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Sample records for direct detection constraints

  1. Direct detection constraints on superheavy dark matter.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Ivone F M; Baudis, Laura

    2003-06-01

    The dark matter in the Universe might be composed of superheavy particles (mass greater, similar 10(10) GeV). These particles can be detected via nuclear recoils produced in elastic scatterings from nuclei. We estimate the observable rate of strongly interacting supermassive particles (simpzillas) in direct dark matter search experiments. The simpzilla energy loss in Earth and in the experimental shields is taken into account. The most natural scenarios for simpzillas are ruled out based on recent EDELWEISS and CDMS results. The dark matter can be composed of superheavy particles only if these interact weakly with normal matter or if their mass is above 10(15) GeV. PMID:12857302

  2. Forecast constraints on inflation from combined CMB and gravitational wave direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-04-15

    We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, Big Bang Observer (BBO), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parametrization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

  3. Derivation of the anisotropy profile, constraints on the local velocity dispersion, and implications for direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    We study the implications of a pseudo-phase-space density power-law for the anisotropy profile of a Milky Way-like dark matter halo. Requiring that the anisotropy parameter does not take non-physical values within the virial radius places a maximum value on the local radial velocity dispersion. For a plausible range of halo parameters, it is possible to take a local total velocity dispersion of up to about 300 km/s. Making this choice uniquely specifies the anisotropy and dispersion profiles. We introduce a way to model the local velocity distribution that incorporates this anisotropy and study the impact on direct detection.

  4. Constraints on Universal Extra-Dimensional Dark Matter from Direct Detection Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Duda, Gintaras

    2011-04-01

    Detection of dark matter is one of the most challenging and important problems in astro-particle physics. One theory that produces a viable particle dark matter candidate is Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which the existence of a 4th spatial dimension is theorized. The extra dimension is not seen because it is compactifed on a circular orbifold whose radius is too small to be observed with current technology. What separates this theory over other Kaluza-Klein-type theories is that UED allows all standard model particles and fields to propagate in the extra dimension. The dark matter candidate in UED theories is a stable particle known as the Lightest Kaluza-Klein Particle or LKP, and the LKP can exist with sufficient relic density to serve as the dark matter. This work will present bounds on UED model parameters from direct dark matter searches such as the CDMS II.

  5. Dark matter direct detection constraints on the minimal supersymmetric standard model and implications for LHC Higgs boson searches

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Junjie; Hikasa, Ken-ichi; Wang, Wenyu; Yang, Jin Min; Yu, Li-Xin

    2010-09-01

    Assuming the lightest neutralino solely composes the cosmic dark matter, we examine the constraints of the CDMS-II and XENON100 dark matter direct searches on the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) Higgs sector. We find that the current CDMS-II/XENON100 limits can exclude some of the parameter space which survive the constraints from the dark matter relic density and various collider experiments. We also find that in the currently allowed parameter space, the charged Higgs boson is hardly accessible at the LHC for an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1}, while the neutral non-SM (standard model) Higgs bosons (H,A) may be accessible in some allowed region characterized by a large {mu}. The future XENON100 (6000 kg-days exposure) will significantly tighten the parameter space in case of nonobservation of dark matter.

  6. Extracting constraints from direct detection searches of supersymmetric dark matter in the light of null results from the LHC in the squark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Mayet, F.; Bélanger, G.; Genest, M.-H.; Santos, D.

    2016-02-01

    The comparison of the results of direct detection of dark matter, obtained with various target nuclei, requires model-dependent, or even arbitrary, assumptions. Indeed, to draw conclusions either the spin-dependent (SD) or the spin-independent (SI) interaction has to be neglected. In the light of the null results from supersymmetry searches at the LHC, the squark sector is pushed to high masses. We show that for a squark sector at the TeV scale, the framework used to extract constraints from direct detection searches can be redefined as the number of free parameters is reduced. Moreover, the correlation observed between SI and SD proton cross sections constitutes a key issue for the development of the next generation of dark matter detectors.

  7. Direct handling of equality constraints in multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renaud, John E.; Gabriele, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there have been several hierarchic multilevel optimization algorithms proposed and implemented in design studies. Equality constraints are often imposed between levels in these multilevel optimizations to maintain system and subsystem variable continuity. Equality constraints of this nature will be referred to as coupling equality constraints. In many implementation studies these coupling equality constraints have been handled indirectly. This indirect handling has been accomplished using the coupling equality constraints' explicit functional relations to eliminate design variables (generally at the subsystem level), with the resulting optimization taking place in a reduced design space. In one multilevel optimization study where the coupling equality constraints were handled directly, the researchers encountered numerical difficulties which prevented their multilevel optimization from reaching the same minimum found in conventional single level solutions. The researchers did not explain the exact nature of the numerical difficulties other than to associate them with the direct handling of the coupling equality constraints. The coupling equality constraints are handled directly, by employing the Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method as the optimizer within a multilevel linear decomposition scheme based on the Sobieski hierarchic algorithm. Two engineering design examples are solved using this approach. The results show that the direct handling of coupling equality constraints in a multilevel optimization does not introduce any problems when the GRG method is employed as the internal optimizer. The optimums achieved are comparable to those achieved in single level solutions and in multilevel studies where the equality constraints have been handled indirectly.

  8. Directional Antineutrino Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdi, Benjamin R.; Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-02-01

    We propose the first event-by-event directional antineutrino detector using inverse beta decay (IBD) interactions on hydrogen, with potential applications including monitoring for nuclear nonproliferation, spatially mapping geoneutrinos, characterizing the diffuse supernova neutrino background and searching for new physics in the neutrino sector. The detector consists of adjacent and separated target and capture scintillator planes. IBD events take place in the target layers, which are thin enough to allow the neutrons to escape without scattering elastically. The neutrons are detected in the thicker boron-loaded capture layers. The location of the IBD event and the momentum of the positron are determined by tracking the positron's trajectory through the detector. Our design is a straightforward modification of existing antineutrino detectors; a prototype could be built with existing technology.

  9. Directional antineutrino detection.

    PubMed

    Safdi, Benjamin R; Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-02-20

    We propose the first event-by-event directional antineutrino detector using inverse beta decay (IBD) interactions on hydrogen, with potential applications including monitoring for nuclear nonproliferation, spatially mapping geoneutrinos, characterizing the diffuse supernova neutrino background and searching for new physics in the neutrino sector. The detector consists of adjacent and separated target and capture scintillator planes. IBD events take place in the target layers, which are thin enough to allow the neutrons to escape without scattering elastically. The neutrons are detected in the thicker boron-loaded capture layers. The location of the IBD event and the momentum of the positron are determined by tracking the positron's trajectory through the detector. Our design is a straightforward modification of existing antineutrino detectors; a prototype could be built with existing technology. PMID:25763953

  10. Directional Antineutrino Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdi, B. R.; Suerfu, J.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the first truly directional antineutrino detector for antineutrinos near the threshold for the inverse beta decay (IBD) of hydrogen, with potential applications including the spatial mapping of geo-neutrinos, searches for stellar antineutrinos, and the monitoring of nuclear reactors. The detector consists of adjacent and separated target and neutron-capture layers. The IBD events, which result in a neutron and a positron, take place in the target layers. These layers are thin enough so that the neutrons escape without scattering elastically. The neutrons are detected in the thicker neutron-capture layers. The location of the IBD event is determined from the energy deposited by the positron as it slows in the medium and from the two gamma rays that come from the positron annihilation. Since the neutron recoils in the direction of the antineutrino's motion, a line may then be drawn between the IBD event location and the neutron-capture location to approximate the antineutrino's velocity. In some events, we may even measure the positron's velocity, which further increases our ability to reconstruct the antineutrino's direction of motion. Our method significantly improves upon previous methods by allowing the neutron to freely travel a long distance before diffusing and being captured. Moreover, our design is a straightforward modification of existing antineutrino detectors; a prototype could easily be built with existing technology. We verify our design through Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4, using commercially-available boron-loaded plastic scintillators for the target and neutron-capture layer materials. We are able to discriminate from background using multiple coincidence signatures within a short, ~microsecond time interval. We conclude that the detector could likely operate above ground with minimal shielding.

  11. Remember judgments and the constraint of direct experience.

    PubMed

    Stoettinger, Elisabeth; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Perner, Josef

    2009-09-01

    The most direct assessment of episodic memory is provided by Remember versus Know judgments of recalled or recognised items. We investigate whether Remember judgments reflect episodic memories as a re-experience of formerly experienced events (mental time travel). If they do, they must obey the direct experience constraint: only directly experienced events can be re-experienced but not when the event is known through indirectly conveyed information. In two Experiments participants saw simple events in Power Point, e.g. a car exploding. In the direct experience condition these events were directly perceived. In three further conditions information about the object (particular car), the kind of event (explosion), or both were verbally conveyed. After controlling for a potential encoding specificity effect in Experiment 1, the frequency of Remember judgments was twice as high in the direct experience condition than in the other three conditions. This suggests that Remember judgments are--at least to some degree--subject to the direct experience constraint. PMID:18987880

  12. Scalar dark matter: direct vs. indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Michael; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Smirnov, Juri

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the simplest model for dark matter. In this context the dark matter candidate is a real scalar field which interacts with the Standard Model particles through the Higgs portal. We discuss the relic density constraints as well as the predictions for direct and indirect detection. The final state radiation processes are investigated in order to understand the visibility of the gamma lines from dark matter annihilation. We find two regions where one could observe the gamma lines at gamma-ray telescopes. We point out that the region where the dark matter mass is between 92 and 300 GeV can be tested in the near future at direct and indirect detection experiments.

  13. Methodological Constraints for Detecting the Modality Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoor, Cornelia; Bannert, Maria; Jahn, Verena

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of our research was to investigate the modality effect in more detail by measuring it in a direct way. Two studies were conducted using the same subject and material. Method: Computer-based learning material was presented on several screens, each containing a short text and a picture. Modality was varied by presenting written…

  14. Automatic Constraint Detection for 2D Layout Regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyong; Nan, Liangliang; Yan, Dong-Ming; Dong, Weiming; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wonka, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of constraint detection for layout regularization. The layout we consider is a set of two-dimensional elements where each element is represented by its bounding box. Layout regularization is important in digitizing plans or images, such as floor plans and facade images, and in the improvement of user-created contents, such as architectural drawings and slide layouts. To regularize a layout, we aim to improve the input by detecting and subsequently enforcing alignment, size, and distance constraints between layout elements. Similar to previous work, we formulate layout regularization as a quadratic programming problem. In addition, we propose a novel optimization algorithm that automatically detects constraints. We evaluate the proposed framework using a variety of input layouts from different applications. Our results demonstrate that our method has superior performance to the state of the art. PMID:26394426

  15. Direct detection of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the latest results of Dark Matter direct detection will be summarized, with particular care to the DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 results and the evidence with high confidence level obtained by exploiting the model independent Dark Matter annual modulation signature for the presence of Dark Matter particles in the galactic halo. Results from other experiments using different procedures, different techniques and different target-materials will be shortly discussed. Results, implications and experimental perspectives will be addressed.

  16. Direct Dark Matter Detection Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newstead, Jayden L.

    The identity and origin of dark matter is one of the more elusive mysteries in the fields of particle physics and cosmology. In the near future, direct dark matter detectors will offer a chance at observing dark matter non-gravitationally for the first time. In this thesis, formalisms are developed to analyze direct detection experiments and to quantify the extent to which properties of the dark matter can be determined. A range of non-standard assumptions about the dark matter are considered, including inelastic scattering, isospin violation and momentum dependent scattering. Bayesian inference is applied to realistic detector configurations to evaluate parameter estimation and model selection ability. A complete set of simplified models for spin-0, spin-1/2 and spin-1 dark matter candidates are formulated. The corresponding non-relativistic operators are found, and are used to derive observational signals for the simplified models. The ability to discern these simplified models with direct detection experiments is demonstrated. In the near future direct dark matter detectors will be sensitive to coherent neutrino scattering, which will limit the discovery potential of these experiments. It was found that eleven of the fourteen non-relativistic operators considered produce signals distinct from coherent scattering, and thus the neutrino background does not greatly affect the discovery potential in these cases.

  17. Plasma dark matter direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. D.; Foot, R.

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way may take the form of a dark plasma. Hidden sector dark matter charged under an unbroken U(1)' gauge interaction provides a simple and well defined particle physics model realising this possibility. The assumed U(1)' neutrality of the Universe then implies (at least) two oppositely charged dark matter components with self-interactions mediated via a massless "dark photon" (the U(1)' gauge boson). In addition to nuclear recoils such dark matter can give rise to keV electron recoils in direct detection experiments. In this context, the detailed physical properties of the dark matter plasma interacting with the Earth is required. This is a complex system, which is here modelled as a fluid governed by the magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved for some illustrative examples, and implications for direct detection experiments discussed. In particular, the analysis presented here leaves open the intriguing possibility that the DAMA annual modulation signal is due primarily to electron recoils (or even a combination of electron recoils and nuclear recoils). The importance of diurnal modulation (in addition to annual modulation) as a means of probing this kind of dark matter is also emphasised.

  18. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-18

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here.

  19. DIRECT IMAGING CONSTRAINTS ON THE PUTATIVE EXOPLANET 14 Her C

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Males, Jared R.; Hinz, Philip M.; Knox, Russell P.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2011-05-01

    We present results of deep direct imaging of the radial velocity (RV) planet-host star 14 Her (=GJ 614, HD 145675), obtained in the L' band with the Clio-2 camera and the MMT adaptive optics system. This star has one confirmed planet and an unconfirmed outer companion, suggested by residuals in the RV data. The orbital parameters of the unconfirmed object are not well constrained since many mass/semimajor axis configurations can fit the available data. The star has been directly imaged several times, but none of the campaigns has ruled out sub-stellar companions. With {approx}2.5 hr of integration, we rule out at 5{sigma} confidence {approx}>18 M{sub J} companions beyond {approx}25 AU, based on the Baraffe et al. COND mass-luminosity models. Combining our detection limits with fits to the RV data and analytic dynamical analysis, we constrain the orbital parameters of 14 Her c to be 3 {approx}< m/M{sub J} {approx}<42, 7 {approx}< a/AU {approx}<25, and e {approx}< 0.5. A wealth of information can be obtained from RV/direct imaging overlap, especially with deep imaging as this work shows. The collaboration between RV and direct imaging will become more important in the coming years as the phase space probed by each technique converges. Future studies involving RV/imaging overlap should be sure to consider the effects of a potential planet's projected separation, as quoting limits assuming face-on orientation will be misleading.

  20. Direct constraints on GIA motion in North America using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sella, G. F.; Stein, S.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T. H.; Craymer, M.; James, T.

    2004-05-01

    We use continuous and episodic Global Positioning System (GPS) data to measure the movement caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) due to glacial unloading in eastern North America. At present it is challenging to quantify GIA motion in North American due to the limited number of continuous GPS sites (CGPS) in and around Hudson Bay, the area of maximum glacial loading. Episodic GPS (EGPS) sites provide a low cost and higher density alternative, but often have large errors, especially in the vertical. However, the large vertical signal due to GIA (>10mm/yr) in the area of maximum uplift permits this motion to be resolved, even with EGPS data. We present data from 130 CGPS sites throughout North America and almost 100 EGPS sites of the Canadian Base Network (CBN). The CBN sites are located across central and southern Canada and have been episodically occupied between 1994 and 2002. We detect a coherent pattern of vertical motions around the area of maximum glacial loading, Hudson Bay. The observed velocities are initially large and upward, and decrease southward from Hudson Bay to zero, delineating the hinge line near the Great Lakes. The position of the hinge line is in agreement with some numerical GIA predictions. The horizontal residual velocities after removing the motion of the rigid North American plate also show a consistent, but more complex pattern than the vertical velocities. In particular we observe larger than expected motions on the east side of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, possibly reflecting larger ice loads and/or changes in mantle viscosity. We believe that this velocity field provides the first comprehensive direct description of GIA motion and can be used to constrain GIA model predictions.

  1. Constraints on the detection of cryovolcanic plumes on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Prockter, Louise M.; Patterson, G. Wesley

    2013-09-01

    Surface venting is a common occurrence on several outer solar system satellites. Spacecraft have observed plumes erupting from the geologically young surfaces of Io, Triton and Enceladus. Europa also has a relatively young surface and previous studies have suggested that cryovolcanic eruptions may be responsible for the production of low-albedo deposits surrounding lenticulae and along triple band margins and lineae. Here, we have used the projected thicknesses of these deposits as constraints to determine the lifetimes of detectable cryovolcanic plumes that may have emplaced them. In an effort to explore the feasibility of detection of the particle component of plumes by spacecraft cameras operating at visible wavelengths, we present a conservative model to estimate plume characteristics such as height, eruption velocity, and optical depth under a variety of conditions. We find that cryovolcanic plumes on Europa are likely to be fairly small in stature with heights between 2.5 and 26 km, and eruption velocities between 81 and 261 m/s, respectively. Under these conditions and assuming that plumes are products of steady eruptions with particle radii of 0.5 μm, our model suggests that easily detectable plumes will have optical depths, τ, greater than or equal to 0.04, and that their lifetimes may be no more than 300,000 years. Plume detection may be possible if high phase angle limb observations and/or stereo imaging of the surface are undertaken in areas where eruptive activity is likely to occur. Cameras with imaging resolutions greater than 50 m/pixel should be used to make all observations. Future missions could employ the results of our model in searches for plume activity at Europa.

  2. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo

    2015-08-13

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.

  3. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Shelton, Jessie E-mail: katz.andrey@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

  4. Geometrical constraints and physical crowding direct collective migration of fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Man Chun; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Migrating cells constantly interact with their immediate microenvironment and neighbors. Although studies on single cell migration offer us insights into the molecular and biochemical signaling pathways, they cannot predict the influence of cell crowding and geometrical cues. Using microfabrication techniques, we examine the influence of cell density and geometrical constraints on migrating fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were allowed to migrate on fibronectin strips of different widths. Under such conditions, cells experience various physical guidance cues including boundary effect, confinement and contact inhibition from neighboring cells. Fibroblasts migrating along the edge of the fibronectin pattern exhibit spindle-like morphology, reminiscent of migrating cells within confined space and high cell density are associated with increased alignment and higher speed in migrating fibroblasts. PMID:23750300

  5. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  6. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  7. On Geometrical Interpretation of Non-Abelian Flat Direction Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaver, G. B.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Perkins, J. T.; Walker, J. W.

    In order to produce a low-energy effective field theory from a string model, it is necessary to specify a vacuum state. In order that this vacuum be supersymmetric, it is well known that all field expectation values must be along so-called flat directions, leaving the F- and D-terms of the scalar potential to be zero. The situation becomes particularly interesting when one attempts to realize such directions while assigning vacuum expectation values to fields transforming under non-Abelian representations of the gauge group. Since the expectation value is now shared among multiple components of a field, satisfaction of flatness becomes an inherently geometrical problem in the group space. Furthermore, the possibility emerges that a single seemingly dangerous F-term might experience a self-cancellation among its components. The hope exists that the geometric language can provide an intuitive and immediate recognition of when the D and F conditions are simultaneously compatible, as well as a powerful tool for their comprehensive classification. This is the avenue explored in this paper, and applied to the cases of SU(2) and SO(2N), relevant respectively to previous attempts at reproducing the MSSM and the flipped SU(5) GUT. Geometrical interpretation of non-Abelian flat directions finds application to M-theory through the recent conjecture of equivalence between D-term strings and wrapped D-branes of Type II theory.1 Knowledge of the geometry of the flat direction "landscape" of a D-term string model could yield information about the dual brane model. It is hoped that the techniques encountered will be of benefit in extending the viability of the quasirealistic phenomenologies already developed.

  8. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  9. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  10. PROJECTED CONSTRAINTS ON THE COSMIC (SUPER)STRING TENSION WITH FUTURE GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanidas, Sotirios A.; Battye, Richard A.; Stappers, Benjamin W. E-mail: rbattye@jb.man.ac.uk

    2013-02-10

    We present projected constraints on the cosmic string tension, G{mu}/c {sup 2}, that could be achieved by future gravitational wave detection experiments and express our results as semi-analytic relations of the form G{mu}({Omega}{sub gw} h {sup 2})/c {sup 2}, to allow for direct computation of the tension constraints for future experiments. These results can be applied to new constraints on {Omega}{sub gw} h {sup 2} as they are imposed. Experiments operating in different frequency bands probe different parts of the gravitational wave spectrum of a cosmic string network and are sensitive to different uncertainties in the underlying cosmic string model parameters. We compute the gravitational wave spectra of cosmic string networks based on the one-scale model, covering all the parameter space accessed by each experiment that is strongly dependent on the birth scale of loops relative to the horizon, {alpha}. The upper limits on the string tension avoid any assumptions on the model parameters. We perform this investigation for Pulsar Timing Array experiments of different durations, as well as ground-based and space-borne interferometric detectors.

  11. Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2008-09-15

    We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

  12. Goal Directed Model Inversion: Learning Within Domain Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Compton, Michael; Raghavan, Bharathi; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Goal Directed Model Inversion (GDMI) is an algorithm designed to generalize supervised learning to the case where target outputs are not available to the learning system. The output of the learning system becomes the input to some external device or transformation, and only the output of this device or transformation can be compared to a desired target. The fundamental driving mechanism of GDMI is to learn from success. Given that a wrong outcome is achieved, one notes that the action that produced that outcome "would have been right if the outcome had been the desired one." The algorithm makes use of these intermediate "successes" to achieve the final goal. A unique and potentially very important feature of this algorithm is the ability to modify the output of the learning module to force upon it a desired syntactic structure. This differs from ordinary supervised learning in the following way: in supervised learning the exact desired output pattern must be provided. In GDMI instead, it is possible to require simply that the output obey certain rules, i.e., that it "make sense" in some way determined by the knowledge domain. The exact pattern that will achieve the desired outcome is then found by the system. The ability to impose rules while allowing the system to search for its own answers in the context of neural networks is potentially a major breakthrough in two ways: 1) it may allow the construction of networks that can incorporate immediately some important knowledge, i.e. would not need to learn everything from scratch as normally required at present, and 2) learning and searching would be limited to the areas where it is necessary, thus facilitating and speeding up the process. These points are illustrated with examples from robotic path planning and parametric design.

  13. Goal Directed Model Inversion: Learning Within Domain Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Compton, Michael; Raghavan, Bharathi; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Goal Directed Model Inversion (GDMI) is an algorithm designed to generalize supervised learning to the case where target outputs are not available to the learning system. The output of the learning system becomes the input to some external device or transformation, and only the output of this device or transformation can be compared to a desired target. The fundamental driving mechanism of GDMI is to learn from success. Given that a wrong outcome is achieved, one notes that the action that produced that outcome "would have been right if the outcome had been the desired one." The algorithm makes use of these intermediate "successes" to achieve the final goal. A unique and potentially very important feature of this algorithm is the ability to modify the output of the learning module to force upon it a desired syntactic structure. This differs from ordinary supervised learning in the following way: in supervised learning the exact desired output pattern must be provided. In GDMI instead, it is possible to require simply that the output obey certain rules, i.e., that it "make sense" in some way determined by the knowledge domain. The exact pattern that will achieve the desired outcome is then found by the system. The ability to impose rules while allowing the system to search for its own answers in the context of neural networks is potentially a major breakthrough in two ways: (1) it may allow the construction of networks that can incorporate immediately some important knowledge, i.e., would not need to learn everything from scratch as normally required at present; and (2) learning and searching would be limited to the areas where it is necessary, thus facilitating and speeding up the process. These points are illustrated with examples from robotic path planning and parametric design.

  14. Disentangling Dark Matter Dynamics with Directional Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-16

    Inelastic dark matter reconciles the DAMA anomaly with other null direct detection experiments and points to a non-minimal structure in the dark matter sector. In addition to the dominant inelastic interaction, dark matter scattering may have a subdominant elastic component. If these elastic interactions are suppressed at low momentum transfer, they will have similar nuclear recoil spectra to inelastic scattering events. While upcoming direct detection experiments will see strong signals from such models, they may not be able to unambiguously determine the presence of the subdominant elastic scattering from the recoil spectra alone. We show that directional detection experiments can separate elastic and inelastic scattering events and discover the underlying dynamics of dark matter models.

  15. Disentangling dark matter dynamics with directional detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2010-05-01

    Inelastic dark matter reconciles the DAMA anomaly with other null direct detection experiments and points to a nonminimal structure in the dark matter sector. In addition to the dominant inelastic interaction, dark matter scattering may have a subdominant elastic component. If these elastic interactions are suppressed at low momentum transfer, they will have similar nuclear recoil spectra to inelastic scattering events. While upcoming direct detection experiments will see strong signals from such models, they may not be able to unambiguously determine the presence of the subdominant elastic scattering from the recoil spectra alone. We show that directional detection experiments can separate elastic and inelastic scattering events and discover the underlying dynamics of dark matter models.

  16. Microgels for multiplex and direct fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Filippo; Aliberti, Anna; Cusano, Angela M.; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2015-05-01

    Blood borne oligonucleotides fragments contain useful clinical information whose detection and monitoring represent the new frontier in liquid biopsy as they can transform the current diagnosis procedure. For instance, recent studies have identified a new class of circulating biomarkers such as s miRNAs, and demonstrated that changes in their concentration are closely associated with the development of cancer and other pathologies. However, direct detection of miRNAs in body fluids is particularly challenging and demands high sensitivity -concentration range between atto to femtomolarspecificity, and multiplexing Here we report on engineered multifunctional microgels and innovative probe design for a direct and multiplex detection of relevant clinical miRNAs in fluorescence by single particle assay. Polyethyleneglycol-based microgels have a coreshell architecture with two spectrally encoded fluorescent dyes for multiplex analyses and are endowed with fluorescent probes for miRNA detection. Encoding and detection fluorescence signals are distinguishable by not overlapping emission spectra. Tuneable fluorescence probe conjugation and corresponding emission confinement on single microgel allows for enhanced target detection. Such suspension array has indeed high selectivity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 10-15 M and a dynamic range from 10-9 to 10-15 M. We believe that sensitivity in the fM concentration range, signal background minimization, multiplexed capability and direct measurement of such microgels will translate into diagnostic benefits opening up new roots toward liquid biopsy in the context of point-of-care testing through an easy and fast detection of sensitive diagnostic biomarkers directly in serum.

  17. Spectral efficiency of optical direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alfonso

    2007-04-01

    The spectral efficiency (channel capacity) of the optical direct-detection channel is studied. The modeling of the optical direct-detection channel as a discrete-time Poisson channel is reviewed. Closed-form integral representations for the entropy of random variables with Poisson and negative binomial distributions are derived. The spectral efficiency achievable with an arbitrary input gamma density is expressed in closed integral form. Simple, nonasymptotic upper and lower bounds to the channel capacity are computed. Numerical results are presented and compared with previous bounds and approximations.

  18. Recent results in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Christopher Michael

    Three dark matter direct detection experiments (DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST-II) have each reported signals which resemble that predicted for a dark matter particle with a mass of roughly 10 GeV. We review the theoretical background for direct detection experiments as well as these particular detectors and their reported signals over the last few years. We also compare the signals of these experiments and discuss whether they can be explained by a single species of dark matter particle, without conflicting with the constraints of other experiments. We show that the spectrum of events reported by CoGeNT and CRESST-II are consistent with each other and with the constraints from CDMS-II, although some tension with xenon- based experiments remains. Similarly, the modulation signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT appear to be compatible, although the corresponding amplitude of the observed modulations are a factor of at least a few higher than would be naively expected, based on the event spectra reported by CoGeNT and CRESST-II. We also discuss some ways that this apparent discrepancy could potentially be resolved.

  19. Dark matter direct-detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrodán Undagoitia, Teresa; Rauch, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, several detector technologies have been developed with the quest to directly detect dark matter interactions and to test one of the most important unsolved questions in modern physics. The sensitivity of these experiments has improved with a tremendous speed due to a constant development of the detectors and analysis methods, proving uniquely suited devices to solve the dark matter puzzle, as all other discovery strategies can only indirectly infer its existence. Despite the overwhelming evidence for dark matter from cosmological indications at small and large scales, clear evidence for a particle explaining these observations remains absent. This review summarises the status of direct dark matter searches, focusing on the detector technologies used to directly detect a dark matter particle producing recoil energies in the keV energy scale. The phenomenological signal expectations, main background sources, statistical treatment of data and calibration strategies are discussed.

  20. Gap Detection for Genome-Scale Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J. Paul; Burns, William P.; Fong, Stephen S.; Gowen, Chris M.; Roberts, Seth B.

    2012-01-01

    Constraint-based metabolic models are currently the most comprehensive system-wide models of cellular metabolism. Several challenges arise when building an in silico constraint-based model of an organism that need to be addressed before flux balance analysis (FBA) can be applied for simulations. An algorithm called FBA-Gap is presented here that aids the construction of a working model based on plausible modifications to a given list of reactions that are known to occur in the organism. When applied to a working model, the algorithm gives a hypothesis concerning a minimal medium for sustaining the cell in culture. The utility of the algorithm is demonstrated in creating a new model organism and is applied to four existing working models for generating hypotheses about culture media. In modifying a partial metabolic reconstruction so that biomass may be produced using FBA, the proposed method is more efficient than a previously proposed method in that fewer new reactions are added to complete the model. The proposed method is also more accurate than other approaches in that only biologically plausible reactions and exchange reactions are used. PMID:22997515

  1. A Generalized Radiation Model for Human Mobility: Spatial Scale, Searching Direction and Trip Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chaogui; Liu, Yu; Guo, Diansheng; Qin, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We generalized the recently introduced “radiation model”, as an analog to the generalization of the classic “gravity model”, to consolidate its nature of universality for modeling diverse mobility systems. By imposing the appropriate scaling exponent λ, normalization factor κ and system constraints including searching direction and trip OD constraint, the generalized radiation model accurately captures real human movements in various scenarios and spatial scales, including two different countries and four different cities. Our analytical results also indicated that the generalized radiation model outperformed alternative mobility models in various empirical analyses. PMID:26600153

  2. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  3. Closing supersymmetric resonance regions with direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris

    2014-01-01

    One of the few remaining ways that neutralinos could potentially evade constraints from direct detection experiments is if they annihilate through a resonance, as can occur if 2m{sub χ⁰} falls within about ~10% of either m{sub A/H}, m{sub h}, or m{sub Z}. Assuming a future rate of progress among direct detection experiments that is similar to that obtained over the past decade, we project that within 7 years the light Higgs and Z pole regions will be entirely closed, while the remaining parameter space near the A/H resonance will require that 2m{sub χ₀} be matched to the central value (near m{sub A}) to within less than 4%. At this rate of progress, it will be a little over a decade before multi-ton direct detection experiments will be able to close the remaining, highly-tuned, regions of the A/H resonance parameter space.

  4. Wind measurement via direct detection lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afek, I.; Sela, N.; Narkiss, N.; Shamai, G.; Tsadka, S.

    2013-10-01

    Wind sensing Lidar is considered a promising technology for high quality wind measurements required for various applications such as hub height wind resource assessment, power curve measurements and advanced, real time, forward looking turbine control. Until recently, the only available Lidar technology was based on coherent Doppler shift detection, whose market acceptance has been slow primarily due to its exuberant price. Direct detection Lidar technology provides an alternative to remote sensing of wind by incorporating high precision measurement, a robust design and an affordable price tag.

  5. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF FISSION-SPECTRUM NEUTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.E.

    2007-05-04

    Conventional neutron detectors consisting of {sup 3}He tubes surrounded by a plastic moderator can be quite efficient in detecting fission spectrum neutrons, but do not indicate the direction of the incident radiation. We have developed a new directional detector based on double proton recoil in two separated planes of plastic scintillators. This method allows the spectrum of the neutrons to be measured by a combination of peak amplitude in the first plane and time of flight to the second plane. It also allows the determination of the angle of scattering in the first plane. If the planes are position-sensitive detectors, then the direction of the scattered neutron is known, and the direction of the incident neutron can be determined to lie on a cone of s fixed angle. The superposition of many such cones generates an image that indicates the presence of a localized source. Typical background neutron fluences from the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere are low and fairly uniformly distributed in angle. Directional detection helps to locate a manmade source in the presence of natural background. Monte Carlo simulations are compared with experimental results.

  6. Directional output distance functions: endogenous directions based on exogenous normalization constraints

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we develop a model for computing directional output distance functions with endogenously determined direction vectors. We show how this model is related to the slacks-based directional distance function introduced by Fare and Grosskopf and show how to use the slacks-based function to e...

  7. Moving object detection using motion field constraint with observer motion parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Ebine, Takumi; Hamada, Nozomu

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we propose a method for detecting moving objects in image sequence observed from a moving platform using optical flow. This problem is difficult because moving observer (i.e. camera) causes apparent motion in the image even for stationary environment. The method can be applied to many situations, such as a robot vision and an obstacle detection for an autonomous vehicle system. We assume that observer motion parameter (translation and rotation) is known and image system is modeled by perspective projection. For the problem, some methods have been proposed, in which the complex logarithm mapping, the estimation of Focus of Expansion and the depth of objects are used. For a given motion parameter of camera, we can formulate motion field constraint (MFC) in the image plane which is satisfied by the relative movement of stationary environment against camera motion. On the other hand, the motion vector in the image plane, which is called motion field, is estimated by the well-known optical flow constraint (OFC). Our main idea is to use the difference between two estimation results. One is the solution of minimizing least squared OFC subjected with MFC, and the other is the solution of that without MFC. For the stationary environment region, the difference between two is small and the difference tends to be large at the moving region. Therefore, the suitable criterion for these values will separate two regions precisely. In our study, two criteria are proposed and are investigated. One criterion uses squared residual of OFC with and without MFC. Another criterion uses directional error between two solutions. The validity of our method is shown through some examples, and the obtained results show the latter criterion gives more accurate estimation than the former one.

  8. Aberration features in directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-08-01

    The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.

  9. Light magnetic dark matter in direct detection searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Chris; Panci, Paolo; Sannino, Francesco; Virkajärvi, Jussi

    2012-08-01

    We study a fermionic Dark Matter particle carrying magnetic dipole moment and analyze its impact on direct detection experiments. In particular we show that it can accommodate the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST experimental results. Assuming conservative bounds, this candidate is shown not to be ruled out by the CDMS, XENON and PICASSO experiments. We offer an analytic understanding of how the long-range interaction modifies the experimental allowed regions, in the cross section versus Dark Matter mass parameter space, with respect to the typically assumed contact interaction. Finally, in the context of a symmetric Dark Matter sector, we determine the associated thermal relic density, and further provide relevant constraints imposed by indirect searches and colliders.

  10. Halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Gondolo, Paolo; Gelmini, Graciela B. E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-12-01

    We extend the halo-independent method of Fox, Liu, and Weiner to include energy resolution and efficiency with arbitrary energy dependence, making it more suitable for experiments to use in presenting their results. Then we compare measurements and upper limits on the direct detection of low mass ( ∼ 10 GeV) weakly interacting massive particles with spin-independent interactions, including the upper limit on the annual modulation amplitude from the CDMS collaboration. We find that isospin-symmetric couplings are severely constrained both by XENON100 and CDMS bounds, and that isospin-violating couplings are still possible at the lowest energies, while the tension of the higher energy CoGeNT bins with the CDMS modulation constraint remains. We find the CRESST-II signal is not compatible with the modulation signals of DAMA and CoGeNT.

  11. NASA direct detection laser diode driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, B. D.; Hornbuckle, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    TRW has developed a prototype driver circuit for GaAs laser diodes as part of the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Direct Detection Laser Transceiver (DDLT) program. The circuit is designed to drive the laser diode over a range of user-selectable data rates from 1.7 to 220 Mbps, Manchester-encoded, while ensuring compatibility with 8-bit and quaternary pulse position modulation (QPPM) formats for simulating deep space communications. The resulting hybrid circuit has demonstrated 10 to 90 percent rise and fall times of less than 300 ps at peak currents exceeding 100 mA.

  12. Miniature laser direct-detection radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharekar, Madhu; Lebeau, Robert

    1992-06-01

    A miniature laser with a total volume less than 15 cu cm and weight less than 100 g has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. The laser uses a composite rod consisting of Nd:Cr:GSGG material rod cladded with an Er:Cr:YSGG tube. The laser provides output at 1 and 3 micron wavelengths. The size and weight reduction is obtained by chemical pumping which eliminates the prime power and the power supply. The laser is used as an illuminator in a direct detection radar.

  13. Direct detection of dark matter axions with directional sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Irastorza, Igor G.; García, Juan A. E-mail: jagarpas@unizar.es

    2012-10-01

    We study the directional effect of the expected axion dark matter signal in a resonant cavity of an axion haloscope detector, for cavity geometries not satisfying the condition that the axion de Broglie wavelength λ{sub a} is sufficiently larger than the cavity dimensions L for a fully coherent conversion, i.e. λ{sub a}∼>2πL. We focus on long thin cavities immersed in dipole magnets and find, for appropriately chosen cavity lengths, an O(1) modulation of the signal with the cavity orientation with respect the momentum distribution of the relic axion background predicted by the isothermal sphere model for the galactic dark matter halo. This effect can be exploited to design directional axion dark matter detectors, providing an unmistakable signature of the extraterrestrial origin of a possible positive detection. Moreover, the precise shape of the modulation may give information of the galactic halo distribution and, for specific halo models, give extra sensitivity for higher axion masses.

  14. Direct and indirect constraints on CP-violating Higgs-quark and Higgs-gluon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Y. T.; Cirigliano, V.; Dekens, W.; de Vries, J.; Mereghetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate direct and indirect constraints on the complete set of anomalous CP-violating Higgs couplings to quarks and gluons originating from dimension-6 operators, by studying their signatures at the LHC and in electric dipole moments (EDMs). We show that existing uncertainties in hadronic and nuclear matrix elements have a significant impact on the interpretation of EDM experiments, and we quantify the improvements needed to fully exploit the power of EDM searches. Currently, the best bounds on the anomalous CP-violating Higgs interactions come from a combination of EDM measurements and the data from LHC Run 1. We argue that Higgs production cross section and branching ratios measurements at the LHC Run 2 will not improve the constraints significantly. On the other hand, the bounds on the couplings scale roughly linearly with EDM limits, so that future theoretical and experimental EDM developments can have a major impact in pinning down interactions of the Higgs.

  15. Directly detecting exozodiacal dust and disk variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Dust is common throughout stellar systems. The architecture of stellar systems may be typically comprised of a distant cold debris disk, a warm exozodiacal disk, and a hot inner disk. Dust in this exozodiacal region confounds exoplanet detections by scattering light or mimicking planetary emission. This environment must be well-modelled in order to find Earth-sized exoplanets. Interferometry at the Center for High Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array provides the angular resolution to directly detect near-infrared (NIR) excesses originating from warm and hot dust close to the host star. The recently upgraded Fiber-Linked Unit for Optical Recombination (JouFLU) is capable of measuring interferometric visibility contrasts to a precision of <0.1% and dust disk fluxes equal to 1% of the host star. There is likely a connection between these hot interferometrically detected dust disks and the harder-to-detect warm zodiacal dust analogues. In this way interferometric studies can observe the tip-of-the-iceberg of stellar system dust, providing details such as composition and grain size of dust, as well as statistics on the correlation of dust populations and stellar properties. These inner dust regions may exhibit a high degree of variability which should also be characterized and may give hint to the dust origin and replenishment mechanisms. JouFLU is currently involved in a large survey of exozodiacal dust stars of spectral types A through K with the aim to provide statistics about dust disk occurrence in relation to their host stars and the presence of cold dust reservoirs. Complementing this survey is a project of re-observing the earliest excess detections in order to determine their variability. In addition, NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) provides a method for spectrophotometric detections of excess stellar flux corresponding to the presence of hot/warm exozodiacal dust. Multiple NIR interferometric instruments as well as medium resolution spectroscopy are a

  16. Neutralino Dark Matter: Update on Direct and Indirect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scopel, S.

    2005-12-02

    Neutralinos represent a viable solution to the Dark Matter problem. In particular, while I discuss here a wide range for their masses, I will deserve a special attention to light neutralinos, which arise in supersymmetric models without unifications conditions of gaugino masses at the GUT scale. They have sizeable direct and indirect detection signals, which are bounded from below by the cosmological constraint on their relic abundance, but are not yet excluded by present direct and indirect searches, including limits coming from the BR(Bs {yields} {mu}+ + {mu}-) decay rate. They represent so an interesting experimental challenge. An intriguing aspect of light neutralinos is also that they could explain the DAMA modulation effect in a still existing compatibility window with other direct search experiments. I also discuss the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and give some examples of external objects, namely the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and M87. Predictions for the fluxes turn out to be below the level required to explain the possible indications of a {gamma}-ray excess shown by EGRET, CANGAROO-II and HESS (toward the Galactic Center) and HEGRA (from M87). As far as future experiments are concerned, only the signal from the galactic center could be accessible to both satellite-borne experiments and to ACTs, even though this requires very steep dark matter density profiles.

  17. Dark matter direct detection with accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.

    2016-04-01

    The mass of the dark matter particle is unknown, and may be as low as ˜1 0-22 eV . The lighter part of this range, below ˜eV , is relatively unexplored both theoretically and experimentally but contains an array of natural dark matter candidates. An example is the relaxion, a light boson predicted by cosmological solutions to the hierarchy problem. One of the few generic signals such light dark matter can produce is a time-oscillating, equivalence-principle-violating force. We propose searches for this using accelerometers, and consider in detail the examples of torsion balances, atom interferometry, and pulsar timing. These approaches have the potential to probe large parts of unexplored parameter space in the next several years. Thus such accelerometers provide radically new avenues for the direct detection of dark matter.

  18. The Earth's velocity for direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    The Earth's velocity relative to the Sun in galactic coordinates is required in the rate calculation for direct detection experiments. We provide a rigorous derivation of this quantity to first order in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. We also discuss the effect of the precession of the equinoxes, which has hitherto received little explicit discussion. Comparing with other expressions in the literature, we confirm that the expression of Lee, Lisanti and Safdi is correct, while the expression of Lewin and Smith, the de facto standard expression, contains an error. For calculations of the absolute event rate, the leading order expression is sufficient while for modulation searches, an expression with the eccentricity is required for accurate predictions of the modulation phase.

  19. A Theory and Model of Conflict Detection in Air Traffic Control: Incorporating Environmental Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Shayne; Bolland, Scott; Humphreys, Michael S.; Neal, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A performance theory for conflict detection in air traffic control is presented that specifies how controllers adapt decisions to compensate for environmental constraints. This theory is then used as a framework for a model that can fit controller intervention decisions. The performance theory proposes that controllers apply safety margins to…

  20. DIRECT DETECTION OF AN ULTRALUMINOUS ULTRAVIOLET SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng Hua; Wong, Diane S.; Tao Lian

    2010-05-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope observations in the far UV of the ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 6946 associated with the optical nebula MF 16. Both a point-like source coincident with the X-ray source and the surrounding nebula are detected in the FUV. The point source has a flux of 5 x 10{sup -16} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} A{sup -1}, and the nebula has a flux of 1.6 x 10{sup -15} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} A{sup -1}, quoted at 1533 A and assuming an extinction of A{sub V} = 1.54. Thus, MF 16 appears to host the first directly detected ultraluminous UV source. The flux of the point-like source is consistent with a blackbody with T{approx} 30,000 K, possibly from a massive companion star, but this spectrum does not create sufficient ionizing radiation to produce the nebular He II flux, and a second, hotter emission component would be required. A multicolor disk blackbody spectrum truncated with an outer disk temperature of {approx}16,000 K provides an adequate fit to the FUV, B, V, I, and He II fluxes and can produce the needed ionizing radiation. Additional observations are required to determine the physical nature of the source.

  1. EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Baushev, A. N.

    2013-07-10

    Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute {approx}12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed ({approx}600 km s{sup -1}), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s{sup -1}), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

  2. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. The Direct Detectability of Giant Exoplanets in the Optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny P.; Burrows, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the possibility that a coronagraph will be put on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA), we explore the direct detectability of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) in the optical. We quantify a planet's detectability by the fraction of its orbit for which it is in an observable configuration ({f}{obs}). Using a suite of Monte Carlo experiments, we study the dependence of {f}{obs} upon the inner working angle (IWA) and minimum achievable contrast ({C}{min}) of the direct-imaging observatory; the planet's phase function, geometric albedo, single-scattering albedo, radius, and distance from Earth; and the semimajor axis distribution of EGPs. We calculate phase functions for a given geometric or single-scattering albedo, assuming various scattering mechanisms. We find that the Lambertian phase function can predict significantly larger {f}{obs}s with respect to the more realistic Rayleigh phase function. For observations made with WFIRST/AFTA's baseline capabilities ({C}{min}˜ {10}-9, {IWA}˜ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2), Jupiter-like planets orbiting stars within 10, 30, and 50 pc of Earth have volume-averaged observability fractions of ˜12%, 3%, and 0.5%, respectively. At 10 pc, such observations yield {f}{obs}\\gt 1% for low- to modest-eccentricity planets with semimajor axes in the range ˜2-10 AU. If {C}{min}={10}-10, this range extends to ˜35 AU. We find that, in all but the most optimistic configurations, the probability for detection in a blind search is low (< 5%). However, with orbital parameter constraints from long-term radial-velocity campaigns and Gaia astrometry, the tools we develop in this work can be used to determine both the most promising systems to target and when to observe them.

  4. Direct Exoplanet Detection with Binary Differential Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Mamajek, Eric E.; Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie; Hinz, Philip M.; Kaib, Nathan

    2015-10-01

    Binaries are typically excluded from direct imaging exoplanet surveys. However, the recent findings of Kepler and radial velocity programs show that planets can and do form in binary systems. Here, we suggest that visual binaries offer unique advantages for direct imaging. We show that Binary Differential Imaging (BDI), whereby two stars are imaged simultaneously at the same wavelength within the isoplanatic patch at a high Strehl ratio, offers improved point spread function (PSF) subtraction that can result in increased sensitivity to planets close to each star. We demonstrate this by observing a young visual binary separated by 4″ with MagAO/Clio-2 at 3.9 μm, where the Strehl ratio is high, the isoplanatic patch is large, and giant planets are bright. Comparing BDI to angular differential imaging (ADI), we find that BDI’s 5σ contrast is ˜0.5 mag better than ADI’s within ˜1″ for the particular binary we observed. Because planets typically reside close to their host stars, BDI is a promising technique for discovering exoplanets in stellar systems that are often ignored. BDI is also 2-4× more efficient than ADI and classical reference PSF subtraction, since planets can be detected around both the target and PSF reference simultaneously. We are currently exploiting this technique in a new MagAO survey for giant planets in 140 young nearby visual binaries. BDI on a space-based telescope would not be limited by isoplanatism effects and would therefore be an even more powerful tool for imaging and discovering planets. This paper includes data obtained at the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Neutralino dark matter in minimal supergravity: Direct detection versus collider searches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Brhlik, M.

    1998-01-01

    We calculate expected event rates for direct detection of relic neutralinos as a function of parameter space of the minimal supergravity model. Numerical results are presented for the specific case of a {sup 73}Ge detector. We find significant detection rates (R{gt}0.01events/kg/day) in regions of parameter space most favored by constraints from B{r_arrow}X{sub s}{gamma} and the cosmological relic density of neutralinos. The detection rates are especially large in regions of large tan{beta}, where many conventional signals for supersymmetry at collider experiments are difficult to detect. If the parameter tan{beta} is large, then there is a significant probability that the first direct evidence for supersymmetry could come from direct detection experiments, rather than from collider searches for sparticles. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Quantitative assignment of reaction directionality in constraint-based models of metabolism: Application to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, R.M.T.; Thiele, I.; Nasheuer, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    Constraint based modeling is an approach for quantitative prediction of net reaction flux in genome scale biochemical networks. In vivo, the second law of thermodynamics requires that net macroscopic flux be forward, when the transformed reaction Gibbs energy is negative. We calculate the latter by using (i) group contribution estimates of metabolite species Gibbs energy, combined with (ii) experimentally measured equilibrium constants. In an application to a genome scale stoichiometric model of E. coli metabolism, iAF1260, we demonstrate that quantitative prediction of reaction directionality is increased in scope and accuracy by integration of both data sources, transformed appropriately to in vivo pH, temperature and ionic strength. Comparison of quantitative versus qualitative assignment of reaction directionality in iAF1260, assuming an accommodating reactant concentration range of 0.02 – 20 mM, revealed that quantitative assignment leads to a low false positive, but high false negative, prediction of effectively irreversible reactions. The latter is partly due to the uncertainty associated with group contribution estimates. We also uncovered evidence that the high intracellular concentration of glutamate in E. coli may be essential to direct otherwise thermodynamically unfavorable essential reactions, such as the leucine transaminase reaction, in an anabolic direction. PMID:19783351

  7. Loop Closing Detection in RGB-D SLAM Combining Appearance and Geometric Constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Yanli; Tan, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    A kind of multi feature points matching algorithm fusing local geometric constraints is proposed for the purpose of quickly loop closing detection in RGB-D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). The visual feature is encoded with BRAND (binary robust appearance and normals descriptor), which efficiently combines appearance and geometric shape information from RGB-D images. Furthermore, the feature descriptors are stored using the Locality-Sensitive-Hashing (LSH) technique and hierarchical clustering trees are used to search for these binary features. Finally, the algorithm for matching of multi feature points using local geometric constraints is provided, which can effectively reject the possible false closure hypotheses. We demonstrate the efficiency of our algorithms by real-time RGB-D SLAM with loop closing detection in indoor image sequences taken with a handheld Kinect camera and comparative experiments using other algorithms in RTAB-Map dealing with a benchmark dataset. PMID:26102492

  8. Loop Closing Detection in RGB-D SLAM Combining Appearance and Geometric Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Yanli; Tan, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    A kind of multi feature points matching algorithm fusing local geometric constraints is proposed for the purpose of quickly loop closing detection in RGB-D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). The visual feature is encoded with BRAND (binary robust appearance and normals descriptor), which efficiently combines appearance and geometric shape information from RGB-D images. Furthermore, the feature descriptors are stored using the Locality-Sensitive-Hashing (LSH) technique and hierarchical clustering trees are used to search for these binary features. Finally, the algorithm for matching of multi feature points using local geometric constraints is provided, which can effectively reject the possible false closure hypotheses. We demonstrate the efficiency of our algorithms by real-time RGB-D SLAM with loop closing detection in indoor image sequences taken with a handheld Kinect camera and comparative experiments using other algorithms in RTAB-Map dealing with a benchmark dataset. PMID:26102492

  9. Detecting Patterns of Aeolian Transport Direction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The magnitude and direction of aeolian transport are of direct interest to those engaged in the study of aeolian processes. Although the magnitude of sediment transport has been studied extensively, the study of aeolian transport direction has garnered less attention. This paper describes the deve...

  10. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-06-15

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans.

  11. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan E-mail: ibarra@tum.de E-mail: stefan.vogl@tum.de

    2012-11-01

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  12. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T.; Berkowitz, E.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar “stealth baryon” dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory—“stealth dark matter.” In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest “baryon” states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be possibly detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200–700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m6B, suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.

  13. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Berkowitz, E.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar "stealth baryon" dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory—"stealth dark matter." In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest "baryon" states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N ) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be potentially detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200-700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1 /mB6 , suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We briefly highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.

  14. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability.

    PubMed

    Appelquist, T; Berkowitz, E; Brower, R C; Buchoff, M I; Fleming, G T; Jin, X-Y; Kiskis, J; Kribs, G D; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Rinaldi, E; Schaich, D; Schroeder, C; Syritsyn, S; Vranas, P; Weinberg, E; Witzel, O

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar "stealth baryon" dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory-"stealth dark matter." In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest "baryon" states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be potentially detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200-700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m(B)(6), suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We briefly highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter. PMID:26551103

  15. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, T.; Berkowitz, E.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; et al

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar “stealth baryon” dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory—“stealth dark matter.” In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest “baryon” states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using themore » background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be possibly detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200–700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m6B, suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.« less

  16. NEW COMPLETENESS METHODS FOR ESTIMATING EXOPLANET DISCOVERIES BY DIRECT DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.; Soummer, Remi

    2010-05-20

    We report on new methods for evaluating realistic observing programs that search stars for planets by direct imaging, where observations are selected from an optimized star list and stars can be observed multiple times. We show how these methods bring critical insight into the design of the mission and its instruments. These methods provide an estimate of the outcome of the observing program: the probability distribution of discoveries (detection and/or characterization) and an estimate of the occurrence rate of planets ({eta}). We show that these parameters can be accurately estimated from a single mission simulation, without the need for a complete Monte Carlo mission simulation, and we prove the accuracy of this new approach. Our methods provide tools to define a mission for a particular science goal; for example, a mission can be defined by the expected number of discoveries and its confidence level. We detail how an optimized star list can be built and how successive observations can be selected. Our approach also provides other critical mission attributes, such as the number of stars expected to be searched and the probability of zero discoveries. Because these attributes depend strongly on the mission scale (telescope diameter, observing capabilities and constraints, mission lifetime, etc.), our methods are directly applicable to the design of such future missions and provide guidance to the mission and instrument design based on scientific performance. We illustrate our new methods with practical calculations and exploratory design reference missions for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) operating with a distant starshade to reduce scattered and diffracted starlight on the focal plane. We estimate that five habitable Earth-mass planets would be discovered and characterized with spectroscopy, with a probability of zero discoveries of 0.004, assuming a small fraction of JWST observing time (7%), {eta} = 0.3, and 70 observing visits, limited by starshade

  17. Detecting and Diagnosing Grammatical Errors for Beginning Learners of German: From Learner Corpus Annotation to Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Adriane

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a corpus of beginning learner German with a reliable error annotation scheme and an approach for detecting and diagnosing grammatical errors in learner language. A constraint-based dependency parser provides the foundation for a flexible and modular analysis of German by representing parsing as a constraint satisfaction…

  18. Constraint-Based Abstract Semantics for Temporal Logic: A Direct Approach to Design and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda, Gourinath; Gallagher, John P.

    interpretation provides a practical approach to verifying properties of infinite-state systems. We apply the framework of abstract interpretation to derive an abstract semantic function for the modal μ-calculus, which is the basis for abstract model checking. The abstract semantic function is constructed directly from the standard concrete semantics together with a Galois connection between the concrete state-space and an abstract domain. There is no need for mixed or modal transition systems to abstract arbitrary temporal properties, as in previous work in the area of abstract model checking. Using the modal μ-calculus to implement CTL, the abstract semantics gives an over-approximation of the set of states in which an arbitrary CTL formula holds. Then we show that this leads directly to an effective implementation of an abstract model checking algorithm for CTL using abstract domains based on linear constraints. The implementation of the abstract semantic function makes use of an SMT solver. We describe an implemented system for proving properties of linear hybrid automata and give some experimental results.

  19. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded ``hidden sector'', annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e‑ and bar p p) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  20. Systematic aspects of direct extrasolar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Using the first optical observatory in space, the Hubble Space Telescope, images of possible extrasolar planets will have poor contrast against the background of diffracted and scattered starlight. The very long exposure time required to achieve an adequate signal-to-noise ratio will make their detection infeasible. For a future telescope, a 16-fold increase in either the smoothness of the collecting area of the optics would reduce the exposure time to a tolerable value, but the contrast would remain low and the required photometric precision high. In this situation, the feasibility of detection would be contingent on the careful identification and control of systematic errors.

  1. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF A NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER, P.E.; FORMAN, L.

    2006-10-23

    Advantages afforded by the development of new directional neutron detectors and imagers are discussed. Thermal neutrons have mean free paths in air of about 20 meters, and can be effectively imaged using coded apertures. Fission spectrum neutrons have ranges greater than 100 meters, and carry enough energy to scatter at least twice in multilayer detectors which can yield both directional and spectral information. Such strategies allow better discrimination between a localized spontaneous fission source and the low, but fluctuating, level of background neutrons generated by cosmic rays. A coded aperture thermal neutron imager will be discussed as well as a proton-recoil double-scatter fast-neutron directional detector with time-of-flight energy discrimination.

  2. Polymeric assay film for direct colorimetric detection

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Nagy, Jon; Spevak, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    A lipid bilayer with affinity to an analyte, which directly signals binding by a changes in the light absorption spectra. This novel assay means and method has special applications in the drug development and medical testing fields. Using a spectrometer, the system is easily automated, and a multiple well embodiment allows inexpensive screening and sequential testing. This invention also has applications in industry for feedstock and effluent monitoring.

  3. Polymeric assay film for direct colorimetric detection

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Nagy, Jon; Spevak, Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A lipid bilayer with affinity to an analyte, which directly signals binding by a changes in the light absorption spectra. This novel assay means and method has special applications in the drug development and medical testing fields. Using a spectrometer, the system is easily automated, and a multiple well embodiment allows inexpensive screening and sequential testing. This invention also has applications in industry for feedstock and effluent monitoring.

  4. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Fischer, Larry E.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  5. Direct Detection of Dark Matter with Resonant Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-07-01

    In the scenario where the dark matter (DM) particles χbar chi pair annihilate through a resonance particle R, the constraint from DM relic density makes the corresponding cross section for DM-nuclei elastic scattering extremely small, and can be below the neutrino background induced by the coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering, which makes the DM particle beyond the reach of the conventional DM direct detection experiments. We present an improved analytical calculation of the DM relic density in the case of resonant DM annihilation for s- and p-wave cases and invesitgate the condition for the DM-nuclei scattering cross section to be above the neutrino background. We show that in Higgs-portal type models, for DM particles with s-wave annihilation, the spin-independent DM-nucleus scattering cross section is proportional to ΓR/mR, the ratio of the decay width and the mass of R. For a typical DM particle mass ˜ 50 GeV, the condition leads to ΓR/mR gtrsim Script O(10-4). In p-wave annihilation case, the spin-independent scattering cross section is insensitive to ΓR/mR, and is always above the neutrino background, as long as the DM particle is lighter than the top quark. The real singlet DM model is discussed as a concrete example. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) under Grant No. 2010CB833000; the National Nature Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant Nos. 10975170, 10821504, 10905084, and 11335012; and the Project of Knowledge Innovation Program (PKIP) of the Chinese Academy of Science

  6. Pulmonary nodule detection in CT images based on shape constraint CV model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bing; Tian, Xuedong; Wang, Qian; Yang, Ying; Xie, Hongzhi E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn; Zhang, Shuyang; Gu, Lixu E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate detection of pulmonary nodules remains a technical challenge in computer-aided diagnosis systems because some nodules may adhere to the blood vessels or the lung wall, which have low contrast compared to the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the analysis of typical shape features of candidate nodules based on a shape constraint Chan–Vese (CV) model combined with calculation of the number of blood branches adhered to nodule candidates is proposed to reduce false positive (FP) nodules from candidate nodules. Methods: The proposed scheme consists of three major stages: (1) Segmentation of lung parenchyma from computed tomography images. (2) Extraction of candidate nodules. (3) Reduction of FP nodules. A gray level enhancement combined with a spherical shape enhancement filter is introduced to extract the candidate nodules and their sphere-like contour regions. FPs are removed by analysis of the typical shape features of nodule candidates based on the CV model using spherical constraint and by investigating the number of blood branches adhered to the candidate nodules. The constrained shapes of CV model are automatically achieved from the extracted candidate nodules. Results: The detection performance was evaluated on 127 nodules of 103 cases including three types of challenging nodules, which are juxta-pleural nodules, juxta-vascular nodules, and ground glass opacity nodules. The free-receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve shows that the proposed method is able to detect 88% of all the nodules in the data set with 4 FPs per case. Conclusions: Evaluation shows that the authors’ method is feasible and effective for detection of three types of nodules in this study.

  7. Prospects for detecting dark matter with neutrino telescopes in light of recent results from direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Halzen, Francis; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Direct detection dark matter experiments, lead by the CDMS collaboration, have placed increasingly stronger constraints on the cross sections for elastic scattering of WIMPs on nucleons. These results impact the prospects for the indirect detection of dark matter using neutrino telescopes. With this in mind, we revisit the prospects for detecting neutrinos produced by the annihilation of WIMPs in the Sun. We find that the latest bounds do not seriously limit the models most accessible to next generation kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. This is largely due to the fact that models with significant spin-dependent couplings to protons are the least constrained and, at the same time, the most promising because of the efficient capture of WIMPs in the Sun. We identify models where dark matter particles are beyond the reach of any planned direct detection experiments while within reach of neutrino telescopes. In summary, we find that, even when contemplating recent direct detection results, neutrino telescopes still have the opportunity to play an important as well as complementary role in the search for particle dark matter.

  8. Impact of dark matter microhalos on signatures for direct and indirect detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Aurel; Moore, Ben; Krauss, Lawrence

    2010-09-15

    Detecting dark matter as it streams through detectors on Earth relies on knowledge of its phase space density on a scale comparable to the size of our Solar System. Numerical simulations predict that our galactic halo contains an enormous hierarchy of substructures, streams and caustics, the remnants of the merging hierarchy that began with tiny Earth-mass microhalos. If these bound or coherent structures persist until the present time, they could dramatically alter signatures for the detection of weakly interacting elementary particle dark matter. Using numerical simulations that follow the coarse grained tidal disruption within the Galactic potential and fine grained heating from stellar encounters, we find that microhalos, streams, and caustics have a negligible likelihood of impacting direct detection signatures implying that dark matter constraints derived using simple smooth halo models are relatively robust. We also find that many dense central cusps survive, yielding a small enhancement in the signal for indirect detection experiments.

  9. Reproductive constraints, direct fitness and indirect fitness benefits explain helping behaviour in the primitively eusocial wasp, Polistes canadensis

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Seirian; Kelstrup, Hans; Fanelli, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    A key step in the evolution of sociality is the abandonment of independent breeding in favour of helping. In cooperatively breeding vertebrates and primitively eusocial insects, helpers are capable of leaving the group and reproducing independently, and yet many do not. A fundamental question therefore is why do helpers help? Helping behaviour may be explained by constraints on independent reproduction and/or benefits to individuals from helping. Here, we examine simultaneously the reproductive constraints and fitness benefits underlying helping behaviour in a primitively eusocial paper wasp. We gave 31 helpers the opportunity to become egg-layers on their natal nests by removing nestmates. This allowed us to determine whether helpers are reproductively constrained in any way. We found that age strongly influenced whether an ex-helper could become an egg-layer, such that young ex-helpers could become egg-layers while old ex-helpers were less able. These differential reproductive constraints enabled us to make predictions about the behaviours of ex-helpers, depending on the relative importance of direct and indirect fitness benefits. We found little evidence that indirect fitness benefits explain helping behaviour, as 71 per cent of ex-helpers left their nests before the end of the experiment. In the absence of reproductive constraints, however, young helpers value direct fitness opportunities over indirect fitness. We conclude that a combination of reproductive constraints and potential for future direct reproduction explain helping behaviour in this species. Testing several competing explanations for helping behaviour simultaneously promises to advance our understanding of social behaviour in animal groups. PMID:20129991

  10. A direct constraint on the mass of an IMBH candidate in NGC 2276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Although long predicted and searched for, a population of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) has yet to be detected in the local Universe. We have recently published a small sample of luminous ULXs that behave like IMBHs in the low/hard state (Sutton et al. 2012 MNRAS 423 1154). If they are in that state, we expect to see steady radio jets; from these we can directly measure the black hole mass using quasi-simultaneous X-ray & radio observations to place an object on the fundamental plane (see e.g. Merloni et al. 2003 MNRAS 345 1057). In VLA follow-up of the sample an IMBH candidate in NGC 2276 was shown to sit at the centre of two extended radio lobes. We have now been awarded European VLBI network (EVN) observations to attempt to detect its radio core. Here we ask for quasi-simultaneous Chandra observations, necessary to resolve the IMBH candidate from two nearby (within ~5") ULXs and provide the X-ray data point that will allow us to measure the mass of the black hole.

  11. Directional complex-valued coherence attributes for discontinuous edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shangxu; Yuan, Sanyi; Yan, Binpeng; He, Yanxiao; Sun, Wenju

    2016-06-01

    We propose directional complex-valued coherence attributes through a simple calculation of the cross-correlation between neighboring complex seismic traces normalized by their corresponding envelope within a local time window along a certain spatial direction. For 3D seismic data with varying directional geological edges, the complex-valued coherence attributes along different spatial directions are distinct, and the coherence along a certain direction can highlight discontinuities at (or near) the perpendicular direction. These separate directional coherence attributes can assist in interpreting the dominant direction(s) of fault development, which is vital in determining sweet spots and locating hydrocarbon wells, and can facilitate the detection of weak or hidden geological edges. In addition, we obtain the minimum complex-valued coherence attribute by comparing all directional coherence volumes to describe the entire lineament and spatial extension direction of geological abnormalities (e.g., channels). In essence, the minimum coherence attribute can be regarded as the result of implementing multi-trace complex-valued coherence calculation along the direction perpendicular to the structural trend. An example of 3D synthetic data with a fault system and channel complex is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the directional and minimum complex-valued coherence attributes. The application on a real 3D seismic data of tight sandstone reservoir with faults, flexures and fractures, illustrates that the directional and minimum complex-valued coherence attributes can highlight subtle structures and the directional details of geological abnormalities, which are favorably consistent with the manually interpreted results.

  12. Ring-like features in directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-06-01

    We discuss a novel dark matter signature relevant for directional detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). For heavy enough WIMPs and low enough recoil energies, the maximum of the recoil rate is not in the direction of the average WIMP arrival direction but in a ring around it at an angular radius that increases with the WIMP mass and can approach 90° at very low energies. The ring is easier to detect for smaller WIMP velocity dispersion and larger average WIMP velocities relative to the detector. In principle the ring could be used as an additional indication of the WIMP mass range.

  13. Predictions of hydrodynamic simulations for direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Calore, Francesca; Schaller, Matthieu; Lovell, Mark; Bertone, Gianfranco; Frenk, Carlos S.; Crain, Robert A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of galaxy formation on dark matter direct detection using hydrodynamic simulations obtained from the “Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments” (EAGLE) and APOSTLE projects. We extract the local dark matter density and velocity distribution of the simulated Milky Way analogues, and use them directly to perform an analysis of current direct detection data. The local dark matter density of the Milky Way-like galaxies is 0.41–0.73 GeV/cm3, and a Maxwellian distribution (with best fit peak speed of 223–289 km/s) describes well the local dark matter speed distribution. We find that the consistency between the result of different direct detection experiments cannot be improved by using the dark matter distribution of the simulated haloes.

  14. Comparing readout strategies to directly detect dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, several ideas and technologies have been developed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) from the galactic halo. All these detection strategies share the common goal of discriminating a WIMP signal from the residual backgrounds. By directly detecting WIMPs, one can measure some or all of the observables associated to each nuclear recoil candidates, such as their energy and direction. In this study, we compare and examine the discovery potentials of each readout strategies from counting only (bubble chambers) to directional detectors (Time Projection Chambers) with 1d-, 2d-, and 3d-sensitivity. Using a profile likelihood analysis, we show that, in the case of a large and irreducible background contamination characterized by an energy distribution similar to the expected WIMP signal, directional information can improve the sensitivity of the experiment by several orders of magnitude. We also found that 1d directional detection is only less effective than a full 3d directional sensitivity by about a factor of 3, or 10 if we assume no sense recognition, still improving by a factor of 2 or more if only the energy of the events is being measured.

  15. Direct detection of classically undetectable dark matter through quantum decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, C. Jess

    2013-12-01

    Although various pieces of indirect evidence about the nature of dark matter have been collected, its direct detection has eluded experimental searches despite extensive effort. If the mass of dark matter is below 1 MeV, it is essentially imperceptible to conventional detection methods because negligible energy is transferred to nuclei during collisions. Here I propose directly detecting dark matter through the quantum decoherence it causes rather than its classical effects, such as recoil or ionization. I show that quantum spatial superpositions are sensitive to low-mass dark matter that is inaccessible to classical techniques. This provides new independent motivation for matter interferometry with large masses, especially on spaceborne platforms. The apparent dark matter wind we experience as the Sun travels through the Milky Way ensures interferometers and related devices are directional detectors, and so are able to provide unmistakable evidence that decoherence has Galactic origins.

  16. Can the Existence of Dark Energy be Directly Detected?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-23

    The majority of astronomers and physicists accept the reality of dark energy and also believe that it can only be studied indirectly through observation of the motions of stars and galaxies. In this paper I open the experimental question of whether it is possible to directly detect dark energy through the presence of dark energy density. Two thirds of this paper outlines the major aspects of dark energy density as now comprehended by the astronomical and physics community. The final third summarizes various proposals for direct detection of dark energy density or its possible effects. At this time I do not have a fruitful answer to the question: Can the Existence of Dark Energy Be Directly Detected?

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure–function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5′ to 3′ directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5′ to 3′ directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure. PMID:26451676

  18. Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

  19. Direct Detection of Biotinylated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric strategies to identify protein subpopulations involved in specific biological functions rely on covalently tagging biotin to proteins using various chemical modification methods. The biotin tag is primarily used for enrichment of the targeted subpopulation for subsequent mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. A limitation of these strategies is that MS analysis does not easily discriminate unlabeled contaminants from the labeled protein subpopulation under study. To solve this problem, we developed a flexible method that only relies on direct MS detection of biotin-tagged proteins called “Direct Detection of Biotin-containing Tags” (DiDBiT). Compared with conventional targeted proteomic strategies, DiDBiT improves direct detection of biotinylated proteins ∼200 fold. We show that DiDBiT is applicable to several protein labeling protocols in cell culture and in vivo using cell permeable NHS-biotin and incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA), into newly synthesized proteins, followed by click chemistry tagging with biotin. We demonstrate that DiDBiT improves the direct detection of biotin-tagged newly synthesized peptides more than 20-fold compared to conventional methods. With the increased sensitivity afforded by DiDBiT, we demonstrate the MS detection of newly synthesized proteins labeled in vivo in the rodent nervous system with unprecedented temporal resolution as short as 3 h. PMID:25117199

  20. Field-stepped direct detection electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhelin; Liu, Tengzhi; Elajaili, Hanan; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-09-01

    The widest scan that had been demonstrated previously for rapid scan EPR was a 155 G sinusoidal scan. As the scan width increases, the voltage requirement across the resonating capacitor and scan coils increases dramatically and the background signal induced by the rapidly changing field increases. An alternate approach is needed to achieve wider scans. A field-stepped direct detection EPR method that is based on rapid-scan technology is now reported, and scan widths up to 6200 G have been demonstrated. A linear scan frequency of 5.12 kHz was generated with the scan driver described previously. The field was stepped at intervals of 0.01 to 1 G, depending on the linewidths in the spectra. At each field data for triangular scans with widths up to 11.5 G were acquired. Data from the triangular scans were combined by matching DC offsets for overlapping regions of successive scans. This approach has the following advantages relative to CW, several of which are similar to the advantages of rapid scan. (i) In CW if the modulation amplitude is too large, the signal is broadened. In direct detection field modulation is not used. (ii) In CW the small modulation amplitude detects only a small fraction of the signal amplitude. In direct detection each scan detects a larger fraction of the signal, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio. (iii) If the scan rate is fast enough to cause rapid scan oscillations, the slow scan spectrum can be recovered by deconvolution after the combination of segments. (iv) The data are acquired with quadrature detection, which permits phase correction in the post processing. (v) In the direct detection method the signal typically is oversampled in the field direction. The number of points to be averaged, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio, is determined in post processing based on the desired field resolution. A degased lithium phthalocyanine sample was used to demonstrate that the linear deconvolution procedure can be employed with

  1. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence. PMID:27066763

  2. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence. PMID:27066763

  3. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence.

  4. Comparison of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links are evaluated and compared. It is shown that the performance of optical links is very sensitive to the pointing and tracking errors at the transmitter and receiver. In the presence of random pointing and tracking errors, optimal antenna gains exist that will minimize the required transmitter power. In addition to limiting the antenna gains, random pointing and tracking errors also impose a power penalty in the link budget. This power penalty is between 1.6 to 3 dB for a direct detection QPPM link, and 3 to 5 dB for a heterodyne QFSK system. For the heterodyne systems, the carrier phase noise presents another major factor of performance degradation that must be considered. In contrast, the loss due to synchronization error is small. The link budgets for direct and heterodyne detection systems are evaluated. It is shown that, for systems with large pointing and tracking errors, the link budget is dominated by the spatial tracking error, and the direct detection system shows a superior performance because it is less sensitive to the spatial tracking error. On the other hand, for systems with small pointing and tracking jitters, the antenna gains are in general limited by the launch cost, and suboptimal antenna gains are often used in practice. In which case, the heterodyne system has a slightly higher power margin because of higher receiver sensitivity.

  5. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  6. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  7. Analysis of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    Fitting the model ''A'' to dark matter direct detection data, when the model that underlies the data is ''B'', introduces a theoretical bias in the fit. We perform a quantitative study of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection, with a focus on assumptions regarding the dark matter interactions, and velocity distribution. We address this problem within the effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle. We analyze 24 benchmark points in the parameter space of the theory, using frequentist and Bayesian statistical methods. First, we simulate the data of future direct detection experiments assuming a momentum/velocity dependent dark matter-nucleon interaction, and an anisotropic dark matter velocity distribution. Then, we fit a constant scattering cross section, and an isotropic Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution to the simulated data, thereby introducing a bias in the analysis. The best fit values of the dark matter particle mass differ from their benchmark values up to 2 standard deviations. The best fit values of the dark matter-nucleon coupling constant differ from their benchmark values up to several standard deviations. We conclude that common assumptions in dark matter direct detection are a source of potentially significant bias.

  8. Sol-Gel Matrices For Direct Colorimetric Detection Of Analytes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Sasaki, Darryl; Yamanaka, Stacey

    2002-11-26

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes using color changes that occur in immobilized biopolymeric material in response to selective binding of analytes to their surface. In particular, the present invention provides methods and compositions related to the encapsulation of biopolymeric material into metal oxide glass using the sol-gel method.

  9. Generalized halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2013-10-01

    We extend the halo-independent method to compare direct dark matter detection data, so far used only for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions, to any type of interaction. As an example we apply the method to magnetic moment interactions.

  10. Halo-Independent Comparison of Direct Dark Matter Detection Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Del Nobile, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    We review the halo-independent formalism that allows comparing data from different direct dark matter detection experiments without making assumptions on the properties of the dark matter halo. We apply this method to spin-independent WIMP-nuclei interactions, for both isospin-conserving and isospin-violating couplings, and to WIMPs interacting through an anomalous magnetic moment.

  11. Sol-gel matrices for direct colorimetric detection of analytes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Sasaki, Darryl; Yamanaka, Stacey

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes using color changes that occur in immobilized biopolymeric material in response to selective binding of analytes to their surface. In particular, the present invention provides methods and compositions related to the encapsulation of biopolymeric material into metal oxide glass using the sol-gel method.

  12. Directed energy active illumination for near-Earth object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jordan; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Bible, Johanna; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna

    2014-09-01

    On 15 February 2013, a previously unknown ~20 m asteroid struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia, releasing kinetic energy equivalent to ~570 kt TNT. Detecting objects like the Chelyabinsk impactor that are orbiting near Earth is a difficult task, in part because such objects spend much of their own orbits in the direction of the Sun when viewed from Earth. Efforts aimed at protecting Earth from future impacts will rely heavily on continued discovery. Ground-based optical observatory networks and Earth-orbiting spacecraft with infrared sensors have dramatically increased the pace of discovery. Still, less than 5% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) >=100 m/~100 Mt TNT have been identified, and the proportion of known objects decreases rapidly for smaller sizes. Low emissivity of some objects also makes detection by passive sensors difficult. A proposed orbiting laser phased array directed energy system could be used for active illumination of NEOs, enhancing discovery particularly for smaller and lower emissivity objects. Laser fiber amplifiers emit very narrow-band energy, simplifying detection. Results of simulated illumination scenarios are presented based on an orbiting emitter array with specified characteristics. Simulations indicate that return signals from small and low emissivity objects is strong enough to detect. The possibility for both directed and full sky blind surveys is discussed, and the resulting diameter and mass limits for objects in different observational scenarios. The ability to determine both position and speed of detected objects is also discussed.

  13. Detection of Laser Optic Defects Using Gradient Direction Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B Y; Kegelmeyer, L M; Liebman, J A; Salmon, J T; Tzeng, J; Paglieroni, D W

    2005-12-14

    That National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser. It has thousands of optics and depends heavily on the quality and performance of these optics. Over the past several years, we have developed the NIF Optics Inspection Analysis System that automatically finds defects in a specific optic by analyzing images taken of that optic. This paper describes a new and complementary approach for the automatic detection of defects based on detecting the diffraction ring patterns in downstream optic images caused by defects in upstream optics. Our approach applies a robust pattern matching algorithm for images called Gradient Direction Matching (GDM). GDM compares the gradient directions (the direction of flow from dark to light) of pixels in a test image to those of a specified model and identifies regions in the test image whose gradient directions are most in line with those of the specified model. For finding rings, we use luminance disk models whose pixels have gradient directions all pointing toward the center of the disk. After GDM identifies potential rings locations, we rank these rings by how well they fit the theoretical diffraction ring pattern equation. We perform false alarm mitigation by throwing out rings of low fit. A byproduct of this fitting procedure is an estimate of the size of the defect and its distance from the image plane. We demonstrate the potential effectiveness of this approach by showing examples of rings detected in real images of NIF optics.

  14. Direct Detection of Sub-GeV Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Mardon, Jeremy; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-03-20

    Direct detection strategies are proposed for dark matter particles with MeV to GeV mass. In this largely unexplored mass range, dark matter scattering with electrons can cause single-electron ionization signals, which are detectable with current technology. Ultraviolet photons, individual ions, and heat are interesting alternative signals. Focusing on ionization, we calculate the expected dark matter scattering rates and estimate the sensitivity of possible experiments. Backgrounds that may be relevant are discussed. Theoretically interesting models can be probed with existing technologies, and may even be within reach using ongoing direct detection experiments. Significant improvements in sensitivity should be possible with dedicated experiments, opening up a window to new regions in dark matter parameter space.

  15. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  16. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; PL Reeder; RR Hansen

    1998-10-18

    It is widely acknowledged that Mure neutron-detection technologies will need to offer increased performance at lower cost. One clear route toward these goals is rapid and direct detection of fast neutrons prior to moderation. This report describes progress to date in an effort to achieve such neutron detection via proton recoil within plastic scintillator. Since recording proton-recoil events is of little practical use without a means to discriminate effectively against gamma-ray interactions, the present effort is concentrated on demonstrating a method that distinguishes between pulse types. The proposed method exploits the substantial difference in the speed of fission neutrons and gamma-ray photons. Should this effort ultimately prove successful, the resulting. technology would make a valuable contribution toward meeting the neutron-detection needs of the next century. This report describes the detailed investigations that have been part of Pacific Northwest National Laborato@s efforts to demonstrate direct fast-neutron detection in the laboratory. Our initial approach used a single, solid piece of scintillator along with the electronics needed for pulse-type differentiation. Work to date has led to the conclusion that faster scintillator and/or faster electronics will be necessary before satisfactory gamma-ray discrimination is achieved with this approach. Acquisition and testing of both faster scintillator and faster electronics are currently in progress. The "advanced" approach to direct fast-neutron detection uses a scintillating assembly with an overall density that is lower than that of ordinary plastic scintillator. The lower average density leads to longer interaction times for both neutrons and gamma rays, allowing easier discrimination. The modeling, optimization, and design of detection systems using this approach are described in detail.

  17. Direct Updating of an RNA Base-Pairing Probability Matrix with Marginal Probability Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A base-pairing probability matrix (BPPM) stores the probabilities for every possible base pair in an RNA sequence and has been used in many algorithms in RNA informatics (e.g., RNA secondary structure prediction and motif search). In this study, we propose a novel algorithm to perform iterative updates of a given BPPM, satisfying marginal probability constraints that are (approximately) given by recently developed biochemical experiments, such as SHAPE, PAR, and FragSeq. The method is easily implemented and is applicable to common models for RNA secondary structures, such as energy-based or machine-learning–based models. In this article, we focus mainly on the details of the algorithms, although preliminary computational experiments will also be presented. PMID:23210474

  18. Directional Detection of Fast Neutrons Using a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, N; Heffner, M; Carosi, G; Carter, D; Foxe, M; Jovanovic, I

    2009-06-03

    Spontaneous fission in Special Nuclear Material (SNM) such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) results in the emission of neutrons with energies in the MeV range (hereafter 'fast neutrons'). These fast neutrons are largely unaffected by the few centimeters of intervening high-Z material that would suffice for attenuating most emitted gamma rays, while tens of centimeters of hydrogenous materials are required to achieve substantial attenuation of neutron fluxes from SNM. Neutron detectors are therefore an important complement to gamma-ray detectors in SNM search and monitoring applications. The rate at which SNM emits fast neutrons varies from about 2 per kilogram per second for typical HEU to some 60,000 per kilogram per second for metallic weapons grade plutonium. These rates can be compared with typical sea-level (cosmogenic) neutron backgrounds of roughly 5 per second per square meter per steradian in the relevant energy range [1]. The fact that the backgrounds are largely isotropic makes directional neutron detection especially attractive for SNM detection. The ability to detect, localize, and ultimately identify fast neutron sources at standoff will ultimately be limited by this background rate. Fast neutrons are particularly well suited to standoff detection and localization of SNM or other fast neutrons sources. Fast neutrons have attenuation lengths of about 60 meters in air, and retain considerable information about their source direction even after one or two scatters. Knowledge of the incoming direction of a fast neutron, from SNM or otherwise, has the potential to significantly improve signal to background in a variety of applications, since the background arriving from any one direction is a small fraction of the total background. Imaging or directional information therefore allows for source detection at a larger standoff distance or with shorter dwell times compared to nondirectional detectors, provided high detection efficiency can be

  19. Detecting groundwater flow direction from infrared thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Akhundzadah Noor; Saito, Hirotaka; Asada, Kei; Kato, Makoto

    In this study we propose an approach to directly measure temperature changes around the heat source placed in a borehole using an infrared camera for determining groundwater flow direction. A plastic box filled with sands with a cylindrical perforated column placed in middle of the box was used in lab experiments. A heater was inserted in the center of the borehole. To detect the flow direction from the temperature distribution, an infrared camera that was placed face-down at the top of the cylinder (i.e., borehole) was used. COMSOL was used to numerically simulate coupled water flow and heat transfer to evaluate experimental results. Results show that when the flux is in the order of 10-2 to 10-4cm s-1, we can determine the groundwater flow direction because of a skewed temperature distribution due to convective transport of heat.

  20. Direct detection of sub-GeV dark matter with semiconductor targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, Rouven; Fernández-Serra, Marivi; Mardon, Jeremy; Soto, Adrián; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2016-05-01

    Dark matter in the sub-GeV mass range is a theoretically motivated but largely unexplored paradigm. Such light masses are out of reach for conventional nuclear recoil direct detection experiments, but may be detected through the small ionization signals caused by dark matter-electron scattering. Semiconductors are well-studied and are particularly promising target materials because their {O} (1 eV) band gaps allow for ionization signals from dark matter particles as light as a few hundred keV. Current direct detection technologies are being adapted for dark matter-electron scattering. In this paper, we provide the theoretical calculations for dark matter-electron scattering rate in semiconductors, overcoming several complications that stem from the many-body nature of the problem. We use density functional theory to numerically calculate the rates for dark matter-electron scattering in silicon and germanium, and estimate the sensitivity for upcoming experiments such as DAMIC and SuperCDMS. We find that the reach for these upcoming experiments has the potential to be orders of magnitude beyond current direct detection constraints and that sub-GeV dark matter has a sizable modulation signal. We also give the first direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from its scattering off electrons in a semiconductor target (silicon) based on published results from DAMIC. We make available publicly our code, QEdark , with which we calculate our results. Our results can be used by experimental collaborations to calculate their own sensitivities based on their specific setup. The searches we propose will probe vast new regions of unexplored dark matter model and parameter space.

  1. Future directions for H sub x O sub y detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R. (Editor); Hoell, James M. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The activities and recommendations of the NASA workshop on the Future Directions for H sub x O sub y detection are given. The objective of this workshop was to access future directions for the measurement of the OH radical as well as other H sub x O sub y species. The workshop discussions were focused by two broad questions: (1) What are the capabilities of potential measurement methods? and (2) Will the results from the most promising method be useful in furthering understanding of tropospheric chemistry?

  2. Principal direction-based Hough transform for line detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yao; Pan, Haibin; Du, Changping; Zheng, Yao

    2015-04-01

    A robust and fast line detection method based on Hough transform (HT) is proposed in this paper. Edge pixels are extracted based on the summation and ratio of principal curvatures. Probabilistic sampling on the edge pixels is applied to reduce the count of voting. Then a one-to-one voting strategy is applied by taking advantages of the information of principal direction. The principal direction is also conducive for the successive accurate line segment extraction. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed method shows better locating accuracy and computation efficiency compared with several significant variations of HT.

  3. An Automated Directed Spectral Search Methodology for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Stanley I.

    Much of the current efforts in remote sensing tackle macro-level problems such as determining the extent of wheat in a field, the general health of vegetation or the extent of mineral deposits in an area. However, for many of the remaining remote sensing challenges being studied currently, such as border protection, drug smuggling, treaty verification, and the war on terror, most targets are very small in nature - a vehicle or even a person. While in typical macro-level problems the objective vegetation is in the scene, for small target detection problems it is not usually known if the desired small target even exists in the scene, never mind finding it in abundance. The ability to find specific small targets, such as vehicles, typifies this problem. Complicating the analyst's life, the growing number of available sensors is generating mountains of imagery outstripping the analysts' ability to visually peruse them. This work presents the important factors influencing spectral exploitation using multispectral data and suggests a different approach to small target detection. The methodology of directed search is presented, including the use of scene-modeled spectral libraries, various search algorithms, and traditional statistical and ROC curve analysis. The work suggests a new metric to calibrate analysis labeled the analytic sweet spot as well as an estimation method for identifying the sweet spot threshold for an image. It also suggests a new visualization aid for highlighting the target in its entirety called nearest neighbor inflation (NNI). It brings these all together to propose that these additions to the target detection arena allow for the construction of a fully automated target detection scheme. This dissertation next details experiments to support the hypothesis that the optimum detection threshold is the analytic sweet spot and that the estimation method adequately predicts it. Experimental results and analysis are presented for the proposed directed

  4. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  5. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; et al

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discussmore » the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  7. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  8. (In)Direct detection of boosted dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Cui, Yanou; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-05-01

    We present a new multi-component dark matter model with a novel experimental signature that mimics neutral current interactions at neutrino detectors. In our model, the dark matter is composed of two particles, a heavier dominant component that annihilates to produce a boosted lighter component that we refer to as boosted dark matter. The lighter component is relativistic and scatters off electrons in neutrino experiments to produce Cherenkov light. This model combines the indirect detection of the dominant component with the direct detection of the boosted dark matter. Directionality can be used to distinguish the dark matter signal from the atmospheric neutrino background. We discuss the viable region of parameter space in current and future experiments.

  9. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-06

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Furthermore, observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  10. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  11. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  12. Direct detection of martian microorganisms based on fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The direct detection of microorganisms and their traces using optical microscopes is one of the most promising techniques to obtain the decisive evidences for extraterrestrial life. The most significant points of this technique are high sensitivity and spatial information with a resolution of 0.2mm. Besides, information on local environments and microscopic ecology can also be obtained. Many difficulties, however, must be solved to get reliable results. We have started to develop a noble technique based on the fluorescence microscopy with special interest to the detection of microorganisms in extreme environments including Mars. The principle is to detect molecules/subcellular organs which are responsible for the three basic characteristics of life; genetic information, metabolism, and discrimination of self from non-self. We have screened fluorescence probes and found several are applicable. We could detect almost all the microorganisms already identified. Discrimination of viable from dead cells was possible. The terrestrial microfossils, some of the artificial primitive microorganism-like-objects, dried bacteria and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixed with simulated Martian sand could be detected. We are now designing a compact detection hardware.

  13. Review of Dark Matter Direct Detection Using Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, P.L.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    The direct detection of the Universe's Dark Matter is one of the key questions in particle astrophysics. Cryogenic based detectors offer advantages in low radioactive backgrounds, target mass, sensitivity to the small energy depositions and rejection of possible background sources. I will summarize the main experimental approaches, including both cryogenic crystal and liquid targets and the options pursued for their signal readout. Recent advances from around the world and prospects for future proposed experiments will be discussed.

  14. Direct detection of classically undetectable dark matter through quantum decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, C. Jess

    2014-03-01

    Although various pieces of indirect evidence about the nature of dark matter have been collected, its direct detection has eluded experimental searches despite extensive effort. If the mass of dark matter is below 1 MeV, it is essentially imperceptible to conventional detection methods because negligible energy is transferred to nuclei during collisions. Here I propose directly detecting dark matter through the quantum decoherence it causes rather than its classical effects such as recoil or ionization. I show that quantum spatial superpositions are sensitive to low-mass dark matter which is inaccessible to classical techniques. This provides new independent motivation for matter interferometry with large masses, especially on spaceborne platforms. The apparent dark matter wind we experience as the Sun travels through the Milky Way ensures interferometers and related devices are directional detectors, and so are able to provide unmistakable evidence that decoherence has galactic origins. This research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD program, and by the John Templeton Foundation through grant number 21484.

  15. New method for analyzing dark matter direct detection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jonathan H.; Enßlin, Torsten; BÅ`hm, Céline

    2014-02-01

    The experimental situation of dark matter direct detection has reached an exciting crossroads, with potential hints of a discovery of dark matter (DM) from the CDMS, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and DAMA experiments in tension with null results from xenon-based experiments such as XENON100 and LUX. Given the present controversial experimental status, it is important that the analytical method used to search for DM in direct detection experiments is both robust and flexible enough to deal with data for which the distinction between signal and background points is difficult, and hence where the choice between setting a limit or defining a discovery region is debatable. In this article we propose a novel (Bayesian) analytical method, which can be applied to all direct detection experiments and which extracts the maximum amount of information from the data. We apply our method to the XENON100 experiment data as a worked example, and show that firstly our exclusion limit at 90% confidence is in agreement with their own for the 225 live days data, but is several times stronger for the 100 live days data. Secondly we find that, due to the two points at low values of S1 and S2 in the 225 days data set, our analysis points to either weak consistency with low-mass dark matter or the possible presence of an unknown background. Given the null result from LUX, the latter scenario seems the more plausible.

  16. Dark matter direct detection with non-Maxwellian velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Weiner, Neal; Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Madau, Piero; Zemp, Marcel E-mail: neal.weiner@nyu.edu E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org E-mail: dpotter@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: mzemp@umich.edu

    2010-02-01

    The velocity distribution function of dark matter particles is expected to show significant departures from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This can have profound effects on the predicted dark matter - nucleon scattering rates in direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter models in which the scattering is sensitive to the high velocity tail of the distribution, such as inelastic dark matter (iDM) or light (few GeV) dark matter (LDM), and for experiments that require high energy recoil events, such as many directionally sensitive experiments. Here we determine the velocity distribution functions from two of the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galactic dark matter structure (Via Lactea II and GHALO), and study the effects for these scenarios. For directional detection, we find that the observed departures from Maxwell-Boltzmann increase the contrast of the signal and change the typical direction of incoming DM particles. For iDM, the expected signals at direct detection experiments are changed dramatically: the annual modulation can be enhanced by more than a factor two, and the relative rates of DAMA compared to CDMS can change by an order of magnitude, while those compared to CRESST can change by a factor of two. The spectrum of the signal can also change dramatically, with many features arising due to substructure. For LDM the spectral effects are smaller, but changes do arise that improve the compatibility with existing experiments. We find that the phase of the modulation can depend upon energy, which would help discriminate against background should it be found.

  17. Spectrally efficient optical transmission based on Stokes vector direct detection.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Che, Di; Chen, Vivian; Shieh, William

    2014-06-30

    We propose a novel detection scheme called Stokes vector direct detection (SV-DD) to realize high electrical spectral efficiency and cost-effective optical communication for short and medium reach. With SV-DD, the signal is modulated in only one polarization and combined with the carrier in the orthogonal polarization for fiber transmission. At reception, the combined signal is detected in Stokes space by three or four photo-detectors. Compared with conventional DD technique, SV-DD is resilient to both chromatic dispersion and signal-to-signal beat noise. Furthermore, SV-DD does not require polarization tracking or narrow band optical filtering for carrier extraction. In this paper, we present for the first time the numerical analysis and experimental demonstration of single-carrier SV-DD. We report 62.5-Gb/s data rate single-carrier SV-DD transmission over 160-km SSMF using 12.5-Gbaud 32-QAM modulation. PMID:24977825

  18. (In)direct detection of boosted dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Cui, Yanou; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    We initiate the study of novel thermal dark matter (DM) scenarios where present-day annihilation of DM in the galactic center produces boosted stable particles in the dark sector. These stable particles are typically a subdominant DM component, but because they are produced with a large Lorentz boost in this process, they can be detected in large volume terrestrial experiments via neutral-current-like interactions with electrons or nuclei. This novel DM signal thus combines the production mechanism associated with indirect detection experiments (i.e. galactic DM annihilation) with the detection mechanism associated with direct detection experiments (i.e. DM scattering off terrestrial targets). Such processes are generically present in multi-component DM scenarios or those with non-minimal DM stabilization symmetries. As a proof of concept, we present a model of two-component thermal relic DM, where the dominant heavy DM species has no tree-level interactions with the standard model and thus largely evades direct and indirect DM bounds. Instead, its thermal relic abundance is set by annihilation into a subdominant lighter DM species, and the latter can be detected in the boosted channel via the same annihilation process occurring today. Especially for dark sector masses in the 10 MeV-10 GeV range, the most promising signals are electron scattering events pointing toward the galactic center. These can be detected in experiments designed for neutrino physics or proton decay, in particular Super-K and its upgrade Hyper-K, as well as the PINGU/MICA extensions of IceCube. This boosted DM phenomenon highlights the distinctive signatures possible from non-minimal dark sectors.

  19. (In)direct detection of boosted dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Cui, Yanou; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: cuiyo@umd.edu E-mail: jthaler@mit.edu

    2014-10-01

    We initiate the study of novel thermal dark matter (DM) scenarios where present-day annihilation of DM in the galactic center produces boosted stable particles in the dark sector. These stable particles are typically a subdominant DM component, but because they are produced with a large Lorentz boost in this process, they can be detected in large volume terrestrial experiments via neutral-current-like interactions with electrons or nuclei. This novel DM signal thus combines the production mechanism associated with indirect detection experiments (i.e. galactic DM annihilation) with the detection mechanism associated with direct detection experiments (i.e. DM scattering off terrestrial targets). Such processes are generically present in multi-component DM scenarios or those with non-minimal DM stabilization symmetries. As a proof of concept, we present a model of two-component thermal relic DM, where the dominant heavy DM species has no tree-level interactions with the standard model and thus largely evades direct and indirect DM bounds. Instead, its thermal relic abundance is set by annihilation into a subdominant lighter DM species, and the latter can be detected in the boosted channel via the same annihilation process occurring today. Especially for dark sector masses in the 10 MeV–10 GeV range, the most promising signals are electron scattering events pointing toward the galactic center. These can be detected in experiments designed for neutrino physics or proton decay, in particular Super-K and its upgrade Hyper-K, as well as the PINGU/MICA extensions of IceCube. This boosted DM phenomenon highlights the distinctive signatures possible from non-minimal dark sectors.

  20. Superconducting Nuclear Recoil Sensor for Directional Dark Matter Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann; Baldwin, Kevin; Hehlen, Markus; Lafler, Randy; Loomba, Dinesh; Phan, Nguyen; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina

    The Universe consists of 72% dark energy, 23% dark matter and only 5% of ordinary matter. One of the greatest challenges of the scientific community is to understand the nature of dark matter. Current models suggest that dark matter is made up of slowly moving, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). But detecting WIMPs is challenging, as their expected signals are small and rare compared to the large background that can mimic the signal. The largest and most robust unique signature that sets them apart from other particles is the day-night variation of the directionality of dark matter on Earth. This modulation could be observed with a direction-sensitive detector and hence, would provide an unambiguous signature for the galactic origin of WIMPs. There are many studies underway to attempt to detect WIMPs both directly and indirectly, but solid-state WIMP detectors are widely unexplored although they would present many advantages to prevalent detectors that use large volumes of low pressure gas. We present first results of a novel multi-layered architecture, in which WIMPs would interact primarily with solid layers to produce nuclear recoils that then induce measureable voltage pulses in adjacent superconductor layers. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  1. Direct Real-Time Detection of Vapors from Explosive Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Clowers, Brian H.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-10-03

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances is demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a non-radioactive ionization source and coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was demonstrated in less than 5 seconds at ambient temperature without sample pre-concentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provides a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3- and NO3-•HNO3), enables highly sensitive explosives detection. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicate detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284 and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX and NG respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations, including double base propellants, plastic explosives and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN and RDX product ions.

  2. Direct real-time detection of vapors from explosive compounds.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Robert G; Clowers, Brian H; Atkinson, David A

    2013-11-19

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX, and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances was demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a nonradioactive ionization source coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was accomplished in less than 5 s at ambient temperature without sample preconcentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provided a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3(-) and NO3(-)·HNO3), enabled highly sensitive explosives detection from explosive vapors present in ambient laboratory air. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicated detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284, and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX, and NG, respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations sampled in ambient laboratory air, including double base propellants, plastic explosives, and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN, and RDX product ions. PMID:24090362

  3. Clustering and community detection in directed networks: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliaros, Fragkiskos D.; Vazirgiannis, Michalis

    2013-12-01

    Networks (or graphs) appear as dominant structures in diverse domains, including sociology, biology, neuroscience and computer science. In most of the aforementioned cases graphs are directed - in the sense that there is directionality on the edges, making the semantics of the edges nonsymmetric as the source node transmits some property to the target one but not vice versa. An interesting feature that real networks present is the clustering or community structure property, under which the graph topology is organized into modules commonly called communities or clusters. The essence here is that nodes of the same community are highly similar while on the contrary, nodes across communities present low similarity. Revealing the underlying community structure of directed complex networks has become a crucial and interdisciplinary topic with a plethora of relevant application domains. Therefore, naturally there is a recent wealth of research production in the area of mining directed graphs - with clustering being the primary method sought and the primary tool for community detection and evaluation. The goal of this paper is to offer an in-depth comparative review of the methods presented so far for clustering directed networks along with the relevant necessary methodological background and also related applications. The survey commences by offering a concise review of the fundamental concepts and methodological base on which graph clustering algorithms capitalize on. Then we present the relevant work along two orthogonal classifications. The first one is mostly concerned with the methodological principles of the clustering algorithms, while the second one approaches the methods from the viewpoint regarding the properties of a good cluster in a directed network. Further, we present methods and metrics for evaluating graph clustering results, demonstrate interesting application domains and provide promising future research directions.

  4. New constraints on direct collapse black hole formation in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Bhaskar; Smith, Britton; Glover, Simon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-07-01

    Direct collapse black holes (DCBH) have been proposed as a solution to the challenge of assembling supermassive black holes by z > 6 to explain the bright quasars observed at this epoch. The formation of a DCBH seed with MBH ˜ 104-5 M⊙ requires a pristine atomic-cooling halo to be illuminated by an external radiation field that is sufficiently strong to entirely suppress H2 cooling in the halo. Many previous studies have attempted to constrain the critical specific intensity that is likely required to suppress H2 cooling, denoted as Jcrit. However, these studies have typically assumed that the incident external radiation field can be modelled with a blackbody spectrum. Under this assumption, it is possible to derive a unique value for Jcrit that depends only on the temperature of the blackbody. In this study we consider a more realistic spectral energy distribution (SED) for the external source of radiation that depends entirely on its star formation history and age. The rate of destruction of the species responsible for suppressing molecular hydrogen cooling depends on the detailed shape of the SED. Therefore the value of Jcrit is tied to the shape of the incident SED of the neighbouring galaxy. We fit a parametric form to the rates of destruction of H2 and H- that permit direct collapse. Owing to this, we find that Jcrit is not a fixed threshold but can lie anywhere in the range Jcrit ˜ 0.5-103, depending on the details of the source stellar population.

  5. On Geometrical Interpretation of Non-Abelian D and F-Flat Direction Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Joel; Cleaver, Gerald; Nanopoulos, Dimitri; Perkins, John

    2004-10-01

    In order to produce a low energy effective field theory from a string model, it is necessary to specify a vacuum state. In order that this vacuum be supersymmetric, it is well known that all field expectation values must be along so-called flat directions, leaving the F- and D-terms of the scalar potential to be zero. The situation becomes particularly interesting when one attempts to realize such directions while assigning VEVS to fields transforming under non-Abelian representations of the gauge group. Since the expectation value is now shared among multiple components of a field, satisfaction of flatness becomes an inherently geometrical problem in the group space. Furthermore, the possibility emerges that a single seemingly dangerous F-term might experience a self-cancellation among its components. The hope exists that the geometric language can provide an intuitive and immediate recognition of when the D and F conditions are simultaneously compatible, as well as a powerful tool for their comprehensive classification. This is the avenue explored in this study, and applied to the cases of SU(2) and SO(2N), relevant respectively to previous attempts at reproducing the MSSM and the flipped SU(5) GUT. It is hoped that the techniques encountered will be of benefit in extending the viability of the quasi-realistic phenomenologies already developed.

  6. A generating set direct search augmented Lagrangian algorithm for optimization with a combination of general and linear constraints.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Robert Michael (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Torczon, Virginia Joanne (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-08-01

    We consider the solution of nonlinear programs in the case where derivatives of the objective function and nonlinear constraints are unavailable. To solve such problems, we propose an adaptation of a method due to Conn, Gould, Sartenaer, and Toint that proceeds by approximately minimizing a succession of linearly constrained augmented Lagrangians. Our modification is to use a derivative-free generating set direct search algorithm to solve the linearly constrained subproblems. The stopping criterion proposed by Conn, Gould, Sartenaer and Toint for the approximate solution of the subproblems requires explicit knowledge of derivatives. Such information is presumed absent in the generating set search method we employ. Instead, we show that stationarity results for linearly constrained generating set search methods provide a derivative-free stopping criterion, based on a step-length control parameter, that is sufficient to preserve the convergence properties of the original augmented Lagrangian algorithm.

  7. Direct impacts of climatic warming on heat stress in endothermic species: seabirds as bioindicators of changing thermoregulatory constraints.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Stephen A; Arnold, Jennifer M

    2012-06-01

    There is now abundant evidence that contemporary climatic change has indirectly affected a wide-range of species by changing trophic interactions, competition, epidemiology and habitat. However, direct physiological impacts of changing climates are rarely reported for endothermic species, despite being commonly reported for ectotherms. We review the evidence for changing physiological constraints on endothermic vertebrates at high temperatures, integrating theoretical and empirical perspectives on the morphology, physiology and behavior of marine birds. Potential for increasing heat stress exposure depends on changes in multiple environmental variables, not just air temperature, as well as organism-specific morphology, physiology and behavior. Endotherms breeding at high latitudes are vulnerable to the forecast, extensive temperature changes because of the adaptations they possess to minimize heat loss. Low-latitude species will also be challenged as they currently live close to their thermal limits and will likely suffer future water shortages. Small, highly-active species, particularly aerial foragers, are acutely vulnerable as they are least able to dissipate heat at high temperatures. Overall, direct physiological impacts of climatic change appear underrepresented in the published literature, but available data suggest they have much potential to shape behavior, morphology and distribution of endothermic species. Coincidence between future heat stress events and other energetic constraints on endotherms remains largely unexplored but will be key in determining the physiological impacts of climatic change. Multi-scale, biophysical modeling, informed by experiments that quantify thermoregulatory responses of endotherms to heat stress, is an essential precursor to urgently-needed analyses at the population or species level. PMID:22691196

  8. Ultrabroadband direct detection of nonclassical photon statistics at telecom wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Kentaro; Eto, Yujiro; Benichi, Hugo; Izumi, Shuro; Yanagida, Tetsufumi; Ema, Kazuhiro; Numata, Takayuki; Fukuda, Daiji; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    Broadband light sources play essential roles in diverse fields, such as high-capacity optical communications, optical coherence tomography, optical spectroscopy, and spectrograph calibration. Although a nonclassical state from spontaneous parametric down-conversion may serve as a quantum counterpart, its detection and characterization have been a challenging task. Here we demonstrate the direct detection of photon numbers of an ultrabroadband (110 nm FWHM) squeezed state in the telecom band centred at 1535 nm wavelength, using a superconducting transition-edge sensor. The observed photon-number distributions violate Klyshko's criterion for the nonclassicality. From the observed photon-number distribution, we evaluate the second- and third-order correlation functions, and characterize a multimode structure, which implies that several tens of orthonormal modes of squeezing exist in the single optical pulse. Our results and techniques open up a new possibility to generate and characterize frequency-multiplexed nonclassical light sources for quantum info-communications technology. PMID:24694515

  9. Ultrabroadband direct detection of nonclassical photon statistics at telecom wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Kentaro; Eto, Yujiro; Benichi, Hugo; Izumi, Shuro; Yanagida, Tetsufumi; Ema, Kazuhiro; Numata, Takayuki; Fukuda, Daiji; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    Broadband light sources play essential roles in diverse fields, such as high-capacity optical communications, optical coherence tomography, optical spectroscopy, and spectrograph calibration. Although a nonclassical state from spontaneous parametric down-conversion may serve as a quantum counterpart, its detection and characterization have been a challenging task. Here we demonstrate the direct detection of photon numbers of an ultrabroadband (110 nm FWHM) squeezed state in the telecom band centred at 1535 nm wavelength, using a superconducting transition-edge sensor. The observed photon-number distributions violate Klyshko's criterion for the nonclassicality. From the observed photon-number distribution, we evaluate the second- and third-order correlation functions, and characterize a multimode structure, which implies that several tens of orthonormal modes of squeezing exist in the single optical pulse. Our results and techniques open up a new possibility to generate and characterize frequency-multiplexed nonclassical light sources for quantum info-communications technology. PMID:24694515

  10. Direct Detection and Sequencing of Damaged DNA Bases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Products of various forms of DNA damage have been implicated in a variety of important biological processes, such as aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, there exists great interest to develop methods for interrogating damaged DNA in the context of sequencing. Here, we demonstrate that single-molecule, real-time (SMRT®) DNA sequencing can directly detect damaged DNA bases in the DNA template - as a by-product of the sequencing method - through an analysis of the DNA polymerase kinetics that are altered by the presence of a modified base. We demonstrate the sequencing of several DNA templates containing products of DNA damage, including 8-oxoguanine, 8-oxoadenine, O6-methylguanine, 1-methyladenine, O4-methylthymine, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-hydroxymethyluracil, or thymine dimers, and show that these base modifications can be readily detected with single-modification resolution and DNA strand specificity. We characterize the distinct kinetic signatures generated by these DNA base modifications. PMID:22185597

  11. Direct Hydrocarbon Detection Using Multi-channel Transient Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B. A.; Ziolkowski, A. M.; Wright, D. A.

    We present a transient electromagnetic method for the detection of hydrocarbons and for monitoring their movement within a reservoir. Replacement of brine by gas or oil can cause a change in electrical resistivity of a porous rock of as much as 4 orders of magnitude. Seismic methods on the other hand are generally poor at detecting fluid content because the fluid content of a media has only a slight effect on its acoustic impedance. The data presented in this paper were collected as part of two Multi-channel Transient ElectroMagnetic (MTEM) surveys carried out in 1994 and 1996 over an underground gas storage reservoir at St. Illiers la Ville in France. The reservoir is a 30% porosity sandstone anticline about 30m thick at a depth of around 700m. In the summer gas is pumped in and the gas-water contact falls; in the winter gas is extracted and the gas- water contact rises. The position of the contact is known from constant monitoring at over 40 wells. The surveys had two objectives: first, to attempt to detect the reservoir directly from the data; second, to detect the movement of the gas water contact be- tween the 2 survey times. A recent breakthrough in the understanding of the system has allowed both these objectives to be achieved.

  12. WIMP physics with ensembles of direct-detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Annika H. G.; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Anne M.; Kavanagh, Bradley J.; Lee, Samuel K.

    2014-12-01

    The search for weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter is multi-pronged. Ultimately, the WIMP-dark-matter picture will only be confirmed if different classes of experiments see consistent signals and infer the same WIMP properties. In this work, we review the ideas, methods, and status of direct-detection searches. We focus in particular on extracting WIMP physics (WIMP interactions and phase-space distribution) from direct-detection data in the early discovery days when multiple experiments see of order dozens to hundreds of events. To demonstrate the essential complementarity of different direct-detection experiments in this context, we create mock data intended to represent the data from the near-future Generation 2 experiments. We consider both conventional supersymmetry-inspired benchmark points (with spin-independent and -dependent elastic cross sections just below current limits), as well as benchmark points for other classes of models (inelastic and effective-operator paradigms). We also investigate the effect on parameter estimation of loosening or dropping the assumptions about the local WIMP phase-space distribution. We arrive at two main conclusions. Firstly, teasing out WIMP physics with experiments depends critically on having a wide set of detector target materials, spanning a large range of target nuclear masses and spin-dependent sensitivity. It is also highly desirable to obtain data from low-threshold experiments. Secondly, a general reconstruction of the local WIMP velocity distribution, which will only be achieved if there are multiple experiments using different target materials, is critical to obtaining a robust and unbiased estimate of the WIMP mass.

  13. Theoretical antineutrino detection, direction and ranging at long distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocher, Glenn R.; Bondy, Daniel A.; Dobbs, Brian M.; Dye, Stephen T.; Georges, James A.; Learned, John G.; Mulliss, Christopher L.; Usman, Shawn

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of what we call “NUDAR” (NeUtrino Direction and Ranging), making the point that measurements of the observed energy and direction vectors can be employed to passively deduce the exact three-dimensional location and thermal power of geophysical and anthropogenic neutrino sources from even a single detector. Earlier studies have presented the challenges of long-range detection, dominated by the unavoidable inverse-square falloff in neutrinos, which force the use of kiloton scale detectors beyond a few kilometers. Earlier work has also presented the case for multiple detectors, and has reviewed the background challenges. We present the most precise background estimates to date, all handled in full three dimensions, as functions of depth and geographical location. For the present calculations, we consider a hypothetical 138 kiloton detector which can be transported to an ocean site and deployed to an operational depth. We present a Bayesian estimation framework to incorporate any a priori knowledge of the reactor that we are trying to detect, as well as the estimated uncertainty in the background and the oscillation parameters. Most importantly, we fully employ the knowledge of the reactor spectrum and the distance-dependent effects of neutrino oscillations on such spectra. The latter, in particular, makes possible determination of range from one location, given adequate signal statistics. Further, we explore the rich potential of improving detection with even modest improvements in individual neutrino direction determination. We conclude that a 300 MWth reactor can indeed be geolocated, and its operating power estimated with one or two detectors in the hundred kiloton class at ranges out to a few hundred kilometers. We note that such detectors would have natural and non-interfering utility for scientific studies of geo-neutrinos, neutrino oscillations, and astrophysical neutrinos. This motivates the development of cost

  14. New constraints on direct collapse black hole formation in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Bhaskar; Smith, Britton; Glover, Simon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    Direct collapse black holes (DCBH) have been proposed as a solution to the challenge of assembling supermassive black holes by z > 6 to explain the bright quasars observed at this epoch. The formation of a DCBH seed with M_{BH}˜ 10^{4-5} M_{⊙} requires a pristine atomic-cooling halo to be illuminated by an external radiation field that is sufficiently strong to entirely suppress H2 cooling in the halo. Many previous studies have attempted to constrain the critical specific intensity that is likely required to suppress H2 cooling, denoted as Jcrit. However, these studies have typically assumed that the incident external radiation field can be modeled with a black-body spectrum. Under this assumption, it is possible to derive a unique value for Jcrit that depends only on the temperature of the black-body. In this study we consider a more realistic spectral energy distribution (SED) for the external source of radiation that depends entirely on its star formation history and age. The rate of destruction of the species responsible for suppressing molecular hydrogen cooling depends on the detailed shape of the SED. Therefore the value of Jcrit is tied to the shape of the incident SED of the neighbouring galaxy. We fit a parametric form to the rates of destruction of H2 and H- that permit direct collapse. Owing to this, we find that Jcrit is not a fixed threshold but can lie anywhere in the range Jcrit ˜ 0.5-103, depending on the details of the source stellar population.

  15. Directing stormwater into small, urban, vegetated spaces: interacting biophysical and institutional constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, F. A.; Bartrand, T.

    2012-12-01

    Billions of dollars have been set aside by urban watershed managers to direct stormwater into new, decentralized networks of small vegetated spaces. The design of these spaces, and their ultimate distribution across space and time could fundamentally change the ecohydrologic properties of urban ecosystems. Our ability to forecast such changes, however, is contingent upon the development of new modeling platforms that simulate the various climatic, biophysical, as well as socio-technical forces at play in the urban water environment. An agent-based model was developed to explore the potential interplay of these phenomena in a small neighborhood of South Philadelphia. In the model, new urban green spaces "emerge" in space and time as the byproduct of alternative choices made by the local water utility, as well as local stakeholders. Several different model scenarios will be presented demonstrating that future changes to urban ecohydrology will be potentially as much determined by the physical conditions in cities, as by social and institutional preferences and behavior.

  16. Design and fabrication of a laterally-driven inertial micro-switch with multi-directional constraint structures for lowering off-axis sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qihuan; Yang, Zhuoqing; Xu, Qiu; Wang, Yang; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel laterally-driven inertial micro-switch with multi-directional compact constraint structures for lowering off-axis sensitivity and improving shock-resistibility. The design utilizes constraint sleeve and reverse stop-block structures to limit too much displacement of proof mass in the micro-switch and avoid damage to the device under a high shock load. The dynamic contact simulation indicates that the designed inertial micro-switch can limit the movement of proof mass and lower the off-axis sensitivity by constraint sleeve and reverse block structures. The first collision response time between proof mass and constraint structures in the z-direction has been analyzed theoretically and simulated, which have indicated that the collision response time mainly depends on geometric parameters, applied shock acceleration amplitude and the inherent frequency of the mass-spring inertial system. Simulated dynamic response curves under applied reverse directional shock accelerations show the proposed inertial micro-switch also has a good shock-resistibility. The inertial micro-switch fabricated by surface micromachining technology has been evaluated using a drop hammer system. The test results indicate that spurious triggering is more likely to occur in the inertial micro-switch without constraint structures, and the designed constraint structures can effectively lower the off-axis sensitivity and improve the shock-resistibility.

  17. HOW DO MOST PLANETS FORM?-CONSTRAINTS ON DISK INSTABILITY FROM DIRECT IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, Markus; Bonavita, Mariangela; Klahr, Hubert; Lafreniere, David

    2012-01-20

    Core accretion and disk instability have traditionally been regarded as the two competing possible paths of planet formation. In recent years, evidence has accumulated in favor of core accretion as the dominant mode, at least for close-in planets. However, it might be hypothesized that a significant population of wide planets formed by disk instabilities could exist at large separations, forming an invisible majority. In previous work, we addressed this issue through a direct imaging survey of B2-A0-type stars and concluded that <30% of such stars form and retain planets and brown dwarfs through disk instability, leaving core accretion as the likely dominant mechanism. In this paper, we extend this analysis to FGKM-type stars by applying a similar analysis to the Gemini Deep Planet Survey sample. The results strengthen the conclusion that substellar companions formed and retained around their parent stars by disk instabilities are rare. Specifically, we find that the frequency of such companions is <8% for FGKM-type stars under our most conservative assumptions, for an outer disk radius of 300 AU, at 99% confidence. Furthermore, we find that the frequency is always <10% at 99% confidence independently of outer disk radius, for any radius from 5 to 500 AU. We also simulate migration at a wide range of rates and find that the conclusions hold even if the companions move substantially after formation. Hence, core accretion remains the likely dominant formation mechanism for the total planet population, for every type of star from M-type through B-type.

  18. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown by Braaten and Hammer [Phys. Rev. D 88, 063511 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.063511] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). The work of Laha and Braaten [Phys. Rev. D, 89, 103510 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.103510] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  19. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-06

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angularmore » recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Furthermore, observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.« less

  20. Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B.; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Trautmann, Norbert G.; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-05-01

    Today’s most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of 229Th (denoted 229mTh). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for 229mTh2+. More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard.

  1. Direct detection of the (229)Th nuclear clock transition.

    PubMed

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E; Trautmann, Norbert G; Thirolf, Peter G

    2016-05-01

    Today's most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of (229)Th (denoted (229m)Th). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for (229m)Th(2+). More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard. PMID:27147026

  2. Corner detection and classification using anisotropic directional derivative representations.

    PubMed

    Shui, Peng-Lang; Zhang, Wei-Chuan

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposes a corner detector and classifier using anisotropic directional derivative (ANDD) representations. The ANDD representation at a pixel is a function of the oriented angle and characterizes the local directional grayscale variation around the pixel. The proposed corner detector fuses the ideas of the contour- and intensity-based detection. It consists of three cascaded blocks. First, the edge map of an image is obtained by the Canny detector and from which contours are extracted and patched. Next, the ANDD representation at each pixel on contours is calculated and normalized by its maximal magnitude. The area surrounded by the normalized ANDD representation forms a new corner measure. Finally, the nonmaximum suppression and thresholding are operated on each contour to find corners in terms of the corner measure. Moreover, a corner classifier based on the peak number of the ANDD representation is given. Experiments are made to evaluate the proposed detector and classifier. The proposed detector is competitive with the two recent state-of-the-art corner detectors, the He & Yung detector and CPDA detector, in detection capability and attains higher repeatability under affine transforms. The proposed classifier can discriminate effectively simple corners, Y-type corners, and higher order corners. PMID:23743776

  3. Optical beamforming networks employing phase modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel dispersion-based optical beamforming network scheme employing phase modulation and direct detection. Optical phase modulators have the advantages of simple-structure, low loss and absence of bias. Dispersion-induced phase-to-intensity conversion is utilized to facilitate direct detection. A structure of wideband dispersive device (WDD) cascaded with periodic dispersive device (PDD) is introduced to enhance the system flexibility, so that the delay adjustability and RF response can be properly designed respectively by choosing appropriate dispersions of the WDD and PDD. A concept-proof system with a wideband chirped fiber grating (CFG) as the WDD and two multiband CFGs (MCFG1 and MCFG2) as the PDD separately is built to demonstrate the basic idea. The delay tuning range is 0-1.8 ns with increment of 164.2 ps. The passband center is 30 GHz for MCFG1 and 20 GHz for MCFG2, and the fractional bandwidth is 51.8%. The shot-noise-limited spurious-free dynamic range is also analyzed and measured to be 105.7 dB ṡ Hz2/3 when the average photocurrent is 2.7 mA.

  4. Constraining the initial entropy of directly detected exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, G.-D.; Cumming, A.

    2014-01-01

    The post-formation, initial entropy Si of a gas giant planet is a key witness to its mass-assembly history and a crucial quantity for its early evolution. However, formation models are not yet able to predict reliably Si, making unjustified the use solely of traditional, `hot-start' cooling tracks to interpret direct-imaging results and calling for an observational determination of initial entropies to guide formation scenarios. Using a grid of models in mass and entropy, we show how to place joint constraints on the mass and initial entropy of an object from its observed luminosity and age. This generalizes the usual estimate of only a lower bound on the real mass, through hot-start tracks. Moreover, we demonstrate that with mass information, e.g. from dynamical-stability analyses or radial velocity, tighter bounds can be set on the initial entropy. We apply this procedure to 2M1207 b and find that its initial entropy is at least 9.2 kB/baryon, assuming that it does not burn deuterium. For the planets of the HR 8799 system, we infer that they must have formed with Si > 9.2 kB/baryon, independent of uncertainties about the age of the star. Finally, a similar analysis for β Pic b reveals that it must have formed with Si > 10.5 kB/baryon, using the radial-velocity mass upper limit. These initial entropy values are, respectively, ca. 0.7, 0.5 and 1.5 kB/baryon higher than the ones obtained from core-accretion models by Marley et al., thereby quantitatively ruling out the coldest starts for these objects and constraining warm starts, especially for β Pic b.

  5. Constraining the initial entropy of directly-detected exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Cumming, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    The post-mass-assembly, initial entropy Si of a gas giant planet is a key witness to its formation history and a crucial quantity for its early evolution. However, formation models are not yet able to predict reliably Si, making unjustified the use of traditional cooling tracks ("hot starts") to interpret direct imaging results and calling for an observational determination of initial entropies to guide formation scenarios. Using a grid of models in mass and entropy, we show how to place joint constraints on the mass and initial entropy of an object from its observed luminosity and age, highlighting that hot-start tracks only provide a lower limit on the real mass. Moreover, we demonstrate that with mass information, e.g. from dynamical stability analyses or radial velocity, tighter bounds can be set on the initial entropy. We apply this procedure to 2M1207 b and find that its initial entropy is at least 9.2 kB/baryon, assuming that it does not burn deuterium. For the planets of the HR 8799 system, we infer that they must have formed with Si > 9.2 kB/baryon, independent of uncertainties about the age of the star. Finally, a similar analysis for beta Pic b reveals that it must have formed with Si > 10.5 kB/baryon, using the radial-velocity mass upper limit. These initial entropy values are respectively ca. 0.7, 0.5, and 1.5 kB/baryon higher than the ones obtained from core accretion models by Marley et al. (2007), thereby quantitatively ruling out the coldest starts for these objects and constraining warm starts, especially for beta Pic b (Marleau & Cumming 2013, arXiv:1302.1517).

  6. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2014-09-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection.

  7. Development of a novel gamma probe for detecting radiation direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Longo, M.; Donnarumma, R.; D'Alessio, A.; Borrazzo, C.; Pergola, A.; Ridolfi, S.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial localization of radioactive sources is currently a main issue interesting different fields, including nuclear industry, homeland security as well as medical imaging. It is currently achieved using different systems, but the development of technologies for detecting and characterizing radiation is becoming important especially in medical imaging. In this latter field, radiation detection probes have long been used to guide surgery, thanks to their ability to localize and quantify radiopharmaceutical uptake even deep in tissue. Radiolabelled colloid is injected into, or near to, the tumor and the surgeon uses a hand-held radiation detector, the gamma probe, to identify lymph nodes with radiopharmaceutical uptkake. The present work refers to a novel scintigraphic goniometric probe to identify gamma radiation and its direction. The probe incorporates several scintillation crystals joined together in a particular configuration to provide data related to the position of a gamma source. The main technical characteristics of the gamma locator prototype, i.e. sensitivity, spatial resolution and detection efficiency, are investigated. Moreover, the development of a specific procedure applied to the images permits to retrieve the source position with high precision with respect to the currently used gamma probes. The presented device shows a high sensitivity and efficiency to identify gamma radiation taking a short time (from 30 to 60 s). Even though it was designed for applications in radio-guided surgery, it could be used for other purposes, as for example homeland security.

  8. Isothermal Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Directly from Respiratory Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Brianna L.; Wolff, Bernard J.; DeLaney, Alexandra A.; Diaz, Maureen H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) across patient populations of all ages. We have developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that enables rapid, low-cost detection of M. pneumoniae from nucleic acid extracts and directly from various respiratory specimen types. The assay implements calcein to facilitate simple visual readout of positive results in approximately 1 h, making it ideal for use in primary care facilities and resource-poor settings. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 100 fg by testing serial dilutions of target DNA ranging from 1 ng to 1 fg per reaction, and no cross-reactivity was observed against 17 other Mycoplasma species, 27 common respiratory agents, or human DNA. We demonstrated the utility of this assay by testing nucleic acid extracts (n = 252) and unextracted respiratory specimens (n = 72) collected during M. pneumoniae outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring in the United States from February 2010 to January 2014. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 88.5% tested on extracted nucleic acid and 82.1% evaluated on unextracted clinical specimens compared to a validated real-time PCR test. Further optimization and improvements to this method may lead to the availability of a rapid, cost-efficient laboratory test for M. pneumoniae detection that is more widely available to primary care facilities, ultimately facilitating prompt detection and appropriate responses to potential M. pneumoniae outbreaks and clusters within the community. PMID:26179304

  9. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ-σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin-tilde g plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tilde h(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g(vmin) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  10. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  11. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR),more » the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.« less

  12. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m{sub χ}−σ{sub n} plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the v{sub min}−g-tilde plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from v{sub min} to nuclear recoil momentum (p{sub R}), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call h-til-tilde(p{sub R}). The entire family of conventional halo-independent g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single h-tilde(p{sub R}) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in h-tilde(p{sub R}) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  13. On the Existence of Low-Mass Dark Matter and its Direct Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, James; McHardy, Ian; Merle, Alexander; Morris, Tim R.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) is an elusive form of matter which has been postulated to explain astronomical observations through its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing of light around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This indirect evidence implies that DM accounts for as much as 84.5% of all matter in our Universe, yet it has so far evaded all attempts at direct detection, leaving such confirmation and the consequent discovery of its nature as one of the biggest challenges in modern physics. Here we present a novel form of low-mass DM χ that would have been missed by all experiments so far. While its large interaction strength might at first seem unlikely, neither constraints from particle physics nor cosmological/astronomical observations are sufficient to rule out this type of DM, and it motivates our proposal for direct detection by optomechanics technology which should soon be within reach, namely, through the precise position measurement of a levitated mesoscopic particle which will be perturbed by elastic collisions with χ particles. We show that a recently proposed nanoparticle matter-wave interferometer, originally conceived for tests of the quantum superposition principle, is sensitive to these collisions, too.

  14. On the Existence of Low-Mass Dark Matter and its Direct Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, James; McHardy, Ian; Merle, Alexander; Morris, Tim R.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) is an elusive form of matter which has been postulated to explain astronomical observations through its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing of light around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This indirect evidence implies that DM accounts for as much as 84.5% of all matter in our Universe, yet it has so far evaded all attempts at direct detection, leaving such confirmation and the consequent discovery of its nature as one of the biggest challenges in modern physics. Here we present a novel form of low-mass DM χ that would have been missed by all experiments so far. While its large interaction strength might at first seem unlikely, neither constraints from particle physics nor cosmological/astronomical observations are sufficient to rule out this type of DM, and it motivates our proposal for direct detection by optomechanics technology which should soon be within reach, namely, through the precise position measurement of a levitated mesoscopic particle which will be perturbed by elastic collisions with χ particles. We show that a recently proposed nanoparticle matter-wave interferometer, originally conceived for tests of the quantum superposition principle, is sensitive to these collisions, too. PMID:25622565

  15. On the existence of low-mass dark matter and its direct detection.

    PubMed

    Bateman, James; McHardy, Ian; Merle, Alexander; Morris, Tim R; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) is an elusive form of matter which has been postulated to explain astronomical observations through its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing of light around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This indirect evidence implies that DM accounts for as much as 84.5% of all matter in our Universe, yet it has so far evaded all attempts at direct detection, leaving such confirmation and the consequent discovery of its nature as one of the biggest challenges in modern physics. Here we present a novel form of low-mass DM χ that would have been missed by all experiments so far. While its large interaction strength might at first seem unlikely, neither constraints from particle physics nor cosmological/astronomical observations are sufficient to rule out this type of DM, and it motivates our proposal for direct detection by optomechanics technology which should soon be within reach, namely, through the precise position measurement of a levitated mesoscopic particle which will be perturbed by elastic collisions with χ particles. We show that a recently proposed nanoparticle matter-wave interferometer, originally conceived for tests of the quantum superposition principle, is sensitive to these collisions, too. PMID:25622565

  16. Lithospheric mantle evolution above a subducting plate: Direct constraints from Antarctic Peninsula spinel peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Lydia; Gibson, Sally; Leat, Phil

    2010-05-01

    Our understanding of the tectono-magmatic processes in subduction zones generally relies on interpretations of the bulk-rock compositions of associated volcanic rocks. These, however, have typically undergone extensive modification in the crust (fractionation and/or contamination) and interpreting the mantle processes that have contributed to their genesis is complex. Direct evidence of the composition of the mantle beneath subduction-related volcanics is rare as mantle xenoliths are seldom brought to the surface. An exception is the Antarctic Peninsula, which consists of a series of suspect arc terranes accreted to the margin of Gondwana. Subduction occurred along a trench, off the west coast, and lasted over 200 Ma. It finally ceased after a series of ridge-trench collisions, which began at ~50 Ma in the south and ended at ca. 4 Ma in the north. This was followed by extensive alkaline volcanism along the length of the Antarctic Peninsula. At several localities these post-subduction volcanics contain abundant, fresh spinel-bearing lherzolites, harzburgites and pyroxenites. The widest variety of xenoliths were collected from basanites and tephrites emplaced on Alexander Island and Rothschild Island in the accreted Western Domain. The mineral chemistry of the xenolith suite as a whole is highly varied, e.g. olivine ranges in composition from Fo77 to Fo91, but within individual xenoliths typically only limited variation is apparent. Xenolith textures and plots of mineral chemistry suggest that the constituent mineral phases are in equilibrium and can be used to determine pressures and temperatures. PT estimates based on pyroxene compositions indicate that the lithosphere beneath the Antarctic Peninsula has a normal, unperturbed mantle geotherm and a thickness of ~90 km; the base of the mechanical boundary layer is at ~70 km and the xenoliths appear to have been entrained from within this region. Preliminary modelling of incompatible-trace-element ratios of diopsides

  17. Detecting Tsunami Genesis and Scales Directly from Coastal GPS Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Tony

    2013-04-01

    Different from the conventional approach to tsunami warnings that rely on earthquake magnitude estimates, we have found that coastal GPS stations are able to detect continental slope displacements of faulting due to big earthquakes, and that the detected seafloor displacements are able to determine tsunami source energy and scales instantaneously. This method has successfully replicated several historical tsunamis caused by the 2004 Sumatra earthquake, the 2005 Nias earthquake, the 2010 Chilean earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, respectively, and has been compared favorably with the conventional seismic solutions that usually take hours or days to get through inverting seismographs (reference listed). Because many coastal GPS stations are already in operation for measuring ground motions in real time as often as once every few seconds, this study suggests a practical way of identifying tsunamigenic earthquakes for early warnings and reducing false alarms. Reference Song, Y. T., 2007: Detecting tsunami genesis and scales directly from coastal GPS stations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L19602, doi:10.1029/2007GL031681. Song, Y. T., L.-L. Fu, V. Zlotnicki, C. Ji, V. Hjorleifsdottir, C.K. Shum, and Y. Yi, 2008: The role of horizontal impulses of the faulting continental slope in generating the 26 December 2004 Tsunami, Ocean Modelling, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.10.007. Song, Y. T. and S.C. Han, 2011: Satellite observations defying the long-held tsunami genesis theory, D.L. Tang (ed.), Remote Sensing of the Changing Oceans, DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-16541-2, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Song, Y. T., I. Fukumori, C. K. Shum, and Y. Yi, 2012: Merging tsunamis of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake detected over the open ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL050767 (Nature Highlights, March 8, 2012).

  18. Spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Lovis, C.

    2013-12-01

    At optical wavelengths, an exoplanet's signature is essentially reflected light from the host star - several orders of magnitude fainter. Since it is superimposed on the star spectrum its detection has been a difficult observational challenge. However, the development of a new generation of instruments like Echelle Spectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets and Stable Spectroscopic Observations (ESPRESSO) and next-generation telescopes like the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) put us in a privileged position to detect these planets' reflected light as we will have access to extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. With this work, we propose an alternative approach for the direct detection of the reflected light of an exoplanet. We simulated observations with ESPRESSO at Very Large Telescope (VLT) and high-resolution spectrograph (HIRES) at E-ELT of several star+planet systems, encompassing 10 h of the most favourable orbital phases. To the simulated spectra we applied the cross-correlation function to operate in a much higher signal-to-noise ratio domain than when compared with the spectra. The use of the cross-correlation function permitted us to recover the simulated planet signals at a level above 3σnoise significance on several prototypical (e.g. Neptune-type planet with a 2 d orbit with the VLT at 4.4σnoise significance) and real planetary systems (e.g. 55 Cnc e with the E-ELT at 4.9σnoise significance). Even by using a more pessimistic approach to the noise level estimation, where systematics in the spectra increase the noise 2-3 times, the detection of the reflected light from large close-orbit planets is possible. We have also shown that this kind of study is currently within reach of current instruments and telescopes (e.g. 51 Peg b with the VLT at 5.2σnoise significance), although at the limit of their capabilities.

  19. Detections and confirmations of electromagnetic pulses directly excited by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to detect and confirm electromagnetic (EM) pulses directly excited by earthquakes, we have been observing EM noise in boreholes of 100 m in depth at various places such as on mountain sides and seashores, inserting EM sensor systems into the boreholes. In the observations, we detected tremendous number of EM pulses of a few kHz with duration of a few millisecond. From detailed analysis of these EM pulses, we found that almost all of these EM pulses were lightning and artificial ones, and we could not confirm any earthquake-related EM pulse at all. The reason why earthquake-related EM pulses could not be detected in the earth was considered that the amplitude of the EM pulses would be strongly decayed during their propagations in the earth due to high electrical conductivity of the earth's medium. The decay rate is generally given by a specific distance so-called 'Skin depth ' through which the amplitude decays to 1/e (e = 2.718), and the skin depth is inversely proportional to square root of EM frequency. This means that high frequency EM waves decay and fade out in a short distance but lower frequency ones can survive for a long distance. Therefore EM waves of a few kHz had been severe to propagate for long distance in the earth. So we shifted down the monitoring frequency to the range of a few tens of Hz. As the result, we have finally detected earthquake-excited EM pulses in the earth and above the ground. By simultaneous capturing of waveforms of detected EM pulses and of seismic accelerations measured at the same observation site, we have confirmed close relationship between earthquakes and EM pulses, in which the waveform of magnetic component clearly shows primary tremor corresponding to seismic P-wave although it can't be seen in the waveform of seismic acceleration. Furthermore, by a laboratory experiment on giving stress impact to a granite pillar, excitation mechanism of EM pulses from granite has been confirmed as the Piezo-electric effect

  20. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the

  1. Detectability of Tidally Heated Exomoons Using Direct Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Turner, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the capability of ground and space-based observatories, both existing and planned, to directly image tidally heated exomoons orbiting exoplanets. Tidally heated exomoons, or THEMs, can conceivably be much more luminous than their host exoplanet and as little as 1000 times dimmer than the system's primary star. Tidal forces can heat THEMs at arbitrarily large angular separations from the host star, in both young and old star systems, to temperatures of hundreds or even thousands of degrees Kelvin. THEMs may thus be far easier targets for direct imaging studies than giant exoplanets which must be both young and at a large projected angular separation from their host star to be imaged with existing high contrast instrumentation. Current instruments are capable of detecting nearby THEMs with Teff ≥ 600K and R ≥ Rearth in K-band. Future mid-infrared space telescopes, such as JWST and SPICA, will be capable of directly imaging THEMs around ~25 nearby stars with Teff ≥ 300K and R≥Rearth orbiting at angular separations ≥ 12AU at a 5σ confidence level in a 10,000 second integration. It is feasible that previously imaged exoplanets are actually THEMs or blends of such objects with hot young planets; we speculate that Fomalhaut b could be such a case. If THEMs exist and are common (i.e., nearby), it may be far easier to directly image a THEM with surface conditions that allow for liquid water than it will be to image an Earth-like planet in the classical Habitable Zone of its primary star.

  2. Subcarrier multiplexing with dispersion reduction and direct detection

    DOEpatents

    Sargis, P.D.; Haigh, R.E.; McCammon, K.G.

    1997-01-21

    An SCM system is disclosed for simultaneously reducing the concomitant problems of receiver complexity and dispersion penalty and without requiring the use of an expensive, high-bandwidth optical detector. The system provides both a dispersion reduction and a direct detection to the receiver, with microwave mixers and lithium niobate external modulators that produce sidebands that are only separated by a few gigahertz from a principal laser optical carrier. Digital data streams are independently impressed upon these sidebands for transmission over an ordinary single-mode fiber. Independent high-speed data streams are upconverted to microwave frequencies. These subcarriers are then combined with a microwave power combiner and amplified with a microwave amplifier. A solid-state 1550-nm laser carrier is modulated by the microwave subcarriers. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is used just prior to long-distance transmission over ordinary single-mode fiber. The transmitted optical signal may then traverse multiple EDFAs to compensate for long-haul optical fiber losses prior to detection. At a receiving end, the optical signal is split into multiple paths. The subcarrier channels are optically pre-selected using a narrowband optical filter, such as a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) filter. An optical detector converts the selected optical signal into a baseband electrical data stream. 2 figs.

  3. Subcarrier multiplexing with dispersion reduction and direct detection

    DOEpatents

    Sargis, Paul D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; McCammon, Kent G.

    1997-01-01

    An SCM system for simultaneously reducing the concomitant problems of receiver complexity and dispersion penalty and without requiring the use of an expensive, high-bandwidth optical detector. The system provides both a dispersion reduction and a direct detection to the receiver, with microwave mixers and lithium niobate external modulators that produce sidebands that are only separated by a few gigahertz from a principal laser optical carrier. Digital data streams are independently impressed upon these sidebands for transmission over an ordinary single-mode fiber. Independent high-speed data streams are upconverted to microwave frequencies. These subcarriers are then combined with a microwave power combiner and amplified with a microwave amplifier. A solid-state 1550-nm laser carrier is modulated by the microwave subcarriers. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is used just prior to long-distance transmission over ordinary single-mode fiber. The transmitted optical signal may then traverse multiple EDFAs to compensate for long-haul optical fiber losses prior to detection. At a receiving end, the optical signal is split into multiple paths. The subcarrier channels are optically pre-selected using a narrowband optical filter, such as a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) filter. An optical detector converts the selected optical signal into a baseband electrical data stream.

  4. Direct Detections of Young Stars in Nearby Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. Alyson; Bregman, Joel N.

    2013-06-01

    Small amounts of star formation in elliptical galaxies are suggested by several results: surprisingly young ages from optical line indices, cooling X-ray gas, and mid-infrared dust emission. Such star formation has previously been difficult to directly detect, but using ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 imaging, we have identified individual young stars and star clusters in four nearby ellipticals. Ongoing star formation is detected in all galaxies, including three ellipticals that have previously exhibited potential signposts of star-forming conditions (NGC 4636, NGC 4697, and NGC 4374), as well as the typical "red and dead" NGC 3379. The current star formation in our closest targets, where we are most complete, is between 2.0 and 9.8 × 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1. The star formation history was roughly constant from 0.5 to 1.5 Gyr (at (3-5) × 10-4 M ⊙ yr-1), but decreased by a factor of several in the past 0.3 Gyr. Most star clusters have a mass between 102 and 104 M ⊙. The specific star formation rates of ~10-16 yr-1 (at the present day) or ~10-14 yr-1 (when averaging over the past Gyr) imply that a fraction 10-8 of the stellar mass is younger than 100 Myr and 10-5 is younger than 1 Gyr, quantifying the level of frosting of recent star formation over the otherwise passive stellar population. There is no obvious correlation between either the presence or spatial distribution of postulated star formation indicators and the star formation we detect. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 11583.

  5. DIRECT DETECTIONS OF YOUNG STARS IN NEARBY ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, H. Alyson; Bregman, Joel N.

    2013-06-20

    Small amounts of star formation in elliptical galaxies are suggested by several results: surprisingly young ages from optical line indices, cooling X-ray gas, and mid-infrared dust emission. Such star formation has previously been difficult to directly detect, but using ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 imaging, we have identified individual young stars and star clusters in four nearby ellipticals. Ongoing star formation is detected in all galaxies, including three ellipticals that have previously exhibited potential signposts of star-forming conditions (NGC 4636, NGC 4697, and NGC 4374), as well as the typical ''red and dead'' NGC 3379. The current star formation in our closest targets, where we are most complete, is between 2.0 and 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The star formation history was roughly constant from 0.5 to 1.5 Gyr (at (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}), but decreased by a factor of several in the past 0.3 Gyr. Most star clusters have a mass between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The specific star formation rates of {approx}10{sup -16} yr{sup -1} (at the present day) or {approx}10{sup -14} yr{sup -1} (when averaging over the past Gyr) imply that a fraction 10{sup -8} of the stellar mass is younger than 100 Myr and 10{sup -5} is younger than 1 Gyr, quantifying the level of frosting of recent star formation over the otherwise passive stellar population. There is no obvious correlation between either the presence or spatial distribution of postulated star formation indicators and the star formation we detect.

  6. Detection of Direct-path Arrivals for Multi-Narrowband Sequences (3-30 kHz) In Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoksimovski, A.; de Moustier, C.

    2004-11-01

    In an effort to measure underwater acoustic transmission loss over direct-path lengths ranging from a few hundred meters to ten kilometers in shallow water, a sequence of 16 gated pure tones (3-30 kHz) was transmitted every 10 s from a lowed source and received at moored sonobuoys. The magnitude of multipath arrivals often exceeded that of direct-path arrivals, resulting in variable detection performance of simple matched filtering techniques. More reliable signal recognition was obtained via iterative least square time constraints on the arrival times across all frequencies in a sequence, based on the known time intervals between transmitted tones. Signal detection improvement was obtained also by searching for the direct-path arrival near the global maximum of the sum of the rectified correlograms of the received sequences. These methods allowed detection in environments characterized by multipath interferences, as well as low signal-to-noise ratio and fading, and in the presence of other unrelated sonar signals that cause large detection errors. It also improved the direct-path signal strength estimation, and associated transmission loss computation, by bounding the time interval over which to compute the signals' autocorrelations and estimate their power. These algorithms were tested on a limited data set recorded in the Southern California Offshore Range, confirming that frequencies below 6 kHz suffered less direct-path transmission losses than higher frequencies (7-30 kHz).

  7. Direct and Indirect Dark Matter Detection in Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo

    2013-01-01

    The Dark matter (DM) problem constitutes a key question at the interface among Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. The observational data which have been accumulated in the last years point to an existence of non baryonic amount of DM. Since the Standard Model (SM) does not provide any candidate for such non-baryonic DM, the evidence of DM is a major indication for new physics beyond the SM. We will study in this work one of the most popular DM candidates, the so called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) from a direct and indirect detection perspective. In order to approach the direct and indirect dection of DM in the context of Particle Physics in a more pedagogic way, we will begin our discussion talking about a minimal extension of the SM. Later we will work on the subject in a 3-3-1 model. Next, we will study the role of WIMPs in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Lastly, we will look for indirect DM signals in the center of our galaxy using the NASA Satellite, called Fermi-LAT. Through a comprehensive analysis of the data events observed by Fermi-LAT and some background models, we will constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section for several annihilation channels and dark matter halo profiles.

  8. Direct Detection Doppler Lidar for Spaceborne Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Flesia, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol and molecular based versions of the double-edge technique can be used for direct detection Doppler lidar spaceborne wind measurement. The edge technique utilizes the edge of a high spectral resolution filter for high accuracy wind measurement using direct detection lidar. The signal is split between an edge filter channel and a broadband energy monitor channel. The energy monitor channel is used for signal normalization. The edge measurement is made as a differential frequency measurement between the outgoing laser signal and the atmospheric backscattered return for each pulse. As a result the measurement is insensitive to laser and edge filter frequency jitter and drift at a level less than a few parts in 10(exp 10). We have developed double edge versions of the edge technique for aerosol and molecular-based lidar measurement of the wind. Aerosol-based wind measurements have been made at Goddard Space Flight Center and molecular-based wind measurements at the University of Geneva. We have demonstrated atmospheric measurements using these techniques for altitudes from 1 to more than 10 km. Measurement accuracies of better than 1.25 m/s have been obtained with integration times from 5 to 30 seconds. The measurements can be scaled to space and agree, within a factor of two, with satellite-based simulations of performance based on Poisson statistics. The theory of the double edge aerosol technique is described by a generalized formulation which substantially extends the capabilities of the edge technique. It uses two edges with opposite slopes located about the laser frequency at approximately the half-width of each edge filter. This doubles the signal change for a given Doppler shift and yields a factor of 1.6 improvement in the measurement accuracy compared to the single edge technique. The use of two high resolution edge filters substantially reduces the effects of Rayleigh scattering on the measurement, as much as order of magnitude, and allows the signal

  9. Measurements of direct CP violation and constraints on the CKM triangle in B → K*π decays

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Andrew Phillips

    2010-02-01

    We constrain the apex of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle with measurements of B → K*π amplitudes from analyses of B0 → K+π-π0 and B0 → KSπ+π- decays. This constraint is consistent with the world average. The B0 → K+π-π0 decay mode is reconstructed from a sample of 454 million B0$\\bar{B}$ 0 events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. We measure direct CP violation in B0 → K*+π- decays at the level of 3σ when measurements from both B0 → K+π-π0 and B0 → KSπ+π- decays are combined.

  10. A systematic halo-independent analysis of direct detection data within the framework of Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun E-mail: koreasds@naver.com

    2014-08-01

    We present a systematic halo-independent analysis of available Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) direct detection data within the framework of Inelastic Dark Matter (IDM). We show that, when the smallest number of assumptions is made on the WIMP velocity distribution in the halo of our Galaxy, it is possible to find values of the WIMP mass and the IDM mass splitting for which compatibility between present constraints and any of the three experiments claiming to see a WIMP excess among DAMA, CDMS-Si and CRESST can be achieved.

  11. Constraints on the Detection of the Solar Nebula's Oxidation State Through Asteroid Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Hardersen, P. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Asteroids represent the only in situ surviving population of planetesimals from the formation of the inner solar system and therefore include materials from the very earliest stages of solar system formation. Hence, these bodies can provide constraints on the processes and conditions that were present during this epoch and can be used to test current models and theories describing the late solar nebula, the early solar system and subsequent planetary accretion. From detailed knowledge of asteroid mineralogic compositions the probable starting materials, thermal histories, and oxidation states of asteroid parent bodies can be inferred. If such data can be obtained from specific mainbelt source regions, then this information can be used to map out the formation conditions of the late solar nebula within the inner solar system and possibly distinguish any trends in oxidation state that may be present.

  12. A direction detective asymmetrical twin-core fiber curving sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Maowei; Geng, Tao; Yang, Wenlei; Zeng, Hongyi; Li, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Long period fiber gratings (LPFGs), which can couple the core mode to the forward propagating cladding modes of a fiber and have the advantage of small additional loss, no backward reflection, small size, which is widely used in optical fiber sensors and optical communication systems. LPFG has different fabricating methods, in order to write gratings on the twin-core at the same time effectively, we specially choose electric heating fused taper system to fabricate asymmetric dual-core long period fiber grating, because this kind of method can guarantee the similarity of gratings on the twin cores and obtain good geometric parameters of LPFG, such as cycle, cone waist. Then we use bending test platform to conduct bending test for each of the core of twin-core asymmetric long period fiber grating. Experiments show that: the sensitivity of asymmetrical twin-core long period fiber grating's central core under bending is -5.47nm·m, while the sensitivity of asymmetric twin-core long period fiber grating partial core changed with the relative position of screw micrometer. The sensitivity at 0°, 30°, 90° direction is -4.22nm·m, -9.84nm·m, -11.44nm·m respectively. The experiment results strongly demonstrate the properties of rim sensing of asymmetrical twin-core fiber gratings which provides the possibility of simultaneously measuring the bending magnitude and direction and solving the problem of cross sensing when multi-parameter measuring. In other words, we can detect temperature and bend at the same time by this sensor. As our knowledge, it is the first time simultaneously measuring bend and temperature using this structure of fiber sensors.

  13. Direct detection of light ''Ge-phobic'' exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng E-mail: a.georgescu@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-07-01

    We present comparisons of direct dark matter (DM) detection data for light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo model–independent manner. Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from xenon targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the recent SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of -0.8 (which we call ''Ge-phobic''), maximally reduces the DM coupling to germanium and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis.

  14. Direct detection of light anapole and magnetic dipole DM

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-06-01

    We present comparisons of direct detection data for ''light WIMPs'' with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section.

  15. Applications of Direct Detection Device in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Li, Shengdong; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James C.; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2008-01-01

    A prototype Direct Detection Device (DDD) camera system has shown great promise in improving both the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio for electron microscopy at 120–400 keV beam energies (Xuong, et al., 2007. Methods in Cell Biology, 79, 721–739). Without the need for a resolution-limiting scintillation screen as in the charge coupled device (CCD), the DDD camera can outperform CCD based systems in terms of spatial resolution, due to its small pixel size (5 μm). In this paper, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the DDD prototype is measured and compared with the specifications of commercial scientific CCD camera systems. Combining the fast speed of the DDD with image mosaic techniques, fast wide-area imaging is now possible. In this paper, the first large area mosaic image and the first tomography dataset from the DDD camera are presented, along with an image processing algorithm to correct the specimen drift utilizing the fast readout of the DDD system. PMID:18054249

  16. Direct detection of exothermic dark matter with light mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da; Lee, Chun-Hao; Wang, Qing

    2016-08-01

    We study the dark matter (DM) direct detection for the models with the effects of the isospin-violating couplings, exothermic scatterings, and/or the lightness of the mediator, proposed to relax the tension between the CDMS-Si signals and null experiments. In the light of the new updates of the LUX and CDMSlite data, we find that many of the previous proposals are now ruled out, including the Ge-phobic exothermic DM model and the Xe-phobic DM one with a light mediator. We also examine the exothermic DM models with a light mediator but without the isospin violation, and we are unable to identify any available parameter space that could simultaneously satisfy all the experiments. The only models that can partially relax the inconsistencies are the Xe-phobic exothermic DM models with or without a light mediator. But even in this case, a large portion of the CDMS-Si regions of interest has been constrained by the LUX and SuperCDMS data.

  17. Dark matter protohalos in a nine parameter MSSM and implications for direct and indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Roberta; Catalan, Maria Eugenia Cabrera; Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2015-09-01

    We study how the kinetic decoupling of dark matter within a minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, by adopting nine independent parameters (MSSM-9), could improve our knowledge of the properties of the dark matter protohalos. We show that the most probable neutralino mass regions, which satisfy the relic density and the Higgs mass constraints, are those with the lightest supersymmetric neutralino mass around 1 TeV and 3 TeV, corresponding to Higgsino-like and winolike neutralino, respectively. The kinetic decoupling temperature in the MSSM-9 scenario leads to a most probable protohalo mass in a range of Mph˜10-12- 10-7M⊙ . The part of the region closer to ˜2 TeV gives also important contributions from the neutralino-stau coannihilation, reducing the effective annihilation rate in the early Universe. We also study how the size of the smallest dark matter substructures correlates to experimental signatures, such as the spin-dependent and spin-independent scattering cross sections, relevant for direct detection of dark matter. Improvements on the spin-independent sensitivity might reduce the most probable range of the protohalo mass between ˜10-9M⊙ and ˜10-7M⊙, while the expected spin-dependent sensitivity provides weaker constraints. We show how the boost of the luminosity due to dark matter annihilation increases, depending on the protohalo mass. In the Higgsino case, the protohalo mass is lower than the canonical value often used in the literature (˜10-6M⊙), while ⟨σ v ⟩ does not deviate from ⟨σ v ⟩˜10-26 cm3 s-1 ; there is no significant enhancement of the luminosity. On the contrary, in the wino case, the protohalo mass is even lighter, and ⟨σ v ⟩ is two orders of magnitude larger; as its consequence, we see a substantial enhancement of the luminosity.

  18. GEOCHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC CONSTRAINTS ON GROUND-WATER FLOW DIRECTIONS, MIXING AND RECHARGE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    A. Meijer; E. Kwicklis

    2000-08-17

    This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report Development Plan entitled ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). As stated in this Development Plan, the purpose of the work is to provide an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. The analysis of hydrochemical and isotopic data is intended to provide a basis for evaluating the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain independently of analyses based purely on hydraulic arguments. Where more than one conceptual model for flow is possible, based on existing hydraulic data, hydrochemical and isotopic data may be useful in eliminating some of these conceptual models. This report documents the use of geochemical and isotopic data to constrain rates and directions of groundwater flow near Yucca Mountain and the timing and magnitude of recharge in the Yucca Mountain vicinity. The geochemical and isotopic data are also examined with regard to the possible dilution of groundwater recharge from Yucca Mountain by mixing with groundwater downgradient from the potential repository site. Specifically, the primary tasks of this report, as listed in the AMR Development Plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), consist of the following: (1) Compare geochemical and isotopic data for perched and pore water in the unsaturated zone with similar data from the saturated zone to determine if local recharge is present in the regional groundwater system; (2) Determine the timing of the recharge from stable isotopes such as deuterium ({sup 2}H) and oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O), which are known to vary over time as a function of climate, and from radioisotopes such as carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) and chlorine-36 ({sup 36}Cl); (3) Determine the magnitude of recharge from relatively

  19. Bed bug detection: Current technologies and future directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates current technologies used to detect bed bug infestations, and presents new information regarding the underlying chemical basis of canines scent detection. The manuscript also reports new and future devices that may play a part in bed bug detection in the future....

  20. Identifying the theory of dark matter with direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Gresham, Moira I.; McDermott, Samuel D.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin-, momentum-, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either "heavy" or "light" mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  1. Identifying the theory of dark matter with direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gluscevic, Vera; Gresham, Moira I.; McDermott, Samuel D.; Peter, Annika H.G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-12-29

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin–, momentum–, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either “heavy” or “light” mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  2. Laplacian eigenmap with temporal constraints for local abnormality detection in crowded scenes.

    PubMed

    Thida, Myo; Eng, How-Lung; Remagnino, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and localizing abnormal activities in crowded scenes. A spatiotemporal Laplacian eigenmap method is proposed to extract different crowd activities from videos. This is achieved by learning the spatial and temporal variations of local motions in an embedded space. We employ representatives of different activities to construct the model which characterizes the regular behavior of a crowd. This model of regular crowd behavior allows the detection of abnormal crowd activities both in local and global contexts and the localization of regions which show abnormal behavior. Experiments on the recently published data sets show that the proposed method achieves comparable results with the state-of-the-art methods without sacrificing computational simplicity. PMID:23757524

  3. Fine Structure ENA Sources Beyond the Termination Shock: Observational Constraints and Detection Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demajistre, R.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    High spatial resolution maps from the IBEX mission (McComas et al, Science, 2009) suggest the presence of "fine structure" in the signal from beyond the termination shock. That is, areas of enhanced ENA emission that span less than a degree in the IBEX sky map. If confirmed, this would suggest very concentrated areas of emission from sources with scales of a few AU embedded in the outer heliosphere (or proportionally larger if they are located beyond the heliopause). This, in turn, would require the presence of unanticipated structures (plasma or neutral) beyond the termination shock for which the physics is poorly defined. It is therefore crucial to confirm the presence of these structures through careful analysis, or to establish the detection limits if the data taken to date is not sufficient for such a confirmation. In this work, we use 5 years worth of IBEX data to examine the statistical significance of these enhancements. We examine correlations in time, ENA energy and coincidence type for evidence of these small-scale spatial structures. Then, using the known spatial response of the IBEX instrument, establish the conditions under which such structure, if present, would be detectable. This detection threshold analysis is fully applicable future measurements, such as those planned for IMAP.

  4. Action change detection in video using a bilateral spatial-temporal constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jing; Chen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Action change detection in video aims to detect action discontinuity in video. The silhouettes-based features are desirable for action change detection. This paper studies the problem of silhouette-quality assessment. For that, a non-reference approach without the need for ground truth is proposed in this paper to evaluate the quality of silhouettes, by exploiting both the boundary contrast of the silhouettes in the spatial domain and the consistency of the silhouettes in the temporal domain. This is in contrast to that either only spatial information or only temporal information of silhouettes is exploited in conventional approaches. Experiments are conducted using artificially generated degraded silhouettes to show that the proposed approach outperforms conventional approaches to achieve more accurate quality assessment. Furthermore, experiments are performed to show that the proposed approach is able to improve the accuracy performance of conventional action change approaches in two human action video data-sets. The average runtime of the proposed approach for Weizmann action video data-set is 0.08 second for one frame using Matlab programming language. It is computationally efficient and potential to real-time implementations.

  5. PDM-16QAM vector signal generation and detection based on intensity modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple method to generate and detect high speed polarization-division-multiplexing 16-ary quadrature-amplitude-modulation (PDM-16QAM) vector signal enabled by Mach-Zehnder modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. Due to the adoption of OCS intensity modulation, carrier beating can be avoided at the receiver, and thus polarization de-multiplexing can be implemented by digital-signal-processing-based (DSP-based) cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization instead of a polarization tracking system. The change of both amplitude and phase information due to the adoption of OCS modulation can be equalized by DSP-based amplitude and phase precoding at the transmitter. Up to 64-Gb/s PDM-16QAM vector signal is generated and detected after 2-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) or 20-km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) transmission with a bit-error-ratio (BER) less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  6. A Fast Flare and Direct Redshift Constraint in Far-ultraviolet Spectra of the Blazar S5 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-01

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by ~40% (-0.45 mag hr-1) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr-1) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from αν ≈ -1.0 to αν ≈ -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the ~30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Lyα, Lyβ, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z Lyα <~ 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 ± 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  7. A FAST FLARE AND DIRECT REDSHIFT CONSTRAINT IN FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE BLAZAR S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-10

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by {approx}40% (-0.45 mag hr{sup -1}) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr{sup -1}) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.0 to {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the {approx}30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx}< 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 {+-} 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy.

  8. Constraint monitoring in TOSCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSSP) deals with the allocation of resources over time to factory operations. Allocations are subject to various constraints (e.g., production precedence relationships, factory capacity constraints, and limits on the allowable number of machine setups) which must be satisfied for a schedule to be valid. The identification of constraint violations and the monitoring of constraint threats plays a vital role in schedule generation in terms of the following: (1) directing the scheduling process; and (2) informing scheduling decisions. This paper describes a general mechanism for identifying constraint violations and monitoring threats to the satisfaction of constraints throughout schedule generation.

  9. Extended maximum likelihood halo-independent analysis of dark matter direct detection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2015-11-01

    We extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct dark matter detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as independent variable we use the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio fn/fp=-0.7, the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with fn/fp=-0.8.

  10. Extended maximum likelihood halo-independent analysis of dark matter direct detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2015-11-24

    We extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct dark matter detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as independent variable we use the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.7, the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.8.

  11. Tests of WIMP Dark Matter Candidates with Direct Dark Matter Detection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Andreea Irina

    by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with ƒn/ƒ p = --0.8. Finally, we reexamine the interpretation of the annual modulation signal observed by the DAMA experiment as due to WIMPs with a spin-dependent coupling mostly to protons. We consider both axial-vector and pseudo-scalar couplings, and elastic as well as endothermic and exothermic inelastic scattering. We conclude that the DAMA signal is in strong tension with null results of other direct detection experiments, particularly PICASSO and KIMS.

  12. Target detection in GPR data using joint low-rank and sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam; Tivive, Fok Hing Chi; Abeynayake, Canicious

    2016-05-01

    In ground penetrating radars, background clutter, which comprises the signals backscattered from the rough, uneven ground surface and the background noise, impairs the visualization of buried objects and subsurface inspections. In this paper, a clutter mitigation method is proposed for target detection. The removal of background clutter is formulated as a constrained optimization problem to obtain a low-rank matrix and a sparse matrix. The low-rank matrix captures the ground surface reflections and the background noise, whereas the sparse matrix contains the target reflections. An optimization method based on split-Bregman algorithm is developed to estimate these two matrices from the input GPR data. Evaluated on real radar data, the proposed method achieves promising results in removing the background clutter and enhancing the target signature.

  13. Recent Results in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Christopher Michael

    2012-08-01

    In this dissertation, we study the original excess of low energy events observed by the Co- GeNT collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately ~7.0 GeV and a cross section with nucleons of σDM-N ~2 x 10-40 cm2 could account for both of these observations. We also compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON 10, XENON 100, and CDMS (Si).

  14. Direct Detection Of Exoplanets: A Dream or a Near-Future Reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.

    We focus here on the question of the direct imaging of exoplanets. Beyond its mediatic impact, this technique will bring several new constraints with respect to other methods and will open the door to spectroscopy and thus to the physics of the planets, ultimately to the search of life signatures. It is generally assumed to be in excess of 23 magnitudes, however, this contrast depends largely on wavelength and other parameters and we first examine how it varies in different situations of planet/star couples, using as far as possible realistic models of planetary evolution. The conclusion is that several very favorable cases do exist: they are the most promising for a direct detection in the near future. There is an amazing richness in concepts and genuine ideas to reach this goal. Of course, the huge difficulty lies in the contrast between the star and the nearby planet. Two main families of instruments are today considered for actually succeeding in planet imaging: a high performance coronagraph on a single telescope and a space nulling interferometer at thermal wavelengths. In the case of coronagraphy, we review briefly several experimental setups, with some illustration based on recent proposals of optimized ground-based and space experiments dedicated to that aim, using the interferometric four quadrant coronagraph that our group proposed. On the ground, even with an extremely powerful adaptive optics system (Strehl ration of 90 % ), it is clear that the speckle noise will be the main limitation: contrast in magnitude as large as _m = 15 are however possible in the K band, provided that one uses a combination of a coronagraph and differential imaging or polarimetry at two wavelengths: this is likely the most promising concept for direct planet detection from the ground. Young planets which are bright in the IR will likely be the first detected bodies in a not so far future. On the other hand, we show that with a dedicated coronagraph on a large space telescope

  15. Business-objective-directed, constraint-based multivariate optimization of high-performance liquid chromatography operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Chester, T L

    2003-10-24

    The goal of a separation can be defined in terms of business needs. One goal often used is to provide the required separation in minimum time, but many other goals are also possible. These include maximizing resolution within an analysis-time limit, or minimizing the overall cost. The remaining requirements of the separation can be applied as constraints in the optimization of the goal. We will present a flexible, business-objective-based approach for optimizing the operational parameters of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. After selecting the stationary phase and the mobile-phase components, several isocratic experiments are required to build a retention model. Multivariate optimization is performed, within the model, to find the best combination of the parameters being varied so that the result satisfies the goal to the fullest extent possible within the constraints. Interdependencies of parameters can be revealed by plotting the loci of optimal variable values or the function being optimized against a constraint. We demonstrate the concepts with a model separation originally requiring a 54 min analysis time. Multivariate optimization reduces the predicted analysis time to as short as 8 min, depending on the goals and constraints specified. PMID:14601838

  16. Bed Bug Detection: Current Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Rajeev; Feldlaufer, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Technologies to detect bed bugs have not kept pace with their global resurgence. Early detection is critical to prevent infestations from spreading. Detection based exclusively on bites is inadequate, because reactions to insect bites are non-specific and often misdiagnosed. Visual inspections are commonly used and depend on identifying live bugs, exuviae, or fecal droplets. Visual inspections are inexpensive, but they are time-consuming and unreliable when only a few bugs are present. Use of a dog to detect bed bugs is gaining in popularity, but it can be expensive, may unintentionally advertise a bed bug problem, and is not foolproof. Passive monitors mimic natural harborages; they are discreet and typically use an adhesive to trap bugs. Active monitors generate carbon dioxide, heat, a pheromone, or a combination to attract bed bugs to a trap. New technologies using DNA analysis, mass spectrometry, and electronic noses are innovative but impractical and expensive for widespread use. PMID:23553226

  17. Bed bug detection: current technologies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Rajeev; Feldlaufer, Mark F

    2013-04-01

    Technologies to detect bed bugs have not kept pace with their global resurgence. Early detection is critical to prevent infestations from spreading. Detection based exclusively on bites is inadequate, because reactions to insect bites are non-specific and often misdiagnosed. Visual inspections are commonly used and depend on identifying live bugs, exuviae, or fecal droplets. Visual inspections are inexpensive, but they are time-consuming and unreliable when only a few bugs are present. Use of a dog to detect bed bugs is gaining in popularity, but it can be expensive, may unintentionally advertise a bed bug problem, and is not foolproof. Passive monitors mimic natural harborages; they are discreet and typically use an adhesive to trap bugs. Active monitors generate carbon dioxide, heat, a pheromone, or a combination to attract bed bugs to a trap. New technologies using DNA analysis, mass spectrometry, and electronic noses are innovative but impractical and expensive for widespread use. PMID:23553226

  18. Region detection by minimizing intraclass variance with geometric constraints, global optimality, and efficient approximation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Dou, Xin; Wahle, Andreas; Sonka, Milan

    2011-03-01

    Efficient segmentation of globally optimal surfaces in volumetric images is a central problem in many medical image analysis applications. Intraclass variance has been successfully utilized for object segmentation, for instance, in the Chan-Vese model, especially for images without prominent edges. In this paper, we study the optimization problem of detecting a region (volume) between two coupled smooth surfaces by minimizing the intraclass variance using an efficient polynomial-time algorithm. Our algorithm is based on the shape probing technique in computational geometry and computes a sequence of minimum-cost closed sets in a derived parametric graph. The method has been validated on computer-synthetic volumetric images and in X-ray CT-scanned datasets of plexiglas tubes of known sizes. Its applicability to clinical data sets was also demonstrated. In all cases, the approach yielded highly accurate results. We believe that the developed technique is of interest on its own. We expect that it can shed some light on solving other important optimization problems arising in medical imaging. Furthermore, we report an approximation algorithm which runs much faster than the exact algorithm while yielding highly comparable segmentation accuracy. PMID:21118766

  19. The local dark matter phase-space density and impact on WIMP direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Ullio, Piero E-mail: ullio@sissa.it

    2012-05-01

    We present a new determination of the local dark matter phase-space density. This result is obtained implementing, in the limit of isotropic velocity distribution and spherical symmetry, Eddington's inversion formula, which links univocally the dark matter distribution function to the density profile, and applying, within a Bayesian framework, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample mass models for the Milky Way against a broad and variegated sample of dynamical constraints. We consider three possible choices for the dark matter density profile, namely the Einasto, NFW and Burkert profiles, finding that the velocity dispersion, which characterizes the width in the distribution, tends to be larger for the Burkert case, while the escape velocity depends very weakly on the profile, with the mean value we obtain being in very good agreement with estimates from stellar kinematics. The derived dark matter phase-space densities differ significantly — most dramatically in the high velocity tails — from the model usually taken as a reference in dark matter detection studies, a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with velocity dispersion fixed in terms of the local circular velocity and with a sharp truncation at a given value of the escape velocity. We discuss the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on dark matter scattering rates and direct detection exclusion limits, considering a few sample cases and showing that the most sensitive ones are those for light dark matter particles and for particles scattering inelastically. As a general trend, regardless of the assumed profile, when adopting a self-consistent phase-space density, we find that rates are larger, and hence exclusion limits stronger, than with the standard Maxwell-Boltzmann approximation. Tools for applying our result on the local dark matter phase-space density to other dark matter candidates or experimental setups are provided.

  20. MSSM A-funnel and the galactic center excess: prospects for the LHC and direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; López, Alejandro; Shah, Nausheen R.; Shakya, Bibhushan

    2016-04-01

    The pseudoscalar resonance or " A-funnel" in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is a widely studied framework for explaining dark matter that can yield interesting indirect detection and collider signals. The well-known Galactic Center excess (GCE) at GeV energies in the gamma ray spectrum, consistent with annihilation of a ≲ 40 GeV dark matter particle, has more recently been shown to be compatible with significantly heavier masses following reanalysis of the background. In this paper, we explore the LHC and direct detection implications of interpreting the GCE in this extended mass window within the MSSM A-funnel framework. We find that compatibility with relic density, signal strength, collider constraints, and Higgs data can be simultaneously achieved with appropriate parameter choices. The compatible regions give very sharp predictions of 200-600 GeV CP-odd/even Higgs bosons at low tan β at the LHC and spin-independent cross sections ≈ 10-11 pb at direct detection experiments. Regardless of consistency with the GCE, this study serves as a useful template of the strong correlations between indirect, direct, and LHC signatures of the MSSM A-funnel region.

  1. Light neutralino dark matter: direct/indirect detection and collider searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Su, Shufang

    2014-08-01

    We study the neutralino being the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) as a cold Dark Matter (DM) candidate with a mass less than 40 GeV in the framework of the Next-to-Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (NMSSM). We find that with the current collider constraints from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC, there are three types of light DM solutions consistent with the direct/indirect searches as well as the relic abundance considerations: ( i) A 1, H 1-funnels, ( ii) stau coannihilation and ( iii) sbottom coannihilation. Type-( i) may take place in any theory with a light scalar (or pseudo-scalar) near the LSP pair threshold; while Type-( ii) and ( iii) could occur in the framework of Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (MSSM) as well. We present a comprehensive study on the properties of these solutions and point out their immediate relevance to the experiments of the underground direct detection such as superCDMS and LUX/LZ, and the astro-physical indirect search such as Fermi-LAT. We also find that the decays of the SM-like Higgs boson may be modified appreciably and the new decay channels to the light SUSY particles may be sizable. The new light CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons will decay to a pair of LSPs as well as other observable final states, leading to interesting new Higgs phenomenology at colliders. For the light sfermion searches, the signals would be very challenging to observe at the LHC given the current bounds. However, a high energy and high luminosity lepton collider, such as the ILC, would be able to fully cover these scenarios by searching for events with large missing energy plus charged tracks or displaced vertices.

  2. Beyond the CMSSM without an accelerator: proton decay and direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Evans, Jason L.; Luo, Feng; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Sandick, Pearl

    2016-01-01

    We consider two potential non-accelerator signatures of generalizations of the well-studied constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM). In one generalization, the universality constraints on soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are applied at some input scale M_{in} below the grand unification (GUT) scale M_{GUT}, a scenario referred to as `sub-GUT'. The other generalization we consider is to retain GUT-scale universality for the squark and slepton masses, but to relax universality for the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the masses of the Higgs doublets. As with other CMSSM-like models, the measured Higgs mass requires supersymmetric particle masses near or beyond the TeV scale. Because of these rather heavy sparticle masses, the embedding of these CMSSM-like models in a minimal SU(5) model of grand unification can yield a proton lifetime consistent with current experimental limits, and may be accessible in existing and future proton decay experiments. Another possible signature of these CMSSM-like models is direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter. The direct dark matter scattering rate is typically below the reach of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment if M_{in} is close to M_{GUT}, but it may lie within its reach if M_{in} ≲ 10^{11} GeV. Likewise, generalizing the CMSSM to allow non-universal supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs offers extensive possibilities for models within reach of the LZ experiment that have long proton lifetimes.

  3. Directional dark matter detection with the DMTPC m3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyton, Michael; DMTPC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Directional reconstruction provides a unique way to positively identify signal interactions induced by dark matter particles, owing to the motion of the Earth through the galactic dark matter halo. Directional information can additionally serve as a powerful discriminant against neutron (and neutrino-induced) backgrounds that have the same final-state signature as a signal interaction. The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration uses gas-based TPC technology, with both optical and charge readout, to measure the directional anisotropy of nuclear recoils induced by particles traversing the detector volume. Here, we present preliminary results from recent calibration runs of the DMTPC m3 detector in a surface laboratory, as well as a study of its projected directional sensitivity.

  4. Technique for detecting a direct signal pulse from an underwater explosive source in a waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenko, K. V.; Kryukov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    A technique for detecting direct signal pulses based on steep rising edges of acoustic pressure is developed. The technique consists in calculating the mirror derivative of the received signal and normalizing it in a specific manner. This makes it possible to amplify weak direct signals and suppress strong reflected ones. A key feature of this technique is that it ensures a high probability of detection of direct signal pulses while keeping the number of false detections at a minimum.

  5. ScP constraints on ultralow-velocity zone parameters using Viterbi Sparse Spike Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, M. S.; Brown, S. P.; Rost, S.

    2012-12-01

    region. We use the Viterbi Sparse Spike Detection (VSSD) method to determine differential travel times and amplitude ratios for all ScP pre- and post-cursor arrivals. We compare this full set of measurements to synthetic predictions constraining all ULVZ physical parameters.

  6. Update on the direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C.; Santoso, Yudi

    2005-05-01

    We compare updated predictions for the elastic scattering of supersymmetric neutralino dark matter with the improved experimental upper limit recently published by Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) II. We take into account the possibility that the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term may be somewhat larger than was previously considered plausible, as may be supported by the masses of exotic baryons reported recently. We also incorporate the new central value of m{sub t}, which affects indirectly constraints on the supersymmetric parameter space, for example, via calculations of the relic density. Even if a large value of {sigma} is assumed, the CDMS II data currently exclude only small parts of the parameter space in the constrained minimal standard model (CMSSM) with universal soft supersymmetry-breaking Higgs, squark, and slepton masses. None of the previously proposed CMSSM benchmark scenarios is excluded for any value of {sigma}, and the CDMS II data do not impinge on the domains of the CMSSM parameter space favored at the 90% confidence level in a recent likelihood analysis. However, some models with nonuniversal Higgs, squark, and slepton masses and neutralino masses < or approx. 700 GeV are excluded by the CDMS II data.

  7. A Nonstationary Markov Model Detects Directional Evolution in Hymenopteran Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Directional evolution has played an important role in shaping the morphological, ecological, and molecular diversity of life. However, standard substitution models assume stationarity of the evolutionary process over the time scale examined, thus impeding the study of directionality. Here we explore a simple, nonstationary model of evolution for discrete data, which assumes that the state frequencies at the root differ from the equilibrium frequencies of the homogeneous evolutionary process along the rest of the tree (i.e., the process is nonstationary, nonreversible, but homogeneous). Within this framework, we develop a Bayesian approach for testing directional versus stationary evolution using a reversible-jump algorithm. Simulations show that when only data from extant taxa are available, the success in inferring directionality is strongly dependent on the evolutionary rate, the shape of the tree, the relative branch lengths, and the number of taxa. Given suitable evolutionary rates (0.1–0.5 expected substitutions between root and tips), accounting for directionality improves tree inference and often allows correct rooting of the tree without the use of an outgroup. As an empirical test, we apply our method to study directional evolution in hymenopteran morphology. We focus on three character systems: wing veins, muscles, and sclerites. We find strong support for a trend toward loss of wing veins and muscles, while stationarity cannot be ruled out for sclerites. Adding fossil and time information in a total-evidence dating approach, we show that accounting for directionality results in more precise estimates not only of the ancestral state at the root of the tree, but also of the divergence times. Our model relaxes the assumption of stationarity and reversibility by adding a minimum of additional parameters, and is thus well suited to studying the nature of the evolutionary process in data sets of limited size, such as morphology and ecology. PMID:26272507

  8. A Nonstationary Markov Model Detects Directional Evolution in Hymenopteran Morphology.

    PubMed

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2015-11-01

    Directional evolution has played an important role in shaping the morphological, ecological, and molecular diversity of life. However, standard substitution models assume stationarity of the evolutionary process over the time scale examined, thus impeding the study of directionality. Here we explore a simple, nonstationary model of evolution for discrete data, which assumes that the state frequencies at the root differ from the equilibrium frequencies of the homogeneous evolutionary process along the rest of the tree (i.e., the process is nonstationary, nonreversible, but homogeneous). Within this framework, we develop a Bayesian approach for testing directional versus stationary evolution using a reversible-jump algorithm. Simulations show that when only data from extant taxa are available, the success in inferring directionality is strongly dependent on the evolutionary rate, the shape of the tree, the relative branch lengths, and the number of taxa. Given suitable evolutionary rates (0.1-0.5 expected substitutions between root and tips), accounting for directionality improves tree inference and often allows correct rooting of the tree without the use of an outgroup. As an empirical test, we apply our method to study directional evolution in hymenopteran morphology. We focus on three character systems: wing veins, muscles, and sclerites. We find strong support for a trend toward loss of wing veins and muscles, while stationarity cannot be ruled out for sclerites. Adding fossil and time information in a total-evidence dating approach, we show that accounting for directionality results in more precise estimates not only of the ancestral state at the root of the tree, but also of the divergence times. Our model relaxes the assumption of stationarity and reversibility by adding a minimum of additional parameters, and is thus well suited to studying the nature of the evolutionary process in data sets of limited size, such as morphology and ecology. PMID:26272507

  9. Calculations of rates for direct detection of neutralino dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim

    1988-01-01

    The detection rates in cryogenic detectors of neutralinos, the most well motivated supersymmetric dark-matter candidate, are calculated. These rates can differ greatly from the special case of pure photinos and pure Higgsinos which are usually considered. In addition, a new term is found in the elastic-scattering cross section proportional to the Z-ino component which is 'spin independent', even for these Majorana particles. As a result, substantial detection rates exist for previously disfavored, mostly spinless materials such as germanium and mercury.

  10. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. PMID:26424841

  11. Direct detection of RDX vapor using a conjugated polymer network.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepti; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a principal component of plastic explosives used in acts of terrorism and within improvised explosive devices, among others. Approaches to detect RDX compatible with remote, "stand-off" sampling that do not require preconcentration strategies, such as the swabs commonly employed in airports, will benefit military and civilian security. Such detection remains a significant challenge because RDX is 10(3) less volatile than 1,3,5-trinitrotoluene (TNT), corresponding to a parts-per-trillion vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Therefore, while fluorescence quenching of conjugated polymers is sufficiently sensitive to detect TNT vapors, RDX vapor detection is undemonstrated. Here we report a cross-linked phenylene vinylene polymer network whose fluorescence is quenched by trace amounts of RDX introduced from solution or the vapor phase. Fluorescence quenching is reduced, but remains significant, when partially degraded RDX is employed, suggesting that the polymer responds to RDX itself. The polymer network also responds to TNT and PETN similarly introduced from solution or the vapor phase. Pure solvents, volatile amines, and the outgassed vapors from lipstick or sunscreen do not quench polymer fluorescence. The established success of TNT sensors based on fluorescence quenching makes this a material of interest for real-world explosive sensors and will motivate further interest in cross-linked polymers and framework materials for sensing applications. PMID:23641956

  12. Direct detection of influenza virus antigen in nasopharyngeal specimens by direct enzyme immunoassay in comparison with quantitating virus shedding.

    PubMed Central

    Döller, G; Schuy, W; Tjhen, K Y; Stekeler, B; Gerth, H J

    1992-01-01

    We developed a direct enzyme immunoassay [EIA; Enzygnost Influenza A(Ag) and Enzygnost Influenza B(Ag)] for the direct detection of influenza A and B virus antigens in nasopharyngeal secretion specimens (NPS). The test is performed without sonification of specimens, and results are obtained within 4 h. A direct comparison between direct EIA and quantitation of virus shedding for influenza A and B virus antigen detection was carried out. A total of 210 NPS and 98 nasopharyngeal wash specimens (NPW) were investigated. We isolated influenza A viruses from 79 (37.6%) of 210 NPS; of these 79 cell-culture-positive NPS, 70 (88.6%) were also positive by direct EIA. Of 29 (13.8%) NPS from which influenza B virus was isolated, 24 (82.8%) NPS were positive by direct EIA. Virus shedding was determined quantitatively in 48 NPS from patients with influenza A and in 24 NPS from patients with influenza B. Only a crude correlation between optical density values and virus concentrations was observed. Detection of influenza virus antigens in NPS by direct EIA showed sensitivities of 89.7% for influenza A virus and 87.9% for influenza B virus and specificities of 99.3% for influenza A virus and 100% for influenza B virus. With direct EIA, all NPW were negative for influenza A virus, although virus was isolated from 21 (21.4%) NPW. Of 15 NPW from which influenza B virus was isolated, 7 showed positive results in direct EIA. In addition, direct EIA is suitable for detecting influenza A and B viruses in cell cultures before the appearance of any cytopathic effects and can be used as a cell culture confirmation test. PMID:1572972

  13. Direct detection of optical phase conjugation in a colloidal medium.

    PubMed

    López-Mariscal, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C; McGloin, David; Dholakia, Kishan

    2007-05-14

    Degenerate four-wave mixing is demonstrated using an artificial Kerr medium and is evidenced by directly observing the phase conjugation of a vortex signal beam. The nonlinear susceptibility is produced by a refractive index grating created in a suspension of dielectric microscopic particles optically confined in the intensity grating distribution of two interfering laser beams. PMID:19546937

  14. Protein-based nanobiosensor for direct detection of hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Meisam; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Yazdian, Fatemeh; Habibi-Rezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemically modified cytochrome c from equine heart, EC (232-700-9), was immobilized onto gold nanoparticles in order to develop a specific biosensing system for monitoring hydrogen sulfide down to the micromolar level, by means of a localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The sensing mechanism is based on the cytochrome-c conformational changes in the presence of H2S which alter the dielectric properties of the gold nanoparticles and the surface plasmon resonance peak undergoes a redshift. According to the experiments, it is revealed that H2S can be detected at a concentration of 4.0 μ \\text{M} (1.3 \\text{ppb}) by the fabricated biosensor. This simple, quantitative and sensitive sensing platform provides a rapid and convenient detection for H2S at concentrations far below the hazardous limit.

  15. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Huske, Nils Kristian

    2010-09-10

    We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < mH < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(mPl). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < mH < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb-1 of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb-1. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < mH < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m

  16. Sensory Deviancy Detection Measured Directly Within the Human Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Zaehle, Tino; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Voges, Jürgen; Garrido, Marta I; Dolan, Raymond J; Knight, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Rapid changes in the environment evoke a comparison between expectancy and actual outcome to inform optimal subsequent behavior. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a key interface between the hippocampus and neocortical regions, is a candidate region for mediating this comparison. Here, we report event-related potentials obtained from the NAcc using direct intracranial recordings in 5 human participants while they listened to trains of auditory stimuli differing in their degree of deviation from repetitive background stimuli. NAcc recordings revealed an early mismatch signal (50-220 ms) in response to all deviants. NAcc activity in this time window was also sensitive to the statistics of stimulus deviancy, with larger amplitudes as a function of the level of deviancy. Importantly, this NAcc mismatch signal also predicted generation of longer latency scalp potentials (300-400 ms). The results provide direct human evidence that the NAcc is a key component of a network engaged in encoding statistics of the sensory environmental. PMID:25576536

  17. Teleconnection Paths via Climate Network Direct Link Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Gozolchiani, Avi; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-12-31

    Teleconnections describe remote connections (typically thousands of kilometers) of the climate system. These are of great importance in climate dynamics as they reflect the transportation of energy and climate change on global scales (like the El Niño phenomenon). Yet, the path of influence propagation between such remote regions, and weighting associated with different paths, are only partially known. Here we propose a systematic climate network approach to find and quantify the optimal paths between remotely distant interacting locations. Specifically, we separate the correlations between two grid points into direct and indirect components, where the optimal path is found based on a minimal total cost function of the direct links. We demonstrate our method using near surface air temperature reanalysis data, on identifying cross-latitude teleconnections and their corresponding optimal paths. The proposed method may be used to quantify and improve our understanding regarding the emergence of climate patterns on global scales. PMID:26765033

  18. Teleconnection Paths via Climate Network Direct Link Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Gozolchiani, Avi; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Teleconnections describe remote connections (typically thousands of kilometers) of the climate system. These are of great importance in climate dynamics as they reflect the transportation of energy and climate change on global scales (like the El Niño phenomenon). Yet, the path of influence propagation between such remote regions, and weighting associated with different paths, are only partially known. Here we propose a systematic climate network approach to find and quantify the optimal paths between remotely distant interacting locations. Specifically, we separate the correlations between two grid points into direct and indirect components, where the optimal path is found based on a minimal total cost function of the direct links. We demonstrate our method using near surface air temperature reanalysis data, on identifying cross-latitude teleconnections and their corresponding optimal paths. The proposed method may be used to quantify and improve our understanding regarding the emergence of climate patterns on global scales.

  19. Direct measurement of ACh release from exposed frog nerve terminals: constraints on interpretation of non-quantal release.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, A D; Gundersen, C B; Meriney, S D; Young, S H

    1989-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine (ACh) release from enzymatically exposed frog motor nerve terminals has been measured directly with closely apposed outside-out clamped patches of Xenopus myocyte membrane, rich in ACh receptor channels. When placed close to the synaptic surface of the terminal, such a membrane patch detects both nerve-evoked patch currents (EPCs) and spontaneous quantal 'miniature' patch currents (MPCs), from a few micrometres length of the terminal, in response to ACh release from the nearest three to five active zones. 2. Chemical measurements of ACh efflux from whole preparations revealed a spontaneous release rate of 4.1 pmol (2 h)-1, and no significant difference in resting efflux between enzyme-treated and control preparations. The ratio of enzyme-treated to contralateral control muscle efflux averaged 1.17, indicating that enzyme treatment did not affect spontaneous ACh release. Vesamicol (1.7 microM), which blocks the ACh transporter in synaptic vesicles, decreased the spontaneous release of ACh to 67% of control. 3. In the absence of nerve stimulation, the frequency of single-channel openings recorded by outside-out patch probes adjacent to nerve terminals was very low (1-2 min-1), and little different at a distance of hundreds of micrometres, suggesting that if ACh was continually leaking from the terminal in a non-quantal fashion, the amount being released near active zone regions on the terminal was below the limit of detection with the patches. 4. Direct measurements of the sensitivity of the patches, coupled with calculated ACh flux rates, lead to the conclusion that the amount of ACh released non-quantally from the synaptic surface of the frog nerve terminal is less than one-tenth the amount expected if all non-quantal release is from this region of the terminal membrane. 5. Following a series of single nerve shocks or a 50 Hz train of nerve stimuli, the frequency of asynchronous single-channel openings increased for several seconds. This transient

  20. When does female multiple mating evolve to adjust inbreeding? Effects of inbreeding depression, direct costs, mating constraints, and polyandry as a threshold trait.

    PubMed

    Duthie, A Bradley; Bocedi, Greta; Reid, Jane M

    2016-09-01

    Polyandry is often hypothesized to evolve to allow females to adjust the degree to which they inbreed. Multiple factors might affect such evolution, including inbreeding depression, direct costs, constraints on male availability, and the nature of polyandry as a threshold trait. Complex models are required to evaluate when evolution of polyandry to adjust inbreeding is predicted to arise. We used a genetically explicit individual-based model to track the joint evolution of inbreeding strategy and polyandry defined as a polygenic threshold trait. Evolution of polyandry to avoid inbreeding only occurred given strong inbreeding depression, low direct costs, and severe restrictions on initial versus additional male availability. Evolution of polyandry to prefer inbreeding only occurred given zero inbreeding depression and direct costs, and given similarly severe restrictions on male availability. However, due to its threshold nature, phenotypic polyandry was frequently expressed even when strongly selected against and hence maladaptive. Further, the degree to which females adjusted inbreeding through polyandry was typically very small, and often reflected constraints on male availability rather than adaptive reproductive strategy. Evolution of polyandry solely to adjust inbreeding might consequently be highly restricted in nature, and such evolution cannot necessarily be directly inferred from observed magnitudes of inbreeding adjustment. PMID:27464756

  1. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fujio

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  2. Direct detection of exoplanets and circumstellar disks using NaCo APP and NaCo PDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanz, S. P.; Meyer, M. R.; Kenworthy, M.; Kasper, M.; Lenzen, R.; Girard, J.; Hinz, P.; Geissler, K.; Brander, W.; Henning, T.; Wolf, S.

    2010-10-01

    The direct detection of faint objects close to a bright star (such as circumstellar disks or exoplanets) is observationally challenging as it requires both, high spatial resolution and high contrast. However, it is exactly these resolved images that boost our understanding of the nature and underlying physics of the corresponding objects. In this talk we will present new results obtained with the versatile NaCo instrument at the VLT. In the first part, we report on recent observations with the newly installed apodizing phase plate (APP) coronagraph aiming at the direct detection of exoplanets at 4 micron. We confirm the detection of beta Pic b and add additional information to the orbit and atmospheric properties of the planet. Additional ongoing studies are briefly discussed. In the second part, we present the results from a mini-survey to resolve circumstellar disks using polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) in the near infrared. Among other targets we show resolved images of the prominent circumstellar disk around the young Herbig Be star HD100546. The images reveal the disk at unprecedented inner working angles. Having polarimetric information in different filters allows us to put constraints on dust grain properties and disk geometry in previously unaccessible disk regions. In addition to their scientific merit, the studies mentioned above will demonstrate the benefits - but also the limitations - of both techniques (APP and PDI). This will help to better determine their potential role in high contrast imaging with future facilities such as VLT/SPHERE and E-ELT.

  3. Direct detection of DNA conformation in hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Bender, Florian; Ferapontova, Elena E; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-02-21

    DNA hybridization studies at surfaces normally rely on the detection of mass changes as a result of the addition of the complementary strand. In this work we propose a mass-independent sensing principle based on the quantitative monitoring of the conformation of the immobilized single-strand probe and of the final hybridized product. This is demonstrated by using a label-free acoustic technique, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and oligonucleotides of specific sequences which, upon hybridization, result in DNAs of various shapes and sizes. Measurements of the acoustic ratio ΔD/ΔF in combination with a "discrete molecule binding" approach are used to confirm the formation of straight hybridized DNA molecules of specific lengths (21, 75, and 110 base pairs); acoustic results are also used to distinguish between single- and double-stranded molecules as well as between same-mass hybridized products with different shapes, i.e., straight or "Y-shaped". Issues such as the effect of mono- and divalent cations to hybridization and the mechanism of the process (nucleation, kinetics) when it happens on a surface are carefully considered. Finally, this new sensing principle is applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection: a DNA hairpin probe hybridized to the p53 target gene gave products of distinct geometrical features depending on the presence or absence of the SNP, both readily distinguishable. Our results suggest that DNA conformation probing with acoustic wave sensors is a much more improved detection method over the popular mass-related, on/off techniques offering higher flexibility in the design of solid-phase hybridization assays. PMID:22248021

  4. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  5. A halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-05-21

    We show that a positive signal in a dark matter (DM) direct detection experiment can be used to place a lower bound on the DM capture rate in the Sun, independent of the DM halo. For a given particle physics model and DM mass we obtain a lower bound on the capture rate independent of the local DM density, velocity distribution, galactic escape velocity, as well as the scattering cross section. We illustrate this lower bound on the capture rate by assuming that upcoming direct detection experiments will soon obtain a significant signal. When comparing the lower bound on the capture rate with limits on the high-energy neutrino flux from the Sun from neutrino telescopes, we can place upper limits on the branching fraction of DM annihilation channels leading to neutrinos. With current data from IceCube and Super-Kamiokande non-trivial limits can be obtained for spin-dependent interactions and direct annihilations into neutrinos. In some cases also annihilations into ττ or bb start getting constrained. For spin-independent interactions current constraints are weak, but they may become interesting for data from future neutrino telescopes.

  6. A prototype direct-detection CCD for protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Green, Katherine S.; Szebenyi, Doletha M. E.; Boggs, Kasey; Bredthauer, Richard; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of a prototype deep-depletion direct-conversion X-ray CCD detector are described. The device is fabricated on 600 µm-thick high-resistivity silicon, with 24 × 24 µm pixels in a 4k × 4k pixel format. Calibration measurements and the results of initial protein crystallography experiments at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) F1 beamline are described, as well as suggested improvements for future versions of the detector. PMID:24046505

  7. Direct detection of relic active and sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Both active and sterile sub-eV neutrinos can form the cosmic neutrino background in the early Universe. We consider the beta-decaying (e.g., 3H) and EC-decaying (e.g., 163Ho) nuclei as the promising targets to capture relic neutrinos in the laboratory. We calculate the capture rates of relic electron neutrinos and antineutrinos against the corresponding beta decay or electron capture (EC) decay backgrounds in the (3+Ns) flavor mixing scheme, and discuss the future prospect in terms of the PTOLEMY project. We stress that such direct measurements of hot DM might not be hopeless in the long term.

  8. Single-particle cryo-EM data acquisition by using direct electron detection camera.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shenping; Armache, Jean-Paul; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) were largely facilitated by the application of direct electron detection cameras. These cameras feature not only a significant improvement in detective quantum efficiency but also a high frame rate that enables images to be acquired as 'movies' made of stacks of many frames. In this review, we discuss how the applications of direct electron detection cameras in cryo-EM have changed the way the data are acquired. PMID:26546989

  9. Direct detection of a single photon by humans.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Jonathan N; Molodtsov, Maxim I; Prevedel, Robert; Wartmann, David; Espigulé-Pons, Jofre; Lauwers, Mattias; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite investigations for over 70 years, the absolute limits of human vision have remained unclear. Rod cells respond to individual photons, yet whether a single-photon incident on the eye can be perceived by a human subject has remained a fundamental open question. Here we report that humans can detect a single-photon incident on the cornea with a probability significantly above chance. This was achieved by implementing a combination of a psychophysics procedure with a quantum light source that can generate single-photon states of light. We further discover that the probability of reporting a single photon is modulated by the presence of an earlier photon, suggesting a priming process that temporarily enhances the effective gain of the visual system on the timescale of seconds. PMID:27434854

  10. Xenon bubble chambers for direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, C.; Fallon, S.; Genovesi, J.; Khaitan, D.; Klimov, K.; Mock, J.; Szydagis, M.

    2016-03-01

    The search for dark matter is one of today's most exciting fields. As bigger detectors are being built to increase their sensitivity, background reduction is an ever more challenging issue. To this end, a new type of dark matter detector is proposed, a xenon bubble chamber, which would combine the strengths of liquid xenon TPCs, namely event by event energy resolution, with those of a bubble chamber, namely insensitivity to electronic recoils. In addition, it would be the first time ever that a dark matter detector is active on all three detection channels, ionization and scintillation characteristic of xenon detectors, and heat through bubble formation in superheated fluids. Preliminary simulations show that, depending on threshold, a discrimination of 99.99% to 99.9999+% can be achieved, which is on par or better than many current experiments. A prototype is being built at the University at Albany, SUNY. The prototype is currently undergoing seals, thermal, and compression testing.