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Sample records for direct factor xa

  1. Apixaban, an oral, direct inhibitor of activated Factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Shantsila, Eduard; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2008-09-01

    Apixaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and Pfizer Inc. Apixaban is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials for cerebrovascular ischemia, deep vein thrombosis and lung embolism, and phase II clinical trials for coronary artery disease. PMID:18729009

  2. Apixaban, an oral direct Factor Xa inhibitor: awaiting the verdict.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Jennifer; Ansell, Jack

    2008-12-01

    For the last half-century, despite its many limitations warfarin has been the mainstay of treatment for patients with venous and arterial thromboembolic disease. During the past decade, a number of new oral anticoagulant agents have been developed that may offer an alternative to warfarin. Emerging data suggest that Factor Xa may be a target for inhibition. Apixaban is one such agent. It is a potent, selective, reversible, and orally bioavailable FXa inhibitor that demonstrates antithrombotic efficacy, with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. At present, the safety and efficacy of apixaban for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism is being evaluated in Phase II and Phase III trials involving nearly 25,000 patients. Trials are also underway involving over 20,000 patients for secondary prevention after acute coronary syndromes and the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. This review article discusses the discovery, pharmacokinetics, attributes, and current clinical trials of this emerging drug. PMID:19012508

  3. The role of structural information in the discovery of direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nar, Herbert

    2012-05-01

    The quest for novel medications to treat thromboembolic disorders such as venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and stroke received a boost when the 3D structures of two major players in the blood coagulation cascade were determined in 1989 and 1993. Structure-guided design of inhibitors of thrombin (factor IIa, fIIa) and factor Xa (fXa) eventually led to the discovery of potent, selective, efficacious, orally active and safe compounds that proved successful in clinical studies. In 2008, the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate developed by Boehringer Ingelheim became the first novel antithrombotic molecular entity to enter the market in 50 years. Additional compounds targeting factor Xa were subsequently granted marketing authorization or are in late-stage clinical studies. In this review, I use selected case studies to describe the discovery of novel fIIa and fXa inhibitors, with a particular emphasis on the pre-eminent role that structural information played in this process. PMID:22503439

  4. Oral, direct factor Xa inhibitors in development for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpie, Alexander G G

    2007-06-01

    Anticoagulants are recommended for the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of thromboembolic events. Although existing anticoagulants are effective, their use is limited by parenteral administration or the requirement for frequent monitoring and subsequent dose adjustment. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel, oral agents with a predictable anticoagulant action. Because of its key position in the coagulation cascade and its limited roles outside of coagulation, Factor Xa has emerged as an attractive target for novel anticoagulants. As a result, the past decade has witnessed an explosion of research into small-molecule, oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitors, and several are now in clinical development. Rivaroxaban, LY517717, YM150, apixaban, PRT054021, and DU-176b, among others, have shown considerable promise; rivaroxaban is currently furthest ahead in its developmental program, having entered phase III in 3 indications. It is hoped that, before long, these anticoagulants will allow us to enter an era of convenient, oral anticoagulation, without the need for regular monitoring or dose adjustment. PMID:17379841

  5. Rivaroxaban – an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor – lessons from a broad clinical study programme

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Anticoagulants are recommended for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and secondary prevention in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). There is a clinical need for novel anticoagulants offering improvements over current standard of care, such as fixed oral dosing and no need for routine monitoring. Rivaroxaban, an oral, once-daily, direct Factor Xa inhibitor, has recently completed the RECORD phase III programme for the prevention of VTE in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement (THR or TKR), an indication for which it is approved in Europe and Canada. It is being investigated in large-scale phase III studies for VTE treatment and prevention of stroke in patients with AF, and phase III studies will soon commence for secondary prevention in patients with ACS. Phase I studies demonstrated that no routine anticoagulation monitoring was required, while phase II studies suggested that fixed daily doses had a wide therapeutic window. The four RECORD studies consistently showed that rivaroxaban was significantly more effective than enoxaparin in the prevention of VTE after THR and TKR, with a similar safety profile. This review describes the development of this novel anticoagulant, from bench to bedside. PMID:19187276

  6. Effect of ketoconazole and diltiazem on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Charles E; Byon, Wonkyung; Song, Yan; Wang, Jessie; Schuster, Alan E; Boyd, Rebecca A; Zhang, Donglu; Yu, Zhigang; Dias, Clapton; Shenker, Andrew; LaCreta, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Aim Apixaban is an orally active inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa and is eliminated by multiple pathways, including renal and non-renal elimination. Non-renal elimination pathways consist of metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, primarily CYP3A4, as well as direct intestinal excretion. Two single sequence studies evaluated the effect of ketoconazole (a strong dual inhibitor of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein [P-gp]) and diltiazem (a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and a P-gp inhibitor) on apixaban pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects. Method In the ketoconazole study, 18 subjects received apixaban 10 mg on days 1 and 7, and ketoconazole 400 mg once daily on days 4–9. In the diltiazem study, 18 subjects received apixaban 10 mg on days 1 and 11 and diltiazem 360 mg once daily on days 4–13. Results Apixaban maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve extrapolated to infinity increased by 62% (90% confidence interval [CI], 47, 78%) and 99% (90% CI, 81, 118%), respectively, with co-administration of ketoconazole, and by 31% (90% CI, 16, 49%) and 40% (90% CI, 23, 59%), respectively, with diltiazem. Conclusion A 2-fold and 1.4-fold increase in apixaban exposure was observed with co-administration of ketoconazole and diltiazem, respectively. PMID:25377242

  7. Comparative pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of oral direct thrombin and factor xa inhibitors in development.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Bengt I; Quinlan, Daniel J; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2009-01-01

    For the past five decades, there has been little progress in the development of oral anticoagulants, with the choices being limited to the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The situation is changing with the development of orally active small molecules that directly target thrombin or activated factor X (FXa). The two agents in the most advanced stages of development are dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban, which inhibit thrombin and FXa, respectively. Both are approved in the EU and Canada for venous thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing elective hip- or knee-replacement surgery. Other agents in the early stages of development include several FXa inhibitors (apixaban, DU 176b, LY 517717, YM 150, betrixaban, eribaxaban [PD 0348292] and TAK 442) and one thrombin inhibitor (AZD 0837). With a predictable anticoagulant response and low potential for drug-drug interactions, these new agents can be given in fixed doses without coagulation monitoring. This renders them more convenient than VKAs. While the anticoagulant effect of the new thrombin and FXa inhibitors is similar, differences in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters may influence their use in clinical practice. Here, we compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features of these new oral agents. PMID:19071881

  8. [Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with oral direct thrombin or factor Xa inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Sié, P; Samama, C-M; Godier, A; Rosencher, N; Steib, A; Llau, J-V; van der Linden, P; Pernod, G; Lecompte, T; Gouin-Thibault, I; Albaladejo, P

    2011-09-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. It is likely that patients on long-term treatment with DOAs will be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple, standardised laboratory assays, and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly from patient to patient. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low risk of haemorrhage, a therapeutic window of 48 h (last administration 24h before surgery, restart 24h after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination of the drug in all patients. The treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients with a high risk of thrombosis (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with an antecedent of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular weight, or unfractionated if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific anti-haemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa, or prothrombin concentrates, should not be given for prophylactic reversal, due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:21820844

  9. Novel anticoagulants in clinical development: focus on factor Xa and direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steffel, Jan; Lüscher, Thomas F

    2009-08-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are the mainstay in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Although effective under optimal conditions, several drawbacks are imminent to the long-term application of these drugs due to their narrow therapeutic window, interactions with other drugs as well as the need for regular monitoring and the risk of a recurrent event versus the risk of bleeding. To overcome these downsides, novel anticoagulants are being developed; in contrast to vitamin K antagonists, these novel agents specifically and selectively block central elements of the coagulation cascade. Several clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective FXa inhibitors (such as fondaparinux, rivaroxaban, apixaban) and direct thrombin inhibitors (such as lepirudin, bivalirudin, dabigatran etexilate) in the treatment of typical indications for conventional vitamin K antagonists, in particular, the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. This review summarizes the results and designs of recently published and ongoing clinical trials of novel anticoagulants. PMID:19561526

  10. Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mimi L; Pinto, Donald J P; Rossi, Karen A; Sheriff, Steven; Alexander, Richard S; Amparo, Eugene; Kish, Kevin; Knabb, Robert M; Luettgen, Joseph M; Morin, Paul; Smallwood, Angela; Woerner, Francis J; Wexler, Ruth R

    2010-02-15

    We have discovered that phenyltriazolinone is a novel and potent P1 moiety for coagulation factor Xa. X-ray structures of the inhibitors with a phenyltriazolinone in the P1 position revealed that the side chain of Asp189 has reoriented resulting in a novel S1 binding pocket which is larger in size to accommodate the phenyltriazolinone P1 substrate. PMID:20100660

  11. Activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Monkovic, D.D.; Tracy, P.B. )

    1990-02-06

    The activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin was studied by functional assessment of cofactor activity and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polycarylamide gel electrophoresis followed by either autoradiography of {sup 125}I-labeled factor V activation products or Western blot analyses of unlabeled factor V activation products. Cofactor activity was measured by the ability of the factor V/Va peptides to support the activation of prothrombin. The factor Xa catalyzed cleavage of factor V was observed to be time, phospholipid, and calcium ion dependent, yielding a cofactor with activity equal to that of thrombin-activated factor V (factor Va). The cleavage pattern differed markedly from the one observed in the bovine system. The factor Xa activated factor V subunits expressing cofactor activity were isolated and found to consist of peptides of M{sub r} 220,000 and 105,000. Although thrombin cleaved the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide to yield peptides previously shown to be products of thrombin activation, cofactor activity did not increase. N-Terminal sequence analysis confirmed that both factor Xa and thrombin cleave factor V at the same bond to generate the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide. The factor Xa dependent functional assessment of {sup 125}I-labeled factor V coupled with densitometric analyses of the cleavage products indicated that the cofactor activity of factor Xa activated factor V closely paralleled the appearance of the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide. The data indicate that factor Xa is as efficient an enzyme toward factor V as thrombin.

  12. Membrane-dependent Interaction of Factor Xa and Prothrombin with Factor Va in the Prothrombinase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shabir H.; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2009-01-01

    Because all three protein components of prothrombinase, factors (f) Xa and Va and prothrombin, bind to negatively charged membrane phospholipids, the exact role of the membrane in the prothrombinase reaction has not been fully understood. In this study, we prepared deletion derivatives of fXa and prothrombin in which both the Gla and first EGF-like domains of the protease (E2-fXa) as well as the Gla and both kringle domains of the substrate (prethrombin-2) were deleted. The fVa-mediated catalytic activity of E2-fXa toward prethrombin-2 was analyzed in both the absence and presence of phospholipids composed of 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 20% phosphatidylserine (PS). PCPS markedly accelerated the initial rate of prethrombin-2 activation by E2-fXa, with the cofactor exhibiting saturation only in the presence of phospholipids (apparent Kd ∼60 nM). Competitive kinetic studies in the presence of the two exosite-1-specific ligands Tyr63-sulfated hirudin54-65 and TM456 suggested that while both peptides are highly effective inhibitors of the fVa-mediated activation of prethrombin-2 by E2-fXa in the absence of PCPS, they are ineffective competitors in the presence of phospholipids. Since neither E2-fXa nor prethrombin-2 can interact with membranes, these results suggest that fVa interaction with PCPS improves the affinity of the activation complex for the proexosite-1 of the substrate. Direct binding studies employing OG488-EGR-labeled fXa and E2-fXa revealed that the interaction of the Gla-domain of fXa with PCPS also induces conformational changes in the protease to facilitate its high-affinity interaction with fVa. PMID:19378973

  13. Current and future prospects for anticoagulant therapy: inhibitors of factor Xa and factor IIa.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job; Wehling, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Indirect systemic and direct oral factor Xa and direct oral factor IIa inhibitors with improved pharmacologic profiles compared with heparins and vitamin K antagonists are currently in clinical development. This overview focuses on the indirect antithrombin dependent pentasaccharide derivatives of idraparinux and on the most advanced oral direct inhibitors to factor Xa (rivaroxaban and apixaban) and IIa (dabigatran). Specifically, the results of dose-finding studies for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after elective orthopedic surgery, the results of dose-finding studies for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism including prolonged prophylaxis of recurrent events, and the designs of ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:18393142

  14. Factor Xa inhibitors--new anticoagulants for secondary haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Perzborn, E

    2009-08-01

    Oral factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors are a promising alternative to current anticoagulants. This paper reviews the latest developments of oral direct FXa inhibitors and focuses on those which have been approved for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total hip or knee replacement or are in advanced development and have passed phase II (proof of principle) testing. The most advanced drugs are apixaban, betrixaban, edoxaban, eribaxaban, rivaroxaban, LY517717, TAK-442, and YM150. Rivaroxaban (Xareltoâ) is the first direct FXa inhibitor which has recently been approved for the prevention of VTE in adult patients after elective hip or knee replacement in several countries, including the European Union and Canada. Rivaroxaban has a flat dose-dependent anticoagulant response with a wide therapeutic window and low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions. Rivaroxaban can be given in fixed doses without coagulation monitoring. This review describes the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles and the results of clinical trials with FXa inhibitors in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:19644596

  15. Evaluation of a Heparin-Calibrated Antifactor Xa Assay for Measuring the Anticoagulant Effect of Oral Direct Xa Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jacob; Trujillo, Toby; Fisher, Sheila; Ko, Ann; Lind, Stuart E; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of oral direct anti-Xa anticoagulants apixaban and rivaroxaban has significantly impacted the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease. Clinical scenarios exist in which a quantitative assessment for degree of anticoagulation due to these agents would aid management. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the chromogenic antifactor Xa assay calibrated with heparin standards at our institution for assessment of intensity of anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or apixaban in addition to its current use for unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin. We also aimed to propose expected steady state peak and trough antifactor Xa activities for these agents based upon dosing regimens approved for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Antifactor Xa activity correlated very strongly with apixaban and rivaroxaban concentration in both spiked samples and treated patient plasma samples (r (2) = .99, P < .001). This correlation was observed over a broad range (20-500 ng/mL) of drug concentrations, as sample dilution with pooled normal plasma significantly extended the range of quantitative assessment. Based on drug concentrations previously published in pharmacokinetic studies, the expected steady state peak and trough antifactor Xa activity ranges for apixaban are 1.80 to 2.20 IU/mL and 0.70 to 1.10 IU/mL, respectively. For rivaroxaban, these ranges are 3.80 to 6.20 IU/mL and 0.60 to 1.00 IU/mL, respectively. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that heparin-calibrated antifactor Xa activity correlates strongly with apixaban and rivaroxaban concentration. The dilution of samples allowed for this correlation to be extended over the majority of on-therapy drug concentrations. PMID:26842561

  16. Factor Xa dimerization competes with prothrombinase complex formation on platelet-like membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koklic, Tilen; Chattopadhyay, Rima; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) molecules on activated platelet membrane surface is a crucial event in blood coagulation. Binding of PS to specific sites on factor Xa (fXa) and factor Va (fVa) promotes their assembly into a complex that enhances proteolysis of prothrombin by approximately 10⁵. Recent studies demonstrate that both soluble PS and PS-containing model membranes promote formation of inactive fXa dimers at 5 mM Ca²⁺. In the present study, we show how competition between fXa dimerization and prothrombinase formation depends on Ca²⁺ and lipid membrane concentrations. We used homo-FRET measurements between fluorescein-E-G-R-chloromethylketone (CK)-Xa [fXa irreversibly inactivated by alkylation of the active site histidine residue with FEGR (FEGR-fXa)] and prothrombinase activity measurements to reveal the balance between fXa dimer formation and fXa-fVa complex formation. Changes in FEGR-fXa dimer homo-FRET with addition of fVa to model-membrane-bound FEGR-fXa unambiguously demonstrated that formation of the FEGR-fXa-fVa complex dissociated the dimer. Quantitative global analysis according to a model for protein interaction equilibria on a surface provided an estimate of a surface constant for fXa dimer dissociation (K(fXa×fXa)(d, σ)) approximately 10-fold lower than K(fXa×fVa)(d,σ) for fXa-fVa complex. Experiments performed using activated platelet-derived microparticles (MPs) showed that competition between fXa dimerization and fXa-fVa complex formation was even more prominent on MPs. In summary, at Ca²⁺ concentrations found in the maturing platelet plug (2-5 mM), fVa can compete fXa off of inactive fXa dimers to significantly amplify thrombin production, both because it releases dimer inhibition and because of its well-known cofactor activity. This suggests a hitherto unanticipated mechanism by which PS-exposing platelet membranes can regulate amplification and propagation of blood coagulation. PMID:25572019

  17. FRET studies with Factor X mutants provide insight into the topography of the membrane-bound Factor X/Xa

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shabir H.; Yang, Likui; Yegneswaran, Subramanian; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2007-01-01

    FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) studies have shown that the vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases bind to membrane surfaces perpendicularly, positioning their active sites above the membrane surfaces. To investigate whether EGF (epidermal growth factor) domains of these proteases play a spacer function in this model of the membrane interaction, we used FRET to measure the distance between the donor fluorescein dye in the active sites of Fl–FPR (fluorescein–D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethane)-inhibited fXa (activated Factor Xa) and its N-terminal EGF deletion mutant (fXa-desEGF1), and the acceptor OR (octadecylrhodamine) dye incorporated into phospholipid vesicles composed of 80% phosphatidylcholine and 20% phosphatidylserine. The average distance of closest approach (L) between fluorescein in the active site and OR at the vesicle surface was determined to be 56±1 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) and 63±1 Å for fXa-desEGF1 compared with 72±2 Å and 75±1 Å for fXa, in the absence and presence of fVa (activated Factor V) respectively, assuming κ2=2/3. In comparison, an L value of 95±6 Å was obtained for a S195C mutant of fXa in the absence of fVa in which fluorescein was attached directly to Cys195 of fXa. These results suggest that (i) EGF1 plays a spacer function in holding the active site of fXa above the membrane surface, (ii) the average distance between fluorescein attached to Fl–FPR in the active site of fXa and OR at the vesicle surface may not reflect the actual distance of the active-site residue relative to the membrane surface, and (iii) fVa alters the orientation and/or the height of residue 195 above the membrane surface. PMID:17635109

  18. Reversal Strategies for Intracranial Hemorrhages in Patients Taking Oral Factor Xa Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karli, Betsy; Bartel, Billie; Pavelko, Rachel

    2015-07-01

    Factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors are becoming more common in clinical practice due to a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, limited data are currently available on the safe and efficacious reversal of these agents. This series presents 3 patient cases of intracranial hemorrhage and illustrates the observed effect of different methodologies undertaken in an attempt to reverse the fXa inhibitors implicated. Additionally, a brief review of the current available literature in reversal strategies is provided. The appropriate reversal for fXa inhibitors at this time is unknown. The cases described indicate that the administration of fresh frozen plasma and 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate may provide minimal benefit in reversing the coagulation abnormalities caused by fXa inhibitors. However, in a life-threatening situation, the addition of these agents should be considered to prevent further progression of the bleed. PMID:26448667

  19. Reversal Strategies for Intracranial Hemorrhages in Patients Taking Oral Factor Xa Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Billie; Pavelko, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors are becoming more common in clinical practice due to a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, limited data are currently available on the safe and efficacious reversal of these agents. This series presents 3 patient cases of intracranial hemorrhage and illustrates the observed effect of different methodologies undertaken in an attempt to reverse the fXa inhibitors implicated. Additionally, a brief review of the current available literature in reversal strategies is provided. The appropriate reversal for fXa inhibitors at this time is unknown. The cases described indicate that the administration of fresh frozen plasma and 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate may provide minimal benefit in reversing the coagulation abnormalities caused by fXa inhibitors. However, in a life-threatening situation, the addition of these agents should be considered to prevent further progression of the bleed. PMID:26448667

  20. Evaluation of Factor Xa-Specific Chromogenic Substrate Assays and the Determination of Pharmacokinetics of Fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Yuri, Maiko; Tabe, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Aoki, Jun; Horii, Takashi; Iba, Toshiaki; Ohsaka, Akimichi

    2016-07-01

    Fondaparinux (FPX), a synthesized factor Xa inhibitor, is one of the most popular anticoagulants for the prevention of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although routine monitoring is not required, the bleeding adverse events cannot be neglected, and the measurement of anti-Xa activity is expected to be monitored. The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate the performances of 2 chromogenic assays for the detection of anti-Xa activity. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of FPX was examined using chromogenic assays. Anti-Xa activity was measured using 2 FPX-based chromogenic substrates (S2222 and STA-Liquid Anti-Xa). The reproducibility, detection limits, linearity, and correlations between the substrates were examined using normal plasma doped with low and high concentrations of FPX formulation. In addition, anti-Xa activity in 235 clinical samples from 164 cases treated was measured, and the pharmacokinetics of FPX was evaluated. Both of the tested substrates were capable of accurately measuring the anti-Xa activity of FPX, with a lower limit of 0.05 μg/mL and a coefficient of variation of less than 10%. The repeated administration of FPX induced a gradual but significant increase in the anti-Xa activity, which was negatively correlated with body weight and estimated glomerular filtration rate. No significant correlation between the anti-Xa activity and the occurrence of postoperative VTE or bleeding event was observed. Anti-Xa activity can be successfully determined using 2 chromogenic assays and automated biochemical analyzers. The clinical significance of anti-Xa activity monitoring should be examined in the future study. PMID:26177660

  1. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  2. Effects of water soluble phosphotidylserine on bovine factor Xa: functional and structural changes plus dimerization.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Wang, Jianfang; Lentz, Barry R

    2003-02-01

    Previous work has shown that two molecules of a soluble form of phosphatidylserine, C6PS, bind to human and bovine factor X(a). Activity measurements along with the fluorescence of active-site-labeled human factor X(a) showed that two linked sites specifically regulate the active site conformation and proteolytic activity of the human enzyme. These results imply, but cannot demonstrate, a C6PS-induced factor X(a) conformational change. The purpose of this paper is to extend these observations to bovine factor X(a) and to demonstrate that they do reflect conformational changes. We report that the fluorescence of active-site-labeled bovine factor X(a) also varied with C6PS concentration in a sigmoidal manner, whereas amidolytic activity of unlabeled enzyme varied in a simple hyperbolic fashion, also as seen for human factor X(a). C6PS induced a 70-fold increase in bovine factor X(a)'s autolytic activity, consistent with the 60-fold increase in proteolytic activity reported for human factor X(a). In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that C6PS binding to bovine factor X(a) induces secondary structural changes. In addition, C6PS binding to the tighter of the two sites triggered structural changes that lead to Ca(2+)-dependent dimer formation, as demonstrated by changes in intrinsic fluorescence and quantitative native gel electrophoresis. Dimerization produced further change in secondary structure, either inter- or intramolecularly. These results, along with results presented previously, support a model in which C6PS binds in a roughly sequential fashion to two linked sites whose occupancy in both human and bovine factor X(a) elicits different structural and functional responses. PMID:12547804

  3. A Novel Factor Xa-Inhibiting Peptide from Centipedes Venom.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yi; Shao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Ming, Xin; Wang, Jin-Bin; Li, Zhi-Yu; Wei, Ji-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have been used as traditional medicine for thousands of years in China. Centipede venoms consist of many biochemical peptides and proteins. Factor Xa (FXa) is a serine endopeptidase that plays the key role in blood coagulation, and has been used as a new target for anti-thrombotic drug development. A novel FXa inhibitor, a natural peptide with the sequence of Thr-Asn-Gly-Tyr-Thr (TNGYT), was isolated from the venom of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using a combination of size-exclusion and reverse-phase chromatography. The molecular weight of the TNGYT peptide was 554.3 Da measured by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence of TNGYT was determined by Edman degradation. TNGYT inhibited the activity of FXa in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 41.14 mg/ml. It prolonged the partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time in both in vitro and ex vivo assays. It also significantly prolonged whole blood clotting time and bleeding time in mice. This is the first report that an FXa inhibiting peptide was isolated from centipedes venom. PMID:24273471

  4. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    PubMed

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis. PMID:23993157

  5. Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Recommendations of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis and the French Study Group on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Sié, Pierre; Samama, Charles M; Godier, Anne; Rosencher, Nadia; Steib, Annick; Llau, Juan V; Van der Linden, Philippe; Pernod, Gilles; Lecompte, Thomas; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs)--inhibitors of thrombin or factor-Xa--are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. Patients receiving long-term treatment with DOAs are likely to be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Owing to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety regarding the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple standardized laboratory assays and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly between patients. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low haemorrhagic risk, a therapeutic window of 48 hours (last administration 24 hours before surgery, restart 24 hours after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination in all patients. Treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients at high thrombotic risk (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with a history of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin, if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In an emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific antihaemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa or prothrombin complex concentrates should not be given for prophylactic reversal due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:22152517

  6. Application of Molecular Modeling to Development of New Factor Xa Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, Vladimir B.; Gribkova, Irina V.; Kochugaeva, Maria P.; Katkova, Ekaterina V.; Sulimov, Alexey V.; Kutov, Danil C.; Shikhaliev, Khidmet S.; Medvedeva, Svetlana M.; Krysin, Michael Yu.; Sinauridze, Elena I.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.

    2015-01-01

    In consequence of the key role of factor Xa in the clotting cascade and absence of its activity in the processes that do not affect coagulation, this protein is an attractive target for development of new blood coagulation inhibitors. Factor Xa is more effective and convenient target for creation of anticoagulants than thrombin, inhibition of which may cause some side effects. This study is aimed at finding new inhibitors of factor Xa by molecular computer modeling including docking SOL and postdocking optimization DISCORE programs. After validation of molecular modeling methods on well-known factor Xa inhibitors the virtual screening of NCI Diversity and Voronezh State University databases of ready-made low molecular weight species has been carried out. Seventeen compounds selected on the basis of modeling results have been tested experimentally in vitro. It has been found that 12 of them showed activity against factor Xa (IC50 = 1.8–40 μM). Based on analysis of the results, the new original compound was synthesized and experimentally verified. It shows activity against factor Xa with IC50 value of 0.7 μM. PMID:26484350

  7. Identification of anthranilamide derivatives as potential factor Xa inhibitors: drug design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Junhao; Yang, Lingyun; Li, Hui; Li, Qing; Zhao, Leilei; Wang, Xinning; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Muxing; Zhou, Jinpei; Zhang, Huibin

    2015-05-01

    The coagulation enzyme factor Xa (fXa) plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation cascade. In this study, three-dimensional fragment based drug design (FBDD) combined with structure-based pharmacophore (SBP) model and structural consensus docking were employed to identify novel fXa inhibitors. After a multi-stage virtual screening (VS) workflow, two hit compounds 3780 and 319 having persistent high performance were identified. Then, these two hit compounds and several analogs were synthesized and screened for in-vitro inhibition of fXa. The experimental data showed that most of the designed compounds displayed significant in vitro potency against fXa. Among them, compound 9b displayed the greatest in vitro potency against fXa with the IC50 value of 23 nM and excellent selectivity versus thrombin (IC50 = 40 μM). Moreover, the prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) was measured for compound 9b to evaluate its in vitro anticoagulant activity. As a result, compound 9b exhibited pronounced anticoagulant activity with the 2 × PT value of 8.7 μM. PMID:25839438

  8. Reversal of oral factor Xa inhibitors by prothrombin complex concentrates: a re-appraisal.

    PubMed

    Dzik, W H

    2015-06-01

    Oral factor Xa inhibitors are an attractive class of anticoagulants expected to have broad application. Rapid and reliable reversal of the anticoagulant effect is important for patients with bleeding complications or those in need of urgent reversal for procedures. While no specific reversal agent is yet available, multiple published clinical guidelines suggest that four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) should be considered when urgent reversal is desired. This presentation updates prior reviews on this topic (Crit Care, 17, 2013, 230; Thromb Haemost, 111, 2014, 189; J Thromb Thrombolysis, 2015, 39, 395); and summarizes more recent evidence in human studies indicating that four-factor PCCs available in North America do not reverse oral factor Xa-inhibitor anticoagulants. New agents on the horizon appear to be far more promising as therapies for reversal or oral factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:26149022

  9. Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors: proposals of the working group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013.

    PubMed

    Pernod, Gilles; Albaladejo, Pierre; Godier, Anne; Samama, Charles M; Susen, Sophie; Gruel, Yves; Blais, Normand; Fontana, Pierre; Cohen, Ariel; Llau, Juan V; Rosencher, Nadia; Schved, Jean-François; de Maistre, Emmanuel; Samama, Meyer M; Mismetti, Patrick; Sié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Direct new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) - inhibitors of thrombin or factor Xa - are intended to be used largely in the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease or the prevention of systematic embolism in atrial fibrillation, instead of vitamin K antagonists. Like any anticoagulant treatment, they are associated with spontaneous or provoked haemorrhagic risk. Furthermore, a significant proportion of treated patients are likely to be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Given the absence of a specific antidote, the action to be taken in these situations must be defined. The lack of data means that it is only possible to issue proposals rather than recommendations, which will evolve according to accumulated experience. The proposals presented here apply to dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)); data for apixaban and edoxaban are still scarce. For urgent surgery with haemorrhagic risk, the drug plasma concentration should be less or equal to 30ng/mL for dabigatran and rivaroxaban should enable surgery associated with a high bleeding risk. Beyond that, if possible, the intervention should be postponed by monitoring the drug concentration. The course to follow is then defined according to the NOAC and its concentration. If the anticoagulant dosage is not immediately available, worse propositions, based on the usual tests (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time), are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or the risk of bleeding that depends on it. In case of serious bleeding in a critical organ, the effect of anticoagulant therapy should be reduced using a non-specific procoagulant drug as a first-line approach: activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) (FEIBA(®) 30-50U/kg) or non-activated PCC (50U/kg). In addition, for any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of a procoagulant drug, which is potentially thrombogenic in these patients, is discussed according

  10. Synthesis of 3,4-diaminobenzoyl derivatives as factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiabin; Su, Guoqiang; Ren, Yu; Chen, Yang

    2015-08-28

    The coagulation factor Xa (FXa) plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent studies have shown that FXa is a particularly attractive target for the development of oral antithrombotic agents. In view of the excellent pharmaceutical properties of 1,2-phenylenediamine-based FXa inhibitors and the reported structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of FXa inhibitors, we designed and synthesized a series of 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-based FXa inhibitors. Intensive SAR studies on this new series led to the discovery of 3,4-dimethoxyl substituted compound 7b. 7b is a highly potent, selective, direct FXa inhibitor with excellent in vivo antithrombotic activity. PMID:26114810

  11. Oral factor Xa inhibitors for thromboprophylaxis in major orthopedic surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Pierfranceschi, Matteo Giorgi

    2009-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. Routine thromboprophylaxis has been the standard of care over the last 20 years. Currently available options for the prevention of VTE in major orthopedic surgery include low molecular weight heparins, vitamin K antagonists, and, more recently, the synthetic pentasaccharide fondaparinux. Although effective, all these drugs have several limitations and new oral antithrombotics offering predictable, effective and safe anticoagulation are strongly needed. This overview focuses on the most advanced oral direct inhibitors to factor Xa rivaroxaban, apixaban, LY517717 and YM150; specifically, the results of phase II and III studies and the designs of ongoing clinical trials in patients undergoing elective hip and knee replacement are reviewed. PMID:19696978

  12. Oral factor Xa inhibitors for venous thromboembolism prevention in major orthopedic surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Prisco, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, and routine thromboprophylaxis has been the standard of care over the last 20 years. Currently available options for the prevention of VTE in major orthopedic surgery include low-molecular-weight heparins, vitamin K antagonists and, more recently, the synthetic pentasaccharide fondaparinux. Although effective, these drugs have several limitations, and new oral antithrombotics offering predictable, effective and safe anticoagulation are strongly needed. This overview focuses on the most advanced oral direct inhibitors of factor Xa, rivaroxaban, apixaban, LY517717, YM150 and betrixaban. Specifically, the results of phase II and III studies and the designs of ongoing clinical trials in patients undergoing elective hip and knee replacement are reviewed. PMID:19996630

  13. Measuring Anti–Factor Xa Activity to Monitor Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin in Obesity: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Gregory; Ensom, Mary H H

    2015-01-01

    Background: The choice of whether to monitor anti–factor Xa (anti-Xa) activity in patients who are obese and who are receiving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) therapy is controversial. To the authors’ knowledge, no systematic review of monitoring of anti-Xa activity in such patients has been published to date. Objective: To systematically ascertain the utility of monitoring anti-Xa concentrations for LMWH therapy in obese patients. Data Sources: MEDLINE (1946 to September 2014), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Embase (1974 to September 2014), PubMed (1947 to September 2014), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to September 2014), and Scopus were searched using the terms obesity, morbid obesity, thrombosis, venous thrombosis, embolism, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, low-molecular weight heparin, enoxaparin, dalteparin, tinzaparin, anti-factor Xa, anti-factor Xa monitoring, anti-factor Xa activity, and anti-factor Xa assay. The reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed. Study Selection and Data Extraction: English-language studies describing obese patients treated with LMWH or reporting anti-Xa activity were reviewed using a 9-step decision-making algorithm to determine whether monitoring of LMWH therapy by means of anti-Xa activity in obesity is warranted. Studies published in abstract form were excluded. Data Synthesis: The analysis showed that anti-Xa concentrations are not strongly associated with thrombosis or hemorrhage. In clinical studies of LMWH for thromboprophylaxis in bariatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, general surgery, and medical patients, and for treatment of venous thrombo embolism and acute coronary syndrome, anti-Xa activity can be predicted from dose of LMWH and total body weight; no difference in clinical outcome was found between obese and non-obese participants. Conclusions: Routinely determining anti-Xa concentrations in obese patients to monitor the clinical effectiveness of LMWH is

  14. Coagulation factors X, Xa, and protein S as potent mitogens of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gasic, G P; Arenas, C P; Gasic, T B; Gasic, G J

    1992-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the rat carotid artery leave the quiescent state and proliferate after balloon catheter injury. The precise signals responsible for this SMC mitogenesis need to be elucidated. Although platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent SMC mitogen, is released from activated platelets, damaged endothelium, and macrophages, it cannot be solely responsible for this proliferation. In search of other SMC growth factors, we have examined several proteins of the coagulation cascade. At nanomolar concentrations, factors X, Xa, and protein S promote cultured rat aortic SMC mitosis. In contrast, factor IX is only weakly mitogenic, whereas factor VII and protein C fail to stimulate SMC division. Protein S, the most mitogenic of these coagulation cascade factors, stimulates DNA synthesis in cultured SMCs with a time course similar to that of PDGF-AA and without the delay observed for transforming growth factor beta. Antistasin and tick anticoagulant peptide, two specific factor Xa inhibitors, inhibit SMC mitogenesis due to Xa and protein S. Coagulation factors that possess mitogenic activity may contribute to intimal SMC proliferation after vascular injury as a result of angioplasty or vascular compromise during atherogenesis. Images PMID:1532256

  15. Inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa by Fucus evanescens fucoidan and its modified analogs.

    PubMed

    Lapikova, E S; Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Makarov, V A; Zvyagintseva, T N; Shevchenko, N M; Bakunina, I U; Besednova, N N; Kuznetsova, T A

    2008-09-01

    Specimens of fucoidan extracted from Fucus evanescens were purified from protein and polyphenols, deacetylated and depolymerized by fucoidanase for evaluation of their biological activity. Deacetylation did not modify the capacity of fucoidan to inhibit thrombin and factor Xa, while purification from protein and polyphenols reduced this capacity. Depolymerization of fucoidan increased its capacity to inhibit thrombin mainly through heparin cofactor II. All the studied specimens formed complexes with protamine sulfate. PMID:19240852

  16. Pharmacophore identification, in silico screening, and virtual library design for inhibitors of the human factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Krovat, Eva M; Frühwirth, Karin H; Langer, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Factor Xa inhibitors are innovative anticoagulant agents that provide a better safety/efficacy profile compared to other anticoagulative drugs. A chemical feature-based modeling approach was applied to identify crucial pharmacophore patterns from 3D crystal structures of inhibitors bound to human factor Xa (Pdb entries 1fjs, 1kns, 1eqz) using the software LIGANDSCOUT and CATALYST. The complex structures were selected regarding the criteria of high inhibitory potency (i.e. all ligands show K(i) values against factor Xa in the subnanomolar range) and good resolution (i.e. at least 2.2 A) in order to generate selective and high quality pharmacophore models. The resulting chemical-feature based hypotheses were used for virtual screening of commercial molecular databases such as the WDI database. Furthermore, a ligand-based molecular modeling approach was performed to obtain common-feature hypotheses that represent the relevant chemical interactions between 10 bioactive factor Xa inhibitors and the protein, respectively. In a next step a virtual combinatorial library was designed in order to generate new compounds with similar chemical and spatial properties as known inhibitors. The software tool ILIB DIVERSE was used for this procedure in order to provide new scaffolds of this group of anticoagulants. Finally we present the combination of these two techniques, hence virtual screening was performed with selective pharmacophore models in a focused virtual combinatorial database. De novo derived molecular scaffolds that were able to adequately satisfy the pharmacophore criteria are revealed and are promising templates for candidates for further development. PMID:15667140

  17. Contemporary developments in the discovery of selective factor Xa inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirav R; Patel, Dushyant V; Murumkar, Prashant R; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2016-10-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death in cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the industrialized world. Venous thromboembolism is observed in about 1 million people every year in United States causing significant morbidity and mortality. Conventional antithrombotic therapy has been reported to have several disadvantages and limitations like inconvenience in oral administration, bleeding risks (heparin analogs), narrow therapeutic window and undesirable interactions with food and drugs (vitamin K antagonist-warfarin). The unmet medical demand for orally active safe anticoagulants has generated widespread interest among the medicinal chemists engaged in this field. To modulate blood coagulation, various enzymes involved in the coagulation process have received great attention as potential targets by various research groups for the development of oral anticoagulants. Among these enzymes, factor Xa (FXa) has remained the centre of attention in the last decade. Intensive research efforts have been made by various research groups for the development of small, safe and orally bioavailable FXa inhibitors. This review is an attempt to compile the research work of various researchers in the direction of development of FXa inhibitors reported since 2010 onward. PMID:27322757

  18. Phosphatidylserine-induced Factor Xa Dimerization and Binding to Factor Va Are Competing Processes in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R.; Lentz, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (Kd ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na+ binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20 and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca2+ to show that the apparent Kd of FVa-FXa interaction increased with increasing FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca2+, but the Kd was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca2+. A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa ·Va heterodimers but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both reduced dimerization (Kd~147 nM) and reduced FVa binding (apparent Kd, = 58, 92 and 128 nM, respectively for 5, 20 and 50 nM R165A FXa). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGFNC fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS and 5 mM Ca2+. Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically. PMID:23214401

  19. Structure-based drug design of pyrrolidine-1, 2-dicarboxamides as a novel series of orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Van Huis, Chad A; Bigge, Christopher F; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Cody, Wayne L; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Heemstra, Ronald J; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; Schaum, Robert P; Zhang, Erli; Bryant, John W; Haarer, Staci; Janiczek, Nancy; Leadley, Robert J; McClanahan, Thomas; Thomas Peterson, J; Welch, Kathleen M; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-06-01

    A novel series of pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides was discovered as factor Xa inhibitors using structure-based drug design. This series consisted of a neutral 4-chlorophenylurea P1, a biphenylsulfonamide P4 and a D-proline scaffold (1, IC(50) = 18 nM). Optimization of the initial hit resulted in an orally bioavailable, subnanomolar inhibitor of factor Xa (13, IC(50) = 0.38 nM), which was shown to be efficacious in a canine electrolytic model of thrombosis with minimal bleeding. PMID:17581239

  20. [Successful treatment of venous thromboembolism with a Factor Xa inhibitor, edoxaban, in patients with lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masato; Uchimura, Norio; Okuda, Yuko; Konuma, Satomi; Nehashi, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    Two multiple myeloma (MM) patients developed venous thromboembolism (VTE) while being treated with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. Aspirin is recommended for VTE prophylaxis when using lenalidomide/dexamethasone for MM patients with a standard risk of VTE. Despite aspirin administration, however, these two patients experienced VTE. Following VTE development, warfarin and then a Factor Xa inhibitor, edoxaban, were administered. The edoxaban treatment, especially, resulted in favorable and effective control of VTE. Considering these observations, Factor Xa inhibitors may in future become a preferred option for prevention and treatment of VTE when managing MM patients. PMID:26345573

  1. Oral anticoagulation with Factor Xa and thrombin inhibitors: Is there an alternative to warfarin?

    PubMed

    Zikria, Jennifer; Ansell, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA), such as warfarin, have been the only available oral anticoagulants despite their many limitations. The greatest medical need is to find a replacement for warfarin for long-term therapy, particularly for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Emerging oral anticoagulants are free from many of warfarin's drawbacks and may offer a convenient alternative. Drugs in advanced development target factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban) or thrombin (dabigatran etexilate). Recently, the RE-LY phase III study found dabigatran etexilate was an effective and convenient alternative to warfarin in stroke prevention for AF patients. Within the next two years, similar studies comparing rivaroxaban and apixaban versus warfarin in AF patients will become available. This paper reviews warfarin's limitations, discusses the pharmacokinetics of emerging anticoagulants in advanced development, and summarizes trials with an emphasis on head-to-head studies comparing novel anticoagulants to warfarin. PMID:20040270

  2. The Anti-Factor Xa Range For Low Molecular Weight Heparin Thromboprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Salena M.

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are now the mainstay option in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. In some patients receiving therapeutic doses of LMWH, activity can be measured by quantifying the presence of Anti-factor Xa (AFXa) for dose adjustment. However, currently there are no guidelines for LMWH monitoring in patients on thromboprophylactic, doses, despite certain patient populations may be at risk of suboptimal dosing. This review found that while the AFXa ranges for therapeutic levels of LMWHs are relatively well defined in the literature, prophylactic ranges are much less clear, thus making it difficult to interpret current research data. From the studies published to date, we concluded that a reasonable AFXa target range for LMWH deep venous thromboses prophylaxis might be 0.2-0.5 IU/mL. PMID:26733269

  3. Structure-activity relationships of anthranilamide-based factor Xa inhibitors containing piperidinone and pyridinone P4 moieties.

    PubMed

    Corte, James R; Fang, Tianan; Pinto, Donald J P; Han, Wei; Hu, Zilun; Jiang, Xiang-Jun; Li, Yun-Long; Gauuan, Jolicia F; Hadden, Mark; Orton, Darren; Rendina, Alan R; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wong, Pancras C; He, Kan; Morin, Paul E; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cheney, Daniel L; Knabb, Robert M; Wexler, Ruth R; Lam, Patrick Y S

    2008-05-01

    Introduction of the phenyl piperidinone and phenyl pyridinone P4 moieties in the anthranilamide scaffold led to potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitors of factor Xa. Anthranilamide 28 displayed comparable efficacy to apixaban in the rabbit arteriovenous-shunt (AV) thrombosis model. PMID:18424044

  4. Cooperative Regulation of the Activity of Factor Xa within Prothrombinase by Discrete Amino Acid Regions from Factor Va Heavy Chain†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The prothrombinase complex catalyzes the activation of prothrombin to α-thrombin. We have repetitively shown that amino acid region 695DYDY698 from the COOH terminus of the heavy chain of factor Va regulates the rate of cleavage of prothrombin at Arg271 by prothrombinase. We have also recently demonstrated that amino acid region 334DY335 is required for the optimal activity of prothrombinase. To assess the effect of these six amino acid residues on cofactor activity, we created recombinant factor Va molecules combining mutations at amino acid regions 334–335 and 695−698 as follows: factor V3K (334DY335 → KF and 695DYDY698 → KFKF), factor VKF/4A (334DY335 → KF and 695DYDY698 → AAAA), and factor V6A (334DY335 → AA and 695DYDY698 → AAAA). The recombinant factor V molecules were expressed and purified to homogeneity. Factor Va3K, factor VaK4/4A, and factor Va6A had reduced affinity for factor Xa, when compared to the affinity of the wild-type molecule (factor VaWt) for the enzyme. Prothrombinase assembled with saturating concentrations of factor Va3K had a 6-fold reduced second-order rate constant for prothrombin activation compared to the value obtained with prothrombinase assembled with factor VaWt, while prothrombinase assembled with saturating concentrations of factor VaKF/4A and factor Va6A had approximately 1.5-fold reduced second-order rate constants. Overall, the data demonstrate that amino acid region 334–335 together with amino acid region 695−698 from factor Va heavy chain are part of a cooperative mechanism within prothrombinase regulating cleavage and activation of prothrombin by factor Xa. PMID:18991406

  5. Contribution of Amino Acid Region 659−663 of Factor Va Heavy Chain to the Activity of Factor Xa within Prothrombinase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Factor Va, the cofactor of prothrombinase, is composed of heavy and light chains associated noncovalently in the presence of divalent metal ions. The COOH-terminal region of the heavy chain contains acidic amino acid clusters that are important for cofactor activity. In this work, we have investigated the role of amino acid region 659−663, which contains five consecutive acidic amino acid residues, by site-directed mutagenesis. We have generated factor V molecules in which all residues were mutated to either lysine (factor V5K) or alanine (factor V5A). We have also constructed a mutant molecule with this region deleted (factor VΔ659−663). The recombinant molecules along with wild-type factor V (factor VWT) were transiently expressed in mammalian cells, purified, and assessed for cofactor activity. Two-stage clotting assays revealed that the mutant molecules had reduced clotting activities compared to that of factor VaWT. Kinetic analyses of prothrombinase assembled with the mutant molecules demonstrated diminished kcat values, while the affinity of all mutant molecules for factor Xa was similar to that for factor VaWT. Gel electrophoresis analyses of plasma-derived and recombinant mutant prothrombin activation demonstrated delayed cleavage of prothrombin at both Arg320 and Arg271 by prothrombinase assembled with the mutant molecules, resulting in meizothrombin lingering throughout the activation process. These results were confirmed after analysis of the cleavage of FPR-meizothrombin. Our findings provide new insights into the structural contribution of the acidic COOH-terminal region of factor Va heavy chain to factor Xa activity within prothrombinase and demonstrate that amino acid region 659−663 from the heavy chain of the cofactor contributes to the regulation of the rate of cleavage of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:20722419

  6. A novel microfluidic anti-factor Xa assay device for monitoring anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Leanne F.; Rainey, Paul; Castro-López, Vanessa; O'Donnell, James S.; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Millions of patients worldwide are receiving anticoagulant therapy to treat hypercoagulable diseases. While standard testing is still performed in the central laboratory, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are being developed due to the increasing number of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation and with a need for more personalized and targeted therapy. Many POC devices on the market focus on clot measurement, a technique which is limited in terms of variability, highlighting the need for more reliable assays of anticoagulant status. The anti-Xa assay, a factor specific optical assay, was developed to measure the extent to which exogenous factor Xa (FXa) is inhibited by heparinantithrombin complexes. We have developed a novel microfluidic device and assay for monitoring the effect of heparin anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care. The assay which was also developed in our institute is based on the anti-Xa assay principle but uses fluorescence as the method of detection. Our device is a disposable laminate microfluidic strip, fabricated from the cyclic polyolefin (COP), Zeonor®, which is extremely suitable for application to fluorescent device platforms. We present data on the execution of the anti-Xa assay in this microfluidic format, demonstrating that the assay can be used to measure heparin in human plasma samples from 0 to 0.8 U/ml, with average assay reproducibility of 8% and a rapid result obtained within 60 seconds. Results indicate that with further development, the fluorogenic anti-Xa assay and device could become a successful method for monitoring anticoagulant therapy.

  7. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow. PMID:26874201

  8. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  9. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  10. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  11. Intron-exon organization of the human gene coding for the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor: The factor Xa dependent inhibitor of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    van der Logt, C.P.E.; Reitsma, P.H.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1991-02-12

    Blood coagulation can be initiated when factor VII(a) binds to its cofactor tissue factor. This factor VIIa/tissue factor complex proteolytically activates factors IX and X, which eventually leads to the formation of a fibrin clot. Plasma contains a lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor (LACI) which inhibits factor Xa directly and, in a Xa-dependent manner, also inhibits the factor VIIa/tissue factor complex. Here the authors report the cloning of the human LACI gene and the elucidation of its intron-exon organization. The LACI gene, which spans about 70 kb, consists of nine exons separated by eight introns. As has been found for other Kunitz-type protease inhibitors, the domain structure of human LACI is reflected in the intron-exon organization of the gene. The 5{prime} terminus of the LACI mRNA has been determined by primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping. The putative promoter was examined and found to contain two consensus sequences for AP-1 binding and one for NF-1 binding, but no TATA consensus promoter element.

  12. Identification of potent orally active factor Xa inhibitors based on conjugation strategy and application of predictable fragment recommender system.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Tsukasa; Koga, Yuji; Iwatsuki, Yoshiyuki; Hirayama, Fukushi

    2015-01-15

    Anticoagulant agents have emerged as a promising class of therapeutic drugs for the treatment and prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. We investigated a series of novel orally active factor Xa inhibitors designed using our previously reported conjugation strategy to boost oral anticoagulant effect. Structural optimization of anthranilamide derivative 3 as a lead compound with installation of phenolic hydroxyl group and extensive exploration of the P1 binding element led to the identification of 5-chloro-N-(5-chloro-2-pyridyl)-3-hydroxy-2-{[4-(4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)benzoyl]amino}benzamide (33, AS1468240) as a potent factor Xa inhibitor with significant oral anticoagulant activity. We also reported a newly developed Free-Wilson-like fragment recommender system based on the integration of R-group decomposition with collaborative filtering for the structural optimization process. PMID:25523211

  13. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  14. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  15. Structure-guided creation of AcAP5-derived and platelet targeted factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Aihua; Shui, Mengyang; Li, Ruyi; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Wenhui; Wang, Yinye

    2015-06-15

    Anticoagulants and anti-platelet agents are simultaneously administrated in clinical practice (i.e. percutaneous coronary intervention), which cause significant risk of systemic bleeding. Targeted delivery of anticoagulants to the activated platelets at sites of vascular injuries may condense the site-specific anticoagulant effect and reduce the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. To this end, we prepared three ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5) variants NR1, NR2 and NR3 engineered with a platelet-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif and evaluated their anti-Factor Xa (FXa) and platelet-binding effects. These RGD-containing AcAP5 variants were capable of interacting with platelet receptor αIIbβ3 as shown in computational analysis. All variants, especially NR2 and NR3, retained entirely the anti-FXa function of parent AcAP5. Moreover, they prevented the formation of occlusive thrombi in rat carotid artery injury model, suggesting that they inhibit platelet aggregation in vivo. Further functional investigation of NR3 demonstrated that NR3 inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and FXa activity in vivo, and prolonged the coagulation time, all in a dose-dependent manner. Through flow cytometry assay, we confirmed the binding of NR3 to αIIbβ3 receptor. In mouse model of carotid artery endothelium injury, NR3-treated mice showed less tail bleeding time than AcAP5-treated mice, and aspirin plus NR3 treatment exhibited moderate reduction of blood loss compared with aspirin plus AcAP5 treatment. These results indicate the feasibility to engineer a novel FXa inhibitor specifically targeting the activated platelets, which centralizes its anticoagulation efficacy in the injured vascular endothelium and reduces the risk of systemic bleeding. PMID:25887920

  16. Hemostatic agents of broad applicability produced by selective tuning of factor Xa zymogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Camire, Rodney M

    2015-07-01

    There is a clinical need to develop safe therapeutic strategies to mitigate bleeding. Previously, we found that a novel zymogen-like factor Xa variant (FXa-I16L) was effective in correcting the coagulation defect in hemophilic mice. Here we expand the mutational framework to tune the FX(a) zymogen-like state. Alteration of FXa zymogenicity yields variants (V17M, I16L, I16M, V17T, V17S, and I16T) with a wide range (≤1000-fold) of reduced function toward physiologic substrates and inhibitors. The extent of zymogen-like character, including resistance to antithrombin III, correlates well with plasma half-life (<2 minutes to >4 hours). Importantly, biologic function, including that of the most zymogen-like variant (FXa-I16T), was greatly enhanced when bound to FVa membranes. This resulted in improvement of clotting times and thrombin generation in hemophilic plasma. The FXa variants were remarkably effective in mouse injury models. In these systems, the data show that the more active the protease, the more difficult it is to overcome the protective mechanism of circulating inhibitors to achieve a therapeutic benefit. Depending on the treatment situation, the more zymogen-like variants (V17S and I16T) were most useful when given before injury whereas variants exhibiting greater activity but shorter half-lives (I16L and I16M) were most effective when administered after injury. This new class of FXa variants provides a useful and flexible platform for selectively bioengineering biologic function and half-life to target different clinical bleeding scenarios. PMID:25896653

  17. Effect of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban on arterial thrombosis in wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nana-Maria; Dressel, Tobias; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-11-01

    Rivaroxaban is a potent and specific direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Recent studies have highlighted its effectiveness in the prevention of venous thrombosis and embolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. To evaluate the antithrombotic effects of rivaroxaban in an in vivo model of arterial thrombosis, photochemical vascular injury was induced in wild-type mice by intravenous rose bengal (50 mg/kg body weight [BW]) followed by illumination of the left common carotid artery using a 543 nm helium-neon laser beam. Rivaroxaban, injected concomitantly with rose bengal at doses of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg BW, dose-dependently prolonged the times to first thrombotic occlusion and stable thrombosis. Quantitative analysis of carotid flow curves revealed higher blood volumes passing through the injured artery with increasing rivaroxaban doses (P<0.01 and P<0.001 vs. vehicle for 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg , respectively), suggesting a dose-dependent effect on vascular patency. Consistently, a significantly higher proportion of mice that received 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban exhibited patent carotid arteries at the end of the flow monitoring period compared to vehicle alone (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Histological analysis showed complete thrombotic arterial occlusion in vehicle-treated mice compared to less thrombotic material in mice injected with 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban (P<0.05). Rivaroxaban also prolonged the time to cessation of tail bleeding in a dose-dependent manner, starting at 1.5 mg/kg. Similar findings were obtained in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Rivaroxaban may exert beneficial effects by preventing arterial thrombosis and vascular occlusion after endothelial injury. PMID:22281071

  18. Coagulation factor Xa drives tumor cells into apoptosis through BH3-only protein Bim up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borensztajn, Keren S. . E-mail: K.S.Borensztajn@amc.uva.nl; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.; Brueggemann, Lois W.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2007-07-15

    Coagulation Factor (F)Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role during blood coagulation by converting prothrombin into active thrombin. Recently, however, it emerged that besides this role in coagulation, FXa induces intracellular signaling leading to different cellular effects. Here, we show that coagulation factor (F)Xa drives tumor cells of epithelial origin, but not endothelial cells or monocytes, into apoptosis, whereas it even enhances fibroblast survival. FXa signals through the protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to activate extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38. This activation is associated with phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, and in tumor cells with up-regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim, leading to caspase-3 cleavage, the main hallmark of apoptosis. Transfection of tumor cells with dominant negative forms of CREB or siRNA for either PAR-1, Bim, ERK1 and/or p38 inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of FXa. In fibroblasts, FXa-induced PAR-1 activation leads to down-regulation of Bim and pre-treatment with PAR-1 or Bim siRNA abolishes proliferation. We thus provide evidence that beyond its role in blood coagulation, FXa plays a key role in cellular processes in which Bim is the central player in determining cell survival.

  19. Ca2+ Switches the Effect of PS-containing Membranes on Factor Xa from Activating to Inhibiting: Implications for Initiation of Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Koklic, Tilen; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in cellular and organismal physiology. The Ca2+ ion has an intermediate protein-binding affinity, thus it can serve as an on/off switch in regulation of different biochemical processes. The serum level of ionized Ca2+ is regulated with normal ionized Ca2+ being in the range from 1.10 to 1.29 mM. Hypocalcaemia (free Ca2+ < 1.1mM) in critically ill patients is commonly accompanied by hemostatic abnormalities, ranging from isolated thrombocytopenia to complex defects such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, commonly thought to be due to insufficient functioning of anticoagulation pathways. A small amount of Factor Xa (fXa) produced by Factor VIIa and exposed tissue factor is key to initiating blood coagulation by producing enough thrombin to induce later stages of coagulation. FXa must bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to produce thrombin at a physiologically significant rate. In this work, we show that overall fXa activity on PS-containing membranes is sharply regulated by a “Ca2+ switch” centered at 1.16 mM, below which fXa is active and above which fXa forms inactive dimers on PS-exposing membranes. Our data lead to a mathematical model that predicts the variation of fXa activity as a function of both calcium and membrane concentrations. Because the critical Ca2+ concentration is at the lower end of the normal plasma ionized Ca2+ concentration range, we propose a new regulatory mechanism by which local Ca2+ concentration switches fXa from an intrinsically active form to a form requiring its cofactor (fVa) to achieve significant activity. PMID:24920080

  20. Daboxin P, a Major Phospholipase A2 Enzyme from the Indian Daboia russelii russelii Venom Targets Factor X and Factor Xa for Its Anticoagulant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janaki Krishnamurthy; Shih, Norrapat; Majumder, Munmi; Mattaparthi, Venkata Satish Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Doley, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a major protein has been purified from the venom of Indian Daboia russelii russelii using gel filtration, ion exchange and Rp-HPLC techniques. The purified protein, named daboxin P accounts for ~24% of the total protein of the crude venom and has a molecular mass of 13.597 kDa. It exhibits strong anticoagulant and phospholipase A2 activity but is devoid of any cytotoxic effect on the tested normal or cancerous cell lines. Its primary structure was deduced by N-terminal sequencing and chemical cleavage using Edman degradation and tandem mass spectrometry. It is composed of 121 amino acids with 14 cysteine residues and catalytically active His48 -Asp49 pair. The secondary structure of daboxin P constitutes 42.73% of α-helix and 12.36% of β-sheet. It is found to be stable at acidic (pH 3.0) and neutral pH (pH 7.0) and has a Tm value of 71.59 ± 0.46°C. Daboxin P exhibits anticoagulant effect under in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. It does not inhibit the catalytic activity of the serine proteases but inhibits the activation of factor X to factor Xa by the tenase complexes both in the presence and absence of phospholipids. It also inhibits the tenase complexes when active site residue (His48) was alkylated suggesting its non-enzymatic mode of anticoagulant activity. Moreover, it also inhibits prothrombinase complex when pre-incubated with factor Xa prior to factor Va addition. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy and affinity chromatography suggest the probable interaction of daboxin P with factor X and factor Xa. Molecular docking analysis reveals the interaction of the Ca+2 binding loop; helix C; anticoagulant region and C-terminal region of daboxin P with the heavy chain of factor Xa. This is the first report of a phospholipase A2 enzyme from Indian viper venom which targets both factor X and factor Xa for its anticoagulant activity. PMID:27089306

  1. Selective inhibition of factor Xa during thrombolytic therapy markedly improves coronary artery patency in a canine model of coronary thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, F A; Lee, P; Malycky, J L; Lefkovits, J; Kottke-Marchant, K; Plow, E F; Topol, E J

    1996-01-01

    The success of current thrombolytic strategies is undermined by ongoing thrombin activity, but it is uncertain whether prevention of thrombin generation or direct thrombin antagonism is effective in achieving more optimal thrombolysis. To address this question, 24 dogs with electrically induced coronary thrombus undergoing thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator (1 mg/kg) over 20 min, were given one of the following adjunctive regimens in a random fashion. Twelve dogs received saline, and served as the control group; a direct thrombin antagonist, hirudin, was given at a dose of 20 micrograms/kg/min for 90 min to six dogs, and a selective factor Xa inhibitor, tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP), was administered to six dogs at a dose of 30 micrograms/kg/min for 90 min. The time to reperfusion was similar in the saline and hirudin groups (34 +/- 4 vs 37 +/- 7 min; P = NS) but shorter in the TAP group (21 +/- 4 min; P < 0.05). Coronary blood flow was restored to 100% of its baseline value for 7 +/- 2 min in control dogs, and for 20 +/- 6 min in the hirudin group (P < 0.05). In the TAP group, coronary blood flow was restored to 100% of its baseline value for more than 120 min in all dogs (P < 0.01 vs others treatments). Reocclusion occurred in 89% and 50% of dogs receiving saline and hirudin, respectively (P = NS), but in none of the TAP-treated dogs (P < 0.01). Plasma fibrinopeptide A (FpA) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) levels were determined in all dogs as indicators of thrombin activation. In the saline group, FpA and TAT during reperfusion were 19 +/- 2 ng/ml and 104 +/- 24 ng/ml respectively (P < 0.02 vs baseline) indicating high thrombin activity. In contrast, during reperfusion in hirudin-treated dogs FpA and TAT remained similar to baseline (10 +/- 3 ng/ml and 53 +/- 4 ng/ml respectively; both P < 0.05 vs saline). Reperfusion in TAP-treated dogs did not alter FpA and TAT in plasma, which remained similar to baseline (9 +/- 1 ng/ml and 39

  2. Reproducibility of the anti-Factor Xa and anti-Factor IIa assays applied to enoxaparin solution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Céline; Savadogo, Adama; Agut, Christophe; Anger, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Enoxaparin is a widely used subcutaneously administered antithrombotic agent comprising a complex mixture of glycosaminoglycan chains. Owing to this complexity, its antithrombotic potency cannot be defined by physicochemical methods and is therefore evaluated using an enzymatic assay of anti-Xa and anti-IIa activity. Maintaining consistent anti-Xa activity in the final medicinal product allows physicians to ensure administration of the appropriate dosage to their patients. Bioassays are usually complex and display poorer reproducibility than physicochemical tests such as HPLC assays. Here, we describe the implementation of a common robotic platform and standard release potency testing procedures for enoxaparin sodium injection (Lovenox, Sanofi, Paris, France) products at seven quality control sites within Sanofi. Qualification and analytical procedures, as well as data handling, were optimized and harmonized to improve assay reproducibility. An inter-laboratory study was performed in routine-release conditions. The coefficients of variation for repeatability and reproducibility in assessments of anti-Xa activity were 1.0% and 1.2%, respectively. The tolerance interval in reproducibility precision conditions, expressed as percentage potency, was 96.8-103.2% of the drug product target of 10,000 IU/ml, comparing favorably with the United States of America Pharmacopeia specification (90-110%). The maximum difference between assays in two different laboratories is expected to be 4.1%. The reproducibility characteristics of anti-IIa activity assessments were found to be similar. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the standardization process established and allow for further improvements to quality control in Lovenox manufacture. This process guarantees closeness between actual and target potencies, as exemplified by the results of release assays obtained during a three-year period. PMID:23644908

  3. Small Peptides Blocking Inhibition of Factor Xa and Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa by Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)*

    PubMed Central

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M. Christella L. G. D.; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nm). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nm) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nm). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  4. Correction of the coagulation defect in hemophilia using a factor Xa variant with novel engineered protease function

    PubMed Central

    Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Toso, Raffaella; Margaritis, Paris; Pavani, Giulia; Kim, Haein; Schlachterman, Alexander; Liu, Jian-Hua; Clerin, Valerie; Pittman, Debra D.; Rose-Miranda, Rosalind; Shields, Kathleen M.; Erbe, David V.; Tobin, James F.; Arruda, Valder R.; Camire, Rodney M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective therapies are needed to control excessive bleeding in a range of clinical conditions. We describe a surprisingly useful approach to improve hemostasis in vivo using a variant of coagulation factor Xa (FXaI16L). This conformationally pliant derivative is partially inactive due to a defect in transitioning from zymogen to protease 1,2. Using mouse models of hemophilia, we show that FXaI16L has a prolonged half-life, relative to wild-type FXa and does not cause excessive activation of coagulation. Once clotting mechanisms are activated to produce its cofactor FVa, FXaI16L is driven to the protease state and restores hemostasis in hemophilic animals upon vascular injury. Moreover, using human or murine analogs, we show that FXaI16L is more efficacious than FVIIa which is used to treat bleeding in hemophilia inhibitor patients3. Because of its underlying mechanism of action, FXaI16L may provide an effective strategy to enhance blood clot formation and act as a rapid pan-hemostatic agent for the treatment of bleeding conditions. PMID:22020385

  5. Microfluidic Chip-Based Online Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry: Identification of Inhibitors of Thrombin and Factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janaki Krishnamoorthy; Otvos, Reka A; Kool, Jeroen; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa (FXa) are critical enzymes of the blood coagulation cascade and are excellent targets of anticoagulant agents. Natural sources present an array of anticoagulants that can be developed as antithrombotic drugs. High-resolution, online screening techniques have been developed for the identification of drug leads from complex mixtures. In this study, we have developed and optimized a microfluidic online screening technique coupled to nano-liquid chromatography (LC) and in parallel with a mass spectrometer for the identification of thrombin and FXa inhibitors in mixtures. Inhibitors eluting from the nano-LC were split postcolumn in a 1:1 ratio; half was fed into a mass spectrometer (where its mass is detected), and the other half was fed into a microfluidic chip (which acts as a microreactor for the online assays). With our platform, thrombin and FXa inhibitors were detected in the assay in parallel with their mass identification. These methods are suitable for the identification of inhibitors from sample amounts as low as sub-microliter volumes. PMID:26323281

  6. Inhibition of coagulation activation and inflammation by a novel Factor Xa inhibitor synthesized from the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Joo, Seong Soo; Won, Tae Joon; Kim, Jong Sung; Yoo, Yeong Min; Tak, Eun Sik; Park, So-Young; Park, Hee Yong; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Park, Soon Cheol; Lee, Do Ik

    2009-02-01

    We have cloned an earthworm-derived Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, with an excellent inhibitory specificity from the midgut of the Eisenia andrei. We designate this inhibitor eisenstasin. An eisenstasin-derived small peptide (ESP) was synthesized and we examined whether ESP played an essential role in FXa inhibition. Compared to antistasin-derived small peptides (ASP) originating from leech, ESP primarily exhibited a high level of FXa inhibition in chromogenic peptide substrate assays and revealed an approximately 2-fold greater inhibition of FXa cleavage of a target protein than ASP. This suggests that ESP could be an effective anti-coagulant that targets FXa during the propagation step of coagulation. ESP also inhibited proteinase-activated receptor 2-mediated FXa activation, which may trigger endothelial inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) was significantly reduced by ESP (p<0.0001), indicating that protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) was effectively inactivated. We also found that ESP reduced the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-16, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta) by cultured cells treated with both ESP and FXa. Our results provide the first evidence that ESP might interrupt coagulation cascades by inhibiting FXa, and thereby may effectively control the bidirectional alternation between coagulation and inflammation. PMID:19182385

  7. Edoxaban: A Novel Factor Xa Inhibitor for the Management of Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation and Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kubli, Kara A; Snead, Jessica A; Cheng-Lai, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin has been a highly prevalent agent for over 70 years; however, its use has been limited by drug-drug interactions, adverse events, and the need for frequent monitoring. To minimize these complications, several non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants have been approved, including the latest agent, edoxaban. Edoxaban is a factor Xa inhibitor approved for the prevention of stroke/systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Edoxaban was largely studied in the Edoxaban versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48) and Edoxaban versus Warfarin for the Treatment of Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism (Hokusai-VTE) trials, both showing noninferiority when compared with warfarin. Similar to other oral anticoagulants, the most serious adverse effects of edoxaban are related to bleeding. However, there are currently no approved reversal agents. Andexanet alfa and ciraparantag are the latest agents being studied for reversal. This article provides an overview of the safety and efficacy along with the advantages and disadvantages of edoxaban. PMID:26991962

  8. Exploration of 4,4-disubstituted pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides as potent, orally active Factor Xa inhibitors with extended duration of action.

    PubMed

    Van Huis, Chad A; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Bigge, Christopher F; Cody, Wayne L; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Heemstra, Ronald J; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Leadley, Robert J; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; McClanahan, Thomas; Mochalkin, Igor; Pamment, Michael; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Schaum, Robert P; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2009-03-15

    Aiming to improve upon previously disclosed Factor Xa inhibitors, a series of 4,4-disubstituted pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides were explored with the intent of increasing the projected human half-life versus 5 (projected human t(1/2)=6 h). A stereospecific route to compounds containing a 4-aryl-4-hydroxypyrrolidine scaffold was developed, resulting in several compounds that demonstrated an increase in the half-life as well as an increase in the in vitro potency compared to 5. Reported herein is the discovery of 26, containing a (2R,4S)-4-hydroxy-4-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine scaffold, which is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious Factor Xa inhibitor that appears suitable for a once-daily dosing (projected human t(1/2)=23 h). PMID:19231206

  9. Enhanced endogenous thrombolysis induced by a specific factor Xa inhibitor, DX-9065a, evaluated in a rat arterial thrombolysis model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masaru; Onobayashi, Yuko; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Giddings, John C; Yamamoto, Junichiro

    2002-04-15

    We have previously established an animal model to investigate mechanisms of arterial thrombolysis in vivo and have demonstrated that endogenous thrombolysis, mediated by thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, is enhanced by administration of specific thrombin inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a synthetic and specific factor Xa inhibitor, DX-9065a, on endogenous fibrinolysis. Mural thrombi were formed in rat mesenteric arterioles by helium-neon laser irradiation in the presence of Evans blue. Thrombolysis was continuously monitored by video microscopy and was quantified using image analysis software. Oral and intravenous administration of DX-9065a enhanced endogenous thrombolysis in vivo. The mechanisms require additional investigation using other experimental systems, but nevertheless, the present results extended our previous findings and further suggested that the enhanced fibrinolysis might be due to depressed activity thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The synthetic factor Xa inhibitor could provide the basis for a useful thrombolytic agent. PMID:12182917

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Edoxaban, a Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant that Inhibits Clotting Factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Parasrampuria, Dolly A; Truitt, Kenneth E

    2016-06-01

    Edoxaban, a once daily non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant, is a direct, selective, reversible inhibitor of factor Xa (FXa). In healthy subjects, single oral doses of edoxaban result in peak plasma concentrations within 1.0-2.0 h of administration, followed by a biphasic decline. Exposure is approximately dose proportional for once daily doses of 15-150 mg. Edoxaban is predominantly absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract, and oral bioavailability is approximately 62 %. Food does not affect total exposure to edoxaban. The terminal elimination half-life in healthy subjects ranges from 10 to 14 h, with minimal accumulation upon repeat once daily dosing up to doses of 120 mg. The steady-state volume of distribution is approximately 107 L, and total clearance is approximately 22 L/h; renal clearance accounts for approximately 50 % of total clearance, while metabolism and biliary secretion account for the remaining 50 %. Intrinsic factors, such as age, sex and race, do not affect edoxaban pharmacokinetics after renal function is taken into account. Oral administration of edoxaban results in rapid changes in anticoagulatory biomarkers, with peak effects on anticoagulation markers (such as anti-FXa), the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time occurring within 1-2 h of dosing. PMID:26620048

  11. The antithrombotic effect of synthetic low molecular weight human factor Xa inhibitor, DX-9065a, on He-Ne laser-induced thrombosis in rat mesenteric microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Tsuji, T; Matsuoka, A; Giddings, J C; Yamamoto, J

    1997-01-01

    The effect of a synthetic low molecular weight factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, DX9065a, on thrombosis in vivo were examined in a rat animal model using a Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser method. DX-9065a administered either intravenously or orally promoted anti factor Xa activity in a dose dependent manner. Anti Xa activity was maximal immediately after intravenous injection and persisted for approximately 30 minutes. Inhibitory activity was maximal 15-30 minutes after oral administration and persisted for approximately 90 minutes. Similarly DX-9065a inhibited platelet-rich thrombosis formation in mesenteric arterioles and venules. In these instances inhibition was relatively transient after intravenous injection (10-20 minutes), but persisted for more than 3 hours after oral administration. The minimum effective doses of DX-9065a given intravenously and orally were 3.89 mg/kg and 25.9 mg/kg, respectively. The results confirmed that DX-9065a selectively modulates thrombotic mechanisms, and suggest that development of this synthetic FXa antagonist could constitute an effective intravenous and oral antithrombotic agent. PMID:8983124

  12. Prevention of arterial thrombosis by edoxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor in rats: monotherapy and in combination with antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuko; Kamisato, Chikako; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In addition to platelet aggregation, coagulation activation is considered to be involved in arterial thrombosis. In this study, we determined antithrombotic effects of edoxaban, an oral factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, as both a monotherapy and in combination with antiplatelet agents in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. We further examined its effects on a procoagulant biomarker and bleeding. Arterial thrombosis was induced by topical application of 15% ferric chloride to rat abdominal aortas. Bleeding time was measured by a tail incision method. Edoxaban, clopidogrel, and aspirin were orally administered 30min, 4h, and 2h before thrombus or bleeding induction. As a biomarker of coagulation activation, plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) was measured. Edoxaban dose-dependently prevented arterial thrombosis in a manner comparable to clopidogrel and aspirin. The combination of edoxaban plus clopidogrel or edoxaban plus aspirin significantly potentiated the antithrombotic effects compared with these drugs alone. The combination of edoxaban and clopidogrel was more potent than clopidogrel and aspirin. Plasma TAT concentration was elevated after thrombus induction and suppressed by edoxaban and clopidogrel, but not by aspirin, suggesting P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet procoagulant activity. Bleeding time was prolonged by the coadministration of edoxaban and clopidogrel, but not by edoxaban and aspirin. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the monotherapy with edoxaban and combination therapy with edoxaban plus clopidogrel or edoxaban plus aspirin are promising options for the prevention of arterial thrombosis as effective as the standard antiplatelet agents; however, a combination of edoxaban and clopidogrel increased the risk of bleeding. PMID:27288116

  13. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  14. SAR and X-ray Structures of Enantiopure 1,2-cis-(1R,2S)-cyclopentyldiamine and Cyclohexyldiamine Derivativies as Inhibitors of Coagulation Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao,J.; Chang, C.; Cheney, D.; Morin, D.; Wang, P.; King, G.; Wang, S.; Rendina, T.; Luettgen, A.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    In the search of Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors structurally different from the pyrazole-based series, we identified a viable series of enantiopure cis-(1R,2S)-cycloalkyldiamine derivatives as potent and selective inhibitors of FXa. Among them, cyclohexyldiamide 7 and cyclopentyldiamide 9 were the most potent neutral compounds, and had good anticoagulant activity comparable to the pyrazole-based analogs. Crystal structures of 7-FXa and 9-FXa illustrate binding similarities and differences between the five- and the six-membered core systems, and provide rationales for the observed SAR of P1 and linker moieties.

  15. Clinical Scenarios for Discordant Anti-Xa.

    PubMed

    Vera-Aguilera, Jesus; Yousef, Hindi; Beltran-Melgarejo, Diego; Teng, Teng Hugh; Jan, Ramos; Mok, Mary; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Xa test measures the activity of heparin against the activity of activated coagulation factor X; significant variability of anti-Xa levels in common clinical scenarios has been observed. Objective. To review the most common clinical settings in which anti-Xa results can be bias. Evidence Review. Guidelines and current literature search: we used PubMed, Medline, Embase, and MEDION, from 2000 to October 2013. Results. Anti-Xa test is widely used; however the assay underestimates heparin concentration in the presence of significant AT deficiency, pregnancy, end stage renal disease, and postthrombolysis and in patients with hyperbilirubinemia; limited published data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of anti-Xa assays for managing UH therapy is available. Conclusions and Relevance. To our knowledge this is the first paper that summarizes the most common causes in which this assay can be affected, several "day to day" clinical scenarios can modify the outcomes, and we concur that these rarely recognized scenarios can be affected by negative outcomes in the daily practice. PMID:27293440

  16. Clinical Scenarios for Discordant Anti-Xa

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Aguilera, Jesus; Yousef, Hindi; Beltran-Melgarejo, Diego; Teng, Teng Hugh; Jan, Ramos; Mok, Mary; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Xa test measures the activity of heparin against the activity of activated coagulation factor X; significant variability of anti-Xa levels in common clinical scenarios has been observed. Objective. To review the most common clinical settings in which anti-Xa results can be bias. Evidence Review. Guidelines and current literature search: we used PubMed, Medline, Embase, and MEDION, from 2000 to October 2013. Results. Anti-Xa test is widely used; however the assay underestimates heparin concentration in the presence of significant AT deficiency, pregnancy, end stage renal disease, and postthrombolysis and in patients with hyperbilirubinemia; limited published data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of anti-Xa assays for managing UH therapy is available. Conclusions and Relevance. To our knowledge this is the first paper that summarizes the most common causes in which this assay can be affected, several “day to day” clinical scenarios can modify the outcomes, and we concur that these rarely recognized scenarios can be affected by negative outcomes in the daily practice. PMID:27293440

  17. Conserved Amblyomma americanum tick Serpin19, an inhibitor of blood clotting factors Xa and XIa, trypsin and plasmin, has anti-haemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Tirloni, Lucas; Radulovic, Zeljko; Lewis, Lauren; Bakshi, Mariam; Hill, Creston; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Termignoni, Carlos; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Tick saliva serine protease inhibitors (serpins) facilitate tick blood meal feeding through inhibition of protease mediators of host defense pathways. We previously identified a highly conserved Amblyomma americanum serpin 19 that is characterised by its reactive center loop being 100% conserved in ixodid ticks. In this study, biochemical characterisation reveals that the ubiquitously transcribed A. americanum serpin 19 is an anti-coagulant protein, inhibiting the activity of five of the eight serine protease blood clotting factors. Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant (r) A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits the enzyme activity of trypsin, plasmin and blood clotting factors (f) Xa and XIa, with stoichiometry of inhibition estimated at 5.1, 9.4, 23.8 and 28, respectively. Similar to typical inhibitory serpins, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 forms irreversible complexes with trypsin, fXa and fXIa. At a higher molar excess of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19, fXIIa is inhibited by 82.5%, and thrombin (fIIa), fIXa, chymotrypsin and tryptase are inhibited moderately by 14-29%. In anti-hemostatic functional assays, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits thrombin but not ADP and cathepsin G activated platelet aggregation, delays clotting in recalcification and thrombin time assays by up to 250s, and up to 40s in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay. Given A. americanum serpin 19 high cross-tick species conservation, and specific reactivity of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 with antibodies to A. americanum tick saliva proteins, we conclude that recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 is a potential candidate for development of a universal tick vaccine. PMID:25957161

  18. Pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and mass balance of edoxaban, a selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in humans.

    PubMed

    Bathala, Mohinder S; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Oguma, Toshihiro; He, Ling; Lowrie, Chris; Mendell, Jeanne

    2012-12-01

    This study determined the mass balance and pharmacokinetics of edoxaban in humans after oral administration of [¹⁴C]edoxaban. After oral administration of 60 mg (as active moiety) of [¹⁴C]edoxaban to six healthy male subjects, serial blood/plasma and urinary and fecal samples were collected for up to 168 h postdose. All samples were analyzed for total radioactivity by liquid scintillation counting and for concentrations of edoxaban and four metabolites in plasma, urine, and fecal samples by either high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method using multiple reaction modes, or a liquid chromatography radiometric method. The mean recovery of radioactivity was >97% of the administered radioactive dose, with 62.2% eliminated in feces and 35.4% in urine. Unchanged edoxaban accounted for the majority of radioactivity, with 49.1 and 23.8% of the dose as parent observed in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged edoxaban was the most abundant species in plasma, with a mean area under the curve (AUC)(0-∞) of 1596 ng · h/ml. The next most abundant species was metabolite M4, with a mean AUC(0-∞) 147 ng · h/ml. The mass balance of edoxaban was well described, with unchanged edoxaban as the most abundant component of total radioactivity. Edoxaban is eliminated through multiple pathways, but each accounts for only a small amount of overall elimination. PMID:22936313

  19. The discovery of (2R,4R)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N- (2-fluoro-4-(2-oxopyridin-1(2H)-yl)phenyl)-4-methoxypyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamide (PD 0348292), an orally efficacious factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Bigge, Christopher F; Bryant, John W; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Chi, Liguo; Cody, Wayne L; Dahring, Tawny; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Haarer, Staci; Heemstra, Ron; Janiczek, Nancy; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; McClanahan, Thomas; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaisheli; Schaum, Robert; Van Huis, Chad A; Welch, Kathleen M; Zhang, Erli; Leadley, Robert J; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-08-01

    Herein, we report the discovery of novel, proline-based factor Xa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. Through the additional incorporation of 1-(4-amino-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-pyridin-2-one 22, as a P4 pharmacophore, we discovered compound 7 (PD 0348292). This compound is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious FXa inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders. PMID:17683371

  20. Lessons learned, DC-XA

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Delta Clipper-Experimental A (DC-XA) program was conceived and specifically developed to provide a low cost reusable flight vehicle testbed for demonstrating performance and operability testing of advanced technologies required for the development of next generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). The three primary program objectives addressed were: To integrate a variety of advanced launch vehicle technology components into the DC-XA flight vehicle testbed. Demonstrate performance, operability, and supportability of Advanced Launch Technologies (ALT) components through ground and flight testing of the DC-XA. Demonstrate rapid prototyping of hardware and software in a combined government, industry cooperative effort. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Maximize x(a - x)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Five different methods for determining the maximizing condition for x(a - x) are presented. Included is the ancient Greek version and a method attributed to Fermat. None of the proofs use calculus. (LS)

  2. Home treatment of patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban. Rationale and design of the HoT-PE Trial.

    PubMed

    Barco, Stefano; Lankeit, Mareike; Binder, Harald; Schellong, Sebastian; Christ, Michael; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Duerschmied, Daniel; Bauersachs, Rupert; Empen, Klaus; Held, Matthias; Schwaiblmair, Martin; Fonseca, Cândida; Jiménez, David; Becattini, Cecilia; Quitzau, Kurt; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life-threatening acute cardiovascular syndrome. However, more than 95 % of patients are haemodynamically stable at presentation, and among them are patients at truly low risk who may qualify for immediate or early discharge. The Home Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism (HoT-PE) study is a prospective international multicentre single-arm phase 4 management (cohort) trial aiming to determine whether home treatment of acute low-risk PE with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban is feasible, effective, and safe. Patients with confirmed PE, who have no right ventricular dysfunction or free floating thrombi in the right atrium or ventricle, are eligible if they meet none of the exclusion criteria indicating haemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity or any condition mandating hospitalisation, or a familial/social environment unable to support home treatment. The first dose of rivaroxaban is given in hospital, and patients are discharged within 48 hours of presentation. Rivaroxaban is taken for at least three months. The primary outcome is symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism or PE-related death within three months of enrolment. Secondary outcomes include quality of life and patient satisfaction, and health care resource utilisation compared to existing data on standard-duration hospital treatment. HoT-PE is planned to analyse 1,050 enrolled patients, providing 80 % power to reject the null hypothesis that the recurrence rate of venous thromboembolism is >3 % with α≤0.05. If the hypothesis of HoT-PE is confirmed, early discharge and out-of-hospital treatment may become an attractive, potentially cost-saving option for a significant proportion of patients with acute PE. PMID:27010343

  3. A new peptide (Ruviprase) purified from the venom of Daboia russelii russelii shows potent anticoagulant activity via non-enzymatic inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Kumar, Ashok; Bose, Biplab; Panda, Dulal; Saikia, Debashree; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2014-10-01

    Compounds showing dual inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa (FXa) are the subject of great interest owing to their broader specificity for effective anticoagulation therapy against cardiovascular disorders. This is the first report on the functional characterization and assessment of therapeutic potential of a 4423.6 Da inhibitory peptide (Ruviprase) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom. The secondary structure of Ruviprase is composed of α-helices (61.9%) and random coils (38.1%). The partial N-terminal sequence (E(1)-V(2)-X(3)-W(4)-W(5)-W(6)-A(7)-Q(8)-L(9)-S(10)) of Ruviprase demonstrated significant similarity (80.0%) with an internal sequence of apoptosis-stimulating protein reported from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah and Python bivittatus; albeit Ruviprase did not show sequence similarity with existing thrombin/FXa inhibitors, suggesting its uniqueness. Ruviprase demonstrated a potent in vitro anticoagulant property and inhibited both thrombin and FXa following slow binding kinetics. Ruviprase inhibited thrombin by binding to its active site via an uncompetitive mechanism with a Ki value and dissociation constant (KD) of 0.42 μM and 0.46 μM, respectively. Conversely, Ruviprase demonstrated mixed inhibition (Ki = 0.16 μM) of FXa towards its physiological substrate prothrombin. Furthermore, the biological properties of Ruviprase could not be neutralized by commercial polyvalent or monovalent antivenom. Ruviprase at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg was non-toxic and showed potent in vivo anticoagulant activity after 6 h of intraperitoneal treatment in mice. Because of the potent anticoagulant property as well as non-toxic nature of Ruviprase, the possible application of the peptide as an antithrombotic agent for combating thrombosis-associated ailments appears promising. PMID:25038567

  4. Lufaxin, a Novel Factor Xa Inhibitor from the Salivary Gland of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, Blocks PAR2 Activation and Inhibits Inflammation and Thrombosis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Nicolas; Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Gilmore, Dana; Dutra-Oliveira, Angélica; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Teixeira, Clarissa; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Blood-sucking arthropods salivary glands (SGs) contain a remarkable diversity of antihemostatics. The aim of this study was to identify the unique salivary anticoagulant of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, which remained elusive for decades. Methods and Results Several L. longipalpis salivary proteins were expressed in HEK293 cells and screened for inhibition of blood coagulation. A novel 32.4-kDa molecule, named Lufaxin, was identified as a slow, tight, non-competitive, and reversible inhibitor of Factor Xa (FXa). Notably, Lufaxin primary sequence does not share similarity to any physiological or salivary inhibitors of coagulation reported to date. Lufaxin is specific for FXa and does not interact with FX, DEGR- FXa, or 15 other enzymes. In addition, Lufaxin blocks prothrombinase and increases both PT and aPTT. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that FXa binds Lufaxin with a KD ~3 nM, and isothermal titration calorimetry determined a stoichiometry of 1:1. Lufaxin also prevents PAR2 activation by FXa in the MDA-MB-231 cell line and abrogates edema formation triggered by injection of FXa in the paw of mice. Moreover, Lufaxin prevents FeCl3-induced carotid artery thrombus formation and prolongs aPTT ex vivo, implying that it works as an anticoagulant in vivo. Finally, SG of sandflies was found to inhibit FXa and to interact with the enzyme. Conclusion Lufaxin belongs to a novel family of slow-tight FXa inhibitors, which display antithrombotic and antiinflamatory activities. It is a useful tool to understand FXa structural features and its role in pro-hemostatic and pro-inflammatory events. PMID:22796577

  5. The antithrombotic activity of EP224283, a neutralizable dual factor Xa inhibitor/glycoprotein IIbIIIa antagonist, exceeds that of the coadministered parent compounds.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Freund, Monique; Alame, Ghina; Leguay, Cécile; Gaertner, Sébastien; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Petitou, Maurice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-08-01

    EP224283 combines in a single molecule idraparinux and tirofiban, which allows obtaining a predictable and sustained antiplatelet effect through the transfer of the pharmacokinetics properties of idraparinux to the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonist. The activity can be instantaneously neutralized by injection of avidin, a specific antidote. We have tested the effects of this new profile anticoagulant in various thrombosis models. The antithrombotic effect of EP224283 was compared with those of the parent compounds used alone or in association at doses achieving low to moderate inhibition of platelet aggregation ex vivo. In a model of systemic thromboembolism independent of thrombin generation, tirofiban and EP224283 had similar effects at equimolar doses. On the other hand, EP224283 was more potent than tirofiban or idraparinux under thrombin-dependent conditions. In a ferric chloride-induced thrombosis model, EP224283 was more potent than either parent compound or their combination. Similar results were obtained after atherosclerotic plaque rupture in ApoE(-/-) mice. Thus, the dual action of EP224283 exceeds that of the parent compounds used in combination. A possible explanation is that EP224283 could concentrate antithrombin inside the thrombus by binding to αIIbβ3 through the tirofiban moiety, as shown by immunolabeling of the occluded vessel. No prolongation of the bleeding time was observed at doses achieving strong antithrombotic effects, suggesting that low to moderate αIIbβ3 inhibition combined with factor Xa inhibition minimizes the bleeding risk. The favorable antithrombotic profile of EP224283 together with its possible neutralization by avidin makes it an interesting drug candidate for the treatment and prevention of acute ischemic events. PMID:21527535

  6. Monitoring Low Molecular Weight Heparins at Therapeutic Levels: Dose-Responses of, and Correlations and Differences between aPTT, Anti-Factor Xa and Thrombin Generation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Owain; Lybeck, Emanuel; Strandberg, Karin; Tynngård, Nahreen; Schött, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Background Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH’s) are used to prevent and treat thrombosis. Tests for monitoring LMWH’s include anti-factor Xa (anti-FXa), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin generation. Anti-FXa is the current gold standard despite LMWH’s varying affinities for FXa and thrombin. Aim To examine the effects of two different LMWH’s on the results of 4 different aPTT-tests, anti-FXa activity and thrombin generation and to assess the tests’ concordance. Method Enoxaparin and tinzaparin were added ex-vivo in concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 anti-FXa international units (IU)/mL, to blood from 10 volunteers. aPTT was measured using two whole blood methods (Free oscillation rheometry (FOR) and Hemochron Jr (HCJ)) and an optical plasma method using two different reagents (ActinFSL and PTT-Automat). Anti-FXa activity was quantified using a chromogenic assay. Thrombin generation (Endogenous Thrombin Potential, ETP) was measured on a Ceveron Alpha instrument using the TGA RB and more tissue-factor rich TGA RC reagents. Results Methods’ mean aPTT at 1.0 IU/mL LMWH varied between 54s (SD 11) and 69s (SD 14) for enoxaparin and between 101s (SD 21) and 140s (SD 28) for tinzaparin. ActinFSL gave significantly shorter aPTT results. aPTT and anti-FXa generally correlated well. ETP as measured with the TGA RC reagent but not the TGA RB reagent showed an inverse exponential relationship to the concentration of LMWH. The HCJ-aPTT results had the weakest correlation to anti-FXa and thrombin generation (Rs0.62–0.87), whereas the other aPTT methods had similar correlation coefficients (Rs0.80–0.92). Conclusions aPTT displays a linear dose-respone to LMWH. There is variation between aPTT assays. Tinzaparin increases aPTT and decreases thrombin generation more than enoxaparin at any given level of anti-FXa activity, casting doubt on anti-FXa’s present gold standard status. Thrombin generation with tissue factor-rich activator is

  7. RUBY-1: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and tolerability of the novel oral factor Xa inhibitor darexaban (YM150) following acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Mehta, Shamir R.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Gibson, C. Michael; Kovar, Frantisek; Kala, Petr; Garcia-Hernandez, Alberto; Renfurm, Ronny W.; Granger, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To establish the safety, tolerability and most promising regimen of darexaban (YM150), a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, for prevention of ischaemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods In a 26-week, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 1279 patients with recent high-risk non-ST-segment or ST-segment elevation ACS received one of six darexaban regimens: 5 mg b.i.d., 10 mg o.d., 15 mg b.i.d., 30 mg o.d., 30 mg b.i.d., or 60 mg o.d. or placebo, on top of dual antiplatelet treatment. Primary outcome was incidence of major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding events. The main efficacy outcome was a composite of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic thromboembolism, and severe recurrent ischaemia. Results Bleeding rates were numerically higher in all darexaban arms vs. placebo (pooled HR: 2.275; 95% CI: 1.13–4.60, P = 0.022). Using placebo as reference (bleeding rate 3.1%), there was a dose–response relationship (P = 0.009) for increased bleeding with increasing darexaban dose (6.2, 6.5, and 9.3% for 10, 30, and 60 mg daily, respectively), which was statistically significant for 30 mg b.i.d. (P = 0.002). There was no decrease (indeed a numerical increase in the 30 and 60 mg dose arms) in efficacy event rates with darexaban, but the study was underpowered for efficacy. Darexaban showed good tolerability without signs of liver toxicity. Conclusions Darexaban when added to dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS produces an expected dose-related two- to four-fold increase in bleeding, with no other safety concerns but no signal of efficacy. Establishing the potential of low-dose darexaban in preventing major cardiac events after ACS requires a large phase III trial. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00994292 PMID:21878434

  8. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  9. Molecular Phylogeny, Homology Modeling, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Race-Specific Bacterial Blight Disease Resistance Protein (xa5) of Rice: A Comparative Agriproteomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dehury, Budheswar; Sahu, Mousumi; Sarma, Kishore; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sharma, Gauri Dutta; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a model plant belonging to the family Poaceae, is a staple food for a majority of the people worldwide. Grown in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world, this important cereal crop is under constant and serious threat from both biotic and abiotic stresses. Among the biotic threats, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, causing the damaging bacterial blight disease in rice, is a prominent pathogen. The xa5 gene in the host plant rice confers race-specific resistance to this pathogen. This recessive gene belongs to the Xa gene family of rice and encodes a gamma subunit of transcription factor IIA (TFIIAγ). In view of the importance of this gene in conferring resistance to the devastating disease, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationship of this gene, developed a three-dimensional protein model, followed by long-term molecular dynamics simulation studies to gain a better understanding of the evolution, structure, and function of xa5. The modeled structure was found to fit well with the small subunit of TFIIA from human, suggesting that it may also act as a small subunit of TFIIA in rice. The model had a stable conformation in response to the atomic flexibility and interaction, when subjected to MD simulation at 20 nano second in aqueous solution. Further structural analysis of xa5 indicated that the protein retained its basic transcription factor function, suggesting that it might govern a novel pathway responsible for bacterial blight resistance. Future molecular docking studies of xa5 underway with its corresponding avirulence gene is expected to shed more direct light into plant–pathogen interactions at the molecular level and thus pave the way for richer agriproteomic insights. PMID:23758479

  10. Discovery of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (apixaban, BMS-562247), a highly potent, selective, efficacious, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Koch, Stephanie; Rossi, Karen A; Alexander, Richard S; Smallwood, Angela; Wong, Pancras C; Rendina, Alan R; Luettgen, Joseph M; Knabb, Robert M; He, Kan; Xin, Baomin; Wexler, Ruth R; Lam, Patrick Y S

    2007-11-01

    Efforts to identify a suitable follow-on compound to razaxaban (compound 4) focused on modification of the carboxamido linker to eliminate potential in vivo hydrolysis to a primary aniline. Cyclization of the carboxamido linker to the novel bicyclic tetrahydropyrazolopyridinone scaffold retained the potent fXa binding activity. Exceptional potency of the series prompted an investigation of the neutral P1 moieties that resulted in the identification of the p-methoxyphenyl P1, which retained factor Xa binding affinity and good oral bioavailability. Further optimization of the C-3 pyrazole position and replacement of the terminal P4 ring with a neutral heterocycle culminated in the discovery of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (apixaban, compound 40). Compound 40 exhibits a high degree of fXa potency, selectivity, and efficacy and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile relative to 4. PMID:17914785

  11. Discovery of 1-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro- 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (Apixaban, BMS-562247), a Highly Potent, Selective, Efficacious, and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of Blood Coagulation Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Donald J.P.; Orwat, Michael J.; Koch, Stephanie; Rossi, Karen A.; Alexander, Richard S.; Smallwood, Angela; Wong, Pancras C.; Rendina, Alan R.; Luettgen, Joseph M.; Knabb, Robert M.; He, Kan; Xin, Baomin; Wexler, Ruth R.; Lam, Patrick Y.S.

    2010-03-08

    Efforts to identify a suitable follow-on compound to razaxaban (compound 4) focused on modification of the carboxamido linker to eliminate potential in vivo hydrolysis to a primary aniline. Cyclization of the carboxamido linker to the novel bicyclic tetrahydropyrazolopyridinone scaffold retained the potent fXa binding activity. Exceptional potency of the series prompted an investigation of the neutral P{sub 1} moieties that resulted in the identification of the p-methoxyphenyl P{sub 1}, which retained factor Xa binding affinity and good oral bioavailability. Further optimization of the C-3 pyrazole position and replacement of the terminal P{sub 4} ring with a neutral heterocycle culminated in the discovery of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (apixaban, compound 40). Compound 40 exhibits a high degree of fXa potency, selectivity, and efficacy and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile relative to 4.

  12. [Advances in antithrombotic treatment--antithrombotics with anti-Xa effect].

    PubMed

    Bátorová, A

    2009-03-01

    The use of anticoagulants in the prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thrombosis has substantially expanded during the last years. Increasing knowledge about the inherited and acquired thrombophilia and the risk factors predisposing to the recurrency of thromboembolic events result in a new indications for primary and secondary thromboprophylaxis with prolonged or even life-long duration. The limitations of classical anticoagulans, heparin and vitamin K antagonists support the development of medicaments with a specific antithrombotic action. The new generation anticoagulants inhibit in a specific way either particular coagulation enzyme or hemostasis activation step. Based on the in vitro studies and extensive clinical observations the activated factor Xa (FXa) seems to be one of the most advantageous targets for a specific action of perspective antithrombotic agents. Two selective F Xa inhibitors have been approved for clinical use: fondaparinux is an indirect parenteral F Xa inhibitor, and most recently approved rivaroxaban is the first oral anti-Xa inhibitor. Other anti-Xa molecules are under development for either parenteral (idraparinux, DX-9065a) or oral use (razaxaban, apixaban, rivaroxaban, LY-51, 7717, BMS-56247 a DU-176b). PMID:19378862

  13. 77 FR 17323 - Special Conditions: XtremeAir GmbH, XA42; Acrobatic Category Aerodynamic Stability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...These special conditions are issued for the XtremeAir GmbH XA42 airplane. The XA42 airplane has a novel or unusual design feature associated with its static stability. This airplane can perform at the highest level of aerobatic competition. To be competitive, the aircraft was designed with positive and, at some points, neutral stability within its flight envelope. Its lateral and directional......

  14. Identifying Direct Protective Factors for Nonviolence

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Dustin A.; Loeber, Rolf; Farrington, David P.; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Background The CDC recently organized a panel to examine whether a series of constructs consistently acted as risk and/or direct protective factors for youth violence across four longitudinal studies. Analyses first examined constructs commonly assessed across all four studies and then included constructs unique to each study. Purpose This paper describes findings from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS) as part of this supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine documenting the findings from the project. Methods Participants were boys in the youngest cohort of the PYS (N= 503), which was initiated in 1987–1988. Constructs measured at age 12 years were trichotimized to test whether they acted as risk and/or direct protective factors in predicting violence (i.e., assault, rape, robbery) across ages 13–14 years and 15–18 years. Results Multivariate logistic regressions with predictors present across studies indicated that depressed mood (OR=1.96) and low religious observance (OR=1.88) were risk factors for violence at ages 13–14 years, while peer delinquency acted as both a risk (OR=2.34) and direct protective factor (OR=0.44). Low peer delinquency was also a direct protective factor (OR=0.41) for violence at ages 15–18 years. Analyses including predictors specific to the PYS indicated that negative attitude toward delinquency (OR=0.50) was protective against violence at ages 13–14 years, while the risk factors of low perceived likelihood of being caught (OR=1.81) and high neighborhood disorder/crime (OR=1.77) predicted violence at ages 15–18 years. Conclusions Some factors may be best conceptualized as direct protective factors for nonviolence, whereas other constructs act primarily as risk factors that increase the probability of adolescent violence. PMID:22789956

  15. Draft genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1, a fecal bacterium of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong; Tan, Xue-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a β-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome. PMID:23209197

  16. Marker-aided Incorporation of Xa38, a Novel Bacterial Blight Resistance Gene, in PB1121 and Comparison of its Resistance Spectrum with xa13 + Xa21.

    PubMed

    Ellur, Ranjith K; Khanna, Apurva; S, Gopala Krishnan; Bhowmick, Prolay K; Vinod, K K; Nagarajan, M; Mondal, Kalyan K; Singh, Nagendra K; Singh, Kuldeep; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    Basmati rice is preferred internationally because of its appealing taste, mouth feel and aroma. Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121) is a widely grown variety known for its excellent grain and cooking quality in the international and domestic market. It contributes approximately USD 3 billion to India's forex earning annually by being the most traded variety. However, PB1121 is highly susceptible to bacterial blight (BB) disease. A novel BB resistance gene Xa38 was incorporated in PB1121 from donor parent PR114-Xa38 using a modified marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB) scheme. Phenotypic selection prior to background selection was instrumental in identifying the novel recombinants with maximum recovery of recurrent parent phenome. The strategy was effective in delimiting the linkage drag to <0.5 mb upstream and <1.9 mb downstream of Xa38 with recurrent parent genome recovery upto 96.9% in the developed NILs. The NILs of PB1121 carrying Xa38 were compared with PB1121 NILs carrying xa13 + Xa21 (developed earlier in our lab) for their resistance to BB. Both NILs showed resistance against the Xoo races 1, 2, 3 and 6. Additionally, Xa38 also resisted Xoo race 5 to which xa13 + Xa21 was susceptible. The PB1121 NILs carrying Xa38 gene will provide effective control of BB in the Basmati growing region. PMID:27403778

  17. Marker-aided Incorporation of Xa38, a Novel Bacterial Blight Resistance Gene, in PB1121 and Comparison of its Resistance Spectrum with xa13 + Xa21

    PubMed Central

    Ellur, Ranjith K.; Khanna, Apurva; S, Gopala Krishnan.; Bhowmick, Prolay K.; Vinod, K. K.; Nagarajan, M.; Mondal, Kalyan K.; Singh, Nagendra K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Basmati rice is preferred internationally because of its appealing taste, mouth feel and aroma. Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121) is a widely grown variety known for its excellent grain and cooking quality in the international and domestic market. It contributes approximately USD 3 billion to India’s forex earning annually by being the most traded variety. However, PB1121 is highly susceptible to bacterial blight (BB) disease. A novel BB resistance gene Xa38 was incorporated in PB1121 from donor parent PR114-Xa38 using a modified marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB) scheme. Phenotypic selection prior to background selection was instrumental in identifying the novel recombinants with maximum recovery of recurrent parent phenome. The strategy was effective in delimiting the linkage drag to <0.5 mb upstream and <1.9 mb downstream of Xa38 with recurrent parent genome recovery upto 96.9% in the developed NILs. The NILs of PB1121 carrying Xa38 were compared with PB1121 NILs carrying xa13 + Xa21 (developed earlier in our lab) for their resistance to BB. Both NILs showed resistance against the Xoo races 1, 2, 3 and 6. Additionally, Xa38 also resisted Xoo race 5 to which xa13 + Xa21 was susceptible. The PB1121 NILs carrying Xa38 gene will provide effective control of BB in the Basmati growing region. PMID:27403778

  18. Constitutive heterologous expression of avrXa27 in rice containing the R gene Xa27 confers enhanced resistance to compatible Xanthomonas oryzae strains.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dongsheng; Yin, Zhongchao

    2009-01-01

    The vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and nonvascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) cause bacterial blight (BB) and bacterial leaf streak (BLS) diseases of rice, respectively. We have previously identified the avirulence gene avrXa27 from Xoo PXO99(A), which specifically induces the expression of the rice resistance gene Xa27, ultimately leading to resistance against BB disease in rice. In this study, we have generated a transgenic rice line (L24) that expresses avrXa27 constitutively under the control of the PR1 promoter, and have examined its role in the host-pathogen interaction. L24 is not more susceptible to BB, indicating that avrXa27 does not contribute to virulence. AvrXa27 retains avirulence activity in L24 and, after crossing with a line containing Xa27, progeny display phenotypic changes including inhibition of tillering, delay in flowering, stiff leaves, early leaf senescence and activation of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. On challenge with a variety of compatible strains of Xoo and Xoc strain L8, lines with both avrXa27 and Xa27 also show enhanced resistance to bacterial infection. The induction of Xa27 and subsequent inhibition of Xoc growth in Xa27 plants are observed on inoculation with Xoc L8 harbouring avrXa27. Our results indicate that the heterologous expression of avrXa27 in rice containing Xa27 triggers R gene-specific resistance and, at the same time, confers enhanced resistance to compatible strains of Xoo and Xoc. The expression of AvrXa27 and related proteins in plants has the potential to generate broad resistance in plants. PMID:19161350

  19. Human Factors Directions for Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in understanding human capabilities and limitations, incorporating human factors into aircraft design, operation, and certification, and the emergence of new technologies designed to reduce workload and enhance human performance in the system, most aviation accidents still involve human errors. Such errors occur as a direct or indirect result of untimely, inappropriate, or erroneous actions (or inactions) by apparently well-trained and experienced pilots, controllers, and maintainers. The field of human factors has solved many of the more tractable problems related to simple ergonomics, cockpit layout, symbology, and so on. We have learned much about the relationships between people and machines, but know less about how to form successful partnerships between humans and the information technologies that are beginning to play a central role in aviation. Significant changes envisioned in the structure of the airspace, pilots and controllers' roles and responsibilities, and air/ground technologies will require a similarly significant investment in human factors during the next few decades to ensure the effective integration of pilots, controllers, dispatchers, and maintainers into the new system. Many of the topics that will be addressed are not new because progress in crucial areas, such as eliminating human error, has been slow. A multidisciplinary approach that capitalizes upon human studies and new classes of information, computational models, intelligent analytical tools, and close collaborations with organizations that build, operate, and regulate aviation technology will ensure that the field of human factors meets the challenge.

  20. Indirect effects of ploidy suggest X chromosome dose, not the X:A ratio, signals sex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Erickson, James W; Quintero, Jerome J

    2007-12-01

    In the textbook view, the ratio of X chromosomes to autosome sets, X:A, is the primary signal specifying sexual fate in Drosophila. An alternative idea is that X chromosome number signals sex through the direct actions of several X-encoded signal element (XSE) proteins. In this alternative, the influence of autosome dose on X chromosome counting is largely indirect. Haploids (1X;1A), which possess the male number of X chromosomes but the female X:A of 1.0, and triploid intersexes (XX;AAA), which possess a female dose of two X chromosomes and the ambiguous X:A ratio of 0.67, represent critical tests of these hypotheses. To directly address the effects of ploidy in primary sex determination, we compared the responses of the signal target, the female-specific SxlPe promoter of the switch gene Sex-lethal, in haploid, diploid, and triploid embryos. We found that haploids activate SxlPe because an extra precellular nuclear division elevates total X chromosome numbers and XSE levels beyond those in diploid males. Conversely, triploid embryos cellularize one cycle earlier than diploids, causing premature cessation of SxlPe expression. This prevents XX;AAA embryos from fully engaging the autoregulatory mechanism that maintains subsequent Sxl expression, causing them to develop as sexual mosaics. We conclude that the X:A ratio predicts sexual fate, but does not actively specify it. Instead, the instructive X chromosome signal is more appropriately seen as collective XSE dose in the early embryo. Our findings reiterate that correlations between X:A ratios and cell fates in other organisms need not implicate the value of the ratio as an active signal. PMID:18162044

  1. Ectopic expression of rice Xa21 overcomes developmentally controlled resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Lee, Sang-Won; Chern, Mawsheng; Sharma, Rita; Canlas, Patrick E.; Song, Min-Young; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) activates the innate immune response. The rice PRR, XA21, confers robust resistance at adult stages to most strains of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Seedlings are still easily infected by Xoo, causing severe yield losses. Here we report that Xa21 is induced by Xoo infection and that ectopic expression of Xa21 confers resistance at three leaf stage (three-week-old), overcoming the developmental limitation of XA21-mediated resistance. Ectopic expression of Xa21 also up-regulates a larger set of defense-related genes as compared to Xa21 driven by the native promoter. These results indicate that altered regulation of Xa21 expression is useful for developing enhanced resistance to Xoo at multiple developmental stages. PMID:21076626

  2. RGS Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop XA Knot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetz, Terrance J.; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The observations were performed at the end of April 2002, and the data were received in July 2002. Unfortunately, the observations were badly compromised by high levels of background radiation; one the three observations lost entirely. Two replacement observations were scheduled for November 2002, and were only made available in January of 2003. Consequently, we have had little time to grapple with the unusual data analysis challenges. The search for a postdoctoral fellow has been successfully concluded, and Manami Sasaki began working for us in January 2003. She will be supported in part by these funds, and will be working to help understand these data. Examination of the RGS 'Orders' images indicate the presence of broad emission lines (as expected for the diffuse XA knot). However, examination of the 'Spatial' dispersion/cross-dispersion images indicate that the emission is also broad in the cross-dispersion direction. (As a crosscheck, some of the 'Lockman Hole' datasets were also examined as representative 'sky background' datasets; in these, both types of images are relatively flat (outside the calibration source regions). The quicklook plots of the spectra show the expected O VII and O VIII lines, in addition to a complex around 35 Angstroms; the approx. 35 Angstrom line is likely the C V He-beta line at 34.97 Angstrom, but identifying the additional line(s) will require a more careful reduction of the data. Consequently, there is valuable information to be extracted from these data, but it is complicated by diffuse nature of the emission. Because the angular scale is large, we will have to make use of sky background datasets in order to do the background fitting. A color composite image of OM data in the three UV bands was presented at the 'How does the Galaxy Work?' meeting, and compared to optical and X-ray imaging data. Quantitative analysis will require obtaining the effective bandpasses of the UV filters so that the predominant line and continuum

  3. A ΩXaV motif in the Rift Valley fever virus NSs protein is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and virulence.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Normand; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Lecoq, Lauriane; Guendel, Irene; Chabot, Philippe R; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Omichinski, James G

    2015-05-12

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a single-stranded RNA virus capable of inducing fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. A key component of RVFV virulence is its ability to form nuclear filaments through interactions between the viral nonstructural protein NSs and the host general transcription factor TFIIH. Here, we identify an interaction between a ΩXaV motif in NSs and the p62 subunit of TFIIH. This motif in NSs is similar to ΩXaV motifs found in nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors and transcription factors known to interact with p62. Structural and biophysical studies demonstrate that NSs binds to p62 in a similar manner as these other factors. Functional studies in RVFV-infected cells show that the ΩXaV motif is required for both nuclear filament formation and degradation of p62. Consistent with the fact that the RVFV can be distinguished from other Bunyaviridae-family viruses due to its ability to form nuclear filaments in infected cells, the motif is absent in the NSs proteins of other Bunyaviridae-family viruses. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that p62 binding to NSs through the ΩXaV motif is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and enhancing RVFV virulence. In addition, these results show how the RVFV incorporates a simple motif into the NSs protein that enables it to functionally mimic host cell proteins that bind the p62 subunit of TFIIH. PMID:25918396

  4. A ΩXaV motif in the Rift Valley fever virus NSs protein is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Normand; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Lecoq, Lauriane; Guendel, Irene; Chabot, Philippe R.; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Omichinski, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a single-stranded RNA virus capable of inducing fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. A key component of RVFV virulence is its ability to form nuclear filaments through interactions between the viral nonstructural protein NSs and the host general transcription factor TFIIH. Here, we identify an interaction between a ΩXaV motif in NSs and the p62 subunit of TFIIH. This motif in NSs is similar to ΩXaV motifs found in nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors and transcription factors known to interact with p62. Structural and biophysical studies demonstrate that NSs binds to p62 in a similar manner as these other factors. Functional studies in RVFV-infected cells show that the ΩXaV motif is required for both nuclear filament formation and degradation of p62. Consistent with the fact that the RVFV can be distinguished from other Bunyaviridae-family viruses due to its ability to form nuclear filaments in infected cells, the motif is absent in the NSs proteins of other Bunyaviridae-family viruses. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that p62 binding to NSs through the ΩXaV motif is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and enhancing RVFV virulence. In addition, these results show how the RVFV incorporates a simple motif into the NSs protein that enables it to functionally mimic host cell proteins that bind the p62 subunit of TFIIH. PMID:25918396

  5. Rice Xa21 primed genes and pathways that are critical for combating bacterial blight infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Junfei; Xia, Zhihui; Gao, Lifen; Chen, Lihong; Li, Lili; Li, Tiantian; Zhai, Wenxue; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight (BB) is a devastating rice disease. The Xa21 gene confers a broad and persistent resistance against BB. We introduced Xa21 into Oryza sativa L ssp indica (rice 9311), through multi-generation backcrossing, and generated a nearly isogenic, blight-resistant 9311/Xa21 rice. Using next-generation sequencing, we profiled the transcriptomes of both varieties before and within four days after infection of bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The identified differentially expressed (DE) genes and signaling pathways revealed insights into the functions of Xa21. Surprisingly, before infection 1,889 genes on 135 of the 316 signaling pathways were DE between the 9311/Xa21 and 9311 plants. These Xa21-mediated basal pathways included mainly those related to the basic material and energy metabolisms and many related to phytohormones such as cytokinin, suggesting that Xa21 triggered redistribution of energy, phytohormones and resources among essential cellular activities before invasion. Counter-intuitively, after infection, the DE genes between the two plants were only one third of that before the infection; other than a few stress-related pathways, the affected pathways after infection constituted a small subset of the Xa21-mediated basal pathways. These results suggested that Xa21 primed critically important genes and signaling pathways, enhancing its resistance against bacterial infection. PMID:26184504

  6. Comparison of three different anti-Xa assays in major orthopedic surgery patients treated with fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Ikejiri, Makoto; Wada, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Sakaguchi, Akane; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Ohishi, Kohshi; Fujimoto, Naoki; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki; Katayama, Naoyuki; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-05-01

    Anti-Xa assays are useful for monitoring the effects of selective anti-Xa drugs, such as fondaparinux, in the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis. In the present study, anti-Xa activity was measured using three different assays, Testzym(®) Heparin S, STA(®)-Liquid Anti-Xa and HemosIL(®) Liquid Heparin. Anti-Xa activity in each assay gradually increased from day one after administration to day eight, and still remained on day 15. Although there were significant differences in anti-Xa activity among the three assays, the activity showed significant correlation across assays. There were no significant differences in the anti-Xa activity between patients with and without DVT or between patients with and without massive bleeding on day one before and after administration, day four, day eight and day 15. Anti-Xa activity in each assay was weakly correlated with antithrombin (AT) activity. The AT activity in patients were significantly higher on days four, eight and 15 compared with day one before and after administration, suggesting that AT activity increases following the administration of fondaparinux. The three anti-Xa assay kits tested are useful for monitoring fondaparinux treatment in orthopedic surgery patients. PMID:26922193

  7. Distribution of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains Virulent to Xa21 in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Choi, S H; Han, S S; Lee, D G; Lee, B Y

    1999-10-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae that are virulent to rice lines carrying the Xa21 resistance gene were widely distributed in Korea. A total of 105 strains collected during 1987 to 1996 in Korea was characterized by pathogenicity tests and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the XorII methyltransferase (xorIIM) and avrXa10 genes. Although the lesion lengths on rice line IRBB21, which carries Xa21, decreased as plant age increased, resistance and susceptibility of the plants to 31 strains were clearly differentiated at the seedling (14, 21, and 28 days old), maximum tillering, and flag leaf stages. The resistance or susceptibility of seedlings was correlated with bacterial populations within an inoculated leaf. There was a significant change in the population structure of X. oryzae pv. oryzae with regard to virulence to Xa21 over the last 10 years; this change in population was confirmed by genome analysis. Lineage I, which is avirulent to Xa21 and does not have a genomic xorIIM homolog, was the predominant lineage found between 1987 and 1989, while lineage II, which is virulent to Xa21 and contains the xorIIM homolog, was predominant in strains collected between 1994 and 1995. Our results demonstrate that introduction of Xa21 into commercial rice should be based on the regional structure of X. oryzae pv. oryzae populations and suggest that Xa21 will not be useful in Korea. PMID:18944737

  8. Computing modified Newton directions using a partial Cholesky factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Forsgren, A. . Dept. of Mathematics); Gill, P.E. ); Murray, W. . Systems Optimization Lab.)

    1993-03-01

    The effectiveness of Newton's method for finding an unconstrained minimizer of a strictly convex twice continuously differentiable function has prompted the proposal of various modified Newton inetliods for the nonconvex case. Linesearch modified Newton methods utilize a linear combination of a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature. If these directions are sufficient in a certain sense, and a suitable linesearch is used, the resulting method will generate limit points that satisfy the second-order necessary conditions for optimality. We propose an efficient method for computing a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature that is based on a partial Cholesky factorization of the Hessian. This factorization not only gives theoretically satisfactory directions, but also requires only a partial pivoting strategy, i.e., the equivalent of only two rows of the Schur complement need be examined at each step.

  9. Computing modified Newton directions using a partial Cholesky factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Forsgren, A.; Gill, P.E.; Murray, W.

    1993-03-01

    The effectiveness of Newton`s method for finding an unconstrained minimizer of a strictly convex twice continuously differentiable function has prompted the proposal of various modified Newton inetliods for the nonconvex case. Linesearch modified Newton methods utilize a linear combination of a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature. If these directions are sufficient in a certain sense, and a suitable linesearch is used, the resulting method will generate limit points that satisfy the second-order necessary conditions for optimality. We propose an efficient method for computing a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature that is based on a partial Cholesky factorization of the Hessian. This factorization not only gives theoretically satisfactory directions, but also requires only a partial pivoting strategy, i.e., the equivalent of only two rows of the Schur complement need be examined at each step.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF NOX EMISSION FACTORS FOR DIRECT-FIRED HEATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a review of available data on emission factors for major categories of direct-fired heaters. Systematic studies were analyzed to develop emission factors for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) at various levels of combustion air preheat used in major energy-cons...

  11. GATA factors efficiently direct cardiac fate from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Turbendian, Harma K; Gordillo, Miriam; Tsai, Su-Yi; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; Liu, Ting-Chun; Tang, Alice; Liu, Susanna; Fishman, Glenn I; Evans, Todd

    2013-04-01

    The GATA4 transcription factor is implicated in promoting cardiogenesis in combination with other factors, including TBX5, MEF2C and BAF60C. However, when expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), GATA4 was shown to promote endoderm, not cardiac mesoderm. The capacity of related GATA factors to promote cardiogenesis is untested. We found that expression of the highly related gene, Gata5, very efficiently promotes cardiomyocyte fate from murine ESCs. Gata5 directs development of beating sheets of cells that express cardiac troponin T and show a full range of action potential morphologies that are responsive to pharmacological stimulation. We discovered that by removing serum from the culture conditions, GATA4 and GATA6 are each also able to efficiently promote cardiogenesis in ESC derivatives, with some distinctions. Thus, GATA factors can function in ESC derivatives upstream of other cardiac transcription factors to direct the efficient generation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:23487308

  12. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate). This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE. PMID:27581829

  13. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  14. Fast rotation of a subkilometer-sized near-Earth object 2011 XA{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Urakawa, Seitaro; Ohtsuka, Katsuhito; Abe, Shinsuke; Ito, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomoki

    2014-05-01

    We present light curve observations and their multiband photometry for near-Earth object (NEO) 2011 XA{sub 3}. The light curve has shown a periodicity of 0.0304 ± 0.0003 days (= 43.8 ± 0.4 minutes). The fast rotation shows that 2011 XA{sub 3} is in a state of tension (i.e., a monolithic asteroid) and cannot be held together by self-gravitation. Moreover, the multiband photometric analysis indicates that the taxonomic class of 2011 XA{sub 3} is S-complex, or V-type. Its estimated effective diameter is 225 ± 97 m (S-complex) and 166 ± 63 m (V-type), respectively. Therefore, 2011 XA{sub 3} is a candidate for the second-largest, fast-rotating, monolithic asteroid. Moreover, the orbital parameters of 2011 XA{sub 3} are apparently similar to those of NEO (3200) Phaethon, but F/B-type. We computed the orbital evolutions of 2011 XA{sub 3} and Phaethon. However, the results of the computation and distinct taxonomy indicate that neither of the asteroids is of common origin.

  15. Clinical Use of Anti-Xa Monitoring in Malignancy-Associated Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yentz, Sarah; Onwuemene, Oluwatoyosi A; Stein, Brady L; Cull, Elizabeth H; McMahon, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is preferred for malignancy-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE). Many providers monitor LMWH with anti-Xa levels, despite little validation on correspondence with patient outcome. Methods. This is a retrospective, single institution study of anti-Xa measurement in malignancy-associated thrombosis. Cases were identified using the Electronic Data Warehouse, and inclusion was confirmed by two independent reviewers. Malignancy type, thrombotic history, measurement rationale and accuracy, clinical context, and management changes were evaluated. Results. 167 cases met inclusion criteria. There was no clear rationale for anti-Xa testing in 56%. Impaired renal function (10%), documented or suspected recurrent thrombosis despite anticoagulation (9%), and bleeding (6%) were the most common reasons for testing. Incorrect measurement occurred in 44%. Renal impairment was not a significant impetus for testing, as 70% had a GFR > 60. BMI > 30 was present in 40%, and 28% had a BMI < 25. Clinical impact was low, as only 11% of patients had management changes. Conclusions. Provider education in accuracy and rationale for anti-Xa testing is needed. Our study illustrates uncertainty of interpretation and clinical impact of routine anti-Xa testing, as management was affected in few patients. It is not yet clear in which clinical context providers should send anti-Xa levels. PMID:26543644

  16. Direct Extrapolation of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for fish and shellfish were extrapolated directly from one location and species to other species, to other locations within a site, to other sites, and their combinations. The median errors in the extrapolations across species at a loc...

  17. Correction factors for the directional response of Gill propeller anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, A. J.; Teunissen, H. W.

    1986-12-01

    This note briefly summarizes some recent wind-tunnel tests carried out at the Atmospheric Environment Service, Canada, to investigate the directional response of Gill (1975) propeller anemometers with two specific models of propeller. Tables of optimum noncosine-response correction factors are presented for both propeller types, and results of some field intercomparisons between the Gill and sonic anemometer measurements of turbulence statistics are summarized.

  18. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Dibildox, Gerardo Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van; Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul; Schultz, Carl; Niessen, Wiro

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  19. Interaction of blood coagulation factor Va with phospholipid vesicles examined by using lipophilic photoreagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, U.C.; Isaacs, B.S.; Yemul, S.S.; Esmon, C.T.; Bayley, H.; Johnson, A.E.

    1987-01-13

    Two different lipophilic photoreagents, (/sup 3/H)adamantane diazirine and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine (TID), have been utilized to examine the interactions of blood coagulation factor Va with calcium, prothrombin, factor Xa, and, in particular, phospholipid vesicles. With each of these structurally dissimilar reagents, the extent of photolabeling of factor Va was greater when the protein was bound to a membrane surface than when it was free in solution. Specifically, the covalent photoreaction with Vl, the smaller subunit of factor Va, was 2-fold higher in the presence of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS, 3:1) vesicles, to which factor Va binds, than in the presence of 100% PC vesicles, to which the protein does not bind. However, the magnitude of the PC/PS-dependent photolabeling was much less than has been observed previously with integral membrane proteins. It therefore appears that the binding of factor Va to the membrane surface exposes Vl to the lipid core of the bilayer, but that only a small portion of the Vl polypeptide is exposed to, or embedded in, the bilayer core. Addition of either prothrombin or active-site-blocked factor Xa to PC/PS-bound factor Va had little effect on the photolabeling of Vl with TID, but reduced substantially the covalent labeling of Vh, the larger subunit of factor Va. This indicates that prothrombin and factor Xa each cover nonpolar surfaces on Vh when the macromolecules associate on the PC/PS surface. It therefore seems likely that the formation of the prothrombinase complex involves a direct interaction between Vh and factor Xa and between Vh and prothrombin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 directs polar replication fork pausing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonghong; Posse, Viktor; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Jacobs, Howard T.; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.

    2016-01-01

    During replication of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), clashes with the transcription apparatus can cause replication fork collapse and genomic instability. To avoid this problem, a replication fork barrier protein is situated downstream of rDNA, there preventing replication in the direction opposite rDNA transcription. A potential candidate for a similar function in mitochondria is the mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 (MTERF1, also denoted mTERF), which binds to a sequence just downstream of the ribosomal transcription unit. Previous studies have shown that MTERF1 prevents antisense transcription over the ribosomal RNA genes, a process which we here show to be independent of the transcription elongation factor TEFM. Importantly, we now demonstrate that MTERF1 arrests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication with distinct polarity. The effect is explained by the ability of MTERF1 to act as a directional contrahelicase, blocking mtDNA unwinding by the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. This conclusion is also supported by in vivo evidence that MTERF1 stimulates TWINKLE pausing. We conclude that MTERF1 can direct polar replication fork arrest in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:27112570

  1. Dynamics of directional reflectance factor distributions for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that span the entire exitance hemisphere are collected on the ground for a variety of homogeneous vegetation canopies and bare soils. NOAA 6/7 AVHRR bands 1 (0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.73-1.1 microns) are used. When possible, geometric measurements of leaf orientation distributions are taken simultaneously with each spectral measurement. Other supporting structural and optical measurements are made. These data sets are taken at various times of the day for each cover type. These unique sets, together with pertinent data in the literature, are used to investigate the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of the geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith angle, and optical properties of the scene components (leaves and soil). For complete homogeneous vegetation canopies, the principal trend observed at all sun angles and spectral bands is a minimum reflectance near nadir and increasing reflectance with increasing off-nadir view angle for all azimuth directions.

  2. "XA6" octahedra influencing the arrangement of anionic groups and optical properties in inverse-perovskite [B6O10]XA3 (X = Cl, Br; A = alkali metal).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Lei, Bing-Hua; Yang, Bin; Pan, Shilie

    2016-06-01

    Exploring the effect of microscopic units, which set up the perovsikte framework, is of importance for material design. In this study, a series of borate halides with inverse-perovskite structures [B6O10]XA3 (X = Cl, Br; A = alkali metal) have been studied. It was revealed that the distortion and volume of XA6 octahedra influence the arrangement of anionic groups, which leads to the flexibility of the perovskite-related framework and differences in optical properties. Under the structural control scheme, the structure of Rb3B6O10Cl was predicted. The stability of the predicted structure was confirmed by an ab initio density functional theory-based method. The calculation shows Rb3B6O10Cl has a short UV cutoff edge of less than 200 nm, a moderate birefringence and a large second harmonic generation response. PMID:27211304

  3. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation. PMID:26273933

  4. A direct thrombin inhibitor suppresses protein C activation and factor Va degradation in human plasma: Possible mechanisms of paradoxical enhancement of thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Kamisato, Chikako; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that antithrombin (AT)-independent thrombin inhibitors paradoxically increase thrombin generation (TG) in human plasma in a thrombomodulin (TM)- and protein C (PC)-dependent manner. We determined the effects of AT-independent thrombin inhibitors on the negative-feedback system, activation of PC and production and degradation of factor Va (FVa), as possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical enhancement of TG. TG in human plasma containing 10nM TM was assayed by means of the calibrated automated thrombography. As an index of PC activation, plasma concentration of activated PC-PC inhibitor complex (aPC-PCI) was measured. The amounts of FVa heavy chain and its degradation product (FVa(307-506)) were examined by western blotting. AT-independent thrombin inhibitors, melagatran and dabigatran (both at 25-600nM) and 3-30μg/ml active site-blocked thrombin (IIai), increased peak levels of TG. Melagatran, dabigatran and IIai significantly decreased plasma concentration of aPC-PCI complex at 25nM or more, 75nM or more, and 10 and 30μg/ml, respectively. Melagatran (300nM) significantly increased FVa and decreased FVa(307-506). In contrast, a direct factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban preferentially inhibited thrombin generation (≥25nM), and higher concentrations were required to inhibit PC activation (≥150nM) and FVa degradation (300nM). The present study suggests that the inhibitions of protein C activation and subsequent degradation of FVa and increase in FVa by antithrombin-independent thrombin inhibitors may contribute to the paradoxical TG enhancement, and edoxaban may inhibit PC activation and FVa degradation as a result of TG suppression. PMID:26974491

  5. Directional reflectance factor distributions for cover types of Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Tucker, C. J.; Zonneveld, I. S.; Van Wijngaarden, W.

    1985-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that spanned the entire exitance hemisphere were collected on the ground throughout the morning period for common cover types in Tunisia, Africa. NOAA 7/8 AVHRR bands 1(0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.7301.1 micron) were used in data collection. The cover types reported were a plowed field, annual grassland, steppe grassland, hard wheat, salt plain, and irrigated wheat. Several of these cover types had geometric structures that are extreme as compared to those reported in the literature. Comparisons were made between the dynamics of the observed reflectance distributions and those reported in the literature. It was found that the dynamics of the measured data could be explained by a combination of soil and vegetation scattering components. The data and analysis further validated physical principles that cause the reflectance distribution dynamics as proposed by field and simulation studies in the literature. Finally, the normalized difference transformation (Band 2 - Band 1)/(Band 1 + Band 2), which is useful in monitoring vegetation cover, generally decreased the variation in signal with changing view angle. However, several exceptions were noted.

  6. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S.; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G.; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H.; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs. PMID:26181364

  7. 76 FR 80829 - Special Conditions: XtremeAir GmbH, XA42; Acrobatic Category Aerodynamic Stability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...This action proposes special conditions for the XtremeAir GmbH XA42 airplane. The XA42 airplane has a novel or unusual design feature associated with its static stability. This airplane can perform at the highest level of aerobatic competition. To be competitive, the aircraft was designed with positive and, at some points, neutral stability within its flight envelope. Its lateral and......

  8. Materials Testing on the DC-X and DC-XA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dane; Carroll, Carol; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Flight testing of thermal protection materials has been carried out over a two year period on the base heat shield of the Delta Clipper (DC-X and DC-XA), as well on a body flap. The purpose was to use the vehicle as a test bed for materials and more efficient repair or maintenance processes which would be potentially useful for application on new entry vehicles (i.e., X-33, RLV, planetary probes), as well as on the existing space shuttle orbiters. Panels containing Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and/or structural materials were constructed either at NASA Ames Research Center or at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and attached between two of the four thrusters in the base heat shield of the DC-X or DC-XA. Three different panels were flown on DC-X flights 6, 7, and 8. A total of 7 panels were flown on DC-XA flights 1, 2, and 3. The panels constructed at Ames contained a variety of ceramic TPS including flexible blankets, tiles with high emissivity coatings, lightweight ceramic ablators and other ceramic composites. The MDS test panels consisted primarily of a variety of metallic composites. This report focuses on the ceramic TPS test results.

  9. Comparative nutritional compositions and proteomics analysis of transgenic Xa21 rice seeds compared to conventional rice.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Dipak; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-07-15

    Transgenic rice expressing the Xa21 gene have enhanced resistant to most devastating bacterial blight diseases caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identification of unintended modifications, owing to the genetic modification, is an important aspect of transgenic crop safety assessment. In this study, the nutritional compositions of seeds from transgenic rice plants expressing the Xa21 gene were compared against non-transgenic rice seeds. In addition, to detect any changes in protein translation levels as a result of Xa21 gene expression, rice seed proteome analyses were also performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No significant differences were found in the nutritional compositions (proximate components, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and anti-nutrients) of the transgenic and non-transgenic rice seeds. Although gel electrophoresis identified 11 proteins that were differentially expressed between the transgenic and non-transgenic seed, only one of these (with a 20-fold up-regulation in the transgenic seed) shows nutrient reservoir activity. No new toxins or allergens were detected in the transgenic seeds. PMID:26948618

  10. The phylogenetically-related pattern recognition receptors EFR and XA21 recruit similar immune signaling components in monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nicholas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ronald, Pamela C; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    During plant immunity, surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The transfer of PRRs between plant species is a promising strategy for engineering broad-spectrum disease resistance. Thus, there is a great interest in understanding the mechanisms of PRR-mediated resistance across different plant species. Two well-characterized plant PRRs are the leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) EFR and XA21 from Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and rice, respectively. Interestingly, despite being evolutionary distant, EFR and XA21 are phylogenetically closely related and are both members of the sub-family XII of LRR-RKs that contains numerous potential PRRs. Here, we compared the ability of these related PRRs to engage immune signaling across the monocots-dicots taxonomic divide. Using chimera between Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21, we show that the kinase domain of the rice XA21 is functional in triggering elf18-induced signaling and quantitative immunity to the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the EFR:XA21 chimera associates dynamically in a ligand-dependent manner with known components of the EFR complex. Conversely, EFR associates with Arabidopsis orthologues of rice XA21-interacting proteins, which appear to be involved in EFR-mediated signaling and immunity in Arabidopsis. Our work indicates the overall functional conservation of immune components acting downstream of distinct LRR-RK-type PRRs between monocots and dicots. PMID:25607985

  11. The Phylogenetically-Related Pattern Recognition Receptors EFR and XA21 Recruit Similar Immune Signaling Components in Monocots and Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Nicholas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ronald, Pamela C.; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    During plant immunity, surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The transfer of PRRs between plant species is a promising strategy for engineering broad-spectrum disease resistance. Thus, there is a great interest in understanding the mechanisms of PRR-mediated resistance across different plant species. Two well-characterized plant PRRs are the leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) EFR and XA21 from Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and rice, respectively. Interestingly, despite being evolutionary distant, EFR and XA21 are phylogenetically closely related and are both members of the sub-family XII of LRR-RKs that contains numerous potential PRRs. Here, we compared the ability of these related PRRs to engage immune signaling across the monocots-dicots taxonomic divide. Using chimera between Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21, we show that the kinase domain of the rice XA21 is functional in triggering elf18-induced signaling and quantitative immunity to the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the EFR:XA21 chimera associates dynamically in a ligand-dependent manner with known components of the EFR complex. Conversely, EFR associates with Arabidopsis orthologues of rice XA21-interacting proteins, which appear to be involved in EFR-mediated signaling and immunity in Arabidopsis. Our work indicates the overall functional conservation of immune components acting downstream of distinct LRR-RK-type PRRs between monocots and dicots. PMID:25607985

  12. Item Factor Analysis: Current Approaches and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, R. J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The rationale underlying factor analysis applies to continuous and categorical variables alike; however, the models and estimation methods for continuous (i.e., interval or ratio scale) data are not appropriate for item-level data that are categorical in nature. The authors provide a targeted review and synthesis of the item factor analysis (IFA)…

  13. Future directions in Alzheimer's disease from risk factors to prevention.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Bushra; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka

    2014-04-15

    The increase in life expectancy has resulted in a high occurrence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research on AD has undergone a paradigm shift from viewing it as a disease of old age to taking a life course perspective. Several vascular, lifestyle, psychological and genetic risk factors influencing this latent period have been recognized and they may act both independently and by potentiating each other. These risk factors have consequently been used to derive risk scores for predicting the likelihood of dementia. Despite population differences, age, low education and vascular risk factors were identified as key factors in all scoring systems. Risk scores can help to identify high-risk individuals who might benefit from different interventions. The European Dementia Prevention Initiative (EDPI), an international collaboration, encourages data sharing between different randomized controlled trials. At the moment, it includes three large ongoing European trials: Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care (preDIVA), and Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention study (MAPT). Recently EDPI has developed a "Healthy Aging through Internet Counseling in Elderly" (HATICE) program, which intends to manage modifiable risk factors in an aged population through an easily accessible Internet platform. Thus, the focus of dementia research has shifted from identification of potential risk factors to using this information for developing interventions to prevent or delay the onset of dementia as well as identifying special high-risk populations who could be targeted in intervention trials. PMID:24418410

  14. Habitual and goal-directed factors in (everyday) object handling.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Oliver; Butz, Martin V

    2011-09-01

    A habitual and a goal-directed system contribute to action selection in the human CNS. We examined to which extent both systems interact when selecting grasps for handling everyday objects. In Experiment 1, an upright or inverted cup had to be rotated or moved. To-be-rotated upright cups were more frequently grasped with a thumb-up grasp, which is habitually used to hold an upright cup, than inverted cups, which are not associated with a specific grasp. Additionally, grasp selection depended on the overarching goal of the movement sequence (rotation vs. transport) according to the end-state comfort principle. This shows that the habitual system and the goal-directed system both contribute to grasp selection. Experiment 2 revealed that this object-orientation-dependent grasp selection was present for movements of the dominant- and non-dominant hand. In Experiment 3, different everyday objects had to be moved or rotated. Only if different orientations of an object were associated with different habitual grasps, the grasp selection depended on the object orientation. Additionally, grasp selection was affected by the horizontal direction of the forthcoming movement. In sum, the experiments provide evidence that the interaction between the habitual and the goal-directed system determines grasp selection for the interaction with every-day objects. PMID:21748333

  15. Factors affecting the direct mineralization of CO2 with olivine.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonchul; Fan, Maohong; DaCosta, Herbert F M; Russell, Armistead G

    2011-01-01

    Olivine, one of the most abundant minerals existing in nature, is explored as a CO2 carbonation agent for direct carbonation of CO2 in flue gas. Olivine based CO2 capture is thermodynamically favorable and can form a stable carbonate for long-term storage. Experimental results have shown that water vapor plays an important role in improving CO2 carbonation rate and capacities. Other operation conditions including reaction temperature, initial CO2 concentration, residence time corresponding to the flow rate of CO2 gas stream, and water vapor concentration also considerably affect the performance of the technology. PMID:22128528

  16. The Use of a Dexamethasone-inducible System to Synchronize Xa21 Expression to Study Rice Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caddell, Daniel F.; Wei, Tong; Park, Chang-Jin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Inducible gene expression systems offer researchers the opportunity to synchronize target gene expression at particular developmental stages and in particular tissues. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a vertebrate steroid receptor, has been well adopted for this purpose in plants. To generate steroid-inducible plants, a construct of GAL4-binding domain-VP16 activation domain-GR fusion (GVG) with the target gene under the control of upstream activation sequence (UAS) has been developed and extensively used in plant research. Immune receptors perceive conserved molecular patterns secreted by pathogens and initiate robust immune responses. The rice immune receptor, XA21, recognizes a molecular pattern highly conserved in all sequenced genomes of Xanthomonas, and confers robust resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identifying genes downstream of XA21 has been hindered because of the restrained lesion and thus limited defense response region in the plants expressing Xa21. Inducible expression allows for a synchronized immune response across a large amount of rice tissue, well suited for studying XA21-mediated immunity by genome-wide approaches such as transcriptomics and proteomics. In this protocol, we describe the use of this GVG system to synchronize Xa21 expression.

  17. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  18. A present status of CD-ROM XA and its future - Introduction to "TIBETAN ART in LADAKH" -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumio; Nomura, Kounoshin

    The first release of CD-ROM XA was anounced in March, 1989. This anouncement means that the interleaved ADPCM Audio system of the GREEN BOOK is applied to the specifications of CD-ROM. Accordingly it could lead to expanding application areas of CD-ROM. On the other hand within this year the logical format of video and graphics of CD-ROM XA will be probably confirmed. It will open the door to the new technology of CD-ROM, the real multimedia in the future. Hereafter will mention the summary of this release and the introduction of our first trial sample software, "TIBETAN ART in LADAKH" on CD-ROM XA.

  19. Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression in Rice is Correlated with Developmentally Controlled Xa21-mediated Resistance against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance mediated by the resistance gene Xa21 is developmentally controlled in rice. We examined the relationship between pathogenesis related (PR) defense gene expression and Xa21-mediated developmental disease resistance induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). OsPR1a, OsPR1b, a...

  20. Independent anti-angiogenic capacities of coagulation factors X and Xa.

    PubMed

    Lange, Soledad; Gonzalez, Ibeth; Pinto, Mauricio P; Arce, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Aranda, Evelyn; Elliot, Matias; Alvarez, Marjorie; Henriquez, Soledad; Velasquez, Ethel V; Orge, Felipe; Oliva, Barbara; Gonzalez, Pamela; Villalon, Manuel; Cautivo, Kelly M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Pereira, Karla; Mendoza, Camila; Saez, Claudia; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Parborell, Fernanda; Irusta, Griselda; Palma, Veronica; Allende, Miguel L; Owen, Gareth I

    2014-11-01

    Knockout models have shown that the coagulation system has a role in vascular development and angiogenesis. Herein, we report for the first time that zymogen FX and its active form (FXa) possess anti-angiogenic properties. Both the recombinant FX and FXa inhibit angiogenesis in vitro using endothelial EA.hy926 and human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). This effect is dependent on the Gla domain of FX. We demonstrate that FX and FXa use different mechanisms: the use of Rivaroxaban (RX) a specific inhibitor of FXa attenuated its anti-angiogenic properties but did not modify the anti-angiogenic effect of FX. Furthermore, only the anti-angiogenic activity of FXa is PAR-1dependent. Using in vivo models, we show that FX and FXa are anti-angiogenic in the zebrafish intersegmental vasculature (ISV) formation and in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Our results provide further evidence for the non-hemostatic functions of FX and FXa and demonstrate for the first time a biological role for the zymogen FX. PMID:24615682

  1. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.80 Direct GME payments: Determination of... before July 1, 1987, the weighting factor for a graduate of a foreign medical school who was in...

  2. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.80 Direct GME payments: Determination of... before July 1, 1987, the weighting factor for a graduate of a foreign medical school who was in...

  3. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.80 Direct GME payments: Determination of... before July 1, 1987, the weighting factor for a graduate of a foreign medical school who was in...

  4. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.80 Direct GME payments: Determination of... before July 1, 1987, the weighting factor for a graduate of a foreign medical school who was in...

  5. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.80 Direct GME payments: Determination of... before July 1, 1987, the weighting factor for a graduate of a foreign medical school who was in...

  6. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek foreign…

  7. Diurnal changes in reflectance factor due to Sun-row direction interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Vanderbilt, V. C.; Kollenkark, J. C.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.; Ranson, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Over a two year period, data were collected regarding the canopies of soybeans grown in rows in planter boxes placed on a turntable in an effort to investigate changes in the spectral reflectance factor related to row direction, Sun direction, soil background, and crop development stage. Results demonstrate that the direction of rows in a soybean canopy can affect the reflectance factor of the canopy by as much as 230%. The results for the red spectral region tend to support the validity of canopy reflectance models; results for the infrared region do not.

  8. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. ); Berkner, K.L. )

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  9. Defining the Minimal Factors Required for Erythropoiesis through Direct Lineage Conversion.

    PubMed

    Capellera-Garcia, Sandra; Pulecio, Julian; Dhulipala, Kishori; Siva, Kavitha; Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Singbrant, Sofie; Sommarin, Mikael N E; Walkley, Carl R; Soneji, Shamit; Karlsson, Göran; Raya, Ángel; Sankaran, Vijay G; Flygare, Johan

    2016-06-14

    Erythroid cell commitment and differentiation proceed through activation of a lineage-restricted transcriptional network orchestrated by a group of well characterized genes. However, the minimal set of factors necessary for instructing red blood cell (RBC) development remains undefined. We employed a screen for transcription factors allowing direct lineage reprograming from fibroblasts to induced erythroid progenitors/precursors (iEPs). We show that Gata1, Tal1, Lmo2, and c-Myc (GTLM) can rapidly convert murine and human fibroblasts directly to iEPs. The transcriptional signature of murine iEPs resembled mainly that of primitive erythroid progenitors in the yolk sac, whereas addition of Klf1 or Myb to the GTLM cocktail resulted in iEPs with a more adult-type globin expression pattern. Our results demonstrate that direct lineage conversion is a suitable platform for defining and studying the core factors inducing the different waves of erythroid development. PMID:27264182

  10. Identification of direct targets of plant transcription factors using the GR fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M; Wellmer, Frank; Wagner, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor-dependent activation of plant transcription factors has proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of their direct target genes. In the absence of the synthetic steroid hormone dexamethasone (dex), transcription factors fused to the hormone-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (TF-GR) are held in an inactive state, due to their cytoplasmic localization. This requires physical interaction with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) complex. Hormone binding leads to disruption of the interaction between GR and HSP90 and allows TF-GR fusion proteins to enter the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, they bind to specific DNA sequences and immediately activate or repress expression of their targets. This system is well suited for the identification of direct target genes of transcription factors in plants, as (A) there is little basal protein activity in the absence of dex, (B) steroid application leads to rapid transcription factor activation, (C) no side effects of dex treatment are observed on the physiology of the plant, and (D) secondary effects of transcription factor activity can be eliminated by simultaneous application of an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, cycloheximide (cyc). In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for the preparation of plant material, for dex and cyc treatment, for RNA extraction, and for the PCR-based or genome-wide identification of direct targets of transcription factors fused to GR. PMID:25757770

  11. The Measure of Human Error: Direct and Indirect Performance Shaping Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Candice D. Griffith; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2007-08-01

    The goal of performance shaping factors (PSFs) is to provide measures to account for human performance. PSFs fall into two categories—direct and indirect measures of human performance. While some PSFs such as “time to complete a task” are directly measurable, other PSFs, such as “fitness for duty,” can only be measured indirectly through other measures and PSFs, such as through fatigue measures. This paper explores the role of direct and indirect measures in human reliability analysis (HRA) and the implications that measurement theory has on analyses and applications using PSFs. The paper concludes with suggestions for maximizing the reliability and validity of PSFs.

  12. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  13. Monte Carlo direct view factor and generalized radiative heat transfer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Williams, J. L.; Scates, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    Computer programs find the direct view factor from one surface segment to another using the Monte carlo technique, and the radioactive-transfer coefficients between surface segments. An advantage of the programs is the great generality of problems treatable and rapidity of solution from problem conception to receipt of results.

  14. The Relationship between Teachers' Personality Factors and Their Compliance with Administrative Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Janet C.

    The relationship between teachers' personality factors and their willingness to comply with administrative directives is examined in this report. A random sample of 200 elementary school teachers in Mississippi received mailed questionnaires, of which 158, or 79 percent, responded. Survey instruments included the Wilkes and Blackbourn Zones of…

  15. Determining eyeball surface area directly exposed to the effects of external factors.

    PubMed

    Juliszewski, Tadeusz; Kadłuczka, Filip; Kiełbasa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses determining the surface area of eyeballs of men and women exposed to the direct effects of external factors in the working environment. For one eye, the mean surface is 172-182 mm(2). The determined surface area can be used in formulas for calculating the exposure of eyeballs to harmful chemical substances in workplace air. PMID:26758027

  16. Factors Affecting Long-Term-Care Residents' Decision-Making Processes as They Formulate Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Heather C.; McColl, Mary Ann; Gilbert, Julie; Wong, Jiahui; Murray, Gale; Shortt, Samuel E. D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe factors contributing to the decision-making processes of elderly persons as they formulate advance directives in long-term care. Design and Methods: This study was qualitative, based on grounded theory. Recruitment was purposive and continued until saturation was reached. Nine residents of a…

  17. Lifestyle factors, direct and indirect costs for a Brazilian airline company

    PubMed Central

    Rabacow, Fabiana Maluf; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malik, Ana Maria; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze lifestyle risk factors related to direct healthcare costs and the indirect costs due to sick leave among workers of an airline company in Brazil. METHODS In this longitudinal 12-month study of 2,201 employees of a Brazilian airline company, the costs of sick leave and healthcare were the primary outcomes of interest. Information on the independent variables, such as gender, age, educational level, type of work, stress, and lifestyle-related factors (body mass index, physical activity, and smoking), was collected using a questionnaire on enrolment in the study. Data on sick leave days were available from the company register, and data on healthcare costs were obtained from insurance records. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the association between direct and indirect healthcare costs with sociodemographic, work, and lifestyle-related factors. RESULTS Over the 12-month study period, the average direct healthcare expenditure per worker was US$505.00 and the average indirect cost because of sick leave was US$249.00 per worker. Direct costs were more than twice the indirect costs and both were higher in women. Body mass index was a determinant of direct costs and smoking was a determinant of indirect costs. CONCLUSIONS Obesity and smoking among workers in a Brazilian airline company were associated with increased health costs. Therefore, promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and anti-tobacco campaigns are important targets for health promotion in this study population. PMID:26039398

  18. Lifestyle factors, direct and indirect costs for a Brazilian airline company.

    PubMed

    Rabacow, Fabiana Maluf; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malik, Ana Maria; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze lifestyle risk factors related to direct healthcare costs and the indirect costs due to sick leave among workers of an airline company in Brazil. METHODS In this longitudinal 12-month study of 2,201 employees of a Brazilian airline company, the costs of sick leave and healthcare were the primary outcomes of interest. Information on the independent variables, such as gender, age, educational level, type of work, stress, and lifestyle-related factors (body mass index, physical activity, and smoking), was collected using a questionnaire on enrolment in the study. Data on sick leave days were available from the company register, and data on healthcare costs were obtained from insurance records. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the association between direct and indirect healthcare costs with sociodemographic, work, and lifestyle-related factors. RESULTS Over the 12-month study period, the average direct healthcare expenditure per worker was US$505.00 and the average indirect cost because of sick leave was US$249.00 per worker. Direct costs were more than twice the indirect costs and both were higher in women. Body mass index was a determinant of direct costs and smoking was a determinant of indirect costs. CONCLUSIONS Obesity and smoking among workers in a Brazilian airline company were associated with increased health costs. Therefore, promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and anti-tobacco campaigns are important targets for health promotion in this study population. PMID:26039398

  19. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Paul G

    2011-08-16

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction--abundance, body size, and geographic range size--to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts. PMID:21808004

  20. Form factor effects in the direct detection of isospin-violating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Lie-Wen E-mail: malkuth@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    Isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM) provides a possible mechanism to ameliorate the tension among recent direct detection experiments. For IVDM, we demonstrate that the results of direct detection experiments based on neutron-rich target nuclei may depend strongly on the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is presently largely unknown and controls the neutron skin thickness that reflects the relative difference of neutron and proton form factors in the neutron-rich nuclei. In particular, using the neutron and proton form factors obtained from Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations by varying the symmetry energy within the uncertainty region set by the latest model-independent measurement of the neutron skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb from PREX experiment at JLab, we find that, for IVDM with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fixed to f{sub n}/f{sub p}=-0.7, the form factor effect may enhance the sensitivity of Xe-based detectors (e.g., XENON100 and LUX) to the DM-proton cross section by a factor of 3 in the DM mass region constrained by CMDS-II(Si) and even by more than an order of magnitude for heavy DM with mass larger than 80 GeV, compared with the results using the empirical Helm form factor. Our results further indicate that the form factor effect can significantly modify the recoil spectrum of Xe-based detectors for heavy IVDM with f{sub n}/f{sub p}=-0.7.

  1. Drug Interactions of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John Leonard; Howes, Laurence Guy

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, new direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice that specifically inhibit either factor Ia or Xa. These drugs have, to a large extent, replaced warfarin for the treatment of venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. They have potential advantages over warfarin in providing more stable anticoagulation and the lack of a need for regular venesection to monitor activity. They also have the promise of less drug and food interactions. All of these drugs are substrates for the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) excretion system, and several are metabolised, in part, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. This current article assesses the interactions that do or may occur with the DOACs, particularly with respect to the P-gp and CYP3A4 systems. PMID:27435452

  2. [Successful direct thrombin inhibitor treatment of a left atrial appendage thrombus developed under rivaroxaban therapy].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Nándor; Gellér, László; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-24

    The authors present the history of a 62-year-old man on continuous rivaroxaban therapy who was scheduled for pulmonary vein isolation due to persistent atrial fibrillation. Preoperative transesophageal echocardiography detected the presence of left atrial appendage thrombus. Thrombophilia tests showed that the patient was heterozygous carrier of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation. The authors hypothesized that a direct thrombin inhibitor might exert a more appropriate effect against thrombosis in this case and, therefore, a switch to dabigatran was performed. After two months of anticoagulation with the direct thrombin inhibitor and folic acid supplementation the thrombus resolved. The authors underline that thrombus formation may develop in atrial fibrillation even if the patient is adequately treated with rivaroxaban. This case suggests, that methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation may modulate the efficacy of direct Xa factor inhibitors. According to this case history, dabigatran may be an effective therapeutic option in resolving established thrombus. PMID:26772828

  3. Geometrical gauge factor of directional electric potential drop sensors for creep monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Madhi, E.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-23

    Directional electric potential drop measurements can be exploited for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor monitors the variation in the ratio of the resistances measured simultaneously in the axial and lateral directions using a square-electrode configuration. This technique can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical and indirect material effects of creep. Initially, this ratio is roughly proportional to the axial creep strain, while at later stages, the resistance ratio increases even faster with creep strain because of the formation of directional discontinuities such as preferentially oriented grain boundary cavities and multiple-site cracks in the material. Similarly to ordinary strain gauges, the relative sensitivity of the sensor is defined as a gauge factor that can be approximated as a sum of geometrical and material parts. This work investigated the geometrical gauge factor by analytical and experimental means. We found that under uniaxial stress square-electrode sensors exhibit geometrical gauge factors of about 4 and 5 in the elastic and plastic regimes, respectively, i.e., more than twice those of conventional strain gauges. Experimental results obtained on 304 stainless steel using a square-electrode electric potential drop creep sensor agree well with our theoretical predictions.

  4. Human projected area factors for detailed direct and diffuse solar radiation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kubaha, K; Fiala, D; Toftum, J; Taki, A H

    2004-11-01

    Projected area factors for individual segments of the standing and sedentary human body were modelled for both direct and diffuse solar radiation using detailed 3D geometry and radiation models. The local projected area factors with respect to direct short-wave radiation are a function of the solar azimuth angle (alpha) between 0 degrees < alpha<360 degrees and the solar altitude (beta) angles between -90 degrees < beta<+90 degrees . In case of diffuse solar radiation from the isotropic sky the local human projected area factors were modelled as a function of the ground albedo (rho) ranging between 0< rho<1. The model was validated against available experimental data and showed good general agreement with projected area factors measured for both the human body as a whole and for local quantities. Scientists can use the equations to predict the inhomogeneous irradiation and absorption of direct and diffuse solar radiation and UV-radiation at surfaces of the human body. In conjunction with detailed multi-node models of human thermoregulation the equations can be used to predict the physiological implications of solar radiation and outdoor weather conditions on humans. PMID:15278684

  5. Factor structure of overall autobiographical memory usage: the directive, self and social functions revisited.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Anne S; Habermas, Tilmann

    2011-08-01

    According to theory, autobiographical memory serves three broad functions of overall usage: directive, self, and social. However, there is evidence to suggest that the tripartite model may be better conceptualised in terms of a four-factor model with two social functions. In the present study we examined the two models in Danish and German samples, using the Thinking About Life Experiences Questionnaire (TALE; Bluck, Alea, Habermas, & Rubin, 2005), which measures the overall usage of the three functions generalised across concrete memories. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor model and rejected the theoretical three-factor model in both samples. The results are discussed in relation to cultural differences in overall autobiographical memory usage as well as sharing versus non-sharing aspects of social remembering. PMID:21919587

  6. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Bautista, Manuel; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  7. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of the three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  8. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts into Functional Astrocytes by Defined Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Giannelli, Serena; Valente, Pierluigi; Lignani, Gabriele; Carissimo, Annamaria; Sessa, Alessandro; Colasante, Gaia; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Massimino, Luca; Ferroni, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Benfenati, Fabio; Broccoli, Vania

    2014-01-01

    Summary Direct cell reprogramming enables direct conversion of fibroblasts into functional neurons and oligodendrocytes using a minimal set of cell-lineage-specific transcription factors. This approach is rapid and simple, generating the cell types of interest in one step. However, it remains unknown whether this technology can be applied to convert fibroblasts into astrocytes, the third neural lineage. Astrocytes play crucial roles in neuronal homeostasis, and their dysfunctions contribute to the origin and progression of multiple human diseases. Herein, we carried out a screening using several transcription factors involved in defining the astroglial cell fate and identified NFIA, NFIB, and SOX9 to be sufficient to convert with high efficiency embryonic and postnatal mouse fibroblasts into astrocytes (iAstrocytes). We proved both by gene-expression profiling and functional tests that iAstrocytes are comparable to native brain astrocytes. This protocol can be then employed to generate functional iAstrocytes for a wide range of experimental applications. PMID:25556566

  9. Variation of directional reflectance factors with structural changes of a developing alfalfa canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, J. A.; Kimes, D. S.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors of an alfalfa canopy were determined and related to canopy structure, agronomic variables, and irradiance conditions at four periods during a cutting cycle. Nadir and off-nadir reflectance factors decreased with increasing biomass in Thematic Mapper band 3(0.63-0.69 micrometer) and increased with increasing biomass in band 4(0.76-0.90 micrometer). The sensor view angle had less impact on perceived reflectance as the alfalfa progressed from an erectophile canopy of stems after harvest to a near planophile canopy of leaves at maturity. Studies of directional reflectance are needed for testing and upgrading vegetation canopy models and to aid in the complex interpretation problems presented by aircraft scanners and pointable satellites where illumination and viewing geometries may vary widely. Distinct changes in the patterns of radiance observed by a sensor as structural and biomass changes occur are keys to monitoring the growth and condition of crops.

  10. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system, and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction, and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  11. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    SALMA, NUNCIADA; SONG, JUN S.; ARANY, ZOLTAN; FISHER, DAVID E.

    2015-01-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3’s binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes. PMID:25736533

  12. Risk Factors for and Behavioral Consequences of Direct Versus Indirect Exposure to Violence.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Gregory M; Posick, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that direct exposure (personal victimization) and indirect exposure (witnessing or hearing about the victimization of a family member, friend, or neighbor) to violence are correlated. However, questions remain about the co-occurrence of these phenomena within individuals. We used data on 1915 youths (with an average age of 12 years at baseline) from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine this issue. Results indicated that youths who tended to be personally victimized were also likely to witness violence; conversely, youths who disproportionately witnessed violence were relatively unlikely to experience personal victimization. In addition, direct and indirect exposures to violence were associated with subsequent adverse outcomes in similar ways. The key distinguishing factor was, rather, the cumulative level of violence (both direct and indirect) to which youths were exposed. PMID:26562101

  13. Material gauge factor of directional electric potential drop sensors for creep monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Madhi, E.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-23

    Directional electric potential drop measurements can be exploited for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor monitors the variation in the ratio of the resistances measured simultaneously in the axial and lateral directions using a square-electrode configuration. This method can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical (size and shape) and indirect material (resistivity) effects of creep. Similarly to ordinary strain gauges, the relative sensitivity of the sensor is defined as a gauge factor that can be approximated as the sum of geometrical and material parts. Initially, subtle material changes produce weak electric anisotropy via reversible and irreversible piezoresistivity due to elastic and plastic strains, respectively. At high temperature, much stronger irreversible resistivity changes also occur due to preferentially aligned clusters of cavities developing along grain boundaries approximately perpendicular to the applied stress and subsequent cracks forming between these cavities. The ensuing electric anisotropy is detected by the directional sensor. Although the material effects remain smaller than the geometrical ones up to the initiation of preferentially oriented cracks, later the material gauge factor sharply increases and close to rupture can reach a value of more than 10.

  14. Hemophilia as a defect of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation: Effect of factors VIII and IX on factor X activation in a continuous-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Repke, D.; Gemmell, C.H.; Guha, A.; Turitto, V.T.; Nemerson, Y. ); Broze, G.J. Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of factors VIII and IX on the ability of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex to activate factor X was studied in a continuous-flow tubular enzyme reactor. Tissue factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of the tube was exposed to a perfusate containing factors VIIa, VIII, IX, and X flowing at a wall shear rate of 57, 300, or 1130 sec{sup {minus}1}. The addition of factors VIII and IX at their respective plasma concentrations resulted in a further 2{endash}-to 3{endash}fold increase. The direct activation of factor X by tissue factor-factor VIIa could be virtually eliminated by the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. These results suggest that the tissue factor pathway, mediated through factors VIII and IX, produces significant levels of factor Xa even in the presence of an inhibitor of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex; moreover, the activation is dependent on local shear conditions. These findings are consistent both with a model of blood coagulation in which initiation of the system results from tissue factor and with the bleeding observed in hemophilia.

  15. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  16. ETS transcription factor ETV2 directly converts human fibroblasts into functional endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Rimpei; Suzuki, Mayu; Kasahara, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nana; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Kimura, Akihiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Yasukawa, Hideo; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of endothelial cells (ECs) is a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic disorders. In addition, the generation of ECs has become increasingly important for providing vascular plexus to regenerated organs, such as the liver. Although many attempts have been made to generate ECs from pluripotent stem cells and nonvascular cells, the minimum number of transcription factors that specialize in directly inducing vascular ECs remains undefined. Here, by screening 18 transcription factors that are important for both endothelial and hematopoietic development, we demonstrate that ets variant 2 (ETV2) alone directly converts primary human adult skin fibroblasts into functional vascular endothelial cells (ETVECs). In coordination with endogenous FOXC2 in fibroblasts, transduced ETV2 elicits expression of multiple key endothelial development factors, including FLI1, ERG, and TAL1, and induces expression of endothelial functional molecules, including EGFL7 and von Willebrand factor. Consequently, ETVECs exhibits EC characteristics in vitro and forms mature functional vasculature in Matrigel plugs transplanted in NOD SCID mice. Furthermore, ETVECs significantly improve blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemic model using BALB/c-nu mice. Our study indicates that the creation of ETVECs provides further understanding of human EC development induced by ETV2. PMID:25540418

  17. Exposure to aggressive behaviour and burnout in direct support providers: The role of positive work factors.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Jennifer M; Lunsky, Yona; Dewa, Carolyn S

    2014-11-11

    Many direct support providers (DSPs) are exposed to aggressive behaviour in their work supporting adults with developmental disabilities service recipients. This is a work environment factor that has been linked to job burnout. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of positive work factors on emotional exhaustion (EE) among DSPs who are exposed to aggressive behaviour. Survey responses from 671 DSPs who were working in community service settings for adults with developmental disabilities, and were exposed to aggressive behaviour at least monthly were examined. Hierarchical linear regression examined the direct contribution and moderating role of positive work factors (self-efficacy for dealing with aggression and work contributions) on EE measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, after controlling for demographics, occupational variables, exposure to aggression and negative emotional reactions to aggression. Results showed that younger age, more experience, more depression/anger emotions in response to aggression, lower self-efficacy and low positive work contributions were significantly associated with EE. Positive work motivation was a moderator of exposure to aggression and EE. When work motivations were low, DSPs were more negatively affected by higher exposure to aggression. These findings suggest that in addition to addressing the negative emotional reactions to the aggressive behaviour encountered at work, it is also important to foster positive work factors which may be protective against EE. PMID:25462500

  18. A structured elicitation method to identify key direct risk factors for the management of natural resources.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael; Wallace, Ken; Lewis, Loretta; Wagner, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The high level of uncertainty inherent in natural resource management requires planners to apply comprehensive risk analyses, often in situations where there are few resources. In this paper, we demonstrate a broadly applicable, novel and structured elicitation approach to identify important direct risk factors. This new approach combines expert calibration and fuzzy based mathematics to capture and aggregate subjective expert estimates of the likelihood that a set of direct risk factors will cause management failure. A specific case study is used to demonstrate the approach; however, the described methods are widely applicable in risk analysis. For the case study, the management target was to retain all species that characterise a set of natural biological elements. The analysis was bounded by the spatial distribution of the biological elements under consideration and a 20-year time frame. Fourteen biological elements were expected to be at risk. Eleven important direct risk factors were identified that related to surrounding land use practices, climate change, problem species (e.g., feral predators), fire and hydrological change. In terms of their overall influence, the two most important risk factors were salinisation and a lack of water which together pose a considerable threat to the survival of nine biological elements. The described approach successfully overcame two concerns arising from previous risk analysis work: (1) the lack of an intuitive, yet comprehensive scoring method enabling the detection and clarification of expert agreement and associated levels of uncertainty; and (2) the ease with which results can be interpreted and communicated while preserving a rich level of detail essential for informed decision making. PMID:27441228

  19. MYRF is a membrane-associated transcription factor that autoproteolytically cleaves to directly activate myelin genes.

    PubMed

    Bujalka, Helena; Koenning, Matthias; Jackson, Stacey; Perreau, Victoria M; Pope, Bernard; Hay, Curtis M; Mitew, Stanlislaw; Hill, Andrew F; Lu, Q Richard; Wegner, Michael; Srinivasan, Rajini; Svaren, John; Willingham, Melanie; Barres, Ben A; Emery, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The myelination of axons is a crucial step during vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development, allowing for rapid and energy efficient saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Accordingly, the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, and their expression of myelin genes are under tight transcriptional control. We previously identified a putative transcription factor, Myelin Regulatory Factor (Myrf), as being vital for CNS myelination. Myrf is required for the generation of CNS myelination during development and also for its maintenance in the adult. It has been controversial, however, whether Myrf directly regulates transcription, with reports of a transmembrane domain and lack of nuclear localization. Here we show that Myrf is a membrane-associated transcription factor that undergoes an activating proteolytic cleavage to separate its transmembrane domain-containing C-terminal region from a nuclear-targeted N-terminal region. Unexpectedly, this cleavage event occurs via a protein domain related to the autoproteolytic intramolecular chaperone domain of the bacteriophage tail spike proteins, the first time this domain has been found to play a role in eukaryotic proteins. Using ChIP-Seq we show that the N-terminal cleavage product directly binds the enhancer regions of oligodendrocyte-specific and myelin genes. This binding occurs via a defined DNA-binding consensus sequence and strongly promotes the expression of target genes. These findings identify Myrf as a novel example of a membrane-associated transcription factor and provide a direct molecular mechanism for its regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelination. PMID:23966833

  20. CHANDRA IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE EASTERN XA REGION OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Brantseg, T.

    2011-04-01

    The XA region of the Cygnus Loop is a bright knot of X-ray emission on the eastern edge of the supernova remnant. The emission results from the interaction of the supernova blast wave with density enhancements at the edge of a precursor formed cavity. However, this interaction is complex given the irregular morphology of the cavity wall. To study the nature and origin of the X-ray emission, we use high spatial resolution images from Chandra. We extract spectra from these images to analyze the physical conditions of the plasma. Our goal is to probe the density of various regions to form a picture of the cavity wall and characterize the interaction between this supernova and the local interstellar medium. We find that a series of regions along the edge of the X-ray emission appears to trace out the location of the cavity wall. The best-fit plasma models result in two temperature component equilibrium models for each region. The low-temperature components have densities that are an order of magnitude higher than the high-temperature components. The high-density plasma may exist in the cavity wall where it equilibrates rapidly and cools efficiently. The low-density plasma is interior to the enhancement and heated further by a reverse shock from the wall. Calculations of shock velocities and timescales since shock heating are consistent with this interpretation. Furthermore, we find a bright knot of emission indicative of a discrete interaction of the blast wave with a high-density cloud in the cavity wall with a size scale {approx}0.1 pc. Aside from this, other extractions made interior to the X-ray edge are confused by line-of-sight projection of various components. Some of these regions show evidence of detecting the cavity wall but their location makes the interpretation difficult. In general, the softer plasmas are well fit at temperatures (kT){approx} 0.11 keV, with harder plasmas at temperatures of (kT){approx} 0.27 keV. All regions displayed consistent metal

  1. Environmental Determinants of Cardiovascular Diseases Risk Factors: A Qualitative Directed Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzmakan, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Afaghi, Ahmad; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of death in the world. In most analyses of health problems, environment plays a significant and modifiable role in causing the problem either directly or indirectly through behavior. Objectives: This study aims to understand the patients and healthcare providers’ experiences about the environmental determinants of CVD risk factors based on the Precede Model. Patients and Methods: This qualitative study conducted over six months in 2012 at Diabetes Units of Health Centers associated with Alborz University of Medical Sciences and Health Services which is located in Karaj, Iran. The data were collected based on individual semi-structured interviews with 50 patients and 12 healthcare providers. Data analysis was performed simultaneous with data collection using the content analysis directed method. Results: Lack of behaviors like stress control, healthy eating and physical activity were the roots of the risk factors for CVD. The environmental factor is one of the barriers for conducting these behaviors. The environmental barriers included of structural environment including “availability and accessibility of health resources”, “new skills”, and “law and policies” which are located in enabling category and social environment including “social support”, “motivation to comply” and “consequences of behavior” which are located in reinforcing category. The most barriers to performing health behaviors were often structural. Conclusions: The environmental factors were barriers for doing healthy behaviors. These factors need to be considered to design health promotion interventions. Policymakers should not only focus on patients’ education but also should provide specific facilities to enhance economic, social and cultural status. PMID:25031848

  2. Hypobaric hypoxia is not a direct dyspnogenic factor in healthy individuals at rest.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takayuki; Iwazaki, Masayuki; Sasao, Gen; Nagai, Asuka; Ebihara, Akinori; Iwamoto, Tokuzen; Kuwahira, Ichiro

    2015-11-01

    Dyspnea consists of various uncomfortable respiratory sensations. It is believed that hypoxia causes dyspnea, but whether hypoxia is a direct dyspnogenic factor remains uncertain. We investigated whether hypoxia has a direct dyspnogenic effect. We evaluated changes in vital signs, arterial blood gases, SaO2, CaO2, Borg scale, and Mini-Mental State Examination in seven mountain climbers by using a hypobaric hypoxic chamber in which the barometric pressure was lowered to the simulated altitude of 4500 m. PaO2 and CaO2 both decreased significantly as the simulated altitude increased. On the other hand, Borg scale score which reflects dyspnea showed no significant difference. At the simulated altitude of 4500 m, Borg scale score was 1.5 ± 1.2 (mean ± SD), despite the presence of absolute hypoxia (PaO2, 46.8 ± 8.3T; CaO2, 16.4 ± 0.6 mL/dL). These results suggest that hypoxia is not a direct dyspnogenic factor in healthy individuals capable of breathing without restriction at rest. PMID:26219585

  3. Characterization of the direct targets of FOXO transcription factors throughout evolution.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ashley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Brunet, Anne

    2016-08-01

    FOXO transcription factors (FOXOs) are central regulators of lifespan across species, yet they also have cell-specific functions, including adult stem cell homeostasis and immune function. Direct targets of FOXOs have been identified genome-wide in several species and cell types. However, whether FOXO targets are specific to cell types and species or conserved across cell types and throughout evolution remains uncharacterized. Here, we perform a meta-analysis of direct FOXO targets across tissues and organisms, using data from mammals as well as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila. We show that FOXOs bind cell type-specific targets, which have functions related to that particular cell. Interestingly, FOXOs also share targets across different tissues in mammals, and the function and even the identity of these shared mammalian targets are conserved in invertebrates. Evolutionarily conserved targets show enrichment for growth factor signaling, metabolism, stress resistance, and proteostasis, suggesting an ancestral, conserved role in the regulation of these processes. We also identify candidate cofactors at conserved FOXO targets that change in expression with age, including CREB and ETS family factors. This meta-analysis provides insight into the evolution of the FOXO network and highlights downstream genes and cofactors that may be particularly important for FOXO's conserved function in adult homeostasis and longevity. PMID:27061590

  4. Improved Growth Factor Directed Vascularization into Fibrin Constructs Through Inclusion of Additional Extracellular Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Smith, JD; Melhem, ME; Magge, KT; Waggoner, AS; Campbell, PG

    2009-01-01

    Using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) and a novel histological technique we investigated the ability of blood vessels to directly invade fibrin-based scaffolds. In our initial experiments utilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) we found no direct invasion. Instead, the fibrin was completely degraded and replaced with highly vascularized new tissue. Addition of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to the fibrin construct also did not result in construct vascularization. Because natural and regenerating tissues exhibit complex extracellular matrices (ECMs), we hypothesized that a more complex scaffold may improve blood vessel invasion. Addition of fibronectin, hyaluronic acid, and collagen type I within 20 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in no significant improvement. However, the same additive concentrations within 10 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in dramatic improvements, specifically with hyaluronic acid. Overall, we believe these results indicate the importance of structural and functional cues of not only in the initial scaffold but also as the construct is degraded and remodeled. Furthermore, the CAM assay may represent a useful model for understanding ECM interactions as well as for screening and designing tissue engineered scaffolds. PMID:17223139

  5. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 exerts direct effects on the proliferation and invasiveness of endometrial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Aligeti, Sabitha; Kirma, Nameer B.; Binkely, Peter A; Schenken, Robert S.; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao

    2011-01-01

    Although macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) has been suggested to play a role in part in maintaining the chronic inflammatory response in endometriosis, our previous data suggest that CSF-1 may also play a role in early endometriosis lesion formation. In the current studies, we have examined this possibility and have shown that CSF-1, in an autocrine fashion, has a direct effect on endometrial epithelial cell proliferation and attachment to peritoneal mesothelial cells, early steps in endometriosis lesion formation on the peritoneum. PMID:21481374

  6. Direct lineage reprogramming via pioneer factors; a detour through developmental gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samantha A

    2016-08-01

    Although many approaches have been employed to generate defined fate in vitro, the resultant cells often appear developmentally immature or incompletely specified, limiting their utility. Growing evidence suggests that current methods of direct lineage conversion may rely on the transition through a developmental intermediate. Here, I hypothesize that complete conversion between cell fates is more probable and feasible via reversion to a developmentally immature state. I posit that this is due to the role of pioneer transcription factors in engaging silent, unmarked chromatin and activating hierarchical gene regulatory networks responsible for embryonic patterning. Understanding these developmental contexts will be essential for the precise engineering of cell identity. PMID:27486230

  7. Rice xa13 Recessive Resistance to Bacterial Blight Is Defeated by Induction of the Disease Susceptibility Gene Os-11N3[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Ginny; Zhou, Junhui; Huang, Sheng; Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; White, Frank; Yang, Bing

    2010-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) gene xa13 is a recessive resistance allele of Os-8N3, a member of the NODULIN3 (N3) gene family, located on rice chromosome 8. Os-8N3 is a susceptibility (S) gene for Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight, and the recessive allele is defeated by strains of the pathogen producing any one of the type III effectors AvrXa7, PthXo2, or PthXo3, which are all members of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector family. Both AvrXa7 and PthXo3 induce the expression of a second member of the N3 gene family, here named Os-11N3. Insertional mutagenesis or RNA-mediated silencing of Os-11N3 resulted in plants with loss of susceptibility specifically to strains of X. oryzae pv oryzae dependent on AvrXa7 or PthXo3 for virulence. We further show that AvrXa7 drives expression of Os-11N3 and that AvrXa7 interacts and binds specifically to an effector binding element within the Os-11N3 promoter, lending support to the predictive models for TAL effector binding specificity. The result indicates that variations in the TAL effector repetitive domains are driven by selection to overcome both dominant and recessive forms of resistance to bacterial blight in rice. The finding that Os-8N3 and Os-11N3 encode closely related proteins also provides evidence that N3 proteins have a specific function in facilitating bacterial blight disease. PMID:21098734

  8. Specific antidotes against direct oral anticoagulants: A comprehensive review of clinical trials data.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Ramyashree; Kavtaradze, Ana; Gupta, Anjan; Ghosh, Raktim Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Vitamin K antagonist warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for decades for the treatment of thrombosis and prevention of thromboembolism until Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs); a group of new oral anticoagulants got approved in the last few years. Direct thrombin inhibitor: dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors: apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban directly inhibit the coagulation cascade. DOACs have many advantages over warfarin. However, the biggest drawback of DOACs has been the lack of specific antidotes to reverse the anticoagulant effect in emergency situations. Activated charcoal, hemodialysis, and activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) were amongst the nonspecific agents used in a DOAC associated bleeding but with limited success. Idarucizumab, the first novel antidote against direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran was approved by US FDA in October 2015. It comprehensively reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a phase I study. A phase III trial on Idarucizumab also complete reversal of anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (PRT064445), a specific reversal agent against factor Xa inhibitors, showed a complete reversal of anticoagulant activity of apixaban and rivaroxaban within minutes after administration without adverse effects in two recently completed parallel phase III trials ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R respectively. It is currently being studied in ANNEXA-4, a phase IV study. Aripazine (PER-977), the third reversal agent, has shown promising activity against dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH. This review article summarizes pharmacological characteristics of these novel antidotes, coagulation's tests affected, available clinical and preclinical data, and the need for phase III and IV studies. PMID:27082776

  9. MicroRNA-218 inhibits melanogenesis by directly suppressing microphthalmia-associated transcription factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Wang, Wei-Mao; Cheung, Florence Wing-ki; Lu, Ying-fei; Ng, Chi-fai; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Liu, Wing-keung

    2014-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a pivotal regulator of melanogenic enzymes for melanogenesis, and its expression is modulated by many transcriptional factors at the transcriptional level or post-transcriptional level through microRNAs (miRNAs). Although several miRNAs modulate melanogenic activities, there is no evidence of their direct action on MITF expression. Out of eight miRNAs targeting the 3′-UTR of Mitf predicted by bioinformatic programs, our results show miR-218 to be a novel candidate for direct action on MITF expression. Ectopic miR-218 dramatically reduced MITF expression, suppressed tyrosinase activity, and induced depigmentation in murine immortalized melan-a melanocytes. MiR-218 also suppressed melanogenesis in human pigmented skin organotypic culture (OTC) through the repression of MITF. An inverse correlation between MITF and miR-218 expression was found in human primary skin melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism involving miR-218 in the regulation of the MITF pigmentary process and its potential application for skin whitening therapy. PMID:24824743

  10. Youth Anxiety and Parent Factors Over Time: Directionality of Change Among Youth Treated for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Settipani, Cara Anne; O’Neil, Kelly A; Podell, Jennifer L; Beidas, Rinad S; Kendall, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The relationship between improvements in child anxiety and changes in parent factors (e.g., parental anxiety, parenting behaviors) is poorly understood. The present study investigated the directionality of change for child anxiety and parent factors among youth treated for anxiety disorders. Method Structural equation modeling examined these relationships pre- to post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up for 111 youth aged 7–14 (57% male, 84% Caucasian). Child anxiety was measured using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children and the Child Behavior Checklist. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Children’s Report of Parental Behavior Inventory, and Family Assessment Device were used to measure maternal anxiety, psychological control, behavior control, and family affective involvement. Results Findings suggest that decreases in mother-reported child anxiety led to decreases in maternal anxiety. Decreases in maternal psychological control and family affective involvement preceded decreases in clinician-rated child anxiety. Youth who showed the most reductions in anxiety over the course of treatment were those who tended to have lower family affective involvement, behavior control, and maternal anxiety at pretreatment. Stability of the parent factors and child anxiety over time suggest that stability was greater for behavior control and maternal anxiety relative to affective involvement and psychological control. Conclusions The findings are consistent with previous research indicating the importance of these parent factors as they relate to anxiety in youth. Furthermore, results indicate that changes in child anxiety may precede changes in parent factors and suggest that psychological control and affective involvement are important treatment targets for youth with anxiety disorders. PMID:23009743

  11. Directed Evolution of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor for Improved Folding and Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Michael L.; Malott, Thomas M.; Metcalf, Kevin J.; Hackel, Benjamin J.; Chan, Jonah R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in nervous system function and has therapeutic potential. Microbial production of BDNF has resulted in a low-fidelity protein product, often in the form of large, insoluble aggregates incapable of binding to cognate TrkB or p75 receptors. In this study, employing Saccharomyces cerevisiae display and secretion systems, it was found that BDNF was poorly expressed and partially inactive on the yeast surface and that BDNF was secreted at low levels in the form of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Thus, for the purpose of increasing the compatibility of yeast as an expression host for BDNF, directed-evolution approaches were employed to improve BDNF folding and expression levels. Yeast surface display was combined with two rounds of directed evolution employing random mutagenesis and shuffling to identify BDNF mutants that had 5-fold improvements in expression, 4-fold increases in specific TrkB binding activity, and restored p75 binding activity, both as displayed proteins and as secreted proteins. Secreted BDNF mutants were found largely in the form of soluble homodimers that could stimulate TrkB phosphorylation in transfected PC12 cells. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that a particularly important mutational class involved the introduction of cysteines proximal to the native cysteines that participate in the BDNF cysteine knot architecture. Taken together, these findings show that yeast is now a viable alternative for both the production and the engineering of BDNF. PMID:25015885

  12. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  13. Direct measurement of electron beam quality conversion factors using water calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, James Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman; Marchant, Kristin; McEwen, Malcolm; Ross, Carl

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an electron sealed water calorimeter (ESWcal) designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams and its use to derive electron beam quality conversion factors for two ionization chamber types. Methods: A functioning calorimeter prototype was constructed in-house and used to obtain reproducible measurements in clinical accelerator-based 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams. Corrections for the radiation field perturbation due to the presence of the glass calorimeter vessel were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The conductive heat transfer due to dose gradients and nonwater materials was also accounted for using a commercial finite element method software package. Results: The relative combined standard uncertainty on the ESWcal dose was estimated to be 0.50% for the 9–20 MeV beams and 1.00% for the 6 MeV beam, demonstrating that the development of a water calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over such a wide range of clinically relevant energies is feasible. The largest contributor to the uncertainty was the positioning (Type A, 0.10%–0.40%) and its influence on the perturbation correction (Type B, 0.10%–0.60%). As a preliminary validation, measurements performed with the ESWcal in a 6 MV photon beam were directly compared to results derived from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) photon beam standard water calorimeter. These two independent devices were shown to agree well within the 0.43% combined relative uncertainty of the ESWcal for this beam type and quality. Absorbed dose electron beam quality conversion factors were measured using the ESWcal for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers. The photon-electron conversion factor, k{sub ecal}, for the A12 was also experimentally determined. Nonstatistically significant differences of up to 0.7% were found when compared to the calculation-based factors listed in the AAPM’s TG-51 protocol

  14. Determining the direction of causality between psychological factors and aircraft noise annoyance.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Maarten; Molin, Eric J E; van Wee, Bert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to establish the direction of causality between a range of psychological factors and aircraft noise annoyance. For this purpose, a panel model was estimated within a structural equation modeling approach. Data were gathered from two surveys conducted in April 2006 and April 2008, respectively, among the same residents living within the 45 Level day-evening-night contour of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, the largest airport in the Netherlands (n=250). A surprising result is that none of the paths from the psychological factors to aircraft noise annoyance were found to be significant. Yet 2 effects were significant the other way around: (1) from 'aircraft noise annoyance' to 'concern about the negative health effects of noise' and (2) from 'aircraft noise annoyance' to 'belief that noise can be prevented.' Hence aircraft noise annoyance measured at time 1 contained information that can effectively explain changes in these 2 variables at time 2, while controlling for their previous values. Secondary results show that (1) aircraft noise annoyance is very stable through time and (2) that changes in aircraft noise annoyance and the identified psychological factors are correlated. PMID:20160387

  15. Ectopic expression of single transcription factors directs differentiation of a medaka spermatogonial cell line.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eva C; Wagner, Toni U; Weber, Isabell P; Herpin, Amaury; Fischer, Andreas; Schartl, Manfred

    2011-08-01

    The capability to form all cell types of the body is a unique feature of stem cells. However, many questions remain concerning the mechanisms regulating differentiation potential. The derivation of spermatogonial cell lines (SGs) from mouse and human, which can differentiate across germ-layer borders, suggested male germ cells as a potential stem cell source in addition to embryonic stem cells. Here, we present a differentiation system using an SG of the vertebrate model organism Oryzias latipes (medaka). We report differentiation of this cell line into 4 different ectodermal and mesodermal somatic cell types. In addition to differentiation into adipocytes by retinoic acid treatment, we demonstrate for the first time that directed differentiation of an SG can be induced by ectopic expression of single transcription factors, completely independent of culture conditions. Transient transfection with mitf-m, a transcription factor that has been shown to induce differentiation into melanocytes in medaka embryonic stem cells, resulted in the formation of the same cell type in spermatogonia. Similarly, the formation of neuron-like cells and matrix-depositing osteoblasts was induced by ectopic expression of mash1 and cbfa1, respectively. Interestingly, we found that the expression of all mentioned fate-inducing transcription factors leads to recapitulation of the temporal pattern of marker gene expression known from in vivo studies. PMID:21090990

  16. The Ets factor Spi-B is a direct critical target of the coactivator OBF-1

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Boris; Du Roure, Camille; Bordon, Alain; Emslie, Dianne; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Matthias, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    OBF-1 (Bob.1, OCA-B) is a lymphoid-specific transcriptional coactivator that associates with the transcription factors Oct-1 or Oct-2 on the conserved octamer element present in the promoters of several ubiquitous and lymphoid-specific genes. OBF-1-deficient mice have B cell-intrinsic defects, lack germinal centers, and have severely impaired immune responses to T cell-dependent antigens. Crucial genes that are regulated by OBF-1 and that might explain the observed phenotype of OBF-1 deficiency have remained elusive to date. Here we have generated transgenic mice expressing OBF-1 specifically in T cells and examined these together with mice lacking OBF-1 to discover transcriptional targets of this coactivator. Using microarray analysis, we have identified the Ets transcription factor Spi-B as a direct target gene critically regulated by OBF-1 that can help explain the phenotype of OBF-1-deficient mice. Spi-B has been implicated in signaling pathways downstream of the B cell receptor and is essential for germinal center formation and maintenance. The present findings establish a hierarchy between these two factors and provide a molecular link between OBF-1 and B cell receptor signaling. PMID:16861304

  17. Direct interaction of avermectin with epidermal growth factor receptor mediates the penetration resistance in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of avermectins (AVMs) for managing parasitic and agricultural pests, the resistance of worms and insects to AVMs has emerged as a serious threat to human health and agriculture worldwide. The reduced penetration of AVMs is one of the main reasons for the development of the resistance to the chemicals. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster as the model organism to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to AVMs. We clearly show that the chitin layer is thickened and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in the AVM-resistant larvae epidermis. We reveal that the activation of the transcription factor Relish by the over-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/AKT/ERK pathway induces the overexpression of the chitin synthases DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp in the resistant larvae. Interestingly, we discover for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AVM directly interacts with EGFR and leads to the activation of the EGFR/AKT/ERK pathway, which activates the transcription factor Relish and induces the overexpression of DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to drugs. PMID:27249340

  18. [Unemployment during pregnancy: direct or indirect risk factor of prematurity and fetus hypotrophy?].

    PubMed

    Hanke, W

    1999-01-01

    The question as to whether in a transitional phase in the political and socio-economic development in Poland, an increased threat of unemployment may also produce health effects manifested by an elevated risk for prematurity and fetus hypotrophy is one of important challenges. If the answer is positive then this issue should have much stronger impact on political and economic decisions. The data obtained from numerous studies carried out in countries of western Europe and the United States shows that the job performance during pregnancy under conditions free from occupational exposure and arduousness does not directly augment the risk of detrimental effect to the health of pregnant woman or her fetus. Just on the contrary, it was found that job performance during pregnancy, and strictly speaking steady employment during this period may somewhat become a 'protective factor'. In Poland, the highest rate of unemployment is observed among women in the 18-24 age group, that is at the age most suitable for procreation. Nowadays it is common that the decision on child-bearing is postponed until the economic status of the woman or her family comes to be more stable. On the other hand, in the population of women looking for a job but determined to set up a family prematurity is quite common that results only in part from an excessive effect of risk factors for this pathology very typical of this social group, like smoking, single parenthood, early or late child-bearing age. After adjusting these factors, the risk of prematurity decreased considerably but it was still high. It is thought that stress and the sense of threat and uncertainty is mostly responsible for this phenomenon. An increased risk of fetus hypotrophy among unemployed women after considering all confounding factors, was not observed. PMID:10746241

  19. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Mitchell, Isaiah P; Desotell, Anthony W; Kreeger, Pamela K; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a critical element in dermal repair, but EGF-containing wound dressings have not been successful clinically. However, these dressings have delivered only soluble EGF, and the native environment provides both soluble and matrix-bound EGF. To address our hypothesis that tethered EGF can stimulate cell behaviors not achievable with soluble EGF, we examined single-cell movement and signaling in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes treated with soluble or immobilized EGF. Although both EGF treatments increased collective sheet displacement and individual cell speed, only cells treated with immobilized EGF exhibited directed migration, as well as 2-fold greater persistence compared with soluble EGF. Immunofluorescence showed altered EGF receptor (EGFR) trafficking, where EGFR remained membrane-localized in the immobilized EGF condition. Cells treated with soluble EGF demonstrated higher phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cells on immobilized EGF exhibited higher pPLCγ1, which was localized at the leading edge. Treatment with U0126 inhibited migration in both conditions, demonstrating that ERK1/2 activity was necessary but not responsible for the observed differences. In contrast, PLCγ1 inhibition with U73122 significantly decreased persistence on immobilized EGF. Combined, these results suggest that immobilized EGF increases collective keratinocyte displacement via an increase in single-cell migration persistence resulting from altered EGFR trafficking and PLCγ1 activation.-Kim, C. S., Mitchell, I. P., Desotell, A. W., Kreeger, P. K., Masters, K. S. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1. PMID:27025961

  20. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  1. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jaindra Nath; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Summary Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, bio-control agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21 mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar ‘Gonja manjaya’ (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic plants in the glass house for resistance against Xcm. About fifty percent of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  2. Efficient constitutive expression of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A in Escherichia coli DH5alpha under the control of the Bacillus BsXA promoter.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Rosa, José César; Faça, Victor M; Greene, Lewis J; Ward, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Xylanase A (XynA) is a class G/11 xylanase secreted by Bacillus subtilis. XynA was purified to homogeneity from B. subtilis strain 168 culture supernatants by ethanol precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography. The DNA fragment encoding the XynA together with the BsXA promoter region was amplified by PCR from B. subtilis 168 genomic DNA, and cloned into the plasmid pT7T3 to give the plasmid pT7BsXA. After transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha with pT7BsXA, a 19-fold increase in the levels of the secreted XynA was detected in the supernatant as compared with the B. subtilis culture. Correct post-translation modification of the recombinant protein was confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and MS analyses. The pH- and temperature-dependences of the native and recombinant proteins were identical, indicating that the pT7BsXA may be useful for the constitutive expression of heterologous protein in E. coli. PMID:15982188

  3. 78 FR 70209 - Airworthiness Directives; XtremeAir GmbH Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect...-047-AD; Amendment 39-17674; AD 2013-23-19] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; XtremeAir GmbH.... SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for XtremeAir GmbH Model XA42 airplanes....

  4. Direct phase-sensitive identification of a d-form factor density wave in underdoped cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Hamidian, Mohammad H.; Edkins, Stephen D.; Kim, Chung Koo; Kohsaka, Yuhki; Azuma, Masaki; Takano, Mikio; Takagi, Hidenori; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi; Allais, Andrea; Lawler, Michael J.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Sachdev, Subir; Davis, J. C. Séamus

    2014-01-01

    The identity of the fundamental broken symmetry (if any) in the underdoped cuprates is unresolved. However, evidence has been accumulating that this state may be an unconventional density wave. Here we carry out site-specific measurements within each CuO2 unit cell, segregating the results into three separate electronic structure images containing only the Cu sites [Cu(r)] and only the x/y axis O sites [Ox(r) and Oy(r)]. Phase-resolved Fourier analysis reveals directly that the modulations in the Ox(r) and Oy(r) sublattice images consistently exhibit a relative phase of π. We confirm this discovery on two highly distinct cuprate compounds, ruling out tunnel matrix-element and materials-specific systematics. These observations demonstrate by direct sublattice phase-resolved visualization that the density wave found in underdoped cuprates consists of modulations of the intraunit-cell states that exhibit a predominantly d-symmetry form factor. PMID:24989503

  5. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  6. Hemispherical directional reflectance factor using UAV and a hyperspectral camera, validation and crop field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, T.; Honkavaara, E.; Markelin, L.

    2014-10-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and a prototype hyperspectral imaging camera (HSI) was used to measure the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of a test field with known light scattering properties. The HSI acquires a burst of 24 images within two seconds and all of these images are acquired with different spectral content. By using the autopilot of the UAV, the flight can be preplanned so that the target area is optimally covered with overlapping images from multiple view angles. Structure from motion (SFM) algorithm is used to accurately determine the view angles for each image. The HDRF is calculated for each ground pixel by determining view directions from all of the images for that particular pixel. The pixel intensity values are then processed to reflectance by using a reference panel, which has been measured in laboratory with Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO). The UAV flight was performed over a test field with different gravel targets. The targets have known HDRF and this allows us to validate the UAV results. Another test was performed over a crop field to display the potential of this method for crop monitoring.

  7. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  8. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Marie; Hägglöf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L.; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2+) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163+) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  9. Direct measurement of 11B(p ,γ )12C astrophysical S factors at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Jia, B. L.; Xu, S. W.; Chen, S. Z.; Ma, S. B.; Hou, S. Q.; Hu, J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Yu, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    We directly measure the absolute cross section of 11B(p ,γ )12C in the energy region of Ec .m .=130 -257 keV by using a thin target for the first time. This work is performed on a 320-kV platform at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou. The astrophysical S factors of this reaction are obtained for capture to the ground and first excited states of 12C. The properties of the known resonance at ˜150 keV are derived and agree with the previous results. However, in the energy region of 170-240 keV, our S factors are about 15%-50% larger than the adopted values in NACRE II and are also larger than the upper limits of NACRE II by up to ˜20 % . This indicates that our new reaction rate is enhanced by about 15%-50% compared to the NACRE II adopted rate in the temperature region 0.32-0.62 GK.

  10. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  11. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  12. Prospective Evaluation of Weight-Based Prophylactic Enoxaparin Dosing in Critically Ill Trauma Patients: Adequacy of AntiXa Levels Is Improved.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Jade M; Becher, Robert D; Rebo, Gerald J; Farrah, Jason P; Borgerding, Erika M; Stirparo, Joseph J; Lauer, Cynthia; Kilgo, Patrick; Miller, Preston R

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of death in multisystem trauma patients; the importance of VTE prevention is well recognized. Presently, standard dose enoxaparin (30 mg BID) is used as chemical prophylaxis, regardless of weight or physiologic status. However, evidence suggests decreased bioavailability of enoxaparin in critically ill patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that a weight-based enoxaparin dosing regimen would provide more adequate prophylaxis (as indicated by antifactor Xa levels) for patients in our trauma intensive care unit (TICU).These data were prospectively collected in TICU patients admitted over a 5-month period given twice daily 0.6 mg/kg enoxaparin (actual body weight). Patients were compared with a historical cohort receiving standard dosing. Anti-Xa levels were collected at 11.5 hours (trough, goal ≥ 0.1 IU/mL) after each evening administration. Patient demographics, admission weight, dose, and daily anti-Xa levels were recorded. Patients with renal insufficiency or brain, spine, or spinal cord injury were excluded. Data were collected from 26 patients in the standard-dose group and 37 in the weight-based group. Sixty-four trough anti-Xa measurements were taken in the standard dose group and 74 collected in the weight-based group. Evaluating only levels measured after the third dose, the change in dosing of enoxaparin from 30 to 0.6 mg/kg resulted in an increased percentage of patients with goal antifactor Xa levels from 8 per cent to 61 per cent (P < 0.0001). Examining all troughs, the change in dose resulted in an increase in patients with a goal anti-Xa level from 19 to 59 per cent (P < 0.0001). Weight-based dosing of enoxaparin in trauma ICU patients yields superior results with respect to adequate anti-Xa levels when compared with standard dosing. These findings suggest that weight-based dosing may provide superior VTE prophylaxis in TICU patients. Evaluation of the effects of this dosing paradigm on actual VTE rate is

  13. Impact damage resistance of carbon/epoxy composite tubes for the DC-XA liquid hydrogen feedline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Low-velocity impacts were inflicted upon two elbow sections of carbon/epoxy feedline that are to be a part of the Delta Clipper-XA flight vehicle. A soap-based liquid leak detector solution was used to inspect the impact sites for leaks of pressurized gas that was pumped into the tube. Visual surface damage was noted and recorded for each impact site. After impact testing of each of the two sections of tubes was completed, the damage zones were disected from the tube and cross sectioned through the impact site. These specimens were polished after potting them in epoxy and were examined for microcracking using a fluorescent dye penetrant technique. The results showed that nonvisible damage could cause microcracking, thereby resulting in leaks through the tube wall.

  14. Distinguishing direct from indirect roles for bicoid mRNA localization factors

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Timothy T.; Xanthakis, Despina; Parton, Richard; Dobbie, Ian; Rabouille, Catherine; Gavis, Elizabeth R.; Davis, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Localization of bicoid mRNA to the anterior of the Drosophila oocyte is essential for patterning the anteroposterior body axis in the early embryo. bicoid mRNA localizes in a complex multistep process involving transacting factors, molecular motors and cytoskeletal components that remodel extensively during the lifetime of the mRNA. Genetic requirements for several localization factors, including Swallow and Staufen, are well established, but the precise roles of these factors and their relationship to bicoid mRNA transport particles remains unresolved. Here we use live cell imaging, super-resolution microscopy in fixed cells and immunoelectron microscopy on ultrathin frozen sections to study the distribution of Swallow, Staufen, actin and dynein relative to bicoid mRNA during late oogenesis. We show that Swallow and bicoid mRNA are transported independently and are not colocalized at their final destination. Furthermore, Swallow is not required for bicoid transport. Instead, Swallow localizes to the oocyte plasma membrane, in close proximity to actin filaments, and we present evidence that Swallow functions during the late phase of bicoid localization by regulating the actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, Staufen, dynein and bicoid mRNA form nonmembranous, electron dense particles at the oocyte anterior. Our results exclude a role for Swallow in linking bicoid mRNA to the dynein motor. Instead we propose a model for bicoid mRNA localization in which Swallow is transported independently by dynein and contributes indirectly to bicoid mRNA localization by organizing the cytoskeleton, whereas Staufen plays a direct role in dynein-dependent bicoid mRNA transport. PMID:20023172

  15. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  16. Gender and factor-level interactions in psychopathy: implications for self-directed violence risk and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam

    2012-07-01

    Women with antisocial and psychopathic traits have a more extensive history of self-directed violence, as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, than their male counterparts (Chapman, Specht, & Cellucci, 2005; Warren et al., 2003). To inform this area of research, we examined gender differences in the relationship between psychopathy factors and risk for self-directed violence, as measured by a history of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempts, across 2 studies. In both studies, we found that the interaction of the interpersonal-affective (Factor 1) and impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy, a combination considered to exemplify high psychopathy, was associated with ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt histories specifically in women. In men, Factor 2 traits were associated with these risk indices for self-directed violence, regardless of Factor 1. In Study 2, we extended our analysis to examine whether BPD accounted for the relationship between psychopathy and self-directed violence differentially in women and men. Results suggested that BPD symptoms partially accounted for the effects of Factor 2 on self-directed violence (both self-harm and attempts) in both genders but fully accounted for Factor 1 protective effects only in men. These findings underscore the notion that the same psychopathic trait liabilities, at least as they are currently assessed, may confer risk for different forms of behavioral maladjustment in women versus men. PMID:22452771

  17. Direct effects of platelet-activating factor on glomerular capillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Sharma, M; Li, J Z; McCarthy, E T; Savin, V J

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of injury in acute renal failure and glomerulonephritis. Intrarenal infusion of PAF reduces glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow and increases glomerular permselectivity via its renal hemodynamic and/or immunologic effects. Direct effects of PAF on glomerular capillary permeability are not known. We studied the direct effects of PAF on mesangial contraction (a measure of filtration area), glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity (L[p]) and capillary albumin permeability (P[albumin]). Glomeruli were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with or without various concentrations of PAF (10[-9], 10[-7] and 10[-5] M) for up to 5 h at 37 degrees C. Mesangial contraction (percent change in glomerular volume) was assessed from the gradual decrease in volume of glomeruli during 20 min of incubation with PAF. L(p) was calculated from the rate of change in glomerular volume during the 0.1 s of capillary expansion in response to a transcapillary oncotic gradient. P(albumin) was calculated from a change in relative volume of glomeruli in response to an oncotic gradient. Mesangial contraction was maximal after 20 min of incubation and was concentration dependent (5.2+/-0.9, 7.9+/-1.0 and 10.0+/-1.0%, respectively, with PAF 10(-9), 10(-7) and 10(-5) M). Incubation of glomeruli with PAF 10(-7) M for 60 min at 37 degrees C caused a significant decrease in L(p) (2.25+/-0.30 vs. control 3.12+/-0.28 microl x min(-1) x mm Hg(-1) x cm(-1), n = 5). P(albumin) of glomeruli incubated with PAF was unchanged up to 2 h but increased significantly with the highest concentration of PAF (10(-5) M) after 3 h of incubation (0.60+/-0.18, n=15, vs. control 0.00+/-0.08, n = 20), whereas lower concentrations of PAF (10[-7] or 10[-9] M) required at least 5 h of incubation with glomeruli to cause a significant increase in P(albumin) (0.45+/-0.09 and 0.48+/-0.07, respectively, n=15, vs. control 0.00+/-0.08, n=15). We

  18. Factors associated with compliance with community directed treatment with ivermectin for onchocerciasis control in Southwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although ivermectin is distributed free of charge through the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC), not all eligible individuals within communities receive the annual treatment. This poses a serious threat to efforts aimed to control onchocerciasis. This study attempts to determine factors associated with compliance to Community Directed Treatment with Ivermectin (CDTI) and provides a basis for trying to understand how best to sustain long-term compliance in order to achieve success in the control of onchocerciasis. Methods An unmatched case-control study was conducted in Bebeka coffee plantation southwest Ethiopia. Cases were, compliant i.e., those individuals who had been registered on the relevant treatment registers and had taken all the five annual doses of Ivermectin. Controls were non-compliant, i.e. those individuals who had been recorded in the relevant treatment registers during the first treatment round(2003), and did not take at least two doses of which one being in the last treatment round (2007). Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Data were edited, cleaned, coded and analyzed using SPSS version 12.0.1 for Microsoft Windows. Multiple logistic regression models was used to identify factors associated with compliance to ivermectin. Results From the total of 456 individuals selected for administration of the survey questionnaire, 450(225 cases and 225 controls) were contacted and completed the study 2 refused and 4 were unavailable. Five factors associated with compliance were identified: high risk perception [Adjusted Odds Ratio(AOR) = 1.98, 95% Confidence Interval (CI), 1.32-2.95], one's family support [AOR = 1.86, 95% CI, 1.22-2.84], perceiving that the Community Drug Distributors (CDDs) are doing their work well [AOR = 2.84, 95% CI, 1.50-5.37] and perceiving measuring height is the best way to determine a person's treatment dose [AOR = 6.37, 95% CI, 2.10-19.29] are

  19. Identification of factors involved in target RNA-directed microRNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Haas, Gabrielle; Cetin, Semih; Messmer, Mélanie; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Terenzi, Olivier; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Pfeffer, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which micro (mi)RNAs control their target gene expression is now well understood. It is however less clear how the level of miRNAs themselves is regulated. Under specific conditions, abundant and highly complementary target RNA can trigger miRNA degradation by a mechanism involving nucleotide addition and exonucleolytic degradation. One such mechanism has been previously observed to occur naturally during viral infection. To date, the molecular details of this phenomenon are not known. We report here that both the degree of complementarity and the ratio of miRNA/target abundance are crucial for the efficient decay of the small RNA. Using a proteomic approach based on the transfection of biotinylated antimiRNA oligonucleotides, we set to identify the factors involved in target-mediated miRNA degradation. Among the retrieved proteins, we identified members of the RNA-induced silencing complex, but also RNA modifying and degradation enzymes. We further validate and characterize the importance of one of these, the Perlman Syndrome 3'-5' exonuclease DIS3L2. We show that this protein interacts with Argonaute 2 and functionally validate its role in target-directed miRNA degradation both by artificial targets and in the context of mouse cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:26809675

  20. Field Measurements of Gasoline Direct Injection Emission Factors: Spatial and Seasonal Variability.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Wang, Jonathan M; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Ramos, Manuel; Hilker, Nathan; Healy, Robert M; Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Wallace, James S; Evans, Greg J

    2016-02-16

    Four field campaigns were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015 to measure emissions from light-duty gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles (2013 Ford Focus) in an urban near-road environment in Toronto, Canada. Measurements of CO2, CO, NOx, black carbon (BC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene-xylenes (BTEX), and size-resolved particle number (PN) were recorded 15 m from the roadway and converted to fuel-based emission factors (EFs). Other than for NOx and CO, the GDI engine had elevated emissions compared to the Toronto fleet, with BC EFs in the 73rd percentile, BTEX EFs in the 80-90th percentile, and PN EFs in the 75th percentile during wintertime measurements. Additionally, for three campaigns, a second platform for measuring PN and CO2 was placed 1.5-3 m from the roadway to quantify changes in PN with distance from point of emission. GDI vehicle PN EFs were found to increase by up to 240% with increasing distance from the roadway, predominantly due to an increasing fraction of sub-40 nm particles. PN and BC EFs from the same engine technology were also measured in the laboratory. BC EFs agreed within 20% between the laboratory and real-world measurements; however, laboratory PN EFs were an order of magnitude lower due to exhaust conditioning. PMID:26794244

  1. The contribution of interindividual factors to variability of response in transcranial direct current stimulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lucia M.; Uehara, Kazumasa; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for investigating and modulating human cognitive and motor function in healthy populations. It has also been used in many studies seeking to improve deficits in disease populations. With the slew of studies reporting “promising results” for everything from motor recovery after stroke to boosting memory function, one could be easily seduced by the idea of tDCS being the next panacea for all neurological ills. However, huge variability exists in the reported effects of tDCS, with great variability in the effect sizes and even contradictory results reported. In this review, we consider the interindividual factors that may contribute to this variability. In particular, we discuss the importance of baseline neuronal state and features, anatomy, age and the inherent variability in the injured brain. We additionally consider how interindividual variability affects the results of motor-evoked potential (MEP) testing with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which, in turn, can lead to apparent variability in response to tDCS in motor studies. PMID:26029052

  2. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  3. Identification of factors involved in target RNA-directed microRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Gabrielle; Cetin, Semih; Messmer, Mélanie; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Terenzi, Olivier; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Pfeffer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which micro (mi)RNAs control their target gene expression is now well understood. It is however less clear how the level of miRNAs themselves is regulated. Under specific conditions, abundant and highly complementary target RNA can trigger miRNA degradation by a mechanism involving nucleotide addition and exonucleolytic degradation. One such mechanism has been previously observed to occur naturally during viral infection. To date, the molecular details of this phenomenon are not known. We report here that both the degree of complementarity and the ratio of miRNA/target abundance are crucial for the efficient decay of the small RNA. Using a proteomic approach based on the transfection of biotinylated antimiRNA oligonucleotides, we set to identify the factors involved in target-mediated miRNA degradation. Among the retrieved proteins, we identified members of the RNA-induced silencing complex, but also RNA modifying and degradation enzymes. We further validate and characterize the importance of one of these, the Perlman Syndrome 3′-5′ exonuclease DIS3L2. We show that this protein interacts with Argonaute 2 and functionally validate its role in target-directed miRNA degradation both by artificial targets and in the context of mouse cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:26809675

  4. Nurse-Administered, Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy in IBS: Efficacy and Factors Predicting a Positive Response.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Jenny; Ringström, Gisela; Agerforz, Pia; Törnblom, Hans; Simrén, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an effective treatment in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is often delivered by a psychotherapist and is costly and time consuming. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy could increase availability and reduce costs. In this study the authors evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-administered, gut-directed hypnotherapy and identify factors predicting treatment outcome. Eighty-five patients were included in the study. Participants received hypnotherapy by a nurse once/week for 12 weeks. Patients reported marked improvement in gastrointestinal (GI) and extra-colonic symptoms after treatment, as well as a reduction in GI-specific anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Fifty-eight percent were responders after the 12 weeks treatment period, and of these 82% had a favorable clinical response already at week 6. Women were more likely than men to respond favorably to the treatment. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy is an effective treatment for IBS. Being female and reporting a favorable response to treatment by week 6 predicted a positive treatment response at the end of the 12 weeks treatment period. PMID:26046719

  5. Antigenicity of recombinant maltose binding protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins with and without factor Xa cleaving

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that MAP expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such prot...

  6. Improvement of low bioavailability of a novel factor Xa inhibitor through formulation of cationic additives in its oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshimine; Kanamaru, Taro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sakuma, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    A clinical trial of (2S)-2-[4-[[(3S)-1-acetimidoyl-3-pyrrolidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-3-(7-amidino-2-naphtyl) propanoic acid (DX-9065) revealed that its oral bioavailability was only 3% when it was administered as a conventional capsule formulation. The low bioavailability of DX-9065 was likely caused by both its poor membrane permeability and its electrostatic interaction with anionic bile acids. We hypothesized that DX-9065 absorption would be enhanced when the cationic drug was free from the complex through its replacement with other cationic substances. Polystyrene nanospheres coated with cationic poly(vinylamine) and cholestyramine, which is clinically used as a cholesterol-lowering agent, dramatically prevented DX-9065 from interacting with chenodeoxycholic acid in vitro. Successive animal experiments showed that bioavailability of DX-9065 administered with these cationic substances was 2-3 times that of DX-9065 administered solely. A dry syrup formulation with one-half of a minimal cholesterol-lowering equivalent dose of cholestyramine was designed, and the clinical trial was resumed. A 1.3-fold increase in bioavailability of DX-9065 was observed when the dry syrup was administered. We successfully demonstrated that DX-9065 absorption was enhanced when the drug was administered with cationic additives; however, it appeared that the absorption-enhancing function of cholestyramine largely depended on its dose. The dose escalation is probably prerequisite for the significant improvement of DX-9065 absorption in humans. PMID:22001539

  7. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Direct thrombin inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,3:CD009893].

    PubMed

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most important complications of lone (non-valvular) atrial fibrillation. Its prevention is usually accomplished through oral anticoagulation. Until a few years ago warfarin was the most used agent, but recently two new pharmacologic classes have been introduced for stroke prevention in these patients: oral direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and ximelagatran) and oral factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). In this systematic review, oral direct thrombin inhibitors were compared with warfarin for efficacy and safety. The results indicate that there is no difference in terms of efficacy (except dabigatran 150 mg BID). Oral direct thrombin inhibitors presented less hemorrhages but increased treatment withdrawal due to adverse side-effects (the authors performed post-hoc analyses excluding ximelagatran because this drug was withdrawn from the market owing to safety concerns). There was no difference in terms of mortality between the agents. PMID:24813481

  8. Population structure and its effect on haplotype diversity and linkage disequilibrium surrounding the xa5 locus of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed Central

    Garris, Amanda J; McCouch, Susan R; Kresovich, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of linkage disequilibrium mapping in an autogamous, domesticated species, we have characterized linkage disequilibrium in the candidate region for xa5, a recessive gene conferring race-specific resistance to bacterial blight in rice. This trait and locus have good mapping information, a tractable phenotype, and available sequence data, but no cloned gene. We sampled 13 short segments from the 70-kb candidate region in 114 accessions of Oryza sativa. Five additional segments were sequenced from the adjacent 45-kb region in resistant accessions to estimate the distance at which linkage disequilibrium decays. The data show significant linkage disequilibrium between sites 100 kb apart. The presence of the xa5 resistant reaction in two ecotypes and in accessions with different haplotypes in the candidate region may indicate multiple origins or genetic heterogeneity for resistance. In addition, genetic differentiation between ecotypes emphasizes the need for controlling for population structure in the design of linkage disequilibrium studies in rice. PMID:14573486

  9. Direct characterization of factor VIII in plasma: detection of a mutation altering a thrombin cleavage site (arginine-372----histidine).

    PubMed Central

    Arai, M; Inaba, H; Higuchi, M; Antonarakis, S E; Kazazian, H H; Fujimaki, M; Hoyer, L W

    1989-01-01

    An immunoadsorbent method has been developed for the direct analysis of normal and variant plasma factor VIII. Using this method, the molecular defect responsible for mild hemophilia A has been identified for a patient whose plasma factor VIII activity is 0.05 unit/ml, even though the factor VIII antigen content is 3.25 units/ml. Although the variant factor VIII has an apparently normal molecular mass and chain composition, the 92-kDa heavy chain accumulates when the variant protein is incubated with thrombin and the 44-kDa heavy chain fragment cannot be detected. In contrast, thrombin cleavage of the 80-kDa light chain to the 72-kDa fragment is normal. As these data indicate a loss of factor VIII cleavage by thrombin at arginine-372, the genetic defect was determined by polymerase-chain-reaction amplification of exon 8 of the factor VIII gene and direct sequencing of the amplified product. A single-base substitution (guanine----adenine) was identified that produces an arginine to histidine substitution at amino acid residue 372. These data identify the molecular basis of an abnormal factor VIII, "factor VIII-Kumamoto," that lacks procoagulant function because of impaired thrombin activation. Images PMID:2498882

  10. 78 FR 24677 - Safety Zone; XA The Experimental Agency Fireworks, Pier 34, East River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

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  11. Enhancing the Thermostability of Serratia plymuthica Sucrose Isomerase Using B-Factor-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yixin; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The sucrose isomerase of Serratia plymuthica AS9 (AS9 PalI) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The half-life of AS9 PalI was 20 min at 45°C, indicating that it was unstable. In order to improve its thermostability, six amino acid residues with higher B-factors were selected as targets for site-directed mutagenesis, and six mutants (E175N, K576D, K174D, G176D, S575D and N577K) were designed using the RosettaDesign server. The E175N and K576D mutants exhibited improved thermostability in preliminary experiments, so the double mutant E175N/K576D was constructed. These three mutants (E175N, K576D, E175N/K576D) were characterized in detail. The results indicate that the three mutants exhibit a slightly increased optimal temperature (35°C), compared with that of the wild-type enzyme (30°C). The mutants also share an identical pH optimum of 6.0, which is similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The half-lives of the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants were 2.30, 1.78 and 7.65 times greater than that of the wild-type enzyme at 45°C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants decreased by 6.6%, 2.0% and 11.0%, respectively, and their kcat/Km values increased by 38.2%, 4.2% and 19.4%, respectively, compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. After optimizing the conditions for isomaltulose production at 45°C, we found that the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants displayed slightly improved isomaltulose yields, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the mutants produced in this study would be more suitable for industrial biosynthesis of isomaltulose. PMID:26886729

  12. Reduced breastfeeding rates among obese mothers: a review of contributing factors, clinical considerations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Bever Babendure, Jennie; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Mendias, Elnora; Moramarco, Michael W; Davila, Yolanda R

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with significantly lower rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Increasing rates of obesity among reproductive-age women has prompted the need to carefully examine factors contributing to lower breastfeeding rates in this population. Recent research has demonstrated a significant impact of breastfeeding to reduce the risk of obesity in both mothers and their children. This article presents a review of research literature from three databases covering the years 1995 to 2014 using the search terms of breastfeeding and maternal obesity. We reviewed the existing research on contributing factors to lower breastfeeding rates among obese women, and our findings can guide the development of promising avenues to increase breastfeeding among a vulnerable population. The key findings concerned factors impacting initiation and early breastfeeding, factors impacting later breastfeeding and exclusivity, interventions to increase breastfeeding in obese women, and clinical considerations. The factors impacting early breastfeeding include mechanical factors and delayed onset of lactogenesis II and we have critically analyzed the potential contributors to these factors. The factors impacting later breastfeeding and exclusivity include hormonal imbalances, psychosocial factors, and mammary hypoplasia. Several recent interventions have sought to increase breastfeeding duration in obese women with varying levels of success and we have presented the strengths and weaknesses of these clinical trials. Clinical considerations include specific techniques that have been found to improve breastfeeding incidence and duration in obese women. Many obese women do not obtain the health benefits of exclusive breastfeeding and their children are more likely to also be overweight or obese if they are not breastfed. Further research is needed into the physiological basis for decreased breastfeeding among obese women along with effective

  13. Psychosocial factors in the development of heart disease in women: current research and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Low, Carissa A.; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the recent (1995–2009) literature on psychosocial risk and protective factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) among women, including negative emotions, stress, social relationships, and positive psychological factors. Methods Articles for the review were identified using PubMed and bibliographies of relevant articles. Eligible studies included at least 100 women and either focused on (a) exclusively female participants or (b) both men and women, conducting either gender-stratified analyses or examining interactions with gender. Sixty-seven published reports were identified that examined prospective associations with incident or recurrent CHD. Results In general, evidence suggests that depression, anxiety disorders, anger suppression, and stress associated with relationships or family responsibilities are associated with elevated CHD risk among women, that supportive social relationships and positive psychological factors may be associated with reduced risk, and that general anxiety, hostility, and work-related stress are less consistently associated with CHD among women relative to men. Conclusions A growing literature supports the significance of psychosocial factors for the development of CHD among women. Consideration of both traditional psychosocial factors (e.g., depression) and factors that may be especially important for women (e.g., stress associated with responsibilities at home or multiple roles) may improve identification of women at elevated risk as well as the development of effective psychological interventions for women with or at risk for CHD. PMID:20841557

  14. A direct regulatory interaction between chaperonin TRiC and stress-responsive transcription factor HSF1.

    PubMed

    Neef, Daniel W; Jaeger, Alex M; Gomez-Pastor, Rocio; Willmund, Felix; Frydman, Judith; Thiele, Dennis J

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor. PMID:25437552

  15. e-Portfolios Enhancing Students' Self-Directed Learning: A Systematic Review of Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Jorrick; Dolmans, Diana; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    e-Portfolios have become increasingly popular among educators as learning tools. Some research even shows that e-portfolios can be utilised to facilitate the development of skills for self-directed learning. Such skills include self-assessment of performance, formulation of learning goals, and selection of future tasks. However, it is not yet…

  16. Directional Variance Adjustment: Bias Reduction in Covariance Matrices Based on Factor Analysis with an Application to Portfolio Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W.; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation. PMID:23844016

  17. Directional variance adjustment: bias reduction in covariance matrices based on factor analysis with an application to portfolio optimization.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation. PMID:23844016

  18. AquaPathogen X--A template database for tracking field isolates of aquatic pathogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Evi; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    AquaPathogen X is a template database for recording information on individual isolates of aquatic pathogens and is available for download from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) website (http://wfrc.usgs.gov). This template database can accommodate the nucleotide sequence data generated in molecular epidemiological studies along with the myriad of abiotic and biotic traits associated with isolates of various pathogens (for example, viruses, parasites, or bacteria) from multiple aquatic animal host species (for example, fish, shellfish, or shrimp). The simultaneous cataloging of isolates from different aquatic pathogens is a unique feature to the AquaPathogen X database, which can be used in surveillance of emerging aquatic animal diseases and clarification of main risk factors associated with pathogen incursions into new water systems. As a template database, the data fields are empty upon download and can be modified to user specifications. For example, an application of the template database that stores the epidemiological profiles of fish virus isolates, called Fish ViroTrak (fig. 1), was also developed (Emmenegger and others, 2011).

  19. Peer Relationship Problems of Children with AD/HD: Risk Factors and New Directions in Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Selda

    2009-01-01

    This review integrates and evaluates research conducted on possible contributing factors to peer relationship problems of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). Substantial evidence suggests that children with AD/HD have serious problems in multiple aspects of their relationships with peers. Difficulties resulting from…

  20. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Environmental Factors on Nurturing Intellectual Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Abbas, Merza; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2009-01-01

    Many people believe that environmental factors promote giftedness and invest in many programs to adopt gifted students providing them with challenging activities. Intellectual giftedness is founded on fluid intelligence and extends to more specific abilities through the growth and inputs from the environment. Acknowledging the roles played by the…

  1. Influence of Parenting Factors on Childhood Social Anxiety: Direct Observation of Parental Warmth and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rork, Kristine E.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the association of parenting behaviors and social anxiety in children. Three parental factors--including parental socialization, control, and warmth--were investigated in a sample of 31 two-parent families. Rather than solely relying upon retrospective questionnaires, this study incorporated direct…

  2. The EBF transcription factor Collier directly promotes Drosophila blood cell progenitor maintenance independently of the niche

    PubMed Central

    Benmimoun, Billel; Polesello, Cédric; Haenlin, Marc; Waltzer, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of stem or progenitor cell fate relies on intrinsic factors as well as local cues from the cellular microenvironment and systemic signaling. In the lymph gland, an hematopoietic organ in Drosophila larva, a group of cells called the Posterior Signaling Centre (PSC), whose specification depends on the EBF transcription factor Collier (Col) and the HOX factor Antennapedia (Antp), has been proposed to form a niche required to maintain the pool of hematopoietic progenitors (prohemocytes). In contrast with this model, we show here that genetic ablation of the PSC does not cause an increase in blood cell differentiation or a loss of blood cell progenitors. Furthermore, although both col and Antp mutant larvae are devoid of PSC, the massive prohemocyte differentiation observed in col mutant is not phenocopied in Antp mutant. Interestingly, beside its expression in the PSC, Col is also expressed at low levels in prohemocytes and we show that this expression persists in PSC-ablated and Antp mutant larvae. Moreover, targeted knockdown and rescue experiments indicate that Col expression is required in the prohemocytes to prevent their differentiation. Together, our findings show that the PSC is dispensable for blood cell progenitor maintenance and reveal the key role of the conserved transcription factor Col as an intrinsic regulator of hematopoietic progenitor fate. PMID:26150488

  3. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Will, Hans; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. PMID:27012198

  4. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Environmental Factors on Nurturing Intellectual Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Abbas, Merza; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2011-01-01

    Many people believe that environmental factors promote giftedness and invest in many programs to adopt gifted students providing them with challenging activities. Intellectual giftedness is founded on fluid intelligence and extends to more specific abilities through the growth and inputs from the environment. Acknowledging the roles played by the…

  5. Factors Associated with Choice of Web or Print Intervention Materials in the Healthy Directions 2 Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaney, Mary L.; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G.; Haines, Jess; Viswanath, K.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Sprunck-Harrild, Kim; Coeling, Molly; Rusinak, Donna; Emmons, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many U.S. adults have multiple behavioral risk factors, and effective, scalable interventions are needed to promote population-level health. In the health care setting, interventions are often provided in print, although accessible to nearly everyone, are brief (e.g., pamphlets), are not interactive, and can require some logistics…

  6. Skin conductance responses to masked conditioned stimuli: phylogenetic/ontogenetic factors versus direction of threat?

    PubMed

    Flykt, Anders; Esteves, Francisco; Ohman, Arne

    2007-03-01

    Evolutionarily old threat stimuli are likely to require less conscious information processing than threat stimuli of a more recent date. To test this proposal two differential conditioning experiments, with biological threat stimuli (e.g. snakes) in half the groups and cultural threat stimuli (e.g. guns) in the other half, were conducted. The conditioned (CS+) and the control (CS-) stimuli were backward masked during the extinction phase to prevent conscious recognition. The differential skin conductance responding for both biological and cultural threat stimuli survived the masking procedure when the conditioned stimuli were directed towards the participants (Experiment 1), but for neither type of CS when stimuli were not directed towards the participants (Experiment 2). These findings are discussed in relation to the previous finding by Ohman and co-workers and in relation to imminence of threat. PMID:17049710

  7. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  8. Directional bias in the body while walking through a doorway: its association with attentional and motor factors.

    PubMed

    Fujikake, Hiroya; Higuchi, Takahiro; Imanaka, Kuniyasu; Maloney, Laurence T

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that cognitively intact individuals experience frequent rightward collisions while walking through narrow doorways. Such a directional bias has been attributed to an attentional bias in spatial perception. However, these studies did not investigate the involvement of any motor factor that could affect the directional bias in the body. In the present study, three experiments were conducted to quantify the impact of the leading foot when crossing a doorway threshold on the directional bias in the body midpoint when passing through the doorway. Participants walked through the perceived center of a relatively wide doorway. Measurements of the deviation of the upper-body midpoint from the center of the doorway demonstrated that the leading foot had a very strong influence on the directional bias. Some participants showed rightward deviation irrespective of which foot was used to step through the doorway (Experiment 1). However, a consistent rightward bias in the body was not observed in other experiments. Both the movement of one hand (Experiment 2) and covert visual attention to one side of the door (Experiment 3) caused contralateral deviation of the body. It is likely that the movement of the hand and a visual stimulus serve as an attentional cue and are effective to avoid neglect of the ipsilateral side; as a result, the body midpoint is deviated to the contralateral side. From these findings, we conclude that the directional bias in locomotor trajectories while passing through a doorway results from the combination of a motor factor, particularly the leading foot, and attentional/brain factors. PMID:21409408

  9. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E.; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D.; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V.; Butler, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a 60Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method.

  10. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V; Butler, Duncan J

    2015-01-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a (60)Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method. PMID:25565406

  11. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  12. Antibodies directed to Neisseria gonorrhoeae impair nerve growth factor-dependent neurite outgrowth in Rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Reuss, B

    2014-03-01

    In children born from mothers with prenatal infections with the Gram-negative bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, schizophrenia risk is increased in later life. Since cortical neuropil formation is frequently impaired during this disease, actions of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed to N. gonorrhoeae on neurite outgrowth in nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells were investigated here. It turned out that 10 μg/ml of the antiserum leads indeed to a significant reduction in neurite outgrowth, whereas an antiserum directed to Neisseria meningitidis had no such effect. Furthermore, reduction in neurite outgrowth could be reversed by the neuroleptic drugs haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone, and olanzapine. On the molecular level, the observed effects seem to include the known neuritogenic transcription factors FoxO3a and Stat3, since reduced neurite outgrowth caused by the antiserum was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of both factors. In contrast, restitution of neurite outgrowth by neuroleptic drugs revealed no correlation to the phosphorylation state of these factors. The present report gives a first hint that bacterial infections could indeed lead to impaired neuropil formation in vitro; however, the in vivo relevance of this finding for schizophrenia pathogenesis remains to be clarified in the future. PMID:24203572

  13. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Cody A.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2) transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart.

  14. Factor analysis as a tool for spectral line component separation 21cm emission in the direction of L1780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. V.; Mattila, K.; Haikala, L.; Balazs, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the 21cm HI radiation from the direction of L1780, a small high-galactic latitude dark/molecular cloud, were analyzed by multivariate methods. Factor analysis was performed on HI (21cm) spectra in order to separate the different components responsible for the spectral features. The rotated, orthogonal factors explain the spectra as a sum of radiation from the background (an extended HI emission layer), and from the L1780 dark cloud. The coefficients of the cloud-indicator factors were used to locate the HI 'halo' of the molecular cloud. Our statistically derived 'background' and 'cloud' spectral profiles, as well as the spatial distribution of the HI halo emission distribution were compared to the results of a previous study which used conventional methods analyzing nearly the same data set.

  15. Human factors in environmental management: New directions from the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.A.; Savage, S.F.

    1992-10-01

    Environmental management is the general term given to modern attempts to seek technological solutions to certain constrained environmental problems. it involves developing and applying new technologies that respond to changes in environmental policy. It does not eliminate the need for environmental ethics'' in society. Nor does it substitute for the fundamental changes in political and social structures that are needed for dealing with large-scale environmental issues. The scope of these issues can be illustrated by looking at the Hanford Site. Since 1943, the 560-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state has been the production source of much of the nuclear weapons-grade radioactive materials for the United States. The legacy of 50 years of producing fissile materials has been an environmental cleanup problem of impressive proportions. In 1989, with the Cold War winding down, Secretary of Energy James Watkins established a new vision for Hanford as the flagship for waste management research.'' As plans and preparations for cleanup work proceed at the Hanford Site and around the world, the need for well-orchestrated environmental management methodologies has become increasingly apparent. In 1990, a Human Factors Engineering Group was established in the Technology Planning and Analysis Center at PNL to provide appropriate support for the Laboratory's research efforts. At an ever-increasing rate, these research efforts require integrating human performance into complex environmental technology systems. The endeavor of responding to the Laboratory's research needs has provided innovative opportunities for the application of the concept of Human Factors. Discussed are some of the major applications of Human Factors to environmental management.

  16. Hypoxia inducible factors in liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma: current understanding and future directions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Garrick K; Tennant, Daniel A; McKeating, Jane A

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIFs) activate diverse pathways that regulate cellular metabolism, angiogenesis, proliferation, and migration, enabling a cell to respond to a low oxygen or hypoxic environment. HIFs are regulated by oxygen-dependent and independent signals including: mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species, endoplasmic reticular stress, and viral infection. HIFs have been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of liver disease of diverse aetiologies. This review explores the impact of HIFs on hepatocellular biology and inflammatory responses, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting HIFs for an array of liver pathologies. PMID:25157983

  17. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  18. The myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein directly binds nerve growth factor to modulate central axon circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Feng; Greenfield, Ariele; Jahn, Sarah; Shen, Yun-An A.; Reid, Hugh H.; McKemy, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a central nervous system myelin-specific molecule expressed on the outer lamellae of myelin. To date, the exact function of MOG has remained unknown, with MOG knockout mice displaying normal myelin ultrastructure and no apparent specific phenotype. In this paper, we identify nerve growth factor (NGF) as a binding partner for MOG and demonstrate that this interaction is capable of sequestering NGF from TrkA-expressing neurons to modulate axon growth and survival. Deletion of MOG results in aberrant sprouting of nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord. Binding of NGF to MOG may offer widespread implications into mechanisms that underlie pain pathways. PMID:26347141

  19. Sequences promoting the transcription of the human XA gene overlapping P450c21A correctly predict the presence of a novel, adrenal-specific, truncated form of tenascin-X

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Meng Kian; Thomson, A.A.; Bristow, J.; Miller, W.L.

    1995-07-20

    A compact region in the human class III major histocompatibility locus contains the human genes for the fourth component of human complement (C4) and steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) in one transcriptional orientation, while the gene for the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-X (TN-X) overlaps the last exon of P450c21 on the opposite strand of DNA in the opposite transcriptional orientation. This complex locus is duplicated into A and B loci, so that the organization is 5{prime}-C4A-21A-XA-C4B-21B-XB-3{prime}. Although this duplication event truncated the 65-kb X(B) gene to a 4.5-kb XA gene, the XA gene is transcriptionally active in the adrenal cortex. To examine the basis of the tissue-specific expression of XA and C4B, we cloned the 1763-bp region that lies between the cap sites for XA and C4B and analyzed its promoter activity in both the XA and the C4 orientations. Powerful, liver-specific sequences lie within the first 75 to 138 bp from the C4B cap site, and weaker elements lie within 128 bp of the XA cap site that function in both liver and adrenal cells. Because these 128 bp upstream from the XA cap site are perfectly preserved in the XB gene encoding TN-X, we sought to determine whether a transcript similar to XA arises within the SB gene. RNase protection assays, cDNA cloning, and RT/PCR show that adrenal cells contain a novel transcript, termed short XB (XB-S), which has the same open reading frame as TN-X. Cell-free translation and immunoblotting show that this transcript encodes a novel 74-kDa XB-S protein that is identical to the carboxy-terminal 673 residues of TN-X. Because this protein consists solely of fibronectin type III repeats and a fibrinogen-like domain, it appears to correspond to an evolutionary precursor of the tenascin family of extracellular matrix proteins. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Direct transfer of transforming growth factor beta 1 gene into arteries stimulates fibrocellular hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Nabel, E G; Shum, L; Pompili, V J; Yang, Z Y; San, H; Shu, H B; Liptay, S; Gold, L; Gordon, D; Derynck, R

    1993-01-01

    The arterial wall responds to thrombosis or mechanical injury through the induction of specific gene products that increase cellular proliferation and connective tissue formation. These changes result in intimal hyperplasia that is observed in restenosis and the early phases of atherosclerosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a secreted multi-functional protein that plays an important role in embryonal development and in repair following tissue injury. However, the function of TGF-beta 1 in vascular cell growth in vivo has not been defined. In this report, we have evaluated the role of TGF-beta 1 in the pathophysiology of intimal and medial hyperplasia by gene transfer of an expression plasmid encoding active TGF-beta 1 into porcine arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 in normal arteries resulted in substantial extracellular matrix production accompanied by intimal and medial hyperplasia. Increased procollagen, collagen, and proteoglycan synthesis in the neointima was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry relative to control transfected arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 induced a distinctly different program of gene expression and biologic response from the platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF B) gene: procollagen synthesis induced by TGF-beta 1 was greater, and cellular proliferation was less prominent. These findings show that TGF-beta 1 differentially modulates extracellular matrix production and cellular proliferation in the arterial wall in vivo and could play a reparative role in the response to arterial injury. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248168

  1. Multiple intrinsic factors act in concert with Lhx2 to direct retinal gliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Jimmy; Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the principal glial cell type in the vertebrate retina. Recent work has identified the LIM homeodomain factor encoding gene Lhx2 as necessary for both Notch signaling and MG differentiation in late-stage retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). However, the extent to which Lhx2 interacts with other intrinsic regulators of MG differentiation is unclear. We investigated this question by investigating the effects of overexpression of multiple transcriptional regulators that are either known or hypothesized to control MG formation, in both wildtype and Lhx2-deficient RPCs. We observe that constitutively elevated Notch signaling, induced by N1ICD electroporation, inhibited gliogenesis in wildtype animals, but rescued MG development in Lhx2-deficient retinas. Electroporation of Nfia promoted the formation of cells with MG-like radial morphology, but did not drive expression of MG molecular markers. Plagl1 and Sox9 did not induce gliogenesis in wildtype animals, but nonetheless activated expression of the Müller marker P27Kip1 in Lhx2-deficient cells. Finally, Sox2, Sox8, and Sox9 promoted amacrine cell formation in Lhx2-deficient cells, but not in wildtype retinas. These findings demonstrate that overexpression of individual gliogenic factors typically regulates only a subset of characteristic MG markers, and that these effects are differentially modulated by Lhx2. PMID:27605455

  2. Multiple intrinsic factors act in concert with Lhx2 to direct retinal gliogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Jimmy; Clark, Brian S; Blackshaw, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the principal glial cell type in the vertebrate retina. Recent work has identified the LIM homeodomain factor encoding gene Lhx2 as necessary for both Notch signaling and MG differentiation in late-stage retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). However, the extent to which Lhx2 interacts with other intrinsic regulators of MG differentiation is unclear. We investigated this question by investigating the effects of overexpression of multiple transcriptional regulators that are either known or hypothesized to control MG formation, in both wildtype and Lhx2-deficient RPCs. We observe that constitutively elevated Notch signaling, induced by N1ICD electroporation, inhibited gliogenesis in wildtype animals, but rescued MG development in Lhx2-deficient retinas. Electroporation of Nfia promoted the formation of cells with MG-like radial morphology, but did not drive expression of MG molecular markers. Plagl1 and Sox9 did not induce gliogenesis in wildtype animals, but nonetheless activated expression of the Müller marker P27(Kip1) in Lhx2-deficient cells. Finally, Sox2, Sox8, and Sox9 promoted amacrine cell formation in Lhx2-deficient cells, but not in wildtype retinas. These findings demonstrate that overexpression of individual gliogenic factors typically regulates only a subset of characteristic MG markers, and that these effects are differentially modulated by Lhx2. PMID:27605455

  3. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Di Legge, Silvia; Koch, Giacomo; Diomedi, Marina; Stanzione, Paolo; Sallustio, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors) clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:23213626

  4. Purification and partial characterization of draculin, the anticoagulant factor present in the saliva of vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus).

    PubMed

    Apitz-Castro, R; Béguin, S; Tablante, A; Bartoli, F; Holt, J C; Hemker, H C

    1995-01-01

    From the saliva of the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus, we isolated an unknown anticoagulant protein which we have named draculin. Its molecular mass as determined by non-reduced SDS-PAGE is about 83 kDa. The reduced polypeptide shows a slower migration. HPLC in a molecular sieve matrix yields a single, symmetrical peak corresponding to 88.5 kDa. Isoelectric focusing shows an acidic protein with pI = 4.1-4.2. Aminoacid analysis is compatible with a single chain polypeptide of about 80 kDa. Cyanogen bromide cleavage yields a single 16-aminoacid peptide, corresponding to the amino-terminus of the native molecule. Draculin inhibits the activated form of coagulation factors IX and X. It does not act on thrombin, trypsin, chymotrypsin and does not express fibrinolytic activity. The inhibition is immediate and not readily reversible, with a stoichiometry of about two molecules of draculin per molecule of factor IXa or Xa. Surprisingly, the inhibitory activity against either factor is not affected by the presence of the other. Draculin binds quantitatively to either immobilised factor Xa or factor IXa. Our preliminary interpretation is that there are two forms of draculin that hardly differ in structure. Both bind to factor Xa and to factor IXa but one form inhibits factor Xa and the other inhibits factor IXa. When added to plasma, draculin increases the lag phase as well as the height of the peak of thrombin generation. PMID:7740503

  5. Direct observation of the translocation mechanism of transcription termination factor Rho

    PubMed Central

    Gocheva, Veronika; Le Gall, Antoine; Boudvillain, Marc; Margeat, Emmanuel; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Rho is a ring-shaped, ATP-fueled motor essential for remodeling transcriptional complexes and R-loops in bacteria. Despite years of research on this fundamental model helicase, key aspects of its mechanism of translocation remain largely unknown. Here, we used single-molecule manipulation and fluorescence methods to directly monitor the dynamics of RNA translocation by Rho. We show that the efficiency of Rho activation is strongly dependent on the force applied on the RNA but that, once active, Rho is able to translocate against a large opposing force (at least 7 pN) by a mechanism involving ‘tethered tracking’. Importantly, the ability to directly measure dynamics at the single-molecule level allowed us to determine essential motor properties of Rho. Hence, Rho translocates at a rate of ∼56 nt per second under our experimental conditions, which is 2–5 times faster than velocities measured for RNA polymerase under similar conditions. Moreover, the processivity of Rho (∼62 nt at a 7 pN opposing force) is large enough for Rho to reach termination sites without dissociating from its RNA loading site, potentially increasing the efficiency of transcription termination. Our findings unambiguously establish ‘tethered tracking’ as the main pathway for Rho translocation, support ‘kinetic coupling’ between Rho and RNA polymerase during Rho-dependent termination, and suggest that forces applied on the nascent RNA transcript by cellular substructures could have important implications for the regulation of transcription and its coupling to translation in vivo. PMID:25662222

  6. Factors that affect micro-tooling features created by direct printing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhani, Mayur N.

    Current market required faster pace production of smaller, better, and improved products in shorter amount of time. Traditional high-rate manufacturing process such as hot embossing, injection molding, compression molding, etc. use tooling to replicate feature on a products. Miniaturization of many product in the field of biomedical, electronics, optical, and microfluidic is occurring on a daily bases. There is a constant need to produce cheaper, and faster tooling, which can be utilize by existing manufacturing processes. Traditionally, in order to manufacture micron size tooling features processes such as micro-machining, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM), etc. are utilized. Due to a higher difficulty to produce smaller size features, and longer production cycle time, various additive manufacturing approaches are proposed, e.g. selective laser sintering (SLS), inkjet printing (3DP), fused deposition modeling (FDM), etc. were proposed. Most of these approaches can produce net shaped products from different materials such as metal, ceramic, or polymers. Several attempts were made to produce tooling features using additive manufacturing approaches. Most of these produced tooling were not cost effective, and the life cycle of these tooling was reported short. In this research, a method to produce tooling features using direct printing approach, where highly filled feedstock was dispensed on a substrate. This research evaluated different natural binders, such as guar gum, xanthan gum, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and their combinations were evaluated. The best binder combination was then use to evaluate effect of different metal (316L stainless steel (3 mum), 316 stainless steel (45 mum), and 304 stainless steel (45 mum)) particle size on feature quality. Finally, the effect of direct printing process variables such as dispensing tip internal diameter (500 mum, and 333 mum) at different printing speeds were evaluated.

  7. Elastic properties of Ca{sub 5-x}A {sub x}Nb{sub 2}TiO{sub 12} (A = Mg, Zn) microwave ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    George, Vimala; Philip, J.; Bijumon, P.V.; Sebastian, M.T.

    2006-04-13

    Microwave dielectrics in Ca{sub 5-x}A {sub x}Nb{sub 2}TiO{sub 12} (A = Mg, Zn) system have been prepared for different values of x by conventional solid-state ceramic route. The elastic properties of the ceramics were investigated as a function of composition by ultrasonic techniques. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the ceramics form phase pure compounds for 0 {<=} x {<=} 1 and form mixture phases beyond x = 1. The elastic properties were strongly affected by structural transformations. Magnesium-based compositions have better elastic properties compared with zinc-based system.

  8. Tensile properties of HK31XA-H24 magnesium-alloy sheet under rapid-heating conditions and constant elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Thomas W

    1956-01-01

    Specimens of HK31XA-H24 magnesium-alloy sheet from an experimental batch were heated to failure at nominal temperature rates from 0.2 F to 100 F per second under constant-load conditions. Rapid-heating yield and rupture stresses are presented and compared with the yield and ultimate stresses from elevated-temperature tensile stress-strain tests for 1/2-hour exposure. Linear temperature-rate parameters were used to correlate rapid-heating results by constructing master curves which can be used for predicting yield stresses and temperatures and for estimating rupture stresses and temperatures.

  9. Autocrine epidermal growth factor signaling stimulates directionally persistent mammary epithelial cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, Gargi; Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2001-12-24

    Autocrine receptor/ligand signaling loops were first identified in tumor cells, where it was found that transformation of cells resulted in overexpression of certain growth factors leading to unregulated proliferation of the tumor cells (Sporn and Todaro, 1980). However, in the ensuing decades autocrine signaling has been found to operate in numerous physiological situations (Sporn and Roberts, 1992), including wound healing (Tokumaru et al., 2000), angiogenesis (Seghezzi et al., 1998), and tissue organization during development (Wasserman and Freeman, 1998) and reproductive cycles (Xie et al., 1997). Although it is becoming evident that autocrine loops play crucial roles in regulation of cell function within tissue contexts, it is unclear whether their effects on cell responses are different from the effects of the same ligand presented in exogenous or paracrine manner.

  10. Chrysanthemum transcription factor CmLBD1 direct lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Ruixia; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Zhaohe; Xin, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) genes are important regulators of growth and development. Here, a chrysanthemum class I LBD transcription factor gene, designated CmLBD1, was isolated and its function verified. CmLBD1 was transcribed in both the root and stem, but not in the leaf. The gene responded to auxin and was shown to participate in the process of adventitious root primordium formation. Its heterologous expression in Arabidopsis thaliana increased the number of lateral roots formed. When provided with exogenous auxin, lateral root emergence was promoted. CmLBD1 expression also favored callus formation from A. thaliana root explants in the absence of exogenously supplied phytohormones. In planta, CmLBD1 probably acts as a positive regulator of the response to auxin fluctuations and connects auxin signaling with lateral root formation. PMID:26819087

  11. Transcription Factor Networks Directing the Development, Function, and Evolution of Innate Lymphoid Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joonsoo; Malhotra, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian lymphoid immunity is mediated by fast and slow responders to pathogens. Fast innate lymphocytes are active within hours after infections in mucosal tissues. Slow adaptive lymphocytes are conventional T and B cells with clonal antigen receptors that function days after pathogen exposure. A transcription factor (TF) regulatory network guiding early T cell development is at the core of effector function diversification in all innate lymphocytes, and the kinetics of immune responses is set by developmental programming. Operational units within the innate lymphoid system are not classified by the types of pathogen-sensing machineries but rather by discrete effector functions programmed by regulatory TF networks. Based on the evolutionary history of TFs of the regulatory networks, fast effectors likely arose earlier in the evolution of animals to fortify body barriers, and in mammals they often develop in fetal ontogeny prior to the establishment of fully competent adaptive immunity. PMID:25650177

  12. Chrysanthemum transcription factor CmLBD1 direct lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Ruixia; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Zhaohe; Xin, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) genes are important regulators of growth and development. Here, a chrysanthemum class I LBD transcription factor gene, designated CmLBD1, was isolated and its function verified. CmLBD1 was transcribed in both the root and stem, but not in the leaf. The gene responded to auxin and was shown to participate in the process of adventitious root primordium formation. Its heterologous expression in Arabidopsis thaliana increased the number of lateral roots formed. When provided with exogenous auxin, lateral root emergence was promoted. CmLBD1 expression also favored callus formation from A. thaliana root explants in the absence of exogenously supplied phytohormones. In planta, CmLBD1 probably acts as a positive regulator of the response to auxin fluctuations and connects auxin signaling with lateral root formation. PMID:26819087

  13. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg. PMID:26518250

  14. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song E.; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression. PMID:27120051

  15. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song E; Kim, Han-Na; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression. PMID:27120051

  16. External and internal factors influencing self-directed online learning of physiotherapy undergraduate students in Sweden: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Nilsson, Maria H.; Gummesson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Online courses have become common in health sciences education. This learning environment can be designed using different approaches to support student learning. To further develop online environment, it is important to understand how students perceive working and learning online. The aim of this study is to identify aspects influencing students’ learning processes and their adaptation to self-directed learning online. Methods: Thirty-four physiotherapy students with a mean age of 25 years (range, 21 to 34 years) participated. Qualitative content analysis and triangulation was used when investigating the students’ self-reflections, written during a five week self-directed, problem-oriented online course. Results: Two categories emerged: ‘the influence of the structured framework’ and ‘communication and interaction with teachers and peers.’ The learning processes were influenced by external factors, e.g., a clear structure including a transparent alignment of assignments and assessment. Important challenges to over-come were primarily internal factors, e.g., low self-efficacy, difficulties to plan the work effectively and adapting to a new environment. Conclusion: The analyses reflected important perspectives targeting areas which enable further course development. The influences of external and internal factors on learning strategies and self-efficacy are important aspects to consider when designing online courses. Factors such as pedagogical design, clarity of purpose, goals, and guidelines were important as well as continuous opportunities for communication and collaboration. Further studies are needed to understand and scaffold the motivational factors among students with low self-efficacy. PMID:26101401

  17. Factors Affecting Stable Planar Growth During the Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Aluminum-indium Alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Z.B.

    1994-01-01

    Immiscible (monotectic) alloy systems have become materials of interest due to their unique potential applications, which include bearing materials, catalysts, permanent magnets, and fine particle superconductors. For some of these applications, a microstructure containing continuous aligned fibers is desired. In-situ fibrous growth has been observed in directionally solidified alloys of monotectic composition. However, for the proposed applications, a greater volume fraction of the fibrous phase is needed than is available in alloys of monotectic composition. In order to obtain this greater volume fraction of the fibrous phase, alloys of hypermonotectic composition are necessary. However, when alloys of hypermonotectic composition are directionally solidified, there are two factors which can disrupt in-situ fibrous growth. These factors are buoyancy-driven convection and constitutional supercooling. A theoretical model containing the effects of both convection and constitutional supercooling has been developed and applied to the immiscible aluminum-indium system. The resulting stability limit diagram predicts the theoretical composition limits for stable growth as a function of solidification front velocity. This research has concentrated on experimentally verifying the theoretical limits of stable growth. By directionally solidifying samples over a range of compositions and growth rates, the region of stable growth was determined by examining both the microstructure and the composition profile developed in the samples. The results indicate that the theoretical limits of stable growth predicted by the stability limit diagram are a conservative estimate of the region of stable growth.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling in Pheochromocytoma: Turning the Rudder in the Right Direction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumors, including pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL), are characterized by a (pseudo)hypoxic signature. (Pseudo)hypoxia has been shown to promote both tumor progression and resistance to therapy. The major mediators of the transcriptional hypoxic response are hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). High levels of HIFs lead to transcription of hypoxia-responsive genes, which are involved in tumorigenesis. PHEOs and PGLs are catecholamine-producing tumors arising from sympathetic- or parasympathetic-derived chromaffin tissue. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the metabolic disturbances present in PHEO and PGL, especially because of the identification of some disease-susceptibility genes. To date, fifteen PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes have been identified. Based on the main transcription signatures of the mutated genes, PHEOs and PGLs have been divided into two clusters, pseudohypoxic cluster 1 and cluster 2, rich in kinase receptor signaling and protein translation pathways. Although these two clusters seem to show distinct signaling pathways, recent data suggest that both clusters are interconnected by HIF signaling as the important driver in their tumorigenesis, and mutations in most PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes seem to affect HIF-α regulation and its downstream signaling pathways. HIF signaling appears to play an important role in the development and growth of PHEOs and PGLs, which could suggest new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these tumors. PMID:23940289

  19. Recombinant sea urchin vascular endothelial growth factor directs single-crystal growth and branching in vitro.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Regina T; Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Mobilia, Kellen C; Joester, Derk

    2012-10-31

    Biomineralization in sea urchin embryos is a crystal growth process that results in oriented single-crystalline spicules with a complex branching shape and smoothly curving surfaces. Uniquely, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) that construct the endoskeleton can be cultured in vitro. However, in the absence of morphogenetic cues secreted by other cells in the embryo, spicules deposited in PMC culture lack the complex branching behavior observed in the embryo. Herein we demonstrate that recombinant sea urchin vascular endothelial growth factor (rVEGF), a signaling molecule that interacts with a cell-surface receptor, induces spiculogenesis and controls the spicule shape in PMC culture. Depending on the rVEGF concentration, PMCs deposit linear, "h"- and "H"-shaped, or triradiate spicules. Remarkably, the change from linear to triradiate occurs with a switch from bidirectional crystal growth parallel to the calcite c axis to growth along the three a axes. This finding has implications for our understanding of how cells integrate morphogenesis on the multi-micrometer scale with control over lattice orientation on the atomic scale. The PMC model system is uniquely suited to investigate this mechanism and develop biotechnological approaches to single-crystal growth. PMID:23066927

  20. Human Factors and Health Information Technology: Current Challenges and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kannampallil, T. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Recent federal mandates and incentives have spurred the rapid growth, development and adoption of health information technology (HIT). While providing significant benefits for better data integration, organization, and availability, recent reports have raised questions regarding their potential to cause medication errors, decreased clinician performance, and lowered efficiency. The goal of this survey article is to (a) examine the theoretical and foundational models of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) that are being advocated for achieving patient safety and quality, and their use in the evaluation of healthcare systems; (b) and the potential for macroergonomic HFE approaches within the context of current research in biomedical informatics. Methods We reviewed literature (2007-2013) on the use of HFE approaches in healthcare settings, from databases such as Pubmed, CINAHL, and Cochran. Results Based on the review, we discuss the systems-oriented models, their use in the evaluation of HIT, and examples of their use in the evaluation of EHR systems, clinical workflow processes, and medication errors. We also discuss the opportunities for better integrating HFE methods within biomedical informatics research and its potential advantages. Conclusions The use of HFE methods is still in its infancy - better integration of HFE within the design lifecycle, and quality improvement efforts can further the ability of informatics researchers to address the key concerns regarding the complexity in clinical settings and develop HIT solutions that are designed within the social fabric of the considered setting. PMID:25123724

  1. Transcription Factors and Plants Response to Drought Stress: Current Understanding and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rohit; Wani, Shabir H; Singh, Balwant; Bohra, Abhishek; Dar, Zahoor A; Lone, Ajaz A; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution toward improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern "OMICS" analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs) that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant's response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought. PMID:27471513

  2. Transcription Factors and Plants Response to Drought Stress: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rohit; Wani, Shabir H.; Singh, Balwant; Bohra, Abhishek; Dar, Zahoor A.; Lone, Ajaz A.; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution toward improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern “OMICS” analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs) that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought. PMID:27471513

  3. Direct evaluation of contact injection efficiency into small molecule based transport layers: Influence of extrinsic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkowitz, M.; Facci, J. S.; Rehm, J.

    1998-03-01

    Studies of interface formation on conventional semiconductor materials are typically carried out under relatively pristine conditions. However, for devices based on the use of electronic polymers there is also compelling interest in exploring the variations in contact behavior that might result under realistic manufacturing conditions like multilayer device assembly based on solution coating technology. Small molecule doped polymers (MDPs) developed principally as large area coatings for electrophotographic use are now finding wider device applications. These polymers are insulators capable of transporting excess injected charge with a unipolar drift mobility which can be tuned over a wide range by varying the concentration of transport active species. Most significant in the present context, MDPs can be rendered trap free by molecular design. These unique characteristics of MDPs make it possible to analyze the relative injection efficiencies of their interfaces with various contacts simply by a direct comparison of current-voltage characteristics with time of flight drift mobility measurements carried out on the same film coatings. In this way, and apart from their intrinsic interest and practical value, MDPs and closely related polymeric media provide the ideal venue for the study of contact phenomena on molecular solids. Almost all the present measurements were carried out by measuring dark hole injection from various preformed metal substrates into the MDP film TPD/polycarbonate. Under these circumstances it was found that while injection efficiency nominally scaled with the estimated interfacial energy step there was significant variance that in some cases could be clearly associated with the specific details of interfacial chemistry. For one exceptional case where Au was evaporated on the free surface of an already cast film a time and temperature dependent contact forming process could be delineated in which the interface systematically evolved from emission

  4. First direct measurements of {bold {ital g}} factors of the three superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.H.; Kumbartzki, G.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Cizewski, J.A.; Holden, J.; McNabb, D.P.; Satteson, M.; Weissman, L.; Broude, C.; Hass, M.; Janssens, R.V.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.

    1998-11-01

    The average {ital g} factors of the high-energy states of the three superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg were determined {ital directly} in a transient field experiment. The reaction {sup 150}Nd({sup 48}Ca,4n){sup 194}Hg at a beam energy of 203 MeV was used to provide recoiling reaction product nuclei with sufficient velocity to traverse a gadolinium ferromagnetic layer. The resulting {ital g} factors g(SD1)=0.36(10), g(SD2)=0.41(20), and g(SD3)=0.71(26) are in agreement with cranked Hartree-Fock calculations as well as with the picture of a rigid rotation for which g=Z/A. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts. PMID:25635113

  6. An experiment for the direct determination of the g-factor of a single proton in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodegheri, C. C.; Blaum, K.; Kracke, H.; Kreim, S.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Walz, J.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus has been designed that aims at a direct precision measurement of the g-factor of a single isolated proton or antiproton in a Penning trap. We present a thorough discussion on the trap design and a method for the experimental trap optimization using a single stored proton. A first attempt at the g-factor determination has been made in a section of the trap with a magnetic bottle. The Larmor frequency of the proton has been measured with a relative uncertainty of 1.8 × 10-6 and the magnetic moment has been determined with a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6. A g-factor of 5.585 696(50) has been obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous measurements and predictions. Future experiments shall drive the spin-flip transition in a section of the trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. This has the potential to improve the precision of the measured g-factor of the proton and the antiproton by several orders of magnitude.

  7. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes—ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 (RHD6), RHD6-LIKE1 (RSL1), RSL2, LjRHL1-LIKE1 (LRL1), and LRL2—as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and post-translational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  8. Transcription Factor ATAF1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Senescence by Direct Regulation of Key Chloroplast Maintenance and Senescence Transcriptional Cascades.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Xue, Gang-Ping; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Balazadeh, Salma

    2015-07-01

    Senescence represents a fundamental process of late leaf development. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role for expression reprogramming during senescence; however, the gene regulatory networks through which they exert their functions, and their physiological integration, are still largely unknown. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) abscisic acid (ABA)- and hydrogen peroxide-activated TF Arabidopsis thaliana activating factor1 (ATAF1) as a novel upstream regulator of senescence. ATAF1 executes its physiological role by affecting both key chloroplast maintenance and senescence-promoting TFs, namely GOLDEN2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and ORESARA1 (Arabidopsis NAC092), respectively. Notably, while ATAF1 activates ORESARA1, it represses GLK1 expression by directly binding to their promoters, thereby generating a transcriptional output that shifts the physiological balance toward the progression of senescence. We furthermore demonstrate a key role of ATAF1 for ABA- and hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence, in accordance with a direct regulatory effect on ABA homeostasis genes, including nine-CIS-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase3 involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABC transporter G family member40, encoding an ABA transport protein. Thus, ATAF1 serves as a core transcriptional activator of senescence by coupling stress-related signaling with photosynthesis- and senescence-related transcriptional cascades. PMID:25953103

  9. Estimation of patient attenuation factor for iodine-131 based on direct dose rate measurements from radioiodine therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Khaled; Alenezi, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the actual dose at 1 m from the patients per unit activity with the aim of providing a more accurate prediction of the dose levels around radioiodine patients in the hospital, as well as to compare our results with the literature. In this work the demonstration of a patient body tissue attenuation factor is verified by comparing the dose rates measured from the patients with those measured from the unshielded radioiodine capsules immediately after administration of the radioactivity. The normalized dose rate per unit activity is therefore proposed as an operational quantity that can be used to predict exposure rates to staff and patients' relatives. The average dose rate measured from our patient per unit activity was 38.4±11.8 μSv/h/GBq. The calculated attenuation correction factor based on our measurements was 0.55±0.17. The calculated dose rate from a radioiodine therapy patient should normally include a factor accounting for patient body tissue attenuation and scatter. The attenuation factor is currently neglected and not applied in operational radiation protection. Realistic estimation of radiation dose levels from radioiodine therapy patients when properly performed will reduce the operational cost and optimize institutional radiation protection practice. It is recommended to include patient attenuation factors in risk assessment exercises - in particular, when accurate estimates of total effective doses to exposed individuals are required when direct measurements are not possible. The information provided about patient attenuation might benefit radiation protection specialists and regulators. PMID:25279710

  10. The Impact of Neighborhood Social and Built Environment Factors across the Cancer Continuum: Current Research, Methodologic Considerations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; De Rouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Yen, Irene H.; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A.; Glaser, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. We review the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research, with a scan of the literature for research that focuses on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. We discuss commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research area. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of 34 reviewed papers published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of association varied, due in large part to the variation in cancer sites and outcomes being studied, but also likely due to differences in study populations, geographical region, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measure and geographic scale. We recommend that future studies consider the life course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers. PMID:25847484

  11. Risk Factors for Falls in Older Adults with Lower Extremity Arthritis: A Conceptual Framework of Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Gyurcsik, Nancy C.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: As the numbers of Canadians aged 65 years and over increases over the next 20 years, the prevalence of chronic conditions, including arthritis, will rise as will the number of falls. Although known fall-risk factors are associated with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), minimal research has evaluated fall and fracture risk and/or rates in this population. Thus, the purpose was to summarize research on fall and fracture risk in older adults with hip or knee OA and to develop a conceptual framework of fall-risk screening and assessment. Method: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, clinical practice guidelines for fall-risk screening, and a selected literature review were used. Results: Gaps exist in our knowledge of fall and fracture risk for this population. Muscle performance, balance, and mobility impairments have been identified, but little is known about whether personal and environmental contextual factors impact fall and fracture risk. Physical activity may help to prevent falls, but non-adherence is a problem. Conclusion: A need exists to assess fall risk in older adults with hip and knee OA. Promoting regular physical activity by focusing on disease- and activity-specific personal contextual factors may help direct treatment planning. PMID:23729967

  12. Cobalt inhibits the interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha and von Hippel-Lindau protein by direct binding to hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Hilliard, George; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Millhorn, David E

    2003-05-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activates the expression of genes that contain a hypoxia response element. The alpha-subunits of the HIF transcription factors are degraded by proteasomal pathways during normoxia but are stabilized under hypoxic conditions. The von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) mediates the ubiquitination and rapid degradation of HIF-alpha (including HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha). Post-translational hydroxylation of a proline residue in the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-alpha is required for the interaction between HIF and VHL. It has previously been established that cobalt mimics hypoxia and causes accumulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. However, little is known about the mechanism by which this occurs. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that cobalt binds directly to the ODD domain of HIF-2alpha. Here we provide the first evidence that cobalt inhibits pVHL binding to HIF-alpha even when HIF-alpha is hydroxylated. Deletion of 17 amino acids within the ODD domain of HIF-2alpha that are required for pVHL binding prevented the binding of cobalt and stabilized HIF-2alpha during normoxia. These findings show that cobalt mimics hypoxia, at least in part, by occupying the VHL-binding domain of HIF-alpha and thereby preventing the degradation of HIF-alpha. PMID:12606543

  13. Gonadotropin Surge-inhibiting/attenuating Factors: A Review of Current Evidence, Potential Applications, and Future Directions for Research

    PubMed Central

    VEGA, MARIO G.; ZAREK, SHVETHA M.; BHAGWAT, MEDHA; SEGARS, JAMES H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Animal studies in the 1980s suggested the existence of an ovarian hormone, termed gonadotropin surge-inhibiting/attenuating factor (GnSIF/AF), that modulates pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH). Given the importance of identifying regulatory factors of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and the accumulating data suggesting its existence, we conducted a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase to identify articles related to GnSIF/AF. The search generated 161 publications, of which 97 were included in this study. Several attempts have been made to identify and characterize this hormone and several candidates have been identified, but the protein sequences of these putative GnSIF/AF factors differ widely from one study to another. In addition, while the RF-amide RFRP-3 is known foremost as a neuropeptide, some research supports an ovarian origin for this non-steroidal hormone, thereby suggesting a role for RFRP-3 either as a co-modulator of GnSIF/AF or as a gonadotropin-inhibiting factor in the hypothalamus (GnIH). Discovery of the KNDy neurons that modulate GnRH secretion, on the other hand, further encourages the search for substance(s) that modulate their activity and that indirectly affect LH secretion and the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. While it has remained an elusive hormone, GnSIF/AF holds many potential applications for contraception, in vitro fertilization, and/or cancer as well as for understanding polycystic ovary syndrome, metabolic diseases, and/or pubertal development. In this review, we rigorously examine the available evidence regarding the existence of GnSIF/AF, previous attempts at its identification, limitations to its discovery, future directions of research, and potential clinical applications. PMID:25581424

  14. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Hsing; Luo, Jia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Chang, Julia; Zhang, GuangJun; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Banko, Max R.; Brunet, Anne; Kuang, Shihuan; Wu, Jen-Leih; Chang, Chun-Ju; Scott, Matthew P.; Yang, Jer-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated and how energy sensor regulates Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energy stores that controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This in turn leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency. PMID:26190112

  15. [Competence factors of retinal pigment epithelium cells for reprogramming in the neuronal direction during retinal regeneration in newts].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, E N

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have the unique ability to reprogram retinal cells @in vivo@ were analyzed in the adult newt. Our own data and that available in the literature on the peculiarities of the biology of these cells (from morphology to molecular profile, which can be associated with the capability of phenotype change) were summarized: It was established that the molecular traits of specialized and poorly differentiated cells are combined in RPE of the adult newt. It was registered that persistent (at a low level) proliferation and rapid change of specific cytoskeleton proteins can contribute to the success of RPE cell reprogramming in the neuronal direction. Each of the considered factors of competence for reprogramming can be found for animal RPE, whose cells are not able @in vivo@ to change the phenotype to a neuronal one; however, their totality (supported by the epigenetic state permissive for conversion) is probably an internal property of only newt RPE. PMID:25872395

  16. Determination of factor X activator in the venom of the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus).

    PubMed

    Stocker, K; Fischer, H; Brogli, M

    1986-01-01

    Factor X activator in Echis carinatus venom was determined by incubating the zymogen 'factor X' with venom, interrupting the activation process by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and measuring the generated proteinase 'factor Xa' by means of a synthetic chromogenic substrate. A comparison of factor X- and prothrombin-activating potencies in E. carinatus venoms of five different geographic origins revealed no correlation between these two procoagulant activities. PMID:3715901

  17. Human teneurin-1 is a direct target of the homeobox transcription factor EMX2 at a novel alternate promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teneurin-1 is a member of a family of type II transmembrane proteins conserved from C.elegans to vertebrates. Teneurin expression in vertebrates is best studied in mouse and chicken, where the four members teneurin-1 to -4 are predominantly expressed in the developing nervous system in area specific patterns. Based on their distinct, complementary expression a possible function in the establishment of proper connectivity in the brain was postulated. However, the transcription factors contributing to these distinctive expression patterns are largely unknown. Emx2 is a homeobox transcription factor, known to be important for area specification in the developing cortex. A study of Emx2 knock-out mice suggested a role of Emx2 in regulating patterned teneurin expression. Results 5'RACE of human teneurin-1 revealed new alternative untranslated exons that are conserved in mouse and chicken. Closer analysis of the conserved region around the newly identified transcription start revealed promoter activity that was induced by EMX2. Mutation of a predicted homeobox binding site decreased the promoter activity in different reporter assays in vitro and in vivo in electroporated chick embryos. We show direct in vivo binding of EMX2 to the newly identified promoter element and finally confirm that the endogenous alternate transcript is specifically upregulated by EMX2. Conclusions We found that human teneurin-1 is directly regulated by EMX2 at a newly identified and conserved promoter region upstream of the published transcription start site, establishing teneurin-1 as the first human EMX2 target gene. We identify and characterize the EMX2 dependent promoter element of human teneurin-1. PMID:21651764

  18. Direct cellular effects of some mediators, hormones and growth factor-like agents on denervated (isolated) rat gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Nagy, L; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The brain-gut axis has an important role in the mechanism of gastric cytoprotection in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of protective agents without any central and peripheral innervation. A mixed population of rat gastric mucosal cells was isolated by the method of Nagy et al (Gastroenterology (1994) 77, 433-443). Cells were incubated for 60 min with cytoprotective drugs such as prostacyclin, histamine, pentagastrin and PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of BPC). At the end of this incubation cells were treated by 15% ethanol for 5 min. Cell viability was tested by trypan blue exclusion test and succinic dehydrogenase activity. The following results were obtained: 1) prostacyclin, histamine and pentagastrin had no direct cytoprotective effect on isolated cells; and 2) PL-10 substances significantly protected the cells against ethanol-induced cellular damage. This led to the following conclusions: 1) in the phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection only the growth factor-like agents have a direct cellular effect; and 2) the intact peripheral innervation is basically necessary for the development of mediators and hormone-induced gastric cytoprotection. PMID:9403792

  19. The transcription factor c-Myc enhances KIR gene transcription through direct binding to an upstream distal promoter element

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Frank; Hanson, Rebecca J.; Lenvik, Todd; Pitt, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Li, Hongchuan; Anderson, Stephen K.

    2009-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) repertoire of natural killer (NK) cells determines their ability to detect infected or transformed target cells. Although epigenetic mechanisms play a role in KIR gene expression, work in the mouse suggests that other regulatory elements may be involved at specific stages of NK-cell development. Here we report the effects of the transcription factor c-Myc on KIR expression. c-Myc directly binds to, and promotes transcription from, a distal element identified upstream of most KIR genes. Binding of endogenous c-Myc to the distal promoter element is significantly enhanced upon interleukin-15 (IL-15) stimulation in peripheral blood NK cells and correlates with an increase in KIR transcription. In addition, the overexpression of c-Myc during NK-cell development promotes transcription from the distal promoter element and contributes to the overall transcription of multiple KIR genes. Our data demonstrate the significance of the 5′ promoter element upstream of the conventional KIR promoter region and support a model whereby IL-15 stimulates c-Myc binding at the distal KIR promoter during NK-cell development to promote KIR transcription. This finding provides a direct link between NK-cell activation signals and KIR expression required for acquisition of effector function during NK-cell education. PMID:18987359

  20. A putative model of overeating and obesity based on brain-derived neurotrophic factor: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cara L; Kennedy, James L; Levitan, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Increased food intake is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic in all age groups. Elucidating brain systems that drive overeating and that might serve as targets for novel prevention and treatment interventions is thus a high priority for obesity research. The authors consider 2 major pathways by which decreased activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may confer vulnerability to overeating and weight gain in an obesogenic environment. The first "direct" pathway focuses on the specific role of BDNF as a mediator of food intake control at brain areas rich in BDNF receptors, including the hypothalamus and hindbrain. It is proposed that low BDNF activity limited to this direct pathway may best explain overeating and obesity outside the context of major neuropsychiatric disturbance. A second "indirect" pathway considers the broad neurotrophic effects of BDNF on key monoamine systems that mediate mood dysregulation, impulsivity, and executive dysfunction as well as feeding behavior per se. Disruption in this pathway may best explain overeating and obesity in the context of various neuropsychiatric disturbances including mood disorders, attention-deficit disorder, and/or binge eating disorders. An integrative model that considers these potential roles of BDNF in promoting obesity is presented. The implications of this model for the early prevention and treatment of obesity are also considered. PMID:22687148

  1. Characterization of the Transcriptome of Nascent Hair Cells and Identification of Direct Targets of the Atoh1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Jen, Hsin-I; Kang, Hyojin; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells are sensory receptors for the auditory and vestibular system in vertebrates. The transcription factor Atoh1 is both necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hair cells, and is strongly upregulated during hair-cell regeneration in nonmammalian vertebrates. To identify genes involved in hair cell development and function, we performed RNA-seq profiling of purified Atoh1-expressing hair cells from the neonatal mouse cochlea. We identified >600 enriched transcripts in cochlear hair cells, of which 90% have not been previously shown to be expressed in hair cells. We identified 233 of these hair cell genes as candidates to be directly regulated by Atoh1 based on the presence of Atoh1 binding sites in their regulatory regions and by analyzing Atoh1 ChIP-seq datasets from the cerebellum and small intestine. We confirmed 10 of these genes as being direct Atoh1 targets in the cochlea by ChIP-PCR. The identification of candidate Atoh1 target genes is a first step in identifying gene regulatory networks for hair-cell development and may inform future studies on the potential role of Atoh1 in mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:25855195

  2. Allosteric collaboration between elongation factor G and the ribosomal L1 stalk directs tRNA movements during translation

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jingyi; Bronson, Jonathan E.; Hofman, Jake M.; Srinivas, Rathi L.; Wiggins, Chris H.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the mechanism by which tRNAs rapidly and precisely transit through the ribosomal A, P, and E sites during translation remains a major goal in the study of protein synthesis. Here, we report the real-time dynamics of the L1 stalk, a structural element of the large ribosomal subunit that is implicated in directing tRNA movements during translation. Within pretranslocation ribosomal complexes, the L1 stalk exists in a dynamic equilibrium between open and closed conformations. Binding of elongation factor G (EF-G) shifts this equilibrium toward the closed conformation through one of at least two distinct kinetic mechanisms, where the identity of the P-site tRNA dictates the kinetic route that is taken. Within posttranslocation complexes, L1 stalk dynamics are dependent on the presence and identity of the E-site tRNA. Collectively, our data demonstrate that EF-G and the L1 stalk allosterically collaborate to direct tRNA translocation from the P to the E sites, and suggest a model for the release of E-site tRNA. PMID:19717422

  3. Direct inhibition of the longevity promoting factor SKN-1 by Insulin-like signaling in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tullet, Jennifer M. A.; Hertweck, Maren; Hyung An, Jae; Baker, Joseph; Hwang, Ji Yun; Liu, Shu; Oliveira, Riva P.; Baumeister, Ralf; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2008-01-01

    Summary Insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) is central to growth and metabolism, and has a conserved role in aging. In C. elegans, reductions in IIS increase stress resistance and longevity, effects that require the IIS-inhibited FOXO protein DAF-16. The C. elegans transcription factor SKN-1 also defends against oxidative stress, by mobilizing the conserved Phase 2 detoxification response. Here we show that IIS not only opposes DAF-16, but also directly inhibits SKN-1 in parallel. The IIS kinases AKT-1,-2 and SGK-1 phosphorylate SKN-1, and reduced IIS leads to constitutive SKN-1 nuclear accumulation in the intestine and SKN-1 target gene activation. SKN-1 contributes to the increased stress tolerance and longevity resulting from reduced IIS, and delays aging when expressed transgenically. Furthermore, SKN-1 that is constitutively active increases lifespan independently of DAF-16. Our findings indicate that the transcription network regulated by SKN-1 promotes longevity, and is an important direct target of IIS. PMID:18358814

  4. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  5. Elevated in vivo levels of a single transcription factor directly convert satellite glia into oligodendrocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Weider, Matthias; Wegener, Amélie; Schmitt, Christian; Küspert, Melanie; Hillgärtner, Simone; Bösl, Michael R; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system and ensure rapid saltatory conduction. Shortage or loss of these cells leads to severe malfunctions as observed in human leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis, and their replenishment by reprogramming or cell conversion strategies is an important research aim. Using a transgenic approach we increased levels of the transcription factor Sox10 throughout the mouse embryo and thereby prompted Fabp7-positive glial cells in dorsal root ganglia of the peripheral nervous system to convert into cells with oligodendrocyte characteristics including myelin gene expression. These rarely studied and poorly characterized satellite glia did not go through a classic oligodendrocyte precursor cell stage. Instead, Sox10 directly induced key elements of the regulatory network of differentiating oligodendrocytes, including Olig2, Olig1, Nkx2.2 and Myrf. An upstream enhancer mediated the direct induction of the Olig2 gene. Unlike Sox10, Olig2 was not capable of generating oligodendrocyte-like cells in dorsal root ganglia. Our findings provide proof-of-concept that Sox10 can convert conducive cells into oligodendrocyte-like cells in vivo and delineates options for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25680202

  6. Elevated In Vivo Levels of a Single Transcription Factor Directly Convert Satellite Glia into Oligodendrocyte-like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weider, Matthias; Wegener, Amélie; Schmitt, Christian; Küspert, Melanie; Hillgärtner, Simone; Bösl, Michael R.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Wegner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system and ensure rapid saltatory conduction. Shortage or loss of these cells leads to severe malfunctions as observed in human leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis, and their replenishment by reprogramming or cell conversion strategies is an important research aim. Using a transgenic approach we increased levels of the transcription factor Sox10 throughout the mouse embryo and thereby prompted Fabp7-positive glial cells in dorsal root ganglia of the peripheral nervous system to convert into cells with oligodendrocyte characteristics including myelin gene expression. These rarely studied and poorly characterized satellite glia did not go through a classic oligodendrocyte precursor cell stage. Instead, Sox10 directly induced key elements of the regulatory network of differentiating oligodendrocytes, including Olig2, Olig1, Nkx2.2 and Myrf. An upstream enhancer mediated the direct induction of the Olig2 gene. Unlike Sox10, Olig2 was not capable of generating oligodendrocyte-like cells in dorsal root ganglia. Our findings provide proof-of-concept that Sox10 can convert conducive cells into oligodendrocyte-like cells in vivo and delineates options for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25680202

  7. Low-dimensional transport and large thermoelectric power factors in bulk semiconductors by band engineering of highly directional electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bilc, Daniel I; Hautier, Geoffroy; Waroquiers, David; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Ghosez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectrics are promising for addressing energy issues but their exploitation is still hampered by low efficiencies. So far, much improvement has been achieved by reducing the thermal conductivity but less by maximizing the power factor. The latter imposes apparently conflicting requirements on the band structure: a narrow energy distribution and a low effective mass. Quantum confinement in nanostructures and the introduction of resonant states were suggested as possible solutions to this paradox, but with limited success. Here, we propose an original approach to fulfill both requirements in bulk semiconductors. It exploits the highly directional character of some orbitals to engineer the band structure and produce a type of low-dimensional transport similar to that targeted in nanostructures, while retaining isotropic properties. Using first-principle calculations, the theoretical concept is demonstrated in Fe2YZ Heusler compounds, yielding power factors 4 to 5 times larger than in classical thermoelectrics at room temperature. Our findings are totally generic and rationalize the search of alternative compounds with similar behavior. Beyond thermoelectricity, these might be relevant also in the context of electronic, superconducting, or photovoltaic applications. PMID:25884131

  8. Salt-induced transcription factor MYB74 is regulated by the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Wang, Yuhan; Zheng, Hao; Lu, Wei; Wu, Changai; Huang, Jinguang; Yan, Kang; Yang, Guodong; Zheng, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide that causes crop failure by interfering with the profile of gene expression and cell metabolism. Transcription factors and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) play an important role in the regulation of gene activation under abiotic stress in plants. This work characterized AtMYB74, a member of the R2R3-MYB gene family, which is transcriptionally regulated mainly by RdDM as a response in salt stress in Arabidopsis. Bisulphite sequencing indicated that 24-nt siRNAs target a region approximately 500bp upstream of the transcription initiation site of AtMYB74, which is heavily methylated. Levels of DNA methylation in this region were significantly reduced in wild type plants under salt stress, whereas no changes were found in RdDM mutants. Northern blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that the accumulation of 24-nt siRNAs was decreased in WT plants under salt stress. Further promoter deletion analysis revealed that the siRNA target region is essential for maintaining AtMYB74 expression patterns. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing AtMYB74 displayed hypersensitivity to NaCl during seed germination. These results suggest that changes in the levels of the five 24-nt siRNAs regulate the AtMYB74 transcription factor via RdDM in response to salt stress. PMID:26139822

  9. A Nonnegative Latent Factor Model for Large-Scale Sparse Matrices in Recommender Systems via Alternating Direction Method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Zhou, MengChu; Li, Shuai; You, Zhuhong; Xia, Yunni; Zhu, Qingsheng

    2016-03-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based models possess fine representativeness of a target matrix, which is critically important in collaborative filtering (CF)-based recommender systems. However, current NMF-based CF recommenders suffer from the problem of high computational and storage complexity, as well as slow convergence rate, which prevents them from industrial usage in context of big data. To address these issues, this paper proposes an alternating direction method (ADM)-based nonnegative latent factor (ANLF) model. The main idea is to implement the ADM-based optimization with regard to each single feature, to obtain high convergence rate as well as low complexity. Both computational and storage costs of ANLF are linear with the size of given data in the target matrix, which ensures high efficiency when dealing with extremely sparse matrices usually seen in CF problems. As demonstrated by the experiments on large, real data sets, ANLF also ensures fast convergence and high prediction accuracy, as well as the maintenance of nonnegativity constraints. Moreover, it is simple and easy to implement for real applications of learning systems. PMID:26011893

  10. Mapping the epitopes of a neutralizing antibody fragment directed against the lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis and cross-reacting with the homologous edema factor.

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Avril, Arnaud; Mathieu, Jacques; Behrens, Christian K; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Pelat, Thibaut

    2013-01-01

    The lethal toxin (LT) of Bacillus anthracis, composed of the protective antigen (PA) and the lethal factor (LF), plays an essential role in anthrax pathogenesis. PA also interacts with the edema factor (EF, 20% identity with LF) to form the edema toxin (ET), which has a lesser role in anthrax pathogenesis. The first recombinant antibody fragment directed against LF was scFv 2LF; it neutralizes LT by blocking the interaction between PA and LF. Here, we report that scFv 2LF cross-reacts with EF and cross-neutralizes ET, and we present an in silico method taking advantage of this cross-reactivity to map the epitope of scFv 2LF on both LF and EF. This method identified five epitope candidates on LF, constituted of a total of 32 residues, which were tested experimentally by mutating the residues to alanine. This combined approach precisely identified the epitope of scFv 2LF on LF as five residues (H229, R230, Q234, L235 and Y236), of which three were missed by the consensus epitope candidate identified by pre-existing in silico methods. The homolog of this epitope on EF (H253, R254, E258, L259 and Y260) was experimentally confirmed to constitute the epitope of scFv 2LF on EF. Other inhibitors, including synthetic molecules, could be used to target these epitopes for therapeutic purposes. The in silico method presented here may be of more general interest. PMID:23741517

  11. The impact of sensor field of view and distance on field measurements of directional reflectance factors: a simulation study for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that a natural surface exhibits anisotropic reflectance properties that depend on the characteristics of the surface. Spectral measurements of the directional reflectance factor (DRF) at ground level provide us a method to capture the directional characteristics of the observe...

  12. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  13. Current Clinical Trials on the Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    von Vajna, Erika; Alam, Ruhaniyah; So, Tsz-Yin

    2016-06-01

    Common treatment options for deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism in the pediatric population include unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin, and warfarin. Other alternatives are bivalirudin, argatroban, and fondaparinux. Warfarin is the only approved oral option, but an oral agent without frequent monitoring would be optimal for pediatric patients. Thus, there is an increasing need for new anticoagulation options in this population. None of the current direct oral anticoagulants have FDA-approved indications and dosing in children. The two classes of DOACs and the drugs they are comprised of are factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) and direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran). Off-label usage of these agents is largely based on adult doses. By far, rivaroxaban and dabigatran have the most published data and ongoing trials in pediatric patients compared to edoxaban and apixaban. After evaluating the current literature available on these agents, it is, however, still too early to make any definitive recommendations on their usage in this special population. PMID:26739579

  14. Direct measurement of the boron isotope fractionation factor: Reducing the uncertainty in reconstructing ocean paleo-pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, Oded; Vengosh, Avner; Harkness, Jennifer S.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lahav, Ori

    2015-03-01

    The boron isotopic composition of calcium carbonate skeletons is a promising proxy method for reconstructing paleo-ocean pH and atmospheric CO2 from the geological record. Although the boron isotope methodology has been used extensively over the past two decades to determine ancient ocean-pH, the actual value of the boron isotope fractionation factor (εB) between the two main dissolved boron species, 11B(OH)3 and 10B(OH)-4, has remained uncertain. Initially, εB values were theoretically computed from vibrational frequencies of boron species, resulting in a value of ∼ 19 ‰. Later, spectrophotometric pH measurements on artificial seawater suggested a higher value of ∼ 27 ‰. A few independent theoretical models also pointed to a higher εB value. Here we provide, for the first time, an independent empirical fractionation factor (εB = 26.0 ± 1.0 ‰ ; 25 °C), determined by direct measurements of B(OH)3 in seawater and other solutions. Boric acid was isolated by preferential passage through a reverse osmosis membrane under controlled pH conditions. We further demonstrate that applying the Pitzer ion-interaction approach, combined with ion-pairing calculations, results in a more accurate determination of species distribution in aquatic solutions of different chemical composition, relative to the traditional two-species boron-system approach. We show that using the revised approach reduces both the error in simulating ancient atmospheric CO2 (by up to 21%) and the overall uncertainty of applying boron isotopes for paleo-pH reconstruction. Combined, this revised methodology lays the foundation for a more accurate determination of ocean paleo-pH through time.

  15. SREB, a GATA Transcription Factor That Directs Disparate Fates in Blastomyces dermatitidis Including Morphogenesis and Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Gregory M.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Gallardo, Sergio S.; Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber J.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Suen, Garret; Currie, Cameron R.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis belongs to a group of human pathogenic fungi that exhibit thermal dimorphism. At 22°C, these fungi grow as mold that produce conidia or infectious particles, whereas at 37°C they convert to budding yeast. The ability to switch between these forms is essential for virulence in mammals and may enable these organisms to survive in the soil. To identify genes that regulate this phase transition, we used Agrobacterium tumefaciens to mutagenize B. dermatitidis conidia and screened transformants for defects in morphogenesis. We found that the GATA transcription factor SREB governs multiple fates in B. dermatitidis: phase transition from yeast to mold, cell growth at 22°C, and biosynthesis of siderophores under iron-replete conditions. Insertional and null mutants fail to convert to mold, do not accumulate significant biomass at 22°C, and are unable to suppress siderophore biosynthesis under iron-replete conditions. The defect in morphogenesis in the SREB mutant was independent of exogenous iron concentration, suggesting that SREB promotes the phase transition by altering the expression of genes that are unrelated to siderophore biosynthesis. Using bioinformatic and gene expression analyses, we identified candidate genes with upstream GATA sites whose expression is altered in the null mutant that may be direct or indirect targets of SREB and promote the phase transition. We conclude that SREB functions as a transcription factor that promotes morphogenesis and regulates siderophore biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first gene identified that promotes the conversion from yeast to mold in the dimorphic fungi, and may shed light on environmental persistence of these pathogens. PMID:20368971

  16. Identification of a cleavage site directing the immunochemical detection of molecular abnormalities in type IIA von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Dent, J A; Berkowitz, S D; Ware, J; Kasper, C K; Ruggeri, Z M

    1990-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the von Willebrand factor subunit may be important for processing and/or function of the molecule and is altered in certain subtypes of von Willebrand disease. It results in the generation of two main fragments with apparent molecular masses of 140 kDa and 176 kDa from the 225-kDa subunit. We have now obtained chemical evidence to locate the protease-sensitive bond between residues Tyr-842 and Met-843, a site that appears to reflect the specificity of calcium-dependent neutral proteases (calpains). Antibodies were raised against four synthetic peptides that represented sequences immediately preceding or following or including the cleavage site. One antibody (against the fragment from Ala-837 through Asp-851) reacted only with the intact subunit, and its epitope included the cleavage site. All others reacted specifically with either the 140-kDa or the 176-kDa fragment, demonstrating their origin from a single cleavage. In samples of purified von Willebrand factor from four of five patients with type IIA von Willebrand disease, the anti-peptide antibodies showed markedly decreased reactivity with either the 140-kDa or the 176-kDa fragment, suggesting the existence of distinct molecular abnormalities clustered around the cleavage site. Thus, in the majority of type IIA patients, a common pathogenetic mechanism may lead to the disappearance of the larger multimers as a consequence of structural changes that may expose a sensitive bond to the action of specific proteases. These studies demonstrate the use of anti-peptide antibodies directed at a relevant structural domain for the immunochemical differentiation of normal and mutant molecules. Images PMID:2385594

  17. Direct interaction of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor with leukemia-associated RhoGEF

    PubMed Central

    Taya, Shinichiro; Inagaki, Naoyuki; Sengiku, Hiroaki; Makino, Hiroshi; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Urakawa, Itaru; Nagao, Kenji; Kataoka, Shiro; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 plays crucial roles in growth control and rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. IGF-1 binds to the IGF-1 receptor and thereby induces the autophosphorylation of this receptor at its tyrosine residues. The phosphorylation of the IGF-1 receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events. Although various signaling molecules have been identified, they appear to interact with the tyrosine-phosphorylated IGF-1 receptor. Here, we identified leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (LARG), which contains the PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ), regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), Dbl homology, and pleckstrin homology domains, as a nonphosphorylated IGF-1 receptor-interacting molecule. LARG formed a complex with the IGF-1 receptor in vivo, and the PDZ domain of LARG interacted directly with the COOH-terminal domain of IGF-1 receptor in vitro. LARG had an exchange activity for Rho in vitro and induced the formation of stress fibers in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. When MDCKII epithelial cells were treated with IGF-1, Rho and its effector Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase) were activated and actin stress fibers were enhanced. Furthermore, the IGF-1–induced Rho-kinase activation and the enhancement of stress fibers were inhibited by ectopic expression of the PDZ and RGS domains of LARG. Taken together, these results indicate that IGF-1 activates the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway via a LARG/IGF-1 receptor complex and thereby regulates cytoskeletal rearrangements. PMID:11724822

  18. Degree and Direction of Change of Body Weight in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Impact on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Gomadam, Pallavi S; Douglas, Christopher J; Sacrinty, Matthew T; Brady, Molly M; Paladenech, Connie C; Robinson, Killian C

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves functional capacity and reduces mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. It also improves cardiovascular risk factors and aids in weight reduction. Because of the increase in morbidly obese patients with cardiovascular disease, the prevalence of obesity and patterns of weight change in those undergoing CR merit fresh study. We studied 1,320 participants in a 12-week CR program at our academic medical center. We compared 5 categories: 69 class III obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40) patients, 128 class II obese patients (BMI 35.0 to 39.9), 318 class I obese patients (BMI 30.0 to 34.9), 487 overweight patients (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), and 318 normal weight patients (BMI 18.5 to 24.9). Exercise capacity in METs, weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profile were measured before and after CR. Overall, 131 patients gained weight, 827 had no significant weight change, and 363 lost weight (176 lost 3% to 5% of their baseline weight, 161 lost 5% to 10%, and 26 lost >10%). Exercise capacity, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved in all patients. Class III obese patients had the smallest improvement in peak METs (p <0.001), but the greatest weight loss. Patients who lost >10% of their baseline weight had the greatest improvements in exercise capacity, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. In conclusion, after CR, a minority of patients lost weight. Most patients had no significant weight change and some even gained weight. The greatest loss was seen in class III obese patients. All patient groups showed improvements in exercise capacity and risk factors, regardless of the direction or degree of weight change. PMID:26768674

  19. Anti-human protein S antibody induces tissue factor expression through a direct interaction with platelet phosphofructokinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Liao, Dan; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengdong; Yao, Qizhi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Autoantibodies including anti-human protein S antibody (anti-hPS Ab) and anti-human protein C antibody (anti-hPC Ab) can be detected in patients with autoimmune diseases with hypercoagulability. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects and molecular pathways of these autoantibodies on tissue factor (TF) expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Materials and Methods HCAECs were treated with anti-hPS Ab or anti-hPC Ab for 3 hours. TF expression was measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. TF-mediated procoagulant activity was determined by a commercial kit. MAPK phosphorylation was analyzed by Bio-Plex luminex immunoassay and Western blot. The potential proteins interacting with anti-hPS Ab were studied by immunoprecipitation, mass spectrometry and in vitro pull-down assay. Results Anti-hPS Ab, but not anti-hPC Ab, specifically induced TF expression and TF-mediated procoagulant activity in HCAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was confirmed in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs). ERK1/2 phosphorylation was induced by anti-hPS Ab treatment, while inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0216 partially blocked anti-hPS Ab-induced TF upregulation (P<0.05). In addition, anti-hPS Ab specifically cross-interacted with platelet phosphofructokinase (PFKP) in HCAECs. Anti-hPS Ab was able to directly inhibit PFKP activities in HCAECs. Furthermore, silencing of PFKP by PFKP shRNA resulted in TF upregulation in HCAECs, while activation of PFKP by fructose-6-phosphate partially blocked the effect of anti-hPS Ab on TF upregulation (P<0.05). Conclusions Anti-hPS Ab induces TF expression through a direct interaction with PFKP and ERK1/2 activation in HCAECs. Anti-hPS Ab may directly contribute to vascular thrombosis in the patient with autoimmune disorders. PMID:24331211

  20. Heparin binding to platelet factor-4. An NMR and site-directed mutagenesis study: arginine residues are crucial for binding.

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, K H; Ilyina, E; Roongta, V; Dundas, M; Joseph, J; Lai, C K; Maione, T; Daly, T J

    1995-01-01

    Native platelet factor-4 (PF4) is an asymmetrically associated, homo-tetrameric protein (70 residues/subunit) known for binding polysulphated glycosaminoglycans like heparin. PF4 N-terminal chimeric mutant M2 (PF4-M2), on the other hand, forms symmetric tetramers [Mayo, Roongta, Ilyina, Milius, Barker, Quinlan, La Rosa and Daly (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11399-11409] making NMR studies with this 32 kDa protein tractable. PF4-M2, moreover, binds heparin with a similar affinity to that of native PF4. NMR data presented here indicate that heparin (9000 Da cut-off) binding to PF4-M2, while not perturbing the overall structure of the protein, does perturb specific side-chain proton resonances which map to spatially related residues within a ring of positively charged side chains on the surface of tetrameric PF4-M2. Contrary to PF4-heparin binding models which centre around C-terminal alpha-helix lysines, this study indicates that a loop containing Arg-20, Arg-22, His-23 and Thr-25, as well as Lys-46 and Arg-49, are even more affected by heparin binding. Site-directed mutagenesis and heparin binding data support these NMR findings by indicating that arginines more than C-terminal lysines, are crucial to the heparin binding process. Images Figure 4 PMID:8526843

  1. Factors influencing consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer and over-the-counter drug advertising.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mina; Whitehill King, Karen; Reid, Leonard N

    2015-04-01

    Using a model developed from the research literature, the authors compared consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DCTA) and over-the-counter nonprescription drug advertising (OTCA) of drugs. Adults 18 years of age and older who had taken any prescription drugs in the past 6 months completed online survey questionnaires. Variables measured included demographics (age, gender, race, education, and income), health-related characteristics (health status, prescription and over-the-counter drug use, health consciousness, and involvement with prescription or over-the-counter drugs), perceived amount of attention and exposure to DTCA and OTCA, attitudinal outcomes (skepticism toward DTCA/OTCA and attitude toward DTCA/OTCA), and behavioral outcomes triggered by DTCA and OTCA. The findings indicate that exposure to drug advertising is one of the most significant predictors of attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. Some audience factors such as health status, involvement with drugs, health consciousness, drug use, income, and age also were differentially associated with consumer responses to drug advertising. PMID:25730505

  2. Demonstration of anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against IgM rheumatoid factor in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, W K; Barnett, E V

    1989-01-01

    We have identified the presence of anti-idiotypic activity against IgMRF in the sera of RA patients. Only patients seropositive for IgMRF had significant levels of anti-idiotypic activity, while seronegative patients and normal volunteers did not. When this anti-idiotypic activity was affinity-purified from a single RA patient, two separate binding activities were identified. IgG antibodies were pepsin-digested to F(ab')2 fragments before affinity-purification to remove the Fc portion capable of binding to IgMRF. Anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 fragments of IgG were eluted from an IgMRF-Sepharose 4B column. These F(ab')2 bound preferentially to IgMRF bearing an idiotype recognized by the anti-idiotypic murine monoclonal 17.109. A second anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was affinity purified using rabbit anti-human Fc antibody bound to Sepharose 4B. These eluted antibodies behaved as the internal image of IgG, binding five out of seven IgMRF's tested. The binding of both anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was inhibited with human IgG. The presence of both IgMRF and anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against it in the sera of RA patients suggests that anti-idiotypic antibodies alone are not capable of inhibiting the production of rheumatoid factor. PMID:2702773

  3. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung Sook; Jo, Ji Yoon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Yangsoon; Bae, Jong Hwan; Chung, Young-Hwa; Koh, Sang Seok

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. {yields} Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. {yields} Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  5. Factors which influence directional coarsening of gamma-prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of the time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep, a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  6. Factors which influence directional coarsening of Gamma prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  7. Factors associated with the persuasiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising on HPV vaccination among young women.

    PubMed

    Manika, Danae; Ball, Jennifer G; Stout, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study explored young women's response to direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising (DTCA) for a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In particular, the study examined (a) the association of factors stemming from consumer research with actual and intended behavioral responses to DTCA for HPV and (b) key elements drawn from commonly used health-related theories to determine the strongest associations with behavioral intentions regarding the HPV vaccine. Survey findings showed that vaccinated women indicated that DTCA played a role in their decision to get vaccinated against HPV more so than those who were not vaccinated. Trust in DTCA for an HPV vaccine brand was significantly related to intentions to seek more information about the vaccine. Also, perceived barriers had the only significant association with behavioral intentions when taking into account perceived threat and response efficacy. These results provide practical implications for key industry decision makers and health communication professionals on the design of effective theory-based health communication message content for an HPV vaccine brand with consequent social implications. PMID:24708436

  8. Management Overview: Taking a Patient with Intracranial Hemorrhage Related to Direct Oral Anticoagulants to the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Abdulrahman; Alamri, Abdullah; Badawy, Mohamed; Teitelbaum, Jeanne

    2016-06-01

    Options for anticoagulation have been expanding constantly during the past few years, providing a greater number of agents for prevention and management of thromboembolic disease. Although heparins and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has been used extensively for many decades, their narrow therapeutic range, interactions with other medications and food, and the need for routine monitoring of blood levels have led to the search for less problematic alternatives. Direct oral anticoagulants represent an important advance in anticoagulation therapy, directly inhibiting thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban) they represent an effective and safe alternatives to VKAs and heparins in the prevention and treatment of several thromboembolic disorders. DOCAs are associated with a low overall intracranial hemorrhage risk; however, life-threatening bleeding can occur. Reversal agents are approved for some and under development for others, concerns over the lack of antidotes or difficulty in obtaining them has tempered enthusiasm for their use because of the perception of better safety with heparins and VKAs as a result of the availability of effective reversal strategies. Appropriate use of these agents requires knowledge of their individual characteristics, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, ways of monitoring, and when needed, manage patients in need of urgent surgery especially in life-threatening bleeds. This article provides a suggested comprehensive approach to manage patients with intracranial hemorrhage while on direct oral anticoagulants who require an urgent surgical intervention and who cannot wait for plasma concentration to decline. PMID:26960279

  9. Modulation of Enhancer Looping and Differential Gene Targeting by Epstein-Barr Virus Transcription Factors Directs Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Michael J.; Wood, C. David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J.; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M.; Palermo, Richard D.; Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G.; West, Michelle J.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  10. A semi-direct procedure using a local relaxation factor and its application to an internal flow problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Generally, fast direct solvers are not directly applicable to a nonseparable elliptic partial differential equation. This limitation, however, is circumvented by a semi-direct procedure, i.e., an iterative procedure using fast direct solvers. An efficient semi-direct procedure which is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions is presented. The current procedure also possesses other highly desirable properties, i.e.: (1) the convergence rate does not decrease with an increase of grid cell aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate is estimated using the coefficients of the partial differential equation being solved.

  11. Galiellalactone Is a Direct Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor STAT3 in Prostate Cancer Cells*♦

    PubMed Central

    Don-Doncow, Nicholas; Escobar, Zilma; Johansson, Martin; Kjellström, Sven; Garcia, Victor; Munoz, Eduardo; Sterner, Olov; Bjartell, Anders; Hellsten, Rebecka

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT3 is constitutively active in several malignancies including castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been identified as a promising therapeutic target. The fungal metabolite galiellalactone, a STAT3 signaling inhibitor, inhibits the growth, both in vitro and in vivo, of prostate cancer cells expressing active STAT3 and induces apoptosis of prostate cancer stem cell-like cells expressing phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3). However, the molecular mechanism of this STAT3-inhibiting effect by galiellalactone has not been clarified. A biotinylated analogue of galiellalactone (GL-biot) was synthesized to be used for identification of galiellalactone target proteins. By adding streptavidin-Sepharose beads to GL-biot-treated DU145 cell lysates, STAT3 was isolated and identified as a target protein. Confocal microscopy revealed GL-biot in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of DU145 cells treated with GL-biot, appearing to co-localize with STAT3 in the nucleus. Galiellalactone inhibited STAT3 binding to DNA in DU145 cell lysates without affecting phosphorylation status of STAT3. Mass spectrometry analysis of recombinant STAT3 protein pretreated with galiellalactone revealed three modified cysteines (Cys-367, Cys-468, and Cys-542). Here we demonstrate with chemical and molecular pharmacological methods that galiellalactone is a cysteine reactive inhibitor that covalently binds to one or more cysteines in STAT3 and that this leads to inhibition of STAT3 binding to DNA and thus blocks STAT3 signaling without affecting phosphorylation. This further validates galiellalactone as a promising direct STAT3 inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:24755219

  12. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template.

    PubMed

    Gouran, Hossein; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC), implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF). In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction. PMID:25717364

  13. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  14. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S H; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  15. Hadamard Factorization of Stable Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo-Villalobos, Carlos Arturo; Aguirre-Hernández, Baltazar

    2011-11-01

    The stable (Hurwitz) polynomials are important in the study of differential equations systems and control theory (see [7] and [19]). A property of these polynomials is related to Hadamard product. Consider two polynomials p,q ∈ R[x]:p(x) = anxn+an-1xn-1+...+a1x+a0q(x) = bmx m+bm-1xm-1+...+b1x+b0the Hadamard product (p × q) is defined as (p×q)(x) = akbkxk+ak-1bk-1xk-1+...+a1b1x+a0b0where k = min(m,n). Some results (see [16]) shows that if p,q ∈R[x] are stable polynomials then (p×q) is stable, also, i.e. the Hadamard product is closed; however, the reciprocal is not always true, that is, not all stable polynomial has a factorization into two stable polynomials the same degree n, if n> 4 (see [15]).In this work we will give some conditions to Hadamard factorization existence for stable polynomials.

  16. Determination of free insulin-like growth factor-I in human serum: comparison of ultrafiltration and direct immunoradiometric assay.

    PubMed

    Frystyk, J; Ivarsen, P; Støving, R K; Dall, R; Bek, T; Hagen, C; Ørskov, H

    2001-04-01

    Two fundamentally different methods are currently used for the determination of free insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I): ultrafiltration by centrifugation (UF) and direct immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). The aim was to evaluate a commercial IRMA (DSL, Webster, TX, USA) and to compare it with UF. In the IRMA it is recommended that samples be incubated for 2 h at 5;C. When comparing samples (n = 8) incubated for 1 and 2 h, levels increased by 27 +/- 5% (P< 0.0001). When incubating samples at 22;C instead of 5;C, levels increased by 192 +/- 32% (P< 0.0001). Addition of IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) to normal sera (n = 6) dose-dependently decreased ultrafiltered free IGF-I only (P< 0.0007). Similarly, UF was more sensitive than IRMA to addition of IGFBP-2 (P< 0.05). In healthy subjects (n = 35) IRMA yielded 20% higher levels than UF (1.09 +/- 0.09 vs 0.91 +/- 0.12 microg/L; P< 0.0001). IRMA and UF yielded similar results in healthy subjects treated with IGF-I (n = 5) or growth hormone (n = 7) and in acromegalic patients (n = 6) before and after somatostatin analogue treatment. However, marked differences were observed in conditions with elevated IGFBP-1 and -2. In type-1 diabetics (n = 23) ultrafiltered free IGF-I was more reduced than IRMA free IGF-I (38 +/- 9 vs 76 +/- 7% of matched controls (n = 13); P< 0.0001). In patients with chronic renal failure (n = 25), IRMA free IGF-I was identical to control levels (n = 13), whereas ultrafiltered free IGF-I was decreased by 51 +/- 7% (P< 0.0001). Similarly, women with anorexia nervosa (n = 9) studied before and after weight gain showed significant changes in ultrafiltered free IGF-I only (P< 0.03). In conclusion, IRMA was not very robust with respect to variations in sample incubation and this may bias results. IRMA generally yielded higher levels than UF, in accordance with the knowledge that IRMA measures free plus readily dissociable IGF-I. IRMA was less affected than UF by added IGFBP-1 and -2, and reductions in free

  17. Understanding the 'four directions of travel': qualitative research into the factors affecting recruitment and retention of doctors in rural Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Motivation and retention of health workers, particularly in rural areas, is a question of considerable interest to policy-makers internationally. Many countries, including Vietnam, are debating the right mix of interventions to motivate doctors in particular to work in remote areas. The objective of this study was to understand the dynamics of the health labour market in Vietnam, and what might encourage doctors to accept posts and remain in-post in rural areas. Methods This study forms part of a labour market survey which was conducted in Vietnam in November 2009 to February 2010. The study had three stages. This article describes the findings of the first stage - the qualitative research and literature review, which fed into the design of a structured survey (second stage) and contingent valuation (third stage). For the qualitative research, three tools were used - key informant interviews at national and provincial level (6 respondents); in-depth interviews of doctors at district and commune levels (11 respondents); and focus group discussions with medical students (15 participants). Results The study reports on the perception of the problem by national level stakeholders; the motivation for joining the profession by doctors; their views on the different factors affecting their willingness to work in rural areas (including different income streams, working conditions, workload, equipment, support and supervision, relationships with colleagues, career development, training, and living conditions). It presents findings on their overall satisfaction, their ranking of different attributes, and willingness to accept different kinds of work. Finally, it discusses recent and possible policy interventions to address the distribution problem. Conclusions Four typical 'directions of travel' are identified for Vietnamese doctors - from lower to higher levels of the system, from rural to urban areas, from preventive to curative health and from public to private

  18. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  19. Preliminary report on social psychological factors in long duration space flights: Review and directions for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Group dynamics, sociological and psychological factors are examined. Crew composition and compatibility are studied. Group dynamics analysis includes: leadership; cohesiveness; conformity; and conflict.

  20. Localized direct C P violation for B±→ρ0(ω )π±→π+π-π± in QCD factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Zhen-Yang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Xin-Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study the localized direct C P violation in the hadronic decays B±→ρ0(ω )π±→π+π-π± , including the effect caused by an interesting mechanism involving the charge symmetry violating mixing between ρ0 and ω in the QCD factorization approach. We find that ρ -ω mixing makes the localized integrated C P asymmetry move toward the negative direction when the low invariant mass of π+π- [m (π+π-)low ] is near ρ0(770 ). The localized integrated direct C P violation obtained in the QCD factorization approach varies from -0.0724 to -0.0389 in the ranges of parameters when 0.750 direct C P violating asymmetries in the QCD factorization approach in the regions 0.470 factorization approach. It is more clear that ρ -ω mixing contributes to the sign change in these two regions.

  1. Brief Report: Direct and Indirect Relations of Risk Factors with Eating Behavior Problems in Late Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Birgit; Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Zimmermann-van Beuningen, Ritine

    2009-01-01

    This study explored correlations between risk factors and eating behavior problems in late adolescent, non-clinical females (N = 301). Participants completed questionnaires for assessing eating problems, the closely associated factors of Body Mass Index (BMI) and body dissatisfaction, and a number of other risk variables that are thought to be…

  2. Steroidogenic factor 1 directs programs regulating diet-induced thermogenesis and leptin action in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is exclusively expressed in the brain in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and is required for the development of this nucleus. However, the physiological importance of transcriptional programs regulated by SF-1 in the VMH is not wel...

  3. A direct method for calculating thermodynamic factors for liquid mixtures using the Permuted Widom test particle insertion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasaad Balaji, Sayee; Schnell, Sondre K.; McGarrity, Erin S.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding mass transport in liquids by mutual diffusion is an important topic for many applications in chemical engineering. The reason for this is that diffusion is often the rate limiting step in chemical reactors and separators. In multicomponent liquid mixtures, transport diffusion can be described by both generalized Fick's law and the Maxwell-Stefan theory. The Maxwell-Stefan and Fick approaches in an n-component system are related by the so-called thermodynamic factor [R. Taylor and H.A. Kooijman, Chem. Eng. Commun, 102, 87 (1991)]. As Fick diffusivities can be measured in experiments and Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities can be obtained from molecular simulations/theory, the thermodynamic factors bridge the gap between experiments and molecular simulations/theory. It is therefore desirable to be able to compute thermodynamic factors from molecular simulations. Unfortunately, presently used simulation techniques for computing thermodynamic factors are inefficient and often require numerical differentiation of simulation results. In this work, we propose a modified version of the Widom test-particle method to compute thermodynamic factors from a single simulation. This method is found to be more efficient than the conventional Widom test particle insertion method combined with numerical differentiation of simulation results. The approach is tested for binary systems consisting of Lennard-Jones particles. The thermodynamic factors computed from the simulation and from numerically differentiating the activity coefficients obtained from the conventional Widom test particle insertion method are in excellent agreement.

  4. Factors influencing the return rate in a direct mail campaign to inform minority women about prevention of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dignan, M B; Michielutte, R; Jones-Lighty, D D; Bahnson, J

    1994-01-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project was a 5-year community-based health education program funded by the National Cancer Institute. The program was developed to reduce cervical cancer mortality among black women in Forsyth County, and it was targeted to those ages 18 and older. The program tried to educate the target population through a combination of mass media and direct education. This paper reports on an experiment conducted to investigate sources of influence on the effectiveness of direct mail, a technique used to augment mass media health education. Direct mail has shown promise as a method for reaching target populations that are difficult to reach with other mass media approaches. Using commercially prepared mailing lists sorted by zip code and other characteristics of the resident, health-related materials can be targeted to persons at their homes. A randomized experiment involving 1,000 households was carried out to estimate the influence of type of postage and address (name versus "resident or occupant") on the response rate to direct mail. Results indicated that there was no significant advantage from use of first class over bulk rate postage, but the return was significantly greater when the envelope bore a name rather than "resident or occupant." PMID:8041850

  5. Linking Contextual Factors with Rhetorical Pattern Shift: Direct and Indirect Strategies Recommended in English Business Communication Textbooks in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Pinfan

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have consistently claimed that rhetorical patterns are culturally bound, and indirectness is a defining characteristic of Chinese writing. Through examining how the rhetorical mechanism of directness and indirectness is presented in 29 English business communication textbooks published in China, we explore how English business…

  6. Understanding Factors Associated with Teacher-Directed Student Use of Technology in Elementary Classrooms: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Helena P.; Russell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Analyses presented here are secondary data analyses of the "Use, Support and Effect of Instructional Technology" study aimed at identifying predictors of teacher-directed student use of technology (TDS) in elementary classrooms. Using data from a convenience sample of 1040 teachers nested within 81 schools in 21 Massachusetts' school districts,…

  7. A Comparison of Factors Related to University Students' Learning: College-Transfer and Direct-Entry from High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acai, Anita; Newton, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Articulation agreements between colleges and universities, whereby students with two-year college diplomas can receive advancement toward a four-year university degree, are provincially mandated in some Canadian provinces and highly encouraged in others. In this study, we compared learning in college transfer and direct-entry from high school…

  8. Directional Phosphorylation and Nuclear Transport of the Splicing Factor SRSF1 Is Regulated by an RNA Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Pedro; Aubol, Brandon E; Keshwani, Malik M; Forli, Stefano; Ma, Chen-Ting; Dutta, Samit K; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt; Adams, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Multisite phosphorylation is required for the biological function of serine-arginine (SR) proteins, a family of essential regulators of mRNA splicing. These modifications are catalyzed by serine-arginine protein kinases (SRPKs) that phosphorylate numerous serines in arginine-serine-rich (RS) domains of SR proteins using a directional, C-to-N-terminal mechanism. The present studies explore how SRPKs govern this highly biased phosphorylation reaction and investigate biological roles of the observed directional phosphorylation mechanism. Using NMR spectroscopy with two separately expressed domains of SRSF1, we showed that several residues in the RNA-binding motif 2 interact with the N-terminal region of the RS domain (RS1). These contacts provide a structural framework that balances the activities of SRPK1 and the protein phosphatase PP1, thereby regulating the phosphoryl content of the RS domain. Disruption of the implicated intramolecular RNA-binding motif 2-RS domain interaction impairs both the directional phosphorylation mechanism and the nuclear translocation of SRSF1 demonstrating that the intrinsic phosphorylation bias is obligatory for SR protein biological function. PMID:27091468

  9. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib. PMID:19349511

  10. Mapping the anisotropic Lande g-factor tensor of 1D GaAs holes in all 3 spatial directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Karina; Srinivasan, Ashwin; Wang, Qingwen; Yeoh, Lareine; Klochan, Oleh; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David; Hamilton, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the Zeeman splitting of 1D holes formed on a (100) GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure on a single cooldown. The strong spin orbit coupling and 1D confinment give rise to a highly anisotropic spin splitting. By use of the high-symmetry (100) crystal, we eliminate the effects of crystal anisotropy on our measurements. In measuring the spin splitting as a function of angle between the wire and the applied magnetic field, we are able to identify the principle axes of the g-tensor. We show that the principle axes are defined by the potential confining the 1D holes, and are not affected by the crystal axes. We find that g∥⊥ factors parallel and perpendicular to the wire, and g⊥ refers to the g-factor perpendicular to the 2D well.

  11. An integrated database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor: identification of direct genomic targets

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Karen I; Jegga, Anil G; Aronow, Bruce J; O'Donnell, Kathryn A; Dang, Chi V

    2003-01-01

    We report a database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor. The database Myc Target Gene prioritizes candidate target genes according to experimental evidence and clusters responsive genes into functional groups. We coupled the prioritization of target genes with phylogenetic sequence comparisons to predict c-Myc target binding sites, which are in turn validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This database is essential for the understanding of the genetic regulatory networks underlying the genesis of cancers. PMID:14519204

  12. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  13. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  14. Direct Induction of Hemogenic Endothelium and Blood by Overexpression of Transcription Factors in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Elcheva, Irina; Brok-Volchanskaya, Vera; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    During development, hematopoietic cells arise from a specialized subset of endothelial cells, hemogenic endothelium (HE). Modeling HE development in vitro is essential for mechanistic studies of the endothelial-hematopoietic transition and hematopoietic specification. Here, we describe a method for the efficient induction of HE from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) by way of overexpression of different sets of transcription factors. The combination of ETV2 and GATA1 or GATA2 TFs is used to induce HE with pan-myeloid potential, while a combination of GATA2 and TAL1 transcription factors allows for the production of HE with erythroid and megakaryocytic potential. The addition of LMO2 to GATA2 and TAL1 combination substantially accelerates differentiation and increases erythroid and megakaryocytic cells production. This method provides an efficient and rapid means of HE induction from hPSCs and allows for the observation of the endothelial-hematopoietic transition in a culture dish. The protocol includes hPSCs transduction procedures and post-transduction analysis of HE and blood progenitors. PMID:26710184

  15. Combination of interferon-alpha and 5-fluorouracil inhibits endothelial cell growth directly and by regulation of angiogenic factors released by tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The combination therapy of interferon (IFN)-alpha and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) improved the prognosis of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To determine the molecular mechanisms of the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects, we examined the direct anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and indirect effects by regulating secretion of angiogenic factors from HCC cells. Methods The direct effects on HUVEC were examined by TUNEL, Annexin-V assays and cell cycles analysis. For analysis of the indirect effects, the apoptosis induced by the conditioned medium from HCC cell treated by IFN-alpha/5-FU and expression of angiogenic factors was examined. Results IFN-alpha and 5-FU alone had anti-proliferative properties on HUVEC and their combination significantly inhibited the growth (compared with control, 5-FU or IFN alone). TUNEL and Annexin-V assays showed no apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that IFN-alpha and 5-FU delayed cell cycle progression in HUVEC with S-phase accumulation. The conditioned medium from HuH-7 cells after treatment with IFN/5-FU significantly inhibited HUVEC growth and induced apoptosis, and contained high levels of angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang-2. Knockdown of Ang-1 in HuH-7 cells abrogated the anti-proliferative effects on HUVEC while knockdown of Ang-2 partially rescue the cells. Conclusion These results suggested that IFN-alpha and 5-FU had direct growth inhibitory effects on endothelial cells, as well as anti-angiogenic effects through regulation of angiogenic factors released from HCC cells. Modulation of VEGF and Angs secretion by IFN-alpha and 5-FU may contribute to their anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects on HCC. PMID:19821965

  16. A study of factors limiting spatial resolution using a 25 micron pixel pitch direct-detection amorphous selenium imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Chris C.; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An amorphous selenium direct detector with a 25 μm pixel pitch is studied for mammography and fluoroscopy applications. In this paper we analyze spatial resolution by examining the main contributions to the inherent modulation transfer function (MTF) of amorphous selenium, such as primary photoelectron range and x-ray beam obliquity; and determine their significance relative to aperture MTF. Improvements in spatial resolution provided by a move to a small pixel size are complicated by deep carrier trapping. Trapped carriers cause residual charge induction across the pixel plane. We examine the significance of this effect on spatial resolution. The potential improvements of moving from a larger pixel pitch to a 25 μm pixel pitch are studied, including all significant effects, at selected pixel pitches.

  17. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs)

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Rick H.; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs). As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction. PMID:26593943

  18. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs).

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Rick H; Schurgers, Leon J

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs). As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction. PMID:26593943

  19. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  20. The Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Binds Directly to CsrS, a Sensor Histidine Kinase of Group A Streptococcus, to Activate Expression of Virulence Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Velarde, Jorge J.; Ashbaugh, Melissa; Wessels, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) responds to subinhibitory concentrations of LL-37 by up-regulation of virulence factors through the CsrRS (CovRS) two-component system. The signaling mechanism, however, is unclear. To determine whether LL-37 signaling reflects specific binding to CsrS or rather a nonspecific response to LL-37-mediated membrane damage, we tested LL-37 fragments for CsrRS signaling and for GAS antimicrobial activity. We identified a 10-residue fragment (RI-10) of LL-37 as the minimal peptide that retains the ability to signal increased expression of GAS virulence factors, yet it has no detectable antimicrobial activity against GAS. Substitution of individual key amino acids in RI-10 reduced or abrogated signaling. These data do not support the hypothesis that CsrS detects LL-37-induced damage to the bacterial cell membrane but rather suggest that LL-37 signaling is mediated by a direct interaction with CsrS. To test whether LL-37 binds to CsrS, we used the purified CsrS extracellular domain to pull down LL-37 in vitro, a result that provides further evidence that LL-37 binds to CsrS. The dissociation of CsrS-mediated signaling from membrane damage by LL-37 fragments together with in vitro evidence for a direct LL-37-CsrS binding interaction constitute compelling evidence that signal transduction by LL-37 through CsrS reflects a direct ligand/receptor interaction. PMID:25378408

  1. The transcription factor E4bp4/Nfil3 controls commitment to the NK lineage and directly regulates Eomes and Id2 expression.

    PubMed

    Male, Victoria; Nisoli, Ilaria; Kostrzewski, Tomasz; Allan, David S J; Carlyle, James R; Lord, Graham M; Wack, Andreas; Brady, Hugh J M

    2014-04-01

    The transcription factor E4bp4 (Nfil3) is essential for natural killer (NK) cell production. Here, we show that E4bp4 is required at the NK lineage commitment point when NK progenitors develop from common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) and that E4bp4 must be expressed at the CLP stage for differentiation toward the NK lineage to occur. To elucidate the mechanism by which E4bp4 promotes NK development, we identified a central core of transcription factors that can rescue NK production from E4bp4(-/-) progenitors, suggesting that they act downstream of E4bp4. Among these were Eomes and Id2, which are expressed later in development than E4bp4. E4bp4 binds directly to the regulatory regions of both Eomes and Id2, promoting their transcription. We propose that E4bp4 is required for commitment to the NK lineage and promotes NK development by directly regulating the expression of the downstream transcription factors Eomes and Id2. PMID:24663216

  2. Direct Regulation of Extracellular Chitinase Production by the Transcription Factor LeClp in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiyong; Chen, Hongfu; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng; Chou, Shan-Ho; Liu, Hongxia; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2016-09-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a gram-negative bacterial biological control agent that produces abundant extracellular enzymes capable of degrading the cell walls of fungal pathogens. In strain OH11, an isolate from China, the global regulator LeClp controls the production of extracellular chitinase by regulating the transcription of the chitinase-encoding gene chiA. Using a combination of bioinformatic, genetic, and biochemical methods, we show that LeClp regulates chiA transcription by directly binding to the chiA promoter region. Although LeClp appears to be important in this role, it is not the sole regulator of chiA transcription. Furthermore, the sequence analysis of putative LeClp binding sites indicated that the LeClp homolog could be involved in the regulation of extracellular chitinase production in diverse Lysobacter spp. by a mechanism similar to that in L. enzymogenes. Our findings present new insights into the molecular mechanism of LeClp in controlling extracellular chitinase activity, providing a fundamental road to elucidate how LeClp regulates the production of other extracellular lytic enzymes in L. enzymogenes. PMID:27385597

  3. The effect of surface contact activation and temperature on plasma coagulation with an RNA aptamer directed against factor IXa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Vogler, Erwin A; Sullenger, Bruce A; Becker, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    The anticoagulant properties of a novel RNA aptamer that binds FIXa depend collectively on the intensity of surface contact activation of human blood plasma, aptamer concentration, and its binding affinity for FIXa. Accordingly, anticoagulation efficiency of plasma containing any particular aptamer concentration is low when coagulation is strongly activated by hydrophilic surfaces compared to the anticoagulation efficiency in plasma that is weakly activated by hydrophobic surfaces. Anticoagulation efficiency is lower at hypothermic temperatures possibly because aptamer-FIXa binding decreases with decreasing temperatures. Experimental results demonstrating these trends are qualitatively interpreted in the context of a previously established model of anticoagulation efficiency of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers that exhibit anticoagulation properties similar to the FIXa aptamer. In principle, FIXa aptamer anticoagulants should be more efficient and therefore more clinically useful than thrombin-binding aptamers because aptamer binding to FIXa competes only with FX that is at much lower blood concentration than fibrinogen (FI) that competes with thrombin-binding aptamers. Our findings may have translatable relevance in the application of aptamer anticoagulants for clinical conditions in which blood is in direct contact with non-biological surfaces such as those encountered in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. PMID:23054460

  4. Structural Factors and Mechanisms Underlying the Improved Photodynamic Cell Killing with Silicon Phthalocyanine Photosensitizers Directed to Lysosomes Versus Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Zhang, Ping; Azizuddin, Kashif; Delos Santos, Grace B.; Chiu, Song-mao; Xue, Liang-yan; Berlin, Jeffery C.; Peng, Xinzhan; Wu, Hongqiao; Lam, Minh; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 has been shown to bind preferentially to mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon photoirradiation of Pc 4-loaded cells, membrane components, especially Bcl-2, are photodamaged and apoptosis, as indicated by activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is triggered. A series of analogs of Pc 4 were synthesized, and the results demonstrate that Pcs with the aminopropylsiloxy ligand of Pc 4 or a similar one on one side of the Pc ring and a second large axial ligand on the other side of the ring have unexpected properties, including enhanced cell uptake, greater monomerization resulting in greater intracellular fluorescence and three-fold higher affinity constants for liposomes. The hydroxyl-bearing axial ligands tend to reduce aggregation of the Pc and direct it to lysosomes, resulting in four to six times more killing of cells, as defined by loss of clonogenicity, than with Pc 4. Whereas Pc 4-PDT photodamages Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, Pc 181-PDT causes much less photodamage to Bcl-2 over the same dose–response range relative to cell killing, with earlier cleavage of Bid and slower caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Therefore, within this series of photosensitizers, these hydroxyl-bearing axial ligands are less aggregated than is Pc 4, tend to localize to lysosomes and are more effective in overall cell killing than is Pc 4, but induce apoptosis more slowly and by a modified pathway. PMID:19508642

  5. SIRT1 deacetylates and stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) via direct interactions during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Yun, Miyong; Jeong, Jaemin; Park, Eun-Ran; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Seon Rang; Jung, Jin Kyu; Kim, Yong-Min; Park, Joong-Jean; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2015-07-10

    Upon shift to a hypoxic environment, cellular HIF-1α protein is stabilized, with a rapid decline in oxygen-sensitive hydroxylation. Several additional post-translational modifications of HIF-1α are critical in controlling protein stability during hypoxia. In the present study, we showed that SIRT1 stabilizes HIF-1α via direct binding and deacetylation during hypoxia. SIRT1 depletion or inactivation led to reduced hypoxic HIF-1α accumulation, accompanied by an increase in HIF-1α acetylation. Impaired HIF-1α accumulation was recovered upon inhibition of 26S proteasome activity, indicating that SIRT1 is essential for HIF-1α stabilization during hypoxia. Consistently, HIF-1α accumulation was enhanced upon overexpression of wild-type SIRT1, but not its dominant-negative form. SIRT1-mediated accumulation of HIF-1α protein led to increased expression of HIF-1α target genes, including VEGF, GLUT1 and MMP2, and ultimate promotion of cancer cell invasion. These findings collectively imply that hypoxic HIF-1α stabilization requires SIRT1 activation. Furthermore, SIRT1 protection of HIF-1α from acetylation may be a prerequisite for stabilization and consequent enhancement of cell invasion. PMID:25979359

  6. Inhibition of B-NHEJ in Plateau-Phase Cells Is Not a Direct Consequence of Suppressed Growth Factor Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Bednar, Theresa; Zhang Lihua; Wu, Wenqi; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: It has long been known that the proliferation status of a cell is a determinant of radiation response, and the available evidence implicates repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the underlying mechanism. Recent results have shown that a novel, highly error-prone pathway of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) operating as backup (B-NHEJ) processes DSBs in irradiated cells when the canonical, DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase)-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Notably, B-NHEJ shows marked reduction in efficiency when D-NHEJ-deficient cells cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. This phenomenon is widespread and observed in cells of different species with defects in core components of D-NHEJ, with the notable exception of DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Using new, standardized serum-deprivation protocols, we re-examine the growth requirements of B-NHEJ and test the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in its regulation. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in cells maintained under different conditions of growth. Results: Serum deprivation in D-NHEJ-deficient cells causes a rapid reduction in B-NHEJ similar to that measured in normally growing cells that enter the plateau phase of growth. Upon serum deprivation, reduction in B-NHEJ activity is evident at 4 h and reaches a plateau reflecting maximum inhibition at 12-16 h. The inhibition is reversible, and B-NHEJ quickly recovers to the levels of actively growing cells upon supply of serum to serum-deprived cells. Chemical inhibition of EGFR in proliferating cells inhibits only marginally B-NHEJ and addition of EGFR in serum-deprived cells increases only a marginally B-NHEJ. Conclusions: The results document a rapid and fully reversible adaptation of B-NHEJ to growth activity and point to factors beyond EGFR in its regulation. They show notable differences in the regulation of error

  7. The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Protein Stimulates SUMOylation of General Transcription Factor TFII-I to Direct Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Rebecca G.; Sohn, Sook-Young; Wright, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modulation of host cell transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification processes is critical for the ability of many viruses to replicate efficiently within host cells. The human adenovirus (Ad) early region 4 open reading frame 3 (E4-ORF3) protein forms unique inclusions throughout the nuclei of infected cells and inhibits the antiviral Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 DNA repair complex through relocalization. E4-ORF3 also induces SUMOylation of Mre11 and Nbs1. We recently identified additional cellular targets of E4-ORF3 and found that E4-ORF3 stimulates ubiquitin-like modification of 41 cellular proteins involved in a wide variety of processes. Among the proteins most abundantly modified in an E4-ORF3-dependent manner was the general transcription factor II–I (TFII-I). Analysis of Ad-infected cells revealed that E4-ORF3 induces TFII-I relocalization and SUMOylation early during infection. In the present study, we explored the relationship between E4-ORF3 and TFII-I. We found that Ad infection or ectopic E4-ORF3 expression leads to SUMOylation of TFII-I that precedes a rapid decline in TFII-I protein levels. We also show that E4-ORF3 is required for ubiquitination of TFII-I and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This is the first evidence that E4-ORF3 regulates ubiquitination. Interestingly, we found that E4-ORF3 modulation of TFII-I occurs in diverse cell types but only E4-ORF3 of Ad species C regulates TFII-I, providing critical insight into the mechanism by which E4-ORF3 targets TFII-I. Finally, we show that E4-ORF3 stimulates the activity of a TFII-I-repressed viral promoter during infection. Our results characterize a novel mechanism of TFII-I regulation by Ad and highlight how a viral protein can modulate a critical cellular transcription factor during infection. PMID:26814176

  8. Effects of stress and other environmental factors on horizontal plasmid transfer assessed by direct quantification of discrete transfer events.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Kroer, Niels

    2007-03-01

    Selection pressure may affect the horizontal transfer of plasmids. The inability to distinguish between gene transfer and the growth of transconjugants complicates testing. We have developed a method that enables the quantification of discrete transfer events. It uses large numbers of replicate matings (192 or 384) in microtiter wells and the counting of transfer-positive and transfer-negative wells. We applied the method to study the transfer of the IncP1 plasmid pRO103 between Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains. pRO103 encodes resistance to mercury and tetracycline and partial degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The results showed positive correlation between transfer and donor metabolic activity, and an optimal temperature for transfer of 29 degrees C. On stimulation of donor activity, the optimal temperature was decreased to 24.5 degrees C. HgCl(2) above 1.0 microg L(-1) negatively affected transfer, whereas 2,4-D up to 0.3 mM had no effect. The negative effect of mercury was shown to be a result of stressing of the recipient. No effects of mercury on transfer could be detected by traditional filter mating. Thus, the method is superior to filter mating and, as the experimental design allows the manipulation of individual parameters, it is ideal for the assessment and comparison of effects of environmental factors on plasmid transfer. PMID:17100984

  9. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factor-β signaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23362281

  10. Platelet-derived growth factor-A and sonic hedgehog signaling direct lung fibroblast precursors during alveolar septal formation.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen E; McCoy, Diann M

    2013-08-01

    Alveolar septal formation is required to support the respiration of growing mammals; in humans effacement of the alveolar surface and impaired gas exchange are critical features of emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis. Platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A) and its receptor PDGF-receptor-α (PDGFRα) are required for secondary septal elongation in mice during postnatal days 4 through 12 and they regulate the proliferation and septal location of interstitial fibroblasts. We examined lung fibroblasts (LF) to learn whether PDGFRα expression distinguished a population of precursor cells, with enhanced proliferative and migratory capabilities. We identified a subpopulation of LF that expresses sonic hedgehog (Shh) and stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1). PDGF-A and Shh both increased cytokinesis and chemotaxis in vitro, but through different mechanisms. In primary LF cultures, Shh signaled exclusively through a noncanonical pathway involving generation of Rac1-GTP, whereas both the canonical and noncanonical pathways were used by the Mlg neonatal mouse LF cell line. LF preferentially oriented their primary cilia toward their anterior pole during migration. Furthermore, a larger proportion of PDGFRα-expressing LF, which are more abundant at the septal tips, bore primary cilia compared with other alveolar cells. In pulmonary emphysema, destroyed alveolar septa do not regenerate, in part because cells fail to assume a configuration that allows efficient gas exchange. Better understanding how LF are positioned during alveolar development could identify signaling pathways, which promote alveolar septal regeneration. PMID:23748534

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-I as a candidate metabolic biomarker: military relevance and future directions for measurement.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C

    2009-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is a ubiquitous peptide hormone involved in a host of critical physiological processes (e.g., protein synthesis and glucose homeostasis) and has been suggested to be a biomarker reflecting health and metabolic status. In most cases (muscle, bone, tendon, body composition, and cognitive function), elevated IGF-I concentrations are considered beneficial; however, cancer remains a notable exception. While the fact that both increased and decreased IGF-I can be considered reflective of favorable and beneficial health outcomes may appear as a paradox, it is important to emphasize that, in both cases, measured IGF-I concentrations do offer important insight into physiological processes. The effects of military operational field training on the circulating IGF-I system are discussed within the context of novel measurement technologies that (1) are field expedient and (2) provide more meaningful information. Prospective experimental approaches involving physical activity that sample and measure IGF-I in the body's various biocompartments will provide greater insight into the complex role that IGF-I possesses. Minimally invasive technologies that are field expedient, cost-effective, and allow for continuous and real-time feedback will have the greatest likelihood of being adapted and used in military environments. PMID:20144370

  12. Direct Ubiquitination of β-Catenin by Siah-1 and Regulation by the Exchange Factor TBL1*

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Yoana N.; Li, Jiong; Lee, Young-Tae; Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Friedman, David B.; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    β-Catenin is a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway that functions as a transcriptional co-activator of Wnt target genes. Upon UV-induced DNA damage, β-catenin is recruited for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation by a unique, p53-induced SCF-like complex (SCF(TBL1)), comprised of Siah-1, Siah-1-interacting protein (SIP), Skp1, transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Given the complexity of the various factors involved and the novelty of ubiquitination of the non-phosphorylated β-catenin substrate, we have investigated Siah-1-mediated ubiquitination of β-catenin in vitro and in cells. Overexpression and purification protocols were developed for each of the SCF(TBL1) proteins, enabling a systematic analysis of β-catenin ubiquitination using an in vitro ubiquitination assay. This study revealed that Siah-1 alone was able to polyubiquitinate β-catenin. In addition, TBL1 was shown to play a role in protecting β-catenin from Siah-1 ubiquitination in vitro and from Siah-1-targeted proteasomal degradation in cells. Siah-1 and TBL1 were found to bind to the same armadillo repeat domain of β-catenin, suggesting that polyubiquitination of β-catenin is regulated by competition between Siah-1 and TBL1 during Wnt signaling. PMID:20181957

  13. Towards using direct methods in seismic tomography: computation of the full resolution matrix using high-performance computing and sparse QR factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogiatzis, Petros; Ishii, Miaki; Davis, Timothy A.

    2016-05-01

    For more than two decades, the number of data and model parameters in seismic tomography problems has exceeded the available computational resources required for application of direct computational methods, leaving iterative solvers the only option. One disadvantage of the iterative techniques is that the inverse of the matrix that defines the system is not explicitly formed, and as a consequence, the model resolution and covariance matrices cannot be computed. Despite the significant effort in finding computationally affordable approximations of these matrices, challenges remain, and methods such as the checkerboard resolution tests continue to be used. Based upon recent developments in sparse algorithms and high-performance computing resources, we show that direct methods are becoming feasible for large seismic tomography problems. We demonstrate the application of QR factorization in solving the regional P-wave structure and computing the full resolution matrix with 267 520 model parameters.

  14. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) directly regulates proliferation in thymocyte development and IL-17 expression during Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    An, Jie; Golech, Susanne; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Zhang, Yongqing; Subedi, Kalpana; Huston, Gail E.; Wood, William H.; Wersto, Robert P.; Becker, Kevin G.; Swain, Susan L.; Weng, Nanping

    2011-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), a transcription factor, plays a key role in the pluripotency of stem cells. We sought to determine the function of KLF4 in T-cell development and differentiation by using T-cell-specific Klf4-knockout (KO) mice. We found that KLF4 was highly expressed in thymocytes and mature T cells and was rapidly down-regulated in mature T cells after activation. In Klf4-KO mice, we observed a modest reduction of thymocytes (27%) due to the reduced proliferation of double-negative (DN) thymocytes. We demonstrated that a direct repression of Cdkn1b by KLF4 was a cause of decreased DN proliferation. During in vitro T-cell differentiation, we observed significant reduction of IL-17-expressing CD4+ T cells (Th17; 24%) but not in other types of Th differentiation. The reduction of Th17 cells resulted in a significant attenuation of the severity (35%) of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo in Klf4-KO mice as compared with the Klf4 wild-type littermates. Finally, we demonstrated that KLF4 directly binds to the promoter of Il17a and positively regulates its expression. In summary, these findings identify KLF4 as a critical regulator in T-cell development and Th17 differentiation.—An, J., Golech, S., Klaewsongkram, J., Zhang, Y., Subedi, K., Huston, G. E., Wood, W. H., III, Wersto, R. P., Becker, K. G., Swain, S. L., Weng, N. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) directly regulates proliferation in thymocyte development and IL-17 expression during Th17 differentiation. PMID:21685331

  15. A structural equation model to evaluate direct and indirect factors associated with a latent measure of mastitis in Belgian dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Detilleux, J; Theron, L; Beduin, J-M; Hanzen, C

    2012-12-01

    In dairy cattle, many farming practices have been associated with occurrence of mastitis but it is often difficult to disentangle the causal threads. Structural equation models may reduce the complexity of such situations. Here, we applied the method to examine the links between mastitis (subclinical and clinical) and risk factors such as herd demographics, housing conditions, feeding procedures, milking practices, and strategies of mastitis prevention and treatment in 345 dairy herds from the Walloon region of Belgium. During the period January 2006 to October 2007, up to 110 different herd management variables were recorded by two surveyors using a questionnaire for the farm managers and during a farm visit. Monthly somatic cell counts of all lactating cows were collected by the local dairy herd improvement association. Structural equation models were created to obtain a latent measure of mastitis and to reduce the complexity of the relationships between farming practices, between indicators of herd mastitis and between both. Robust maximum likelihood estimates were obtained for the effects of the herd management variables on the latent measure of herd mastitis. Variables associated directly (p<0.05) with the latent measure of herd mastitis were the addition of urea in the rations; the practices of machine stripping, of pre-and post-milking teat disinfection; the presence of cows with hyperkeratotic teats, of cubicles for housing and of dirty liners before milking; the treatment of subclinical cases of mastitis; and the age of the herd (latent variable for average age and parity of cows, and percentage of heifers in the herd). Treatment of subclinical mastitis was also an intermediate in the association between herd mastitis and post-milking teat disinfection. The study illustrates how structural equation model provides information regarding the linear relationships between risk factors and a latent measure of mastitis, distinguishes between direct relationships

  16. Climatic factors directly impact the volatile organic compound fingerprint in green Arabica coffee bean as well as coffee beverage quality.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Boulanger, R; Dussert, S; Ribeyre, F; Berthiot, L; Descroix, F; Joët, T

    2012-12-15

    Coffee grown at high elevations fetches a better price than that grown in lowland regions. This study was aimed at determining whether climatic conditions during bean development affected sensory perception of the coffee beverage and combinations of volatile compounds in green coffee. Green coffee samples from 16 plots representative of the broad range of climatic variations in Réunion Island were compared by sensory analysis. Volatiles were extracted by solid phase micro-extraction and the volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS. The results revealed that, among the climatic factors, the mean air temperature during seed development greatly influenced the sensory profile. Positive quality attributes such as acidity, fruity character and flavour quality were correlated and typical of coffees produced at cool climates. Two volatile compounds (ethanal and acetone) were identified as indicators of these cool temperatures. Among detected volatiles, most of the alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and ketones appeared to be positively linked to elevated temperatures and high solar radiation, while the sensory profiles displayed major defects (i.e. green, earthy flavour). Two alcohols (butan-1,3-diol and butan-2,3-diol) were closely correlated with a reduction in aromatic quality, acidity and an increase in earthy and green flavours. We assumed that high temperatures induce accumulation of these compounds in green coffee, and would be detected as off-flavours, even after roasting. Climate change, which generally involves a substantial increase in average temperatures in mountainous tropical regions, could be expected to have a negative impact on coffee quality. PMID:22980845

  17. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 transcription factor gene directs development of low glucosinolate lines in oilseed Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rehna; Mukhopadhyay, Arundhati; Bisht, Naveen C

    2013-09-01

    Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), a globally important oilseed crop, contains relatively high amount of seed glucosinolates ranging from 80 to 120 μmol/g dry weight (DW). One of the major breeding objectives in oilseed Brassicas is to improve the seed-meal quality through the development of low-seed-glucosinolate lines (<30 μmol/g DW), as high amounts of certain seed glucosinolates are known to be anti-nutritional and reduce the meal palatability. Here, we report the development of transgenic B. juncea lines having seed glucosinolates as low as 11.26 μmol/g DW, through RNAi-based targeted suppression of BjMYB28, a R2R3-MYB transcription factor family gene involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 homologs provided significant reduction in the anti-nutritional aliphatic glucosinolates fractions, without altering the desirable nonaliphatic glucosinolate pool, both in leaves and seeds of transgenic plants. Molecular characterization of single-copy, low glucosinolate homozygous lines confirmed significant down-regulation of BjMYB28 homologs vis-à-vis enhanced accumulation of BjMYB28-specific siRNA pool. Consequently, these low glucosinolate lines also showed significant suppression of genes involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. The low glucosinolate trait was stable in subsequent generations of the transgenic lines with no visible off-target effects on plant growth and development. Various seed quality parameters including fatty acid composition, oil content, protein content and seed weight of the low glucosinolate lines also remained unaltered, when tested under containment conditions in the field. Our results indicate that targeted silencing of a key glucosinolate transcriptional regulator MYB28 has huge potential for reducing the glucosinolates content and improving the seed-meal quality of oilseed Brassica crops. PMID:23721233

  18. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  19. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  20. Direct observation of von Willebrand factor elongation and fiber formation on collagen during acute whole blood exposure to pathological flow

    PubMed Central

    Colace, T. V.; Diamond, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In severe stenosis, von Willebrand Factor (vWF) experiences millisecond exposures to pathological wall shear rates (γw). We sought to evaluate the deposition of vWF onto collagen surfaces under flow in these environments. Methods and Results Distinct from shear experiments that last many seconds, we deployed microfluidic devices for single-pass perfusion of whole blood or platelet free plasma (PFP) over fibrillar type 1 collagen (< 50 msec transit time) at pathological γw or spatial wall shear rate gradient (grad γw). Using fluorescent anti-vWF, long thick vWF fibers (>20 μm) bound to collagen were visualized at constant γw > 30,000 s−1 during perfusion of PFP, a process enhanced by EDTA. Rapid acceleration or deceleration of EDTA-PFP at grad γw = ± 5.5 × 105 to 4.3 × 107 s−1/cm did not promote vWF deposition. At 19,400 s−1, EDTA-blood perfusion resulted in rolling vWF-platelet nets, while blood perfusion (normal Ca2+) generated large vWF/platelet deposits that repeatedly embolized and were blocked by anti-GPIb or the α IIbβ3 inhibitor GR144053 and did not require grad γw. Blood perfusion at venous shear rate (200 s−1) produced a stable platelet deposit that was a substrate for massive but unstable vWF-platelet aggregates when flow was increased to 7800 s−1. Conclusion Triggered by collagen and enhanced by platelet GPIb and α IIbβ3, vWF fiber formation occurred during acute exposures to pathological γw and did not require gradients in wall shear rate. PMID:23104847

  1. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  2. The POU Factor Ventral Veins Lacking/Drifter Directs the Timing of Metamorphosis through Ecdysteroid and Juvenile Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Koyama, Takashi; Sarwar, Prioty; Mirth, Christen K.; Smith, Wendy A.; Suzuki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although endocrine changes are known to modulate the timing of major developmental transitions, the genetic mechanisms underlying these changes remain poorly understood. In insects, two developmental hormones, juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids, are coordinated with each other to induce developmental changes associated with metamorphosis. However, the regulation underlying the coordination of JH and ecdysteroid synthesis remains elusive. Here, we examined the function of a homolog of the vertebrate POU domain protein, Ventral veins lacking (Vvl)/Drifter, in regulating both of these hormonal pathways in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae). RNA interference-mediated silencing of vvl expression led to both precocious metamorphosis and inhibition of molting in the larva. Ectopic application of a JH analog on vvl knockdown larvae delayed the onset of metamorphosis and led to a prolonged larval stage, indicating that Vvl acts upstream of JH signaling. Accordingly, vvl knockdown also reduced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, JH acid methyltransferase 3 (jhamt3). In addition, ecdysone titer and the expression of the ecdysone response gene, hormone receptor 3 (HR3), were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae. The expression of the ecdysone biosynthesis gene phantom (phm) and spook (spo) were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae in the anterior and posterior halves, respectively, indicating that Vvl might influence ecdysone biosynthesis in both the prothoracic gland and additional endocrine sources. Injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into vvl knockdown larvae could restore the expression of HR3 although molting was never restored. These findings suggest that Vvl coordinates both JH and ecdysteroid biosynthesis as well as molting behavior to influence molting and the timing of metamorphosis. Thus, in both vertebrates and insects, POU factors modulate the production of major neuroendocrine regulators during sexual maturation. PMID:24945490

  3. Direct demonstration of insulin-like growth factor-I-induced nitric oxide production by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, H; Gordienko, D V; Tonshoff, B; Gelato, M C; Goligorsky, M S

    1994-02-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a potent mediator of vasodilation. To elucidate the mechanism and site of action of IGF-I, we performed continuous monitoring of nitric oxide (NO) release from endothelial cells using a highly-sensitive amperometric NO-sensor. Two types of cultured cells were used: human umbilical vein endothelial cells and immortalized rat renal interlobar artery endothelial cells. In separate experiments, [Ca2+]i changes in response to IGF-I were measured spectrofluorometrically in fura-2-loaded cells. Stimulation with IGF-I resulted in a rapid, dose-dependent increase in [NO] as detected by the NO-probe positioned 1 mm above the monolayers, followed by a sustained elevation lasting for at least five minutes. The effect of IGF-I was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with anti-IGF-I antibody, suggesting that it was specific for IGF-I. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NO synthesis, significantly blunted responses to IGF-I, but dexamethasone preincubation did not reduce the IGF-I-induced release of NO. These results indicate that the observed IGF-I-induced release of NO is a result of activation of the constitutive, rather than the inducible type of NO synthase in endothelial cells. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, resulted in a profound suppression of the IGF-I-induced release of NO. IGF-I did not affect [Ca2+]i in either type of cells. Therefore, IGF-I-induced NO production by both types of endothelial cells is mediated via a tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7513035

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of two genes encoding sigma factors that direct transcription from a Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, L F; Brown, K L; Whiteley, H R

    1991-01-01

    Two sigma factors, sigma 35 and sigma 28, direct transcription from the Bt I and Bt II promoters of the cryIA(a) gene of Bacillus thuringiensis; this gene encodes a lepidopteran-specific crystal protoxin. These sigma factors were biochemically characterized in previous work (K. L. Brown and H. R. Whiteley, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:4166-4170, 1988; K. L. Brown and H. R. Whiteley, J. Bacteriol. 172:6682-6688, 1990). In this paper, we describe the cloning of the genes encoding these two sigma factors, as well as their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. The deduced amino acid sequences of the sigma 35 and sigma 28 genes show 88 and 85% identity, respectively, to the sporulation-specific sigma E and sigma K polypeptides of Bacillus subtilis. Transformation of the sigma 35 and sigma 28 genes into B. subtilis shows that the respective B. thuringiensis sigma factor genes can complement spoIIG55 (sigma E) and spoIIIC94 (sigma K) defects. Further, B. thuringiensis core polymerase reconstituted with either the sigma 35 or sigma 28 polypeptide directs transcription from B. subtilis promoters recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerase containing sigma E and sigma K, respectively. Thus, sigma 35 and sigma 28 of B. thuringiensis appear to be functionally equivalent to sigma E and sigma K of B. subtilis. However, unlike the situation for sigma K in B. subtilis, the homologous sigma 28 gene in B. thuringiensis does not result from a late-sporulation-phase chromosomal rearrangement of two separate, partial genes. Images PMID:1904859

  5. Gata4 expression in lateral mesoderm is downstream of BMP4 and isactivated directly by Forkhead and GATA transcription factors through adistal enhancer element

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Anabel; De Val, Sarah; Heidt, Analeah B.; Xu, Shan-Mei; Bristow, James; Black, Brian L.

    2005-05-20

    The GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays key roles in the specification and differentiation of multiple cell types during development. GATA4 is an early regulator of gene expression during the development of endoderm and mesoderm, and genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that GATA4 is required for embryonic development.Despite the importance of GATA4 in tissue specification and differentiation, the mechanisms by which Gata4 expression is activated and the transcription factor pathways upstream of GATA4 remain largely undefined. To identify transcriptional regulators of Gata4 in the mouse,we screened conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Gata4 gene for enhancer activity in transgenic embryos. Here, we define the regulation of a distal enhancer element from Gata4 that is sufficient to direct expression throughout the lateral mesoderm, beginning at 7.5 days of mouse embryonic development. The activity of this enhancer is initially broad but eventually becomes restricted to the mesenchyme surrounding the liver. We demonstrate that the function of this enhancer in transgenic embryos is dependent upon highly conserved Forkhead and GATA transcription factor binding sites, which are bound by FOXF1 and GATA4,respectively. Furthermore, the activity of the Gata4 lateral mesoderm enhancer is attenuated by the BMP antagonist Noggin, and the enhancer is not activated in Bmp4-null embryos. Thus, these studies establish that Gata4 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead and GATA transcription factors in the lateral mesoderm, and demonstrate that Gata4lateral mesoderm enhancer activation requires BMP4, supporting a model in which GATA4 serves as a downstream effector of BMP signaling in the lateral mesoderm.

  6. Direct Detection of Transcription Factors in Cotyledons during Seedling Development Using Sensitive Silicon-Substrate Photonic Crystal Protein Arrays1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah I.; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts. PMID:25635113

  7. Contribution of Amino Acid Region 334−335 from Factor Va Heavy Chain to the Catalytic Efficiency of Prothrombinase†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated that amino acids E323, Y324, E330, and V331 from the factor Va heavy chain are required for the interaction of the cofactor with factor Xa and optimum rates of prothrombin cleavage. We have also shown that amino acid region 332−336 contains residues that are important for cofactor function. Using overlapping peptides, we identified amino acids D334 and Y335 as contributors to cofactor activity. We constructed recombinant factor V molecules with the mutations D334 → K and Y335 → F (factor VKF) and D334 → A and Y335 → A (factor VAA). Kinetic studies showed that while factor VaKF and factor VaAA had a KD for factor Xa similar to the KD observed for wild-type factor Va (factor VaWT), the clotting activities of the mutant molecules were impaired and the kcat of prothrombinase assembled with factor VaKF and factor VaAA was reduced. The second-order rate constant of prothrombinase assembled with factor VaKF or factor VaAA for prothrombin activation was ∼10-fold lower than the second-order rate constant for the same reaction catalyzed by prothrombinase assembled with factor VaWT. We also created quadruple mutants combining mutations in the amino acid region 334–335 with mutations at the previously identified amino acids that are important for factor Xa binding (i.e., E323Y324 and E330V331). Prothrombinase assembled with the quadruple mutant molecules displayed a second-order rate constant up to 400-fold lower than the values obtained with prothrombinase assembled with factor VaWT. The data demonstrate that amino acid region 334–335 is required for the rearrangement of enzyme and substrate necessary for efficient catalysis of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:18537263

  8. Transcription Factor ATAF1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Senescence by Direct Regulation of Key Chloroplast Maintenance and Senescence Transcriptional Cascades1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Xue, Gang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Senescence represents a fundamental process of late leaf development. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role for expression reprogramming during senescence; however, the gene regulatory networks through which they exert their functions, and their physiological integration, are still largely unknown. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) abscisic acid (ABA)- and hydrogen peroxide-activated TF Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIVATING FACTOR1 (ATAF1) as a novel upstream regulator of senescence. ATAF1 executes its physiological role by affecting both key chloroplast maintenance and senescence-promoting TFs, namely GOLDEN2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and ORESARA1 (ARABIDOPSIS NAC092), respectively. Notably, while ATAF1 activates ORESARA1, it represses GLK1 expression by directly binding to their promoters, thereby generating a transcriptional output that shifts the physiological balance toward the progression of senescence. We furthermore demonstrate a key role of ATAF1 for ABA- and hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence, in accordance with a direct regulatory effect on ABA homeostasis genes, including NINE-CIS-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE3 involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABC TRANSPORTER G FAMILY MEMBER40, encoding an ABA transport protein. Thus, ATAF1 serves as a core transcriptional activator of senescence by coupling stress-related signaling with photosynthesis- and senescence-related transcriptional cascades. PMID:25953103

  9. Self-Directed Violence Aboard U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers: An Examination of General and Shipboard-Specific Risk and Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Saitzyk, Arlene; Vorm, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Self-directed violence (SDV), which includes suicidal ideation with and without intent, suicidal preparatory behaviors and attempts with and without harm, non-suicidal self-directed violence, and completed suicide, has been a rising concern in the military. Military shipboard personnel may represent a unique subset of this population due to the distinct nature of deployment stressors and embedded supports. As such, one might expect differences in the prevalence of SDV between this group and other active duty personnel, signifying a distinct operational impact. This study analyzed the prevalence of SDV among personnel assigned or deployed to U.S. Navy aircraft carriers, and examined whether occurrences varied by descriptors commonly identified in the literature (e.g., age, gender, marital status, pay grade/rank). This study also examined characteristics specific to life aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier in order to better understand the issues particular to this population. Descriptive analyses and relative risk findings suggested similarities in demographic risk factors to the general military population, but also striking differences related to occupational specialty and assigned department. This study is the first to shed light on risk and protective factors relevant to shipboard personnel. PMID:27046180

  10. Progranulin does not bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors and is not a direct regulator of TNF-dependent signaling or bioactivity in immune or neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Chang, Jianjun; Deng, Qiudong; Xu, Jie; Nguyen, Thi A; Martens, Lauren H; Cenik, Basar; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F; Chung, Jaegwon; Yu, Kimberley; Yu, Phillip; Herz, Joachim; Farese, Robert V; Kukar, Thomas; Tansey, Malú G

    2013-05-22

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in neurons and glia that is implicated in neuronal survival on the basis that mutations in the GRN gene causing haploinsufficiency result in a familial form of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recently, a direct interaction between PGRN and tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR I/II) was reported and proposed to be a mechanism by which PGRN exerts anti-inflammatory activity, raising the possibility that aberrant PGRN-TNFR interactions underlie the molecular basis for neuroinflammation in frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathogenesis. Here, we report that we find no evidence for a direct physical or functional interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Using coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we replicated the interaction between PGRN and sortilin and that between TNF and TNFRI/II, but not the interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Recombinant PGRN or transfection of a cDNA encoding PGRN did not antagonize TNF-dependent NFκB, Akt, and Erk1/2 pathway activation; inflammatory gene expression; or secretion of inflammatory factors in BV2 microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Moreover, PGRN did not antagonize TNF-induced cytotoxicity on dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells. Last, co-addition or pre-incubation with various N- or C-terminal-tagged recombinant PGRNs did not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene expression or cytokine secretion in any cell type examined, including BMDMs from Grn+/- or Grn-/- mice. Therefore, the neuroinflammatory phenotype associated with PGRN deficiency in the CNS is not a direct consequence of the loss of TNF antagonism by PGRN, but may be a secondary response by glia to disrupted interactions between PGRN and Sortilin and/or other binding partners yet to be identified. PMID:23699531

  11. Progranulin Does Not Bind Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptors and Is Not a Direct Regulator of TNF-Dependent Signaling or Bioactivity in Immune or Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Chang, Jianjun; Deng, Qiudong; Xu, Jie; Nguyen, Thi A.; Martens, Lauren H.; Cenik, Basar; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F.; Chung, Jaegwon; Yu, Kimberley; Yu, Phillip; Herz, Joachim; Farese, Robert V.; Kukar, Thomas; Tansey, Malú G.

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in neurons and glia that is implicated in neuronal survival on the basis that mutations in the GRN gene causing haploinsufficiency result in a familial form of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recently, a direct interaction between PGRN and tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR I/II) was reported and proposed to be a mechanism by which PGRN exerts anti-inflammatory activity, raising the possibility that aberrant PGRN–TNFR interactions underlie the molecular basis for neuroinflammation in frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathogenesis. Here, we report that we find no evidence for a direct physical or functional interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Using coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we replicated the interaction between PGRN and sortilin and that between TNF and TNFRI/II, but not the interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Recombinant PGRN or transfection of a cDNA encoding PGRN did not antagonize TNF-dependent NFκB, Akt, and Erk1/2 pathway activation; inflammatory gene expression; or secretion of inflammatory factors in BV2 microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Moreover, PGRN did not antagonize TNF-induced cytotoxicity on dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells. Last, co-addition or pre-incubation with various N- or C-terminal-tagged recombinant PGRNs did not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene expression or cytokine secretion in any cell type examined, including BMDMs from Grn+/− or Grn−/− mice. Therefore, the neuroinflammatory phenotype associated with PGRN deficiency in the CNS is not a direct consequence of the loss of TNF antagonism by PGRN, but may be a secondary response by glia to disrupted interactions between PGRN and Sortilin and/or other binding partners yet to be identified. PMID:23699531

  12. Re-quantifying the emission factors based on field measurements and estimating the direct N2O emission from Chinese croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xunhua; Han, Shenghui; Huang, Yao; Wang, Yuesi; Wang, Mingxing

    2004-06-01

    The authors collect 54 direct N2O emission factors (EFds) obtained from 12 sites of Chinese croplands, of which 60% are underestimated by 29% and 30% are overestimated by 50% due to observation shortages. The biases of EFds are corrected and their uncertainties are re-estimated. Of the 31 site-scale EFds, 42% are lower by 58% and 26% are higher by 143% than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change default. Periodically wetting/drying the fields or doubling nitrogen fertilizers may double or even triple an EFd. The direct N2O emission from Chinese croplands is estimated at 275 × 109 g N2O-N yr-1 in the 1990s, of which ˜20% is due to vegetable cultivation. The great uncertainty of this estimate, -79% to 135%, is overwhelmingly due to the huge uncertainty in estimating EFds (-78 ± 15% to 129 ± 62%). Direct N2O emission intensities significantly depend upon the economic situation of the region, implicating a larger potential emission in the future.

  13. The MADS box transcription factor MEF2C regulates melanocyte development and is a direct transcriptional target and partner of SOX10.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pooja; Verzi, Michael P; Nguyen, Thuyen; Hu, Jianxin; Ehlers, Melissa L; McCulley, David J; Xu, Shan-Mei; Dodou, Evdokia; Anderson, Joshua P; Wei, Maria L; Black, Brian L

    2011-06-01

    Waardenburg syndromes are characterized by pigmentation and autosensory hearing defects, and mutations in genes encoding transcription factors that control neural crest specification and differentiation are often associated with Waardenburg and related disorders. For example, mutations in SOX10 result in a severe form of Waardenburg syndrome, Type IV, also known as Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease, characterized by pigmentation and other neural crest defects, including defective innervation of the gut. SOX10 controls neural crest development through interactions with other transcription factors. The MADS box transcription factor MEF2C is an important regulator of brain, skeleton, lymphocyte and cardiovascular development and is required in the neural crest for craniofacial development. Here, we establish a novel role for MEF2C in melanocyte development. Inactivation of Mef2c in the neural crest of mice results in reduced expression of melanocyte genes during development and a significant loss of pigmentation at birth due to defective differentiation and reduced abundance of melanocytes. We identify a transcriptional enhancer of Mef2c that directs expression to the neural crest and its derivatives, including melanocytes, in transgenic mouse embryos. This novel Mef2c neural crest enhancer contains three functional SOX binding sites and a single essential MEF2 site. We demonstrate that Mef2c is a direct transcriptional target of SOX10 and MEF2 via this evolutionarily conserved enhancer. Furthermore, we show that SOX10 and MEF2C physically interact and function cooperatively to activate the Mef2c gene in a feed-forward transcriptional circuit, suggesting that MEF2C might serve as a potentiator of the transcriptional pathways affected in Waardenburg syndromes. PMID:21610032

  14. Changes in the pattern of distribution of von Willebrand factor in rat aortic endothelial cells following thrombin generation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Richardson, M; Tinlin, S; Maurice, D H; Giles, A R

    1996-04-01

    The pattern of distribution of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in relatively large sheets of rat aortic endothelial cells (EC) obtained by the Häutchen technique were analysed by immunocytochemistry and light microscopy. EC were examined pre and post administration of a procoagulant mixture of factor Xa (F.Xa) and phosphotidylcholine/phosphotidylserine (PCPS) vesicles which was demonstrated to result in the selective loss of high molecular weight multimers (HMWM) of plasma VWF in the rat. In placebo animals the pattern was heterogenous both in overall distribution and in individual cells which showed both a diffuse and granular pattern. Groups of intensely stained EC were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aorta and staining was particularly prominent around the orifices of the intercostal arteries, implicating shear-stress as a possible factor in VWF expression by EC. Changes in the pattern of distribution of staining were observed at various time points post-infusion of F.Xa/PCPS, suggesting the immediate release of VWF from EC stores followed by the recruitment of EC to synthesize and store VWF. These changes are consistent with the decrease in EC Weibel-Palade Body (WPB) content observed by EM in previously reported studies using this model. PMID:8611460

  15. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  16. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway Is a Direct Enhancer of Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Makoukji, Joelle; Kimura, Shioko; Talbot, Monique; Caillou, Bernard; Massaad, Charbel; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in the normal development of thyroid gland, but its disregulation provokes the appearance of several types of cancers, including papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) which are the most common thyroid tumours. The follow-up of PTC patients is based on the monitoring of serum thyroglobulin levels which is regulated by the thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1): a tissue-specific transcription factor essential for the differentiation of the thyroid. We investigated whether the Wnt/β-catenin pathway might regulate TTF-1 expression in a human PTC model and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. Immunofluorescence analysis, real time RT-PCR and Western blot studies revealed that TTF-1 as well as the major Wnt pathway components are co-expressed in TPC-1 cells and human PTC tumours. Knocking-down the Wnt/β-catenin components by siRNAs inhibited both TTF-1 transcript and protein expression, while mimicking the activation of Wnt signaling by lithium chloride induced TTF-1 gene and protein expression. Functional promoter studies and ChIP analysis showed that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts its effect by means of the binding of β-catenin to TCF/LEF transcription factors on the level of an active TCF/LEF response element at [−798, −792 bp] in TTF-1 promoter. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a direct and forward driver of the TTF-1 expression. The localization of TCF-4 and TTF-1 in the same area of PTC tissues might be of clinical relevance, and justifies further examination of these factors in the papillary thyroid cancers follow-up. PMID:21814573

  17. Direct CP violation for B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in QCD factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Gang; Yuan Baohe; Wei Kewei

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of QCD factorization, based on the first order of isospin violation, we study direct CP violation in the decay of B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}){yields}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, including the effect of {rho}-{omega} mixing. We find that the CP violating asymmetry is large via the {rho}-{omega} mixing mechanism when the invariant mass of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair is in the vicinity of the {omega} resonance. For the decay of B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}){yields}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, the maximum CP violating asymmetries can reach about 46%. We also discuss the possibility to observe the predicted CP violating asymmetries at the LHC.

  18. Effects of environmental factors on corrosion behaviors of metal-fiber porous components in a simulated direct methanol fuel cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Zhao-chun; Deng, Jun

    2014-09-01

    To enable the use of metallic components in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), issues related to corrosion resistance must be considered because of an acid environment induced by the solid electrolyte. In this study, we report the electrochemical behaviors of metal-fiber-based porous sintered components in a simulated corrosive environment of DMFCs. Three materials were evaluated: pure copper, AISI304, and AISI316L. The environmental factors and related mechanisms affecting the corrosion behaviors were analyzed. The results demonstrated that AISI316L exhibits the best performance. A higher SO{4/2-} concentration increases the risk of material corrosion, whereas an increase in methanol concentration inhibits corrosion. The morphological features of the corroded samples were also characterized in this study.

  19. Direct conversion of mouse fibroblasts to GABAergic neurons with combined medium without the introduction of transcription factors or miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiming; Wang, Yonghui; He, Zuping; Yang, Hao; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Degeneration or loss of GABAergic neurons frequently may lead to many neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. So far no clinically effective therapies can slow and halt the progression of these diseases. Cell-replacement therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of these neuropsychiatric diseases. Although increasing evidence showed that mammalian somatic cells can be directly converted into functional neurons using specific transcription factors or miRNAs via virus delivery, the application of these induced neurons is potentially problematic, due to integration of vectors into the host genome, which results in the disruption or dysfunction of nearby genes. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts could be efficiently reprogrammed into GABAergic neurons in a combined medium composed of conditioned medium from neurotrophin-3 modified Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (NT3-OECs) plus SB431542, GDNF and RA. Following 3 weeks of induction, these cells derived from fibroblasts acquired the morphological and phenotypical GABAerigic neuronal properties, as demonstrated by the expression of neuronal markers including Tuj1, NeuN, Neurofilament-L, GABA, GABA receptors and GABA transporter 1. More importantly, these converted cells acquired neuronal functional properties such as synapse formation and increasing intracellular free calcium influx when treated with BayK, a specific activator of L-type calcium channel. Therefore, our findings demonstrate for the first time that fibroblasts can be directly converted into GABAergic neurons without ectopic expression of specific transcription factors or miRNA. This study may provide a promising cell source for the application of cell replacement therapy in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26114472

  20. MicroRNA-146a expression inhibits the proliferation and promotes the apoptosis of bronchial smooth muscle cells in asthma by directly targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanxia; Xue, Yan; Liu, Yan; Song, Guodong; Lv, Guofeng; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Yijiang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Leiying

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a) in the plasma of children with asthma, and to investigate the effect of miR-146a on the proliferation and apoptosis of bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs). Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression levels of miR-146a mimics and its inhibitor. A Cell Counting kit-8 assay was performed to examine the proliferation of BSMCs. Caspase-3/7 activity was determined using a Caspase-Glo 3/7 kit. To measure the expression levels of proteins associated with apoptosis, western blotting was performed. The target gene of miR-146a was identified using a dual-luciferase reporter assay. The plasma levels of miR-146a in children with asthma were significantly higher compared with those in healthy children. Enhanced miR-146a expression inhibited the proliferation of BSMCs. BSMC apoptosis was promoted by miR-146a. The mechanism underlying the miR-146a-induced promotion of BSMC apoptosis may be its direct targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which affects downstream signaling pathways. In conclusion, miR-146a expression in asthma inhibits the proliferation and promotes the apoptosis of BSMCs by direct targeting of EGFR.

  1. An aptamer-based biosensing platform for highly sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor via enzyme-mediated direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kun; Xiang, Yang; Zhang, Liqun; Chen, Qinghai; Fu, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a new label-free electrochemical aptamer-based sensor (aptasensor) was constructed for detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) based on the direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD). For this proposed aptasensor, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-protected graphene-gold nanoparticles (P-Gra-GNPs) composite was firstly coated on electrode surface to form the interface with biocompatibility and huge surface area for the adsorption of GOD layer. Subsequently, gold nanoclusters (GNCs) were deposited on the surface of GOD to capture PDGF binding aptamer (PBA). Finally, GOD as a blocking reagent was employed to block the remaining active sites of the GNCs and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the direct electron transfer of double layer GOD membranes, the aptasensor showed excellent electrochemical response and the peak current decreased linearly with increasing logarithm of PDGF concentration from 0.005 nM to 60 nM with a relatively low limit of detection of 1.7 pM. The proposed aptasensor exhibited high specificity, good reproducibility and long-term stability, which provided a new promising technique for aptamer-based protein detection. PMID:23260677

  2. Disruption of E-Cadherin by Matrix Metalloproteinase Directly Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Downstream of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Lyons, James Guy; Tan, Thian Kui; Wang, Yiping; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Min, Danqing; Succar, Lena; Rangan, Gopala K.; Hu, Min; Henderson, Beric R.; Alexander, Stephen I.; Harris, David C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in organ fibrosis, including that of the kidney. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a hallmark of EMT; however, whether the loss of E-cadherin is a consequence or a cause of EMT remains unknown, especially in the renal system. In this study, we show that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells is dependent on proteolysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated E-cadherin disruption led directly to tubular epithelial cell EMT via Slug. TGF-β1 induced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin, which caused the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, the transcriptional induction of Slug, and the repression of E-cadherin transcription in tubular epithelial cells. These findings reveal a direct role for E-cadherin and for matrix metalloproteinases in causing EMT downstream of TGF-β1 in fibrotic disease. Specific inhibition rather than activation of matrix metalloproteinases may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic disease. PMID:19590041

  3. De novo transcriptome sequence assembly from coconut leaves and seeds with a focus on factors involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-11-01

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. PMID:25193496

  4. The auxin response factor MONOPTEROS controls meristem function and organogenesis in both the shoot and root through the direct regulation of PIN genes.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Weiner, Aaron I; Berleth, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The regulatory effect auxin has on its own transport is critical in numerous self-organizing plant patterning processes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking auxin signal transduction and auxin transport is still fragmentary, and important regulatory genes remain to be identified. To track a key link between auxin signaling and auxin transport in development, we established an Arabidopsis thaliana genetic background in which fundamental patterning processes in both shoot and root were essentially abolished and the expression of PIN FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators was dramatically reduced. In this background, we demonstrate that activating a steroid-inducible variant of the auxin response factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) is sufficient to restore patterning and PIN gene expression. Further, we show that MP binds to distinct promoter elements of multiple genetically defined PIN genes. Our work identifies a direct regulatory link between central, well-characterized genes involved in auxin signal transduction and auxin transport. The steroid-inducible MP system directly demonstrates the importance of this molecular link in multiple patterning events in embryos, shoots and roots, and provides novel options for interrogating the properties of self-regulated auxin-based patterning in planta. PMID:27441727

  5. De Novo Transcriptome Sequence Assembly from Coconut Leaves and Seeds with a Focus on Factors Involved in RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L.; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-01-01

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. PMID:25193496

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-I and slow, bi-directional perfusion enhance the formation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C; Freed, Lisa E

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  7. Growth and the Growth Hormone-Insulin Like Growth Factor 1 Axis in Children With Chronic Inflammation: Current Evidence, Gaps in Knowledge, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Wong, S C; Dobie, R; Altowati, M A; Werther, G A; Farquharson, C; Ahmed, S F

    2016-02-01

    Growth failure is frequently encountered in children with chronic inflammatory conditions like juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cystic fibrosis. Delayed puberty and attenuated pubertal growth spurt are often seen during adolescence. The underlying inflammatory state mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, prolonged use of glucocorticoid, and suboptimal nutrition contribute to growth failure and pubertal abnormalities. These factors can impair growth by their effects on the GH-IGF axis and also directly at the level of the growth plate via alterations in chondrogenesis and local growth factor signaling. Recent studies on the impact of cytokines and glucocorticoid on the growth plate further advanced our understanding of growth failure in chronic disease and provided a biological rationale of growth promotion. Targeting cytokines using biological therapy may lead to improvement of growth in some of these children, but approximately one-third continue to grow slowly. There is increasing evidence that the use of relatively high-dose recombinant human GH may lead to partial catch-up growth in chronic inflammatory conditions, although long-term follow-up data are currently limited. In this review, we comprehensively review the growth abnormalities in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cystic fibrosis, systemic abnormalities of the GH-IGF axis, and growth plate perturbations. We also systematically reviewed all the current published studies of recombinant human GH in these conditions and discussed the role of recombinant human IGF-1. PMID:26720129

  8. The ETS domain transcription factor ELK1 directs a critical component of growth signaling by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patki, Mugdha; Chari, Venkatesh; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Gonit, Mesfin; Trumbly, Robert; Ratnam, Manohar

    2013-04-19

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for diverse aspects of prostate development and function. Molecular mechanisms by which prostate cancer (PC) cells redirect AR signaling to genes that primarily support growth are unclear. A systematic search for critical AR-tethering proteins led to ELK1, an ETS transcription factor of the ternary complex factor subfamily. Although genetically redundant, ELK1 was obligatory for AR-dependent growth and clonogenic survival in both hormone-dependent PC and castration-recurrent PC cells but not for AR-negative cell growth. AR required ELK1 to up-regulate a major subset of its target genes that was strongly and primarily enriched for cell growth functions. AR functioned as a coactivator of ELK1 by association through its A/B domain, bypassing the classical mechanism of ELK1 activation by phosphorylation and without inducing ternary complex target genes. The ELK1-AR synergy per se was ligand-independent, although it required ligand for nuclear localization of AR as targeting the AR A/B domain to the nucleus recapitulated the action of hormone; accordingly, Casodex was a poor antagonist of the synergy. ELK3, the closest substitute for ELK1 in structure/function and genome recognition, did not interact with AR. ELK1 thus directs selective and sustained gene induction that is a substantial and critical component of growth signaling by AR in PC cells. The ELK1-AR interaction offers a functionally tumor-selective drug target. PMID:23426362

  9. Alveolar Epithelial Cells Are Critical in Protection of the Respiratory Tract by Secretion of Factors Able To Modulate the Activity of Pulmonary Macrophages and Directly Control Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Petursdottir, Dagbjort H.; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity. PMID:23147039

  10. Factors associated with coverage of praziquantel for schistosomiasis control in the community-direct intervention (CDI) approach in Mali (West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the progress made in the control of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD), schistosome and soil-transmitted helminth infections are far from being effectively managed in many parts of the world. Chemotherapy, the key element of all control strategies, is faced with some difficulties in terms of access to treatment. Our study aims to describe the factors involved in the success or failure of the community-directed intervention (CDI) approach through control programmes, which aims to achieve consistent high coverage at affordable and sustainable costs in endemic areas. Methods The CDI approach was carried out from December 2007 to October 2008 in ten villages of the district of Diéma, Mali. At inclusion, each child part of the study’s sample was interviewed and submitted for a physical examination. The study focused on: data collection, treatment of the eligible population, evaluation of the treatment coverage, performance of community drug distributors (CDDs), and the involvement and perception of populations. Results A total of 8,022 eligible people were studied with a mean coverage rate of 76.7%. Using multiple regression, it was determined that receiving praziquantel as treatment was associated with five factors: belonging to the Fulani or Moorish ethnic minority versus the Bambara/Soninke, use of the central versus the house-to-house drug distribution mode, the ratio of the population to the number of CDDs, the lack of supervision and belonging to the age group of 15 years or above (p<0.05). As well as that, it was found that the presence of parallel community-based programmes (HIV, tuberculosis) that provide financial incentives for community members discouraged many CDDs (who in most cases are volunteers) to participate in the CDI approach due to a lack of incentives. Conclusions The findings indicate that the success of the CDI approach depends on, amongst other things, the personal characteristics of the respondents, as well as on community

  11. Direct, Interferon-Independent Activation of the CXCL10 Promoter by NF-κB and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Jessica; Bruckner, Jacob; Wagoner, Jessica; Thomas, Emmanuel; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Liang, T. Jake

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of hepatocytes leads to transcriptional induction of the chemokine CXCL10, which is considered an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene. However, we have recently shown that IFNs are not required for CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes during acute HCV infection. Since the CXCL10 promoter contains binding sites for several proinflammatory transcription factors, we investigated the contribution of these factors to CXCL10 transcriptional induction during HCV infection in vitro. Wild-type and mutant CXCL10 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were used to identify critical sites of transcriptional regulation. The proximal IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and NF-κB binding sites positively regulated CXCL10 transcription during HCV infection as well as following exposure to poly(I·C) (a Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3] stimulus) and 5′ poly(U) HCV RNA (a retinoic acid-inducible gene I [RIG-I] stimulus) from two viral genotypes. Conversely, binding sites for AP-1 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP-β) negatively regulated CXCL10 induction in response to TLR3 and RIG-I stimuli, while only C/EBP-β negatively regulated CXCL10 during HCV infection. We also demonstrated that interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is transiently recruited to the proximal ISRE during HCV infection and localizes to the nucleus in HCV-infected primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, IRF3 activated the CXCL10 promoter independently of type I or type III IFN signaling. The data indicate that sensing of HCV infection by RIG-I and TLR3 leads to direct recruitment of NF-κB and IRF3 to the CXCL10 promoter. Our study expands upon current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes and lays the foundation for additional mechanistic studies that further elucidate the combinatorial and synergistic aspects of immune signaling pathways. PMID:24257594

  12. Risk factors of direct heat-related hospital admissions during the 2009 heatwave in Adelaide, Australia: a matched case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Nitschke, Monika; Krackowizer, Antoinette; Dear, Keith; Pisaniello, Dino; Weinstein, Philip; Tucker, Graeme; Shakib, Sepehr; Bi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The extreme heatwave of 2009 in South Australia dramatically increased morbidity, with a 14-fold increase in direct heat-related hospitalisation in metropolitan Adelaide. Our study aimed to identify risk factors for the excess morbidity. Design A matched case–control study of risk factors was conducted. Setting Patients and matched community controls were interviewed to gather data on demographics, living environment, social support, health status and behaviour changes during the heatwave. Participants Cases were all hospital admissions with heat-related diagnoses during the 5-day heatwave in 2009. Controls were randomly selected from communities. Outcome measures Descriptive analyses, simple and multiple conditional logistic regressions were performed. Adjusted ORs (AORs) were estimated. Results In total, 143 hospital patients and 143 matched community controls were interviewed, with a mean age of 73 years (SD 21), 96% European ethnicity, 63% retired, 36% with high school or higher education, and 8% institutional living. The regression model indicated that compared with the controls, cases were more likely to have heart disease (AOR=13.56, 95% CI 1.27 to 144.86) and dementia (AOR=26.43, 95% CI 1.99 to 350.73). The protective factors included higher education level (AOR=0.48, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.99), having air-conditioner in the bedroom (AOR=0.12, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.74), having an emergency button (AOR=0.09, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.96), using refreshment (AOR=0.10, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.84), and having more social activities (AOR=0.11, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.57). Conclusions Pre-existing heart disease and dementia significantly increase the risk of direct heat-related hospitalisations during heatwaves. The presence of an air-conditioner in the bedroom, more social activities, a higher education level, use of emergency buttons and refreshments reduce the risk during heatwaves. PMID:27256088

  13. DIRECTIONAL COUPLERS

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.J.

    1961-12-01

    A directional coupler of small size is designed. Stripline conductors of non-rectilinear configuration, and separated from each other by a thin dielectric spacer. cross each other at least at two locations at right angles, thus providing practically pure capacitive coupling which substantially eliminates undesirable inductive coupling. The conductors are sandwiched between a pair of ground planes. The coupling factor is dependent only on the thickness and dielectric constant of the dielectric spacer at the point of conductor crossover. (AEC)

  14. Comparison of human coagulation factor VIII expression directed by cytomegalovirus and mammary gland-specific promoters in HC11 cells and transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Hao, Siguo; Ma, Liyuan; Zhang, Wenhao; Wan, Jiangbo; Deng, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The conventional treatment involves the administration of recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) preparations. In this study, the mammary gland ‘bioreactor’ is designed to specifically and efficiently express a foreign protein hFVIII in the mammary glands of transgenic mice. We constructed a P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector directed by the mammary gland-specific P1A3 promoter, and transiently transfected HC11 cells and mouse mammary glands with P1A3-hFVIIIBD or CMV-hFVIIIBD vectors directed by a ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, respectively. We also generated P1A3-hFVIIIBD and CMV-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice by microinjection, respectively. Our data indicated that both vectors effectively expressed hFVIIIBD in HC11 cells at the transcription level, and hFVIIIBD protein was efficiently expressed in mouse milk after the injection of the hFVIIIBD vectors into mouse mammary glands during lactation. In both CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice, hFVIIIBD proteins were efficiently expressed in the mammary glands at the mRNA and protein levels. No significant difference was observed in hFVIIIBD levels between the CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice (P > 0.05). However, the activity of hFVIII in CMV-directed transgenic mice was slightly higher than that in P1A3-directed transgenic mice (P < 0.05). While hFVIIIBD was present in multiple organs in CMV-hFVIIIBD mice, P1A3-hFVIIIBD mice showed negligible hFVIIIBD expression in organs other than the mammary glands. This study demonstrated that the mammary gland-specific P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector was more suitable for the generation of hFVIIIBD mammary gland bioreactor. PMID:26192111

  15. Fermi resonance in the ν8:ν1 + ν6 ground state diad and relative vibronic activity of the ν8 and ν6 vibrations in the AB2u-XA1g system of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. L.

    2013-07-01

    Using the known resonance parameters determined from the ionisation detected Raman spectrum of the ν8:ν1 + ν6 Fermi resonance diad in the ground state, the intensity relations in the Fermi resonance diads 810:110610 and 810611:110621 in the benzene AB2u-XA1g system are analysed to give a value of + 0.18 for the ratio of the first order Herzberg-Teller coefficients for the ν8 and ν6 vibrations in this spectrum. This leads to a figure of 0.012 for the relative vibronic activity (oscillator strength) of ν8 and ν6, which result is compared with current theoretical estimates. Some anomalies in the SVL fluorescence spectra of these Fermi resonance diads are discussed.

  16. The Role of RaxST, a Prokaryotic Sulfotransferase, and RaxABC, a Putative Type I Secretion System, in Activation of the Rice XA21-Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is an important posttranslational modification that determines the outcome of serious diseases in plants and animals. We have recently demonstrated that the plant pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) carries a functional sulfotransferase (RaxST). raxST is required for activation of rice Xa21-mediated immunity indicating the critical, but unknown, function of raxST in mediating the Xoo/rice interaction. The raxST gene resides in the same operon (raxSTAB) as components of a predicted type I secretion and processing system (RaxA and RaxB). These observations suggest a model where RaxST sulfates a molecule that contains a leader peptide, which is cleaved by the peptidase domain of the RaxB protein and secreted outside the bacterial cell by the RaxABC T1SS. PMID:25386383

  17. A method for the identification of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase containing a particular sigma factor: cloning of a developmentally regulated promoter and corresponding gene directed by the Streptomyces aureofaciens sigma factor RpoZ.

    PubMed

    Nováková, R; Sevcíková, B; Kormanec, J

    1998-02-16

    We have developed a method for the identification of promoters recognized by a particular sigma factor of RNA polymerase, based on a two-compatible plasmid system in Escherichia coli (Ec). Using the method, a DNA fragment containing the promoter, PREN40, recognized by sporulation-specific Streptomyces aureofaciens (Sa) sigma factor RpoZ, was cloned. High-resolution S1 nuclease mapping using RNA prepared from Ec, and Sa from various developmental stages has shown a high degree of similarity of PREN40 to consensus sequence of flagellar and chemotaxis promoters. The promoter was induced at the time of aerial mycelium formation, and was off in the Sa strain with the rpoZ-disrupted gene. A promoter-bearing DNA fragment was inserted into the promoter-probe plasmid pARC1 to give expression patterns consistent with the results of direct RNA analysis. The region downstream of the promoter was cloned in Sa. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 283 amino acids (Mr 30006), encoding a highly basic (pI 12.35) protein with high percentage of serine, threonine and alanine (41.8%). PMID:9479043

  18. Regulation of factor IXa in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. Role of the endothelium and the plasma proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, H.E.; Trapp, H.G.; Griffith, M.J.; Roberts, H.R.; Pizzo, S.V.

    1984-06-01

    The regulation of human Factor IXa was studied in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. In human plasma, approximately 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to antithrombin III (ATIII) by 2 h, with no binding to alpha 2-macroglobulin or alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose beads. In the presence of heparin, virtually 100% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII by 1 min. The distribution of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa in mouse plasma was similar. The clearance of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was rapid (50% clearance in 2 min) and biphasic and was inhibited by large molar excesses of ATIII-thrombin and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor-trypsin, but not alpha 2-macro-globulin-trypsin; it was also inhibited by large molar excesses of diisopropylphosphoryl - (DIP-) Factor Xa, DIP-thrombin, and Factor IX, but not by prothrombin or Factor X. The clearance of Factor IX was also rapid (50% clearance in 2.5 min) and was inhibited by a large molar excess of Factor IX, but not by large molar excesses of Factor X, prothrombin, DIP-Factor Xa, or DIP-thrombin. Electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose bead studies confirmed that by 2 min after injection into the murine circulation, 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII. Organ distribution studies with /sup 125/I-Factor IXa demonstrated that most of the radioactivity was in the liver. These studies suggest that Factor IXa binds to at least two classes of binding sites on endothelial cells. One site apparently recognizes both Factors IX and IXa, but not Factor X, Factor Xa, prothrombin, or thrombin. The other site recognizes thrombin, Factor Xa, and Factor IXa, but not the zymogen forms of these clotting factors. After this binding, Factor IXa is bound to ATIII and the complex is cleared from the circulation by hepatocytes.

  19. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat. PMID:26285082

  20. The Arabidopsis transcription factor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 is a direct substrate of MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 and regulates immunity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sining; Yang, Fan; Li, Lin; Chen, Huamin; Chen, She; Zhang, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are recognized by plant pattern recognition receptors to activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as other cytoplasmic kinases, integrate upstream immune signals and, in turn, dissect PTI signaling via different substrates to regulate defense responses. However, only a few direct substrates of these signaling kinases have been identified. Here, we show that PAMP perception enhances phosphorylation of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1), a transcription factor involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway, through pathogen-induced MAPKs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BES1 interacts with MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) and is phosphorylated by MPK6. bes1 loss-of-function mutants display compromised resistance to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. BES1 S286A/S137A double mutation (BES1(SSAA)) impairs PAMP-induced phosphorylation and fails to restore bacterial resistance in bes1 mutant, indicating a positive role of BES1 phosphorylation in plant immunity. BES1 is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3)-like kinase BR-insensitive2 (BIN2), a negative regulator of BR signaling. BR perception inhibits BIN2 activity, allowing dephosphorylation of BES1 to regulate plant development. However, BES1(SSAA) does not affect BR-mediated plant growth, suggesting differential residue requirements for the modulation of BES1 phosphorylation in PTI and BR signaling. Our study identifies BES1 as a unique direct substrate of MPK6 in PTI signaling. This finding reveals MAPK-mediated BES1 phosphorylation as another BES1 modulation mechanism in plant cell signaling, in addition to GSK3-like kinase-mediated BES1 phosphorylation and F box protein-mediated BES1 degradation. PMID:25609555

  1. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  2. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Tonya M.; Fremin, Brayon J.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles. PMID:25797154

  3. Intravenous injection of siRNA directed against hypoxia-inducible factors prolongs survival in a Lewis lung carcinoma cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kamlah, F; Eul, B G; Li, S; Lang, N; Marsh, L M; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Rose, F; Hänze, J

    2009-03-01

    Different routes for the in vivo administration of synthetic siRNA complexes targeting lung tumors were compared, and siRNA complexes were administered for the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha). Intravenous jugular vein injection of siRNA proved to be the most effective means of targeting lung tumor tissue in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1) model. In comparison, intraperitoneal injection of siRNA was not suitable for targeting of lung tumor and intratracheal administration of siRNA exclusively targeted macrophages. Inhibition of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha by siRNA injected intravenously was validated by immunohistofluorescent analysis for glucose-transporter-1 (GLUT-1), a well-established HIF target protein. The GLUT-1 signal was strongly attenuated in the lung tumors of mice treated with siRNA-targeting HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha, compared with mice treated with control siRNA. Interestingly, injection of siRNA directed against HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha into LLC1 lung tumor-bearing mice resulted in prolonged survival. Immunohistological analysis of the lung tumors from mice treated with siRNA directed against HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha displayed reduced proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, cellular responses, which are known to be affected by HIF. In conclusion, intravenous jugular vein injection of siRNA strongly targets the lung tumor and is effective in gene inhibition as demonstrated for HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. PMID:18818708

  4. Factors Associated with Non-Participation and Non-Adherence in Directly Observed Mass Drug Administration for Malaria in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Susan; Gryseels, Charlotte; Mwesigwa, Julia; O’Neill, Sarah; Bannister-Tyrell, Melanie; Ronse, Maya; Jaiteh, Fatou; Gerrets, René; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Grietens, Koen Peeters

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefits of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) for malaria elimination are being considered in several malaria endemic countries where a decline in malaria transmission has been reported. For this strategy to work, it is important that a large proportion of the target population participates, requiring an in-depth understanding of factors that may affect participation and adherence to MDA programs. Methodology This social science study was ancillary to a one-round directly observed MDA campaign with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, carried out in 12 villages in rural Gambia between June and August 2014. The social science study employed a mixed-methods approach combining qualitative methods (participant observation and in-depth interviewing) and quantitative methods (structured follow-up interviews among non-participating and non-adhering community members). Results Of 3942 people registered in the study villages, 67.9% adhered to the three consecutive daily doses. For the remaining villagers, 12.6% did not attend the screening, 3.5% was not eligible and 16% did not adhere to the treatment schedule. The main barriers for non-participation and adherence were long and short-term mobility of individuals and specific subgroups, perceived adverse drug reactions and rumors, inconveniences related to the logistics of MDA (e.g. waiting times) and the perceived lack of information about MDA. Conclusion While, there was no fundamental resistance from the target communities, adherence was 67.9%. This shows the necessity of understanding local perceptions and barriers to increase its effectiveness. Moreover, certain of the constraining factors were socio-spatially clustered which might prove problematic since focal areas of residual malaria transmission may remain allowing malaria to spread to adjacent areas where transmission had been temporarily interrupted. PMID:26866685

  5. Nuclear factor-kappa B directs carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 receptor expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The human-specific pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae expresses opacity-associated (Opa) protein adhesins that bind to various members of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family. In this study, we have analyzed the mechanism underlying N. gonorrhoeae-induced CEACAM up-regulation in epithelial cells. Epithelial cells represent the first barrier for the microbial pathogen. We therefore characterized CEACAM expression in primary human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells and found that CEACAM1-3 (L, S) and CEACAM1-4 (L, S) splice variants mediate an increased Opa(52)-dependent gonoccocal binding to HOSE cells. Up-regulation of these CEACAM molecules in HOSE cells is a direct process that takes place within 2 h postinfection and depends on close contact between microbial pathogen and HOSE cells. N. gonorrhoeae-triggered CEACAM1 up-regulation involves activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which translocates as a p50/p65 heterodimer into the nucleus, and an NF-kappaB-specific inhibitory peptide inhibited CEACAM1-receptor up-regulation in N. gonorrhoeae-infected HOSE cells. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides did not induce NF-kappaB and CEACAM up-regulation, which corresponds to our findings that HOSE cells do not express toll-like receptor 4. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to up-regulate its epithelial receptor CEACAM1 through NF-kappaB suggests an important mechanism allowing efficient bacterial colonization during the initial infection process. PMID:11751883

  6. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is a direct transcriptional target of NF-κB and is aberrantly regulated in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hariri, F; Arguello, M; Volpon, L; Culjkovic-Kraljacic, B; Nielsen, T H; Hiscott, J; Mann, K K; Borden, K L B

    2013-10-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is a potent oncogene elevated in many cancers, including the M4 and M5 subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although eIF4E RNA levels are elevated 3- to 10-fold in M4/M5 AML, the molecular underpinnings of this dysregulation were unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EIF4E is a direct transcriptional target of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) that is dysregulated preferentially in M4 and M5 AML. In primary hematopoietic cells and in cell lines, eIF4E levels are induced by NF-κB activating stimuli. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of NF-κB represses this activation. The endogenous human EIF4E promoter recruits p65 and cRel to evolutionarily conserved κB sites in vitro and in vivo following NF-κB activation. Transcriptional activation is demonstrated by recruitment of p300 to the κB sites and phosphorylated Pol II to the coding region. In primary AML specimens, generally we observe that substantially more NF-κB complexes associate with eIF4E promoter elements in M4 and M5 AML specimens examined than in other subtypes or unstimulated normal primary hematopoietic cells. Consistently, genetic inhibition of NF-κB abrogates eIF4E RNA levels in this same population. These findings provide novel insights into the transcriptional control of eIF4E and a novel molecular basis for its dysregulation in at least a subset of M4/M5 AML specimens. PMID:23467026

  7. The Factors Associated with Good Responses to Speech Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Post-stroke Aphasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Il-Young; Lim, Jong Youb; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with good responses to speech therapy combined with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in aphasic patients after stroke. Method The language function was evaluated using Korean version of Western aphasia battery (K-WAB) before and after speech therapy with tDCS in 37 stroke patients. Patients received speech therapy for 30 minutes over 2 to 3 weeks (10 sessions) while the cathodal tDCS was performed to the Brodmann area 45 with 1 mA for 20 minutes. We compared the improvement of aphasia quotient % (AQ%) between two evaluation times according to age, sex, days after onset, stroke type, aphasia type, brain lesion confirmed by magnetic resonance image and initial severity of aphasia. The factors related with good responses were also checked. Results AQ% improved from pre- to post-therapy (14.94±6.73%, p<0.001). AQ% improvement was greater in patients with less severe, fluent type of aphasia who received treatment before 30 days since stroke was developed (p<0.05). The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that patients with hemorrhagic stroke were more likely to achieve good responses (odds ratio=4.897, p<0.05) relative to infarction. Initial severity over 10% in AQ% was also found to be significantly associated with good improvement (odds ratio=8.618, p<0.05). Conclusion Speech therapy with tDCS was established as a treatment tool for aphasic patients after stroke. Lower initial severity was associated with good responses. PMID:22506160

  8. A phase I study of 99mTc-hR3 (DiaCIM), a humanized immunoconjugate directed towards the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Vallis, K A; Reilly, R M; Chen, P; Oza, A; Hendler, A; Cameron, R; Hershkop, M; Iznaga-Escobar, N; Ramos-Suzarte, M; Keane, P

    2002-12-01

    A phase I trial was conducted to evaluate the safety, tumour and normal tissue localization, pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of Tc-hR3, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed towards the epidermal growth factor receptor, in 12 patients with recurrent or metastatic epithelial malignancies. Patients were injected intravenously with 3.0 mg or 6.0 mg (1010 MBq) of Tc-hR3. Blood and plasma concentrations of radioactivity were measured and a complete 24 h urine collection was obtained. Whole-body images were acquired up to 24 h post-injection and normal organ uptake quantified. Radiation dosimetry was estimated using MIRDose. Safety was evaluated by clinical observation, biochemical/haematological testing and by measuring immune response to Tc-hR3. There were no adverse effects, no changes in biochemical/haematological indices and no immune response to Tc-hR3. Tc-hR3 was rapidly cleared from the blood with a distribution half-life of 10.8+/-3.8 min. The volume of distribution, and clearance, were 180+/-37 ml.kg and 14+/-3 ml.kg.min, respectively. The elimination phase could not be discerned due to increasing blood radioactivity at later times. About 19-24% was excreted in the urine. Normal tissue uptake was mainly in the liver (44-50%), spleen (3-4%) and kidneys (3%). Imaging was positive in one patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and an involved cervical lymph node. The whole-body radiation dose from Tc-hR3 was 1.34+/-0.02x10 mSv.Bq. We conclude that Tc-hR3 exhibited an excellent safety profile. Future studies to determine the sensitivity and specificity of imaging with Tc-hR3 in a larger group of patients with pre-selection for epidermal growth factor receptor positivity are planned. PMID:12464779

  9. The Fission Yeast GATA Factor, Gaf1, Modulates Sexual Development via Direct Down-Regulation of ste11+ Expression in Response to Nitrogen Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yeong Man; Yeon, Ji-Hyun; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-01-01

    Gaf1 is the first GATA family zinc-finger transcription factor identified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we report that Gaf1 functions as a negatively acting transcription factor of ste11+, delaying the entrance of cells exposed to transient nitrogen starvation into the meiotic cycle. gaf1Δ strains exhibited accelerated G1-arrest upon nitrogen starvation. Moreover, gaf1Δ mutation caused increased mating and sporulation frequency under both nitrogen-starved and unstarved conditions, while overexpression of gaf1+ led to a significant impairment of sporulation. By microarray analysis, we found that approximately 63% (116 genes) of the 183 genes up-regulated in unstarved gaf1Δ cells were nitrogen starvation-responsive genes, and furthermore that 25 genes among the genes up-regulated by gaf1Δ mutation are Ste11 targets (e.g., gpa1+, ste4+, spk1+, ste11+, and mei2+). The phenotype caused by gaf1Δ mutation was masked by ste11Δ mutation, indicating that ste11+ is epistatic to gaf1+ with respect to sporulation efficiency, and accordingly that gaf1+ functions upstream of ste11+ in the signaling pathway governing sexual development. gaf1Δ strains showed accelerated ste11+ expression under nitrogen starvation and increased ste11+ expression even under normal conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis demonstrated that Gaf1 specifically binds to the canonical GATA motif (5′-HGATAR-3′) spanning from −371 to −366 in ste11+ promoter. Consequently, Gaf1 provides the prime example for negative regulation of ste11+ transcription through direct binding to a cis-acting motif of its promoter. PMID:22900017

  10. Sustained dual release of placental growth factor-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 from heparin-based nanocomplexes for direct osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Deng, Li-Zhi; Sun, Hai-Peng; Xu, Jia-Yun; Li, Yi-Ming; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct osteogenic effect between placental growth factor-2 (PlGF-2) and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Methods Three groups of PlGF-2/BMP-2-loaded heparin–N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC) nanocomplexes were prepared: those with 0.5 μg PlGF-2; with 1.0 μg BMP-2; and with 0.5 μg PlGF-2 combined with 1.0 μg BMP-2. The loading efficiencies and release profiles of these growth factors (GFs) in this nanocomplex system were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, their biological activities were evaluated using cell counting kit-8, cell morphology, and cell number counting assays, and their osteogenic activities were quantified using alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays. Results The loading efficiencies were more than 99% for the nanocomplexes loaded with just PlGF-2 and for those loaded with both PlGF-2 and BMP-2. For the nanocomplex loaded with just BMP-2, the loading efficiency was more than 97%. About 83%–84% of PlGF-2 and 89%–91% of BMP-2 were stably retained on the nanocomplexes for at least 21 days. In in vitro biological assays, PlGF-2 exhibited osteogenic effects comparable to those of BMP-2 despite its dose in the experiments being lower than that of BMP-2. Moreover, the results implied that heparin-based nanocomplexes encapsulating two GFs have enhanced potential in the enhancement of osteoblast function. Conclusion PlGF-2-loaded heparin–HTCC nanocomplexes may constitute a promising system for bone regeneration. Moreover, the dual delivery of PlGF-2 and BMP-2 appears to have greater potential in bone tissue regeneration than the delivery of either GFs alone. PMID:27042064

  11. MicroRNA-205 directly targets Krüppel-like factor 12 and is involved in invasion and apoptosis in basal-like breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bing; Li, Qing; Shen, Li; Rao, Qiu; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated microRNAs (miRs) specific to its target gene and exerting distinct biological functions for basal-like breast carcinoma (BLBC). Total RNA was extracted and subjected to miR microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Based on the comprehensive analysis, expression of miRs including its target was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Further functional analyses were conducted including proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. miR-205 was identified as downregulated (less than 0.5-fold) in BLBC relatively to normal control (NC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested miR-205 may directly targeted Krüppel-like factor 12 (KLF12; degree=4). Luciferase assay revealed miR-205 directly targeted KLF12 through binding its 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR; p=0.0016). qRT-PCR and western blot analysis showed miR-205 expression was low in cells (p=0.007) and tumor tissues (n=6; p=0.0074), and KLF12 RNA/protein was observed at high levels in cells (p=0.0026; p=0.0079) and tumor tissues (n=9; p=0.0083); knock-up of miR-205 increased its expression (p=0.0021) but reduced KLF12 RNA/protein levels (p=0.0038; p=0.009) in cells. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfecting its mimics in cells, was involved in invasion (p=0.00175) and apoptosis (p=0.006). In conclusion, our results supported that miR-205 was a miR specific to BLBC which functioned as tumor suppressor gene through directly targeting and negatively regulating proto-oncogene KLF12. miR-205 dysregulation was involved in invasion and apoptosis. miR-205 and KLF12 provided a potential diagnosis biomarker and therapeutic approach for BLBC. PMID:27278159

  12. Development of a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for characterizing the impact of genetic and demographic factors on clopidogrel response in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Samant, Snehal; Lewis, Joshua P; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peletier, Lambertus A; Lesko, Lawrence J; Schmidt, Stephan

    2016-01-20

    Clopidogrel (Plavix®), is a widely used antiplatelet agent, which shows high inter-individual variability in treatment response in patients following the standard dosing regimen. In this study, a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed based on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite (clop-AM) data from the PAPI and the PGXB2B studies using a step-wise approach in NONMEM (version 7.2). The developed model characterized the in vivo disposition of clopidogrel, its bioactivation into clop-AM in the liver and subsequent platelet aggregation inhibition in the systemic circulation reasonably well. It further allowed the identification of covariates that significantly impact clopidogrel's dose-concentration-response relationship. In particular, CYP2C19 intermediate and poor metabolizers converted 26.2% and 39.5% less clopidogrel to clop-AM, respectively, compared to extensive metabolizers. In addition, CES1 G143E mutation carriers have a reduced CES1 activity (82.9%) compared to wild-type subjects, which results in a significant increase in clop-AM formation. An increase in BMI was found to significantly decrease clopidogrel's bioactivation, whereas increased age was associated with increased platelet reactivity. Our PK/PD model analysis suggests that, in order to optimize clopidogrel dosing on a patient-by-patient basis, all of these factors have to be considered simultaneously, e.g. by using quantitative clinical pharmacology tools. PMID:26524713

  13. The nuclear-encoded sigma factor SIG4 directly activates transcription of chloroplast psbA and ycf17 genes in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Gaku; Imamura, Sousuke; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-05-01

    The plant organelle chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterial-like photosynthetic bacterium, and still retains its own genome derived from this ancestor. We have been focusing on a unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as a model photosynthetic eukaryote. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional specificity of SIG4, which is one of four nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in this alga. Accumulation of the SIG4 protein was observed in response to nitrogen depletion or high light conditions. By comparing the chloroplast transcriptomes under nitrogen depletion and SIG4-overexpressing conditions, we identified several candidate genes as SIG4 targets. Together with the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, the promoters of the psbA (encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center) and ycf17 (encoding a protein of the early light-inducible protein family) genes were shown to be direct activation targets. The phycobilisome (PBS) CpcB protein was decreased by SIG4 overexpression, which suggests the negative involvement of SIG4 in PBS accumulation. PMID:25883111

  14. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor Directly Inhibits Proliferation, Migration, and uPAR Expression of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bielenberg, Diane R.; Dridi, Sami; Wu, Jason; Jiang, Weihua; Huang, Bin; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth. Its activity, however, has been attributed to indirect mechanisms such as boosting the immune response by activating macrophages and inhibiting the blood vessel growth necessary for the growth of tumors. Methods and Findings In this study we show for the first time that DBP-maf exhibits a direct and potent effect on prostate tumor cells in the absence of macrophages. DBP-maf demonstrated inhibitory activity in proliferation studies of both LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines as well as metastatic clones of these cells. Flow cytometry studies with annexin V and propidium iodide showed that this inhibitory activity is not due to apoptosis or cell death. DBP-maf also had the ability to inhibit migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Finally, DBP-maf was shown to cause a reduction in urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in prostate tumor cells. There is evidence that activation of this receptor correlates with tumor metastasis. Conclusions These studies show strong inhibitory activity of DBP-maf on prostate tumor cells independent of its macrophage activation. PMID:20976141

  15. Inflexinol inhibits colon cancer cell growth through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB activity via direct interaction with p50.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jung Ok; Oh, Ju Hoon; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Moon, Dong Cheul; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Lee, Seram; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Hyosung; Kim, Kyung-Bo; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2009-06-01

    Kaurane diterpene compounds have been known to be cytotoxic against several cancer cells through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. Here, we showed that inflexinol, a novel kaurane diterpene compound, inhibited the activity of NF-kappaB and its target gene expression as well as cancer cell growth through induction of apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. These inhibitory effects on NF-kappaB activity and on cancer cell growth were suppressed by the reducing agents DTT and glutathione and were abrogated in the cells transfected with mutant p50 (C62S). Sol-gel biochip and surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that inflexinol binds to the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB. These results suggest that inflexinol inhibits colon cancer cell growth via induction of apoptotic cell death through inactivation of NF-kappaB by a direct modification of cysteine residue in the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB. PMID:19509257

  16. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha neutralization has no direct effect on parasite burden, but causes impaired IFN-γ production by spleen cells from human visceral leishmaniasis patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Kumar, Rajiv; Engwerda, Christian; Sacks, David; Nylen, Susanne; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has an important role in control of experimental Leishmania donovani infection. Less is known about the role of TNF-α in human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Evidence for a protective role is primarily based on case reports of VL development in individuals treated with TNF-α neutralizing antibody. In this study, we have evaluated how TNF-α neutralization affects parasite replication and cytokine production in ex vivo splenic aspirates (SA) from active VL patients. The effect of TNF-α neutralization on cell mediated antigen specific responses were also evaluated using whole blood cultures. Neutralization of TNF-α did not affect parasite numbers in SA cultures. Interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly reduced, but interleukin (IL)-10 levels were unchanged in these cultures. Leishmania antigen stimulated SA produced significant TNF-α which suggests that TNF-α is actively produced in VL spleen. Further it stimulates IFN-γ production, but no direct effect on parasite replication. PMID:27372917

  18. Amino Acid Region 1000–1008 of Factor V Is a Dynamic Regulator for the Emergence of Procoagulant Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wiencek, Joesph R.; Na, Mahesheema; Hirbawi, Jamila; Kalafatis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Single chain factor V (fV) circulates as an Mr 330,000 quiescent pro-cofactor. Removal of the B domain and generation of factor Va (fVa) are vital for procoagulant activity. We investigated the role of the basic amino acid region 1000–1008 within the B domain of fV by constructing a recombinant mutant fV molecule with all activation cleavage sites (Arg709/Arg1018/Arg1545) mutated to glutamine (fVQ3), a mutant fV molecule with region 1000–1008 deleted (fVΔB9), and a mutant fV molecule containing the same deletion with activation cleavage sites changed to glutamine (fVΔB9/Q3). The recombinant molecules along with wild type fV (fVWT) were transiently expressed in COS-7L cells, purified, and assessed for their ability to bind factor Xa (fXa) prior to and following incubation with thrombin. The data showed that fVQ3 was severely impaired in its interaction with fXa before and after incubation with thrombin. In contrast, KD(app) values for fVΔB9 (0.9 nm), fVaΔB9 (0.4 nm), and fVΔB9/Q3 (0.7 nm) were similar to the affinity of fVaWT for fXa (0.3 nm). Two-stage clotting assays revealed that although fVQ3 was deficient in its clotting activity, fVΔB9/Q3 had clotting activity comparable with fVaWT. The kcat value of prothrombinase assembled with fVΔB9/Q3 was minimally affected, whereas the Km value of the reaction was increased 57-fold compared with the Km value obtained with prothrombinase assembled with fVaWT. These findings strongly suggest that amino acid region 1000–1008 of fV is a regulatory sequence protecting the organisms from spontaneous binding to fXa and unnecessary prothrombinase complex formation, which in turn results in catastrophic physiological consequences. PMID:24178294

  19. Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients under Directly Observed Treatment Short Course and Factors Affecting Outcome in Southern Ethiopia: A Five-Year Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Gebrezgabiher, Gebremedhin; Romha, Gebremedhin; Ejeta, Eyasu; Asebe, Getahun; Zemene, Endalew; Ameni, Gobena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health and socio-economic issues in the 21st century globally. Assessment of TB treatment outcomes, and monitoring and evaluation of its risk factors in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) are among the major indicators of the performance of a national TB control program. Hence, this institution-based retrospective study was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of TB patients and investigate factors associated with unsuccessful outcome at Dilla University Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia. Five years (2008 to 2013) TB record of TB clinic of the hospital was reviewed. A total 1537 registered TB patients with complete information were included. Of these, 942 (61.3%) were male, 1015 (66%) were from rural areas, 544 (35.4%) were smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB+), 816 (53.1%) were smear negative pulmonary TB (PTB-) and 177(11.5%) were extra pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. Records of the 1537 TB patients showed that 181 (11.8%) were cured, 1129(73.5%) completed treatment, 171 (11.1%) defaulted, 52 (3.4%) died and 4 (0.3%) had treatment failure. The overall mean treatment success rate of the TB patients was 85.2%. The treatment success rate of the TB patients increased from 80.5% in September 2008-August 2009 to 84.8% in September 2012-May 2013. Tuberculosis type, age, residence and year of treatment were significantly associated with unsuccessful treatment outcome. The risk of unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among TB patients from rural areas (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.21-2.20) compared to their urban counterparts. Unsuccessful treatment outcome was also observed in PTB- patients (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.26-2.50) and EPTB (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28-3.37) compared to the PTB+ patients. In conclusion, it appears that DOTS have improved treatment success in the hospital during five years. Regular follow-up of patients with poor treatment outcome and provision of health information on TB treatment to

  20. Short-term exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha enables human osteoblasts to direct adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, ZuFu; Wang, Guocheng; Dunstan, Colin R; Zreiqat, Hala

    2012-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is one major inflammatory factor peaking at 24 h after bone fracture in response to injury; its role in bone healing is controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate whether the duration of exposure to TNF-α is crucial for the initiation of bone regeneration and to determine its underlying mechanism(s). We demonstrated that 24 h of TNF-α treatment significantly abrogated osteocalcin gene expression by human primary osteoblasts (HOBs). However, when TNF-α was withdrawn after 24 h, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin gene expression levels in HOBs at day 7 were significantly up-regulated compared with the HOBs without TNF-α treatment. In contrast, continuous TNF-α treatment down-regulated bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin gene expression. In addition, in an indirect co-culture system, HOBs pretreated with TNF-α for 24 h induced significantly greater osteogenic differentiation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) than the HOBs without TNF-α treatment. TNF-α treatment also promoted endogenous bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) production in HOBs, while blocking the BMP-2 signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited osteogenic differentiation of ASCs in the co-culture system. Furthermore, activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway after TNF-α treatment occurred earlier than BMP-2 protein expression. BMP-2 production by HOBs and osteogenic differentiation of ASCs in the co-culture system with HOBs was significantly decreased when HOBs were pretreated with TNF-α in combination with the p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor (SB203580). Taken together, we provide evidence that exposure duration is a critical element in determining TNF-α's effects on bone regeneration. We also demonstrate that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway regulates the expression of BMP-2 in osteoblasts, which then acts through a paracrine loop, to direct the osteoblast lineage commitment of mesenchymal

  1. Direct inhibition of osteoblastic Wnt pathway by fibroblast growth factor 23 contributes to bone loss in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-López, Natalia; Panizo, Sara; Alonso-Montes, Cristina; Román-García, Pablo; Rodríguez, Isabel; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; Dusso, Adriana S; Naves, Manuel; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B

    2016-07-01

    Bone loss and increased fractures are common complications in chronic kidney disease. Because Wnt pathway activation is essential for normal bone mineralization, we assessed whether Wnt inhibition contributes to high-phosphorus-induced mineralization defects in uremic rats. By week 20 after 7/8 nephrectomy, rats fed a high-phosphorus diet had the expected high serum creatinine, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels and low serum calcium. There was a 15% reduction in tibial mineral density and a doubling of bone cortical porosity compared to uremic rats fed a normal-phosphorus diet. The decreases in tibial mineral density were preceded by time-dependent increments in gene expression of bone formation (Osteocalcin and Runx2) and resorption (Cathepsin K) markers, which paralleled elevations in gene expression of the Wnt inhibitors Sfrp1 and Dkk1 in bone. Similar elevations of Wnt inhibitors plus an increased phospho-β-catenin/β-catenin ratio occurred upon exposure of the osteoblast cell line UMR106-01 either to uremic serum or to the combination of parathyroid hormone, FGF23, and soluble Klotho, at levels present in uremic serum. Strikingly, while osteoblast exposure to parathyroid hormone suppressed the expression of Wnt inhibitors, FGF23 directly inhibited the osteoblastic Wnt pathway through a soluble Klotho/MAPK-mediated process that required Dkk1 induction. Thus, the induction of Dkk1 by FGF23/soluble Klotho in osteoblasts inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This provides a novel autocrine/paracrine mechanism for the adverse impact of high FGF23 levels on bone in chronic kidney disease. PMID:27165819

  2. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  3. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on risk of myocardial infarction from the use of oral direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Artang, Ramin; Rome, Eric; Nielsen, Jørn Dalsgaard; Vidaillet, Humberto J

    2013-12-15

    Dabigatran has been associated with greater risk of myocardial infarction (MI) than warfarin. It is unknown whether the increased risk is unique to dabigatran, an adverse effect shared by other oral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs), or the result of a protective effect of warfarin against MI. To address these questions, we systematically searched MEDLINE and performed a meta-analysis on randomized trials that compared oral DTIs with warfarin for any indication with end point of MIs after randomization. We furthermore performed a secondary meta-analysis on atrial fibrillation stroke prevention trials with alternative anticoagulants compared with warfarin with end point of MIs after randomization. A total of 11 trials (39,357 patients) that compared warfarin to DTIs (dabigatran, ximelagatran, and AZD0837) were identified. In these trials, patients treated with oral DTIs were more likely to experience an MI than their counterparts treated with warfarin (285 of 23,333 vs 133 of 16,024, odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.66, p = 0.005). For secondary analysis, 8 studies (69,615 patients) were identified that compared warfarin with alternative anticoagulant including factor Xa inhibitors, DTIs, aspirin, and clopidogrel. There was no significant advantage in the rate of MIs with the use of warfarin versus comparators (odds ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.34, p = 0.59). In conclusion, our data suggest that oral DTIs were associated with increased risk of MI. This increased risk appears to be a class effect of these agents, not a specific phenomenon unique to dabigatran or protective effect of warfarin. These findings support the need for enhanced postmarket surveillance of oral DTIs and other novel agents. PMID:24075284

  4. Molecular interactions of the intrinsic activation complex of coagulation: binding of native and activated human factors IX and X to defined phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burri, B J; Edgington, T S; Fair, D S

    1987-02-20

    The assembly of proteins of the intrinsic activation complex has been partially elucidated. In the present study we examine the association of gamma-carboxylated serine proteinase zymogens factors IX and X, and their proteolytically activated counterparts factors IXa and Xa to unilamellar lipid vesicles of defined composition using three types of physical measurement. Utilizing relative light scatter to estimate the dissociation constants for binding in the presence of calcium ions, it appears that factor IXa (0.93 +/- 0.37 microM) may preferentially associate with phospholipids relative to factor IX (0.35 +/- 0.08 microM). In contrast, factor X (0.34 +/- 0.14 microM), the substrate for factor IXa, appears to bind to phospholipid with a higher affinity than factor Xa (0.58 +/- 0.13 microM). These observations are compatible with the hypothesized dynamics where the forward 'traffic' is facilitated by favoring the association of factor IXa with factor X. The dissociation constants were estimated by molecular exclusion chromatography (1.1 - 2.5 microM) and do not reflect these relative and ordered differences in association with lipid vesicles. Quasi-elastic light scatter analyses indicate that each protein appears to saturate the same vesicle surface, consistent with competition for similar surface lipids, although the molecular shell formed by factor Xa (36 A) is smaller, suggesting that it has a different packing on the phospholipid surface than the other proteins (64-79 A). The pattern of preferential affinities for phospholipid is consistent with a kinetically functional forward traffic through the reaction precursors to products, and suggests that these preferential affinities may assist in the ordering of the four proteins in the intrinsic activation complex. PMID:3493031

  5. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of groundbased and regional tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhinav

    -San Joaquin River Delta in the Central Valley. Through analysis of these field measurements, this dissertation presents the apportionment of observed CH4 and N2O concentration enhancements into major source categories along with direct emissions estimates from airborne observations. We perform high-precision measurements of greenhouse gases using gas analyzers based on absorption spectroscopy, and other source marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using state of the art VOC measurement systems (e.g. proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry). We combine these measurements with a statistical source apportionment technique called positive matrix factorization (PMF) to evaluate and investigate the major local sources of CH4 and N2O during CalNex and Walnut Grove campaigns. In the CABERNET study, we combine measurements with an airborne approach to a well-established micrometeorological technique (eddy-covariance method) to derive CH4 fluxes over different source regions in the Central Valley. In the CalNex experiments, we demonstrate that dairy and livestock remains the largest source sector of non-CO2 greenhouse gases in the San Joaquin Valley contributing most of the CH4 and much of the measured N2O at Bakersfield. Agriculture is observed to provide another major source of N2O, while vehicle emissions are found to be an insignificant source of N2O, contrary to the current statewide greenhouse gas inventory which includes vehicles as a major source. Our PMF source apportionment also produces an evaporative/fugitive factor but its relative lack of CH4 contributions points to removal processes from vented emissions in the surrounding O&G industry and the overwhelming dominance of the dairy CH4 source. In the CABERNET experiments, we report enhancements of CH4 from a number of sources spread across the spatial domain of the Central Valley that improves our understanding of their distribution and relative strengths. We observe large enhancements of CH4 mixing ratios over the

  6. Membrane Binding Events in the Initiation and Propagation Phases of Tissue Factor-initiated Zymogen Activation under Flow*

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Laura M.; Dubief, Yves C.; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamics of zymogen activation when both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase are assembled on an appropriate membrane. Although the activation of prothrombin by surface-localized prothrombinase is clearly mediated by flow-induced dilutional effects, we find that when factor X is activated in isolation by surface-localized extrinsic tenase, it exhibits characteristics of diffusion-mediated activation in which diffusion of substrate to the catalytically active region is rate-limiting. When prothrombin and factor X are activated coincident with each other, competition for available membrane binding sites masks the diffusion-limiting effects of factor X activation. To verify the role of membrane binding in the activation of factor X by extrinsic tenase under flow conditions, we demonstrate that bovine lactadherin competes for both factor X and Xa binding sites, limiting factor X activation and forcing the release of bound factor Xa from the membrane at a venous shear rate (100 s−1). Finally, we present steady-state models of prothrombin and factor X activation under flow showing that zymogen and enzyme membrane binding events further regulate the coagulation process in an open system representative of the vasculature geometry. PMID:22187432

  7. The Impact of Direct Involvement I and Direct Involvement II Experiences on Secondary School Students' Social Capital, as Measured by Co-Cognitive Factors of the Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Michelle M.; Heilbronner, Nancy N.

    2014-01-01

    A mixed-methods study grounded in Renzulli's Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory examined the impact of different types of volunteer experiences on the six co-cognitive factors (Optimism, Courage, Romance With a Topic/Discipline, Sensitivity to Human Concerns, Physical/Mental Energy, and Vision/Sense of Destiny) associated with the…

  8. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of groundbased and regional tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhinav

    -San Joaquin River Delta in the Central Valley. Through analysis of these field measurements, this dissertation presents the apportionment of observed CH4 and N2O concentration enhancements into major source categories along with direct emissions estimates from airborne observations. We perform high-precision measurements of greenhouse gases using gas analyzers based on absorption spectroscopy, and other source marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using state of the art VOC measurement systems (e.g. proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry). We combine these measurements with a statistical source apportionment technique called positive matrix factorization (PMF) to evaluate and investigate the major local sources of CH4 and N2O during CalNex and Walnut Grove campaigns. In the CABERNET study, we combine measurements with an airborne approach to a well-established micrometeorological technique (eddy-covariance method) to derive CH4 fluxes over different source regions in the Central Valley. In the CalNex experiments, we demonstrate that dairy and livestock remains the largest source sector of non-CO2 greenhouse gases in the San Joaquin Valley contributing most of the CH4 and much of the measured N2O at Bakersfield. Agriculture is observed to provide another major source of N2O, while vehicle emissions are found to be an insignificant source of N2O, contrary to the current statewide greenhouse gas inventory which includes vehicles as a major source. Our PMF source apportionment also produces an evaporative/fugitive factor but its relative lack of CH4 contributions points to removal processes from vented emissions in the surrounding O&G industry and the overwhelming dominance of the dairy CH4 source. In the CABERNET experiments, we report enhancements of CH4 from a number of sources spread across the spatial domain of the Central Valley that improves our understanding of their distribution and relative strengths. We observe large enhancements of CH4 mixing ratios over the

  9. Future direction of direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Han, Kenneth N.

    2010-11-01

    Direct write technology using special inks consisting of finely dispersed metal nanoparticles in liquid is receiving an undivided attention in recent years for its wide range of applicability in modern electronic industry. The application of this technology covers radio frequency identification-tag (RFID-tag), flexible-electronics, organic light emitting diodes (OLED) display, e-paper, antenna, bumpers used in flip-chip, underfilling, frit, miniresistance applications and biological uses, artificial dental applications and many more. In this paper, the authors have reviewed various direct write technologies on the market and discussed their advantages and shortfalls. Emphasis has given on microdispensing deposition write (MDDW), maskless mesoscale materials deposition (M3D), and ink-jet technologies. All of these technologies allow printing various patterns without employing a mask or a resist with an enhanced speed with the aid of computer. MDDW and M3D are capable of drawing patterns in three-dimension and MDDW, in particular, is capable of writing nanoinks with high viscosity. However, it is still far away for direct write to be fully implemented in the commercial arena. One of the hurdles to overcome is in manufacturing conductive inks which are chemically and physically stable, capable of drawing patterns with acceptable conductivity, and also capable of drawing patterns with acceptable adhesiveness with the substrates. The authors have briefly discussed problems involved in manufacturing nanometal inks to be used in various writing devices. There are numerous factors to be considered in manufacturing such inks. They are reducing agents, concentrations, oxidation, compact ability allowing good conductivity, and stability in suspension.

  10. A Factor Analytic Investigation of the BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form: Psychometric Properties, Practical Implications, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Erin; Chin, Jenna K.; Twyford, Jennifer M.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2011-01-01

    The Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form (BESS Parent; Kamphaus & Reynolds, 2007) is a recently developed instrument designed to identify behavioral and emotional risk in students. To describe the underlying factor structure for this instrument, exploratory (EFA) and…

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing VLDL via impairment of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistant states are commonly associated with both increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a) and hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). In the present study, we examined the potential mechanistic link between TNF-a and hepatic overproduction of ap...

  12. Human nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor UPF2 interacts directly with eRF3 and the SURF complex

    PubMed Central

    López-Perrote, Andrés; Castaño, Raquel; Melero, Roberto; Zamarro, Teresa; Kurosawa, Hitomi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Uchiyama, Akiko; Aoyagi, Kyoko; Buchwald, Gretel; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Akio; Llorca, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an mRNA degradation pathway that regulates gene expression and mRNA quality. A complex network of macromolecular interactions regulates NMD initiation, which is only partially understood. According to prevailing models, NMD begins by the assembly of the SURF (SMG1–UPF1–eRF1–eRF3) complex at the ribosome, followed by UPF1 activation by additional factors such as UPF2 and UPF3. Elucidating the interactions between NMD factors is essential to comprehend NMD, and here we demonstrate biochemically and structurally the interaction between human UPF2 and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3). In addition, we find that UPF2 associates with SURF and ribosomes in cells, in an UPF3-independent manner. Binding assays using a collection of UPF2 truncated variants reveal that eRF3 binds to the C-terminal part of UPF2. This region of UPF2 is partially coincident with the UPF3-binding site as revealed by electron microscopy of the UPF2–eRF3 complex. Accordingly, we find that the interaction of UPF2 with UPF3b interferes with the assembly of the UPF2–eRF3 complex, and that UPF2 binds UPF3b more strongly than eRF3. Together, our results highlight the role of UPF2 as a platform for the transient interactions of several NMD factors, including several components of SURF. PMID:26740584

  13. Direct targeting of risk factors significantly increases the detection of liver cirrhosis in primary care: a cross-sectional diagnostic study utilising transient elastography

    PubMed Central

    Harman, David J; Ryder, Stephen D; James, Martin W; Jelpke, Matthew; Ottey, Dominic S; Wilkes, Emilie A; Card, Timothy R; Aithal, Guruprasad P; Guha, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of a novel diagnostic algorithm targeting patients with risk factors for chronic liver disease in a community setting. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Two primary care practices (adult patient population 10 479) in Nottingham, UK. Participants Adult patients (aged 18 years or over) fulfilling one or more selected risk factors for developing chronic liver disease: (1) hazardous alcohol use, (2) type 2 diabetes or (3) persistently elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) liver function enzyme with negative serology. Interventions A serial biomarker algorithm, using a simple blood-based marker (aspartate aminotransferase:ALT ratio for hazardous alcohol users, BARD score for other risk groups) and subsequently liver stiffness measurement using transient elastography (TE). Main outcome measures Diagnosis of clinically significant liver disease (defined as liver stiffness ≥8 kPa); definitive diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. Results We identified 920 patients with the defined risk factors of whom 504 patients agreed to undergo investigation. A normal blood biomarker was found in 62 patients (12.3%) who required no further investigation. Subsequently, 378 patients agreed to undergo TE, of whom 98 (26.8% of valid scans) had elevated liver stiffness. Importantly, 71/98 (72.4%) patients with elevated liver stiffness had normal liver enzymes and would be missed by traditional investigation algorithms. We identified 11 new patients with definite cirrhosis, representing a 140% increase in the number of diagnosed cases in this population. Conclusions A non-invasive liver investigation algorithm based in a community setting is feasible to implement. Targeting risk factors using a non-invasive biomarker approach identified a substantial number of patients with previously undetected cirrhosis. Trial registration number The diagnostic algorithm utilised for this study can be found on clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02037867), and is

  14. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J.; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP. PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (−)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (−)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  15. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-05-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (-)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (-)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-responsive Transcription Factor ATF6α Directs Recruitment of the Mediator of RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Multiple Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Dotan; Chen, Lu; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper transcription factor ATF6α functions as a master regulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes. Previous studies have established that, in response to ER stress, ATF6α translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of ER stress response genes upon binding sequence specifically to ER stress response enhancer elements in their promoters. In this study, we investigate the biochemical mechanism by which ATF6α activates transcription. By exploiting a combination of biochemical and multidimensional protein identification technology-based mass spectrometry approaches, we have obtained evidence that ATF6α functions at least in part by recruiting to the ER stress response enhancer elements of ER stress response genes a collection of RNA polymerase II coregulatory complexes, including the Mediator and multiple histone acetyltransferase complexes, among which are the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) and Ada-Two-A-containing (ATAC) complexes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanism of action of ATF6α, and they outline a straightforward strategy for applying multidimensional protein identification technology mass spectrometry to determine which RNA polymerase II transcription factors and coregulators are recruited to promoters and other regulatory elements to control transcription. PMID:22577136

  17. Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Whom First-Line Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapies Fail.

    PubMed

    Malouf, Gabriel G; Flippot, Ronan; Khayat, David

    2016-05-01

    Metastases are present in one third of renal cell carcinomas at diagnosis. The overall survival duration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma is approximately 22 months, which underlines the need for more effective systemic treatments. Therapies on the basis of antiangiogenic agents and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin have been approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, but only benefits for progression-free survival were demonstrated in the second-line setting. Fortunately, promising treatments are emerging, from new antiangiogenic agents to immune checkpoint inhibitors. For the first time, both an immune checkpoint inhibitor (nivolumab) and a dual inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (cabozantinib) have demonstrated improvements in overall survival in the second-line setting. Finding the best sequence for these novel agents will be crucial to improving outcomes in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article comprises both a systematic review of the literature and recommendations for second-line therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma in whom inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor have failed. PMID:27170687

  18. Reversibility of Apixaban Anticoagulation with a Four-Factor Prothrombin Complex Concentrate in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nagalla, S; Thomson, L; Oppong, Y; Bachman, B; Chervoneva, I; Kraft, W K

    2016-06-01

    It was hypothesized that the four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) Kcentra 25 unit/kg would reverse impairment of thrombin generation in healthy volunteers dosed with apixaban to steady state. In this randomized, two-period crossover, assessor-blinded trial, 12 healthy subjects received 5 mg apixaban every 12 h. Three h after the fifth dose, four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) 25 unit/kg or saline were infused. Serial blood samples were assessed for thrombin generation using PPP-reagent and PPP-reagent low, anti-Xa, PT, and PTT assays. Geometric mean ratio was calculated at 30 min postinfusion, and at 24, 48, and 72 h. Peak thrombin generation was 76% higher at 30 min postinfusion with 4F-PCC (p = 0.025). The difference declined to 24% at 24 h and resolved by 48 h. Other thrombin generation parameters were also partially normalized. There was no difference between 4F-PCC and saline in anti-Xa assessment at 30 min or later time points. PMID:27170068

  19. Direct identification of bacteria in urine samples by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and relevance of defensins as interfering factors.

    PubMed

    Köhling, Hedda Luise; Bittner, Anna; Müller, Karl-Dieter; Buer, Jan; Becker, Markus; Rübben, Herbert; Rettenmeier, Albert Wolfgang; Mosel, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Standard methods for the identification of uropathogens that are based on the determination of metabolic activity require cultivation on agar plates, which often takes more than 1 day. If microbial growth on agar plates is slow, or if metabolic activity is impaired by adverse interactions resulting from the patient's condition or from medical treatment, the application of standard methods may lead to delayed or erroneous identification of bacteria. In recent studies, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be able to rapidly identify bacteria obtained from cultures. We tested the applicability of this analytical technique for the rapid identification of bacteria collected directly from urine samples and compared the results with those of conventional identification methods, such as the Vitek system, the MicroScan WalkAway system and the API system, and in some cases with the gas chromatographic determination of the bacterial long-chain fatty acid pattern. We analysed a total of 107 urine samples with bacterial counts ranging from 10(2) to ≥10(5) c.f.u. ml(-1). Mass spectrometric identification of bacteria was accomplished for 62 of these samples. In the mass spectra obtained from 40 of the 45 urine samples for which no identification result was achieved, a triplet of very intense peaks corresponding to the human α-defensins 1, 2 and 3 occurred at m/z values of around 3440 Da. This signal suppressed the intensity of the bacterial protein peaks and thus impaired database matching. Our results show that MALDI-TOF MS allows the reliable direct identification of bacteria in urine samples at concentrations as low as 10(3) c.f.u. ml(-1). In a subset of samples, human defensins may occur and impair the mass spectrometric identification of bacteria. PMID:22275503

  20. Two Acidic, Anticoagulant PLA2 Isoenzymes Purified from the Venom of Monocled Cobra Naja kaouthia Exhibit Different Potency to Inhibit Thrombin and Factor Xa via Phospholipids Independent, Non-Enzymatic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ashis K.; Kalita, Bhargab; Thakur, Rupamoni

    2014-01-01

    Background The monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) is responsible for snakebite fatality in Indian subcontinent and in south-western China. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2; EC 3.1.1.4) is one of the toxic components of snake venom. The present study explores the mechanism and rationale(s) for the differences in anticoagulant potency of two acidic PLA2 isoenzymes, Nk-PLA2α (13463.91 Da) and Nk-PLA2β (13282.38 Da) purified from the venom of N. kaouthia. Principal Findings By LC-MS/MS analysis, these PLA2s showed highest similarity (23.5% sequence coverage) with PLA2 III isolated from monocled cobra venom. The catalytic activity of Nk-PLA2β exceeds that of Nk-PLA2α. Heparin differentially regulated the catalytic and anticoagulant activities of these Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2α was comparable to commercial anticoagulants warfarin, and heparin/antithrombin-III albeit Nk-PLA2β demonstrated highest anticoagulant activity. The anticoagulant action of these PLA2s was partially contributed by a small but specific hydrolysis of plasma phospholipids. The strong anticoagulant effect of Nk-PLA2α and Nk-PLA2β was achieved via preferential, non-enzymatic inhibition of FXa (Ki = 43 nM) and thrombin (Ki = 8.3 nM), respectively. Kinetics study suggests that the Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes inhibit their “pharmacological target(s)” by uncompetitive mechanism without the requirement of phospholipids/Ca2+. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2β which is higher than that of Nk-PLA2α is corroborated by its superior catalytic activity, its higher capacity for binding to phosphatidylcholine, and its greater strength of thrombin inhibition. These PLA2 isoenzymes thus have evolved to affect haemostasis by different mechanisms. The Nk-PLA2β partially inhibited the thrombin-induced aggregation of mammalian platelets suggesting its therapeutic application in the prevention of unwanted clot formation. Conclusion/Significance In order to develop peptide-based superior anticoagulant therapeutics, future application of Nk-PLA2α and Nk-PLA2β for the treatment and/or prevention of cardiovascular disorders are proposed. PMID:25118676

  1. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3’s function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression. PMID:26107960

  2. Brain Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Directs the Transition from Stem Cells to Mature Neurons During Postnatal/Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Oueslati-Morales, Carlos O; Li, Lingling; Pickel, James; Morales, Aixa V; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The specific actions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the role of brain-derived IGF-I during hippocampal neurogenesis have not been fully defined. To address the influence of IGF-I on the stages of hippocampal neurogenesis, we studied a postnatal/adult global Igf-I knockout (KO) mice (Igf-I(-/-) ) and a nervous system Igf-I conditional KO (Igf-I(Δ/Δ) ). In both KO mice we found an accumulation of Tbr2(+) -intermediate neuronal progenitors, some of which were displaced in the outer granule cell layer (GCL) and the molecular layer (ML) of the dentate gyrus (DG). Similarly, more ectopic Ki67(+) - cycling cells were detected. Thus, the GCL was disorganized with significant numbers of Prox1(+) -granule neurons outside this layer and altered morphology of radial glial cells (RGCs). Dividing progenitors were also generated in greater numbers in clonal hippocampal stem cell (HPSC) cultures from the KO mice. Indeed, higher levels of Hes5 and Ngn2, transcription factors that maintain the stem and progenitor cell state, were expressed in both HPSCs and the GCL-ML from the Igf-I(Δ/Δ) mice. To determine the impact of Igf-I deletion on neuronal generation in vivo, progenitors in Igf-I(-/-) and Igf-I(+/+) mice were labeled with a GFP-expressing vector. This revealed that in the Igf-I(-/-) mice more GFP(+) -immature neurons were formed and they had less complex dendritic trees. These findings indicate that local IGF-I plays critical roles during postnatal/adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the transition from HPSCs and progenitors to mature granule neurons in a cell stage-dependent manner. Stem Cells 2016;34:2194-2209. PMID:27144663

  3. A nuclear factor for interleukin-6 expression (NF-IL6) and the glucocorticoid receptor synergistically activate transcription of the rat alpha 1-acid glycoprotein gene via direct protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Y; Isshiki, H; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1993-01-01

    The acute-phase reaction is accompanied by an increase in a variety of serum proteins, named acute-phase proteins. The synthesis of these proteins is synergistically controlled by glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Recently, we have cloned nuclear factor-IL-6 (NF-IL6), a transcription factor that activates the IL-6 gene, and have demonstrated its involvement in the expression of acute-phase-protein genes. We report here an analysis of the molecular mechanisms by which inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoid act synergistically to activate expression of the rat alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene. We found that NF-IL6 and ligand-activated rat glucocorticoid receptor acted synergistically to transactivate the AGP gene and that maximal transcriptional activation of the AGP gene required expression of both intact NF-IL6 and rat glucocorticoid receptor. Surprisingly, however, transcriptional synergism was still observed even when one of the two factors lacked either its DNA-binding or transcriptional-activation function. We present evidence for a direct protein-protein interaction between these two distinct transcription factors and propose that this may be responsible for the synergistic activation of the rat AGP gene. Images PMID:8441418

  4. Transcription Factors SOD7/NGAL2 and DPA4/NGAL3 Act Redundantly to Regulate Seed Size by Directly Repressing KLU Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueying; Du, Liang; Xu, Ran; Cui, Rongfeng; Hao, Jianjun; Sun, Caixia; Li, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    Although seed size is one of the most important agronomic traits in plants, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that set the final size of seeds are largely unknown. We previously identified the ubiquitin receptor DA1 as a negative regulator of seed size, and the Arabidopsis thaliana da1-1 mutant produces larger seeds than the wild type. Here, we describe a B3 domain transcriptional repressor NGATHA-like protein (NGAL2), encoded by the suppressor of da1-1 (SOD7), which acts maternally to regulate seed size by restricting cell proliferation in the integuments of ovules and developing seeds. Overexpression of SOD7 significantly decreases seed size of wild-type plants, while the simultaneous disruption of SOD7 and its closest homolog DEVELOPMENT-RELATED PcG TARGET IN THE APEX4 (DPA4/NGAL3) increases seed size. Genetic analyses indicate that SOD7 and DPA4 act in a common pathway with the seed size regulator KLU to regulate seed growth, but do so independently of DA1. Further results show that SOD7 directly binds to the promoter of KLUH (KLU) in vitro and in vivo and represses the expression of KLU. Therefore, our findings reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms of SOD7, DPA4, and KLU in seed size regulation and suggest that they are promising targets for seed size improvement in crops. PMID:25783029

  5. Transcription factors SOD7/NGAL2 and DPA4/NGAL3 act redundantly to regulate seed size by directly repressing KLU expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueying; Du, Liang; Xu, Ran; Cui, Rongfeng; Hao, Jianjun; Sun, Caixia; Li, Yunhai

    2015-03-01

    Although seed size is one of the most important agronomic traits in plants, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that set the final size of seeds are largely unknown. We previously identified the ubiquitin receptor DA1 as a negative regulator of seed size, and the Arabidopsis thaliana da1-1 mutant produces larger seeds than the wild type. Here, we describe a B3 domain transcriptional repressor NGATHA-like protein (NGAL2), encoded by the suppressor of da1-1 (SOD7), which acts maternally to regulate seed size by restricting cell proliferation in the integuments of ovules and developing seeds. Overexpression of SOD7 significantly decreases seed size of wild-type plants, while the simultaneous disruption of SOD7 and its closest homolog DEVELOPMENT-RELATED PcG TARGET IN THE APEX4 (DPA4/NGAL3) increases seed size. Genetic analyses indicate that SOD7 and DPA4 act in a common pathway with the seed size regulator KLU to regulate seed growth, but do so independently of DA1. Further results show that SOD7 directly binds to the promoter of KLUH (KLU) in vitro and in vivo and represses the expression of KLU. Therefore, our findings reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms of SOD7, DPA4, and KLU in seed size regulation and suggest that they are promising targets for seed size improvement in crops. PMID:25783029

  6. Psychological factors, beliefs about medication, and adherence of youth with human immunodeficiency virus in a multisite directly observed therapy pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Patricia A; Flynn, Patricia M; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D; Spector, Stephen A; Gaur, Aditya H

    2011-06-01

    This study examined psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Participants were youth with behaviorally acquired HIV (n = 20; 65% female; median age, 21 years) with adherence problems, who received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT), and week 24 (follow-up). At baseline, 55% of youth reported having clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. At baseline, substance use was reported within the borderline clinical range (T(score) = 68), with clinical but statistically nonsignificant improvement (T(score) = 61) at week 12. Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased cognitive avoidance (p = .02), emotional discharge (p = .004), and acceptance/resignation ("nothing I can do," p = .004), whereas positive reappraisal and seeking support emerged. With the exception of depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p = .05), beliefs about medicine (p = .006) and perceived threat of illness scores (p = .03). Youth with behaviorally acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, beliefs about medicine, and viewing HIV as a potential threat predicted better DOT adherence. PMID:21575827

  7. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  8. Promoter opening by σ54 and σ70 RNA polymerases: σ factor-directed alterations in the mechanism and tightness of control

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuli; Lew, Chih Min; Gralla, Jay D.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription control at the melting step is not yet understood. Here, band shift, cross-linking, and transcription experiments on diverse DNA probes were used with two bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzymes that differ in how they regulate melting. Data indicated that both σ54 and σ70 holoenzymes assume a default closed form that cannot establish single-strand binding. Upon activation the enzymes are converted to an open form that can bind simultaneously to the upstream fork junction and to the melted transcription start site. The key difference is that σ54 imposes tighter regulation by creating a complex molecular switch at −12/−11; the current data show that this switch can be thrown by activator. In this case an ATP-bound enhancer protein causes σ54 to alter its cross-linking pattern near −11 and also causes a reorganization of holoenzyme: DNA interactions, detected by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. At a temperature-dependent σ70 promoter, elevated temperature alone can assist in triggering conformational changes that enhance the engagement of single-strand DNA. Thus, the two σ factors modify the same intrinsic opening pathway to create quite different mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. PMID:10970887

  9. Direct association of thioredoxin-1 (TRX) with macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): regulatory role of TRX on MIF internalization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Son, Aoi; Kato, Noriko; Horibe, Tomohisa; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Mochizuki, Michika; Mitsui, Akira; Kawakami, Koji; Nakamura, Hajime; Yodoi, Junji

    2009-10-01

    Thioredoxin-1 (TRX) is a small (14 kDa) multifunctional protein with the redox-active site Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a 12 kDa cytokine belonging to the TRX family. Historically, when we purified TRX from the supernatant of ATL-2 cells, a 12 kDa protein was identified along with TRX, which was later proved to be MIF. Here, we show that TRX and MIF form a complex in the cell and the culture supernatant of ATL-2 cells. Using a BIAcore assay, we confirmed that TRX has a specific affinity with MIF. We also found that extracellular MIF was more effectively internalized into the ATL-2 cells expressing TRX on the cell surface, than the Jurkat T cells which do not express surface TRX. Moreover, anti-TRX antibody blocked the MIF internalization, suggesting that the cell surface TRX is involved in MIF internalization into the cells. Furthermore, anti-TRX antibody inhibited MIF-mediated enhancement of TNF-alpha production from macrophage RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that the cell surface TRX serves as one of the MIF binding molecules or MIF receptor component and inhibits MIF-mediated inflammatory signals. PMID:19601712

  10. Use of affinity-directed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to map the epitopes of a factor VIII inhibitor antibody fraction

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Amy E.; Wang, Wensheng; Hagen, Fred K.; Fay, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neutralizing factor (F) VIII antibodies develop in ~30% of individuals with hemophilia A and show specificity to multiple sites in the FVIII protein. Methods Reactive epitopes to an immobilized IgG fraction prepared from a high-titer, FVIII inhibitor plasma were determined following immuno-precipitation (IP) of tryptic and chymotryptic peptides derived from digests of the A1 and A2 subunits of FVIIIa and FVIII light chain. Peptides were detected and identified using highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Results Coverage maps of the A1 subunit, A2 subunit and light chain represented 79%, 69% and 90%, respectively, of the protein sequences. Dot blots indicated that the inhibitor IgG reacted with epitopes contained within each subunit of FVIIIa. IP coupled with LC-MS identified 19 peptides representing epitopes from all FVIII A and C domains. The majority of peptides (10) were derived from the A2 domain. Three peptides mapped to the C2 domain, while two mapped to the A1 and A3 domains, and single peptides mapped to the a1 segment and C1 domain. Epitopes were typically defined by peptide sequences of <12 residues. Conclusions IP coupled with LC-MS identified extensive antibody reactivity at high resolution over the entire functional FVIII molecule and yielded sequence lengths of less than 15 residues. A number of the peptides identified mapped to known sequences involved in functionally important protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. PMID:21668738

  11. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  12. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  13. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER-2/neu)-Directed Therapy for Rare Metastatic Epithelial Tumors with HER-2 Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Sherry, Timothy; Kallen, Michael E.; Wong, Steven; Drakaki, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Case 1 A 67-year-old Asian female was diagnosed with locally advanced high-grade salivary duct carcinoma in June 2011. Molecular analysis revealed human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) amplification. She received adjuvant therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel/ trastuzumab and maintenance of trastuzumab. Upon disease progression, trastuzumab could not be continued due to lack of financial coverage. Instead, she was treated with compassionate use of lapatinib from April 2013 and standard 5-fluorouracil. Her disease ultimately progressed and she expired later in 2013. Case 2 A 68-year-old Asian male was diagnosed with extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum with HER-2 amplification in May 2011. He received 6 cycles of adjuvant trastuzumab/docetaxel/carboplatin followed by maintenance trastuzumab, which was changed to compassionate use of lapatinib as his insurance did not cover further administration of trastuzumab. He showed clinical benefits from single-agent lapatinib and a combination of lapatinib/capecitabine upon progression to the single-agent lapatinib. Ultimately, he was started on ado-trastuzumab emtansine, which was approved at that time by the FDA for HER-2-positive breast cancer progressed on trastuzumab. He is having clinical and radiographic complete response based on current imaging and normalization of his tumor markers. Conclusion HER-2-targeted therapy should be considered for tumors with HER-2 amplification. In our case series, we would like to emphasize this approach in other rare histologies. Specifically, our patient with extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum represents the first reported case of a non-breast, non-gastric tumor with HER-2 overexpression with complete clinical and radiographic response to HER-2-targeted therapy PMID:27403128

  14. Protein Hit1, a novel box C/D snoRNP assembly factor, controls cellular concentration of the scaffolding protein Rsa1 by direct interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rothé, Benjamin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Quinternet, Marc; Back, Régis; Tiotiu, Decebal; Jacquemin, Clémence; Loegler, Christine; Schlotter, Florence; Peña, Vlad; Eckert, Kelvin; Moréra, Solange; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Branlant, Christiane; Massenet, Séverine; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Manival, Xavier; Charpentier, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (C/D snoRNPs) involves conserved trans-acting factors, which are proposed to facilitate the assembly of the core proteins Snu13p/15.5K, Nop58p/NOP58, Nop56p/NOP56 and Nop1p/Fibrillarin on box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs). In yeast, protein Rsa1 acts as a platform, interacting with both the RNA-binding core protein Snu13 and protein Pih1 of the Hsp82–R2TP chaperone complex. In this work, a proteomic approach coupled with functional and structural studies identifies protein Hit1 as a novel Rsa1p-interacting partner involved in C/D snoRNP assembly. Hit1p contributes to in vivo C/D snoRNA stability and pre-RNA maturation kinetics. It associates with U3 snoRNA precursors and influences its 3′-end processing. Remarkably, Hit1p is required to maintain steady-state levels of Rsa1p. This stabilizing activity is likely to be general across eukaryotic species, as the human protein ZNHIT3(TRIP3) showing sequence homology with Hit1p regulates the abundance of NUFIP1, the Rsa1p functional homolog. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the Rsa1p317–352–Hit1p70–164 complex reveals a novel mode of protein–protein association explaining the strong stability of the Rsa1p–Hit1p complex. Our biochemical data show that C/D snoRNAs and the core protein Nop58 can interact with the purified Snu13p–Rsa1p–Hit1p heterotrimer. PMID:25170085

  15. Direct Comparative Effectiveness Among 3 Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Biologics in a Real-Life Cohort of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Moreno, Pedro; Sánchez, Guillermo; Gómez, Danny; Bello-Gualtero, Juan; Castro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the clinical response at 36 months and evaluate the adverse events in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab. Methods An observational retrospective cohort study was performed. Patients older than 18 years with active rheumatoid arthritis, for which the physician had initiated a treatment scheme with etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab, were included in the study. The follow-up was conducted through at least trimestral evaluations during the course of 36 months. Outcomes eval