Isogeometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schollmeyer, Andre; Froehlich, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    In NURBS-based isogeometric analysis, the basis functions of a 3D model's geometric description also form the basis for the solution space of variational formulations of partial differential equations. In order to visualize the results of a NURBS-based isogeometric analysis, we developed a novel GPU-based multi-pass isosurface visualization technique which performs directly on an equivalent rational Bézier representation without the need for discretization or approximation. Our approach utilizes rasterization to generate a list of intervals along the ray that each potentially contain boundary or isosurface intersections. Depth-sorting this list for each ray allows us to proceed in front-to-back order and enables early ray termination. We detect multiple intersections of a ray with the higher-order surface of the model using a sampling-based root-isolation method. The model's surfaces and the isosurfaces always appear smooth, independent of the zoom level due to our pixel-precise processing scheme. Our adaptive sampling strategy minimizes costs for point evaluations and intersection computations. The implementation shows that the proposed approach interactively visualizes volume meshes containing hundreds of thousands of Bézier elements on current graphics hardware. A comparison to a GPU-based ray casting implementation using spatial data structures indicates that our approach generally performs significantly faster while being more accurate. PMID:26357373

  13. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here. PMID:27264892

  14. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Directional Solidification Process of Turbine Blade Casting with MCA Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qingyan; Zhang, Hang; Qi, Xiang; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-04-01

    Nickel-based superalloy turbine blade castings are widely used as a key part in aero engines. However, due to the complex manufacturing processes, the complicated internal structure, and the interaction between different parts of the turbine blade, casting defects, such as stray grains, often happen during the directional solidification of turbine blade castings, which causes low production yield and high production cost. To improve the quality of the directionally solidified turbine blade castings, modeling and simulation technique has been employed to study the microstructure evolution as well as to optimize the casting process. In this article, a modified cellular automaton (MCA) method was used to simulate the directional solidification of turbine blade casting. The MCA method was coupled with macro heat transfer and micro grain growth kinetics to simulate the microstructure evolution during the directional solidification. In addition, a ray tracing method was proposed to calculate the heat transfer, especially the heat radiation of multiple blade castings in a Bridgman furnace. A competitive mechanism was incorporated into the grain growth model to describe the grain selection behavior phenomena of multiple columnar grains in the grain selector. With the proposed models, the microstructure evolution and related defects could be simulated, while the processing parameters optimized and the blade casting quality guaranteed as well. Several experiments were carried out to validate the proposed models, and good agreement between the simulated and experimental results was achieved.

  15. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  16. Characteristics of high-quality Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) ejaculates and in vitro sperm quality after prolonged chilled storage and directional freezing.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J K; Steinman, K J; Montano, G A; Love, C C; Saiers, R L; Robeck, T R

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro quality of spermatozoa from one elephant (Elephas maximus) was examined after chilled storage and directional freezing (DF). High-quality, non-contaminated ejaculates (77.6±6.0% progressive motility, 3.9±1.5 µg creatinine mL(-1) raw semen, 2.7±0.6% detached heads) were cryopreserved after 0 (0hStor), 12 (12hStor) and 24 h (24hStor) of chilled storage. At 0 h and 6h post-thawing, total motility, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome integrity, mitochondrial activity and normal morphology were similar (P>0.05) across treatments. In contrast, progressive motility, rapid velocity and several kinematic parameters were lower (P<0.05) for 24Stor compared with 0hStor at 0 h post-thaw. By 6 h post-thaw, amplitude of lateral head displacement and velocity parameters (average pathway, straight-line and curvilinear velocity) were lower (P<0.05) for 24hStor compared with 0hStor and 12hStor. DNA integrity was high and remained unchanged (P>0.05) across all groups and processing stages (1.6±0.6% of cells contained fragmented DNA). Results indicate that DF after up to 12 h of chilled storage results in a post-thaw sperm population of acceptable quality for artificial insemination. These findings have implications for the cryopreservation of sex-sorted spermatozoa, which typically undergo more than 12 h of chilled storage prior to sorting and preservation. PMID:22951419

  17. Modeling of grain selection during directional solidification of single crystal superalloy turbine blade castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng; Li, Jiarong; Yuan, Hailong; Jin, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades are currently widely used as key components in gas turbine engines. The single crystal turbine blade casting’s properties are quite sensitive to the grain orientation determined directly by the grain selector geometry of the casting, A mathematical model was proposed for the grain selection during directional solidification of turbine blade casting. Based on heat transfer modeling of the directional withdrawing process, the competitive grain growth within the starter block and the spiral of the grain selector were simulated by using the cellular automaton method (CA). Validation experiments were carried out, and the measured results were compared quantitatively with the predicted results. The model could be used to predict the grain morphology and the competitive grain evolution during solidification, together with the distribution of grain orientation of primary <001> dendrite growth direction, with respect to the longitudinal axis of the turbine blade casting.

  18. Soft capacitive tactile sensing arrays fabricated via direct filament casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Gao, Yang; Fontecchio, Adam; Visell, Yon

    2016-07-01

    Advances in soft electronics are enabling the development of mechanical sensors that can conform to curved surfaces or soft objects, allowing them to interface seamlessly with the human body. In this paper, we report on intrinsically deformable tactile sensing arrays that achieve a unique combination of high spatial resolution, sensitivity, and mechanical stretchability. The devices are fabricated via a casting process that yields arrays of microfluidic channels in low modulus polymer membranes with thickness as small as one millimeter. Using liquid metal alloy as a conductor, we apply matrix-addressed capacitive sensing in order to resolve spatially distributed strain with millimeter precision over areas of several square centimeters. Due to the use of low-modulus polymers, the devices readily achieve stretchability greater than 500%, making them well suited for novel applications in wearable tactile sensing for biomedical applications.

  19. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Interdendritic Strain for Exuded Surface Segregation Layer in the Direct Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-02-01

    This investigation on the formation of exuded surface segregation layer " ESSL" is intended to provide experimental and simulated comparison to verify the model developed previously by El-Bealy. Preliminary verification and calibration of the previous 2D mathematical model are demonstrated by quantitative errors between the previous measurements and predictions of temperature and macrosegregation. Also, the results from these comparisons reveal that the errors are in the reasonable and within allowable limits. These comparisons lead to the fact that the exuded surface segregation layer mostly forms on the middle slice of broad sheet ingot face and in the early stages of mold zone. The model predictions point out also that the different interdendritic strain hypotheses associated with fluctuations of mold cooling conditions. This affects the interdendritic liquid flow between the equiaxed crystals which influences the severity of ESSL formation and its macrosegregation level. The mechanism of ESSL with heat flow and interdendritic strain generation has been analyzed and discussed. The quantitative comparisons between the pervious experimental results and numerical simulation in this investigation reveal also several solutions to prevent this defect for future work.

  20. DM-2 Chilling

    NASA Video Gallery

    How do you chill down 1.4 million pounds of solid rocket fuel in the hot Utah desert? Lots of air conditioning! Learn how ATK chilled down DM-2, the second Ares first stage development motor in adv...

  1. [Music-induced chills as a strong emotional experience].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    While enjoying music and other works of art, people sometimes experience "chills," a strong emotional response characterized by a sensation of goose bumps or shivers. Such experiences differ from having goose bumps as a defense response or from shivering in reaction to cold temperatures. The current paper presents the phenomenon of music-induced chills and reviews the chill-related emotional response, autonomic nervous system activity, and brain activity. It also reviews the musico-acoustic features, listening contexts, and individual differences that cause chills. Based on the review, we propose a hypothetical model regarding the evocation of music-induced chills. Furthermore, we investigate the strong emotional response associated with chills by exploring the relationship between music-related chills and non-music-related chills, and discuss future research directions. PMID:25639033

  2. Refinement of Promising Coating Compositions for Directionally Cast Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Felten, E. J.; Benden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The successful application of high creep strength, directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta (Ni-19.7Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) eutectic superalloy turbine blades requires the development of suitable coatings for airfoil, root and internal blade surfaces. In order to improve coatings for the gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy, the current investigation had the goals of (1) refining promising coating compositions for directionally solidified eutectics, (2) evaluating the effects of coating/ substrate interactions on the mechanical properties of the alloy, and (3) evaluating diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surfaces. Burner rig cyclic oxidation, furnace cyclic hot corrosion, ductility, and thermal fatigue tests indicated that NiCrAlY+Pt(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y + 6 micron Pt) and NiCrAlY(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y) coatings are capable of protecting high temperature gas path surfaces of eutectic alloy airfoils. Burner rig (Mach 0.37) testing indicated that the useful coating life of the 127 micron thick coatings exceeded 1000 hours at 1366 K (2000 deg F). Isothermal fatigue and furnance hot corrosion tests indicated that 63 micron NiCrAlY, NiCrAlY + Pt and platinum modified diffusion aluminide (Pt + Al) coating systems are capable of protecting the relatively cooler surfaces of the blade root. Finally, a gas phase coating process was evaluated for diffusion aluminizing internal surfaces and cooling holes of air-cooled gamma/gamma prime-delta turbine blades.

  3. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  4. Effect of casting/mould interfacial heat transfer during solidification of aluminium alloys cast in CO2-sand mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. N.; Radhakrishna, D. K.

    2011-06-01

    The ability of heat to flow across the casting and through the interface from the casting to the mold directly affects the evolution of solidification and plays a notable role in determining the freezing conditions within the casting, mainly in foundry systems of high thermal diffusivity such as chill castings. An experimental procedure has been utilized to measure the formation process of an interfacial gap and metal-mould interfacial movement during solidification of hollow cylindrical castings of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand mould. Heat flow between the casting and the mould during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy in CO2-sand mould was assessed using an inverse modeling technique. The analysis yielded the interfacial heat flux ( q), heat transfer coefficient ( h) and the surface temperatures of the casting and the mould during solidification of the casting. The peak heat flux was incorporated as a dimensionless number and modeled as a function of the thermal diffusivities of the casting and the mould materials. Heat flux transients were normalized with respect to the peak heat flux and modeled as a function of time. The heat flux model proposed was to estimate the heat flux transients during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand moulds.

  5. The chilling of carcasses.

    PubMed

    Savell, J W; Mueller, S L; Baird, B E

    2005-07-01

    Biochemical processes and structural changes that occur in muscle during the first 24h postmortem play a great role in the ultimate quality and palatability of meat and are influenced by the chilling processes that carcasses are subjected to after slaughter. For beef and lamb, employing chilling parameters that minimize cold shortening is of greatest importance and can be best addressed by ensuring that muscle temperatures are not below 10°C before pH reaches 6.2. For pork, because of the impact of high muscle temperatures and low pH on the development of pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) pork, a more rapid chilling process is needed to reduce PSE with the recommended internal muscle temperature of 10°C at 12h and 2-4°C at 24h. Spray chilling, a system whereby chilled water is applied to carcasses during the early part of postmortem cooling, is used to control carcass shrinkage and to improve chilling rates through evaporative cooling. Delayed chilling can be used to reduce or prevent the negative effects of cold shortening; however, production constraints in high-volume facilities and food safety concerns make this method less useful in commercial settings. Electrical stimulation and alternative carcass suspension programs offer processors the opportunity to negate most or all of the effects of cold shortening while still using traditional chilling systems. Rapid or blast chilling can be an effective method to reduce the incidence of PSE in pork but extreme chilling systems may cause quality problems because of the differential between the cold temperatures on the outside of the carcass compared to the warm muscle temperatures within the carcass (i.e., muscles that are darker in color externally and lighter in color internally). PMID:22063744

  6. Real-time video monitoring of ingot casting

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, R.T.; Adomaitis, P.R.; Hildeman, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    During start-up and steady-state casting of ingots, a number of effects related to ingot casting variables can be observed on the surface of the ingot. For example, the amount of curl at the bottom of the ingot, surface laps, liquation, cracks, and folds, as well as extreme events such as bleed-outs when molten metal melts through the shell of the ingot crater, are significant events which could be viewed. Unfortunately, observation of these surface effects is difficult since the as-cast surface is hidden below the casting table and direct visual observations of ingot surfaces are limited due to the proximity of the molds, cooling water sprays, and the ability of the casting operators to safely view ingot surface details at close range. The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique video monitoring capability which is being used as Alcoa`s Advanced Vertical Casting facility, to observe in real-time, surface effects of an ingot during casting. A description of the development of the video monitoring system, including camera, lighting, and video recording capability will be presented. Examples of various surface conditions on direct chill (DC) and electromagnetic cast (EMC) ingots will also be discussed.

  7. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  8. Ductility improvement of direct-cast gamma TiAl-based alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Keizo

    1997-12-31

    For improving the room temperature tensile ductility of direct-cast gamma TiAl sheets without affecting their high-temperature strength, direct sheet casting with TiB{sub 2} particle dispersion is employed and conducted. The TiB{sub 2} addition and rapid cooling results in the formation of a fine equiaxed grain microstructure with an average grain size of {approximately}10{micro}m, contributing to the increase in the room temperature ductility to 2.1% with the high-temperature tensile strength kept at about 200 MPa. This improvement of room-temperature ductility is attributable to the following fact. The high oxygen content of this material, about 2,500 wt.ppm, is not harmful to the tensile ductility when the oxygen is in the solid solution of the {alpha}{sub 2} lamellar phase or in oxide particles, which are fine enough not to cause brittleness to the matrix. From these findings, a principle is proposed that oxygen is not harmful to the ductility of gamma TiAl when its microstructure containing oxygen is fine enough.

  9. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  10. Chilling temperatures affect flavor quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomatoes are harvested green in Florida and gassed with ethylene, then stored at chilling temperatures. These chilled temperatures of 12-13ºC can cause a decrease in aroma. Green fruit are more susceptible to chilling injury (CI) which manifests as a pitting of the peel through which decay organisms...

  11. Microstructure and properties of cast ingots of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys modified with Sc and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Bhat, R. B.; Senkova, S. V.; Schloz, J. D.

    2005-08-01

    The effect of combined additions of Sc and Zr on the microstructure and tensile properties of the direct chill (DC) cast ingots of developmental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys has been evaluated in this work. The properties in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were determined in as-cast and cast-plus-heat-treated conditions, at room temperature (RT) and cryogenic temperature (CT). Extensive microstructural evaluation was carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, including orientation image microscopy (OIM) by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The Sc-containing developmental cast alloys showed the tensile properties, which are much better than the properties of commercial cast Al alloys and are similar or even superior to the properties of 7075-T6 alloy forgings. The microstructural evolution, the strengthening mechanisms, the optimum content of the dispersoid-forming elements, and the processing-structure-property correlations are discussed.

  12. A Chilling Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knill, George; Fawcett, George

    1982-01-01

    Wind chill is detailed and noted as an estimate of how cold the wind makes a person feel in cold weather. A worksheet master that provides a table of temperatures and wind speeds is provided along with a set of problems. Answers to the brief question set are provided. (MP)

  13. Bioreactor-free tissue engineering: directed tissue assembly by centrifugal casting.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-02-01

    Casting is a process by which a material is introduced into a mold while it is liquid, allowed to solidify in a predefined shape inside the mold, and then removed to give a fabricated object, part or casing. Centrifugal casting could be defined as a process of molding using centrifugal forces. Although the centrifugal casting technology has a long history in metal manufacturing and in the plastics industry, only recently has this technology attracted the attention of tissue engineers. Initially, centrifugation was used to optimize cell seeding on a solid scaffold. More recently, centrifugal casting has been used to create tubular scaffolds and both tubular and flat multilayered, living tissue constructs. These newer applications were enabled by a new class of biocompatible in situ crosslinkable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix. Herein the authors summarize the state of the art of centrifugal casting technology in tissue engineering, they outline associated technological challenges, and they discuss the potential future for clinical applications. PMID:18194071

  14. Chilling requirement of Ribes cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hamlyn G.; Gordon, Sandra L.; Brennan, Rex M.

    2015-01-01

    It is usually thought that adequate winter chill is required for the full flowering of many temperate woody species. This paper investigates the sensitivity of blackcurrant bud burst and flowering to natural weather fluctuations in a temperate maritime climate, and compares a range of chill models that have been proposed for assessing the accumulation of winter chill. Bud break for four contrasting cultivars are compared in an exceptionally cold and in a mild winter in Eastern Scotland. The results confirm the importance of chilling at temperatures lower than 0°C and demonstrate that no single chilling function applies equally to all blackcurrant cultivars. There is a pressing need for further model development to take into account the relationship between chilling temperatures and warming temperatures occurring both during and after the chill accumulation period. PMID:25610448

  15. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  16. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.X.; Karnezis, P.A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from {approximately}1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to {approximately}8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated conditions. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25 + Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of {approximately}6.5 pct, compared to that of {approximately}0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  17. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. X.; Karnezis, P. A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from ˜1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to ˜8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25+Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of ˜6.5 pct, compared to that of ˜0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  18. Growth directions of C8-BTBT thin films during drop-casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Naoki; Zanka, Tomohiko; Onishi, Yosuke; Fujieda, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Because charge transport in a single crystal is anisotropic, control of its orientation is important for enhancing electrical characteristics and reducing variations among devices. For growing an organic thin film, a solution process such as inkjet printing offers advantages in throughput. We have proposed to apply an external temperature gradient during drop-casting and to control the direction of solvent evaporation. In experiment, a temperature gradient was generated in a bare Si substrate by placing it on a Si plate bridging two heat stages. When a solution containing 2,7-dioctyl [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) was dropped on the substrate, evaporation started at the hotter side of the droplet and proceeded toward the colder side. The front line of the liquid was not pinned and the solution extended toward the colder region. As a result, a thin film was formed in a 7mm-long region. The peripheral region of the film was significantly thicker due to the coffee ring effect. The surface of the rest of the film was mostly smooth and terrace structures with 2.6nm steps were observed. The step roughly corresponds to the length of the C8-BTBT molecule. The film thickness varied from 20nm to 50nm over the distance of 3mm. Another film was grown on a glass substrate under a similar condition. Observation of the film with a polarizing microscope revealed that fan-shaped domains were formed in the film and that their optical axes were mostly along the directions of the solvent evaporation.

  19. Numerical Optimization of the Method of Cooling of a Massive Casting of Ductile Cast-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovska, Jana; Kavicka, Frantisek; Stransky, Karel; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stetina, Josef

    2010-06-01

    The numerical models of the temperature field of solidifying castings, according to various authors, have been observing two main goals—directed solidification as the basic assumption for the healthiness of a casting and the optimization of the technology while maintaining the optimal product properties. The achievement of these goals is conditioned by the ability to analyze and, successively, to control the effect of the deciding factors, which either characterize the process or accompany it. An original application of ANSYS simulated the forming of the temperature field of a massive casting from ductile cast-iron during the application various methods of its cooling using steel chills. The numerical model managed to optimize more than one method of cooling but, in addition to that, provided serious results for the successive model of structural and chemical heterogeneity, and so it also contributes to influencing the pouring structure. The file containing the acquired results from both models, as well as from their organic unification, brings new and, simultaneously, remarkable findings of causal relationships between the structural and chemical heterogeneity (i.e. between the sizes of the spheroids of graphite, the cells, density of the spheroids of graphite, etc.) and the local solidification time in any point of the casting. The determined relations therefore enable the prediction of the face density of the spheroids of graphite in dependence on the local solidification time. The calculated temperature field of a two-ton 500×500×1000 mm casting of ductile cast-iron with various methods of cooling has successfully been compared with temperatures obtained experimentally. The casting was cast in sand mould. The calculated model of the kinetics of the temperature field of the casting was verified during casting with temperature measurements in selected points. This has created a tool for the optimization of the structure with an even distribution of the

  20. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... The absence of cellular casts or presence of a few hyaline casts is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of ...

  1. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with advanced kidney disease and chronic kidney failure . White blood cell (WBC) casts are more common ... Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  2. Calculation of heat transfer coefficients at the ingot surface during DC casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwana, K.; Viswanathan, S.; Clark, John A, III; Sabau, A.; Hassan, M.; Saito, K.; Das, S.

    2005-02-01

    Surface heat transfer coefficients representing the various regimes of water cooling during the Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminum 3004 alloy ingots have been calculated using the inverse heat transfer technique. ProCAST, a commercial casting simulation package, which includes heat transfer, fluid flow, solidification, and inverse heat transfer, was used for this effort. Thermocouple data from an experimental casting run, and temperature-dependent thermophysical properties of the alloy were used in the calculation. The use of a structured vs. unstructured mesh was evaluated. The calculated effective heat transfer coefficient, which is a function of temperature and time, covers three water cooling regimes, i.e., convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling, and the change of water flow rate with time.

  3. Photosynthetic responses to chilling in a chilling-tolerant and chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrid.

    PubMed

    Friesen, P C; Sage, R F

    2016-07-01

    Miscanthus is a C4 perennial grass being developed for bioenergy production in temperate regions where chilling events are common. To evaluate chilling effects on Miscanthus, we assessed the processes controlling net CO2 assimilation rate (A) in Miscanthus x giganteus (M161) and a chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrid (M115) before and after a chilling treatment of 12/5 °C. The temperature response of A and maximum Rubisco activity in vitro were identical below 20 °C in chilled and unchilled M161, demonstrating Rubisco capacity limits or co-limits A at cooler temperatures. By contrast, A in M115 decreased at all measurement temperatures after growth at 12/5 °C. Rubisco activity in vitro declined in proportion to the reduction in A in chilled M115 plants, indicating Rubisco capacity is responsible in part for the decline in A. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase activities were also reduced by the chilling treatment when assayed at 28 °C, indicating this enzyme may also contribute to the reduction in A in M115. The maximum extractable activities of PEPCase and NADP-ME remained largely unchanged after chilling. The carboxylation efficiency of the C4 cycle was depressed in both genotypes to a similar extent after chilling. ΦP :ΦCO2 remained unchanged in both genotypes indicating the C3 and C4 cycles decline equivalently upon chilling. PMID:26714623

  4. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, E. J.; Zhao, S. C.; Wang, L. P.; Wu, T.; Xin, B. P.; Tan, J. J.; Jia, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills.

  5. Nucleation in Al Alloys Processed By MCDC Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Present work confines itself to discuss the mechanism responsible for the grain refinement of the melt conditioned direct-chill cast aluminum alloys. It has been found that the Al alloys processed by this process undergo grain refinement irrespective of their chemical composition. The forced convection caused during this process led to dendrite fragmentation which enhances the heterogeneous nucleation and result in grain refinement. It is suggested that owing to their favorable lattice matching with α-Al, these fragments serve as potent nuclei for α-Al grains.

  6. Continuous Casting for Aluminum Sheet: a Product Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert E.

    2012-02-01

    Continuous casting processes have been used successfully for more than 50 years to reduce the cost of manufacturing a variety of aluminum rolled products. Approximately 25% of North American flat-rolled sheet and foil is sourced from twin-roll cast or slab cast processes. Twin roll-casters provide a cost-effective solution for producing foil and light-gauge sheet from relatively low-alloyed aluminum (1xxx and 8xxx alloys). Slab casters, particularly Hazelett twin-belt machines, are well utilized in the production of 3xxx or 5xxx painted building products which require moderate strength and good corrosion resistance. Both foil and painted sheet are cost-sensitive commodity products with well-known metallurgical and quality requirements. There have been extensive trials and modest successes with continuous cast can stock and automotive sheet. However, they have not been widely adopted commercially due to generally lower levels of surface quality and formability compared with sheet produced from scalped direct chill (DC) cast ingot. The metallurgical requirements for can and auto sheet are considered in more detail with emphasis on the microstructural features which limit their application, e.g., particle distribution, grain size, and texture. Looking forward, slab casting offers the most viable opportunity for producing strong (i.e., higher alloy content), formable structural auto sheet with acceptable surface quality.

  7. Directional solidification of flake and spheroidal graphite cast iron in low and normal gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA KC-135 research aircraft, flying repeated low-g trajectories that yield 20-30 sec of 0.1-0.001 g microgravity, has been used to study microgravity solidification's elimination of sedimentation and convection (with formation of unique and advantageous microstructures) for the case of eutectic-composition cast irons. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons has been slowly advanced through a 4 mm-diameter rod sample. Sample solidification rates have been correlated with accelerometer data, while independently controlling thermal gradients and solidification rates.

  8. Photophosphorylation after Chilling in the Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Robert R.; Ort, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    inhibition in net photosynthesis observed after chilling in the light cannot, therefore, be attributed to any direct effect on photophosphorylation competence. PMID:16666824

  9. Fundamental insights on impact of non-condensible gas evolution from coating pyrolysis and intentional injection on molten-aluminum water explosion onset during direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Gulec, K.

    1998-05-01

    Explosive interactions between molten aluminum and water are being studied with a focus on fundamentals to determine what causes robust-enough triggers for explosion onset, to determine the extent of protection provided from various coatings and to develop a fundamentally-based simple, cost-effective novel methodology for prevention. The workscope includes experimentation and mathematical modeling of the interactions between molten metals and water at various different coated and uncoated surfaces. Phenomenological issues related to surface wettability, gas generation from coatings, charring of coatings, inertial constraint, melt temperature, water temperature, external shocks are being investigated systematically to gage their relative impact on the triggerability of surface-assisted steam explosions. The steam explosion triggering studies (SETS) facility was designed and constructed as a rapid-turnaround, cost-effective, and safe means to address these phenomenological issues. Data from SETS tests have indicated that, non-condensible gas (NCG) generation during paint pyrolysis plays a predominant role in explosion prevention. This paper describes results of studies on impact of deliberate NCG injection on explosion prevention, via molten melt drops free-falling into water, as well as from tests using the SETS facility for studying entrapment induced explosive boiling. SETS is also being used to obtain information on time-varying and integral amounts of NCGs generated from various paints. Relevant data are presented. Results of investigations, taken together provide compelling evidence on the positive role NCGs play on explosion prevention.

  10. Preliminary science report on the directional solidification of hypereutectic cast iron during KC-135 low-G maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An ADSS-P directional solidification furnace was reconfigured for operation on the KC-135 low-g aircraft. The system offers many advantages over quench ingot methods for study of the effects of sedimentation and convection on alloy formation. The directional sodification furnace system was first flown during the September 1982 series of flights. The microstructure of the hypereutectic cast iron sample solidified on one of these flights suggests a low-g effect on graphite morphology. Further experiments are needed to ascertain that this effect is due to low-gravity and to deduce which of the possible mechanisms is responsible for it.

  11. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  12. Prediction of Hot Tear Formation in Vertical DC Casting of Aluminum Billets Using a Granular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-09-01

    A coupled hydromechanical granular model aimed at predicting hot tear formation and stress-strain behavior in metallic alloys during solidification is applied to the semicontinuous direct chill casting of aluminum alloy round billets. This granular model consists of four separate three-dimensional (3D) modules: (I) a solidification module that is used for generating the solid-liquid geometry at a given solid fraction, (II) a fluid flow module that is used to calculate the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid, (III) a semisolid deformation module that is based on a combined finite element/discrete element method and simulates the rheological behavior of the granular structure, and (IV) a failure module that simulates crack initiation and propagation. To investigate hot tearing, the granular model has been applied to a representative volume within the direct chill cast billet that is located at the bottom of the liquid sump, and it reveals that semisolid deformations imposed on the mushy zone open the liquid channels due to localization of the deformation at grains boundaries. At a low casting speed, only individual pores are able to form in the widest channels because liquid feeding remains efficient. However, as the casting speed increases, the flow of liquid required to compensate for solidification shrinkage also increases and as a result the pores propagate and coalesce to form a centerline crack.

  13. Fabrication of Porous Copper with Directional Pores by Continuous Casting Technique Through Thermal Decomposition of Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Takuya; Tsunemi, Akihiro; Nakajima, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Lotus-type porous copper with aligned long cylindrical pores was fabricated by continuous casting technique through thermal decomposition method (TDM) in an argon atmosphere of 0.1 MPa. A pellet of titanium hydride was supplied into molten copper with adjusting the time interval to maintain the constant concentration of hydrogen to be dissolved in the melt, when the transfer velocity of the unidirectional solidification is changed. Long lotus-type porous copper slabs were fabricated with constant solidification velocity. The effect of the transfer velocity on the porosity and pore size was investigated. The average pore diameter was independent of the transfer velocity, but the porosity is slightly dependent on the velocity. It is apparent that the continuous casting technique can be applicable for production of lotus metals through TDM.

  14. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  15. A New Direct-Pour In-Mold (DPI) Technology for Producing Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Castings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Hitchings; Jay R. Hitchings

    2007-07-20

    A new "Direct Pour In-Mold" (DPI) Magnesium treatment technology has been developed that can produce both Nodular and Compacted Graphite iron. The DPI technology converts the standard horizontal runner system into a vertical one, by placing a Magnesium Ferrosilicon treatment alloy and molten metal filter into a specially designed container. The DPI container is easily placed into either vertically or horizontally parted molds, and then a base metal can be poured directly into it. The metal is treated and filtered as it passes through, and then proceeds directly into a runner or casting cavity. Various sizes of containers provide all of the necessary components required to deliver a range of weights of treated and filtered metal at accurate and consistent flow rates. The DPI containers provide energy savings over competing techniques, increased mold yields, very high Magnesium recovery, zero Magnesium fume, and no post inoculation is required. By treating the metal just prior to it entering a casting cavity many other benefits and advantages are also realized.

  16. Insights on the development, kinetics, and variation of photoinhibition using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of a chilled, variegated leaf.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The effect of chilling on photosystem II (PSII) efficiency was studied in the variegated leaves of Calathea makoyana, in order to gain insight into the causes of chilling-induced photoinhibition. Additionally, a relationship was revealed between (chilling) stress and variation in photosynthesis. Chilling treatments (5 degrees C and 10 degrees C) were performed for different durations (1-7 d) under a moderate irradiance (120 micromol m-2 s-1). The individual leaves were divided into a shaded zone and two illuminated, chilled zones. The leaf tip and sometimes the leaf base were not chilled. Measurements of the dark-adapted Fv/Fm were made on the different leaf zones at the end of the chilling treatment, and then for several days thereafter to monitor recovery. Chilling up to 7 d in the dark did not affect PSII efficiency and visual appearance, whereas chilling in the light caused severe photoinhibition, sometimes followed by leaf necrosis. Photoinhibition increased with the duration of the chilling period, whereas, remarkably, chilling temperature had no effect. In the unchilled leaf tip, photoinhibition also occurred, whereas in the unchilled leaf base it did not. Whatever the leaf zone, photoinhibition became permanent if the mean value dropped below 0.4, although chlorosis and necrosis were associated solely with chilled illuminated tissue. Starch accumulated in the unchilled leaf tip, in contrast to the adjacent chilled irradiated zone. This suggests that photoinhibition was due to a secondary effect in the unchilled leaf tip (sink limitation), whereas it was a direct effect of chilling and irradiance in the chilled illuminated zones. The PSII efficiency and its coefficient of variation showed a unique negative linearity across all leaf zones and different tissue types. The slope of this curve was steeper for chilled leaves than it was for healthy, non-stressed leaves, suggesting that the coefficient of variation may be an important tool for assessing stress in

  17. Micromechanical Characterization and Texture Analysis of Direct Cast Titanium Alloys Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This research was conducted to determine a post-processing technique to optimize mechanical and material properties of a number of Titanium based alloys and aluminides processed via Melt Overflow Solidification Technique (MORST). This technique was developed by NASA for the development of thin sheet titanium and titanium aluminides used in high temperature applications. The materials investigated in this study included conventional titanium alloy strips and foils, Ti-1100, Ti-24Al-11Nb (Alpha-2), and Ti-48Al-2Ta (Gamma). The methodology used included micro-characterization, heat-treatment, mechanical processing and mechanical testing. Characterization techniques included optical, electron microscopy, and x-ray texture analysis. The processing included heat-treatment and mechanical deformation through cold rolling. The initial as-cast materials were evaluated for their microstructure and mechanical properties. Different heat-treatment and rolling steps were chosen to process these materials. The properties were evaluated further and a processing relationship was established in order to obtain an optimum processing condition. The results showed that the as-cast material exhibited a Widmanstatten (fine grain) microstructure that developed into a microstructure with larger grains through processing steps. The texture intensity showed little change for all processing performed in this investigation.

  18. Comparison of directly compressed vitamin B12 tablets prepared from micronized rotary-spun microfibers and cast films.

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Bodai, Zsolt; Eke, Zsuzsanna; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Szabó, Péter; Zelkó, Romána

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-based dosage forms are potential alternatives of conventional dosage forms from the point of the improved extent and rate of drug dissolution. Rotary-spun polymer fibers and cast films were prepared and micronized in order to direct compress after homogenization with tabletting excipients. Particle size distribution of powder mixtures of micronized fibers and films homogenized with tabletting excipients were determined by laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. Powder rheological behavior of the mixtures containing micronized fibers and cast films was also compared. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied for the microstructural characterization of micronized fibers and films. The water-soluble vitamin B12 release from the compressed tablets was determined. It was confirmed that the rotary spinning method resulted in homogeneous supramolecularly ordered powder mixture, which was successfully compressed after homogenization with conventional tabletting excipients. The obtained directly compressed tablets showed uniform drug release of low variations. The results highlight the novel application of micronized rotary-spun fibers as intermediate for further processing reserving the original favorable powder characteristics of fibrous systems. PMID:25190153

  19. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  20. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  1. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  2. Process-directed self-assembly of multiblock copolymers: Solvent casting vs spray coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q.; Tang, J.; Müller, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using computer simulation of a soft, coarse-grained model and self-consistent field theory we investigate how collapsed, globular chain conformations in the initial stages of structure formation, which are produced by spray-coating, affect the single-chain structure and morphology of microphase-separated multiblock copolymers. Comparing spray-coated films with films that start from a disordered state of Gaussian chains, we observe that the collapsed molecular conformations in the initial stage give rise to (1) a smaller fraction of blocks that straddle domains (bridges), (2) a significant reduction of the molecular extension normal to the internal interfaces, and (3) a slightly larger lamellar domain spacing in the final morphology. The relaxation of molecular conformations towards equilibrium is very protracted for both processes - solvent casting and spray coating. These findings illustrate that the process conditions of the copolymer materials may significantly affect materials properties (such as mechanical properties) because the system does not reach thermal equilibrium on the relevant time scales.

  3. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  4. LLNL casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  5. Molecular basis of chill resistance adaptations in poikilothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Scott A L; Manso, Bruno; Cossins, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Chill and freeze represent very different components of low temperature stress. Whilst the principal mechanisms of tissue damage and of acquired protection from freeze-induced effects are reasonably well established, those for chill damage and protection are not. Non-freeze cold exposure (i.e. chill) can lead to serious disruption to normal life processes, including disruption to energy metabolism, loss of membrane perm-selectivity and collapse of ion gradients, as well as loss of neuromuscular coordination. If the primary lesions are not relieved then the progressive functional debilitation can lead to death. Thus, identifying the underpinning molecular lesions can point to the means of building resistance to subsequent chill exposures. Researchers have focused on four specific lesions: (i) failure of neuromuscular coordination, (ii) perturbation of bio-membrane structure and adaptations due to altered lipid composition, (iii) protein unfolding, which might be mitigated by the induced expression of compatible osmolytes acting as 'chemical chaperones', (iv) or the induced expression of protein chaperones along with the suppression of general protein synthesis. Progress in all these potential mechanisms has been ongoing but not substantial, due in part to an over-reliance on straightforward correlative approaches. Also, few studies have intervened by adoption of single gene ablation, which provides much more direct and compelling evidence for the role of specific genes, and thus processes, in adaptive phenotypes. Another difficulty is the existence of multiple mechanisms, which often act together, thus resulting in compensatory responses to gene manipulations, which may potentially mask disruptive effects on the chill tolerance phenotype. Consequently, there is little direct evidence of the underpinning regulatory mechanisms leading to induced resistance to chill injury. Here, we review recent advances mainly in lower vertebrates and in arthropods, but increasingly

  6. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  7. Pouring or chilling a bottle of wine: an fMRI study on the prospective planning of object-directed actions.

    PubMed

    van Elk, M; Viswanathan, S; van Schie, H T; Bekkering, H; Grafton, S T

    2012-04-01

    This fMRI study investigates the neural mechanisms supporting the retrieval of action semantics. A novel motor imagery task was used in which participants were required to imagine planning actions with a familiar object (e.g. a toothbrush) or with an unfamiliar object (e.g. a pair of pliers) based on either goal-related information (i.e. where to move the object) or grip-related information (i.e. how to grasp the object). Planning actions with unfamiliar compared to familiar objects was slower and was associated with increased activation in the bilateral superior parietal lobe, the right inferior parietal lobe and the right insula. The stronger activation in parietal areas for unfamiliar objects fits well with the idea that parietal areas are involved in motor imagery and suggests that this process takes more effort in the case of novel or unfamiliar actions. In contrast, the planning of familiar actions resulted in increased activation in the anterior prefrontal cortex, suggesting that subjects maintained a stronger goal-representation when planning actions with familiar compared to unfamiliar objects. These findings provide further insight into the neural structures that support action semantic knowledge for the functional use of real-world objects and suggest that action semantic knowledge is activated most readily when actions are planned in a goal-directed manner. PMID:22349497

  8. Influences of intergranular structure on the magnetic properties of directly cast nanocrystalline NdFeCoTiNbBC alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Hong, Y.; Jiao, D. L.; Qiu, Z. G.; Zhou, Q.; Hussain, M.; Liu, Z. W.; Greneche, J. M.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The millimeter-sized Nd9.5Fe61.5Co10Ti2.5Nb0.5B16‑x C x (x  =  0–1.25) alloy rods with various compositions were fabricated by direct casting. Nano-sized hard phase Nd2(FeCo)14B, soft phase ɑ-FeCo, and amorphous phase were observed in all alloys. An optimized amount of carbon additions improved the magnetic properties by enhancing the glass forming ability and forming near single domain-sized Nd2(FeCo)14B grains around the rod surface. Various intergranular structures were observed in the alloys with x  =  0.25–1. Micromagnetic simulation using the images obtained from the magnetic force microscope and transition electron microscope indicates that the distribution and magnetism of the intergranular phase have an important influence on the magnetic properties and demagnetization process of the alloys. A uniformly distributed nonmagnetic intergranular amorphous phase may enhance the magnetic properties, but the coercivity decreases when the amorphous phase is magnetic. It is important to modify the structure and distribution of the inter-grain amorphous phase in order to achieve high hard magnetic properties in these alloys.

  9. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  10. Minimization of Macrosegregation in DC Cast Ingots Through Jet Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Samuel R.; Allanore, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    With an increase in demand for aluminum alloys, industrial suppliers are seeking to increase the size and speed of casting processes. Unfortunately operating the existing Direct-Chill (DC) process in such conditions tends to enhance metallurgical defects. Perhaps the most recognized of these defects is macrosegregation, whose effects are permanent once the material is solidified. In order to facilitate the expansion of the DC process without increasing the presence of macrosegregation, a novel jet mixing method to distribute the liquid metal is presented. The governing equations for this process are derived and the operating parameters necessary to minimize the centerline macrosegregation are predicted. The results of commercial-scale tests are presented, validating the predictive equations and performance of this process.

  11. Semi-quantitative predictions of hot tearing and cold cracking in aluminum DC casting using numerical process simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, T.; Miroux, A.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking is one of the most critical defects that may occur during aluminum direct-chill (DC) casting. There are two types of cracking typical of DC casting: hot tearing and cold cracking. To study and predict such defects, currently we are using a process simulator, ALSIM. ALSIM is able to provide semi-quantitative predictions of hot tearing and cold cracking susceptibility. In this work, we performed benchmark tests using predictions of both types of cracks and experimental results of DC casting trials. The trials series resulted in billets with hot tearing as well as cold cracking. The model was also used to study the influence of several casting variables such as casting speed and inlet geometry with respect to the cracking susceptibility in the ingots. In this work, we found that the sump geometry was changed by the feeding scheme, which played an important role in hot tear occurrence. Moreover, increasing the casting speed also increased the hot tear and cold crack susceptibility. In addition, from the result of simulation, we also observed a phenomenon that supported the hypotheses of connection between hot tearing and cold cracking.

  12. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Bai, Ge; Wang, Shu; Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  13. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  14. Theoretical discussion of the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating field on the as-cast microstructures of DC Al Zn Mg Cu Zr ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Dong; Jianzhong, Cui; Wenjiang, Ding

    2006-10-01

    Within the framework of classical solidification theories, the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating field on the as-cast microstructures of direct chilling (DC) casting Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr ingots was discussed. In comparison with the conventional DC ingots, the microstructures of the low-frequency electromagnetic vibrating casting (LFEVC) ingots are gradually refined with increasing electromagnetic intensity. The increased number of nuclei is likely to be as a result of electromagnetic undercooling and forced convection. Grains were assumed to grow first into a global morphology and then into a dendritic one after exceeding a critical size. The unstable wavelength of a growing global grain was deduced to evaluate this transition from a global grain to a dendritic grain. Decreasing the electromagnetic frequency and/or increasing of electromagnetic intensity lead to a longer wavelength and therefore are suitable for less dendritic or net-global grains.

  15. High coercivity microcrystalline Nd-rich Nd-Fe-Co-Al-B bulk magnets prepared by direct copper mold casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Hong, Y.; Fang, X. G.; Qiu, Z. G.; Zhong, X. C.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, Z. W.

    2016-06-01

    High coercivity Nd25Fe40Co20Al15-xBx (x=7-15) hard magnets were prepared by a simple process of injection casting. Different from many previous investigations on nanocomposite compositions, the magnets in this work contain hard magnetic Nd2(FeCoAl)14B, Nd-rich, and Nd1+ε(FeCo)4B4 phases. The magnetic properties, phase evolution, and microstructure of the as-cast and annealed magnets were investigated. As the boron content increased from 7 to 11 at%, the intrinsic coercivity Hcj of the as-cast magnet increased from 816 to 1140 kA/m. The magnets annealed at 750 °C have shown more regular and smaller grains than the as-cast alloys, especially for the x=11 alloy. The high intrinsic coercivities for the annealed alloys with x=8~11 result from the presence of small-sized grains in the microstructure. The highest Hcj of 1427 kA/m was obtained for the heat treated alloy with x=10. This work provides an alternative approach for preparing fully dense Nd-rich bulk hard magnets with relatively good properties.

  16. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  17. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  18. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  19. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  20. 21 CFR 890.5940 - Chilling unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chilling unit. 890.5940 Section 890.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5940 Chilling unit....

  1. Chill block melt spinning of nickel-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemker, Kevin J.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of Ni-Mo alloys ranging in composition from pure nickel to Ni-40 at. pct molybdenum were cast by the chill block melt-spinning rapid solidification technique and examined by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. Casting difficulties were encountered with lean alloys, but richer alloys spread more readily on the casting wheel. Alloy microstructures for 5 to 37.5 at. pct molybdenum ribbons were primarily cellular/dendritic; microstructure feature size decreased with increasing molybdenum content. Extended solubility of molybdenum in gamma-nickel, with fcc lattice parameter increasing with composition to the 1.05 power, was observed up to 37/5 at. pct molybdenum. Substoichiometric Ni-Mo (delta) nucleated on the wheel side of the ribbons of compositions 35, 37.5, and 40 at. pct molybdenum. The amount of partitionless delta-phase thus formed increased with increasing molybdenum content and quench rate. This substoichiometric delta transformed readily to a fine structure gamma-delta mixture.

  2. Preparation and characterization of microparticles of piroxicam by spray drying and spray chilling methods

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, M.; Kini, A.G.; Kulkarni, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, exhibits poor water solubility and flow properties, poor dissolution and poor wetting. Consequently, the aim of this study was to improve the dissolution of piroxicam. Microparticles containing piroxicam were produced by spray drying, using isopropyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 40:60 v/v as solvent system, and spray chilling technology by melting the drug and chilling it with a pneumatic nozzle to enhance dissolution rate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for in vitro dissolution and solubility. The prepared drug particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimeter, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dissolution profile of the spray dried microparticles was compared with spray-chilled microparticles, pure and recrystallized samples. Spray dried microparticles and spray chilled microparticles exhibited decreased crystallinity and improved micromeritic properties. The dissolution of the spray dried microparticle and spray chilled particles were improved compared with recrystallized and pure sample of piroxicam. Consequently, it was believed that spray drying of piroxicam is a useful tool to improve dissolution but not in case of spray chilling. This may be due to the degradation of drug or variations in the resonance structure or could be due to minor distortion of bond angles. Hence, this spray drying technique can be used for formulation of tablets of piroxicam by direct compression with directly compressible tablet excipients. PMID:21589797

  3. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which

  4. Technical development of double-clad process for thin strip casting of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.L.; Forkel, C.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    1984-08-01

    This report documents the technical development for a patent disclosure of a double-clad process for the continuous casting of thin-strip carbon steel. The fundamental idea of the disclosure is to form a product strip by depositing molten steel between two, cooled, clad strips of the same material. The claimed benefits include: (a) the conservation of energy in steel making through the elimination of soaking pits and reheat cycles, and (b) an improved surface on both sides of the as-cast product such that it will be suitable for direct feed to a cold-reduction mill. However, the process as conceived is not necessarily limited to the casting of carbon steel, but may be also applied to other metals and alloys. The work is described under three headings as follows. Preliminary Considerations and Scoping Analysis presents the basic idea of the double-clad, thin-strip casting process; the energy conservation potential; scoping heat transfer calculations for the casting process; and independent review of this work. Thermal Analysis for Roller Configuration of Double-Clad Process, presents the development, results, and independent review of a finite-element thermal analysis for the casting process as originally conceived (using only chilled rollers in direct contact with the clad material of the product strip). Further Considerations for Belt Configuration of Double-Clad Process deals with a modified equipment design which interposes two product support belts, one on each side of the product, between the clad strip and the rollers. In addition to the process description, this section presents the preliminary mechanical calculations for the endless metal belts and the work scope and results for the computer model revision and thermal analysis for the modified concept.

  5. Constitutive behavior of as-cast AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, W. M.; Magnin, B.; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2002-07-01

    Recent thermomechanical modeling to calculate the stress field in industrially direct-chill (DC) cast-aluminum slabs has been successful, but lack of material data limits the accuracy of these calculations. Therefore, the constitutive behavior of three aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182) was determined in the as-cast condition using tensile tests at low strain rates and from room temperature to solidus temperature. The parameters of two constitutive equations, the extended Ludwik equation and a combination of the Sellars-Tegart equation with a hardening law, were determined. In order to study the effect of recovery, the constitutive behavior after prestraining at higher temperatures was also investigated. To evaluate the quantified constitutive equations, tensile tests were performed simulating the deformation and cooling history experienced by the material during casting. It is concluded that both constitutive equations perform well, but the combined hardening-Sellars-Tegart (HST) equation has temperature-independent parameters, which makes it easier to implement in a DC casting model. Further, the deformation history of the ingot should be taken into account for accurate stress calculations.

  6. Modelling of stress fields during LFEM DC casting of aluminium billets by a meshless method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2015-06-01

    Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys is a widely established technology for efficient production of aluminium billets and slabs. The procedure is being further improved by the application of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (LFEM) in the area of the mold. Novel LFEM DC processing technique affects many different phenomena which occur during solidification, one of them being the stresses and deformations present in the billet. These quantities can have a significant effect on the quality of the cast piece, since they impact porosity, hot-tearing and cold cracking. In this contribution a novel local radial basis function collocation method (LRBFCM) is successfully applied to the problem of stress field calculation during the stationary state of DC casting of aluminium alloys. The formulation of the method is presented in detail, followed by the presentation of the tackled physical problem. The model describes the deformations of linearly elastic, inhomogeneous isotropic solid with a given temperature field. The temperature profile is calculated using the in-house developed heat and mass transfer model. The effects of low frequency EM casting process parameters on the vertical, circumferential and radial stress and on the deformation of billet surface are presented. The application of the LFEM appears to decrease the amplitudes of the tensile stress occurring in the billet.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Phosphatidylglycerol and Chilling Sensitivity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Roughan, P. Grattan

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that molecular species of thylakoid phosphatidylglycerol containing two saturated fatty acids (disaturated phosphatidylglycerol) confer chilling sensitivity upon plants was tested by analyzing the fatty acid composition of phosphatidylglycerols isolated from leaves of a range of plants expected to have different sensitivities to chilling temperatures. `Saturated' fatty acids (palmitate plus stearate plus hexadeca-trans-3-enoate) as a proportion of total phosphatidylglycerol fatty acids varied from 51 to 80 mole per cent in the plants analyzed but appeared to be rigidly fixed for a given plant species, being unaffected by leaf maturity or by environment. Hexadeca-trans-3-enoate occurred only at the sn-2 position, whereas C-18 fatty acids occurred only at the sn-1 position of thylakoid phosphatidylglycerol. Therefore, the proportion of disaturated molecular species could be predicted accurately from the total fatty acids of phosphatidylglycerol. Disaturated molecular species accounted for <25% of the total phosphatidylglycerol from leaves of chilling-resistant plants and for 50 to 60% of the phosphatidylglycerol in leaves from some of the most chilling-sensitive plants. However, not all chilling-sensitive plants contained high proportions of disaturated phosphatidylglycerol; solanaceous and other 16:3-plants and C4 grasses may be important exceptions. Nonetheless, proportions of disaturated phosphatidylglycerol increased concomitantly with increasing chilling sensitivity of plants within a genus. PMID:16664127

  9. In situ purification, alloying and casting methodology for metallic plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.; Blau, Michael S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    Plutonium metal that has been double ER (electrorefined/electrorefining) was further purified via zone refining, using a floating molten zone to minimize the introduction of impurities. The temperature of the molten zone was 750°C, and the atmosphere was 10 -5 Pa. A total of ten zone refining passes were made at a travel rate of 1.5 cm/h. There were 19 elements reduced to quantities below the minimum detectable limits (MDL) by zone refining, while P, K, and W were significantly reduced. The zone-refined metal was then used in an in situ distillation, alloying, and casting step to prepare tapered specimens for single-crystal growth experiments. Specifically, 241Am was distilled from Pu metal by levitating Pu metal with 1 wt% Ga in the melt in a Crystallox vertical electromagnetic levitation crucible at 10 -5 Pa. The Pu is alloyed with Ga to stabilize the δ phase (fcc symmetry) upon solidification. The Pu was chill-cast directly from the electromagnetic levitation field into 1- cm tapered specimens. A water-cooled ceramic mold was used, and the Pu metal was cooled at a rate of 100°C/min. A microstructure examination of the specimen showed 10 × 25 μm acicular grains with a density of 15.938 g/cm 3 (±0.002 g/cm 3).

  10. Suppression of volatile production in tomato fruit exposed to chilling temperature and alleviation of chilling injury by a pre-chilling heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomatoes to 5°C for longer than 6-8 days can cause surface pitting, irregular (blotchy) color development and other symptoms of chilling injury (CI). The objectives for this study were to investigate whether a 4-day exposure of tomato fruit to chilling at the mature green stage ...

  11. Suppression of volatile production in tomato fruit exposed to chilling temperature and alleviation of chilling injury by a pre-chilling heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomato fruit to 5 °C for less than 5 days at mature green stage does not cause visual symptom of chilling injury (CI), however, it is unknown whether such conditions would impact flavor quality (internal CI) after ripening, and if a pre-chilling heat treatment could alleviate in...

  12. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  13. Direct formation of L10 FePt in as-cast FePt-based magnetic nanocomposite ribbons without post-synthesis annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Crisan, O.

    2011-09-01

    A novel nanocomposite FePt-based exchange-coupled magnet has been synthesized and structurally and magnetically characterized. We report for the first time the direct formation of the L10 FePt phase without the need for post-synthesis annealing procedures in Fe-Pt-based melt-spun ribbons, obtained by a conventional melt spinning method. The structure and magnetic properties are investigated and the occurrence of the L10 ordered phase in the as-cast state of Fe-Pt-Ag-B melt-spun ribbons is confirmed by XRD and magnetic measurements. A microstructure consisting of fine, uniformly dispersed, 22-24 nm FePt grains dispersed within a soft magnetic matrix is observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. Coercive fields as high as 727 kA m-1, saturation magnetization of about 1.2 T and energy product around 87 kJ m-3 are determined from 270 K hysteresis loops of the as-cast ribbons, making one of the best FePt-based nanocomposite magnet ribbons even without further annealing treatments.

  14. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  15. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  16. Warming and Chilling: Assessing Aspects of Changing Plant Ecology with Continental-scale Phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. D.; Hanes, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Many recent ecological studies have concentrated on the direct impacts of climate warming, such as modifications to seasonal plant and animal life cycle events (phenology). There are many examples, with most indicating earlier onset of spring plant growth and delayed onset of autumn senescence. However, the implication of continued warming for plant species’ chilling requirements has received comparatively less attention. Temperate zone woody plants often require a certain level of cool season "chilling" (accumulated time at temperatures below a specific threshold) to break dormancy and prepare to respond to springtime warming. Thus, the potential impacts of insufficient chilling must be included in a comprehensive assessment of plant species' responses to climate warming. Vegetation phenological data, when collected for specific plant species at continental-scale, can be used to extract information relating to the combined impacts of reduced chilling and warming on plant species physiology. In a recent study, we demonstrated that common lilac first leaf and first bloom phenology (collected from multiple locations in the western United States and matched with air temperature records) can estimate the species' chilling requirement (in this case 1748 chilling hours, below a base temperature of 7.2°C) and highlight the changing impact of warming on the plant's phenological response in light of that requirement. Specifically, when chilling is above the requirement, lilac first leaf dates advance at a rate of -5.0 days per 100 hour chilling accumulation reduction, and lilac first bloom dates advance at a rate of -4.2 days per 100 hour chilling accumulation reduction. In contrast, when chilling is below the requirement, the lilac event dates advance at a much reduced rate of -1.6 days per 100 hour reduction for first leaf date and -2.2 days per 100 hour reduction for first bloom date. Overall, these encouraging results for common lilac suggest that similar continental

  17. Constitutive behaviour of an as-cast AA7050 alloy in the sub-solidus temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, T. A. S.; Miroux, A. G.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 7050 is of interest for aerospace industries due to its superior mechanical properties. However, its inherent solidification behaviour may augment the accumulation of residual stresses due to uneven cooling conditions upon direct-chill (DC) casting. This can increase the propensity of cold cracking (CC), which is a potentially catastrophic phenomenon in casting ingots. To predict the outcome of the aluminum casting process, ALSIM software is utilised. This software has the capability to predict CC susceptibility during the casting process. However, at the moment, ALSIM lacks the information regarding material constitutive behaviour in the sub-solidus temperature range, which is considered important for studying CC phenomenon. At the moment, ALSIM only has a partial constitutive database for AA7050 and misses data, especially in the vicinity of non-equilibrium solidus (NES) point. The present work presents measurements of tensile constitutive parameters in the temperature range between 400 °C and NES, which is for this alloy defined as 465 °C. The mechanical behaviour is tested in a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator. Constitutive parameters such as stress-strain curves, strain-rate sensitivity and ductility of the alloy have been measured at different test temperatures. With these constitutive data, we expect to improve the accuracy of ALSIM simulations in terms of CC prediction, and gain more insight into the evolution of mechanical properties of AA7050 in the temperature nearby the NES.

  18. The New Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature Chart.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osczevski, Randall; Bluestein, Maurice

    2005-10-01

    The formula used in the U.S. and Canada to express the combined effect of wind and low temperature on how cold it feels was changed in November 2001. Many had felt that the old formula for equivalent temperature, derived in the 1960s from Siple and Passel's flawed but quite useful Wind Chill Index, unnecessarily exaggerated the severity of the weather. The new formula is based on a mathematical model of heat flow from the upwind side of a head-sized cylinder moving at walking speed into the wind. The paper details the assumptions that were made in generating the new wind chill charts. It also points out weaknesses in the concept of wind chill equivalent temperature, including its steady-state character and a seemingly paradoxical effect of the internal thermal resistance of the cylinder on comfort and equivalent temperature. Some improvements and alternatives are suggested.

  19. Finite Element Modelling of the Sawing of DC Cast AA2024 Aluminium Alloy Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.-M.; Ludwig, O.; Heinrich, B.

    2007-04-07

    In the semi-continuous casting of large cross-section rolling sheet ingots of high-strength aluminum alloys (2xxx and 7xxx series), the control of the residual (internal) stresses generated by the non-uniform cooling becomes a necessity. These stresses must be relieved by a thermal treatment before the head and foot of the ingot can be cut. Otherwise, the saw can be caught owing to compressive stresses or cut parts may be ejected thus injuring people or damaging equipment. These high added-value ingots need to be produced in secure conditions. Moreover, a better control of the sawing procedure could allow the suppression of the thermal treatment and therefore save time and energy. By studying the stress build-up during casting and the stress relief during sawing, key parameters for the control and optimization of the processing steps, can be derived. To do so, the direct chill (DC) casting of the AA2024 alloy is modeled with ABAQUS 6.5 with special attention to the thermo-mechanical properties of the alloy. The sawing operation is then simulated by removing mesh elements so as to reproduce the progression of the saw in the ingot. Preliminary results showing the stress relief during sawing accompanied by the risk of saw blocking due to compression or initiating a crack ahead of the saw, are analyzed with an approach based on the rate of strain energy release.

  20. Finite Element Modelling of the Sawing of DC Cast AA2024 Aluminium Alloy Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Ludwig, O.; Heinrich, B.

    2007-04-01

    In the semi-continuous casting of large cross-section rolling sheet ingots of high-strength aluminum alloys (2xxx and 7xxx series), the control of the residual (internal) stresses generated by the non-uniform cooling becomes a necessity. These stresses must be relieved by a thermal treatment before the head and foot of the ingot can be cut. Otherwise, the saw can be caught owing to compressive stresses or cut parts may be ejected thus injuring people or damaging equipment. These high added-value ingots need to be produced in secure conditions. Moreover, a better control of the sawing procedure could allow the suppression of the thermal treatment and therefore save time and energy. By studying the stress build-up during casting and the stress relief during sawing, key parameters for the control and optimization of the processing steps, can be derived. To do so, the direct chill (DC) casting of the AA2024 alloy is modeled with ABAQUS 6.5 with special attention to the thermo-mechanical properties of the alloy. The sawing operation is then simulated by removing mesh elements so as to reproduce the progression of the saw in the ingot. Preliminary results showing the stress relief during sawing accompanied by the risk of saw blocking due to compression or initiating a crack ahead of the saw, are analyzed with an approach based on the rate of strain energy release.

  1. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-04

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  2. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  3. Chilling stress response of post-emergent cotton seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    • Early season development of cotton is often impaired by sudden episodes of chilling temperature. We determined the chilling response specific to post-emergent 13-d-old cotton seedlings. • Seedlings were gradually chilled during the dark period and rewarmed during the night-to-day transition. Fo...

  4. Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

    1998-11-23

    A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

  5. Dewaxing process using agitated heat exchanger to chill solvent-oil and wax slurry to wax filtration temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Th.E.

    1984-04-10

    In an improved process for dewaxing waxy hydrocarbon oils, wherein said waxy oil is cooled in an indirect chilling zone to a temperature greater than the wax separation temperature whereby wax is precipitated to form a wax-oil-solvent slurry, cooling the slurry to the wax separation temperature in an indirect chilling zone thereby precipitating a further portion of wax from said waxy oil and separating said precipitated wax from the wax-oil-solvent slurry in solid-liquid separation means, the improvement comprises using as the indirect chilling zone an indirect heat exchanger means operated at a high level of agitation. Expressed in terms of Impeller Reynolds Number the agitation is on the order of about 1,000 to 1,000,000. Alternatively, the direct chilling zone is totally replaced by the high agitation indirect heat exchanger means.

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water System Design Description (SYS 47-4)

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-06-13

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water (VPSCHW) system. The discussion that follows is limited to the VPSCHW system and its interfaces with associated systems. The reader's attention is directed to Drawings H-1-82162, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Process Equipment Skid P&ID Vacuum System, and H-1-82224, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Mechanical Utilities Process Chilled Water P&ID. Figure 1-1 shows the location and equipment arrangement for the VPSCHW system. The VPSCHW system provides chilled water to the Vacuum Purge System (VPS). The chilled water provides the ability to condense water from the multi-canister overpack (MCO) outlet gases during the MCO vacuum and purge cycles. By condensing water from the MCO purge gas, the VPS can assist in drying the contents of the MCO.

  7. Control of salmonella at the chill tank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Salmonella on poultry meat should be in the form of a continuous effort from the breeder farm to the fully processed and further processed product, as well as, consumer education. However, control is often measured at the chill tank and efforts are made to relate prevalence to processing...

  8. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  9. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  10. Quality assessment of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets during super chilling and chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Xiaochang; Luo, Yongkang; Gao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of super chilling (-3 °C) and chilled (3 °C) storage on the quality of rainbow trout fillets, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), drip loss, pH, electric conductivity (EC), total aerobic count (TAC), K and related values, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and related compounds, color and sensory score were determined and correlation between these indicators were analyzed. According to the comprehensive evaluation of TAC, K value and sensory score, the limit for acceptability of rainbow trout fillets was 5 days at 3 °C and 11 days at -3 °C. Additionally, the correlation coefficients between TVB-N and other freshness indicators (TAC, K value, sensory score) were relatively low. TVB-N may be inadequate for evaluating freshness changes of rainbow trout fillets compared with other indicators. Among the K and related values, H value was a better freshness indicator in rainbow trout fillets during chilled and super chilling storage for its better correlation coefficients with other freshness indicators. Super chilling storage could extend the shelf life of rainbow trout fillets by 6 days compared to chilled storage. PMID:26243943

  11. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  12. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Basic Casting from A to Z. Student's Instruction Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebco, Tulsa, OK.

    A profusely illustrated student instruction booklet contains step-by-step directions and diagrams for learning four basic casting techniques. Separate sections cover basic spin-casting, spinning, bait-casting, and fly-casting. Each section details recommended equipment (reel, rod, line, plug, tackle, lures, leaders, flies), describes specific…

  14. Exogenous Melatonin Treatment Increases Chilling Tolerance and Induces Defense Response in Harvested Peach Fruit during Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Song, Chunbo; Shao, Jiarong; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2016-06-29

    The effect of exogenous melatonin on chilling injury in peach fruit after harvest was investigated. To explore the optimum concentration of melatonin for chilling tolerance induction, peach fruit were treated with 50, 100, or 200 μM melatonin for 120 min and then stored for 28 days at 4 °C. The results showed that application of melatonin at 100 μM was most effective in reducing chilling injury of peach fruit after harvest. Peaches treated with melatonin at this concentration displayed higher levels of extractable juice rate and total soluble solids than the non-treated peaches. In addition, melatonin treatment enhanced expression of PpADC, PpODC, and PpGAD and consequently increased polyamines and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents. Meanwhile, the upregulated transcripts of PpADC and PpODC and inhibited PpPDH expression resulted in the higher proline content in melatonin-treated fruit compared to the control fruit. Our results revealed that melatonin treatment may be a useful technique to alleviate chilling injury in cold-stored peach fruit. The chilling tolerance of harvested peaches induced by melatonin treatment is associated with higher levels of polyamine, GABA, and proline. These data provided here are the first protective evidence of exogenous melatonin in harvested horticultural products in response to direct chilling stress. PMID:27281292

  15. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  16. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  17. Flow Analysis on a Limited Volume Chilled Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lin

    2012-07-31

    LANL Currently has a limited volume chilled water system for use in a glove box, but the system needs to be updated. Before we start building our new system, a flow analysis is needed to ensure that there are no high flow rates, extreme pressures, or any other hazards involved in the system. In this project the piping system is extremely important to us because it directly affects the overall design of the entire system. The primary components necessary for the chilled water piping system are shown in the design. They include the pipes themselves (perhaps of more than one diameter), the various fitting used to connect the individual pipes to form the desired system, the flow rate control devices (valves), and the pumps that add energy to the fluid. Even the most simple pipe systems are actually quite complex when they are viewed in terms of rigorous analytical considerations. I used an 'exact' analysis and dimensional analysis considerations combined with experimental results for this project. When 'real-world' effects are important (such as viscous effects in pipe flows), it is often difficult or impossible to use only theoretical methods to obtain the desired results. A judicious combination of experimental data with theoretical considerations and dimensional analysis are needed in order to reduce risks to an acceptable level.

  18. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  19. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  20. Direct Dating and Physico-Chemical Analyses Cast Doubts on the Coexistence of Humans and Dwarf Hippos in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lebon, Matthieu; Quiles, Anita; Reiche, Ina; Vigne, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    In the Mediterranean, the island dwarf megafaunas became extinct around the end of the Pleistocene, during a period of rapid and global climate change. In Cyprus, this coincided with the first human presence on the island, as attested by the rock shelter of Akrotiri-Aetokremnos where an Epipaleolithic anthropogenic layer (stratum 2) was found overlying a massive accumulation of pygmy hippopotamus (Phanourios minor (Desmarest, 1822)) [Boekschoten and Sondaar, 1972] bones (stratum 4). The relationship between the two layers is highly controversial and the role played by humans in hippo extinction remains fiercely debated. Here, we provide new, direct radiocarbon and physico-chemical analyses on calcined bones which elucidates the complex depositional history of the assemblage. Bone turquoise was identified using micro-PIXE analysis and depth-profiling together with Vis spectroscopy, demonstrating that these bones were not freshly burned. Bayesian modeling of the radiocarbon dates indicates that stratum 4 accumulated during the first half of the 13th mill cal BP and that calcination occurred several hundred years later. We conclude that accumulation occurred naturally during the beginning of the Younger Dryas and that Epipalaeolithic visitors subsequently used the bones as fuel, starting from the mid-13th mill cal BP. At that time, dwarf hippos were probably already extinct or at least highly endangered. Our results shed new light on the possible causes of hippo extinction, on the subsequent introduction of the wild boar and on the earliest occupation of the island by humans. PMID:26284623

  1. Direct Dating and Physico-Chemical Analyses Cast Doubts on the Coexistence of Humans and Dwarf Hippos in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lebon, Matthieu; Quiles, Anita; Reiche, Ina; Vigne, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    In the Mediterranean, the island dwarf megafaunas became extinct around the end of the Pleistocene, during a period of rapid and global climate change. In Cyprus, this coincided with the first human presence on the island, as attested by the rock shelter of Akrotiri-Aetokremnos where an Epipaleolithic anthropogenic layer (stratum 2) was found overlying a massive accumulation of pygmy hippopotamus (Phanourios minor (Desmarest, 1822)) [Boekschoten and Sondaar, 1972] bones (stratum 4). The relationship between the two layers is highly controversial and the role played by humans in hippo extinction remains fiercely debated. Here, we provide new, direct radiocarbon and physico-chemical analyses on calcined bones which elucidates the complex depositional history of the assemblage. Bone turquoise was identified using micro-PIXE analysis and depth-profiling together with Vis spectroscopy, demonstrating that these bones were not freshly burned. Bayesian modeling of the radiocarbon dates indicates that stratum 4 accumulated during the first half of the 13th mill cal BP and that calcination occurred several hundred years later. We conclude that accumulation occurred naturally during the beginning of the Younger Dryas and that Epipalaeolithic visitors subsequently used the bones as fuel, starting from the mid-13th mill cal BP. At that time, dwarf hippos were probably already extinct or at least highly endangered. Our results shed new light on the possible causes of hippo extinction, on the subsequent introduction of the wild boar and on the earliest occupation of the island by humans. PMID:26284623

  2. The use of water cooling during the continuous casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, J.; Thomas, B. G.; Wells, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    In both continuous casting of steel slabs and direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloy ingots, water is used to cool the mold in the initial stages of solidification, and then below the mold, where it is in direct contact with the newly solidified surface of the metal. Water cooling affects the product quality by (1) controlling the heat removal rate that creates and cools the solid shell and (2) generating thermal stresses and strains inside the solidified metal. This work reviews the current state-of-the-art in water cooling for both processes, and draws insights by comparing and contrasting the different practices used in each process. The heat extraction coefficient during secondary cooling depends greatly on the surface temperature of the ingot, as represented by boiling water-cooling curves. Thus, the heat extraction rate varies dramatically with time, as the slab/ingot surface temperature changes. Sudden fluctuations in the temperature gradients within the solidifying metal cause thermal stresses, which often lead to cracks, especially near the solidification front, where even small tensile stresses can form hot tears. Hence, a tight control of spray cooling for steel, and practices such as CO2 injection/pulse water cooling for aluminum, are now used to avoid sudden changes in the strand surface temperature. The goal in each process is to match the rate of heat removal at the surface with the internal supply of latent and sensible heat, in order to lower the metal surface temperature monotonically, until cooling is complete.

  3. Influence of transport mechanisms on nucleation and grain structure formation in DC cast aluminium alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedel, M.; Založnik, M.; Kumar, A.; Combeau, H.; Jarry, P.; Waz, E.

    2012-01-01

    The grain structure formation in direct chill (DC) casting is directly linked to nucleation, which is generally promoted by inoculation. Inoculation prevents defects, but also modifies the physical properties by changing the microstructure. We studied the coupling of the nucleation on inoculant particles and the grain growth in the presence of melt flow induced by thermosolutal convection and of the transport of free-floating equiaxed grains. We used a volume-averaged two-phase multiscale model with a fully coupled description of phenomena on the grain scale (nucleation on grain refiner particles and grain growth) and on the product scale (macroscopic transport). The transport of inoculant particles is also modeled, which accounts for the inhomogeneous distribution of inoculant particles in the melt. The model was applied to an industrial sized (350mm thick) DC cast aluminium alloy ingot. A discretised nuclei size distribution was defined and the impact of different macroscopic phenomena on the grain structure formation was studied: the zone and intensity of nucleation and the resulting grain size distribution. It is shown that nucleation in the presence of macroscopic transport cannot be explained only in terms of cooling rate, but variations of composition, nuclei density and grain density, all affected by transport, must be accounted for.

  4. Growth of Salmonella on chilled meat.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, B. M.; Roberts, T. A.; Mansfield, J.; Farkas, G.

    1980-01-01

    Growth rates of a mixture of Salmonella serotypes inoculated on beef from a commercial abattoir were measured at chill temperatures. The minimum recorded mean generation times were 8.1 h at 10 degrees C; 5.2 h at 12.5 degrees C and 2.9 h at 15 degrees C. Growth did not occur at 7-8 degrees C. From these data the maximum extent of growth of Salmonella during storage of meat for different times at chill temperatures was calculated. Criteria for deciding safe handling temperatures for meat are discussed. Maintaining an internal temperature below 10 degrees C during the boning operation would be sufficient to safeguard public health requirements. PMID:7052227

  5. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  6. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  7. Economic uncertainties in chilled water system design

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerud, R.; Gillespie, K.L. Jr.; Hydeman, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    The analysis described here examines how uncertainties in engineering and economic assumptions made during chilled water system design translate to uncertainty in commonly used design decision metrics. The metric used is the benefit-cost ratio based on discounted cash flow. This analysis was performed as part of a project that is developing engineering tools for use in selecting energy-efficient chilled water system components, controls, and operating strategies. These tools include cooling thermal load prediction capabilities and performance data and models for chillers and cooling towers. The purpose of this study is to estimate accuracy requirements for the load and performance data that will be provided as part of the chilled water system tools. The logic is that there is inherent uncertainty in the decision metric due to uncertainty in inputs other than load and equipment performance, and, consequently, there is a limit below which further improvements in the accuracy of the load and equipment performance do not appreciably improve the quality of information available to the decision maker.

  8. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  9. Evolution of Fe Bearing Intermetallics During DC Casting and Homogenization of an Al-Mg-Si Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Grant, P. S.; O'Reilly, K. A. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of iron (Fe) bearing intermetallics (Fe-IMCs) during direct chill casting and homogenization of a grain-refined 6063 aluminum-magnesium-silicon (Al-Mg-Si) alloy has been studied. The as-cast and homogenized microstructure contained Fe-IMCs at the grain boundaries and within Al grains. The primary α-Al grain size, α-Al dendritic arm spacing, IMC particle size, and IMC three-dimensional (3D) inter-connectivity increased from the edge to the center of the as-cast billet; both α c-AlFeSi and β-AlFeSi Fe-IMCs were identified, and overall α c-AlFeSi was predominant. For the first time in industrial billets, the different Fe-rich IMCs have been characterized into types based on their 3D chemistry and morphology. Additionally, the role of β-AlFeSi in nucleating Mg2Si particles has been identified. After homogenization, α c-AlFeSi predominated across the entire billet cross section, with marked changes in the 3D morphology and strong reductions in inter-connectivity, both supporting a recovery in alloy ductility.

  10. Study of twin-roll cast Aluminium alloys subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poková, M.; Cieslar, M.

    2014-08-01

    Aluminium alloys prepared by twin-roll casting method become widely used in industry applications. Their high solid solution supersaturation and finer grains ensure better mechanical properties when compared with the direct-chill cast ones. One of the possibilities how to enhance their thermal stability is the addition of zirconium. After heat treatment Al3Zr precipitates form and these pin moving grain boundaries when the material is exposed to higher temperatures. In the present work twin-roll cast aluminium alloys based on AA3003 with and without Zr addition were annealed for 8 hours at 450 °C to enable precipitation of Al3Zr phase. Afterwards they were subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing, which led to the reduction of average grain size under 1 μm. During subsequent isochronal annealing recovery and recrystallization took place. These processes were monitored by microhardness measurements, light optical microscopy and in-situ transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Zr stabilizes the grain size and increases the recrystallization temperature by 100 °C.

  11. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction (ND) in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. In the present study, these measurements are used to show that a well-designed thermomechanical finite element (FE) process model can reproduce relatively well the experimental results. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out to determine the relative effect of the various mechanical parameters when computing the as-cast residual stresses in a cylindrical billet. Two model parameters have been investigated: the temperature when the alloy starts to thermally contract and the plasticity behavior. It is shown that the mechanical properties at low temperatures have a much larger influence on the residual stresses than those at high temperatures.

  12. Evolution of Fe Bearing Intermetallics During DC Casting and Homogenization of an Al-Mg-Si Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Grant, P. S.; O'Reilly, K. A. Q.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of iron (Fe) bearing intermetallics (Fe-IMCs) during direct chill casting and homogenization of a grain-refined 6063 aluminum-magnesium-silicon (Al-Mg-Si) alloy has been studied. The as-cast and homogenized microstructure contained Fe-IMCs at the grain boundaries and within Al grains. The primary α-Al grain size, α-Al dendritic arm spacing, IMC particle size, and IMC three-dimensional (3D) inter-connectivity increased from the edge to the center of the as-cast billet; both α c-AlFeSi and β-AlFeSi Fe-IMCs were identified, and overall α c-AlFeSi was predominant. For the first time in industrial billets, the different Fe-rich IMCs have been characterized into types based on their 3D chemistry and morphology. Additionally, the role of β-AlFeSi in nucleating Mg2Si particles has been identified. After homogenization, α c-AlFeSi predominated across the entire billet cross section, with marked changes in the 3D morphology and strong reductions in inter-connectivity, both supporting a recovery in alloy ductility.

  13. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  14. Ethylene Production by Chilled Cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Adams, D O

    1980-11-01

    Chilling at 2.5 C accelerated the synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and C(2)H(4) production in cucumber fruit. Skin tissue contained higher levels of ACC and was more sensitive to chilling than was cortex tissue. Accumulation of ACC in chilled tissue was detected after 1 day of chilling and remained elevated even after C(2)H(4) production started to decline. These data suggest that ACC synthesis is readily stimulated by chilling, whereas the system that converts ACC to C(2)H(4) is vulnerable to chilling injury. Chilling-induced C(2)H(4) production was inhibited by amino-ethoxyvinylglycine, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and cycloheximide. The utilization of methionine for ACC formation and chilling-induced C(2)H(4) biosynthesis was established using l-[3,4-(14)C]methionine. Chilled tissue had a higher capacity to convert l-[3,4-(14)C]methionine to ACC and C(2)H(4) than did nonchilled tissue. PMID:16661538

  15. Ethylene Production by Chilled Cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien Yi; Adams, Douglas O.

    1980-01-01

    Chilling at 2.5 C accelerated the synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and C2H4 production in cucumber fruit. Skin tissue contained higher levels of ACC and was more sensitive to chilling than was cortex tissue. Accumulation of ACC in chilled tissue was detected after 1 day of chilling and remained elevated even after C2H4 production started to decline. These data suggest that ACC synthesis is readily stimulated by chilling, whereas the system that converts ACC to C2H4 is vulnerable to chilling injury. Chilling-induced C2H4 production was inhibited by amino-ethoxyvinylglycine, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and cycloheximide. The utilization of methionine for ACC formation and chilling-induced C2H4 biosynthesis was established using l-[3,4-14C]methionine. Chilled tissue had a higher capacity to convert l-[3,4-14C]methionine to ACC and C2H4 than did nonchilled tissue. PMID:16661538

  16. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  17. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  18. Center crack detection during continuous casting of aluminum by laser ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Hubert; Mitter, Thomas; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Crack detection during continuous direct chill casting of aluminum is a matter of economics. Determining cracks during production process saves money, energy and raw material. Of course, a non-destructive method is required for this evaluation. Because of temperature concerns conventional ultrasound is not applicable. One non-contact alternative is laser ultrasonics. In laser ultrasonics short laser pulses illuminate the sample. The electromagnetic energy gets absorbed at the surface of the sample and results in local heating followed by expansion. Thereby broadband ultrasonic waves are launched which propagate through the sample and get back reflected or scattered at interfaces (cracks, blowholes,…) like conventional ultrasonic waves. Therefore laser ultrasonics is an alternative thermal infrared technology. By using an interferometer also the detection of the ultrasonic waves at the sample surface is done in a remote manner. During preliminary examinations in the lab by scanning different aluminum studs it was able to distinguish between studs with and without cracks. The prediction of the dimension of the crack by evaluation of the damping of the broadband ultrasonic waves was possible. With simple image reconstruction methods one can localize the crack and give an estimation of its extent and even its shape. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  19. Tomato flavor changes at chilling and non-chilling temperatures as influenced by controlled atmospheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest temperatures recommended as safe to avoid chilling injury (CI) based on lack of visible symptoms suppress tomato aroma development. We investigated how temperatures at or above the putative CI threshold of 12.5°C affected aroma of pink ‘Tasti Lee’ tomatoes and if controlled atmosphere (C...

  20. Performance of a chill ATES system

    SciTech Connect

    Midkiff, K.C.; Song, Y.K.; Schaetzle, W.J.

    1989-03-01

    An aquifer air-conditioning system has been installed to cool the Student Recreation Center on the University of Alabama Campus. This research program encompasses the monitoring of the operation of the aquifer system and provision of emplacements to the system. The monitoring includes establishing the instrumentation, acquiring data, and analyzing the results. The instrumentation allows the measurement of water flow rates and corresponding temperatures, electrical energy input, aquifer temperatures at nineteen monitoring wells, and aquifer levels at six monitoring wells. Recent acquifer performance data indicate that 76% of the chill energy stored was recovered for the period Oct/86 - Sep/87 and 70% for the period Oct/87 - Sep/88. This is a substantial improvement over recoveries of 38% for the 1985 season and 55% for 1986. The overall coefficient of performance was 5.4 for Oct/86 - Sep/87 and 4.6 for Oct/87 - Sep/88. THe system has supplied 100% of the cooling with only about one-half of the energy input required by a conventional system. Some of the increased recovery of chilled water is a result of modifying the production well operation to reduce the regional flow of water toward the northwest. All warm water is withdrawn form the southeast wells, chilled, and injected in northwest wells. The cold water then withdrawn from the cold wells is used for air-conditioning but not reinjected into the aquifer. Additional flow control is provided by pumping (and discarding) water out of a southeast well, although the complete results of this new strategy are as yet unclear.

  1. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  2. Increasing chilling reduces heat requirement for floral budbreak in peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to chilling temperatures is a critical factor in the suitability of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] cultivars to moderate climates such as in the southeastern United States. Time of bloom depends on the innate chilling requirement of the cultivar as well as the timing and quantity of co...

  3. 76 FR 166 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... imports of fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway (56 FR 14920, 14921). Following five-year reviews... imports of fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway (71 FR 7512). The Commission is now conducting...), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ \\1\\ No response to this request...

  4. Quality and safety of broiler meat in various chilling systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling is a critical step in poultry processing to attain high quality meat and to meet the USDA-FSIS temperature standards. This study was conducted to determine the effects of commercially available chilling systems on quality and safety of broiler meat. A total of 300 carcasses in two replica...

  5. Incidence of chilling injury in fresh-cut 'Kent' mangoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preferred storage temperature for fresh-cut fruits in terms of visual quality retention is around 5 °C, which is considered to be a chilling temperature for chilling sensitive tropical fruits like mango (Mangifera indica L.). Changes in visual and compositional quality factors, aroma volatile pr...

  6. Chilling and heat requirements for flowering in temperate fruit trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Dai, Junhu; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Yu, Haiying; Xu, Jianchu; Luedeling, Eike

    2014-08-01

    Climate change has affected the rates of chilling and heat accumulation, which are vital for flowering and production, in temperate fruit trees, but few studies have been conducted in the cold-winter climates of East Asia. To evaluate tree responses to variation in chill and heat accumulation rates, partial least squares regression was used to correlate first flowering dates of chestnut ( Castanea mollissima Blume) and jujube ( Zizyphus jujube Mill.) in Beijing, China, with daily chill and heat accumulation between 1963 and 2008. The Dynamic Model and the Growing Degree Hour Model were used to convert daily records of minimum and maximum temperature into horticulturally meaningful metrics. Regression analyses identified the chilling and forcing periods for chestnut and jujube. The forcing periods started when half the chilling requirements were fulfilled. Over the past 50 years, heat accumulation during tree dormancy increased significantly, while chill accumulation remained relatively stable for both species. Heat accumulation was the main driver of bloom timing, with effects of variation in chill accumulation negligible in Beijing's cold-winter climate. It does not seem likely that reductions in chill will have a major effect on the studied species in Beijing in the near future. Such problems are much more likely for trees grown in locations that are substantially warmer than their native habitats, such as temperate species in the subtropics and tropics.

  7. Diurnal variation of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balafoutis, Ch. J.

    1989-12-01

    The diurnal variations of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece, are considered using hourly data from January 1960 to December 1977. This is the first attempt in Greece to describe bioclimatic conditions using wind-chill data. The hourly values of wind-chill were calculated by Siple-Passel's formula which still appears to be most widely used. The values of wind-chill are discussed in terms of Terjung's scale. Thessaloniki does not experience “frost-bite” conditions during the coldest months but does experience “warm” conditions during the summer period. A comparison of hourly and daily mean values show that the means do not indicate the real range of wind-chill during the day.

  8. Sugar metabolism in relation to chilling tolerance of loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chilling injury and sugar metabolism was investigated in loquat fruit stored at 1°C for 35days. No symptoms of chilling injury occurred in the fruit, of 'Ninghaibai' cultivar, during the whole storage whereas, in 'Dahongpao' fruit, severe chilling symptoms were observed after 20days of storage at 1°C. 'Ninghaibai' fruit had higher levels of glucose and fructose and higher activities of sucrose hydrolyzing enzymes, such as sucrose synthase-cleavage and invertase, than had 'Dahongpao'. Furthermore, the chilling resistant 'Ninghaibai' fruit also showed higher activities of hexokinase and fructokinase, involved in hexose phoshorylation and sugar signal generation. These results suggest that the higher content of hexoses and activities of hexose sensors were likely part of the mechanism for chilling tolerance of loquat fruit. PMID:23017404

  9. Effects of chilling on protein synthesis in tomato suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Matadial, B.; Pauls, K.P. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of chilling on cell growth, cell viability, protein content and protein composition in suspension cultures of L. esculentum and L. hirsutum was investigated. Cell growth for both species was arrested at 2{degrees}C but when cultures were transferred to 25{degree}C cell growth resumed. There was no difference in viability between control and chilled cultures of L. esculentum, however, L. hirsutum control cultures exhibited larger amounts of Fluorescein Diacetate induced fluorescence than chilled cultures. {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation into proteins was 2.5-2 times higher in L. hirsutum than in L. esculentum. Quantitative and qualitative differences, in {sup 35}S-methionine labelled proteins, between chilled and control cultures were observed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Protein content in chilled cultures decreased over time but then increased when cultures were transferred to 25{degrees}C.

  10. The Chilled-Mirror Humidity Sensor: Improved Radiosonde Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    Chilled-mirror humidity sensor technology recently was adapted for use with the VIZ radiosonde. The principle of the chilled-mirror operation is to lower its temperature until dew forms on the mirror, at that point the dew point temperature is noted and the mirror is then heated to evaporate the moisture. The cycle is repeated. Research conducted from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility has provided comparisons between the chilled-mirror sensor and the carbon hygristor of VIZ, and the capacitive sensors of AIR Inc. and Vaisala Co. We believe the chilled-mirror sensor is accurate and would serve as a reference standard for evaluating operational radiosonde relative humidity sensors. Thus, differences seen in the comparisons are beginning to furnish insight into developing better humidity sensors. We discuss these comparison results as well as reproducibility results from a dual chilled-mirror measurement.

  11. EPA's ToxCast Project: Lessons learned and future directions for use of HTS in predicting in vivo toxicology -- A Chemical Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA’s ToxCast and the related Tox21 projects are employing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies to profile thousands of chemicals, which in turn serve as probes of a wide diversity of targets, pathways and mechanisms related to toxicity. Initial models relating ToxCa...

  12. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  13. Nut crop yield records show that budbreak-based chilling requirements may not reflect yield decline chill thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pope, Katherine S; Dose, Volker; Da Silva, David; Brown, Patrick H; DeJong, Theodore M

    2015-06-01

    Warming winters due to climate change may critically affect temperate tree species. Insufficiently cold winters are thought to result in fewer viable flower buds and the subsequent development of fewer fruits or nuts, decreasing the yield of an orchard or fecundity of a species. The best existing approximation for a threshold of sufficient cold accumulation, the "chilling requirement" of a species or variety, has been quantified by manipulating or modeling the conditions that result in dormant bud breaking. However, the physiological processes that affect budbreak are not the same as those that determine yield. This study sought to test whether budbreak-based chilling thresholds can reasonably approximate the thresholds that affect yield, particularly regarding the potential impacts of climate change on temperate tree crop yields. County-wide yield records for almond (Prunus dulcis), pistachio (Pistacia vera), and walnut (Juglans regia) in the Central Valley of California were compared with 50 years of weather records. Bayesian nonparametric function estimation was used to model yield potentials at varying amounts of chill accumulation. In almonds, average yields occurred when chill accumulation was close to the budbreak-based chilling requirement. However, in the other two crops, pistachios and walnuts, the best previous estimate of the budbreak-based chilling requirements was 19-32 % higher than the chilling accumulations associated with average or above average yields. This research indicates that physiological processes beyond requirements for budbreak should be considered when estimating chill accumulation thresholds of yield decline and potential impacts of climate change. PMID:25119825

  14. Nut crop yield records show that budbreak-based chilling requirements may not reflect yield decline chill thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Katherine S.; Dose, Volker; Da Silva, David; Brown, Patrick H.; DeJong, Theodore M.

    2015-06-01

    Warming winters due to climate change may critically affect temperate tree species. Insufficiently cold winters are thought to result in fewer viable flower buds and the subsequent development of fewer fruits or nuts, decreasing the yield of an orchard or fecundity of a species. The best existing approximation for a threshold of sufficient cold accumulation, the "chilling requirement" of a species or variety, has been quantified by manipulating or modeling the conditions that result in dormant bud breaking. However, the physiological processes that affect budbreak are not the same as those that determine yield. This study sought to test whether budbreak-based chilling thresholds can reasonably approximate the thresholds that affect yield, particularly regarding the potential impacts of climate change on temperate tree crop yields. County-wide yield records for almond ( Prunus dulcis), pistachio ( Pistacia vera), and walnut ( Juglans regia) in the Central Valley of California were compared with 50 years of weather records. Bayesian nonparametric function estimation was used to model yield potentials at varying amounts of chill accumulation. In almonds, average yields occurred when chill accumulation was close to the budbreak-based chilling requirement. However, in the other two crops, pistachios and walnuts, the best previous estimate of the budbreak-based chilling requirements was 19-32 % higher than the chilling accumulations associated with average or above average yields. This research indicates that physiological processes beyond requirements for budbreak should be considered when estimating chill accumulation thresholds of yield decline and potential impacts of climate change.

  15. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  16. Casting Shadows in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Uses the metaphor of shadows in a critical exploration of what it means to know and how the cultures of classrooms have shaped these images of knowing. Directs attention to objects that cast shadows on the learning and knowing of mathematics and science through the voices of preservice teachers. Discusses shadow casting toward textbooks, teachers,…

  17. Modeling of Chill Down in Cryogenic Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Matthew F.; Majumdar, Alok K.; Bennett, John C., Jr.; Malla, Ramesh B.; Rodriquez, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model to predict chill down in cryogenic transfer lines has been developed. Three chill down cases using hydrogen as the working fluid are solved: 1) a simplified model amenable to analytical solution, 2) a realistic model of superheated vapor flow, and 3) a realistic model of initially subcooled liquid flow. The first case compares a numerical model with an analytical solution with very good agreement between the two. Additionally, the analytical solution provides a convenient way to look at parametric effects on the chill down. The second and third cases are numerical models which provide temperature histories of the fluid and solid tube wall during chill down as well as several other quantities of interest such as pressure and mass flow rate. Of great interest is the ability to predict accurate values of chill down time (the time required to achieve steady-state cryogenic flow). The models predict that a 26 in. long, 3/16 in. ID aluminum tube has a shorter chill down time (approx. equal to 100 sec) and uses less hydrogen with superheated vapor flow than with initially subcooled liquid flow (greater than 200 sec for chill down).

  18. The effects of blast chilling on pork quality.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk, Artur; Karamucki, Tadeusz; Pietruszka, Arkadiusz; Rybak, Kinga; Matysiak, Beata

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of blast chilling of pig carcasses on the physiochemical and sensory properties of the longissimus lumborum muscle. To this end, right half-carcasses were blast-chilled for 70min at -24°C and then for 22h and 50min at 1°C, while left half-carcasses were chilled conventionally at 1°C for 24h. At 2h and 6h post mortem, blast chilling had significantly reduced the temperature of the carcasses, as well as the rate of pH decrease and the rate of increase in EC. It had no significant effect on the ultimate pH or its range, or on EC at 24h post mortem, but it significantly lowered L*, b*, C* and drip loss compared to the conventionally chilled carcasses. Blast chilling adversely affected sensory characteristics such as tenderness and flavor. There were no significant differences between the effects of blast and conventional chilling systems on meat quality between conformation classes. PMID:25462383

  19. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  1. Temperature-Induced Leakage from Chilling-Sensitive and Chilling-Resistant Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    Leakage rates were determined from leaf cells loaded with rubidium and [3H]leucine. There was a differential response between leucine and rubidium leakage depending upon the species used. The rate of leucine leakage shows a small decline below 5 C for two altitudinal variants of Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl., whereas Lycopersicon esculentum L. showed a marked increase below 5 C. Rubidium showed a marked increase in leakage rate below 10 C with the altitudinal variants, with only a slight increase for the L. esculentum species. A rough relationship existed between rubidium leakage rate at 1 C and the altitude of origin of the L. hirsutum race, the low altitudinal forms having higher leakage rates than the higher altitudinal variants. The L. esculentum lines show a rubidium leakage response similar to that of the high altitude L. hirsutum variants. Higher leakage rates were obtained if the calcium concentration in the medium was less than 1 millimolar and upon addition of metabolic poisons and detergents. The results are consistent with the view that chilling injury causes changes in the membrane and that cell leakage is an early symptom of this change in some species. Some chilling-sensitive species have increased leakage within 1 hour of exposure to chilling temperature. PMID:16661859

  2. Mechanics of buried chilled gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Selvadurai, A.P.S.; Hu, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper examines the factors influencing the modelling of soil-pipeline interaction for a pipeline which is used to transport chilled gas. The soil-pipeline interaction is induced by the generation of discontinuous frost heave at a boundary between soils with differing frost susceptibility. The three-dimensional modelling takes into consideration the time-dependent evolution of frost heave due to moisture migration, the creep and elastic behavior of the frozen soil and flexural behavior of the embedded pipeline. The results of the computational model are compared with experimental results obtained from the frost heave induced soil-pipeline interaction test performed at the full scale test facilities in Caen, France.

  3. Effects of chilling rate and spray-chilling on weight loss and tenderness in beef strip loin steaks.

    PubMed

    Prado, C S; de Felício, P E

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of chilling rate and the use of a spray-chilling system on the weight loss by evaporation on carcasses. We also evaluated the effects on meat purge in vacuum package, cooking losses, and on parameters related to the tenderness of strip loin steaks (M. longissimus lumborum). Forty non-castrated males of approximately 12 months old, finished in feed-lot were harvested in 16 Montana cattle (a composite breed), and 24 SimmentalxNellore crossbred cattle. After bleeding, the bodies were electrically stimulated and assigned to one of the four treatments: conventional air-chilling (CAC), conventional spray-chilling (CSC), slow air-chilling (SAC), and slow spray-chilling (SSC). Strip loin steaks (M. longissimus lumborum) of approximately 2.5 cm thick were removed, vacuum packed and aged for 7, 14, 30 or 60 days. Samples were analyzed for sarcomere length, myofibrillar fragmentation index, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and weight losses by purge and cooking. Spraying was efficient in reducing weight loss by evaporation (P<0.05). Effects of treatments and aging period on purge losses were observed, where samples from sprayed carcasses or aged cuts showed higher losses. Cooking losses were not affected either by spraying or aging. The slow chilling, with or without spraying, was more efficient in producing strip loin steaks with lower average shear force and longer sarcomere. The myofibrillar fragmentation index increased with aging time, but was not affected by carcasses spraying. PMID:20647150

  4. Cementite Solidification in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, J. J.; Sinatora, A.; Albertin, E.

    2014-06-01

    Two hypereutectic cast irons (5.01 pct Cr and 5.19 pct V) were cast and the polished surfaces of test pieces were deep-etched and analyzed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that graphite lamellae intersect the cementite and a thin austenite film nucleates and grows on the cementite plates. For both compositions, graphite and cementite can coexist as equilibrium phases, with the former always nucleating and growing first. The eutectic carbides grow from the austenite dendrites in a direction perpendicular to the primary plates.

  5. Application of TRIZ Theory in Patternless Casting Manufacturing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Gan, Dequan; Jiang, Ping; Tian, Yumei

    The ultimate goal of Patternless Casting Manufacturing (referred to as PCM) is how to obtain the casts by casting the sand mold directly. In the previous PCM, the resin content of sand mold is much higher than that required by traditional resin sand, so the casts obtained are difficult to be sound and qualified products, which limits the application of this technique greatly. In this paper, the TRIZ algorithm is introduced to the innovation process in PCM systematically.

  6. The Energy Savings in Reroll Casting From Primary Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. F.; Fitzpatrick, N. P.

    1981-11-01

    Recent developments in the continuous casting of strip by belt casting, associated with the primary production of aluminum, offer substantial advantages in energy saving, through the direct conversion of molten metal into strip and through the reduction of melt loss. The total energy content (electrical and thermal) of the continuous casting route is compared to that involved in the conventional ingot casting and hot-rolling route for a typical semi-fabricated product.

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling of Chilling Stress Responsiveness in Two Contrasting Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wang, Wensheng; Pan, Yajiao; Huang, Liyu; Liu, Xiaoyue; Zong, Ying; Zhu, Linghua; Yang, Daichang; Fu, Binying

    2012-01-01

    Rice is sensitive to chilling stress, especially at the seedling stage. To elucidate the molecular genetic mechanisms of chilling tolerance in rice, comprehensive gene expressions of two rice genotypes (chilling-tolerant LTH and chilling-sensitive IR29) with contrasting responses to chilling stress were comparatively analyzed. Results revealed a differential constitutive gene expression prior to stress and distinct global transcription reprogramming between the two rice genotypes under time-series chilling stress and subsequent recovery conditions. A set of genes with higher basal expression were identified in chilling-tolerant LTH compared with chilling-sensitive IR29, indicating their possible role in intrinsic tolerance to chilling stress. Under chilling stress, the major effect on gene expression was up-regulation in the chilling- tolerant genotype and strong repression in chilling-sensitive genotype. Early responses to chilling stress in both genotypes featured commonly up-regulated genes related to transcription regulation and signal transduction, while functional categories for late phase chilling regulated genes were diverse with a wide range of functional adaptations to continuous stress. Following the cessation of chilling treatments, there was quick and efficient reversion of gene expression in the chilling-tolerant genotype, while the chilling-sensitive genotype displayed considerably slower recovering capacity at the transcriptional level. In addition, the detection of differentially-regulated TF genes and enriched cis-elements demonstrated that multiple regulatory pathways, including CBF and MYBS3 regulons, were involved in chilling stress tolerance. A number of the chilling-regulated genes identified in this study were co-localized onto previously fine-mapped cold-tolerance-related QTLs, providing candidates for gene cloning and elucidation of molecular mechanisms responsible for chilling tolerance in rice. PMID:22912843

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. Chemical additive to enhance antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine and control cross-contamination during immersion chill of broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Schambach, B T; Berrang, M E; Harrison, M A; Meinersmann, R J

    2014-09-01

    Immersion chilling of broiler carcasses can be a site for cross-contamination between the occasional highly contaminated carcass and those that are co-chilled. Chlorine is often used as an antimicrobial but can be overcome by organic material. A proprietary chlorine stabilizer (T-128) based on phosphoric acid-propylene glycol was tested as a chill tank additive in experiments simulating commercial broiler chilling. In bench-scale experiments, 0.5% T-128 was compared with plain water (control), 50 ppm of chlorine, and the combination of 0.5% T-128 with 50 ppm of chlorine to control transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter from inoculated wing drummettes to co-chilled uninoculated drummettes. Both chlorine and T-128 lessened cross-contamination with Salmonella (P < 0.05); T-128 and T-128 with chlorine were significantly more effective (P < 0.05) than the control or plain chlorine for control of Campylobacter. T-128 treatments were noted to have a pH of less than 4.0; an additional experiment demonstrated that the antimicrobial effect of T-128 was not due merely to a lower pH. In commercial broiler chilling, a pH close to 6.0 is preferred to maximize chlorine effectiveness, while maintaining water-holding capacity of the meat. In a set of pilot-scale experiments with T-128, a near-ideal pH of 6.3 was achieved by using tap water instead of the distilled water used in bench-scale experiments. Pilot-scale chill tanks were used to compare the combination of 0.5% T-128 and 50 ppm of chlorine with 50 ppm of plain chlorine for control of cross-contamination between whole carcasses inoculated with Salmonella and Campylobacter and co-chilled uninoculated carcasses. The T-128 treatment resulted in significantly less crosscontamination by either direct contact or water transfer with both organisms compared with plain chlorine treatment. T-128 may have use in commercial broiler processing to enhance the effectiveness of chlorine in processing water. PMID:25198851

  10. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  11. Chilling outweighs photoperiod in preventing precocious spring development.

    PubMed

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H; Estrella, Nicole; Höfler, Josef; Ankerst, Donna P; Menzel, Annette

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that increased spring temperatures cause earlier onset dates of leaf unfolding and flowering. However, a temperature increase in winter may be associated with delayed development when species' chilling requirements are not fulfilled. Furthermore, photosensitivity is supposed to interfere with temperature triggers. To date, neither the relative importance nor possible interactions of these three factors have been elucidated. In this study, we present a multispecies climate chamber experiment to test the effects of chilling and photoperiod on the spring phenology of 36 woody species. Several hypotheses regarding their variation with species traits (successional strategy, floristic status, climate of their native range) were tested. Long photoperiods advanced budburst for one-third of the studied species, but magnitudes of these effects were generally minor. In contrast to prior hypotheses, photosensitive responses were not restricted to climax or oceanic species. Increased chilling length advanced budburst for almost all species; its effect greatly exceeding that of photoperiod. Moreover, we suggest that photosensitivity and chilling effects have to be rigorously disentangled, as the response to photoperiod was restricted to individuals that had not been fully chilled. The results indicate that temperature requirements and successional strategy are linked, with climax species having higher chilling and forcing requirements than pioneer species. Temperature requirements of invasive species closely matched those of native species, suggesting that high phenological concordance is a prerequisite for successful establishment. Lack of chilling not only led to a considerable delay in budburst but also caused substantial changes in the chronological order of species' budburst. The results reveal that increased winter temperatures might impact forest ecosystems more than formerly assumed. Species with lower chilling requirements, such as pioneer or invasive

  12. Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal chill source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal chill source was investigated. Costs were estimated for point demand and residential development ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR. AQUASTOR was developed at PNL specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on the costs of ATES delivered chill were: system size; well flow rate; transmission distance; source temperature; well depth; and cost of capital. The effects of each parameter are discussed. Two primary constraints of ATES chill systems are the extremely low energy density of the storage fluid and the prohibitive costs of lengthy pipelines for delivering chill to residential users. This economic analysis concludes that ATES-delivered chill will not be competitive for residential cooling applications. The otherwise marginal attractiveness of ATES chill systems vanishes under the extremely low load factors characteristic of residential cooling systems. (LCL)

  13. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  14. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  15. Effect of dry-air chilling on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked broiler breast meat deboned four hours after the initiation of chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air chilled chicken products are gaining popularity in the USA. It has been claimed that air chilling (AC) results in improved tenderness and flavor of broiler meat compared with immersion chilling (IC). However, there is a lack of published sensory study results to support the claims. The objecti...

  16. Evaluation of electroslag castings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of evaluations of electroslag castings of ferritic (2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo) and austenitic (CF8M or type 316) steels are presented. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical composition, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Pertinent data are compared with equivalent data for sand castings and wrought products of the same materials. Based on the results of these studies, the properties of electroslag castings compare favorably with those of sand castings and wrought materials.

  17. The Chilling Effect: How Do Researchers React to Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Kempner, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Background Can political controversy have a “chilling effect” on the production of new science? This is a timely concern, given how often American politicians are accused of undermining science for political purposes. Yet little is known about how scientists react to these kinds of controversies. Methods and Findings Drawing on interview (n = 30) and survey data (n = 82), this study examines the reactions of scientists whose National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded grants were implicated in a highly publicized political controversy. Critics charged that these grants were “a waste of taxpayer money.” The NIH defended each grant and no funding was rescinded. Nevertheless, this study finds that many of the scientists whose grants were criticized now engage in self-censorship. About half of the sample said that they now remove potentially controversial words from their grant and a quarter reported eliminating entire topics from their research agendas. Four researchers reportedly chose to move into more secure positions entirely, either outside academia or in jobs that guaranteed salaries. About 10% of the group reported that this controversy strengthened their commitment to complete their research and disseminate it widely. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that political controversies can shape what scientists choose to study. Debates about the politics of science usually focus on the direct suppression, distortion, and manipulation of scientific results. This study suggests that scholars must also examine how scientists may self-censor in response to political events. PMID:19018657

  18. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable. PMID:22075754

  19. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  20. Tomato expressing Arabidopsis glutaredoxin gene AtGRXS17 confers tolerance to chilling stress via modulating cold responsive components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling stress is a production constraint of tomato, a tropical origin, chilling-sensitive horticultural crop. The development of chilling tolerant tomato thus has significant potential to impact tomato production. Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous oxidoreductases, which utilize the reducing powe...

  1. Concurrent effects of cold and hyperkalaemia cause insect chilling injury.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Baatrup, Erik; Overgaard, Johannes

    2015-10-22

    Chilling injury and death are the ultimate consequence of low temperature exposure for chill susceptible insects, and low temperature tolerance is considered one of the most important factors determining insect distribution patterns. The physiological mechanisms that cause chilling injury are unknown, but chronic cold exposure that causes injury is consistently associated with elevated extracellular [K(+)], and cold tolerant insects possess a greater capacity to maintain ion balance at low temperatures. Here, we use the muscle tissue of the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) to examine whether chill injury occurs during cold exposure or following return to benign temperature and we specifically examine if elevated extracellular [K(+)], low temperature, or a combination thereof causes cell death. We find that in vivo chill injury occurs during the cold exposure (when extracellular [K(+)] is high) and that there is limited capacity for repair immediately following the cold stress. Further, we demonstrate that that high extracellular [K(+)] causes cell death in situ, but only when experienced at low temperatures. These findings strongly suggest that that the ability to maintain ion (particularly K(+)) balance is critical to insect low temperature survival, and highlight novel routes of study in the mechanisms regulating cell death in insects in the cold. PMID:26468241

  2. Delayed light emission and fluorescence responses of plants to chilling

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Campbell, T.A.; Massie, D.R. . Agricultural Research Service)

    1994-01-01

    Delayed light emission (DLE) of chlorophyll has the same excitation and emission spectra as chlorophyll fluorescence and was formerly called delayed fluorescence. DLE has a much longer time response than true chlorophyll fluorescence and is detectable for times ranging from milliseconds to many minutes. DLE is induced by back reactions of the photosynthetic pathway and therefore requires functional chloroplasts. It is detectable only in the dark following light excitation, yields very low energy, and decays very rapidly. DLE repetitively excited over time, which they term refreshed DLE (RDLE), shows a shoulder and broad peak in the measurements, indicating participation of at least two energy pools. DLE is altered by physiological stresses that affect chloroplasts or photosynthesis, and as illustration, plant species known to be very susceptible or very tolerant to chilling were exposed to chilling temperatures for varying times. RDLE at 0.3 s (the initial shoulder on the curves) rose in response to chilling damage in the susceptible species. The major RDLE peak was greatly inhibited in the susceptible species and showed only small changes in the tolerant species. Fluorescence measurements made on the chilling-tolerant species indicated similar responses and similar coefficients of determination were derived. These results indicate that measurement of precisely timed delayed light emission or of refreshed delayed light emission at a less precisely controlled time can be used to detect chilling stress.

  3. Impact of future warming on winter chilling in Australia.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, Rebecca; Webb, Leanne; Goodwin, Ian; Barlow, E W R

    2013-05-01

    Increases in temperature as a result of anthropogenically generated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are likely to impact key aspects of horticultural production. The potential effect of higher temperatures on fruit and nut trees' ability to break winter dormancy, which requires exposure to winter chilling temperatures, was considered. Three chill models (the 0-7.2°C, Modified Utah, and Dynamic models) were used to investigate changes in chill accumulation at 13 sites across Australia according to localised temperature change related to 1, 2 and 3°C increases in global average temperatures. This methodology avoids reliance on outcomes of future GHG emission pathways, which vary and are likely to change. Regional impacts and rates of decline in chilling differ among the chill models, with the 0-7.2°C model indicating the greatest reduction and the Dynamic model the slowest rate of decline. Elevated and high latitude eastern Australian sites were the least affected while the three more maritime, less elevated Western Australian locations were shown to bear the greatest impact from future warming. PMID:22674019

  4. Primary arm spacing in chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt % Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient.

  5. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  6. Chill sensitivity of honey bee, Apis mellifera, embryos.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anita M; Mazur, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Improved methods for preservation of honey bee, Apis mellifera L., germplasm would be very welcome to beekeeping industry queen breeders. The introduction of two parasites and the emergence of an antibiotic resistant disease have increased demands for resistant stock. Techniques for artificial insemination of queens are available, and semen has been cryopreserved with limited success. However, cryopreservation of embryos for rearing queens would mesh well with current practices and also provide drones (haploid males). Eggs at five ages between twenty-four hours and sixty-two hours were exposed to 0, -6.6, and/or -15 degrees C for various times, and successful hatch measured. Honey bee embryos show chill sensitivity as do other insect embryos, and the rate of chill injury increases dramatically with decrease in holding temperature. The 48 h embryos in both groups showed the greatest tolerance to chilling, although 44 h embryos were only slightly less so. PMID:16677625

  7. Improved Humidity Sensing with the Chilled Mirror: Really?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, Francis J.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Testing of the chilled mirror sensor was initiated at Wallops Island in 1997. The chilled mirror dew point system is integrated with the Sippican, Inc., MK2 radiosonde providing a relatively inexpensive instrument. Early tests suggested that better stratospheric humidity measurements might be available. But, recent tests with different configurations of the mirror's cooler indicated that the systems capability to cool to the very low dew point temperatures required in the stratosphere were not being met with the present system. Nonetheless, the present mirror technology, while still undergoing development gives better humidity information between 400 and 100 hPa than the current routine radiosonde sensor. Comparisons are given of the chilled mirror and the typical operational humidity sensors.

  8. Identification of chilling and heat requirements of cherry trees—a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeling, Eike; Kunz, Achim; Blanke, Michael M.

    2013-09-01

    Most trees from temperate climates require the accumulation of winter chill and subsequent heat during their dormant phase to resume growth and initiate flowering in the following spring. Global warming could reduce chill and hence hamper the cultivation of high-chill species such as cherries. Yet determining chilling and heat requirements requires large-scale controlled-forcing experiments, and estimates are thus often unavailable. Where long-term phenology datasets exist, partial least squares (PLS) regression can be used as an alternative, to determine climatic requirements statistically. Bloom dates of cherry cv. `Schneiders späte Knorpelkirsche' trees in Klein-Altendorf, Germany, from 24 growing seasons were correlated with 11-day running means of daily mean temperature. Based on the output of the PLS regression, five candidate chilling periods ranging in length from 17 to 102 days, and one forcing phase of 66 days were delineated. Among three common chill models used to quantify chill, the Dynamic Model showed the lowest variation in chill, indicating that it may be more accurate than the Utah and Chilling Hours Models. Based on the longest candidate chilling phase with the earliest starting date, cv. `Schneiders späte Knorpelkirsche' cherries at Bonn exhibited a chilling requirement of 68.6 ± 5.7 chill portions (or 1,375 ± 178 chilling hours or 1,410 ± 238 Utah chill units) and a heat requirement of 3,473 ± 1,236 growing degree hours. Closer investigation of the distinct chilling phases detected by PLS regression could contribute to our understanding of dormancy processes and thus help fruit and nut growers identify suitable tree cultivars for a future in which static climatic conditions can no longer be assumed. All procedures used in this study were bundled in an R package (`chillR') and are provided as Supplementary materials. The procedure was also applied to leaf emergence dates of walnut (cv. `Payne') at Davis, California.

  9. Revised Wind Chill Index (The Development of a New Wind Chill Temperature Chart)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, Maurice

    2009-04-10

    It had been known for many years that the original wind chill temperature charts used by the weather services of Canada and the U.S. were flawed. This speaker applied modern heat transfer principles to the Antarctic research that was the basis for the original charts to demonstrate that the temperatures were much too cold. He then proposed an alternative model that would more accurately depict the effect of wind in cold weather on exposed skin. Media attention and an internet conference sponsored in Canada prompted the U.S. Weather Service to initiate a program to update their charts. This speaker and a Canadian researcher who worked with a similar approach were charged with developing a new chart. An algorithm was completed and the new chart was put into effect in Canada in October and in the U.S. in November, 2001.

  10. Revised Wind Chill Index (The Development of a New Wind Chill Temperature Chart)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, Maurice

    2002-04-10

    It had been known for many years that the original wind chill temperature charts used by the weather services of Canada and the U.S. were flawed. This speaker applied modern heat transfer principles to the Antarctic research that was the basis for the original charts to demonstrate that the temperatures were much too cold. He then proposed an alternative model that would more accurately depict the effect of wind in cold weather on exposed skin. Media attention and an internet conference sponsored in Canada prompted the U.S. Weather Service to initiate a program to update their charts. This speaker and a Canadian researcher who worked with a similar approach were charged with developing a new chart. An algorithm was completed and the new chart was put into effect in Canada in October and in the U.S. in November, 2001.

  11. Heat treatment alleviation of chilling-induced suppression of aroma volatile levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomatoes to 5 °C for longer than 6-8 days can cause surface pitting, irregular (blotchy) color development and other symptoms of chilling injury (CI). The objectives for this study were to investigate whether a 4-day exposure of tomato fruit to 5 °C chilling temperature at the m...

  12. 77 FR 12800 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Revocation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 89 (January 3, 2011); Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From... Duty Order, 76 FR 70409 (November 14, 2011), and Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Final... Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders: Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon from Norway, 71 FR...

  13. Temperature conditioning alters transcript abundance of genes related to chilling stress in 'Marsh' grapefruit flavedo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi) develop symptoms of chilling injury (CI) if held at temperatures below about 10 degrees C. Conditioning grapefruit at a low, but non-chilling temperature prior to storage at a chilling temperature reduces the development of CI symptoms. Changes in transcript abundanc...

  14. Chilling and chipping influence plant growth and reproduction of star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse studies were conducted on two southern Illinois star-of-Bethlehem biotypes to determine the influence of chilling and bulb chipping on plant growth and reproduction. Chilling was not required for leaf emergence of dormant bulbs, but an increase to 10 weeks of chilling proportionally delay...

  15. Sensory descriptive Profiles of Air and Water Chilled Broiler Breast Fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air chilled chicken products are gaining popularity in the USA. It has been claimed that air chilling (AC) results in improved tenderness and flavor of broiler meat compared with water chilling (WC). However, there was lack of published sensory study results to support the claims. The objective of...

  16. Inhibition of photosynthesis by chilling in moderate light: a comparison of plants sensitive and insensitive to chilling.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, R A; Raison, J K

    1989-12-01

    Photosynthetic activity, in leaf slices and isolated thylakoids, was examined at 25° C after preincubation of the slices at either 25° C or 4° C at a moderate photon flux density (PFD) of 450 μmol·m(-2)·s(-1), or at 4° C in the dark. The plants used wereSpinacia oleracea L.,Cucumis sativus L. andNerium oleander L. which was acclimated to growth at 20° C or 45° C. The plants were grown at a PFD of 550 μmol·m(-2)·s(-1). Photosynthesis, measured as CO2-dependent O2 evolution, was not inhibited in leaf slices from any plant after preincubation at 25° C at a moderate PFD or at 4° C in the dark. However, exposure to 4° C at a moderate PFD induced an inhibition of CO2-dependent O2 evolution within 1 h inC. sativus, a chilling-sensitive plant, and in 45° C-grownN. oleander. The inhibition in these plants after 5 h reached 80% and 40%, respectively, and was independent of the CO2 concentration but was reduced at O2 concentrations of less than 3%. Methyl-viologen-dependent O2 exchange in leaf slices from these plants was not inhibited. There was no photoxidation of chlorophyll, in isolated thylakoids, or any inhibition of electron transport at photosystem (PS)II, PSI or through both photosystems which would account for the inhibition of photosynthesis. The conditions which inhibit photosynthesis in chilling-sensitive plants do not cause inhibition inS. oleracea, a chilling-insensitive plant, or in 20° C-grownN. oleander. The CO2-dependent photosynthesis, measured at 5° C, was reduced to about 3% of that recorded at 25° C in chilling-sensitive plants but only to about 30% in the chilling-insensitive plants. Methyl-viologen-dependent O2 exchange, measured at 5° C, was greater than 25% of the activity at 25° C in all the plants. The results indicate that the mechanism of the chilling-induced inhibition of photosynthesis does not involve damage to PSII. That inhibition of photosynthesis is observed only in the chilling-sensitive plants indicates it is

  17. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  18. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys. Part 2: Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Prasso, D.C.; Evans, J.W.; Wilson, I.J.

    1995-12-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part 1 (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part 1) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  19. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  20. Cooling of Poultry Using Immersion or air chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During processing, poultry carcasses must be cooled to 40 F or below within 4 to 8 hours after slaughter to retard growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. In the U.S., poultry has traditionally been cooled using immersion chilling because this method is both economical and efficient; howe...

  1. Meaningful wind chill indicators derived from heat transfer principles.

    PubMed

    Brauner, N; Shacham, M

    1995-08-01

    The wind chill index (WCI) and the more widely used wind chill equivalent temperature represent an attempt to combine several weather-related variables (temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation) into a single index which can indicate human comfort. Since its introduction in 1945, the WCI has been criticized mainly on the ground that the underlying model does not comply with modern heat transfer theory. In spite of that, the WCI, "calibrated" to human comfort, has proven to be successful in predicting discomfort and tolerance of man to the cold. Nevertheless, neither the WCI nor the wind chill equivalent temperature can be actually measured and, therefore, without the additional 'calibration' they are meaningless. In this study we have shown that the WCI represents the instantaneous rate of heat loss from bare skin at the moment of exposure to the cold, and as such, it correlates reasonably well with measurable variables that represent a feeling of cold. Two new wind chill indicators have been introduced: exposed skin temperature and maximum exposure time. These indicators yield more information than the WCI provides, are measurable, have physical meaning and are based on established heat transfer principles. PMID:7558408

  2. Meaningful wind chill indicators derived from heat transfer principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Neima; Shacham, M.

    1995-03-01

    The wind chill index (WCI) and the more widely used wind chill equivalent temperature represent an attempt to combine several weather-related variables (temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation) into a single index which can indicate human comfort. Since its introduction in 1945, the WCI has been criticized mainly on the ground that the underlying model does not comply with modern heat transfer theory. In spite of that, the WCI, “calibrated” to human comfort, has proven to be successful in predicting discomfort and tolerance of man to the cold. Nevertheless, neither the WCI nor the wind chill equivalent temperature can be actually measured and, therefore, without the additional ‘calibration’ they are meaningless. In this study we have shown that the WCI represents the instantaneous rate of heat loss from bare skin at the moment of exposure to the cold, and as such, it correlates reasonably well with measurable variables that represent a feeling of cold. Two new wind chill indicators have been introduced: exposed skin temperature and maximum exposure time. These indicators yield more information than the WCI provides, are measurable, have physical meaning and are based on established heat transfer principles.

  3. 77 FR 10772 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 166) and determined on April 8, 2011 that it would conduct full reviews (76 FR 22422, April..., 2011 (76 FR 38698). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on November 30, 2011, and all persons who... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway Determination On the basis of the record...

  4. Interaction of chill and heat in peach flower bud dormancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peach bud dormancy requirement is a critical factor in selecting adapted cultivars, but the dormancy process is not well-understood. The Utah model proposes bloom occurs after a cultivar-specific amount of chilling followed by 5000 heat units above 4 °C. This model works well in colder climates, but...

  5. Imagining Citizenship as Friendship in "The Big Chill"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This essay stages a theoretically driven critique of Lawrence Kasdan's film "The Big Chill" as a productive example of a constitutive contradiction animating the liberal political imaginary. In particular, it argues that liberalism relies irreducibly on an under-examined conception of friendship to supply its model of citizenship as a distinctive,…

  6. Chilling the Messenger: The Impact of Libel on Community Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Elizabeth K.; Moore, Roy L.

    A study used a new attitude and behavioral scale for measuring the chilling effect--an undercurrent of fear with respect to publishing decisions--and to determine the impact, if any, of threatened or actual libel suits on community newspapers. The editors and/or publishers of all 167 newspapers in Kentucky with a circulation of less than 50,000…

  7. Subcritical Measurements Multiple HEU Metal Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Wright, Michael C

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with the standard annular highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal castings at Y-12 were performed in which up to 5 castings ({approx}90kg) were assembled in a tightly packed array with minimal spacing between castings. The fission chain multiplication process was initiated by a time tagged {sup 253}Cf spontaneously fissioning neutron source or time and directionally tagged neutrons from a small portable DT neutron generator and the prompt neutron time behavior measured with plastic scintillation detectors sensitive the fast neutron (>1 MeV) and gamma ray without distinction. These experiments were performed to provide data to benchmark methods for the calculation of the prompt neutron time behavior. Previous measurements with a single casting have been reported. This paper presents the experimental results for multiple castings. The prompt time decay was obtained by time coincidence correlation measurements between the detectors and the time tagged neutron source emission (equivalent to randomly pulsed neutron measurements) and between pairs of plastic scintillation detectors (equivalent to a 2-detector Rossi-alpha measurement). These standard HEU storage castings at the Y-12 plant had 5.000-in-OD, 3.500-in-ID, masses between 17,636 and 17,996 g, impurity content of 992 ppm, density of 18.75 g/cm{sup 3} and average enrichment of 93.16 wt % {sup 235}U. The castings were in tight fitting 025-in.-thick, 8.0-in-high stainless steel (SS-304) cylindrical cans for contamination control which were 8.0 in high. One can had an inside diameter of 3.0 in so that the Cf source could be located on the axes of this casting. Four 1 x 1 x 6 in plastic scintillators with the long dimension perpendicular to axes of the castings and adjacent to the outer surface of the casting cans were used. The detectors were enclosed in 1/4.-in.-thick lead shields on four 1 x 6 surfaces and on the 1 x 1 surface. The small surface of the lead shield was adjacent to the steel table. The

  8. Structure and Property Studies on Austempered and As-Cast Ausferritic Gray Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiraj, Aravind; Balachandran, G.; Kamaraj, M.

    2010-10-01

    A high-strength and wear-resistant alloyed gray iron with ausferritic microstructure on solidification directly from molten condition could be made in a Ni and Mo alloyed gray cast iron. The as-cast ausferritic cast iron was compared with two conventionally austempered gray iron with and without Ni and Mo additions. The various phase constitution and volume fractions were analyzed using optical, SEM and XRD analyses. The various aspects of the alloy chemistry and processing conditions have been correlated with the microstructure and mechanical properties obtained. The analysis showed that the Ni-Mo alloyed austempered gray iron and the directly as-cast austempered gray iron had similar phase constitutions. The strength of the direct as-cast alloy with ausferritic microstructure was higher than the others due to its higher austenite content and carbide distribution. The wear rate of the conventionally austempered Ni and Mo containing alloy and direct as-cast ausferritic alloys is 20% of the austempered gray iron without Ni and Mo with friction coefficient less than 0.4.

  9. QuikChill software for efficient chiller upgrade assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.J.; Anderson, D.

    1998-07-01

    Chiller upgrades, required by recent CFC legislation, have not occurred in most large US facilities. Opportunities for compliance via efficient, correctly-sized chillers is significant, but there is little industry infrastructure encouraging downsizing and maximum efficiency, nor are changeouts approached as investments. Upgrade performance analysis is either too simplistic (missing integration and downsizing opportunities) or too difficult, detailed, and expensive. A niche exists for dedicated tools that can be used for both early screening and more detailed final design analysis, including downsizing, system integration, and staging. QuickChill, a chiller upgrade analysis software tool, as developed by EPA's ENERGY STAR Buildings Program to address these issues. It performs economic and energy analyses of potential centrifugal chiller upgrades using minimal information, and performs more accurate calculations as the quality and detail or inputs are increased. QuikChill assesses the consolidation of existing chillers, integration/staging of new chillers, and refrigerant conversion retrofits. QuikChill was designed for facility managers and consulting engineers facing CFC phaseouts. Rather than require time-consuming, detailed building shell and operational inputs, QuikChill estimates loads using DOE2-generated curves which plot the relationship between cooling load and outdoor temperature. Surprisingly, these curves reasonably predict annual cooling system operating requirements when used with local hourly temperatures and the peak load met by the existing system. Hourly temperature data is available for over 240 locations and users can easily supply peak information. QuikChill's combination of simplified inputs, investment-orientation, and unique approach to hourly cooling load estimation help fill an analytical void for the post-CFC chiller industry.

  10. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  12. Casting in Sport

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the “least hard” of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257

  13. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  14. Moldless casting by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  15. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  16. Efficient ray casting with LF-Minmax map in CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae

    2011-03-01

    Ray casting is the most frequently used algorithm in direct volume rendering for displaying medical data, although it is computationally very expensive. Recent hardware improvements have allowed ray casting to be used in real-time, however, there is room for performance gains to take advantage of the recent development of general-purpose graphical processing units (GPU). The purpose of this paper is to implement the volume ray casting with the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to obtain higher rendering performance. The experimental results show that the new algorithm is up to 15 times faster than the conventional CPU-based ray casting algorithm.

  17. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOEpatents

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  18. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Land-based turbine casting initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.A.; Spicer, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program has set goals which include a large-scale utility turbine efficiency that exceeds 60 percent (LHV) on natural gas and an industrial turbine system heat rate improvement of 15 percent. To meet these goals, technological advances developed for aircraft gas turbine engines need to be applied to land based gas turbines. These technological advances include: directionally solidified and single crystal castings, alloys tailored to exploit these microstructures, complex internal cooling schemes, and coatings. Equiaxed and directionally solidified castings are employed in current land based power generation equipment. These castings do not possess the ability to meet the efficiency targets as outlined above. The production use of premium single crystal components with complex internal cooling schemes in the latest generation of alloys is necessary to meet the ATS goals. However, at present, the use of single crystal components with complex internal cooling schemes is restricted to industrial sized or aeroderivative engines, and prototype utility sized components.

  20. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  1. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  2. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  3. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  4. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirita, G.; Stefanescu, I.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting).

  5. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  6. (Continuous casting 1985)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, R.A.

    1985-06-12

    The report covers the Continuous Casting '85 Conference including informal discussions with conference attendees. In general, the papers presented at the conference concerned an overview of continuous steel casting worldwide, state-of-the-art aspects of steel continuous casting technology including caster startup problems, modifications, control system strategies, energy use profiles, quality control aspects, steel chemistry control, refractories, operational aspects of continuous casters, etc. No papers were presented in the development of thin section or thin strip casting of steel. Informal discussions were held with several conference attendees including (1) Bernard Trentini, Executive Director of the Association Technique De La Siderurgie Francaise in Paris, France (similar to the American Iron and Steel Institute); (2) Dr. Wolfgang Reichelt and Dr. Peter Voss-Spilker both of Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik -a continuous casting and other steel making machine builder in-lieu of meeting at their plant in Duisburg, FRG on May 31; (3) Ewan C. Hewitt of Devote McKee Corp., Sheffield, England; (4) Wilfried Heinemann, head of R D Dept. at Concast Standard AG in Zurich, Switzerland; and (5) Hideo Ueno, engineer of melting section, Mitsubishi Steel Mfg. Co. Ltd, Tokyo Japan. A visit was made to the Teesside Laboratories of British Steel Corp. for discussions of their thin section casting research program in particular and R D program in general.

  7. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  8. Short and long term effects of root and shoot chilling of ransom soybean.

    PubMed

    Musser, R L; Thomas, S A; Kramer, P J

    1983-11-01

    The immediate short term effects on some physiological processes and the long term effects on morphology and reproductive development of root- and shoot-chilled soybeans (Glycine max L. cv Ransom) were studied. Roots or shoots of 16- or 17-day-old plants were chilled at 10 degrees C for one week, and then rewarmed to 25 degrees C. Leaf elongation rate, net CO(2) uptake rate, and stomatal conductance decreased during root or shoot chilling. Root chilling had only temporary effects on water relations, while shoot chilling caused large changes in potentials during chilling. Most processes measured returned to control levels after two days of rewarming. Root-chilled plants harvested 90 days after emergence were similar in morphology and seed weight to controls. Shoot-chilled plants showed a large increase over controls in axillary branch growth, but an early abortion of flowers and a delayed resumption of flowering caused a 78% reduction in seed weight. Root chilling in this study was found to have little or no long term effect on the plants, while shoot chilling caused significant changes in vegetative morphology, and a delay in flowering and subsequent pod filling. PMID:16663300

  9. Impact of Added Sand on the Recovery of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli, and Coliforms from Pre-Chill and Post-Chill Broiler Carcass Halves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of sand to a rinse for bacterial enumeration and determining the incidence of pathogens from broiler carcasses. During each of 4 replications, 6 pre-chill and 6 post-chill broiler carcasses were collected from a commercial processing plant. All carcasses wer...

  10. Tradeoffs between chilling and forcing in satisfying dormancy requirements for Pacific Northwest tree species

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Constance A.; Gould, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many temperate and boreal tree species have a chilling requirement, that is, they need to experience cold temperatures during fall and winter to burst bud normally in the spring. Results from trials with 11 Pacific Northwest tree species are consistent with the concept that plants can accumulate both chilling and forcing units simultaneously during the dormant season and they exhibit a tradeoff between amount of forcing and chilling. That is, the parallel model of chilling and forcing was effective in predicting budburst and well chilled plants require less forcing for bud burst than plants which have received less chilling. Genotypes differed in the shape of the possibility line which describes the quantitative tradeoff between chilling and forcing units. Plants which have an obligate chilling requirement (Douglas-fir, western hemlock, western larch, pines, and true firs) and received no or very low levels of chilling did not burst bud normally even with long photoperiods. Pacific madrone and western redcedar benefited from chilling in terms of requiring less forcing to promote bud burst but many plants burst bud normally without chilling. Equations predicting budburst were developed for each species in our trials for a portion of western North America under current climatic conditions and for 2080. Mean winter temperature was predicted to increase 3.2–5.5°C and this change resulted in earlier predicted budburst for Douglas-fir throughout much of our study area (up to 74 days earlier) but later budburst in some southern portions of its current range (up to 48 days later) as insufficient chilling is predicted to occur. Other species all had earlier predicted dates of budburst by 2080 than currently. Recent warming trends have resulted in earlier budburst for some woody plant species; however, the substantial winter warming predicted by some climate models will reduce future chilling in some locations such that budburst will not consistently occur earlier. PMID

  11. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  12. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  13. A Thermal Simulation Method for Solidification Process of Steel Slab in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Honggang; Chen, Xiangru; Han, Qingyou; Han, Ke; Zhai, Qijie

    2016-07-01

    Eighty years after the invention of continuous cast of steels, reproducibility from few mm3 samples in the laboratory to m3 product in plants is still a challenge. We have engineered a thermal simulation method to simulate the continuous casting process. The temperature gradient (G L ) and dendritic growth rate (v) of the slab were reproduced by controlling temperature and cooling intensity at hot and chill end, respectively, in our simulation samples. To verify that our samples can simulate the cast slab in continuous casting process, the heat transfer, solidification structure, and macrosegregation of the simulating sample were compared to those of a much larger continuous casting slab. The morphology of solid/liquid interface, solidified shell thickness, and dendritic growth rate were also investigated by in situ quenching the solidifying sample. Shell thickness (δ) determined by our quenching experiment was related to solidification time (τ) by equation: δ = 4.27 × τ 0.38. The results indicated that our method closely simulated the solidification process of continuous casting.

  14. Inhibition of flowering 'Arbequina' olives from chilling at lower temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of four nighttime chilling temperatures on the induction of flowering in ‘Arbequina’ olives was investigated. Daytime temperature was kept at 17.5 ± 0.8°C (8 hrs) while nighttime temperatures (8 hrs ) were maintained at 7.8 ± 0.5, 4.4 ± 0.5, 2.2 ± 0.5, or -1.2 ± 0.6°C; transition from da...

  15. Directing 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  16. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique. [CF8M

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-01-01

    ELectroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and sand castings.

  17. Chill-inducing music enhances altruism in humans.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    Music is a universal feature of human cultures, and it has both fascinated and troubled many researchers. In this paper we show through the dictator game (DG) that an individual's listening to preferred "chill-inducing" music may promote altruistic behavior that extends beyond the bounds of kin selection or reciprocal altruism. Participants were 22 undergraduate and postgraduate students who were divided into two groups, the in-group and the out-group, and they acted as dictators. The dictators listened to their own preferred "chill-inducing" music, to music they disliked, or to silence, and then played the DG. In this hypothetical experiment, the dictators were given real money (which they did not keep) and were asked to distribute it to the recipients, who were presented as stylized images of men and women displayed on a computer screen. The dictators played the DG both before and after listening to the music. Both male and female dictators gave more money after listening to their preferred music and less after listening to the music they disliked, whereas silence had no effect on the allocated amounts. The group to which the recipient belonged did not influence these trends. The results suggest that listening to preferred "chill-inducing" music promotes altruistic behavior. PMID:25389411

  18. Chill-inducing music enhances altruism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    Music is a universal feature of human cultures, and it has both fascinated and troubled many researchers. In this paper we show through the dictator game (DG) that an individual’s listening to preferred “chill-inducing” music may promote altruistic behavior that extends beyond the bounds of kin selection or reciprocal altruism. Participants were 22 undergraduate and postgraduate students who were divided into two groups, the in-group and the out-group, and they acted as dictators. The dictators listened to their own preferred “chill-inducing” music, to music they disliked, or to silence, and then played the DG. In this hypothetical experiment, the dictators were given real money (which they did not keep) and were asked to distribute it to the recipients, who were presented as stylized images of men and women displayed on a computer screen. The dictators played the DG both before and after listening to the music. Both male and female dictators gave more money after listening to their preferred music and less after listening to the music they disliked, whereas silence had no effect on the allocated amounts. The group to which the recipient belonged did not influence these trends. The results suggest that listening to preferred “chill-inducing” music promotes altruistic behavior. PMID:25389411

  19. "Chilled" pork--Part II. Consumer perception of sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Riendeau, L; Laberge, C; Fortin, J

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare consumer perception of the sensory quality of grilled Canadian pork destined for Japanese and domestic markets, with particular reference to export selection criteria imposed by Japanese importers and transportation conditions. Consumers from Quebec, Canada tasted local and export quality pork subjected to "chilled" (aged 43 days at -1.7 °C) or conventional ageing (5 days at 3.1 °C). Consumers' scores (out of 10) were higher (P<0.05) in the "chilled" than conventionally aged pork for tenderness (6.8 vs 5.7), juiciness (6.6 vs 6.0), taste liking (6.4 vs 5.9) and overall acceptability (6.7 vs 6.1). When informed that the conventionally aged, domestic quality pork was destined for the domestic market, consumer scores increased significantly (P<0.05). No effect of information was observed on the perception of the 'chilled' export quality meat, perhaps a consequence of the high sensory quality observed prior to labelling. PMID:22647653

  20. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR INJECTION CASTING

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1960-09-13

    S>A single-chamber metal casting apparatus is described wherein molten metal in a vertically movable container can be brought directly into contact with molds. By increasing the gas pressure within the chamber the metal is forced upward into the molds.

  1. Graphite formation in cast iron, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Fiske, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several types of cast irons are directionally solidified aboard the KC-135 aircraft. Also, control samples are run on Earth for comparison. Some of these samples are unusable because of various mechanical problems; the analysis and the interpretation of results on the samples that are run successfully is discussed.

  2. Impact of the sampling method and chilling on the Salmonella recovery from pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Vanantwerpen, Gerty; De Zutter, Lieven; Berkvens, Dirk; Houf, Kurt

    2016-09-01

    Differences in recovery of Salmonella on pig carcasses using non-destructive and destructive sampling methods is not well understood in respect to the chilling processes applied in slaughterhouses. Therefore, in two slaughterhouses, four strains at two different concentrations were inoculated onto pork skin. Inoculated skin samples were sampled before and after chilling with two sampling methods: swabbing and destruction. Both slaughterhouses were visited three times and all tests were performed in triplicate. All samples were analysed using the ISO-method and recovered isolates were confirmed by PFGE. The chilling system (fast or conventional cooling) nor the sampling step (before and after chilling) did not significantly influence the recovery of Salmonella. However, swabbing after chilling leads to an underestimation of the real number of contaminated carcasses. Therefore, destructive sampling is the more designated sampling method after chilling. PMID:27236225

  3. Investment cast AISI H13 tooling for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.

    1995-07-01

    While many techniques exist for production of soft tooling, for die casting there is limited recent experience with cast tooling. The most common US alloy used for manufacture of die casting tooling is wrought AISI H13. If the performance of the cast material is comparable to the wrought counterpart, the use of investment cast HI 3 tooling directly from patterns made via rapid prototyping is of considerable interest. A metallurgical study of investment cast H13 was conducted to evaluate the mechanical behavior in simulated die casting applications. Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were produced and characterized in the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 were heat-treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples produced in different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat-treatment, microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness.The mechanical properties of the cast and heat-treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat-treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was to con-elate the heat checking susceptibility of H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was observed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat-treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking.

  4. Effect of dry-air chilling on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked broiler breast meat deboned four hours after the initiation of chilling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H; Savage, E M; Smith, D P; Berrang, M E

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a dry air-chilling (AC) method on sensory texture and flavor descriptive profiles of broiler pectoralis major (fillet) and pectoralis minor (tender). The profiles of the muscles immersion-chilled and deboned at the same postmortem time and the profiles of the muscles hot-boned (or no chill) were used for the comparison. A total of 108 eviscerated carcasses (6-wk-old broilers) were obtained from a commercial processing line before the chillers. Carcasses were transported to a laboratory facility where they were either i) chilled by a dry AC method (0.7 degrees C, 150 min in a cold room), ii) chilled by immersion chilling (IC; 0.3 degrees C, 50 min in a chiller), or iii) not chilled (9 birds per treatment per replication). Both IC and AC fillets and tenders were removed from the bone at 4 h after the initiation of chilling (approximately 4.75 h postmortem) in a processing area (18 degrees C). The no-chill muscles were removed immediately upon arrival. The sensory properties (21 attributes) of cooked broiler breast meat were evaluated by trained panelists using 0- to 15-point universal intensity scales. The average intensity scores of the 9 flavor attributes analyzed ranged from 0.9 to 4.0. Regardless of breast muscle type, there were no significant differences in sensory flavor descriptive profiles between the 3 treatments. The average intensity scores of the 12 texture attributes ranged from 1.5 to 7.5 and there were no significant differences between the AC and IC samples. The average intensity scores of the texture attributes, cohesiveness, hardness, cohesiveness of mass, rate of breakdown, and chewiness of the no chill fillets and tenders were significantly higher than those of either of the chilled samples. These results demonstrate that chicken breast meat from AC retains sensory flavor profile characteristics but AC results in sensory texture profile differences when compared with no-chill meat. Sensory

  5. Moderate Photoinhibition of Photosystem II Protects Photosystem I from Photodamage at Chilling Stress in Tobacco Leaves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that photosystem I (PSI) is susceptible to chilling-light stress in tobacco leaves, but the effect of growth light intensity on chilling-induced PSI photoinhibition in tobacco is unclear. We examined the effects of chilling temperature (4°C) associated with moderate light intensity (300 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) on the activities of PSI and photosystem II (PSII) in leaves from sun- and shade-grown plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. k326). The sun leaves had a higher activity of alternative electron flow than the shade leaves. After 4 h chilling treatment, the sun leaves showed significantly a higher PSI photoinhibition than the shade leaves. At chilling temperature the sun leaves showed a greater electron flow from PSII to PSI, accompanying with a lower P700 oxidation ratio. When leaves were pre-treated with lincomycin, PSII activity decreased by 42% (sun leaves) and 47% (shade leaves) after 2 h exposure to the chilling-light stress, but PSI activity remained stable during the chilling-light treatment, because the electron flow from PSII to PSI was remarkably depressed. These results indicated that the stronger chilling-induced PSI photoinhibition in the sun leaves was resulted from a greater electron flow from PSII to PSI. Furthermore, moderate PSII photoinhibition depressed electron flow to PSI and then protected PSI activity against further photodamage in chilled tobacco leaves. PMID:26941755

  6. Moderate Photoinhibition of Photosystem II Protects Photosystem I from Photodamage at Chilling Stress in Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that photosystem I (PSI) is susceptible to chilling-light stress in tobacco leaves, but the effect of growth light intensity on chilling-induced PSI photoinhibition in tobacco is unclear. We examined the effects of chilling temperature (4°C) associated with moderate light intensity (300 μmol photons m-2 s-1) on the activities of PSI and photosystem II (PSII) in leaves from sun- and shade-grown plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. k326). The sun leaves had a higher activity of alternative electron flow than the shade leaves. After 4 h chilling treatment, the sun leaves showed significantly a higher PSI photoinhibition than the shade leaves. At chilling temperature the sun leaves showed a greater electron flow from PSII to PSI, accompanying with a lower P700 oxidation ratio. When leaves were pre-treated with lincomycin, PSII activity decreased by 42% (sun leaves) and 47% (shade leaves) after 2 h exposure to the chilling-light stress, but PSI activity remained stable during the chilling-light treatment, because the electron flow from PSII to PSI was remarkably depressed. These results indicated that the stronger chilling-induced PSI photoinhibition in the sun leaves was resulted from a greater electron flow from PSII to PSI. Furthermore, moderate PSII photoinhibition depressed electron flow to PSI and then protected PSI activity against further photodamage in chilled tobacco leaves. PMID:26941755

  7. Twenty-five ways to raise your chilled-water temperature differential

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    This paper recommends practical methods of achieving high chilled-water temperature differentials invariable-flow hydronic cooling systems. After high chilled-water temperature differentials are realized, more Btus (J/s) of cooling will be accomplished per gallon (liter) of chilled-water distributed, and pressure losses and pumping energy will decline considerably. Also, water chiller capacities no longer will be limited by maximum evaporator flow rates and chilled-water storage tanks will store many more ton-hours (megajoules) of cooling. This fundamental approach provides significant, enduring improvements in the performance of variable-flow hydronic cooling systems with great leverage.

  8. Identification of chilling and heat requirements of cherry trees--a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Luedeling, Eike; Kunz, Achim; Blanke, Michael M

    2013-09-01

    Most trees from temperate climates require the accumulation of winter chill and subsequent heat during their dormant phase to resume growth and initiate flowering in the following spring. Global warming could reduce chill and hence hamper the cultivation of high-chill species such as cherries. Yet determining chilling and heat requirements requires large-scale controlled-forcing experiments, and estimates are thus often unavailable. Where long-term phenology datasets exist, partial least squares (PLS) regression can be used as an alternative, to determine climatic requirements statistically. Bloom dates of cherry cv. 'Schneiders späte Knorpelkirsche' trees in Klein-Altendorf, Germany, from 24 growing seasons were correlated with 11-day running means of daily mean temperature. Based on the output of the PLS regression, five candidate chilling periods ranging in length from 17 to 102 days, and one forcing phase of 66 days were delineated. Among three common chill models used to quantify chill, the Dynamic Model showed the lowest variation in chill, indicating that it may be more accurate than the Utah and Chilling Hours Models. Based on the longest candidate chilling phase with the earliest starting date, cv. 'Schneiders späte Knorpelkirsche' cherries at Bonn exhibited a chilling requirement of 68.6 ± 5.7 chill portions (or 1,375 ± 178 chilling hours or 1,410 ± 238 Utah chill units) and a heat requirement of 3,473 ± 1,236 growing degree hours. Closer investigation of the distinct chilling phases detected by PLS regression could contribute to our understanding of dormancy processes and thus help fruit and nut growers identify suitable tree cultivars for a future in which static climatic conditions can no longer be assumed. All procedures used in this study were bundled in an R package ('chillR') and are provided as Supplementary materials. The procedure was also applied to leaf emergence dates of walnut (cv. 'Payne') at Davis, California. PMID

  9. Enumeration of Salmonella from Poultry Carcass Rinses via Direct Plating Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct plating methods for the estimation of Salmonella load in poultry carcass rinses were evaluated. Twenty broiler carcasses were collected weekly for three weeks from each of three sites (pre-inside outside bird wash [Pre-IOBW], Pre-chill and Post-chill) in a poultry abattoir resulting in 60 ca...

  10. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Structure and properties of polypropylene cast films: Polymer type and processing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileva, Daniela; Gahleitner, Markus; Gloger, Dietrich

    2016-05-01

    The influence of processing parameters in a cast film extrusion process of thin films of isotactic polypropylene homopolymer and random propylene-ethylene copolymer was analyzed. Variation of the chill roll temperature allowed changing the supercooling of the melt and thus the generation of different crystal polymorphs of iPP. Additional focus was placed on the effect of flow induced crystallization via changing the output rate of the line. The crystal structure and morphology of the materials were evaluated and correlated to selected optical and mechanical properties.

  12. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  13. Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2005-01-01

    The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

  14. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Antioxidant Defense in Cucumber Seeds (Cucumis sativus L.) Germinated under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Marta, Bałabusta; Szafrańska, Katarzyna; Posmyk, Małgorzata M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between exogenous melatonin applied into cucumber seeds during osmopriming and modifications of their antioxidant defense was studied. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione pool were investigated in embryonic axes isolated from the control, osmoprimed, and osmoprimed with melatonin seeds. Germinating cucumber seeds are very sensitive to chilling. Temperature 10°C causes oxidative stress in young seedlings. Seed pre-treatment with melatonin seemed to limit H2O2 accumulation during germination under optimal condition as well as during chilling stress and recovery period. Melatonin affected superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and its isoforms during stress and recovery period but did not influence CAT and POX activities. Thus it is possible that in cucumber this indoleamine could act mostly as a direct H2O2 scavenger, but superoxide anion combat via SOD stimulation. The GSH/GSSG ratio is considered as an indirect determinant of oxidative stress. When the cells are exposed to oxidative stress GSSG is accumulated and the ratio of GSH to GSSG decreases. In our research pre-sowing melatonin application into the cucumber seeds caused high beneficial value of GSH/GSSG ratio that could be helpful for stress countering. Glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) activity in the axes isolated from these seeds was two fold higher than in those isolated from the control and from the osmoprimed without melatonin ones. Additional isoforms of GSSG-R in melatonin treated seeds were also observed. It explains high and effective GSH pool restoration in the seeds pre-treated with melatonin. We confirmed that melatonin could protect cucumber seeds and young seedlings against oxidative stress directly and indirectly detoxifying ROS, thereby plants grown better even in harmful environmental conditions. This work is the first that investigated on plant in vivo model and documented melatonin influence on redox state during seed germination

  15. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Antioxidant Defense in Cucumber Seeds (Cucumis sativus L.) Germinated under Chilling Stress.

    PubMed

    Marta, Bałabusta; Szafrańska, Katarzyna; Posmyk, Małgorzata M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between exogenous melatonin applied into cucumber seeds during osmopriming and modifications of their antioxidant defense was studied. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione pool were investigated in embryonic axes isolated from the control, osmoprimed, and osmoprimed with melatonin seeds. Germinating cucumber seeds are very sensitive to chilling. Temperature 10°C causes oxidative stress in young seedlings. Seed pre-treatment with melatonin seemed to limit H2O2 accumulation during germination under optimal condition as well as during chilling stress and recovery period. Melatonin affected superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and its isoforms during stress and recovery period but did not influence CAT and POX activities. Thus it is possible that in cucumber this indoleamine could act mostly as a direct H2O2 scavenger, but superoxide anion combat via SOD stimulation. The GSH/GSSG ratio is considered as an indirect determinant of oxidative stress. When the cells are exposed to oxidative stress GSSG is accumulated and the ratio of GSH to GSSG decreases. In our research pre-sowing melatonin application into the cucumber seeds caused high beneficial value of GSH/GSSG ratio that could be helpful for stress countering. Glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) activity in the axes isolated from these seeds was two fold higher than in those isolated from the control and from the osmoprimed without melatonin ones. Additional isoforms of GSSG-R in melatonin treated seeds were also observed. It explains high and effective GSH pool restoration in the seeds pre-treated with melatonin. We confirmed that melatonin could protect cucumber seeds and young seedlings against oxidative stress directly and indirectly detoxifying ROS, thereby plants grown better even in harmful environmental conditions. This work is the first that investigated on plant in vivo model and documented melatonin influence on redox state during seed germination

  16. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  17. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  18. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  19. Effects of Dry Chilling on the Microflora on Beef Carcasses at a Canadian Beef Packing Plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Youssef, M K; Yang, X

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the course of effects on the microflora on beef carcasses of a commercial dry chilling process in which carcasses were dry chilled for 3 days. Groups of 25 carcasses selected at random were sampled when the chilling process commenced and after the carcasses were chilled for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 67 h for determination of the numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. The temperatures of the surfaces and the thickest part of the hip (deep leg) of carcasses, as well as the ambient air conditions, including air temperature, velocity, and relative humidity (RH), were monitored throughout the chilling process. The chiller was operated at 0°C with an off-coil RH of 88%. The air velocity was 1.65 m/s when the chiller was loaded. The initial RH levels of the air in the vicinity of carcasses varied with the locations of carcasses in the chiller and decreased rapidly during the first hour of chilling. The average times for shoulder surfaces, rump surfaces, and the deep leg of carcasses to reach 7°C were 13.6 ± 3.1, 16.0 ± 2.4 and 32.4 ± 3.2 h, respectively. The numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and E. coli on carcasses before chilling were 5.33 ± 0.42, 1.95 ± 0.77, 1.42 ± 0.78 log CFU/4,000 cm(2), respectively. The number of aerobes on carcasses was reduced by 1 log unit each in the first hour of chilling and in the subsequent 23 h of chilling. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the numbers of aerobes recovered from carcasses after 24 and 67 h of chilling. The total numbers (log CFU/100,000 cm(2)) on carcasses before chilling and after the first hour of chilling were 3.86 and 2.24 for coliforms and 3.30 and 2.04 for E. coli. The subsequent 23 h of chilling reduced the numbers of both groups of organisms by a further log unit. No coliforms or E. coli were recovered after 67 h of chilling. The findings show that the chilling regime investigated in this study resulted in significant reductions of all

  20. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  1. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  2. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  3. Hair Casts or Pseudonits

    PubMed Central

    França, Katlein; Villa, Ricardo Tadeu; Silva, Isabella Rezende; de Carvalho, Cristine Almeida; Bedin, Valcinir

    2011-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are thin, elongated, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair shaft and can be easily dislodged. A case of pseudonits in a 9-year-old girl is reported. Though not unusual, false diagnoses are common. PMID:22223977

  4. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  5. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines. PMID:3889295

  6. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  7. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  8. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  9. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-01

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94-1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  10. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  11. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  12. A demonstration of chill block melt spinning of metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, Robert B.

    1990-01-01

    One of the most exciting adventures in materials in recent times has been the discovery of amorphous metals and the pursuit of methods of manufacturing various alloys into various shapes which are amorphous. Some of these alloys possess electrical properties which are extremely beneficial, whereas others offer different benefits such as corrosion resistence and no solidification shrinkage anomalies. There are a number of techniques for producing such amorphous shapes, but one of the earliest systems used is referred to as chill block melt spinning. The object of this demonstration is to show the simplicity of the process. The equipment and procedures are described.

  13. Chilling tolerant U.S. processing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.): three advanced backcross and ten inbred backcross lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental stresses such as chilling temperatures can reduce seed germination rate, seeding emergence rate, flower and fruit development, marketable yield, and postharvest fruit storage longevity in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Chilling temperatures occur in unpredictable patterns, making it d...

  14. Textures in Strip-Cast Aluminum Alloys: Their On-Line Monitoring and Quantitative Effects on Formability. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Chi-Sing

    2003-07-27

    Aluminum sheets produced by continuous casting (CC) provide energy and economic savings of at least 25 and 14 percent, respectively, over sheets made from conventional direct chill (DC) ingot casting and rolling. As a result of the much simpler production route in continuous casting, however, the formability of CC aluminum alloys is often somewhat inferior to that of their DC counterparts. The mechanical properties of CC alloys can be improved by controlling their microstructure through optimal thermomechanical processing. Suitable annealing is an important means to improve the formability of CC aluminum alloy sheets. Recrystallization of deformed grains occurs during annealing, and it changes the crystallographic texture of the aluminum sheet. Laboratory tests in this project showed that this texture change can be detected by either laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy or resonance EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) spectroscopy, and that monitoring this change allows the degree of recrystallization or the ''recrystallized fraction'' in an annealed sheet to be ascertained. Through a plant trial conducted in May 2002, this project further demonstrated that it is feasible to monitor the recrystallized state of a continuous-cast aluminum sheet in-situ on the production line by using a laser-ultrasound sensor. When used in conjunction with inline annealing, inline monitoring of the recrystallized fraction by laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy offers the possibility of feed-back control that helps optimize processing parameters (e.g., annealing temperature), detect production anomalies, ensure product quality, and further reduce production costs of continuous-cast aluminum alloys. Crystallographic texture strongly affects the mechanical anisotropy/formability of metallic sheets. Clarification of the quantitative relationship between texture and anisotropy/formability of an aluminum alloy will render monitoring and control of its texture during the sheet

  15. Effect of Thermal and Chemical Treatment on the Microstructural, Mechanical and Machining Performance of W319 Al-Si-Cu Cast Alloy Engine Blocks and Directionally Solidified Machinability Test Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szablewski, Daniel

    The research presented in this work is focused on making a link between casting microstructural, mechanical and machining properties for 319 Al-Si sand cast components. In order to achieve this, a unique Machinability Test Block (MTB) is designed to simulate the Nemak V6 Al-Si engine block solidification behavior. This MTB is then utilized to cast structures with in-situ nano-alumina particle master alloy additions that are Mg based, as well as independent in-situ Mg additions, and Sr additions to the MTB. The Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer (UMSA) Technology Platform is utilized for characterization of each cast structure at different Secondary Dendrite Arm Spacing (SDAS) levels. The rapid quench method and Jominy testing is used to assess the capability of the nano-alumina master alloy to modify the microstructure at different SDAS levels. Mechanical property assessment of the MTB is done at different SDAS levels on cast structures with master alloy additions described above. Weibull and Quality Index statistical analysis tools are then utilized to assess the mechanical properties. The MTB is also used to study single pass high speed face milling and bi-metallic cutting operations where the Al-Si hypoeutectic structure is combined with hypereutectoid Al-Si liners and cast iron cylinder liners. These studies are utilized to aid the implementation of Al-Si liners into the Nemak V6 engine block and bi-metallic cutting of the head decks. Machining behavior is also quantified for the investigated microstructures, and the Silicon Modification Level (SiML) is utilized for microstructural analysis as it relates to the machining behavior.

  16. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  17. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Karimian, Majid; Idris, M. H.; Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  18. My shadow, myself: cast-body shadows are embodied.

    PubMed

    Kuylen, Christopher; Balas, Benjamin; Thomas, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    Objects that serve as extensions of the body can produce a sensation of embodiment, feeling as if they are a part of us. We investigated the characteristics that drive an object's embodiment, examining whether cast-body shadows, a purely visual stimulus, are embodied. Tools are represented as an extension of the body when they enable observers to interact with distant targets, perceptually distorting space. We examined whether perceptual distortion would also result from exposure to cast-body shadows in two separate distance estimation perceptual matching tasks. If observers represent cast-body shadows as extensions of their bodies, then when these shadows extend toward a target, it should appear closer than when no shadow is present (Experiment 1). This effect should not occur when a non-cast-body shadow is cast toward a target (Experiment 2). We found perceptual distortions in both cast-body shadow and tool-use conditions, but not in our non-cast-body shadow condition. These results suggest that, although cast-body shadows do not enable interaction with objects or provide direct tactile feedback, observers nonetheless represent their shadows as if they were a part of them. PMID:24243137

  19. Effect of Immersion or Dry Chilling on Broiler Carcass Moisture Retention and Breast Fillet Functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of chilling method on broiler carcass skin color, carcass moisture retention, and breast fillet quality and functionality. One hundred fifty eviscerated broilers carcasses were removed from a commercial processing line prior to chilling, transported to...

  20. Salmonella recovery following air chilling for matched neck-skin and whole carcass sampling methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence and serogroups of Salmonella recovered following air chilling were determined for both enriched neck skin and matching enriched whole carcass samples. Commercially processed and eviscerated carcasses were air chilled to 4C before removing the neck skin (8.3 g) and stomaching in 83 mL...

  1. Effect of chilling method and post-mortem aging time on broiler breast fillet quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of chilling method and post-mortem aging time on broiler breast fillet quality. One hundred-fifty eviscerated broiler carcasses were removed from a commercial processing line prior to chilling and transported to the laboratory. Half of the carcasses we...

  2. Investigation of hygiene aspects during air chilling of poultry carcases using a model rig.

    PubMed

    Allen, V M; Burton, C H; Corry, J E; Mead, G C; Tinker, D B

    2000-12-01

    1. An experimental rig, designed and built to simulate conditions found in commercial poultry chilling systems, was used to investigate the effects of varying air temperature and chilling duration, and the effect of chlorinated water sprays, on the microbial load present on the skin and in the body cavity of freshly eviscerated poultry carcases; deep muscle and skin temperatures were monitored during chilling at three different temperatures. 2. During dry chilling for 2 h, total viable microbe counts (TVC) and counts of coliforms and pseudomonads from the body cavity fell by between half and one log unit; smaller reductions were observed in samples from the breast skin. 3. The situation changed when chlorinated water sprays (50, 100 or 250 ppm available chlorine) were applied for the first hour of chilling; spraying carcases enhanced the reduction in numbers on the skin; the effect was most pronounced with 250 ppm chlorine; conversely in the body cavity, the general effects of sprays was to increase contamination by up to one log unit. 4. There was no evidence that sprays increased the rate of chilling. 5. When carcases were held overnight in the rig at 11 degrees C after chilling, microbe counts on dry-chilled carcases remained stable, but increased on carcases that had been sprayed with chlorinated water. PMID:11201437

  3. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures and... temperature is reduced to 40 °F. or less, as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless such...

  4. Salmonella Recovery Following Immersion Chilling for Matched Neck Skin and Whole Carcass Enrichment Sampling Methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence and serogroups of Salmonella recovered following immersion chilling were determined for both neck skin and the matching whole carcass enriched samples. Commercially processed and eviscerated broiler carcasses were immersion chilled in ice and tap water for 40 min. Following immersio...

  5. Chilling-Induced Lipid Degradation in Cucumber (Cucumis sativa L. cv Hybrid C) Fruit 1

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, Kirk L.; Kuo, Shu-Jung

    1989-01-01

    Chilling at 4°C in the dark induced lipid degradation in cucumber (Cucumis sativa L.) fruit upon rewarming at 14°C. Rates of ethane evolution by fruits rewarmed after 3 days of chilling were up to four-fold higher than those evolved by unchilled (14°C) fruits (0.02-0.05 picomoles gram fresh weight−1 hour−1). This potentiation of lipid peroxidation occurred prior to irreversible injury (requiring 3 to 7 days of chilling) as indicated by increases in ethylene evolution and visual observations. Decreases in unsaturation of peel tissue glycolipids were observed in fruits rewarmed after 3 days of chilling, indicating the plastids to be the site of the early phases of chilling-induced peroxidation. Losses in unsaturation of tissue phospholipids were first observed only after chilling for 7 days. Phospholipase D activity appeared to be potentiated in fruits rewarmed after 7 days of chilling as indicated by a decrease in phosphatidylcholine (and secondarily phosphatidylethanolamine) with a corresponding increase in phosphatidic acid. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation may have a role in conferring chilling injury. PMID:16666850

  6. Chills in Different Sensory Domains: Frisson Elicited by Acoustical, Visual, Tactile and Gustatory Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grewe, Oliver; Katzur, Bjorn; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmuller, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    "Chills" (frisson manifested as goose bumps or shivers) have been used in an increasing number of studies as indicators of emotions in response to music (e.g., Craig, 2005; Guhn, Hamm, & Zentner, 2007; McCrae, 2007; Panksepp, 1995; Sloboda, 1991). In this study we present evidence that chills can be induced through aural, visual, tactile, and…

  7. A chemical additive to limit potential bacterial contamination in chill tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler carcasses with different types and numbers of bacteria are commonly chilled together in an ice water bath which may lead to transfer of unwanted bacteria from carcass to carcass. Historically chill tanks have been chlorinated to help prevent cross contamination and recently other chemical a...

  8. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures and... temperature is reduced to 40 °F. or less, as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless such...

  9. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures and... temperature is reduced to 40 °F. or less, as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless such...

  10. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures and... temperature is reduced to 40 °F. or less, as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless such...

  11. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures and... temperature is reduced to 40 °F. or less, as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless such...

  12. TEMPERATURE CONDITIONING ALTERS TRANSCRIPT ABUNDANCE OF GENES RELATED TO CHILLING STRESS IN GRAPEFRUIT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) are susceptible to chilling injury (CI) if held at temperatures below about 10C. Changes in transcript abundance for a number of genes have been correlated with chilling stress in citrus fruit. We tested the hypothesis that conditioning affects transcript abundance of ...

  13. Occurrence of chilling injury in fresh-cut ‘Kent’ mangoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For best visual quality retention of fresh-cut fruits, the preferred storage temperature is about 5 °C, which is considered a chilling temperature for chilling sensitive tropical fruits like mango. Changes in visual and compositional attributes, aroma volatile production, respiration rate, and elect...

  14. Putative paternal factors controlling chilling tolerance in Korean market-type cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling temperatures (<10 degrees C) may cause damage to Korean market-type cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants during winter and early spring growing seasons. Inheritance to chilling in U.S. processing cucumber is controlled by cytoplasmic (maternally) and nuclear factors. To understand inherit...

  15. Interactive effects of light and chilling on peach flower and leaf budbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to chilling temperatures is a critical factor in the suitability of peach cultivars to moderate climates such as that in the southeastern United States. Much of the research on chilling uses cuttings exposed to various treatments and forced under controlled conditions. Light is not genera...

  16. Diversity of low chill peaches from Asia, Brasil, Europe and the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred fifty-five peach (Prunus persica) cultivars, from Asia, Brazil, Europe, and the USA, were examined using eleven SSRs to study the genetic relationships among low chill as compared to high chill peach germplasm. Data was analyzed by NTSYSpc to form a similarity matrix using Nei and Li’s ...

  17. How does music arouse "chills"? Investigating strong emotions, combining psychological, physiological, and psychoacoustical methods.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Oliver; Nagel, Frederik; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2005-12-01

    Music can arouse ecstatic "chill" experiences defined as "goose pimples" and as "shivers down the spine." We recorded chills both via subjects' self-reports and physiological reactions, finding that they do not occur in a reflex-like manner, but as a result of attentive, experienced, and conscious musical enjoyment. PMID:16597800

  18. Maternal Effects Supersede Nuclear Effects Conditioning Chilling Response in Cucumber (Cucumis Sativus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling damage can be a major determinant of yield reduction in cucumber production by acting to alter in sex expression, flowering dates, and plant development. Previous research determined that the ability of cucumber plants to withstand a chilling event (i.e., tolerance and susceptibility) is d...

  19. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  20. A parametric study of wind chill equivalent temperatures by a dimensionless steady-state analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    A first order analytical approximation of steady-state heat conduction in a hollow cylinder exchanging heat at its external surface by convection with a cold and windy environment is presented. The model depicts the thermal behavior of certain body elements, e.g., head/face, when exposed to such environments. The results are presented by dimensionless parameters and facilitate the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs). The effects of several variables on determining WCETs were studied using specific examples, leading to the following generalizations: (1) the conditions assumed for "calm" wind speed appear to be a dominant factor in determining WCET; (2) the effects, on both (skin) surface temperature and on WCET, of a 1°C change in environmental temperature appear to be more pronounced than those of a 1 m/s change in wind speed; (3) similarly, predicted WCETs are more sensitive to the geometrical dimensions assumed for the modeled entity than they are to wind speeds; and (4) tissue thermal conductivity, the angle at which the convective heat transfer coefficient is measured relative to wind direction, and the factor used to establish "effective" wind speeds in the domain occupied by humans relative to reported values, all seem to have relatively small effects on the determination of WCET. These conclusions strongly suggest, among other things, that for any given combination of environmental conditions, wind chill indices may best be presented as ranges rather than as single values. This seems to apply even when worst-case scenarios are considered. Also emphasized is the need for careful and realistic selection of all the parameter values used in the determination of WCETs.

  1. Stratified storage economically increases capacity and efficiency of campus chilled water system

    SciTech Connect

    Bahnfleth, W.P.; Joyce, W.S.

    1995-03-01

    This article describes how the addition of stratified chilled water storage to the Cornell University campus chilled water system has increased its capacity and efficiency and reduced its operating costs for less than the cost of a conventional chilled water plant expansion. While chilled water storage is not appropriate for all chilled water systems, the experience at Cornell indicates that it can be very cost effective when favorable conditions exist. It should receive serious consideration by owners of large systems who are investigating alternatives for system expansion. The benefits of variable speed chiller operation were found to be considerable. It is hoped that this successful application will stimulate further interest in the development and application of variable speed drive chillers.

  2. An Inexpensive Radiosonde Chilled Mirror Sensor: An Old Technology With New Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The availability of an inexpensive chilled mirror dewpoint sensor has made improved atmospheric relative humidity measurements accessible. Comparisons between the chilled mirror sensor and routine radiosonde sensors have provided new information on the limitation and reliability of the routine measurements. The chilled mirror has observed detailed moisture profiles at cirrus cloud levels when cirrus was not visible, a feature that routine sensors fail to observe. Comparison measurements between the chilled mirror, the carbon resistive (hygristor) and, the capacitive sensors will be discussed. Measurements from three locations (Wallops Island; Andros Island, Bahamas; and Camborne, UK) will be highlighted. It is conceivable that the chilled mirror sensor, when its capability is fully understood, may be sufficiently reliable to serve as a reference.

  3. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  4. Warm Root Temperature Mitigates the Effect of Chilling in the Dark on Photosynthesis in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of warm season crops such as cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) can be reduced by untimely episodes of chilling temperature that often occur during the first weeks after planting. We examined the impact of chilling stress on cotton seedlings two weeks after planting by chilling both shoots...

  5. Chemical additive to enhance antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine and control cross-contamination during immersion chill of broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immersion chilling during broiler processing can be a site for cross contamination between the occasional highly contaminated carcass and those that are co-chilled. Chlorine is often used as a chill tank antimicrobial but it can be overcome with heavy organic loads associated with the constant supp...

  6. Nondestructive detection of chilling injury in cucumber fruit using hyperspectral imaging with feature selection and supervised classification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling injury, as a physiological disorder in cucumbers, occurs after the fruit has been subjected to low temperatures. It is thus desirable to detect chilling injury at early stages and/or remove chilling injured cucumbers during sorting and grading. This research was aimed to apply hyperspectral...

  7. Nd8Fe73Co5Hf2B12 strip cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Marinescu, M.; Castaño, F. J.

    2000-05-01

    Nd8Fe73Co5Hf2B12 alloys were cast as strips (thick continuous ribbons with thickness t=100-160 μm) by a chill disk melt spinning technique (vdisk=3 m/s) from a master alloy prepared by arc melting (A) and from two prealloyed components (B). Samples obtained by the B procedure revealed in the as-cast state, good magnetic properties with an unusually high value of the coercivity, Hc=10.3 kOe, for the substoichiometric Nd2Fe14B system. A high degree of structural refinement and a homogeneous dispersion of the phases are attained in sample B. The strength and type of magnetic interactions between the grains are presented by δM and irreversible susceptibility plots.

  8. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  9. Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality

    PubMed Central

    Sumpf, Maria; Jentschke, Sebastian; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion. Methodology/Principal Findings The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values). The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder. PMID:26083383

  10. Climate Change Affects Winter Chill for Temperate Fruit and Nut Trees

    PubMed Central

    Luedeling, Eike; Girvetz, Evan H.; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Brown, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Temperate fruit and nut trees require adequate winter chill to produce economically viable yields. Global warming has the potential to reduce available winter chill and greatly impact crop yields. Methodology/Principal Findings We estimated winter chill for two past (1975 and 2000) and 18 future scenarios (mid and end 21st century; 3 Global Climate Models [GCMs]; 3 greenhouse gas emissions [GHG] scenarios). For 4,293 weather stations around the world and GCM projections, Safe Winter Chill (SWC), the amount of winter chill that is exceeded in 90% of all years, was estimated for all scenarios using the “Dynamic Model” and interpolated globally. We found that SWC ranged between 0 and about 170 Chill Portions (CP) for all climate scenarios, but that the global distribution varied across scenarios. Warm regions are likely to experience severe reductions in available winter chill, potentially threatening production there. In contrast, SWC in most temperate growing regions is likely to remain relatively unchanged, and cold regions may even see an increase in SWC. Climate change impacts on SWC differed quantitatively among GCMs and GHG scenarios, with the highest GHG leading to losses up to 40 CP in warm regions, compared to 20 CP for the lowest GHG. Conclusions/Significance The extent of projected changes in winter chill in many major growing regions of fruits and nuts indicates that growers of these commodities will likely experience problems in the future. Mitigation of climate change through reductions in greenhouse gas emissions can help reduce the impacts, however, adaption to changes will have to occur. To better prepare for likely impacts of climate change, efforts should be undertaken to breed tree cultivars for lower chilling requirements, to develop tools to cope with insufficient winter chill, and to better understand the temperature responses of tree crops. PMID:21629649

  11. Broiler carcass bacterial counts after immersion chilling using either a low or high volume of water.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, J K; Cason, J A; Smith, D P; Buhr, R J; Fletcher, D L

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the bacteriological impact of using different volumes of water during immersion chilling of broiler carcasses. Market-aged broilers were processed, and carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone immediately after the final bird wash. One half of each carcass pair was individually chilled at 4 degrees C in a separate bag containing either 2.1 L/kg (low) or 16.8 L/kg (high) of distilled water. Carcass halves were submersed in a secondary chill tank containing approximately 150 L of an ice-water mix (0.6 degrees C). After chilling for 45 min, carcass halves were rinsed with 100 mL of sterile water for 1 min. Rinses and chill water were analyzed for total aerobic bacteria (APC), Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Campylobacter. After chilling with a low volume of water, counts were 3.7, 2.5, 2.6, and 2.1 log(10) cfu/mL of rinse for APC, E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Campylobacter, respectively. When a high volume of chill water was used, counts were 3.2, 1.7, 1.6, and 1.8 log(10) cfu/mL of rinse for APC, E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Campylobacter, respectively. There was no difference in bacterial counts per milliliter of chill water among treatments. These results show that using additional water during immersion chilling of inoculated broilers will remove more bacteria from the carcass surfaces, but numbers of bacteria per milliliter in the chiller water will remain constant. The bacteriological impact of using more water during commercial immersion chilling may not be enough to offset economic costs. PMID:17012173

  12. [Effects of chilling stress on antioxidant system and ultrastructure of walnut cultivars].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing-hua; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhang, Zhi-hua; Gao, Yi

    2015-05-01

    In order to reveal cold hardiness mechanisms and ascertain suitable cold hardiness biochemical indicators of walnut (Juglans regia) , three walnut cultivars ' Hartley' , 'Jinlong 1' and 'Jinlong 2' with strong to weak tolerance of chilling stress, were used to investigate variations of leaf antioxidant enzyme activity and superoxide anion (O2-·) content in one year-old branches under chilling stress at 1 °C in leaf-expansion period. The mesophyll cells ultrastructure of ' Hartley' and 'Jinlong 2' under chilling stress were also observed by transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) enzyme activities were the strongest and O2-· content was the lowest in chilling-tolerant cultivar ' Hartley' under chilling stress among the three cultivars. The ultrastructure of the mesophyll cells was stable, and chilling injury symptoms of the leaves were not observed. In chilling-sensitive cultivar 'Jinlong 2' , the SOD, POD and catalase enzyme ( CAT) activities decreased sharply, and the O2-· content was kept at a high level under chilling stress. The ultrastructure of the mesophyll cells was injured obviously at 1 °C∟ for 72 hours. Most of chloroplasts were swollen, and grana lamella became thinner and fewer. A number of chloroplasts envelope and plasma membrane were damaged and became indistinct. At the same time, the edges of some of 'Jinlong 2' young leaves became water-soaked. It was concluded that the ultrastructure stability of mesophyll cells under chilling stress was closely related to walnut cold hardiness. SOD, POD enzyme activities and O2-· content in walnut leaves could be used as biochemical indicators of walnut cold hardiness in leaf-expansion period. There might be a correlation between the damage of cell membrane system and reactive oxygen accumulation under chilling stress. PMID:26571647

  13. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t < 200 ms) thanks to a photodiode, which is located below the substrate. The microstructures that are obtained in laboratory are characterised in both the as-cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  14. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  15. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  16. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  17. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the advance in computer technology has increased the computing power of small work stations as well as PC (personal computers) to permit a much shorter turn-around time for complex computations. The DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARC station 10-41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  18. USGS ShakeCast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David; Lin, Kuo-Wan

    2007-01-01

    Automating, Simplifying, and Improving the Use of ShakeMap for Post-Earthquake Decisionmaking and Response. ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  19. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy. PMID:352670

  20. Prosthetic management of malpositioned implant using custom cast abutment

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aishwarya; Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Patil, Sanket; Chatterjee, Debopriya; Dandekeri, Savita; Prabhu, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are reported with malpositioned implants. Both the implants were placed 6–7 months back. They had osseointegrated well with the surrounding bone. However, they presented severe facial inclination. Case I was restored with custom cast abutment with an auto polymerizing acrylic gingival veneer. Case II was restored with custom cast UCLA type plastic implant abutment. Ceramic was directly fired on the custom cast abutments. The dual treatment strategy resulted in functional and esthetic restorations despite facial malposition of the implants. PMID:26538957

  1. Advanced Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Components

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shingledecker, J.P.; Evans, N.D.; Pollard, M.J.

    2008-10-09

    In July of 2002, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to develop and commercialize new cast stainless steels invented and initially tested on a prior CRADA. This CRADA is a direct follow-on project to CRADA ORNL-99-0533 for diesel engine exhaust component and gas turbine engine structural component applications. The goal of this new CRADA was to develop and commercialize the newly discovered cast stainless steels (primarily CF8C-Plus) with improved performance and reliability, as lower-cost upgrade alternatives to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys.

  2. Melting and casting processes for high-temperature intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, D.M. )

    1991-05-01

    Most of the metallic systems thus far identified as promising from the commercial viewpoint are composed of elements which are either susceptible to oxidation, such as Al, or highly reactive, such as Ti; these characteristics entail the use of such melting and casting techniques as vacuum-induction melting, vacuum-arc remelting, electroslag refining, plasma-arc melting, spray casting, and directional solidification. Spray casting is noteworthy both in its ability to produce near-net-shape components and its inherent reduction of the oxygen and hydrogen pickup which has been associated with the embrittlement of aluminides. 24 refs.

  3. Lost-Wax Casting in Ancient China: New Discussion on Old Debates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weirong; Huang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The possible use of lost-wax casting in China has long been a matter of controversy. Based on the study of pertinent ancient texts concerning the technical origins of lost-wax casting in China, direct examination of questioned ancient Chinese bronzes as well as definite lost-wax castings from both overseas and China, and modern production of objects using piece-mold casting, the authors point out their own conceptual ideas about ancient lost-wax casting as follows. First, the lost-wax casting technique does not have its earliest origins in ancient China but rather from the Sumerians in Mesopotamia, where it was predominantly used to cast small human and animal figures (statuettes). Next, some essential characteristics of the lost-wax casting technique can be identified from the point of view of a distortable soft starting model. The locally deformed shape of lost-wax castings is found to be variable. Finally, it is improper to consider the ease of extraction from the mold as the criterion for distinguishing lost-wax casting from piece-mold casting. It is therefore incorrect to conclude that the three-dimensional openwork decorations present on Chinese bronzes from the Spring and Autumn Period, and the Warring States Period, are fabricated using lost-wax castings.

  4. Roll Casting of Al-25%Si

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Toshio; Harada, Hideto; Watari, Hisaki

    2011-05-04

    Strip casting of Al-25%Si strip was tried using an unequal diameter twin roll caster. The diameter of the lower roll (large roll) was 1000 mm and the diameter of the upper roll (small roll) was 250 mm. Roll material was mild steel. The sound strip could be cast at the speeds ranging from 8 m/min to 12 m/min. The strip did not stick to the roll without the parting material. The primary Si, which existed at centre area of the thickness direction, was larger than that which existed at other area. The size of the primary Si was smaller than 0.2 mm. Eutectic Si was smaller 5 {mu}m. The as-cast strip was ranging from 2 mm to 3 mm thick and its width was 100 mm. The as-cast strip could be hot rolled down to 1 mm. The hot rolled strip was cold rolled. The primary Si became smaller and the pore occurred around the primary Si after the rolling.

  5. Cold resistance depends on acclimation and behavioral caste in a temperate ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlmeier, Andreas P.; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne; Scharf, Inon

    2012-10-01

    Adjusting to low temperatures is important for animals living in cold environments. We studied the chill-coma recovery time in temperate ant workers ( Temnothorax nylanderi) from colonies collected in autumn and spring in Germany. We experimentally acclimated these ant colonies to cold temperatures followed by warm temperatures. As expected, cold-acclimated workers recovered faster from freezing temperatures, but subsequent heat acclimation did not change the short recovery times observed after cold acclimation. Hence, either heat acclimation improves cold tolerance, possibly as a general response to stress, or at least it does not negate enhanced cold tolerance following cold acclimation. Colonies collected in spring showed similar cold tolerance levels to cold-acclimated colonies in the laboratory. Next, we compared the chill-coma recovery time of different worker castes and found that exterior workers recovered faster than interior workers. This difference may be related to their more frequent exposure to cold, higher activity level, or distinct physiology. Interior workers were also heavier and showed a higher gaster-to-head ratio and thorax ratio compared to exterior workers. An obvious difference between exterior and interior workers is activity level, but we found no link between activity and cold tolerance. This suggests that physiology rather than behavioral differences could cause the increased cold tolerance of exterior workers. Our study reveals the importance of acclimation for cold tolerance under natural and standardized conditions and demonstrates differences in cold tolerance and body dimensions in monomorphic behavioral castes of an ant.

  6. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  7. Music chills: The eye pupil as a mirror to music's soul.

    PubMed

    Laeng, Bruno; Eidet, Lise Mette; Sulutvedt, Unni; Panksepp, Jaak

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated whether music-induced aesthetic "chill" responses, which typically correspond to peak emotional experiences, can be objectively monitored by degree of pupillary dilation. Participants listened to self-chosen songs versus control songs chosen by other participants. The experiment included an active condition where participants made key presses to indicate when experiencing chills and a passive condition (without key presses). Chills were reported more frequently for self-selected songs than control songs. Pupil diameter was concurrently measured by an eye-tracker while participants listened to each of the songs. Pupil size was larger within specific time-windows around the chill events, as monitored by key responses, than in comparison to pupil size observed during 'passive' song listening. In addition, there was a clear relationship between pupil diameter within the chills-related time-windows during both active and passive conditions, thus ruling out the possibility that chills-related pupil dilations were an artifact of making a manual response. These findings strongly suggest that music chills can be visible in the moment-to-moment changes in the size of pupillary responses and that a neuromodulatory role of the central norepinephrine system is thereby implicated in this phenomenon. PMID:27500655

  8. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for the detection of chilling injury in cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, Yud-Ren; Wang, C. Y.; Chan, D. E.; Kim, Moon S.

    2004-11-01

    Hyperspectral images of cucumbers were acquired before and during cold storage treatments as well as during subsequent room temperature (RT) storage to explore the potential for the detection of chilling induced damage in whole cucumbers. Region of interest (ROI) spectral features of chilling injured areas, resulting from cold storage treatments at 0°C or 5°C, showed a reduction in reflectance intensity during multi-day post chilling periods of RT storage. Large spectral differences between good-smooth skins and chilling injured skins occurred in the 700-850 nm visible/NIR region. A number of data processing methods, including simple spectral band algorithms, second difference, and principal component analysis (PCA), were attempted to discriminate the ROI spectra of good cucumber skins from those of chilling injured skins. Results revealed that using either a dual-band ratio algorithm (Q811/756) or a PCA model from a narrow spectral region of 733-848 nm could detect chilling injured skins with a success rate of over 90%. Furthermore, the dual-band algorithm was applied to the analysis of images of cucumbers at different conditions, and the resultant images showed more correct identification of chilling injured spots than other processing methods.

  9. A chilling sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis with altered steryl-ester metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hugly, S.; McCourt, P.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. ); Patterson, G.W. )

    1990-07-01

    A chilling-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated and subjected to genetic, physiological, and biochemical analysis. The chilling-sensitive nature of the mutant line is due to a single recessive nuclear mutation at a locus designated chs1. In contrast to wild-type plants, which are not adversely affected by low temperatures, the chs1 mutant is killed by several days of exposure to temperatures below 18{degree}C. Following exposure to chilling temperatures, the mutant displays two common symptoms of chilling injury - leaf chlorosis and electrolyte leakage. In these respects, the physiological response of the mutant to low temperatures mimics the response observed in some naturally occurring chilling sensitive species. The biochemical basis of chilling sensitivity was explored by examining the pattern of incorporation of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} into soluble metabolites and lipids in wild-type and mutant plants. The only difference observed between the mutant and wild type was that following low temperature treatment, the mutant accumulated 10-fold more radioactivity in a specific class of neutral lipids which were identified by a variety of criteria to be steryl-esters. The accumulation of radioactivity in the steryl-ester fraction occurs 24 hours before there is any visible evidence of chilling injury.

  10. 40 CFR 467.21 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ancillary operations shall include direct chill casting, solution heat treatment, cleaning or etching, and... AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions...

  11. 40 CFR 467.21 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ancillary operations shall include direct chill casting, solution heat treatment, cleaning or etching, and... AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions...

  12. 40 CFR 467.21 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ancillary operations shall include direct chill casting, solution heat treatment, cleaning or etching, and... AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions...

  13. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  14. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  15. Chilling and frost tolerance in Miscanthus and Saccharum genotypes bred for cool temperate climates

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Patrick C.; Peixoto, Murilo M.; Busch, Florian A.; Johnson, Daniel C.; Sage, Rowan F.

    2014-01-01

    Miscanthus hybrids are leading candidates for bioenergy feedstocks in mid to high latitudes of North America and Eurasia, due to high productivity associated with the C4 photosynthetic pathway and their tolerance of cooler conditions. However, as C4 plants, they may lack tolerance of chilling conditions (0–10 °C) and frost, particularly when compared with candidate C3 crops at high latitudes. In higher latitudes, cold tolerance is particularly important if the feedstock is to utilize fully the long, early-season days of May and June. Here, leaf gas exchange and fluorescence are used to assess chilling tolerance of photosynthesis in five Miscanthus hybrids bred for cold tolerance, a complex Saccharum hybrid (energycane), and an upland sugarcane variety with some chilling tolerance. The chilling treatment consisted of transferring warm-grown plants (25/20 °C day/night growth temperatures) to chilling (12/5 °C) conditions for 1 week, followed by assessing recovery after return to warm temperatures. Chilling tolerance was also evaluated in outdoor, spring-grown Miscanthus genotypes before and after a cold front that was punctuated by a frost event. Miscanthus×giganteus was found to be the most chilling-tolerant genotype based on its ability to maintain a high net CO2 assimilation rate (A) during chilling, and recover A to a greater degree following a return to warm conditions. This was associated with increasing its capacity for short-term dark-reversible photoprotective processes (ΦREG) and the proportion of open photosystem II reaction centres (qL) while minimizing photoinactivation (ΦNF). Similarly, in the field, M.×giganteus exhibited a significantly greater A and pre-dawn F v/F m after the cold front compared with the other chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrids. PMID:24642848

  16. Physiological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Seed Priming-Induced Chilling Tolerance in Rice Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Hussain, Hafiz A; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Rice belongs to tropical and subtropical environments and is extremely sensitive to chilling stress particularly during emergence and early stages of seedling development. Seed priming can be a good approach to enhance rice germination and stand establishment under chilling stress. The present study examined the role of different seed priming techniques viz., hydropriming, osmopriming, redox priming, chemical priming, and hormonal priming, in enhancing the chilling tolerance in rice. The most effective reagents and their pre-optimized concentrations based on preliminary experiments were used in this study. Two different rice cultivars were sown under chilling stress (18°C) and normal temperatures (28°C) in separate growth chambers. A non-primed control treatment was also maintained for comparison. Chilling stress caused erratic and delayed germination, poor seedling growth, reduced starch metabolism, and lower respiration rate, while higher lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide accumulation in rice seedlings of both cultivars. Nevertheless, all the seed priming treatments effectively alleviated the negative effects of chilling stress. In addition, seed priming treatments triggered the activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase, and enhanced the accumulations of glutathione and free proline in rice seedlings, which suggests that these measures help prevent the rice seedlings from chilling induced oxidative stress. Chemical priming with selenium and hormonal priming with salicylic acid remained more effective treatments for both rice cultivars under chilling stress than all other priming treatments. The better performance and greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings was associated with enhanced starch metabolism, high respiration rate, lower lipid peroxidation, and strong antioxidative defense system under chilling stress. PMID:26904078

  17. "On-off" thermoresponsive coating agent containing salicylic acid applied to maize seeds for chilling tolerance.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yajing; Li, Zhan; He, Fei; Huang, Yutao; Song, Wenjian; Hu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Chilling stress is an important constraint for maize seed establishment in the field. In this study, a type of "on-off" thermoresponsive coating agent containing poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylmethacrylate) (Abbr. P(NIPAm-co-BMA)) hydrogel was developed to improve the chilling tolerance of coated maize seed. The P(NIPAm-co-BMA) hydrogel was synthesized by free-radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and butylmethacrylate (BMA). Salicylic acid (SA) was loaded in the hydrogel as the chilling resistance agent. SA-loaded P(NIPAm-co-BMA) was used for seed film-coating of two maize varieties, Huang C (HC, chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive), to investigate the coated seed germination and seedling growth status under chilling stress. The results showed that the hydrogel obtained a phase transition temperature near 12°C with a NIPAM to MBA weight ratio of 1: 0.1988 (w/w). The temperature of 12°C was considered the "on-off" temperature for chilling-resistant agent release; the SA was released from the hydrogel more rapidly at external temperatures below 12°C than above 12°C. In addition, when seedlings of both maize varieties suffered a short chilling stress (5°C), higher concentrations of SA-loaded hydrogel resulted in increased germination energy, germination percentage, germination index, root length, shoot height, dry weight of roots and shoots and protective enzyme activities and a decreased malondialdehyde content in coated maize seeds compared to single SA treatments. The majority of these physiological and biochemical parameters achieved significant levels compared with the control. Therefore, SA-loaded P(NIPAm-co-BMA), a nontoxic thermoresponsive hydrogel, can be used as an effective material for chilling tolerance in film-coated maize seeds. PMID:25807522

  18. Role of the aquaporin PIP1 subfamily in the chilling tolerance of rice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tadashi; Lian, Hong-Li; Su, Wei-Ai; Tanaka, Daisuke; Liu, Cheng wei; Iwasaki, Ikuko; Kitagawa, Yoshichika

    2009-02-01

    Although an association between chilling tolerance and aquaporins has been reported, the exact mechanisms involved in this relationship remain unclear. We compared the expression profiles of aquaporin genes between a chilling-tolerant and a low temperature-sensitive rice variety using real-time PCR and identified seven genes that closely correlated with chilling tolerance. Chemical treatment experiments, by which rice plants were induced to lose their chilling tolerance, implicated the PIP1 (plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1) subfamily member genes in chilling tolerance. Of these members, changes in expression of the OsPIP1;3 gene suggested this to be the most closely related to chilling tolerance. Although OsPIP1;3 showed a much lower water permeability than members of the OsPIP2 family, OsPIP1;3 enhanced the water permeability of OsPIP2;2 and OsPIP2;4 when co-expressed with either of these proteins in oocytes. Transgenic rice plants (OE1) overexpressing OsPIP1;3 showed an enhanced level of chilling tolerance and the ability to maintain high OsPIP1;3 expression levels under low temperature treatment, similar to that of chilling-tolerant rice plants. We assume that OsPIP1;3, constitutively overexpressed in the leaf and root of transgenic OE1 plants, interacts with members of the OsPIP2 subfamily, thereby improving the plants' water balance under low temperatures and resulting in the observed chilling tolerance of the plants. PMID:19098326

  19. Chilling and frost tolerance in Miscanthus and Saccharum genotypes bred for cool temperate climates.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Patrick C; Peixoto, Murilo M; Busch, Florian A; Johnson, Daniel C; Sage, Rowan F

    2014-07-01

    Miscanthus hybrids are leading candidates for bioenergy feedstocks in mid to high latitudes of North America and Eurasia, due to high productivity associated with the C4 photosynthetic pathway and their tolerance of cooler conditions. However, as C4 plants, they may lack tolerance of chilling conditions (0-10 °C) and frost, particularly when compared with candidate C3 crops at high latitudes. In higher latitudes, cold tolerance is particularly important if the feedstock is to utilize fully the long, early-season days of May and June. Here, leaf gas exchange and fluorescence are used to assess chilling tolerance of photosynthesis in five Miscanthus hybrids bred for cold tolerance, a complex Saccharum hybrid (energycane), and an upland sugarcane variety with some chilling tolerance. The chilling treatment consisted of transferring warm-grown plants (25/20 °C day/night growth temperatures) to chilling (12/5 °C) conditions for 1 week, followed by assessing recovery after return to warm temperatures. Chilling tolerance was also evaluated in outdoor, spring-grown Miscanthus genotypes before and after a cold front that was punctuated by a frost event. Miscanthus×giganteus was found to be the most chilling-tolerant genotype based on its ability to maintain a high net CO2 assimilation rate (A) during chilling, and recover A to a greater degree following a return to warm conditions. This was associated with increasing its capacity for short-term dark-reversible photoprotective processes (ΦREG) and the proportion of open photosystem II reaction centres (qL) while minimizing photoinactivation (ΦNF). Similarly, in the field, M.×giganteus exhibited a significantly greater A and pre-dawn F v/F m after the cold front compared with the other chilling-sensitive Miscanthus hybrids. PMID:24642848

  20. Physiological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Seed Priming-Induced Chilling Tolerance in Rice Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Hussain, Hafiz A.; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Rice belongs to tropical and subtropical environments and is extremely sensitive to chilling stress particularly during emergence and early stages of seedling development. Seed priming can be a good approach to enhance rice germination and stand establishment under chilling stress. The present study examined the role of different seed priming techniques viz., hydropriming, osmopriming, redox priming, chemical priming, and hormonal priming, in enhancing the chilling tolerance in rice. The most effective reagents and their pre-optimized concentrations based on preliminary experiments were used in this study. Two different rice cultivars were sown under chilling stress (18°C) and normal temperatures (28°C) in separate growth chambers. A non-primed control treatment was also maintained for comparison. Chilling stress caused erratic and delayed germination, poor seedling growth, reduced starch metabolism, and lower respiration rate, while higher lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide accumulation in rice seedlings of both cultivars. Nevertheless, all the seed priming treatments effectively alleviated the negative effects of chilling stress. In addition, seed priming treatments triggered the activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase, and enhanced the accumulations of glutathione and free proline in rice seedlings, which suggests that these measures help prevent the rice seedlings from chilling induced oxidative stress. Chemical priming with selenium and hormonal priming with salicylic acid remained more effective treatments for both rice cultivars under chilling stress than all other priming treatments. The better performance and greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings was associated with enhanced starch metabolism, high respiration rate, lower lipid peroxidation, and strong antioxidative defense system under chilling stress. PMID:26904078

  1. Effect of Light and Chilling Temperatures on Chilling-sensitive and Chilling-resistant Plants. Pretreatment of Cucumber and Spinach Thylakoids in Vivo and in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Garber, M P

    1977-05-01

    The effects of chilling temperatures, in light or dark, on the isolated thylakoids and leaf discs of cucumber (Cucumis sativa L. "Marketer") and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. "Bloomsdale") were studied. The pretreatment of isolated thylakoids and leaf discs at 4 C in the dark did not affect the phenazine methosulfate-dependent phosphorylation, proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity, or chlorophyll content. Exposure of cucumber cotyledon discs and isolated thylakoids of cucumber and spinach to 4 C in light resulted in a rapid inactivation of the thylakoids. The sequence of activities or components lost during inactivation (starting with the most sensitive) are: phenazine methosulfate-dependent cyclic phosphorylation, proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity, and chlorophyll. The rate of loss of proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity and chlorophyll is similar for isolated cucumber and spinach thylakoids, whereas spinach thylakoids are more resistant to the loss of phenazine methosulfate-dependent phosphorylation. The thylakoids of spinach leaf discs were unaffected by exposure to 4 C in light. The results question whether the extreme resistance of spinach thylakoids treated in vivo is solely a function of the chloroplast thylakoid membranes and establish the validity of using in vitro results to make inferences about cucumber thylakoids treated in vivo at 4 C in light. PMID:16659980

  2. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  3. Columnar to equiaxed transition in high Cr white iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.

    1996-07-15

    White cast irons are frequently used in applications requiring high wear resistance. High Cr white cast irons have a composite microstructure composed of hard (Fe,Cr){sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides in a steel matrix. In thick section castings, long rod-shaped carbides may grow perpendicular to the mold wall to form the columnar zone of the casting, or their long axes may grow in random directions to form equiaxed grains. Previous research has indicated that the equiaxed region of these high Cr white iron castings is much more wear resistant under high stress abrasive conditions than the columnar region, when the carbides are oriented perpendicular to the wear surface. Therefore, in order to maximize their abrasion resistance, it is essential that wear resistant cast parts with thick sections be produced with completely equiaxed macrostructures to maximize their abrasion resistance. In the present study, the effect of both the chemical composition, particularly carbon content, and the pouring superheat of the melt on the macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings is investigated.

  4. Monitoring and analysis of a chill storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzle, W. J.; Brett, C. E.

    1982-12-01

    Parisian, a major department store in University Mall, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, has a free cooling system installed to provide air conditioning. The system uses a cooling tower during cold weather, below 47 F Wet bulb temperature, to chill water to an average 43 F. The cold water is stored in an unconfined aquifer and recovered as required for air conditioning on an annual basis. This contract provides monitoring of this system to evaluate system performance. Instrumentation for monitoring has been selected and is being installed. Water temperatures and integrated flow entering and leaving the air conditioning cooling coils and the cooling tower are the prime measurements. Power input to all pumps and cooling tower is also measured. In addition, the temperatures leaving and entering the wells and near the bottom of the wells are measured at random intervals. The water levels in the wells are measured at similar times. Store and ambient data are also recorded.

  5. Advances, shortcomings, and recommendations for wind chill estimation.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham; Tikuisis, Peter

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses briefly the advances made and the remaining short-comings in the "new" wind chill charts adopted in the US and Canada in 2001. A number of indicated refinements are proposed, including the use of whole body models in the computations, verification of heat exchange coefficients by human experiments, reconsideration of "calm" wind conditions, reconsideration of frostbite threshold levels, the inclusion of cold-related pain and numbness in the charts, etc. A dynamic numerical model is applied to compare the effects of wind speeds, on the one hand, and air temperatures, on the other, on the steady-state exposed facial and bare finger temperatures. An apparent asymmetry is demonstrated, favoring the effects of wind speeds over those of air temperatures for an identical final facial temperature. This asymmetry is reversed, however, when SI unit changes in these quantities are considered. PMID:20852897

  6. Advances, shortcomings, and recommendations for wind chill estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham; Tikuisis, Peter

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses briefly the advances made and the remaining short-comings in the "new" wind chill charts adopted in the US and Canada in 2001. A number of indicated refinements are proposed, including the use of whole body models in the computations, verification of heat exchange coefficients by human experiments, reconsideration of "calm" wind conditions, reconsideration of frostbite threshold levels, the inclusion of cold-related pain and numbness in the charts, etc. A dynamic numerical model is applied to compare the effects of wind speeds, on the one hand, and air temperatures, on the other, on the steady-state exposed facial and bare finger temperatures. An apparent asymmetry is demonstrated, favoring the effects of wind speeds over those of air temperatures for an identical final facial temperature. This asymmetry is reversed, however, when SI unit changes in these quantities are considered.

  7. Quality and bacteriological consequences of beef carcass spray-chilling: Effects of spray duration and boxed beef storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Greer, G G; Jones, S D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of water spray-chilling on beef carcass traits and muscle quality, bacteriology and retail case life were determined in a research abattoir. Chilling treatments were compared using 10 crossbred steer carcasses (280 ± 4 kg) at each spray duration (4, 8, 12 and 16 h) and each vacuum storage temperature (1, 4, 8 and 12 °C). Control sides were air-chilled (1 °C, 24 h) while spray-chilled sides were sprayed with an intermittent water mist at 1 °C in four, 60 s cycles/h for the initial 4-16 h of chilling. The effects of storage temperature were evaluated using vacuum packaged longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle at post-chill intervals of 2, 16, 30 and 44 days. Chilling treatment effects were similar at all spray-chill durations and LT vacuum storage times and temperatures. Carcass spray-chilling did not effect pH, lean colour, % moisture, sarcomere length, shear value or weight loss during the vacuum storage of LT muscle. Carcass fat colour tended to brighten as spray duration was extended up to 12 h, but there was a grey discoloration of fat at spray durations beyond 12 h. Chilling treatment had only marginal effects on anaerobic bacteria during the vacuum storage of LT muscles, or aerobic bacteria during the retail display of rib-eye steaks, and the retail case life of steaks was largely unaffected by spray-chilling. A linear relationship between spray-chill duration and carcass weight loss was determined and carcass shrinkage was reduced by 0.08 g/100 g for every hour of spray-chilling. It was estimated that a major beef processing abattoir could utilize spray-chilling to save more than 2000 kg daily in carcass shrinkage, without compromising quality or increasing spoilage losses. PMID:22061138

  8. Cryoprotectants protect medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos from chilling injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Jing; Zhou, Guang-Bin; Wang, Yan-Ping; Fu, Xiang-Wei; Zhu, Shi-En

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of six cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol (Gly), methanol (MeOH), ethylene glycol (EG), 1,2-propylene glycol (PG) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) on the survival of medaka (Oryzias lapites) embryos at low temperatures (0 and -5C). Firstly, the embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages were exposed to different concentrations (1 to 4 mol per L) of DMSO, Gly, MeOH, EG, PG and DMF for 40min at 26C. After removal of the cryoprotectants (CPAs), the embryo survivals were assessed by their development into live fries following 9 day of culture. The results showed that the higher concentration of the CPA, the lower survival of the embryos; and that the toxicity of the six CPAs to medaka embryos is in the order of PG < MeOH = DMSO < Gly < EG < DMF (P < 0.05). Secondly, based on the results obtained above, embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages or other stages were exposed to 2 mol per L of PG, MeOH or DMSO for up to 180 min at 0C and up to 80 min at -5C respectively. The 8 to 16-cell embryos treated with MeOH at low temperatures showed highest survival. Thirdly, when embryos at different stages were treated with 2 mol per L of MeOH at -5C for 60 min, 16-somite stage embryos showed highest survival, followed by 4-somite, neurula, 50 percent epiboly, blastula, 32-cell and 8 to 16-cell embryos. These results demonstrated that PG had the lowest toxicity to medaka embryos among the six permeable CPAs at 26C, whereas MeOH showed highest cryoprotective efficiency under chilling conditions and chilling injury decreased gradually with the development of medaka embryos. PMID:22576114

  9. Rapid Chill and Fill of a Liquid Hydrogen Tank Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with Boeing North American, has been supporting the High Energy Upper Stage (HEUS) program by performing feasibility studies at Lewis Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF). These tests were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of chilling and filling a tank with liquid hydrogen in under 5 minutes. The goal of the HEUS program is to release a satellite from the shuttle cargo bay and then use a cryogenic (high-energy) upper stage to allow the satellite to achieve final orbit. Because of safety considerations, the propellant tanks for the upper stage will be launched warm and dry. They will be filled from the shuttle's external tank during the mission phase after the solid rocket boosters have jettisoned and prior to jettison of the external tank. Data from previous shuttle missions have been analyzed to ensure that sufficient propellant would be available in the external tank to fill the propellant tank of the proposed vehicle upper stage. Because of mission time-line considerations, the propellant tanks for the upper stage will have to be chilled down and filled in approximately 5 minutes. An existing uninsulated flight weight test tank was installed inside the vacuum chamber at SMIRF, and the chamber was evacuated to the 10(exp -5) torr range to simulate space vacuum conditions in the cargo bay with the doors open. During prerun operations, the facility liquid hydrogen (LH2) supply piping was prechilled with the vent gas bypassing the test article. The liquid hydrogen supply dewar was saturated at local ambient pressure and then pressurized with ambient temperature gaseous helium to the test pressure. A control system was used to ensure that the liquid hydrogen supply pressure was maintained at the test pressure.

  10. Casting Equipment. Casting and Angling Skills Series. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Robert D., Jr.

    Part of a series of self-contained instructional units designed by the Missouri Department of Conservation to teach Missourians how to use outdoor resources wisely and skillfully, the instructor manual, the first in the casting and angling series, is intended both as a reference book on casting equipment and as an introduction to the sport.…

  11. Investigation on Tool Wear Rate for Modified and Unmodified Aluminium-Silicon Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, M. M.; Khan, A. A.; Ismail, Ahmad F.

    This study demonstrates and explains the effect of strontium modification on machinability of aluminium-silicon eutectic (LM-6 type) alloy. This alloy is known to have many favourable features including weight to strength ratio, high corrosion resistance and excellent castability. However, normal unmodified LM-6 alloy has poor machinability, which reduces its applications range. In this work, various samples of LM-6 alloy were cast using sand and metallic chill mould with and without strontium addition. Machining on each cast product, was carried out using recommended cutting parameters for Al-Si alloys. Strontium modified samples have recorded a reduction in average flank wear, an increase in shear plane angles and a reduction in chip thickness. The main reason for this improvement is the refining effect of strontium, which reduces the size of the hard silicon particles. As a result, their abrasive action on the tool face has reduced a lot. Dramatic reductions in tool wear rate were recorded when the microstructures were refined. On the other hand, when no refinement of microstructure occurs, tool wear rate becomes high. Chip analysis showed that strontium modified sample produced a thinner chip thickness with a larger shear plane angle, requiring less cutting forces. The tool wear depends not only on the phases present in the work material, but also on their sizes and distribution over entire structure. Thus, strontium modification has better effect on machinability of die cast alloy compared to that of the sand cast LM-6 alloy.

  12. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard bandage that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while ... water. Plaster of Paris casts are heavier than fiberglass casts and don't hold up as well ...

  13. Mechanical-property characterization of an electroslag-cast valve body of CF8M composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hotsur, Y.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1983-11-01

    This initial investigation into electroslag casting involves the mechanical property study of a type 316 stainless steel (CF8M) valve body section (obtained from the University of British Columbia). The casting was subjected to tensile, creep, Charpy V-notch, and microhardness testing as well as an optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electrom microscopy. Tensile tests were conducted in the as-cast and solution-annealed conditions at room and elevated temperatures. Charpy impact testing was performed at room temperature on as-cast and solution-annealed specimens. Creep-deformation properties of the casting were obtianed at 649/sup 0/C (1200/sup 0/F) within a stress range from 90 to 170 MPa (13 to 25 ksi) in the as-cast state. Investigations into the creep behavior of this stainless steel electroslag casting are ongoing. Mechanical testing was conducted on specimens from three levels of the casting in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Comparisons made between the as-cast and solution-annealed specimens indicate that annealed specimens (in most cases) have better mechanical properties. This can be attributed to the dissolution of precipitated Fe-Cr-Mo microconstituents (sigma, chi, metal carbides, etc.) during the solution treatment. In general, though, preliminary results show that the electroslag castings have properties competitive with those of conventional sand castings.

  14. Apollo 14 composite casting demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This program assisted in the design and implementation of the composite casting demonstration for the Apollo 14 mission. Both flight and control samples were evaluated. Some conclusions resulting from a comparison of the flight and control samples were: (1) Solidification in neither the flight nor control samples was truly directional. (2) Apparent intermittent contact of the melt with the container in the flight samples led to unusual nucleation and growth structures. (3) There was greater uniformity, on a macro scale, of both pores and structural features in the flight sample; presumably the result of the reduced gravity conditions. (4) It seems quite feasible to produce enhanced dispersions of gases and dense phases in a melt which is solidified in reduced gravity. (5) A two-stage heating/cooling cycle may help directional solidification. (6) Sample materials should be selected from materials in which the dispersant fully wets the matrix material. (7) Experiments should be conducted in two modes: (1) where the melt is in good thermal contact with the container, and (2) where the melt is in a free-float condition.

  15. The Influence of Cast Shadows on the Detection of Three-Dimensional Curved Contour Structure.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Sieu K; Honson, Vanessa J; Challinor, Kirsten L

    2016-04-01

    Cast shadows have been shown to provide an effective ordinal cue to the depth position of objects. In the present study, two experiments investigated the effectiveness of cast shadows in facilitating the detection of spatial contours embedded in a field of randomly placed elements. In Experiment 1, the separation between the cast shadow and the contour was systematically increased to effectively signal different contour depth positions (relative to background elements), and this was repeated for patterns in which the lighting direction was above and from below. Increasing the shadow separation improved contour detection performance, but the degree to which sensitivity changed was dependent on the lighting direction. Patterns in which the light was from above were better detected than patterns in which the lighting direction was from below. This finding is consistent with the visual system assuming a "light-from-above rule" when processing cast shadows. In Experiment 2, we examined the degree to which changing the shape of the cast shadow (by randomly jittering the position of local cast shadow elements) affected the ability of the visual system to rely on the cast shadow to cue the depth position of the contour. Consistent with a coarse scale analysis, we find that cast shadows remained an effective depth cue even at large degrees of element jitter. Our findings demonstrate that cast shadows provide an effective means of signaling depth, which aids the process of contour integration, and this process is largely tolerant of local variations in lighting direction. PMID:27107019

  16. Thermal stratification of chilled-water slot flows into storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.E. Jr.; Cai, L.; Sohn, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    A numerical model was used to simulate the two dimensional flow of chilled water into a storage tank initially filled with warm water. The inlet flow is from a small slot in one vertical wall at the bottom of the tank. The numerical model employs a transient stream function-vorticity formulation to predict the streamline and temperature distributions in the tank as a function of time. Turbulence was modeled using the turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent length scale equations. The model results for a side-slot inlet to the tank reveal that the Archimedes number should be greater than 5 and the Reynolds number should be smaller than 1,000 to ensure thermal stratification of the hot and cold water. When stratification is achieved, the temperature distribution varies only in the vertical direction of the tank, where the water temperature is approximately uniform in the horizontal direction. The numerical results are in reasonably good agreement with some experimental data available in the literature.

  17. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  18. The Indeterminate Domain Protein ROC1 Regulates Chilling Tolerance via Activation of DREB1B/CBF1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Mingzhu; Cheng, Shuai; Zhao, Baotian; Xuan, Yuanhu; Shao, Minglong

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress, including salinity, drought and cold, severely affect diverse aspects of plant development and production. Rice is an important crop that does not acclimate to cold; therefore, it is relatively sensitive to low temperature stress. Dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 1s (DREB1s)/C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are well known for their function in cold tolerance, but the transcriptional regulation of CBFs remains elusive, especially in rice. Here, we performed a yeast one-hybrid assay using the promoter of CBF1, a cold-induced gene, to isolate transcriptional regulators of CBF1. Among the seven candidates identified, an indeterminate domain (IDD) protein named ROC1 (a regulator of CBF1) was further analyzed. The ROC1 transcript was induced by exogenously-treated auxin, while it was not altered by cold or ABA stimuli. ROC1-GFP was localized at the nucleus, and ROC1 showed trans-activation activity in yeast. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ChIP analyses revealed that ROC1 directly bound to the promoter of CBF1. Furthermore, ROC1 mutants exhibited chilling-sensitive symptoms and inhibited cold-mediated induction of CBF1 and CBF3, indicating that ROC1 is a positive regulator of cold stress responses. Taken together, this study identified the CBF1 regulator, and the results are important for rice plant adaptation to chilling stress. PMID:26927068

  19. The Indeterminate Domain Protein ROC1 Regulates Chilling Tolerance via Activation of DREB1B/CBF1 in Rice.

    PubMed

    Dou, Mingzhu; Cheng, Shuai; Zhao, Baotian; Xuan, Yuanhu; Shao, Minglong

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress, including salinity, drought and cold, severely affect diverse aspects of plant development and production. Rice is an important crop that does not acclimate to cold; therefore, it is relatively sensitive to low temperature stress. Dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 1s (DREB1s)/C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are well known for their function in cold tolerance, but the transcriptional regulation of CBFs remains elusive, especially in rice. Here, we performed a yeast one-hybrid assay using the promoter of CBF1, a cold-induced gene, to isolate transcriptional regulators of CBF1. Among the seven candidates identified, an indeterminate domain (IDD) protein named ROC1 (a regulator of CBF1) was further analyzed. The ROC1 transcript was induced by exogenously-treated auxin, while it was not altered by cold or ABA stimuli. ROC1-GFP was localized at the nucleus, and ROC1 showed trans-activation activity in yeast. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ChIP analyses revealed that ROC1 directly bound to the promoter of CBF1. Furthermore, ROC1 mutants exhibited chilling-sensitive symptoms and inhibited cold-mediated induction of CBF1 and CBF3, indicating that ROC1 is a positive regulator of cold stress responses. Taken together, this study identified the CBF1 regulator, and the results are important for rice plant adaptation to chilling stress. PMID:26927068

  20. The transcriptomic and evolutionary signature of social interactions regulating honey bee caste development.

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Brian R; Harpur, Brock A; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro; Anderson, Kirk E; Linksvayer, Timothy A

    2015-11-01

    The caste fate of developing female honey bee larvae is strictly socially regulated by adult nurse workers. As a result of this social regulation, nurse-expressed genes as well as larval-expressed genes may affect caste expression and evolution. We used a novel transcriptomic approach to identify genes with putative direct and indirect effects on honey bee caste development, and we subsequently studied the relative rates of molecular evolution at these caste-associated genes. We experimentally induced the production of new queens by removing the current colony queen, and we used RNA sequencing to study the gene expression profiles of both developing larvae and their caregiving nurses before and after queen removal. By comparing the gene expression profiles of queen-destined versus worker-destined larvae as well as nurses observed feeding these two types of larvae, we identified larval and nurse genes associated with caste development. Of 950 differentially expressed genes associated with caste, 82% were expressed in larvae with putative direct effects on larval caste, and 18% were expressed in nurses with putative indirect effects on caste. Estimated selection coefficients suggest that both nurse and larval genes putatively associated with caste are rapidly evolving, especially those genes associated with worker development. Altogether, our results suggest that indirect effect genes play important roles in both the expression and evolution of socially influenced traits such as caste. PMID:26640660

  1. Alleviation of postharvest chilling injury of tomato fruit by salicylic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Aghdam, Morteza Soleimani; Asghari, Mohammadreza; Khorsandi, Orojali; Mohayeji, Mehdi

    2014-10-01

    Tomato fruit at the mature green stage were treated with salicylic acid at different concentration (0, 1 and 2 mM) and analyzed for chilling injury (CI), electrolyte leakage (EL), malondialdehyde (MDA) and proline contents and phospholipase D (PLD) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities during cold storage. PLD and LOX activities were significantly reduced by salicylic acid treatment. Compared with the control fruit, salicylic acid treatment alleviated chilling injury, reduced electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde content and increased proline content. Our result suggest that the reduce activity of PLD and LOX, by salicylic acid may be a chilling tolerance strategy in tomato fruit. Inhibition of PLD and LOX activity during low temperature storage could ameliorate chilling injury and oxidation damage and enhance membrane integrity in tomato fruit. PMID:25328231

  2. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  3. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  4. Saturated Fractional Design of Experiments: Toughness and Graphite Phase Optimizing in Nihard Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Lozano, J.; Álvarez-Antolín, J. F.

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present research is to identify the manufacturing factors that exert an active influence on the graphite phase formation in mottled Nihard cast irons constituting the roll shells of duplex work rolls processed by the double pour method during centrifugal casting. The studied rolls, referred to as alloy indefinite chill, were processed at industrial scale and had a core consisting of spheroidal graphite cast iron with a matrix of ferrite and pearlite. An additional aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and extent of these factors on the dynamic toughness response of the roll shell material. The research methodology employed consisted of the application of a saturated design of experiments with seven factors, eight experiments, and resolution III. The measured responses for graphite were: the volume fraction, count number per unit area, and morphology, determined by quantitative metallography. Impact testing was characterized by Charpy tests on U-notched specimens at 350 °C. The manufacturing factors studied were: the final weight percent of silicon, sulfur, and manganese; the liquidus and the casting temperatures; and, finally, inoculation with SiCaMn and A-type FeSi (with Zr). The statistical experimental method conducted allowed us to confirm the significance of factors such as the %Si, the liquidus temperature and inoculation with SiCaMn on the precipitation of graphite in a white cast iron such as the Nihard irons used in the roll shell, in agreement with the precipitation of graphite in gray cast irons widely reported in the literature. It was also shown that the development of lamellar graphite shapes were favored by an increase in the total equivalent carbon and also by the increase in the amount of A-type FeSi added. Furthermore, the impact toughness was shown to improve with the increase in both the %Si and the liquidus temperature.

  5. Water Status Related Root-to-Shoot Communication Regulates the Chilling Tolerance of Shoot in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Liu, Mei-Jun; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Jin, Li-Qiao; Li, Yu-Ting; Li, Qing-Ming; Ai, Xi-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Although root-to-shoot communication has been intensively investigated in plants under drought, few studies have examined root-to-shoot communication under chilling. Here we explored whether root-to-shoot communication contributes to the chilling-light tolerance of cucumber shoots and clarified the key signal involves in this communication. After leaf discs chilling-light treatment, the photoinhibitions of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) were similar in leaf discs of two cucumber varieties (JY-3 and JC-4). When the whole plants, including roots, were chilled under light, the photosynthetic performances in JC-4 leaves decreased more seriously than that in JY-3 leaves. However, when the water status of leaves was maintained by warming roots or floating the attached leaves on water, the PSII activity and amount of PSI in the leaves of the two varieties were similar after chilling-light treatment. In addition, the differences of PSII activities and amount of PSI between the two varieties under whole plant chilling-light treatment were independent of ABA pretreatment. Above results indicate that (1) the better water status in leaves under chilling contributes to the higher chilling tolerance of JY-3; (2) the water status, rather than an ABA signal, dominates root-to-shoot communication under chilling and the chilling tolerance of cucumber shoot. PMID:26471979

  6. Effect of heat shock on the chilling sensitivity of trichomes and petioles of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha).

    PubMed

    Saltveit, Mikal E.; Hepler, Peter K.

    2004-05-01

    Chilling at 6 degrees C caused an immediate cessation of protoplasmic streaming in trichomes from African violets (Saintpaulia ionantha), and a slower aggregation of chloroplasts in the cells. Streaming slowly recovered upon warming to 20 degrees C, reaching fairly stable rates after 4, 15, 25 and 35 min for tissue chilled for 2 min and for 2, 14 and 24 h, respectively. The rate of ion leakage from excised petioles into an isotonic 0.2 M mannitol solution increased after 12 h of chilling and reached a maximum after 3 days of chilling. A heat shock at 45 degrees C for 6 min reduced chilling-induced rates of ion leakage from excised 1-cm petiole segments by over 50%, namely to levels near that from non-chilled control tissue. Heat-shock treatments themselves had no effect on the rate of ion leakage from non-chilled petiole segments. Protoplasmic streaming was stopped by 1 min of heat shock at 45 degrees C, but slowly recovered to normal levels after about 30 min Chloroplasts aggregation was prevented by a 1 or 2 min 45 degrees C heat-shock treatment administered 1.5 h before chilling, but heat-shock treatments up to 6 min only slightly delayed the reduction in protoplasmic streaming caused by chilling. Tradescantia virginiana did not exhibit symptoms associated with chilling injury in sensitive species (i.e. cessation of protoplasmic streaming in stamen hairs and increased ion leakage from leaf tissue). PMID:15086815

  7. Chilling acclimation provides immunity to stress by altering regulatory networks and inducing genes with protective functions in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress acclimation is an effective mechanism that plants acquired for adaption to dynamic environment. Even though generally considered to be sensitive to low temperature, Cassava, a major tropical crop, can be tolerant to much lower temperature after chilling acclimation. Improvement to chilling resistance could be beneficial to breeding. However, the underlying mechanism and the effects of chilling acclimation on chilling tolerance remain largely unexplored. Results In order to understand the mechanism of chilling acclimation, we profiled and analyzed the transcriptome and microRNAome of Cassava, using high-throughput deep sequencing, across the normal condition, a moderate chilling stress (14°C), a harsh stress (4°C) after chilling acclimation (14°C), and a chilling shock from 24°C to 4°C. The results revealed that moderate stress and chilling shock triggered comparable degrees of transcriptional perturbation, and more importantly, about two thirds of differentially expressed genes reversed their expression from up-regulation to down-regulation or vice versa in response to hash stress after experiencing moderate stress. In addition, microRNAs played important roles in the process of this massive genetic circuitry rewiring. Furthermore, function analysis revealed that chilling acclimation helped the plant develop immunity to further harsh stress by exclusively inducing genes with function for nutrient reservation therefore providing protection, whereas chilling shock induced genes with function for viral reproduction therefore causing damage. Conclusions Our study revealed, for the first time, the molecular basis of chilling acclimation, and showed potential regulation role of microRNA in chilling response and acclimation in Euphorbia. PMID:25090992

  8. Androsterone-induced molecular and physiological changes in maize seedlings in response to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Serkan

    2012-08-01

    The aim of study was to elucidate the influence of foliar sprays of androsterone in alleviating detrimental effects of chilling stress in maize seedlings. Eleven-days-old maize seedlings were treated with 10(-9) mol L(-1) androsterone and then transferred to a chamber with temperature of 10/7 °C (day/night) for 3 days. The stress injury was measured in terms of increase in electrolyte leakage, superoxide production and hydrogen peroxide level, and decrease in chlorophyll content. Androsterone application mitigated significantly the chilling-induced stress injury. Under chilling stress, the oxidative damage which was measured as malondialdehyde content was lesser in androsterone-applied seedlings that were associated with greater activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR). Moreover, SOD, POX and APX isozymes exhibited a strong correlation with changes in their activities. Androsterone application enhanced the level of antioxidant compounds like ascorbic acid, glutathione, proline and carotenoid as well as activities of antioxidant enzymes. Similarly, while androsterone treatment increased total antioxidant status, it reduced total oxidant status relative to chilling-stressed seedlings alone. Soluble protein profile was significantly changed by only chilling stress and chilling stress plus androsterone treatment, as well. According to these findings, it is possible to say that androsterone could be used to alleviate the damaging effects of chilling stress by improving antioxidative system in maize seedlings. This is the first study elucidating the effects of androsterone on resistance to chilling stress of plants. PMID:22634365

  9. Endogenous salicylic acid accumulation is required for chilling tolerance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao; Liu, Xin-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone, and its exogenous application can induce tolerance to multiple environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we examine the potential involvement of endogenous SA in response to chilling in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. A low temperature of 8 °C induces a moderate increase in endogenous SA levels. Chilling stimulates the enzymatic activities and the expression of genes for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and benzoic acid-2-hydroxylase rather than isochorismate synthase. This indicates that the PAL enzymatic pathway contributes to chilling-induced SA production. Cucumber seedlings pretreated with SA biosynthesis inhibitors accumulate less endogenous SA and suffer more from chilling damage. The expression of cold-responsive genes is also repressed by SA inhibitors. The reduction in stress tolerance and in gene expression can be restored by the exogenous application of SA, confirming the critical roles of SA in chilling responses in cucumber seedlings. Furthermore, the inhibition of SA biosynthesis under chilling stress results in a prolonged and enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. The application of exogenous SA and the chemical scavenger of H2O2 reduces the excess H2O2 and alleviates chilling injury. In contrast, the protective effects of SA are negated by foliar spraying with high concentrations of H2O2 and an inhibitor of the antioxidant enzyme. These results suggest that endogenous SA is required in response to chilling stress in cucumber seedlings, by modulating the expression of cold-responsive genes and the precise induction of cellular H2O2 levels. PMID:25034826

  10. Chill-coma recovery time, age and sex determine lipid profiles in Ceratitis capitata tissues.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Fagali, Natalia Soledad; Rabossi, Alejandro; Catalá, Ángel; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The remodeling of membrane composition by changes in phospholipid head groups and fatty acids (FA) degree of unsaturation has been associated with the maintenance of membrane homeostasis under stress conditions. Overall lipid levels and the composition of cuticle lipids also influence insect stress resistance and tissue protection. In a previous study, we demonstrated differences in survival, behavior and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene expression between subgroups of Ceratitis capitata flies that had a reversible recovery from chill-coma and those that developed chilling-injury. Here, we analyzed lipid profiles from comparable subgroups of 15 and 30-day-old flies separated according to their recovery time after a chill-coma treatment. Neutral and polar lipid classes of chill-coma subgroups were separated by thin layer chromatography and quantified by densitometry. FA composition of polar lipids of chill-coma subgroups and non-stressed flies was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Higher amounts of neutral lipids such as triglycerides, diacylglycerol, wax esters, sterol esters and free esters were found in male flies that recovered faster from chill-coma compared to slower flies. A multivariate analysis revealed changes in patterns of storage and cuticle lipids among subgroups both in males and females. FA unsaturation increased after cold exposure, and was higher in thorax of slower subgroups compared to faster subgroups. The changes in neutral lipid patterns and FA composition depended on recovery time, sex, age and body-part, and were not specifically associated with the development of chilling-injury. An analysis of phospholipid classes showed that the phosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidylcholine ratio (PC/LPC) was significantly higher, or showed a tendency, in subgroups that may have developed chilling-injury compared to those with a reversible recovery from coma. PMID:26868723

  11. Terral De Vicuna, a Foehnlike Wind in Semiarid Northern Chile: Meteorological Aspects and Implications for the Fulfillment of Chill Requirements in Deciduous Fruit Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Carlo; Rutllant, Jose A.; Aguirre, Anita; Bascunan-Godoy, Luisa; Julia, Cristobal

    2016-01-01

    The terral de Vicuña is a warm and dry wind that flows down the Elqui Valley in north-central Chile typically at dawn and early morning. Given that most terral episodes occur in austral winter when chill accumulation by deciduous fruit trees proceeds, negative effects on agriculture may be expected. During 11 (2004-14) winters a meteorological characterization of terral winds and the assessment of their impact on chill accumulation, by the modified Utah Model and the Dynamic Model, were performed. Within this period, 67 terral days (TD) were identified as those in which nighttime to early morning wind direction and speed, air temperature, and relative humidity reached defined thresholds on an hourly basis (terral hours). Most frequent TD featured 6-9 consecutive terral hours; duration is considered here as a proxy for their intensity. Synoptic-scale meteorological analysis shows that 65% of moderate and strong terral events develop as a cold, migratory anticyclone drifts poleward of the study area, coinciding with the onset of a midtropospheric ridge over central Chile, bringing southwest winds on top of the Andes (approximately 500-hPa level). The remaining 35% are either associated with 500-hPa easterlies (foehn like), with prefrontal conditions ahead of a trough driving northwest 500-hPa winds, or with transitional 500-hPa westerlies.Assessments of chill accumulation during TD show that, although present average and cold winter conditions do not represent a major TD hazard to local agriculture, lower chill accumulation associated with anomalously high nocturnal temperatures could be significantly more important during present and future warmer winters.

  12. [Comparison of texture distribution of cold rolled DC and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy at different positions through thickness direction by XRD].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-biao; Ma, Min; Yang, Qing-xiang; Wang, Shan; Liu, Wen-chang; Zhao, Ying-mei

    2013-09-01

    To provide gist of DC AA 5052 and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy to industry production and application, the texture variation of cold rolled sheets through thickness direction was studied by X-ray diffraction method, and the difference in texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. The hot plates of direct chill cast (DC) AA 5052 and continuous cast (CC) AA 5052 aluminum alloy were annealed at 454 degrees C for 4 hours and then cold rolled to different reductions. The strength and volume fraction of the fiber in CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is larger than in DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy after same rolling reduction The volume fraction of the recrystallization texture cube in the CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is less than in the DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy, which result in that CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy needs less cold rolling reduction than DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for generating the texture with same intensity and volume fraction at surface layer, quarter layer and center layer. The manufacturability and performance of CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is superior to DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for use in stamping. PMID:24369675

  13. Chilling temperature stimulates growth, gene over-expression and podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.

    PubMed

    Yang, De Long; Sun, Ping; Li, Meng Fei

    2016-10-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) and its derivatives, isolated from the rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle (P. hexandrum), are typically used in clinical settings for anti-cancer and anti-virus treatments. Empirical studies have verified that P. hexandrum had stronger tolerance to chilling, due to involving PPT accumulation in rhizome induced by cold stress. However, the cold-adaptive mechanism and its association with PPT accumulation at a molecular level in P. hexandrum are still limited. In this study, the morpho-physiological traits related to plant growth, PPT accumulation and key gene expressions controlling PPT biosynthesis were assessed by exposing P. hexandrum seedlings to different temperatures (4 °C and 10 °C as chilling stress and 22 °C as the control). The results showed that chilling significantly increased chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and plant biomass, whereas it greatly decreased transpiration rates and intercellular CO2 concentration. Compared to the control, the chilling treatments under 4 °C and 10 °C conditions induced a 5.00- and 3.33-fold increase in PPT contents, respectively. The mRNA expressions of six key genes were also up-regulated by chilling stresses. The findings are useful in understanding the molecular basis of P. hexandrum response to chilling. PMID:27314513

  14. Effects of exogenous nitric oxide in wheat seedlings under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Esim, Nevzat; Atici, Okkes; Mutlu, Salih

    2014-04-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on chilling tolerance (contents of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2 (-)) and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde, MDA)) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT)) were investigated in the leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) exposed to chilling. NO treatment was carried out through spraying of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which is a donor of NO. To do this, SNP concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM were applied on the leaves of 11-day plants and the plants were then exposed to chilling conditions (5/2°C) for 3 days. The chilling stress treatment increased both the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of MDA, H2O2 and O2 (-). Similarly, NO treatment enhanced SOD, POX and CAT activities under chilling stress, whereas it decreased H2O2 and O2 (.) (-) contents as well as MDA level. The most effective concentration was determined as 0.1 mM SNP. Exogenous SNP application as a donor of NO was found to have an important ameliorative effect on cold tolerance of seedling exposed to chilling stress by stimulating antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:22903172

  15. Effect of spray-chilling on quality of beef from lean and fatter carcasses.

    PubMed

    Hippe, C L; Field, R A; Ray, B; Russell, W C

    1991-01-01

    Carcasses from five trim cows and five choice steers were used to study the effects of spray-chilling on cooler shrink, chill rate, purge loss from vacuum-packaged cuts, cook loss, shear values and bacterial growth. Spray-chilling reduced cooler shrink but had no effect on chill rate, purge loss from vacuum-packaged cuts, cook loss or shear values. Aerobes, facultative anaerobes, aerobic psychrotrophs, facultative anaerobic psychrotrophs and lactic acid bacteria all tended to be higher on rounds from spray-chilled sides. Leaner (and lighter) cow carcasses chilled faster and had lost a higher percentage of their weight at 24 h than fatter and heavier steer carcasses. The leaner carcasses had higher bacterial counts initially and throughout storage. This difference may have been due to differences in the level of initial contamination during dressing and not due to the carcasses' leanness. Purge-weight loss for each carcass increased and cooking weight loss decreased with increased storage times, making the total weight loss from meat aged 5 vs 10 wk similar. PMID:2005011

  16. Metabolism and energy supply below the critical thermal minimum of a chill-susceptible insect.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Heath A; Williams, Caroline M; Staples, James F; Sinclair, Brent J

    2012-04-15

    When exposed to temperatures below their critical thermal minimum (CT(min)), insects enter chill-coma and accumulate chilling injuries. While the critical thermal limits of water-breathing marine animals may be caused by oxygen- and capacity-limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLT), the mechanisms are poorly understood in air-breathing terrestrial insects. We used thermolimit respirometry to characterize entry into chill-coma in a laboratory population of fall field crickets (Gryllus pennsylvanicus). To detect potential oxygen limitation, we quantified muscle ATP, lactate and alanine concentrations in crickets following prolonged exposure to 0°C (a temperature that causes chill-coma, chilling injury and eventual death). Although there was a sharp (44%) drop in the rate of CO(2) emission at the CT(min) and spiracular control was lost, there was a low, continuous rate of CO(2) release throughout chill-coma, indicating that the spiracles were open and gas exchange could occur through the tracheal system. Prolonged exposure to 0°C caused muscle ATP levels to increase marginally (rather than decrease as OCLT would predict), and there was no change in muscle lactate or alanine concentration. Thus, it appears that insects are not susceptible to OCLT at low temperatures but that the CT(min) may instead be set by temperature effects on whole-animal ion homeostasis. PMID:22442375

  17. Effect of the external field on the soft magnetic properties and microstructure of directly cast Fe75P8.7B5C7Si4.3 nanocrystalline sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, C. W.; Lin, Y. Y.; Chang, H. W.; Lee, Y. I.; Chang, W. C.; Yang, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A new method to fabricate soft magnetic bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by an injection casting with applying external magnetic field during solidification has been developed. The effect of applying magnetic fields (Ha) on soft magnetic properties and microstructure of Fe75P8.7B5C7Si4.3 alloy sheets with dimension of t × 4 mm × 15 mm (t = 1-3 mm) have been studied. The microstructure shows that the fully amorphous is attained by the applying magnetic field even at the core region of the thicker sheets with t = 3 mm. All studied sheets exhibit similar saturation magnetization of 1.23-1.25 T, but the coercivity and resistivity are strongly dependent on the thickness t and the strength of magnetic field Ha, where Hc increases with t, the slope of Hc versus t decreases with the increase of Ha, and the resistivity increases with the increase of Ha. The changes of coercivity and resistivity are strongly related to the fully amorphous induced by Ha. The external magnetic field has significant improvement in glass forming ability, and thus coercivity and resistivity for the studied sheet, especially for larger t = 3 mm. This study suggests that applying a magnetic field during the casting process provides a useful way to produce high-performance magnetically soft Fe-based BMGs.

  18. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  19. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  20. Symposium on electroslag component casting: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Hobday, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Surface Coal Gasification, has established a Materials Program to develop and apply appropriate materials to coal gasification plant components. The overall goals of the Surface Gasification Materials Program (SGMP) are to improve operational reliability and system durability and to reduce fabrication and operating costs of coal gasification plant components. The SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project is directed to the development of electroslag casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is to develop a sufficient data base to permit ESC to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. This symposium was planned to discuss not only the SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project but the activities and experiences of other organizations as well. The symposium addressed descriptions of electroslag processes; a worldwide perspective on the status of ESC technology; and details of production, mechanical properties, economics, and use of ESC for coal gasification components. Ten papers were presented, and a panel discussion was held to provide participants an opportunity to express their opinions and to offer recommendations on the content of the DOE program. This document constitutes the proceedings of that symposium. The papers included here are minimally edited transcripts of the presentations made at the symposium. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  1. The Role of Aquaporins and Membrane Damage in Chilling and Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Changes in the Hydraulic Conductance of Maize Roots12

    PubMed Central

    Aroca, Ricardo; Amodeo, Gabriela; Fernández-Illescas, Silvia; Herman, Eliot M.; Chaumont, François; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    2005-01-01

    When chilling-sensitive plants are chilled, root hydraulic conductance (Lo) declines precipitously; Lo also declines in chilling-tolerant plants, but it subsequently recovers, whereas in chilling-sensitive plants it does not. As a result, the chilling-sensitive plants dry out and may die. Using a chilling-sensitive and a chilling-tolerant maize genotype we investigated the effect of chilling on Lo, and its relationship to osmotic water permeability of isolated root cortex protoplasts, aquaporin gene expression, aquaporin abundance, and aquaporin phosphorylation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation in the roots and electrolyte leakage from the roots. Because chilling can cause H2O2 accumulation we also determined the effects of a short H2O2 treatment of the roots and examined the same parameters. We conclude from these studies that the recovery of Lo during chilling in the chilling-tolerant genotype is made possible by avoiding or repairing membrane damage and by a greater abundance and/or activity of aquaporins. The same changes in aquaporins take place in the chilling-sensitive genotype, but we postulate that membrane damage prevents the Lo recovery. It appears that the aquaporin response is necessary but not sufficient to respond to chilling injury. The plant must also be able to avoid the oxidative damage that accompanies chilling. PMID:15591439

  2. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  3. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  4. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D.J.; Smith, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigate for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649/sup 0/C showed that the tensile, yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and is comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. J.; Smith, H. H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigated for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649 °C showed that the tensile yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and was comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  6. Infants' discrimination of shapes from shading and cast shadows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2016-07-01

    Shadows are powerful cues in the perception of shapes. We can perceive shading and cast shadow implicitly. We investigated infants' ability to detect a single discrepant figure that was depicted by shading or cast shadow and examined the influence of the contrast polarity of shadows on this process. In Experiment 1, we manipulated the blur direction of a shadow to create stimuli that appeared either to be partially shaded or to cast a shadow and then used a preference to test whether this difference would allow 5- to 8-month-old infants to discriminate the figures that adults were able to perceive as different shapes. Only 7- to-8-month-old infants could differentiate one shading figure from cast shadow figures, and vice versa. In Experiment 2, we reversed the contrast polarity of the figure (dark object with a light shadow) and tested whether discrimination was affected. As has been found with adults, infants exposed to this condition were unable to discriminate the contrast-reversed shading and cast shadow figures. Our results suggested that an age of around 7 months is important for development of the ability to perceive shape differences from shading and cast shadows. PMID:27150615

  7. Deep-sequencing transcriptome analysis of chilling tolerance mechanisms of a subnival alpine plant, Chorispora bungeana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plant tolerance mechanisms to low temperature have been studied extensively in the model plant Arabidopsis at the transcriptional level. However, few studies were carried out in plants with strong inherited cold tolerance. Chorispora bungeana is a subnival alpine plant possessing strong cold tolerance mechanisms. To get a deeper insight into its cold tolerance mechanisms, the transcriptome profiles of chilling-treated C. bungeana seedlings were analyzed by Illumina deep-sequencing and compared with Arabidopsis. Results Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and chilling-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of 54,870 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly, and 3,484 chilling up-regulated and 4,571 down-regulated unigenes were identified. The expressions of 18 out of top 20 up-regulated unigenes were confirmed by qPCR analysis. Functional network analysis of the up-regulated genes revealed some common biological processes, including cold responses, and molecular functions in C. bungeana and Arabidopsis responding to chilling. Karrikins were found as new plant growth regulators involved in chilling responses of C. bungeana and Arabidopsis. However, genes involved in cold acclimation were enriched in chilling up-regulated genes in Arabidopsis but not in C. bungeana. In addition, although transcription activations were stimulated in both C. bungeana and Arabidopsis, no CBF putative ortholog was up-regulated in C. bungeana while CBF2 and CBF3 were chilling up-regulated in Arabidopsis. On the other hand, up-regulated genes related to protein phosphorylation and auto-ubiquitination processes were over-represented in C. bungeana but not in Arabidopsis. Conclusions We conducted the first deep-sequencing transcriptome profiling and chilling stress regulatory network analysis of C. bungeana, a subnival alpine plant with inherited cold tolerance. Comparative transcriptome analysis suggests that cold acclimation is not

  8. Consequences of early chilling stress in two Triticum species: plastic responses and adaptive significance.

    PubMed

    Valluru, R; Link, J; Claupein, W

    2012-07-01

    Phenotypic plasticity of two primitive wheat species (Triticum monococcum L. and Triticum dicoccum S.) was studied in response to early chilling stress. Selection pressure differentials, gradients and plasticity costs on plant morphogenesis, growth and reserve carbohydrate consumption were estimated. Regression analysis was applied to investigate differential developmental changes and patterns between treatments. Four-day-old seedlings of T. monococcum and T. dicoccum, differing in plant stature and reserve carbohydrates, were given an early chilling temperature (4 °C for 42 day) and compared with control plants grown at 23 °C. Early chilling stress resulted in a significant increase in leaf mass ratio (LMR) and relative growth rate (RGR), a reduction in flag leaf size, total biomass, specific leaf area (SLA) and reserve carbohydrate storage at flowering, together with advanced onset of flowering. Selection pressure within the early chilling environment favoured early flowering, smaller SLA, higher LMR and lower reserve carbohydrates, suggesting the observed responses were adaptive. Furthermore, a regression of daily cumulative plant biomass derived from a crop growth simulation model (CERES-Wheat) on crop vegetation period revealed a divergent developmental pattern in early-chilled plants. Using selection pressure gradient analysis, we found similar responses among these traits, except for SLA and sucrose, indicating that these two traits have indirect effects on fitness. Thus, the total effects of SLA and reserve sucrose on relative fitness seem to be buffered via the rapid growth rate in chilled plants. While lower SLA may reduce early chilling stress effects at an individual leaf level, a higher LMR and use of reserve carbohydrates indicated that compensatory growth of chilled plants during the recovery period relied on the concerted action of altered resource allocation and reserve carbohydrate consumption. However, a significant cost of plasticity

  9. Impact of broiler processing scalding and chilling profiles on carcass and breast meat yield.

    PubMed

    Buhr, R J; Walker, J M; Bourassa, D V; Caudill, A B; Kiepper, B H; Zhuang, H

    2014-06-01

    The effect of scalding and chilling procedures was evaluated on carcass and breast meat weight and yield in broilers. On 4 separate weeks (trials), broilers were subjected to feed withdrawal, weighed, and then stunned and bled in 4 sequential batches (n = 16 broilers/batch, 64 broilers/trial). In addition, breast skin was collected before scalding, after scalding, and after defeathering for proximate analysis. Each batch of 16 carcasses was subjected to either hard (60.0°C for 1.5 min) or soft (52.8°C for 3 min) immersion scalding. Following defeathering and evisceration, 8 carcasses/batch were air-chilled (0.5°C, 120 min, 86% RH) and 8 carcasses/batch were immersion water-chilled (water and ice 0.5°C, 40 min). Carcasses were reweighed individually following evisceration and following chilling. Breast meat was removed from the carcass and weighed within 4 h postmortem. There were significant (P < 0.05) differences among the trials for all weights and yields; however, postfeed withdrawal shackle weight and postscald-defeathered eviscerated weights did not differ between the scalding and chilling treatments. During air-chilling all carcasses lost weight, resulting in postchill carcass yield of 73.0% for soft-scalded and 71.3% for hard-scalded carcasses, a difference of 1.7%. During water-chilling all carcasses gained weight, resulting in heavier postchill carcass weights (2,031 g) than for air-chilled carcasses (1,899 g). Postchill carcass yields were correspondingly higher for water-chilled carcasses, 78.2% for soft-scalded and 76.1% for hard-scalded carcasses, a difference of 2.1%. Only in trials 1 and 4 was breast meat yield significantly lower for hard-scalded, air-chilled carcasses (16.1 and 17.5%) than the other treatments. Proximate analysis of skin sampled after scalding or defeathering did not differ significantly in moisture (P = 0.2530) or lipid (P = 0.6412) content compared with skin sampled before scalding. Skin protein content was significantly

  10. Recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses after immersion chilling in different volumes of water, part 2.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, J K; Cason, J A; Ingram, K D; Smith, D P; Buhr, R J; Fletcher, D L

    2008-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between poultry chilling water volume and carcass microbiology. In the first study, the volume of water used during immersion chilling was found to have a significant effect on the counts of bacteria recovered from broiler carcass halves; however, these volumes (2.1 and 16.8 L/kg) were extreme and did not reflect commercial levels. A second study using commercial chilling volumes was conducted with 3.3 L/kg (low) or 6.7 L/kg (high) distilled water in the chiller. Prechill broiler carcasses were removed from a commercial processing line, cut into left and right halves, and one-half of each pair was individually chilled in a bag containing low or high volume of water. Bags containing halves were submersed in a secondary chill tank containing approximately 150 L of an ice-water mix (0.6 degrees C). After 45 min, halves were removed, allowed to drip for 5 min, and rinsed with 100 mL of sterile water for 1 min. Rinses were analyzed for total aerobic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Campylobacter. When the numbers of bacteria in the half-carcass rinses (HCR) were compared, counts recovered from halves chilled in a low volume of water were the same as those recovered from the halves chilled with a high volume of water (P > 0.05). Levels found in the HCR ranged from 4.0 to 4.2 log(10) cfu/mL for aerobic bacteria, 3.3 to 3.5 log(10) cfu/mL for E. coli, 3.6 to 3.8 log(10) cfu/mL for Enterobacteriaceae, and 2.4 to 2.6 log(10) cfu/mL for Campylobacter. Data were also analyzed using a paired comparison t-test, and this analysis showed that there was no difference (P > 0.05) in the numbers of aerobic bacteria, E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae, or Campylobacter recovered from paired-halves chilled in different volumes of water. The present study shows that under the conditions outlined in this experiment, doubling the amount of water during immersion chilling (3.3 vs. 6.7 L/kg) did not improve the removal of

  11. Chilled disks in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Kuncic, Zdenka; Gonçalves, Anabela C.

    2007-04-01

    The "soft-excess" component fitted to the X-ray spectra of many ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) remains a controversial finding, which may reveal fundamental information either on the black hole (BH) mass or on the state of the accretion flow. In the simplest model, it was explained as thermal emission from a cool accretion disk around an intermediate-mass BH (about 1000 solar masses). We argue that this scenario is highly implausible, and discuss and compare the two most likely alternatives. 1) The soft-excess does come from a cool disk; however, the temperature is low not because of a high BH mass but because most of the accretion power is drained from the inner disk via magnetic torques, and channelled into jets and outflows ("chilled disk" scenario). Using a phenomenological model, we infer that ULXs contain BHs of about 50 solar masses accreting gas at about 10 times their Eddington rate. 2) The soft excess is in fact a soft deficit, if the power-law continuum is properly fitted. Such broad absorption features are caused by smeared absorption lines in fast, highly ionized outflows. This scenario has already been successfully applied to the soft excess in AGN. If so, this spectral feature reveals details of disk outflows,but is unrelated to the BH mass.

  12. Loop chiller plant design dramatically lowers chilled water costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, T.

    1999-07-01

    Recent improvements in HVAC networking and speed control technologies, together with an improved understanding of the nature of cooling loads in buildings offer exciting opportunities for improving the energy efficiency of chiller plants. A new Loop chiller plant design has been developed that incorporates variable speed control on all plant components. Operation of this cooling plant is coordinated with the load it serves through a control network. This new approach has enormous advantages over traditional optimized plants. The two key advantages of these new Loop design chiller plants designs are: (1) Annual operating energy requirements are reduced by as much as 50% or more when compared to present state-of-the-art optimized chiller plants, and (2) A smaller sized and therefore less costly chiller plant can be designed to serve HVAC loads. The term Loop is employed to describe the technologies employed because the concept employs closed loop control by providing operational feedback from each point of use to the plant. The Loop concept also employs a single, series coupled chilled water loop for higher pumping and distribution efficiencies. This paper presents background and design theory and follows with a case study to introduce the new Loop design and operations concept. Specifics of an actual design are presented along with an explanation of how the principles can be applied economically to all new or existing chiller plant designs to achieve dramatic reductions in both construction costs and energy costs.

  13. The Effects of Externally Solidified Product on Wave Celerity and Quality of Die Cast Products

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll Mobley; Yogeshwar Sahai; Jerry Brevick

    2003-10-10

    The cold chamber die casting process is used to produce essentially all the die cast aluminum products and about 50% of the die cast magnesium products made today. Modeling of the cold chamber die casting process and metallographic observations of cold chamber die cast products indicate that typically 5 to 20% of the shot weight is solidified in the shot sleeve before or during cavity filling. The protion of the resulting die casting which is solidified in the shot sleeve is referred to as externally solidified product, or, when identified as a casting defect, as cold flakes. This project was directed to extending the understanding of the effects of externally solidified product on the cold chamber die casting process and products to enable the production of defect-free die castings and reduce the energy associated with these products. The projected energy savings from controlling the fraction of externally solidified product in die cast components is 40 x 10 Btu through the year 2025.

  14. Climatic Changes Lead to Declining Winter Chill for Fruit and Nut Trees in California during 1950–2099

    PubMed Central

    Luedeling, Eike; Zhang, Minghua; Girvetz, Evan H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Winter chill is one of the defining characteristics of a location's suitability for the production of many tree crops. We mapped and investigated observed historic and projected future changes in winter chill in California, quantified with two different chilling models (Chilling Hours, Dynamic Model). Methodology/Principal Findings Based on hourly and daily temperature records, winter chill was modeled for two past temperature scenarios (1950 and 2000), and 18 future scenarios (average conditions during 2041–2060 and 2080–2099 under each of the B1, A1B and A2 IPCC greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, for the CSIRO-MK3, HadCM3 and MIROC climate models). For each scenario, 100 replications of the yearly temperature record were produced, using a stochastic weather generator. We then introduced and mapped a novel climatic statistic, “safe winter chill”, the 10% quantile of the resulting chilling distributions. This metric can be interpreted as the amount of chilling that growers can safely expect under each scenario. Winter chill declined substantially for all emissions scenarios, with the area of safe winter chill for many tree species or cultivars decreasing 50–75% by mid-21st century, and 90–100% by late century. Conclusions/Significance Both chilling models consistently projected climatic conditions by the middle to end of the 21st century that will no longer support some of the main tree crops currently grown in California, with the Chilling Hours Model projecting greater changes than the Dynamic Model. The tree crop industry in California will likely need to develop agricultural adaptation measures (e.g. low-chill varieties and dormancy-breaking chemicals) to cope with these projected changes. For some crops, production might no longer be possible. PMID:19606220

  15. Geographic Variations in Chilled Margin Chemistry of Jurassic Dolerite Intrusions in the Dry Valley Region of South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, T. H.; Elliot, D. H.; Calhoun, A.

    2005-12-01

    stratigraphically higher sills in the eastern Quartermain Mtns have significantly more evolved chemical compositions that cluster around SiO2=57.5%, MgO=4.3%, TiO2=1.0%, Zr=165 ppm. A sequence of dikes in the southeastern Quartermain Mtns that cross cut sills in that region have compositions similar to the basement and peneplain sills in the Bull Pass region. The complete suite of compositions from both regions can be easily related by simple low-pressure gabbro fractionation. Existing correlations between the Taylor Valley and Bull Pass region requires extrapolation through the poorly exposed and largely ice covered Asgard Range (~15 km). Differences in the compositions of the basement and peneplain sills in each region hint at the possibility that they may be different intrusions. Alternatively, if the existing correlations are correct, our results document a trend of increasingly more evolved chilled margin compositions to the south in both the basement and peneplain sills. If the chilled margins of sills become more evolved away from their initial filling conduit as a result of differentiation processes operating during emplacement, the observed chemical trends would be consistent with a source located in the direction of the Bull Pass region as proposed by Marsh (2004). Marsh, B. (2004) A Magmatic Mush Column Rosetta Stone: the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, EOS, 85(47) 497-508.

  16. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... structural castings except castings that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in... of § 23.305 at an ultimate load corresponding to a casting factor of 1.25; and (ii) The...

  17. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... structural castings except castings that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in... of § 23.305 at an ultimate load corresponding to a casting factor of 1.25; and (ii) The...

  18. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... structural castings except castings that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in... of § 23.305 at an ultimate load corresponding to a casting factor of 1.25; and (ii) The...

  19. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... structural castings except castings that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in... of § 23.305 at an ultimate load corresponding to a casting factor of 1.25; and (ii) The...

  20. Feasibility of cold rolling titanium strip cast by the plasma melt overflow process

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.A.; Sukonnik, I.M.; Bird, R.K.; Brewer, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    A new fabrication method tailored specifically for titanium alloys and intermetallics combined direct strip casting and cold rolling to produce foil products by completely eliminating hot working steps. Titanium strips 0.4-mm- to 0.7-mm-thick and 100-mm-wide were cast by the plasma melt overflow process. The cast strips were cold rolled to 0.15-mm-thick, fully dense foils. The effect of thermal and mechanical treatments on the microstructure of the cast strip was investigated. The cold rolled foils were characterized by measurement of average surface roughness, chemical composition, gas content and tensile properties.

  1. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage. PMID:24001814

  2. Casting evaluation of U-Zr alloy system fuel slug for SFR prepared by injection casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U-Pu-Zr alloys for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) have conventionally been fabricated by a vacuum injection casting method. Recently, management of minor actinides (MA) became an important issue because direct disposal of the long-lived MA can be a long-term burden for a tentative repository up to several hundreds of thousand years. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, remote fabrication capability in a shielded hot cell should be prepared. Moreover, generation of long-lived radioactive wastes and loss of volatile species should be minimized during the recycled fuel fabrication step. In order to prevent the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied applying gravity casting, and improved injection casting in KAERI, including melting under inert atmosphere. And then, metal fuel slugs were examined with casting soundness, density, chemical analysis, particle size distribution and microstructural characteristics. Based on these results there is a high level of confidence that Am losses will also be effectively controlled by application of a modest amount of overpressure. A surrogate fuel slug was generally soundly cast by improved injection casting method, melted fuel material under inert atmosphere.

  3. Investment casting design of experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, R.

    1997-10-01

    Specific steps in the investment casting process were analyzed in a designed experiment. The casting`s sensitivity to changes in these process steps was experimentally determined Dimensional and radiographic inspection were used to judge the sensitivity of the casting. Thirty-six castings of different pedigrees were poured and measured. Some of the dimensional inspection was conducted during the processing. It was confirmed that wax fixturing, number of gates, gate location, pour and mold temperature, pour speed, and cooling profile all affected the radiographic quality of the casting. Gate and runner assembly techniques, number of gates, and mold temperature affect the dimensional quality of the casting.

  4. Study of the Effect of Shrinkage Porosity on Strength Low Carbon Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovik, E.

    2015-09-01

    Today there are many computer systems for modeling of the casting technology processes. All of them allow calculating the availability and distribution of the shrinkage porosity in the test casting, but this information allows only making changes in existing casting technology. In this paper you obtain the information about changes in the local and structural mechanical properties of the casting in the presence of its volume shrinkage porosity. Article presents the results of direct experimental studies of technological defects (shrinkage and gas porosity) impact on the mechanical properties of low carbon steel castings. Methods of investigation are also disclosed, including the methods for producing of molded samples obtained at different process conditions and the crystallization apparatus which is described for the measuring of the density of the samples. There are the mathematical relationship for the elastic modulus, yield stress, elongation and fatigue characteristics fracture cast steel with low carbon content in the presence of the volumetric shrinkage porosity.

  5. The morphology of solidification of thin-section ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.F.; Zhao, H.; Lee, W.B.

    1998-04-01

    The morphology of solidified structures of thin-section ductile iron castings has been investigated by color metallographic techniques. Primary austenitic dendrites were observed to be formed over the whole section of castings when the wall thickness was less than 14mm. The dendrites were thin and long, and the length and the number of dendrites depended on the solidification rate or the wall thickness of the casting. Growth of the dendritic arms was directional, being perpendicular to the surface of castings and along the wall thickness. Interdendrite segregation of Si and Mn is found to occur in thin-section ductile iron castings, as revealed by both color metallography and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The segregation is more pronounced toward the center of castings.

  6. Economic analysis of air-conditioning systems with off-peak chilled-water storage. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    McMullen, B.J.; Papaprokopiou, N.D.

    1981-09-01

    This thesis investigates current methods of chilled-water storage for air conditioning applications and the economics of chilled-water storage with time-of-use electric utility rates. Current methods of chilled-water storage are investigated by comparing costs of construction materials for storage tanks and effectiveness and costs of anti-blending systems. The economics of chilled-water storage are analyzed by computing total life cycle costs of alternative air conditioning systems for two different sized buildings. Computer simulation is used to determine electric consumption for the buildings. The simulation of each building contains three options: no chilled-water storage, chiller operated only at night, and a small chiller supplemented by stored chilled-water. A gunite or Styrofoam tank with a moving partition anti-blending system is the least expensive and most effective storage system. The economics of chilled-water storage are sensitive to the size of the building analyzed. Operating the small chiller with supplemental chilled-water is economical in the smaller building. No chilled-water storage is the most economical option in the larger building. Operation of the chiller only at night was never economical.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis of ten chilling tolerance indices at the germination and seedling stages in maize.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Wenzhen; Hu, Wei; Duan, Lichao; Feng, Yang; Qiu, Fazhan; Yue, Bing

    2013-08-01

    Maize seedlings are very sensitive to chilling, especially during the transition phase from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth. Genetic dissection of the genetic basis of chilling tolerance would provide useful information for genetic improvement of maize inbreds. In this study, genome-wide association analysis was conducted to explore the genetic architecture of maize chilling tolerance at the seed germination and seedling stages with an association panel of 125 inbreds. Ten tolerance indices (ratios of the performance of 10 germination rates and seedling growth-related traits under chilling stress and control conditions) were investigated to assess the ability of chilling tolerance of the inbreds, and a total of 43 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with chilling tolerance were detected, with none of them being related to chilling tolerance at both the germination and seedling stages simultaneously. Correlation analysis also revealed that the genetic basis of chilling tolerance at the seed germination stage is generally different from that at the seedling stage. In addition, a total of 40 candidate genes involving 31 of the 43 single nucleotide polymorphisms were predicted, and were grouped into five categories according to their functions. The possible roles of these candidate genes in chilling tolerance were also discussed. PMID:23551400

  8. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  9. The nature of urinary casts

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, E. G.

    1962-01-01

    The composition of hyaline casts has been investigated. The major constituent appears to be the urinary mucoprotein described by Tamm and Horsfall. Small amounts only of serum proteins are present. Neither the amounts excreted nor the concentration of Tamm-Horsfall protein appeared to determine the rate of cast formation. The only invariable association of hyaline cast formation was with the presence of significant amounts of serum proteins in the urine. In vitro it was found that aqueous solutions of serum albumin were particularly effective in producing precipitation of Tamm-Horsfall protein. This interaction was inhibited in normal urine but occurred to a greater extent in nephrotic urine and is suggested as the possible mechanism of hyaline cast formation. Images PMID:16810981

  10. Advanced casting: Today and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietrach, D.

    The state of aluminum casting technology in terms of processes, component sizes, design and material-scientific data as well as mechanical characteristics was established during visits to foundries in the USA, Canada, France, Italy, Great Britain and the Federal Republic of Germany. Components of the primary structure of Tornado and ALPHA aircraft, (pylon, intake floor) classified according to the degree of difficulty during casting, were used to compare existing designs (riveted sheet metal and machined parts) and cast versions with regard to cost reduction and technical reliability. Visual inspection, dimensional checks, chemical composition analysis, penetrant tests, X-ray tests, metallographic investigations, and tensile tests were carried out. Cost savings of 25% and weight savings of 20% can be achieved by using castings.

  11. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.

  12. Chilling requirements for hatching of a New Zealand isolate of Nematodirus filicollis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, A-M B; Pomroy, W E; Ganesh, S; Leathwick, D M

    2016-08-15

    The eggs of some species of the parasitic nematode Nematodirus require a period of chilling before they can hatch; N. filicollis is one such species. This study investigated this requirement for chilling in a New Zealand strain of this species. Eggs of N. filicollis were extracted from lamb's faeces and incubated at 20°C to allow development to the third stage larvae within the egg. These eggs were then placed into tissue culture plates and incubated at: 2.7°C (±0.99), 3.6°C (±0.90), 4.7°C (±0.35), 6.4°C (±0.37), 8.0°C (±1.54) or 9.9°C (±0.14) for up to 224 days. At 14day intervals until day 84, then every 28 days, one plate was removed from each temperature and placed at 13.1°C (±0.44) for 14 days. Eggs were then assessed for hatching. From this data, chill units were calculated by subtracting the culture temperature from a constant threshold of 11°C and multiplying by the number of days for which the sample was cultured; then the Gompertz model fitted. Even though hatching overall was low, a greater proportion of eggs hatched with chill accumulation. Maximum hatching of eggs required 800-1000 chill units. Consequently in the field, more than one season of chilling would be required before hatching. As such a generation time could take more than one year to complete. This is different to the hatching dynamics of N. spathiger, the other main species found in New Zealand sheep, which does not display this requirement for chilling and hatches immediately once the third stage larvae are developed. PMID:27514876

  13. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Signaling Mechanisms Associated with Rapid Cold Hardening in a Chill-Tolerant Fly.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L

    2016-08-01

    Rapid cold hardening (RCH) is a physiological adaptation in which brief chilling (minutes to hours) significantly enhances the cold tolerance of insects. RCH allows insects to cope with sudden cold snaps and diurnal variation in temperature, but the mechanistic basis of this rapid stress response is poorly understood. Here, we used phosphoproteomics to identify phosphorylation-mediated signaling events that are regulated by chilling that induces RCH. Phosphoproteomic changes were measured in both brain and fat bodies, two tissues that are essential for sensing cold and coordinating RCH at the organismal level. Tissues were chilled ex vivo, and changes in phosphoprotein abundance were measured using 2D electrophoresis coupled with Pro-Q diamond labeling of phosphoproteins followed by protein identification via LC-MS/MS. In both tissues, we observed an abundance of protein phosphorylation events in response to chilling. Some of the proteins regulated by RCH-inducing chilling include proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in the degradation of damaged cellular components via the proteasome and autophagosome. Our results suggest that phosphorylation-mediated signaling cascades are major drivers of RCH and enhance our mechanistic understanding of this complex phenotype. PMID:27362561

  14. Understanding the mechanisms of chilling injury in bell pepper fruits using the proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bel, Paloma; Egea, Isabel; Sánchez-Ballesta, María Teresa; Martinez-Madrid, Concepción; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Romojaro, Félix; Olmos, Enrique; Estrella, Emilio; Bolarín, Maria C; Flores, Francisco Borja

    2012-09-18

    In order to advance in the understanding of CI in pepper fruits, the cell ultrastructure alterations induced by CI and the physiological and metabolic changes have been studied along with the proteomic study. When stored at low temperatures bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruits exhibited visual CI symptoms and important alterations within the cell ultrastructure, since peroxisomes and starch grains were not detected and the structure of the chloroplast was seriously damaged in chilled tissues. Physiological and metabolic disorders were also observed in chilled fruits, such as higher ethylene production, increased MDA content, changes in sugar and organic acids and enzymatic activities. The comparative proteomic analysis between control and chilled fruits reveals that the main alterations induced by CI in bell pepper fruits are linked to redox homeostasis and carbohydrate metabolism. Thus, protein abundance in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle is altered and catalase is down-regulated. Key proteins from glycolysis, Calvin cycle and Krebs cycle are also inhibited in chilled fruits. Enolase and GAPDH are revealed as proteins that may play a key role in the development of chilling injury. This study also provides the first evidence at the protein level that cytosolic MDH is involved in abiotic stress. PMID:22796354

  15. Rapid detection of total viable count of chilled pork using hyperspectral scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yankun; Tao, Feifei; Li, Yongyu; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Jianhu; Dhakal, Sagar

    2010-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive measurement method for determining the total viable count of chilled pork was studied. Chilled pork samples were purchased from supermarket and then stored in refrigerator at 4°C. Every 24 hours, hyperspectral images were collected from the chilled pork samples in 400-1100nm region, in parallel total viable counts were obtained by classical microbiological plating methods. The 3-parameter modified lorentzian distribution function was applied to fit the scattering profiles of all samples and the fitting results were satisfactorily high in region 470-943 nm. Then the parameters extracted were used to establish PLSR models. The prediction results for the parameter a, b, c, b×c are 0.945, 0.918, 0.919, 0.935 respectively. The study show that the hyperspectral technology can accurately tracks the increase of total viable count of chilled pork during 2-14 days storage at 4°C, and so indicate it a valid tool for assessing the quality and safety properties of chilled pork rapidly and nondestructively in the future.

  16. Sodium distribution predicts the chill tolerance of Drosophila melanogaster raised in different thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Andersen, Jonas L; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes

    2015-05-15

    Many insects, including the model holometabolous insect Drosophila melanogaster, display remarkable plasticity in chill tolerance in response to the thermal environment experienced during development or as adults. At low temperatures, many insects lose the ability to regulate Na(+) balance, which is suggested to cause a secondary loss of hemolymph water to the tissues and gut lumen that concentrates the K(+) remaining in the hemolymph. The resultant increase in extracellular [K(+)] inhibits neuromuscular excitability and is proposed to cause cellular apoptosis and injury. The present study investigates whether and how variation in chill tolerance induced through developmental and adult cold acclimation is associated with changes in Na(+), water, and K(+) balance. Developmental and adult cold acclimation improved the chilling tolerance of D. melanogaster in an additive manner. In agreement with the proposed model, these effects were intimately related to differences in Na(+) distribution prior to cold exposure, such that chill-tolerant flies had low hemolymph [Na(+)], while intracellular [Na(+)] was similar among treatment groups. The low hemolymph Na(+) of cold-acclimated flies allowed them to maintain hemolymph volume, prevent hyperkalemia, and avoid injury following chronic cold exposure. These findings extend earlier observations of hemolymph volume disruption during cold exposure to the most ubiquitous model insect (D. melanogaster), highlight shared mechanisms of developmental and adult thermal plasticity and provide strong support for ionoregulatory failure as a central mechanism of insect chill susceptibility. PMID:25761700

  17. Climate Change Impact on Evapotranspiration, Heat Stress and Chill Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Marras, S.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide concentration scenarios project an increase in CO2 from 372 ppm to between 500 and 950 ppm by the year 2100, and the potential effect on temperature, humidity, and plant responses to environmental factors are complex and concerning. For 2100, mean daily temperature increase projections range from 1.2oC to 6.8oC depending on greenhouse gas emissions. On the bad side, higher temperatures are often associated with increases in evapotranspiration (ET), heat stress, and pest infestations. On the good side, increased temperature is commonly related to less frost damage, faster growth, and higher production in some cases. One misconception is that global warming will increase evapotranspiration and, hence, agricultural water demand. As the oceans and other water bodies warm, evaporation and humidity are likely to increase globally, but higher humidity tends to reduce plant transpiration and hence ET. Higher CO2 concentrations also tend to reduce ET, and, in the end, the increase in ET due to higher temperature is likely to be offset by a decrease in ET due to higher humidity and CO2. With a decrease in daytime evapotranspiration, the canopy temperature is likely to rise relative to the air temperature, and this implies that heat stress could be worse than predicted by increased air temperature. Daily minimum temperatures are generally increasing about twice as fast as maximum temperatures presumably because of the increasing dew point temperatures as more water vapor is added to the atmosphere. This could present a serious problem to meet the chill requirement for fruit and nut crops. Growing seasons, i.e., from the last spring to the first fall frost, are likely to increase, but the crop growth period is likely to shorten due to higher temperature. Thus, spring frost damage is unlikely to change but there should be fewer damaging fall frost events. In this paper, we will present some ideas on the possible impact of climate change on evapotranspiration and

  18. Tomato expressing Arabidopsis glutaredoxin gene AtGRXS17 confers tolerance to chilling stress via modulating cold responsive components.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Wu, Qingyu; Sprague, Stuart A; Park, Jungeun; Oh, Myungmin; Rajashekar, C B; Koiwa, Hisashi; Nakata, Paul A; Cheng, Ninghui; Hirschi, Kendal D; White, Frank F; Park, Sunghun

    2015-01-01

    Chilling stress is a production constraint of tomato, a tropical origin, chilling-sensitive horticultural crop. The development of chilling tolerant tomato thus has significant potential to impact tomato production. Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous oxidoreductases, which utilize the reducing power of glutathione to reduce disulfide bonds of substrate proteins and maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Here, we report that tomato expressing Arabidopsis GRX gene AtGRXS17 conferred tolerance to chilling stress without adverse effects on growth and development. AtGRXS17-expressing tomato plants displayed lower ion leakage, higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and increased accumulation of soluble sugar compared with wild-type plants after the chilling stress challenge. Furthermore, chilling tolerance was correlated with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and reduced H2O2 accumulation. At the same time, temporal expression patterns of the endogenous C-repeat/DRE-binding factor 1 (SlCBF1) and CBF mediated-cold regulated genes were not altered in AtGRXS17-expressing plants when compared with wild-type plants, and proline concentrations remained unchanged relative to wild-type plants under chilling stress. Green fluorescent protein -AtGRXS17 fusion proteins, which were initially localized in the cytoplasm, migrated into the nucleus during chilling stress, reflecting a possible role of AtGRXS17 in nuclear signaling of chilling stress responses. Together, our findings demonstrate that genetically engineered tomato plants expressing AtGRXS17 can enhance chilling tolerance and suggest a genetic engineering strategy to improve chilling tolerance without yield penalty across different crop species. PMID:26623076

  19. Tomato expressing Arabidopsis glutaredoxin gene AtGRXS17 confers tolerance to chilling stress via modulating cold responsive components

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Wu, Qingyu; Sprague, Stuart A; Park, Jungeun; Oh, Myungmin; Rajashekar, C B; Koiwa, Hisashi; Nakata, Paul A; Cheng, Ninghui; Hirschi, Kendal D; White, Frank F; Park, Sunghun

    2015-01-01

    Chilling stress is a production constraint of tomato, a tropical origin, chilling-sensitive horticultural crop. The development of chilling tolerant tomato thus has significant potential to impact tomato production. Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous oxidoreductases, which utilize the reducing power of glutathione to reduce disulfide bonds of substrate proteins and maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Here, we report that tomato expressing Arabidopsis GRX gene AtGRXS17 conferred tolerance to chilling stress without adverse effects on growth and development. AtGRXS17-expressing tomato plants displayed lower ion leakage, higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and increased accumulation of soluble sugar compared with wild-type plants after the chilling stress challenge. Furthermore, chilling tolerance was correlated with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and reduced H2O2 accumulation. At the same time, temporal expression patterns of the endogenous C-repeat/DRE-binding factor 1 (SlCBF1) and CBF mediated-cold regulated genes were not altered in AtGRXS17-expressing plants when compared with wild-type plants, and proline concentrations remained unchanged relative to wild-type plants under chilling stress. Green fluorescent protein -AtGRXS17 fusion proteins, which were initially localized in the cytoplasm, migrated into the nucleus during chilling stress, reflecting a possible role of AtGRXS17 in nuclear signaling of chilling stress responses. Together, our findings demonstrate that genetically engineered tomato plants expressing AtGRXS17 can enhance chilling tolerance and suggest a genetic engineering strategy to improve chilling tolerance without yield penalty across different crop species. PMID:26623076

  20. Standard specification for castings, nickel and nickel alloy. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published November 1998. Originally published as B 332-58T. Redesignated as A 494 in 1963. Last previous edition A 494/A 494M-94.