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Sample records for direct mri mapping

  1. Visual Mapping Using BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    DeYoe, Edgar A.; Raut, Ryan V.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used clinically to map visual cortex prior to brain surgery or other invasive treatments in order to achieve an optimal balance between therapeutic effect and the avoidance of post-operative vision deficits. Clinically optimized stimuli, behavioral task, analysis and displays permit identification of cortical subregions supporting high acuity central vision that is critical for reading and other essential visual functions. A novel data display permits instant appreciation of the functional relationship between the pattern of fMRI brain activation and the pattern of vision loss and preservation within the patient’s field of view. Neurovascular uncoupling and its detection in visual cortex are key issues for the interpretation of fMRI results in patients with existing brain pathology. Emerging techniques such as resting state fMRI may facilitate the use of fMRI-based vision mapping with a broader range of patients. PMID:25441501

  2. Mapping of cerebral oxidative metabolism with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Beesam, R. Shashank; Elliott, Mark A.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    Using a T1ρ MRI based indirect detection method, we demonstrate the detection of cerebral oxidative metabolism and its modulation by administration of the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) in a large animal model with minimum utilization of gas. The study was performed by inhalation in swine during imaging on clinical MRI scanners. Metabolic changes in swine were determined by two methods. First, in a series of animals, increased metabolism caused by DNP injection was measured by exhaled gas analysis. The average whole-body metabolic increase in seven swine was 11.9%+/-2.5% per mg/kg, stable over three hours. Secondly, hemispheric brain measurements of oxygen consumption stimulated by DNP injection were made in five swine using T1ρ MRI following administration of gas. Metabolism was calculated from the change in the T1ρ weighted MRI signal due to H217O generated from inhalation before and after doubling of metabolism by DNP. These results were confirmed by direct oxygen-17 MR spectroscopy, a gold standard for in vivo H217O measurement. Overall, this work underscores the ability of indirect oxygen-17 imaging to detect oxygen metabolism in an animal model with a lung capacity comparable to the human with minimal utilization of expensive gas. Given the demonstrated high efficiency in use of and the proven feasibility of performing such measurements on standard clinical MRI scanners, this work enables the adaption of this technique for human studies dealing with a broad array of metabolic derangements. PMID:20547874

  3. Neuroethics and fMRI: Mapping a Fledgling Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, Alex; Whiteley, Louise; Piwowar, Heather; Rasmussen, Edie; Illes, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) informs the understanding of the neural basis of mental function and is a key domain of ethical enquiry. It raises questions about the practice and implications of research, and reflexively informs ethics through the empirical investigation of moral judgments. It is at the centre of debate surrounding the importance of neuroscience findings for concepts such as personhood and free will, and the extent of their practical consequences. Here, we map the landscape of fMRI and neuroethics, using citation analysis to uncover salient topics. We find that this landscape is sparsely populated: despite previous calls for debate, there are few articles that discuss both fMRI and ethical, legal, or social implications (ELSI), and even fewer direct citations between the two literatures. Recognizing that practical barriers exist to integrating ELSI discussion into the research literature, we argue nonetheless that the ethical challenges of fMRI, and controversy over its conceptual and practical implications, make this essential. PMID:21526115

  4. Complete fourier direct magnetic resonance imaging (CFD-MRI) for diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2013-01-01

    The foundation for an accurate and unifying Fourier-based theory of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW–MRI) is constructed by carefully re-examining the first principles of DW–MRI signal formation and deriving its mathematical model from scratch. The derivations are specifically obtained for DW–MRI signal by including all of its elements (e.g., imaging gradients) using complex values. Particle methods are utilized in contrast to conventional partial differential equations approach. The signal is shown to be the Fourier transform of the joint distribution of number of the magnetic moments (at a given location at the initial time) and magnetic moment displacement integrals. In effect, the k-space is augmented by three more dimensions, corresponding to the frequency variables dual to displacement integral vectors. The joint distribution function is recovered by applying the Fourier transform to the complete high-dimensional data set. In the process, to obtain a physically meaningful real valued distribution function, phase corrections are applied for the re-establishment of Hermitian symmetry in the signal. Consequently, the method is fully unconstrained and directly presents the distribution of displacement integrals without any assumptions such as symmetry or Markovian property. The joint distribution function is visualized with isosurfaces, which describe the displacement integrals, overlaid on the distribution map of the number of magnetic moments with low mobility. The model provides an accurate description of the molecular motion measurements via DW–MRI. The improvement of the characterization of tissue microstructure leads to a better localization, detection and assessment of biological properties such as white matter integrity. The results are demonstrated on the experimental data obtained from an ex vivo baboon brain. PMID:23596401

  5. Direct MRI detection of the neuronal magnetic field: the effect of the dendrite branch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ling; Xiong, Hong-Chuan; Yao, De-Zhong

    2010-09-21

    In recent years, neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI) was proposed as a new imaging method to directly map the magnetic field change caused by neuronal activity. Nc-MRI could offer improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood hemodynamics-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this paper, with a finite current dipole as the model of dendrite or dendrite branch, we investigated the spatial distribution of the magnetic field generated by synchronously activated neurons to evaluate the possibility of nc-MRI. Our simulations imply that the existence of a dendrite branch may not only increase the strength of the neuronal magnetic field (NMF), but also raise the non-uniform and unsymmetry of the NMF; therefore, it can enhance the detectability of the neuronal current magnetic field by MRI directly. The results show that the signal phase shift is enlarged, but it is unstable and is still very small, <1 radian, while the magnitude signal may be strong enough for a typical MRI voxel to be detected. We suggest making further efforts to measure the magnitude signal which may induce a large effect in an nc-MRI experiment. PMID:20808026

  6. Contour tracking and probabilistic segmentation of tissue phase mapping MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitiboi, Teodora; Hennemuth, Anja; Schnell, Susanne; Chowdhary, Varun; Honarmand, Amir; Markl, Michael; Linsen, Lars; Hahn, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Many cardiovascular diseases manifest as an abnormal motion pattern of the heart muscle (myocardium). Local cardiac motion can be non-invasively quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using methods such as tissue phase mapping (TPM), which directly measures the local myocardial velocities over time with high temporal and spatial resolution. The challenges for routine clinical use of TPM for the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiac function lie in providing a fast and accurate myocardium segmentation and a robust quantitative analysis of the velocity field. Both of these tasks are difficult to automate on routine clinical data because of the reduced contrast in the presence of noise. In this work, we propose to address these challenges with a segmentation approach that combines smooth, iterative contour displacement and probabilistic segmentation using particle tracing, based on the underlying velocity field. The proposed solution enabled the efficient and reproducible segmentation of TPM datasets from 27 patients and 14 volunteers, showing good potential for routine use in clinical studies. Our method allows for a more reliable quantitative analysis of local myocardial velocities, by giving a higher weight to velocity vectors corresponding to pixels more likely to belong to the myocardium. The accuracy of the contour propagation was evaluated on nine subjects, showing an average error smaller than the spatial resolution of the image data. Statistical analysis concluded that the difference between the segmented contours and the ground truths was not significantly higher than the variability between the manual ground truth segmentations.

  7. Direct probability mapping of contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, C.A.

    1993-09-17

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. Geostatistical simulation provides powerful tools for investigating contaminant levels, and in particular, for identifying and using the spatial interrelationships among a set of isolated sample values. This additional information can be used to assess the likelihood of encountering contamination at unsampled locations and to evaluate the risk associated with decisions to remediate or not to remediate specific regions within a site. Past operation of the DOE Feed Materials Production Center has contaminated a site near Fernald, Ohio, with natural uranium. Soil geochemical data have been collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project. These data have been used to construct a number of stochastic images of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit. Each such image accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely, statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination. Evaluation of the geostatistical simulations can yield maps representing the expected magnitude of the contamination for various regions and other information that may be important in determining a suitable remediation process or in sizing equipment to accomplish the restoration.

  8. Mapping of electrical muscle stimulation using MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Harris, Robert T.; Woodard, Daniel; Dudley, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of muscle contractile activity elicited by electromyostimulation (EMS) was mapped and compared to the contractile-activity pattern produced by voluntary effort. This was done by examining the patterns and the extent of contrast shift, as indicated by T2 values, im magnetic resonance (MR) images after isometric activity of the left m. quadriceps of human subjects was elicited by EMS (1-sec train of 500-microsec sine wave pulses at 50 Hz) or voluntary effort. The results suggest that, whereas EMS stimulates the same fibers repeatedly, thereby increasing the metabolic demand and T2 values, the voluntary efforts are performed by more diffuse asynchronous activation of skeletal muscle even at forces up to 75 percent of maximal to maintain performance.

  9. COMPARISON OF THE COMPLETE FOURIER DIRECT MRI WITH EXISTING DIFFUSION WEIGHTED MRI METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2011-01-01

    The Complete Fourier Direct (CFD) MRI method introduced in earlier work for modeling the diffusion weighted MRI signal is compared with the existing methods. The preservation of Hermitian symmetry in the diffusion weighted MRI signal without affecting its energy is the key point that differentiates CFD–MRI from the existing methods. By keeping the correct Fourier relationship intact, the joint distribution function is represented ‘as it is’, without any constraints, e.g. being symmetric. The necessity to model or assume models for spin motion and try to fit the model to the samples of the Fourier transform as in case of model matching methods is not required because the Discrete Fourier Transform applied to correctly processed signal in CFD–MRI gives more accurate results. PMID:21918715

  10. Quantitative β mapping for calibrated fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shu, Christina Y; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Coman, Daniel; Herman, Peter; Rothman, Douglas L; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2016-02-01

    The metabolic and hemodynamic dependencies of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal form the basis for calibrated fMRI, where the focus is on oxidative energy demanded by neural activity. An important part of calibrated fMRI is the power-law relationship between the BOLD signal and the deoxyhemoglobin concentration, which in turn is related to the ratio between oxidative demand (CMRO2) and blood flow (CBF). The power-law dependence between BOLD signal and deoxyhemoglobin concentration is signified by a scaling exponent β. Until recently most studies assumed a β value of 1.5, which is based on numerical simulations of the extravascular BOLD component. Since the basal value of CMRO2 and CBF can vary from subject-to-subject and/or region-to-region, a method to independently measure β in vivo should improve the accuracy of calibrated fMRI results. We describe a new method for β mapping through characterizing R2' - the most sensitive relaxation component of BOLD signal (i.e., the reversible magnetic susceptibility component that is predominantly of extravascular origin at high magnetic field) - as a function of intravascular magnetic susceptibility induced by an FDA-approved superparamagnetic contrast agent. In α-chloralose anesthetized rat brain, at 9.4 T, we measured β values of ~0.8 uniformly across large neocortical swathes, with lower magnitude and more heterogeneity in subcortical areas. Comparison of β maps in rats anesthetized with medetomidine and α-chloralose revealed that β is independent of neural activity levels at these resting states. We anticipate that this method for β mapping can help facilitate calibrated fMRI for clinical studies. PMID:26619788

  11. MAPPING DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Veselin; Apai, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets, the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time-resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. In this paper, we develop simulations to explore the capabilities of current and next-generation ground- and space-based instruments for this technique. We address and discuss the following questions: (1) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot coverage, spot colors, and spot spectra?; (2) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelength/temporal sampling required for these measurements?; and (3) can principal component analysis be used to invert the light curve and deduce the surface map of the planet? Our simulations describe the expected spectral differences between homogeneous (clear or cloudy) and patchy atmospheres, outline the significance of the dominant absorption features of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO, and provide a method to distinguish these two types of atmospheres. Assuming surfaces with and without clouds for most currently imaged planets the current models predict the largest variations in the J band. Simulated photometry from current and future instruments is used to estimate the level of detectable photometric variations. We conclude that future instruments will be able to recover not only the rotation periods

  12. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  13. MRI Mapping of Cerebrovascular Reactivity via Gas Inhalation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  14. MRI mapping of cerebrovascular reactivity via gas inhalation challenges.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  15. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Sethna, Zachary; Manley, Gregory; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt; Loria, J. Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a `QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  16. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth A.; Sethna, Zachary M.; Manley, Gregory A.; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt W.; Loria, J. Patrick; Barrett, Sean E.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a ‘QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  17. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Jason A.; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  18. [Cardiac MRI: technology, clinical applications, and future directions].

    PubMed

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Peyrou, J; Baron, N; Allouch, P; Aubert, S; Boueri, Z; Livarek, B

    2013-11-01

    The field of cardiovascular MRI has evolved rapidly over the past decade, feeding new applications across a broad spectrum of clinical and research areas. Advances in magnet hardware technology, and key developments such as segmented k-space acquisitions, advanced motion encoding techniques, ultra-rapid perfusion imaging and delayed myocardial enhancement imaging have all contributed to a revolution in how patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease are diagnosed and treated. Actually, cardiac MRI is a widely accepted method as the "gold standard" for detection and characterization of many forms of cardiac diseases. The aim of this review is to present an overview of cardiac MRI technology, advances in clinical applications, and future directions. PMID:24035258

  19. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  20. Using qualitative maps to direct reactive robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, Randolph; Pendleton, Tom

    1992-01-01

    The principal advantage of mobile robots is that they are able to go to specific locations to perform useful tasks rather than have the tasks brought to them. It is important therefore that the robot be used to reach desired locations efficiently and reliably. A mobile robot whose environment extends significantly beyond its sensory horizon must maintain a representation of the environment, a map, in order to attain these efficiency and reliability requirements. We believe that qualitative mapping methods provide useful and robust representation schemes and that such maps may be used to direct the actions of a reactively controlled robot. In this paper we describe our experience in employing qualitative maps to direct, through the selection of desired control strategies, a reactive-behavior based robot. This mapping capability represents the development of one aspect of a successful deliberative/reactive hybrid control architecture.

  1. Mapping Fetal Brain Development in utero Using MRI: The Big Bang of Brain Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The development of tools to construct and investigate probabilistic maps of the adult human brain from MRI have led to advances in both basic neuroscience and clinical diagnosis. These tools are increasingly being applied to brain development in adolescence, childhood and even neonatal and premature neonatal imaging. Looking even earlier in development, parallel developments in clinical fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have led to its growing use as a tool in challenging medical conditions. This has motivated new engineering developments that combine optimal fast MRI scans with techniques derived from computer vision that allow full 3D imaging of the moving fetal brain in utero without sedation. These promise to provide a new and unprecedented window into early human brain growth. This article will review the developments that have led us to this point, and examine the current state of the art in the fields of fast fetal imaging, motion correction and the tools to analyze dynamically changing fetal brain structure. New methods to deal with developmental tissue segmentation and the construction of spatio-temporal atlases will be examined, together with techniques to map fetal brain growth patterns. PMID:21568716

  2. Uncertainty estimations for quantitative in vivo MRI T1 mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polders, Daniel L.; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of brain tissue is of great interest for both clinical research and MRI sequence development. For an unambiguous interpretation of in vivo variations in T1 images, it is important to understand the degree of variability that is associated with the quantitative T1 parameter. This paper presents a general framework for estimating the uncertainty in quantitative T1 mapping by combining a slice-shifted multi-slice inversion recovery EPI technique with the statistical wild-bootstrap approach. Both simulations and experimental analyses were performed to validate this novel approach and to evaluate the estimated T1 uncertainty in several brain regions across four healthy volunteers. By estimating the T1 uncertainty, it is shown that the variation in T1 within anatomic regions for similar tissue types is larger than the uncertainty in the measurement. This indicates that heterogeneity of the inspected tissue and/or partial volume effects can be the main determinants for the observed variability in the estimated T1 values. The proposed approach to estimate T1 and its uncertainty without the need for repeated measurements may also prove to be useful for calculating effect sizes that are deemed significant when comparing group differences.

  3. Uncertainty estimations for quantitative in vivo MRI T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Polders, Daniel L; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time (T(1)) of brain tissue is of great interest for both clinical research and MRI sequence development. For an unambiguous interpretation of in vivo variations in T(1) images, it is important to understand the degree of variability that is associated with the quantitative T(1) parameter. This paper presents a general framework for estimating the uncertainty in quantitative T(1) mapping by combining a slice-shifted multi-slice inversion recovery EPI technique with the statistical wild-bootstrap approach. Both simulations and experimental analyses were performed to validate this novel approach and to evaluate the estimated T(1) uncertainty in several brain regions across four healthy volunteers. By estimating the T(1) uncertainty, it is shown that the variation in T(1) within anatomic regions for similar tissue types is larger than the uncertainty in the measurement. This indicates that heterogeneity of the inspected tissue and/or partial volume effects can be the main determinants for the observed variability in the estimated T(1) values. The proposed approach to estimate T(1) and its uncertainty without the need for repeated measurements may also prove to be useful for calculating effect sizes that are deemed significant when comparing group differences. PMID:23041796

  4. Current and New Directions in MRI in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article summarizes the use of MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Current and emerging imaging techniques are reviewed pertaining to their utility in MS. Recent Findings Conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences are used to identify and characterize disease pathology in MS. T2 lesion burden, postcontrast enhancement, T1 hypointensities, and regional and global atrophy are all informative and correlate to clinical measures, such as disease disability, to a variable extent. Newer techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and MR spectroscopy are increasingly being incorporated into clinical trials and may provide improved specificity to the underlying pathology. Double inversion recovery and ultrahigh-field-strength MRI have direct application in MS for evaluating cortical pathology. Newer functional MRI techniques such as resting-state functional connectivity are increasingly being applied in MS. Summary Conventional and emerging imaging techniques greatly inform our understanding of MS. These techniques are integral in diagnosis, in evaluating new treatments for MS, and for following patients in the clinical setting. PMID:23917101

  5. 3D mapping of somatotopic reorganization with small animal functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Wang, Shumin; Chen, Der-Yow; Dodd, Stephen; Goloshevsky, Artem; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    There are few in vivo noninvasive methods to study neuroplasticity in animal brains. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been developed for animal brain mapping, but few fMRI studies have analyzed functional alteration due to plasticity in animal models. One major limitation is that fMRI maps are characterized by statistical parametric mapping making the apparent boundary dependent on the statistical threshold used. Here, we developed a method to characterize the location of center-of-mass in fMRI maps that is shown not to be sensitive to statistical threshold. Utilizing centers-of-mass as anchor points to fit the spatial distribution of the BOLD response enabled quantitative group analysis of altered boundaries of functional somatosensory maps. This approach was used to study cortical reorganization in the rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) after sensory deprivation to the barrel cortex by follicle ablation (F.A.). FMRI demonstrated an enlarged nose S1 representation in the 3D somatotopic functional maps. This result clearly demonstrates that fMRI enables the spatial mapping of functional changes that can characterize multiple regions of S1 cortex and still be sensitive to changes due to plasticity. PMID:19770051

  6. Vervet MRI Atlas and Label Map for Fully Automated Morphometric Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Maldjian, Joseph A.; Daunais, James B.; Friedman, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently available non-human primate templates typically require input of a skull-stripped brain for structural processing. This can be a manually intensive procedure, and considerably limits their utility. The purpose of this study was to create a vervet MRI population template, associated tissue probability maps (TPM), and a label atlas to facilitate true fully automated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) structural analyses for morphometric analyses. Structural MRI scans of ten vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) scanned at three time points were used in this study. An unbiased population average template was created using a symmetric diffeomorphic registration (SyN) procedure. Skull stripping, segmentation, and label map generation were performed using the publically available rhesus INIA19 MRI template and NeuroMap label atlas. A six-class TPM and a six-layer two-class normalization template was created from the vervet segmentation for use within the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) framework. Fully automated morphologic processing of all of the vervet MRI scans was then performed using the vervet TPM and vervet normalization template including skull-stripping, segmentation and normalization. The vervet template creation procedure resulted in excellent skull stripping, segmentation, and NeuroMap atlas labeling with 720 structures successfully registered. Fully automated processing was accomplished for all vervet scans, demonstrating excellent skull-stripping, segmentation, and normalization performance. We describe creation of an unbiased vervet structural MRI population template and atlas. The template includes an associated six-class TPM and DARTEL six-layer two-class normalization template for true fully automated skull-stripping, segmentation, and normalization of vervet structural T1-weighted MRI scans. We provide the most detailed vervet label atlas currently available based on the NeuroMaps atlas with 720 labels successfully registered. We

  7. Direct mapping of the UV surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Zhou, Liangcheng; Dierolf, Volkmar; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2009-05-01

    Researchers employed various well-developed concepts from conventional optics in designing novel plasmonic devices, which allow us to construct a framework to describe the propagation, diffraction, and interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a chip. Here we present what we believe to be the first direct mapping of the UV SPPs on an Al2O3/Al surface using a UV-compatible near-field scanning optical microscope system. UV SPP modes launched by one-dimensional slits or two-dimensional groove arrays and corresponding interference phenomenon were both observed, which may enrich the studies on subwavelength optics on a chip. PMID:19412260

  8. Foundations of MRI phase imaging and processing for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM).

    PubMed

    Schweser, Ferdinand; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI based technique that relies on estimates of the magnetic field distribution in the tissue under examination. Several sophisticated data processing steps are required to extract the magnetic field distribution from raw MRI phase measurements. The objective of this review article is to provide a general overview and to discuss several underlying assumptions and limitations of the pre-processing steps that need to be applied to MRI phase data before the final field-to-source inversion can be performed. Beginning with the fundamental relation between MRI signal and tissue magnetic susceptibility this review covers the reconstruction of magnetic field maps from multi-channel phase images, background field correction, and provides an overview of state of the art QSM solution strategies. PMID:26702760

  9. Distortion correction in EPI at ultra-high-field MRI using PSF mapping with optimal combination of shift detection dimension.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Hong; Chung, Jun-Young; In, Myung-Ho; Zaitsev, Maxim; Kim, Young-Bo; Speck, Oliver; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2012-10-01

    Despite its wide use, echo-planar imaging (EPI) suffers from geometric distortions due to off-resonance effects, i.e., strong magnetic field inhomogeneity and susceptibility. This article reports a novel method for correcting the distortions observed in EPI acquired at ultra-high-field such as 7 T. Point spread function (PSF) mapping methods have been proposed for correcting the distortions in EPI. The PSF shift map can be derived either along the nondistorted or the distorted coordinates. Along the nondistorted coordinates more information about compressed areas is present but it is prone to PSF-ghosting artifacts induced by large k-space shift in PSF encoding direction. In contrast, shift maps along the distorted coordinates contain more information in stretched areas and are more robust against PSF-ghosting. In ultra-high-field MRI, an EPI contains both compressed and stretched regions depending on the B0 field inhomogeneity and local susceptibility. In this study, we present a new geometric distortion correction scheme, which selectively applies the shift map with more information content. We propose a PSF-ghost elimination method to generate an artifact-free pixel shift map along nondistorted coordinates. The proposed method can correct the effects of the local magnetic field inhomogeneity induced by the susceptibility effects along with the PSF-ghost artifact cancellation. We have experimentally demonstrated the advantages of the proposed method in EPI data acquisitions in phantom and human brain using 7-T MRI. PMID:22213517

  10. fMRI for mapping language networks in neurosurgical cases

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Santosh S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating language has been a long-standing application in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, both in research and clinical circumstances, and still provides challenges. Localization of eloquent areas is important in neurosurgical cases, so that there is least possible damage to these areas during surgery, maintaining their function postoperatively, therefore providing good quality of life to the patient. Preoperative fMRI study is a non-invasive tool to localize the eloquent areas, including language, with other traditional methods generally used being invasive and at times perilous. In this article, we describe methods and various paradigms to study the language areas, in clinical neurosurgical cases, along with illustrations of cases from our institute. PMID:24851003

  11. Comparing different stimulus configurations for population receptive field mapping in human fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ivan; de Haas, Benjamin; Clark, Chris A.; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Population receptive field (pRF) mapping is a widely used approach to measuring aggregate human visual receptive field properties by recording non-invasive signals using functional MRI. Despite growing interest, no study to date has systematically investigated the effects of different stimulus configurations on pRF estimates from human visual cortex. Here we compared the effects of three different stimulus configurations on a model-based approach to pRF estimation: size-invariant bars and eccentricity-scaled bars defined in Cartesian coordinates and traveling along the cardinal axes, and a novel simultaneous “wedge and ring” stimulus defined in polar coordinates, systematically covering polar and eccentricity axes. We found that the presence or absence of eccentricity scaling had a significant effect on goodness of fit and pRF size estimates. Further, variability in pRF size estimates was directly influenced by stimulus configuration, particularly for higher visual areas including V5/MT+. Finally, we compared eccentricity estimation between phase-encoded and model-based pRF approaches. We observed a tendency for more peripheral eccentricity estimates using phase-encoded methods, independent of stimulus size. We conclude that both eccentricity scaling and polar rather than Cartesian stimulus configuration are important considerations for optimal experimental design in pRF mapping. While all stimulus configurations produce adequate estimates, simultaneous wedge and ring stimulation produced higher fit reliability, with a significant advantage in reduced acquisition time. PMID:25750620

  12. Rapid Radiofrequency Field Mapping In Vivo Using Single-Shot STEAM MRI

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Gunther; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Dechent, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Higher field strengths entail less homogeneous RF fields. This may influence quantitative MRI and MRS. A method for rapidly mapping the RF field in the human head with minimal distortion was developed on the basis of a single-shot stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence. The flip angle of the second RF pulse in the STEAM preparation was set to 60° and 100° instead of 90°, inducing a flip angle-dependent signal change. A quadratic approximation of this trigonometric signal dependence together with a calibration accounting for slice excitation-related bias allowed for directly determining the RF field from the two measurements only. RF maps down to the level of the medulla could be obtained in less than 1 min and registered to anatomical volumes by means of the T2-weighted STEAM images. Flip angles between 75% and 125% of the nominal value were measured in line with other methods. Magn Reson Med 60:739–743, 2008. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18727090

  13. Preoperative Sensorimotor Mapping in Brain Tumor Patients using Spontaneous Fluctuations in Neuronal Activity Imaged with fMRI: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyang; Johnston, James M.; Fox, Michael D.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Grubb, Robert L.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Shimony, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe initial experience with resting state correlation mapping as a potential aid for presurgical planning of brain tumor resections. Methods/Technique Resting state blood oxygenation dependent (BOLD) fMRI was acquired in seventeen healthy young adults and four patients with brain tumors invading sensorimotor cortex. Conventional fMRI motor mapping (finger tapping protocol) was also performed in the patients. Intraoperatively, motor hand area was mapped using cortical stimulation. Results Robust and consistent delineation of sensorimotor cortex was obtained using the resting state BOLD data. Resting state functional mapping in patients showed localization to sensorimotor areas consistent with cortical stimulation mapping (CSM) and in all cases performed as well or better than task-based fMRI. Conclusions Resting state correlation mapping is a promising tool for reliable functional localization of eloquent cortex. This method compares well with “gold standard” CSM and offers several advantages in comparison to conventional motor mapping fMRI. PMID:19934999

  14. Quantitative mapping of chemical compositions with MRI using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Harbou, Erik; Fabich, Hilary T.; Benning, Martin; Tayler, Alexander B.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method for accelerating the acquisition time of two dimensional concentration maps of different chemical species in mixtures by the use of compressed sensing (CS) is presented. Whilst 2D-concentration maps with a high spatial resolution are prohibitively time-consuming to acquire using full k -space sampling techniques, CS enables the reconstruction of quantitative concentration maps from sub-sampled k -space data. First, the method was tested by reconstructing simulated data. Then, the CS algorithm was used to reconstruct concentration maps of binary mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and cyclooctane in different samples with a field-of-view of 22 mm and a spatial resolution of 344 μm × 344 μm . Spiral based trajectories were used as sampling schemes. For the data acquisition, eight scans with slightly different trajectories were applied resulting in a total acquisition time of about 8 min. In contrast, a conventional chemical shift imaging experiment at the same resolution would require about 17 h. To get quantitative results, a careful weighting of the regularisation parameter (via the L-curve approach) or contrast-enhancing Bregman iterations are applied for the reconstruction of the concentration maps. Both approaches yield relative errors of the concentration map of less than 2 mol-% without any calibration prior to the measurement. The accuracy of the reconstructed concentration maps deteriorates when the reconstruction model is biased by systematic errors such as large inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field. The presented method is a powerful tool for the fast acquisition of concentration maps that can provide valuable information for the investigation of many phenomena in chemical engineering applications.

  15. Integrated Analysis of EEG and fMRI Using Sparsity of Spatial Maps.

    PubMed

    Samadi, S; Soltanian-Zadeh, H; Jutten, C

    2016-09-01

    Integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an open problem, which has motivated many researches. The most important challenge in EEG-fMRI integration is the unknown relationship between these two modalities. In this paper, we extract the same features (spatial map of neural activity) from both modality. Therefore, the proposed integration method does not need any assumption about the relationship of EEG and fMRI. We present a source localization method from scalp EEG signal using jointly fMRI analysis results as prior spatial information and source separation for providing temporal courses of sources of interest. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated quantitatively along with multiple sparse priors method and sparse Bayesian learning with the fMRI results as prior information. Localization bias and source distribution index are used to measure the performance of different localization approaches with or without a variety of fMRI-EEG mismatches on simulated realistic data. The method is also applied to experimental data of face perception of 16 subjects. Simulation results show that the proposed method is significantly stable against the noise with low localization bias. Although the existence of an extra region in the fMRI data enlarges localization bias, the proposed method outperforms the other methods. Conversely, a missed region in the fMRI data does not affect the localization bias of the common sources in the EEG-fMRI data. Results on experimental data are congruent with previous studies and produce clusters in the fusiform and occipital face areas (FFA and OFA, respectively). Moreover, it shows high stability in source localization against variations in different subjects. PMID:27460558

  16. Imaging whole-brain cytoarchitecture of mouse with MRI-based quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Xie, Luke; Dibb, Russell; Li, Wei; Decker, Kyle; Zhang, Yuyao; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Chunlei

    2016-08-15

    The proper microstructural arrangement of complex neural structures is essential for establishing the functional circuitry of the brain. We present an MRI method to resolve tissue microstructure and infer brain cytoarchitecture by mapping the magnetic susceptibility in the brain at high resolution. This is possible because of the heterogeneous magnetic susceptibility created by varying concentrations of lipids, proteins and irons from the cell membrane to cytoplasm. We demonstrate magnetic susceptibility maps at a nominal resolution of 10-μm isotropic, approaching the average cell size of a mouse brain. The maps reveal many detailed structures including the retina cell layers, olfactory sensory neurons, barrel cortex, cortical layers, axonal fibers in white and gray matter. Olfactory glomerulus density is calculated and structural connectivity is traced in the optic nerve, striatal neurons, and brainstem nerves. The method is robust and can be readily applied on MRI scanners at or above 7T. PMID:27181764

  17. Transspinal direct current stimulation immediately modifies motor cortex sensorimotor maps.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Truong, Dennis Q; Bikson, Marom; Martin, John H

    2015-04-01

    Motor cortex (MCX) motor representation reorganization occurs after injury, learning, and different long-term stimulation paradigms. The neuromodulatory approach of transspinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) has been used to promote evoked cortical motor responses. In the present study, we used cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) of the rat cervical cord to determine if spinal cord activation can modify the MCX forelimb motor map. We used a finite-element method model based on coregistered high-resolution rat MRI and microcomputed tomography imaging data to predict spinal current density to target stimulation to the caudal cervical enlargement. We examined the effects of cathodal and anodal tsDCS on the H-reflex and c-tsDCS on responses evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). To determine if cervical c-tsDCS also modified MCX somatic sensory processing, we examined sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) produced by wrist electrical stimulation and induced changes in ongoing activity. Cervical c-tsDCS enhanced the H-reflex, and anodal depressed the H-reflex. Using cathodal stimulation to examine cortical effects, we found that cervical c-tsDCS immediately modified the forelimb MCX motor map, with decreased thresholds and an expanded area. c-tsDCS also increased SEP amplitude in the MCX. The magnitude of changes produced by c-tsDCS were greater on the motor than sensory response. Cervical c-tsDCS more strongly enhanced forelimb than hindlimb motor representation and had no effect on vibrissal representation. The finite-element model indicated current density localized to caudal cervical segments, informing forelimb motor selectivity. Our results suggest that c-tsDCS augments spinal excitability in a spatially selective manner and may improve voluntary motor function through MCX representational plasticity. PMID:25673738

  18. Transspinal direct current stimulation immediately modifies motor cortex sensorimotor maps

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Truong, Dennis Q.; Bikson, Marom

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex (MCX) motor representation reorganization occurs after injury, learning, and different long-term stimulation paradigms. The neuromodulatory approach of transspinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) has been used to promote evoked cortical motor responses. In the present study, we used cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) of the rat cervical cord to determine if spinal cord activation can modify the MCX forelimb motor map. We used a finite-element method model based on coregistered high-resolution rat MRI and microcomputed tomography imaging data to predict spinal current density to target stimulation to the caudal cervical enlargement. We examined the effects of cathodal and anodal tsDCS on the H-reflex and c-tsDCS on responses evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). To determine if cervical c-tsDCS also modified MCX somatic sensory processing, we examined sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) produced by wrist electrical stimulation and induced changes in ongoing activity. Cervical c-tsDCS enhanced the H-reflex, and anodal depressed the H-reflex. Using cathodal stimulation to examine cortical effects, we found that cervical c-tsDCS immediately modified the forelimb MCX motor map, with decreased thresholds and an expanded area. c-tsDCS also increased SEP amplitude in the MCX. The magnitude of changes produced by c-tsDCS were greater on the motor than sensory response. Cervical c-tsDCS more strongly enhanced forelimb than hindlimb motor representation and had no effect on vibrissal representation. The finite-element model indicated current density localized to caudal cervical segments, informing forelimb motor selectivity. Our results suggest that c-tsDCS augments spinal excitability in a spatially selective manner and may improve voluntary motor function through MCX representational plasticity. PMID:25673738

  19. T2 distribution mapping profiles with phase-encode MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Ersland, Geir; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2011-03-01

    Two 1-D phase-encode sequences for T2 mapping, namely CPMG-prepared SPRITE and spin-echo SPI, are presented and compared in terms of image quality, accuracy of T2 measurements and the measurement time. The sequences implement two different approaches to acquiring T2-weighted images: in the CPMG-prepared SPRITE, the T2-weighting of magnetization precedes the spatial encoding, while in the spin-echo SPI, the T2-weighting follows the spatial encoding. The sequences are intended primarily for T2 mapping of fluids in porous solids, where using frequency encode techniques may be problematic either due to local gradient distortions or too short T2. Their possible applications include monitoring fluid-flow processes in rocks, cement paste hydration, curing of rubber, filtering paramagnetic impurities and other processes accomplished by changing site-specific T2.

  20. Assessment of myocardial fibrosis with T1 mapping MRI.

    PubMed

    Everett, R J; Stirrat, C G; Semple, S I R; Newby, D E; Dweck, M R; Mirsadraee, S

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial fibrosis can arise from a range of pathological processes and its presence correlates with adverse clinical outcomes. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can provide a non-invasive assessment of cardiac structure, function, and tissue characteristics, which includes late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) techniques to identify focal irreversible replacement fibrosis with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. Importantly the presence of LGE is consistently associated with adverse outcomes in a range of common cardiac conditions; however, LGE techniques are qualitative and unable to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis, which is an earlier form of fibrosis preceding replacement fibrosis that may be reversible. Novel T1 mapping techniques allow quantitative CMR assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis with the two most common measures being native T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. Native T1 differentiates normal from infarcted myocardium, is abnormal in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and may be particularly useful in the diagnosis of Anderson-Fabry disease and amyloidosis. ECV is a surrogate measure of the extracellular space and is equivalent to the myocardial volume of distribution of the gadolinium-based contrast medium. It is reproducible and correlates well with fibrosis on histology. ECV is abnormal in patients with cardiac failure and aortic stenosis, and is associated with functional impairment in these groups. T1 mapping techniques promise to allow earlier detection of disease, monitor disease progression, and inform prognosis; however, limitations remain. In particular, reference ranges are lacking for T1 mapping values as these are influenced by specific CMR techniques and magnetic field strength. In addition, there is significant overlap between T1 mapping values in healthy controls and most disease states, particularly using native T1, limiting the clinical application of these techniques at present. PMID:27005015

  1. Non-invasive temperature mapping using temperature-responsive water saturation shift referencing (T-WASSR) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanshu; Qin, Qin; Chan, Kannie W.Y.; Li, Yuguo; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Gilad, Assaf A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a non-invasive MRI approach for assessing the water proton resonance frequency (PRF) shifts associated with changes in temperature. This method is based on Water Saturation Shift Referencing (WASSR), a method first developed for assessing B0 field inhomogeneity. Temperature-induced water PRF shifts were determined by estimating the frequency of the minimum intensity of the water direct saturation spectrum at each temperature using Lorentzian line-shape fitting. The change in temperature was then calculated from the difference in water PRF shifts between temperatures. Optimal acquisition parameters were first estimated using simulations and later confirmed experimentally. Results in vitro and in vivo showed that the temperature changes measured using the temperature-responsive WASSR (T-WASSR) were in good agreement with those obtained with MR spectroscopy or phase mapping-based water PRF measurement methods,. In addition, the feasibility of temperature mapping in fat-containing tissue is demonstrated in vitro. In conclusion, the T-WASSR approach provides an alternative for non-invasive temperature mapping by MRI, especially suitable for temperature measurements in fat-containing tissues. PMID:24395616

  2. Clinical feasibility of using mean apparent propagator (MAP) MRI to characterize brain tissue microstructure.

    PubMed

    Avram, Alexandru V; Sarlls, Joelle E; Barnett, Alan S; Özarslan, Evren; Thomas, Cibu; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J

    2016-02-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is the most widely used method for characterizing noninvasively structural and architectural features of brain tissues. However, the assumption of a Gaussian spin displacement distribution intrinsic to DTI weakens its ability to describe intricate tissue microanatomy. Consequently, the biological interpretation of microstructural parameters, such as fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity, is often equivocal. We evaluate the clinical feasibility of assessing brain tissue microstructure with mean apparent propagator (MAP) MRI, a powerful analytical framework that efficiently measures the probability density function (PDF) of spin displacements and quantifies useful metrics of this PDF indicative of diffusion in complex microstructure (e.g., restrictions, multiple compartments). Rotation invariant and scalar parameters computed from the MAP show consistent variation across neuroanatomical brain regions and increased ability to differentiate tissues with distinct structural and architectural features compared with DTI-derived parameters. The return-to-origin probability (RTOP) appears to reflect cellularity and restrictions better than MD, while the non-Gaussianity (NG) measures diffusion heterogeneity by comprehensively quantifying the deviation between the spin displacement PDF and its Gaussian approximation. Both RTOP and NG can be decomposed in the local anatomical frame for reference determined by the orientation of the diffusion tensor and reveal additional information complementary to DTI. The propagator anisotropy (PA) shows high tissue contrast even in deep brain nuclei and cortical gray matter and is more uniform in white matter than the FA, which drops significantly in regions containing crossing fibers. Orientational profiles of the propagator computed analytically from the MAP MRI series coefficients allow separation of different fiber populations in regions of crossing white matter pathways, which in turn improves our

  3. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19) F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  4. Women's clitoris, vagina and cervix mapped on the sensory cortex: fMRI evidence

    PubMed Central

    Komisaruk, Barry R.; Wise, Nan; Frangos, Eleni; Liu, Wen-Ching; Allen, Kachina; Brody, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The projection of vagina, uterine cervix, and nipple to the sensory cortex in humans has not been reported. Aims To map the sensory cortical fields of the clitoris, vagina, cervix and nipple, toward an elucidation of the neural systems underlying sexual response. Methods Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) we mapped sensory cortical responses to clitoral, vaginal, cervical, and nipple self-stimulation. For points of reference on the homunculus, we also mapped responses to the thumb and great toe (hallux) stimulation. Main Outcome Measures fMRI of brain regions activated by the various sensory stimuli. Results Clitoral, vaginal, and cervical self-stimulation activate differentiable sensory cortical regions, all clustered in the medial cortex (medial paracentral lobule). Nipple self-stimulation activated the genital sensory cortex (as well as the thoracic) region of the homuncular map. Conclusion The genital sensory cortex, identified in the classical Penfield homunculus based on electrical stimulation of the brain only in men, was confirmed for the first time in the literature by the present study in women, applying clitoral, vaginal, and cervical self-stimulation, and observing their regional brain responses using fMRI. Vaginal, clitoral, and cervical regions of activation were differentiable, consistent with innervation by different afferent nerves and different behavioral correlates. Activation of the genital sensory cortex by nipple self-stimulation was unexpected, but suggests a neurological basis for women’s reports of its erotogenic quality. PMID:21797981

  5. Mapping cerebrovascular reactivity using concurrent fMRI and near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Bergethon, Peter R.; Frederick, Blaise d.

    2011-02-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the compensatory dilatory capacity of cerebral vasculature to a dilatory stimulus and is an important indicator of brain vascular reserve. fMRI has been proven to be an effective imaging technique to obtain the CVR map when the subjects perform CO2 inhalation or the breath holding task (BH). However, the traditional data analysis inaccurately models the BOLD using a boxcar function with fixed time delay. We propose a novel way to process the fMRI data obtained during a blocked BH by using the simultaneously collected near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data as regressor1. In this concurrent NIRS and fMRI study, 6 healthy subjects performed a blocked BH (5 breath holds with 20s durations intermitted by 40s of regular breathing). A NIRS probe of two sources and two detectors separated by 3 cm was placed on the right side of prefrontal area of the subjects. The time course of changes in oxy-hemoglobin (Δ[HbO]) was calculated from NIRS data and shifted in time by various amounts, and resampled to the fMRI acquisition rate. Each shifted time course was used as regressor in FEAT (the analysis tool in FSL). The resulting z-statistic maps were concatenated in time and the maximal value was taken along the time for all the voxels to generate a 3-D CVR map. The new method produces more accurate and thorough CVR maps; moreover, it enables us to produce a comparable baseline cerebral vascular map if applied to resting state (RS) data.

  6. Resting-State Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Functional MRI: A Paradigm Shift in Preoperative Brain Mapping.

    PubMed

    Leuthardt, Eric C; Allen, Monica; Kamran, Mudassar; Hawasli, Ammar H; Snyder, Abraham Z; Hacker, Carl D; Mitchell, Timothy J; Shimony, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Currently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) facilitates a preoperative awareness of an association of an eloquent region with a tumor. This information gives the neurosurgeon helpful information that can aid in creating a surgical strategy. Typically, task-based fMRI has been employed to preoperatively localize speech and motor function. Task-based fMRI depends on the patient's ability to comply with the task paradigm, which often is impaired in the setting of a brain tumor. This problem is overcome by using resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) to localize function. rs-fMRI measures spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, representing the brain's functional organization. In a neurosurgical context, it allows noninvasive simultaneous assessment of multiple large-scale distributed networks. Compared with task-related fMRI, rs-fMRI provides more comprehensive information on the functional architecture of the brain and is applicable in settings where task-related fMRI may provide inadequate information or could not be performed. Taken together, rs-fMRI substantially expands the preoperative mapping capability in efficiency, effectiveness, and scope. In this article, a brief introduction into rs-fMRI processing methods is followed by a detailed discussion on the role rs-fMRI plays in presurgical planning. PMID:26784290

  7. Mapping the mouse brain with rs-fMRI: An optimized pipeline for functional network identification.

    PubMed

    Zerbi, Valerio; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The use of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) in translational research is a powerful tool to assess brain connectivity and investigate neuropathology in mouse models. However, despite encouraging initial results, the characterization of consistent and robust resting state networks in mice remains a methodological challenge. One key reason is that the quality of the measured MR signal is degraded by the presence of structural noise from non-neural sources. Notably, in the current pipeline of the Human Connectome Project, a novel approach has been introduced to clean rs-fMRI data, which involves automatic artifact component classification and data cleaning (FIX). FIX does not require any external recordings of physiology or the segmentation of CSF and white matter. In this study, we evaluated the performance of FIX for analyzing mouse rs-fMRI data. Our results showed that FIX can be easily applied to mouse datasets and detects true signals with 100% accuracy and true noise components with very high accuracy (>98%), thus reducing both within- and between-subject variability of rs-fMRI connectivity measurements. Using this improved pre-processing pipeline, maps of 23 resting state circuits in mice were identified including two networks that displayed default mode network-like topography. Hierarchical clustering grouped these neural networks into meaningful larger functional circuits. These mouse resting state networks, which are publicly available, might serve as a reference for future work using mouse models of neurological disorders. PMID:26296501

  8. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM): Decoding MRI data for a tissue magnetic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    In MRI, the main magnetic field polarizes the electron cloud of a molecule, generating a chemical shift for observer protons within the molecule and a magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneity field for observer protons outside the molecule. The number of water protons surrounding a molecule for detecting its magnetic susceptibility is vastly greater than the number of protons within the molecule for detecting its chemical shift. However, the study of tissue magnetic susceptibility has been hindered by poor molecular specificities of hitherto used methods based on MRI signal phase and T2* contrast, which depend convolutedly on surrounding susceptibility sources. Deconvolution of the MRI signal phase can determine tissue susceptibility but is challenged by the lack of MRI signal in the background and by the zeroes in the dipole kernel. Recently, physically meaningful regularizations, including the Bayesian approach, have been developed to enable accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) for studying iron distribution, metabolic oxygen consumption, blood degradation, calcification, demyelination, and other pathophysiological susceptibility changes, as well as contrast agent biodistribution in MRI. This paper attempts to summarize the basic physical concepts and essential algorithmic steps in QSM, to describe clinical and technical issues under active development, and to provide references, codes, and testing data for readers interested in QSM. PMID:25044035

  9. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

    PubMed Central

    Fabri, Mara; Polonara, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC) has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and motor tasks. We reviewed our published and unpublished fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging data on the cortical representation of tactile, gustatory, auditory, and visual sensitivity and of motor activation, obtained in 36 normal volunteers and in 6 patients with partial callosotomy. Activation foci were consistently detected in discrete CC regions: anterior (taste stimuli), central (motor tasks), central and posterior (tactile stimuli), and splenium (auditory and visual stimuli). Reconstruction of callosal fibers connecting activated primary gustatory, motor, somatosensory, auditory, and visual cortices by diffusion tensor tracking showed bundles crossing, respectively, through the genu, anterior and posterior body, and splenium, at sites harboring fMRI foci. These data confirm that the CC commissure has a topographical organization and demonstrate that its functional topography can be explored with fMRI. PMID:23476810

  10. A Novel MRI-compatible Tactile Stimulator for Cortical Mapping of Foot Sole Pressure Stimuli with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ying; Manor, Brad; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Chai, Yufeng; Lipsitz, Lewis; Peng, Chung-Kang; Novak, Vera; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Foot sole somatosensory feedback is critical to motor control and declines with aging and disease. To enable study of cortical networks underlying foot sole somatosensation we developed a pneumatic tactile stimulator capable of producing 1-DOF oscillations with preset waveform, frequency (≤10 Hz), force magnitude (5-500 N), duty cycle (20%-100%) and contacted surface area over which pressures are applied to the foot sole. Image tests (anatomical/functional/field map) of a phantom demonstrated that the device is compatible with 3T MRI. GRE-EPI images of seven healthy young adults using a typical block-designed 1Hz sinusoidal stimulation protocol revealed significant activation contralaterally within the primary somatosensory cortex and paracentral gyrus, and bilaterally within the secondary somatosensory cortex. The stimulation system may therefore serve as a research tool to study functional brain networks involved in the perception and modulation of foot sole somatosensation and its relationship to motor control. PMID:22678849

  11. Head direction maps remain stable despite grid map fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.; Derdikman, Dori

    2012-01-01

    Areas encoding space in the brain contain both representations of position (place cells and grid cells) and representations of azimuth (head direction cells). Previous studies have already suggested that although grid cells and head direction cells reside in the same brain areas, the calculation of head direction is not dependent on the calculation of position. Here we demonstrate that realignment of grid cells does not affect head direction tuning. We analyzed head direction cell data collected while rats performed a foraging task in a multi-compartment environment (the hairpin maze) vs. an open-field environment, demonstrating that the tuning of head direction cells did not change when the environment was divided into multiple sub-compartments, in the hairpin maze. On the other hand, as we have shown previously (Derdikman et al., 2009), the hexagonal firing pattern expressed by grid cells in the open-field broke down into repeating patterns in similar alleys when rats traversed the multi-compartment hairpin maze. The grid-like firing of conjunctive cells, which express both grid properties and head direction properties in the open-field, showed a selective fragmentation of grid-like firing properties in the hairpin maze, while the head directionality property of the same cells remained unaltered. These findings demonstrate that head direction is not affected during the restructuring of grid cell firing fields as a rat actively moves between compartments, thus strengthening the claim that the head direction system is upstream from or parallel to the grid-place system. PMID:22479237

  12. Mapping resting-state functional connectivity using perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmut; Bodurka, Jerzy; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Jeff H.; Talagala, S. Lalith

    2008-01-01

    Resting-state, low frequency (< 0.08 Hz) fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal have been shown to exhibit high correlation among functionally connected regions. However, correlations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) fluctuations during the resting state have not been extensively studied. The main challenges of using arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging to detect CBF fluctuations are low sensitivity, low temporal resolution, and contamination from BOLD. This work demonstrates CBF-based quantitative functional connectivity mapping by combining continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) with a neck labeling coil and a multi-channel receiver coil to achieve high perfusion sensitivity. In order to reduce BOLD contamination, the CBF signal was extracted from the CASL signal time course by high frequency filtering. This processing strategy is compatible with sinc interpolation for reducing the timing mismatch between control and label images and has the flexibility of choosing an optimal filter cutoff frequency to minimize BOLD fluctuations. Most subjects studied showed high CBF correlation in bilateral sensorimotor areas with good suppression of BOLD contamination. Root-mean-square CBF fluctuation contributing to bilateral correlation was estimated to be 29% ± 19% (N = 13) of the baseline perfusion, while BOLD fluctuation was 0.26% ± 0.14% of the mean intensity (at 3T and 12.5 ms echo time). PMID:18314354

  13. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  14. Recovery of directed intracortical connectivity from fMRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Matthieu; Ritter, Petra; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-06-01

    The brain exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns of activity. In particular, its baseline activity at rest has a specific structure: imaging techniques (e.g., fMRI, EEG and MEG) show that cortical areas experience correlated fluctuations, which is referred to as functional connectivity (FC). The present study relies on our recently developed model in which intracortical white-matter connections shape noise-driven fluctuations to reproduce FC observed in experimental data (here fMRI BOLD signal). Here noise has a functional role and represents the variability of neural activity. The model also incorporates anatomical information obtained using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which estimates the density of white-matter fibers (structural connectivity, SC). After optimization to match empirical FC, the model provides an estimation of the efficacies of these fibers, which we call effective connectivity (EC). EC differs from SC, as EC not only accounts for the density of neural fibers, but also the concentration of synapses formed at their end, the type of neurotransmitters associated and the excitability of target neural populations. In summary, the model combines anatomical SC and activity FC to evaluate what drives the neural dynamics, embodied in EC. EC can then be analyzed using graph theory to understand how it generates FC and to seek for functional communities among cortical areas (parcellation of 68 areas). We find that intracortical connections are not symmetric, which affects the dynamic range of cortical activity (i.e., variety of states it can exhibit).

  15. Univalent harmonic mappings convex in one direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnusamy, S.; Kaliraj, A. Sairam

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a criterion for a harmonic function to be convex in one direction. Also, we discuss the class of harmonic functions starlike in one direction in the unit disk and obtain a method to construct univalent harmonic functions convex in one direction. Although the converse of classical Alexander's theorem for harmonic functions was proved to be false, we obtain a version of converse of it under a suitable additional condition.

  16. Pharmacogenomics: mapping monogenic mutations to direct therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Palmer

    2012-07-01

    The molecular mapping of mutations that underlie congenital disorders of monogenic origin can result in both a broader understanding of the molecular basis of the disorder and novel therapeutic insights. Indeed, genotyping patients and then replicating the behavior of the mutant gene products in well-defined biochemical or electrophysiological systems will allow tailoring of therapy to be mutation- and protein sequence-dependent. In this issue of the JCI, Shen and colleagues describe such an approach that identified novel mutations in the α subunit of the nicotinic receptor linked to myasthenia gravis. PMID:22728931

  17. Temperature dependence of relaxation times and temperature mapping in ultra-low-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-low-field MRI is an emerging technology that allows MRI and NMR measurements in microtesla-range fields. In this work, the possibilities of relaxation-based temperature measurements with ultra-low-field MRI were investigated by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times of agarose gel at 50 μT-52 mT and at temperatures 5-45 °C. Measurements with a 3 T scanner were made for comparison. The Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound relaxation theory was combined with a two-state model to explain the field-strength and temperature dependence of the data. The results show that the temperature dependencies of agarose gel T1 and T2 in the microtesla range differ drastically from those at 3 T; the effect of temperature on T1 is reversed at approximately 5 mT. The obtained results were used to reconstruct temperature maps from ultra-low-field scans. These time-dependent temperature maps measured from an agarose gel phantom at 50 μT reproduced the temperature gradient with good contrast.

  18. The impact of functional connectivity changes on support vector machines mapping of fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Sato, João Ricardo; Mourão-Miranda, Janaina; Morais Martin, Maria da Graça; Amaro, Edson; Morettin, Pedro Alberto; Brammer, Michael John

    2008-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently one of the most widely used methods for studying human brain function in vivo. Although many different approaches to fMRI analysis are available, the most widely used methods employ so called "mass-univariate" modeling of responses in a voxel-by-voxel fashion to construct activation maps. However, it is well known that many brain processes involve networks of interacting regions and for this reason multivariate analyses might seem to be attractive alternatives to univariate approaches. The current paper focuses on one multivariate application of statistical learning theory: the statistical discrimination maps (SDM) based on support vector machine, and seeks to establish some possible interpretations when the results differ from univariate approaches. In fact, when there are changes not only on the activation level of two conditions but also on functional connectivity, SDM seems more informative. We addressed this question using both simulations and applications to real data. We have shown that the combined use of univariate approaches and SDM yields significant new insights into brain activations not available using univariate methods alone. In the application to a visual working memory fMRI data, we demonstrated that the interaction among brain regions play a role in SDM's power to detect discriminative voxels. PMID:18499266

  19. Anatomically-adapted graph wavelets for improved group-level fMRI activation mapping.

    PubMed

    Behjat, Hamid; Leonardi, Nora; Sörnmo, Leif; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    A graph based framework for fMRI brain activation mapping is presented. The approach exploits the spectral graph wavelet transform (SGWT) for the purpose of defining an advanced multi-resolutional spatial transformation for fMRI data. The framework extends wavelet based SPM (WSPM), which is an alternative to the conventional approach of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), and is developed specifically for group-level analysis. We present a novel procedure for constructing brain graphs, with subgraphs that separately encode the structural connectivity of the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter (GM), and address the inter-subject GM variability by the use of template GM representations. Graph wavelets tailored to the convoluted boundaries of GM are then constructed as a means to implement a GM-based spatial transformation on fMRI data. The proposed approach is evaluated using real as well as semi-synthetic multi-subject data. Compared to SPM and WSPM using classical wavelets, the proposed approach shows superior type-I error control. The results on real data suggest a higher detection sensitivity as well as the capability to capture subtle, connected patterns of brain activity. PMID:26057594

  20. Extensive Cochleotopic Mapping of Human Auditory Cortical Fields Obtained with Phase-Encoding fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Amedi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The primary sensory cortices are characterized by a topographical mapping of basic sensory features which is considered to deteriorate in higher-order areas in favor of complex sensory features. Recently, however, retinotopic maps were also discovered in the higher-order visual, parietal and prefrontal cortices. The discovery of these maps enabled the distinction between visual regions, clarified their function and hierarchical processing. Could such extension of topographical mapping to high-order processing regions apply to the auditory modality as well? This question has been studied previously in animal models but only sporadically in humans, whose anatomical and functional organization may differ from that of animals (e.g. unique verbal functions and Heschl's gyrus curvature). Here we applied fMRI spectral analysis to investigate the cochleotopic organization of the human cerebral cortex. We found multiple mirror-symmetric novel cochleotopic maps covering most of the core and high-order human auditory cortex, including regions considered non-cochleotopic, stretching all the way to the superior temporal sulcus. These maps suggest that topographical mapping persists well beyond the auditory core and belt, and that the mirror-symmetry of topographical preferences may be a fundamental principle across sensory modalities. PMID:21448274

  1. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter? A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Gawryluk, Jodie R.; Mazerolle, Erin L.; D'Arcy, Ryan C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: (1) the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and (2) fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter) as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter). Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI. PMID:25152709

  2. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. > 20 ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter < 2 µm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1 – 5 ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter ~ 1.27 – 5.54 µm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (< 2.5 µm). This study establishes a framework for quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons. PMID:25225002

  3. Mapping brain networks in awake mice using combined optical neural control and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Kahn, I; Knoblich, U; Bernstein, J; Atallah, H; Yang, A; Kopell, N; Buckner, R L; Graybiel, A M; Moore, C I; Boyden, E S

    2011-03-01

    Behaviors and brain disorders involve neural circuits that are widely distributed in the brain. The ability to map the functional connectivity of distributed circuits, and to assess how this connectivity evolves over time, will be facilitated by methods for characterizing the network impact of activating a specific subcircuit, cell type, or projection pathway. We describe here an approach using high-resolution blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) of the awake mouse brain-to measure the distributed BOLD response evoked by optical activation of a local, defined cell class expressing the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). The utility of this opto-fMRI approach was explored by identifying known cortical and subcortical targets of pyramidal cells of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and by analyzing how the set of regions recruited by optogenetically driven SI activity differs between the awake and anesthetized states. Results showed positive BOLD responses in a distributed network that included secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), primary motor cortex (MI), caudoputamen (CP), and contralateral SI (c-SI). Measures in awake compared with anesthetized mice (0.7% isoflurane) showed significantly increased BOLD response in the local region (SI) and indirectly stimulated regions (SII, MI, CP, and c-SI), as well as increased BOLD signal temporal correlations between pairs of regions. These collective results suggest opto-fMRI can provide a controlled means for characterizing the distributed network downstream of a defined cell class in the awake brain. Opto-fMRI may find use in examining causal links between defined circuit elements in diverse behaviors and pathologies. PMID:21160013

  4. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM): Decoding MRI data for a tissue magnetic biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    In MRI, the main magnetic field polarizes the electron cloud of a molecule, generating a chemical shift for observer protons within the molecule and a magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneity field for observer protons outside the molecule. The number of water protons surrounding a molecule for detecting its magnetic susceptibility is vastly greater than the number of protons within the molecule for detecting its chemical shift. However, the study of tissue magnetic susceptibility has been hindered by poor molecular specificities of hitherto used methods based on MRI signal phase and T2* contrast, which depend convolutedly on surrounding susceptibility sources. Deconvolution of the MRI signal phase can determine tissue susceptibility but is challenged by the lack of MRI signal in the background and by the zeroes in the dipole kernel. Recently, physically meaningful regularizations, including the Bayesian approach, have been developed to enable accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) for studying iron distribution, metabolic oxygen consumption, blood degradation, calcification, demyelination, and other pathophysiological susceptibility changes, as well as contrast agent biodistribution in MRI. This paper attempts to summarize the basic physical concepts and essential algorithmic steps in QSM, to describe clinical and technical issues under active development, and to provide references, codes, and testing data for readers interested in QSM. Magn Reson Med 73:82–101, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:25044035

  5. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26968145

  6. Mapping human preictal and ictal haemodynamic networks using simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Umair J.; Centeno, Maria; Thornton, Rachel C.; Rodionov, Roman; Vulliemoz, Serge; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Diehl, Beate; Walker, Matthew C.; Duncan, John S.; Carmichael, David W.; Lemieux, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Accurately characterising the brain networks involved in seizure activity may have important implications for our understanding of epilepsy. Intracranial EEG-fMRI can be used to capture focal epileptic events in humans with exquisite electrophysiological sensitivity and allows for identification of brain structures involved in this phenomenon over the entire brain. We investigated ictal BOLD networks using the simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI (icEEG-fMRI) in a 30 year-old male undergoing invasive presurgical evaluation with bilateral depth electrode implantations in amygdalae and hippocampi for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. One spontaneous focal electrographic seizure was recorded. The aims of the data analysis were firstly to map BOLD changes related to the ictal activity identified on icEEG and secondly to compare different fMRI modelling approaches. Visual inspection of the icEEG showed an onset dominated by beta activity involving the right amygdala and hippocampus lasting 6.4 s (ictal onset phase), followed by gamma activity bilaterally lasting 14.8 s (late ictal phase). The fMRI data was analysed using SPM8 using two modelling approaches: firstly, purely based on the visually identified phases of the seizure and secondly, based on EEG spectral dynamics quantification. For the visual approach the two ictal phases were modelled as ‘ON’ blocks convolved with the haemodynamic response function; in addition the BOLD changes during the 30 s preceding the onset were modelled using a flexible basis set. For the quantitative fMRI modelling approach two models were evaluated: one consisting of the variations in beta and gamma bands power, thereby adding a quantitative element to the visually-derived models, and another based on principal components analysis of the entire spectrogram in attempt to reduce the bias associated with the visual appreciation of the icEEG. BOLD changes related to the visually defined ictal onset phase were revealed in the medial

  7. Direct Mapping of Hippocampal Surfaces with Intrinsic Shape Context

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Rose, Stephen E.; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: 1) it has the advantage of being automatic; 2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results about temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  8. Direct mapping of hippocampal surfaces with intrinsic shape context.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Rose, Stephen E; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-09-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: (1) it has the advantage of being automatic; (2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer's disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results on temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  9. A direct modulated optical link for MRI RF receive coil interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Wei, Juan; Shen, G. X.

    2007-11-01

    Optical glass fiber is a promising alternative to traditional coaxial cables for MRI RF receive coil interconnection to avoid any crosstalk and electromagnetic interference between multiple channels. A direct modulated optical link is proposed for MRI coil interconnection in this paper. The link performances of power gain, frequency response and dynamic range are measured. Phantom and in vivo human head images have been demonstrated by the connection of this direct modulated optical link to a head coil on a 0.3 T MRI scanner for the first time. Comparable image qualities to coaxial cable link verify the feasibility of using the optical link for imaging with minor modification on the existing scanners. This optical link could also be easily extended for multi-channel array interconnections at high field of 1.5 T.

  10. Decoding the subjective rotation direction of the spinning dancer from fMRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, SuTao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, JiaCai

    2015-03-01

    A challenging goal in neuroscience is to decode the mental states from brain activity. Recently, researchers have successfully deciphered the objective and static visual stimuli (such as orientation of stripes and category of objects) from brain activity recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology. However, few studies focused on the decoding of the rotation direction perception of the actual three-dimensional world with two-dimensional representations. In this study, the brain activities when subjects viewed the animation of the spinning dancer in the front were recorded using fMRI, and subjects reported the viewing-from-bottom motion direction (clockwise or counterclockwise) by press different buttons. One multivariate pattern analysis method, support vector machine was trained to predict the rotation direction. The 5-fold cross-validation result showed that the subjective rotation direction reported by the subjects can be predicted from fMRI with a possibility above the chance level, which imply that fMRI activity of the brain contains detailed rotation direction information that can reliably predict the subjective perception.

  11. Statistical mapping of sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain using Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Zou, Jing; Babb, James S; Johnson, Glyn; Sanes, Dan H; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been developed to image brain activity in small animals, including normal and genetically modified mice. Here, we report the use of a MEMRI-based statistical parametric mapping method to analyze sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain, the inferior colliculus (IC). Acoustic stimuli with defined frequency and amplitude components were shown to activate and enhance neuronal ensembles in the IC. These IC activity patterns were analyzed quantitatively using voxel-based statistical comparisons between groups of mice with or without sound stimulation. Repetitive 40-kHz pure tone stimulation significantly enhanced ventral IC regions, which was confirmed in the statistical maps showing active regions whose volumes increased in direct proportion to the amplitude of the sound stimuli (65 dB, 77 dB, and 89 dB peak sound pressure level). The peak values of the activity-dependent MEMRI signal enhancement also increased from 7% to 20% for the sound amplitudes employed. These results demonstrate that MEMRI statistical mapping can be used to analyze both the 3D spatial patterns and the magnitude of activity evoked by sound stimuli carrying different energy. This represents a significant advance in the development of MEMRI for quantitative and unbiased analysis of brain function in the deep brain nuclei of mice. PMID:17919926

  12. Two-dimensional T 2 distribution mapping in porous solids with phase encode MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2011-09-01

    Two pure phase encode MRI sequences, CPMG-prepared SPRITE and spin-echo SPI with compressed sensing, for two-dimensional (2-D) T2 distribution mapping have been presented. The sequences are 2-D extensions of their 1-D predecessors previously described and are intended for studying processes in porous solids and other samples with short relaxation times whenever 2-D T2 maps are preferable to simple 1-D profiling. The sequences were tested on model samples and natural water-saturated rocks, in a low field MRI instrument. 2-D spin-echo SPI and CPMG-SPRITE demonstrate a similar performance, enabling measurement of T2 down to 1-2 ms. Both experiments are time consuming (up to 2-2.5 h sample dependent). As such, they can be recommended mostly for measurement during steady state conditions or when studying relatively slow dynamic processes (e.g. enhanced oil recovery, cement paste hydration, curing rubber, infiltration of paramagnetic ions).

  13. Two-dimensional T2 distribution mapping in porous solids with phase encode MRI.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Oleg V; Balcom, Bruce J

    2011-09-01

    Two pure phase encode MRI sequences, CPMG-prepared SPRITE and spin-echo SPI with compressed sensing, for two-dimensional (2-D) T2 distribution mapping have been presented. The sequences are 2-D extensions of their 1-D predecessors previously described and are intended for studying processes in porous solids and other samples with short relaxation times whenever 2-D T2 maps are preferable to simple 1-D profiling. The sequences were tested on model samples and natural water-saturated rocks, in a low field MRI instrument. 2-D spin-echo SPI and CPMG-SPRITE demonstrate a similar performance, enabling measurement of T2 down to 1-2 ms. Both experiments are time consuming (up to 2-2.5 h sample dependent). As such, they can be recommended mostly for measurement during steady state conditions or when studying relatively slow dynamic processes (e.g. enhanced oil recovery, cement paste hydration, curing rubber, infiltration of paramagnetic ions). PMID:21757381

  14. Functional MRI mapping of dynamic visual features during natural viewing in the macaque.

    PubMed

    Russ, Brian E; Leopold, David A

    2015-04-01

    The ventral visual pathway of the primate brain is specialized to respond to stimuli in certain categories, such as the well-studied face selective patches in the macaque inferotemporal cortex. To what extent does response selectivity determined using brief presentations of isolated stimuli predict activity during the free viewing of a natural, dynamic scene, where features are superimposed in space and time? To approach this question, we obtained fMRI activity from the brains of three macaques viewing extended video clips containing a range of social and nonsocial content and compared the fMRI time courses to a family of feature models derived from the movie content. Starting with more than two dozen feature models extracted from each movie, we created functional maps based on features whose time courses were nearly orthogonal, focusing primarily on faces, motion content, and contrast level. Activity mapping using the face feature model readily yielded functional regions closely resembling face patches obtained using a block design in the same animals. Overall, the motion feature model dominated responses in nearly all visually driven areas, including the face patches as well as ventral visual areas V4, TEO, and TE. Control experiments presenting dynamic movies, whose content was free of animals, demonstrated that biological movement critically contributed to the predominance of motion in fMRI responses. These results highlight the value of natural viewing paradigms for studying the brain's functional organization and also underscore the paramount contribution of magnocellular input to the ventral visual pathway during natural vision. PMID:25579448

  15. Functional MRI mapping of dynamic visual features during natural viewing in the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Brian E.; Leopold, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ventral visual pathway of the primate brain is specialized to respond to stimuli in certain categories, such as the well-studied face selective patches in the macaque inferotemporal cortex. To what extent does response selectivity determined using brief presentations of isolated stimuli predict activity during the free viewing of a natural, dynamic scene, where features are superimposed in space and time? To approach this question, we obtained fMRI activity from the brains of three macaques viewing extended video clips containing a range of social and nonsocial content and compared the fMRI time courses to a family of feature models derived from the movie content. Starting with more than two dozen feature models extracted from each movie, we created functional maps based on features whose time courses were nearly orthogonal, focusing primarily on faces, motion content, and contrast level. Activity mapping using the face feature model readily yielded functional regions closely resembling face patches obtained using a block design in the same animals. Overall, the motion feature model dominated responses in nearly all visually driven areas, including the face patches as well as ventral visual areas V4, TEO, and TE. Control experiments presenting dynamic movies, whose content was free of animals, demonstrated that biological movement critically contributed to the predominance of motion in fMRI responses. These results highlight the value of natural viewing paradigms for studying the brain’s functional organization and also underscore the paramount contribution of magnocellular input to the ventral visual pathway during natural vision. PMID:25579448

  16. Direct and fast detection of neuronal activation in the human brain with diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Le Bihan, Denis; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Hanakawa, Takashi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2006-01-01

    Using MRI, we found that a slowly diffusing water pool was expanding (1.7 ± 0.3%) upon activation on the human visual cortex at the detriment of a faster diffusing pool. The time course of this water phase transition preceded the activation-triggered vascular response detected by usual functional MRI by several seconds. The observed changes in water diffusion likely reflect early biophysical events that take place in the activated cells, such as cell swelling and membrane expansion. Although the exact mechanisms remain to clarify, access to such an early and direct physiological marker of cortical activation with MRI will provide opportunities for functional neuroimaging of the human brain. PMID:16702549

  17. Segmentation of fat in MRI using a preparatory pair of rectangular RF pulses of opposite direction.

    PubMed

    Yee, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    A radiofrequency (RF) pulse-based MRI method is introduced as a novel fat (or water) segmentation method that, unlike the mostly used Dixon's method, does not depend on the echo times. A pair of rectangular RF pulses of opposite direction, when the duration of its rectangular pulse and the off-resonance of its carrier frequency are set to specific values, is proposed as a preparatory RF pulse to be used for the quantitative fat segmentation. The optimal duration of its rectangular pulse and its specific off-resonance were first determined theoretically. Then, such pair of rectangular pulses of opposite direction (PROD pulse) was applied in imaging a few phantoms and volunteers. During the imaging experiments, MRI images were dynamically acquired with the PROD pulse while its carrier frequency was varied in a predefined off-resonance range. By analyzing the dynamically acquired signal changes, the theoretical properties of the PROD pulse were confirmed and the utility of the PROD pulse for the fat segmentation was verified. All MRI scans were performed in a clinical 3T system. The PROD pulse, if the duration of each rectangular pulse was set to 1.66ms and its carrier frequency was set to a specific off-resonance (e.g. ±223.5Hz, or -670.5Hz) in 3T, was effective in optimally modulating MRI signals to be used for the fat-water segmentation. Therefore, the PROD pulse can successfully be used as a preparatory RF pulse in MRI to achieve effective fat (or water) segmentation in MRI. PMID:26612077

  18. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/.

  19. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. PMID:25261742

  20. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) Using 23Na and Proton MRI

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/hour concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/ PMID:25261742

  1. Accelerating patch-based directional wavelets with multicore parallel computing in compressed sensing MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyue; Qu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yunsong; Guo, Di; Lai, Zongying; Ye, Jing; Chen, Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Compressed sensing MRI (CS-MRI) is a promising technology to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. Both improving the image quality and reducing the computation time are important for this technology. Recently, a patch-based directional wavelet (PBDW) has been applied in CS-MRI to improve edge reconstruction. However, this method is time consuming since it involves extensive computations, including geometric direction estimation and numerous iterations of wavelet transform. To accelerate computations of PBDW, we propose a general parallelization of patch-based processing by taking the advantage of multicore processors. Additionally, two pertinent optimizations, excluding smooth patches and pre-arranged insertion sort, that make use of sparsity in MR images are also proposed. Simulation results demonstrate that the acceleration factor with the parallel architecture of PBDW approaches the number of central processing unit cores, and that pertinent optimizations are also effective to make further accelerations. The proposed approaches allow compressed sensing MRI reconstruction to be accomplished within several seconds. PMID:25620521

  2. Multiclass fMRI data decoding and visualization using supervised self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Hausfeld, Lars; Valente, Giancarlo; Formisano, Elia

    2014-08-01

    When multivariate pattern decoding is applied to fMRI studies entailing more than two experimental conditions, a most common approach is to transform the multiclass classification problem into a series of binary problems. Furthermore, for decoding analyses, classification accuracy is often the only outcome reported although the topology of activation patterns in the high-dimensional features space may provide additional insights into underlying brain representations. Here we propose to decode and visualize voxel patterns of fMRI datasets consisting of multiple conditions with a supervised variant of self-organizing maps (SSOMs). Using simulations and real fMRI data, we evaluated the performance of our SSOM-based approach. Specifically, the analysis of simulated fMRI data with varying signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio suggested that SSOMs perform better than a k-nearest-neighbor classifier for medium and large numbers of features (i.e. 250 to 1000 or more voxels) and similar to support vector machines (SVMs) for small and medium numbers of features (i.e. 100 to 600voxels). However, for a larger number of features (>800voxels), SSOMs performed worse than SVMs. When applied to a challenging 3-class fMRI classification problem with datasets collected to examine the neural representation of three human voices at individual speaker level, the SSOM-based algorithm was able to decode speaker identity from auditory cortical activation patterns. Classification performances were similar between SSOMs and other decoding algorithms; however, the ability to visualize decoding models and underlying data topology of SSOMs promotes a more comprehensive understanding of classification outcomes. We further illustrated this visualization ability of SSOMs with a re-analysis of a dataset examining the representation of visual categories in the ventral visual cortex (Haxby et al., 2001). This analysis showed that SSOMs could retrieve and visualize topography and neighborhood

  3. Probing neuronal activation by functional quantitative susceptibility mapping under a visual paradigm: A group level comparison with BOLD fMRI and PET.

    PubMed

    Özbay, Pinar Senay; Warnock, Geoffrey; Rossi, Cristina; Kuhn, Felix; Akin, Burak; Pruessmann, Klaas Paul; Nanz, Daniel

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic changes of brain-tissue magnetic susceptibility provide the basis for functional MR imaging (fMRI) via T2*-weighted signal-intensity modulations. Promising initial work on a detection of neuronal activity via quantitative susceptibility mapping (fQSM) has been published but consistently reported on ill-understood positive and negative activation patterns (Balla et al., 2014; Chen and Calhoun, 2015a). We set out to (i) demonstrate that fQSM can exploit established fMRI data acquisition and processing methods and to (ii) better describe aspects of the apparent activation patterns using fMRI and PET as standards of reference. Under a standardized visual-stimulation paradigm PET and 3-T gradient-echo EPI-based fQSM, fMRI data from 9 healthy volunteers were acquired and analyzed by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) at subject level and, for the first time, at group level. Numbers of activated (z-score>2.0) voxels were counted and their mean z-scores calculated in volumes of interest (occipital lobe (Nocc_lobe), segmented occipital gray-matter (NGM_occ_lobe), large veins (Nveins)), and in occipital-lobe voxels commonly activated in fQSM and fMRI component maps. Common but not entirely congruent regions of apparent activation were found in the occipital lobe in z-score maps from all modalities, fQSM, fMRI and PET, with distinct BOLD-negatively correlated regions in fQSM data. At subject-level, Nocc_lobe, NGM_occ_lobe and their mean z-scores were significantly smaller in fQSM than in fMRI, but their ratio, NGM_occ_lobe/Nocc_lobe, was comparable. Nveins did not statistically differ and the ratio Nveins/NGM_occ_lobe as well as the mean z-scores were higher for fQSM than for fMRI. In veins and immediate vicinity, z-score maps derived from both phase and fQSM-data showed positive and negative lobes resembling dipole shapes in simulated field and phase maps with no correlate in fMRI or PET data. Our results show that standard fMRI tools can directly be used

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  5. Radiomic Texture Analysis Mapping Predicts Areas of True Functional MRI Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Islam; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Bakhtiari, Ali Shojaee; Thomas, Ginu A.; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Kumar, Ashok J.; Sawaya, Raymond; Luedi, Markus M.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Colen, Rivka R.

    2016-01-01

    Individual analysis of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans requires user-adjustment of the statistical threshold in order to maximize true functional activity and eliminate false positives. In this study, we propose a novel technique that uses radiomic texture analysis (TA) features associated with heterogeneity to predict areas of true functional activity. Scans of 15 right-handed healthy volunteers were analyzed using SPM8. The resulting functional maps were thresholded to optimize visualization of language areas, resulting in 116 regions of interests (ROIs). A board-certified neuroradiologist classified different ROIs into Expected (E) and Non-Expected (NE) based on their anatomical locations. TA was performed using the mean Echo-Planner Imaging (EPI) volume, and 20 rotation-invariant texture features were obtained for each ROI. Using forward stepwise logistic regression, we built a predictive model that discriminated between E and NE areas of functional activity, with a cross-validation AUC and success rate of 79.84% and 80.19% respectively (specificity/sensitivity of 78.34%/82.61%). This study found that radiomic TA of fMRI scans may allow for determination of areas of true functional activity, and thus eliminate clinician bias. PMID:27151623

  6. Creating probabilistic maps of the face network in the adolescent brain: a multicentre functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Amir M; Artiges, Eric; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bruehl, Ruediger; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Gallinat, Jürgen; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Loth, Eva; Mareckova, Klara; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Paus, Tomáš

    2012-04-01

    Large-scale magnetic resonance (MR) studies of the human brain offer unique opportunities for identifying genetic and environmental factors shaping the human brain. Here, we describe a dataset collected in the context of a multi-centre study of the adolescent brain, namely the IMAGEN Study. We focus on one of the functional paradigms included in the project to probe the brain network underlying processing of ambiguous and angry faces. Using functional MR (fMRI) data collected in 1,110 adolescents, we constructed probabilistic maps of the neural network engaged consistently while viewing the ambiguous or angry faces; 21 brain regions responding to faces with high probability were identified. We were also able to address several methodological issues, including the minimal sample size yielding a stable location of a test region, namely the fusiform face area (FFA), as well as the effect of acquisition site (eight sites) and scanner (four manufacturers) on the location and magnitude of the fMRI response to faces in the FFA. Finally, we provided a comparison between male and female adolescents in terms of the effect sizes of sex differences in brain response to the ambiguous and angry faces in the 21 regions of interest. Overall, we found a stronger neural response to the ambiguous faces in several cortical regions, including the fusiform face area, in female (vs. male) adolescents, and a slightly stronger response to the angry faces in the amygdala of male (vs. female) adolescents. PMID:21416563

  7. Evaluations of Tumor Acidosis Within In Vivo Tumor Models Using Parametric Maps Generated with AcidoCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Randtke, Edward A.; Jones, Kyle M.; Moon, Brianna F.; Howison, Christine M.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to develop pixelwise maps of tumor acidosis to aid in evaluating extracellular tumor pH (pHe) in cancer biology. Procedures MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mouse models were imaged during a longitudinal study. AcidoCEST MRI and a series of image processing methods were used to produce parametric maps of tumor pHe, and tumor pHe was also measured with a pH microsensor. Results Sufficient contrast-to-noise for producing pHe maps was achieved by using standard image processing methods. A comparison of pHe values measured with acidoCEST MRI and a pH microsensor showed that acidoCEST MRI measured tumor pHe with an accuracy of 0.034 pH units. The MCF-7 tumor model was found to be more acidic compared to the MDA-MB-231 tumor model. The pHe was not related to tumor size during the longitudinal study. Conclusions These results show that acidoCEST MRI can create pixelwise tumor pHe maps of mouse models of cancer. PMID:25622809

  8. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  9. Detecting directional influence in fMRI connectivity analysis using PCA based Granger causality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Ding, Mingzhou; Chen, Yonghong; Wright, Paul; Lu, Zuhong; Liu, Yijun

    2009-01-01

    A fMRI connectivity analysis approach combining both principal component analysis (PCA) and Granger causality method (GCM) is proposed to study directional influence between functional brain regions. Both simulated data and human fMRI data obtained during behavioral tasks were used to validate this method. If PCA is first used to reduce number of fMRI time series, then more energy and information features in the signal can be preserved than using averaged values from brain regions of interest. Subsequently, GCM can be applied to principal components extracted in order to further investigate effective connectivity. The simulation demonstrated that by using GCM with PCA, between-region causalities were better represented than using GCM with average values. Furthermore, after localizing an emotion task-induced activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, inferior frontal sulcus and amygdala, the directional influences among these brain regions were resolved using our new approach. These results indicate that using PCA may improve upon application of existing GCMs in study of human brain effective connectivity. PMID:19595679

  10. Direction of movement effects under transformed visual/motor mappings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. A.; Pavel, M.

    1989-01-01

    Performance in a discrete aiming task was compared under several transformed visual/motor mappings: rotations by 45, 90, 135, and 180 deg and reflections about the horizontal and the vertical midlines. Eight aiming targets were used, corresponding to eight directions of movement: up, down, right, left, up-right, down-left, up-left, and down-right. Direction of movements were characterized in terms of separable visual and motor components, and two kinds of direction of movement effects were considered. First, a direction of movement effect paralleling that seen in rapid aiming under the usual nontransformed mapping. Second, because rotations, but not reflections, are physically realizable 2-D transformations, a visual/motor control system which is sensitive to physical constraints should perform reflections, but not rotations, in a piecemeal fashion. Results supported the hypothesis that a motor factor having to do with complexity of limb movement accounts for differences in movement accuracy between right and left oblique directions. Direction of movement effects were more evident in reflections than in rotations, and were consistent with the hypothesis that the visual/motor-control system seeks a physically realizable 2-D rotation solution to reflections. Results also suggested that reversal of two orthogonal basis dimensions is far less difficult than reversing only one and leaving the other intact.

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for direct labeling of stem cells and in vivo MRI tracking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saejeong J; Lewis, Bobbi; Steiner, Mark-Steven; Bissa, Ursula V; Dose, Christian; Frank, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    To develop effective stem cell therapies, it is important to track therapeutic cells non-invasively and monitor homing to areas of pathology. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate the labeling efficiency of commercially available dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, FeraTrack Direct (FTD), in various stem and immune cells; assess the cytotoxicity and tolerability of the FTD in stem cells; and monitor stem cell homing using FTD-labeled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) in a tumor model by in vivo MRI. BMSCs, NSCs, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), T-lymphocytes, and monocytes were labeled effectively with FTD without the need for transfection agents, and Prussian blue (PB) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed intracellular uptake of the agent. The viability, proliferation, and functionality of the labeled cells were minimally or not affected after labeling. When 10(6) FTD-labeled BMSCs or NSCs were injected into C6 glioma bearing nude mice, the cells homing to the tumors were detected as hypointense regions within the tumor using 3 T clinical MRI up to 10 days post injection. Histological analysis confirmed the homing of injected cells to the tumor by the presence of PB positive cells that are not macrophages. Labeling of stem cells or immune cells with FTD was non-toxic, and should facilitate the translation of this agent to clinical trials for evaluation of trafficking of cells by MRI. PMID:26234504

  12. Directional patterns of cross frequency phase and amplitude coupling within the resting state mimic patterns of fMRI functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Kurt E; Wander, Jeremiah D; Ko, Andrew L; Casimo, Kaitlyn; Grabowski, Thomas J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Darvas, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Functional imaging investigations into the brain's resting state interactions have yielded a wealth of insight into the intrinsic and dynamic neural architecture supporting cognition and behavior. Electrophysiological studies however have highlighted the fact that synchrony across large-scale cortical systems is composed of spontaneous interactions occurring at timescales beyond the traditional resolution of fMRI, a feature that limits the capacity of fMRI to draw inference on the true directional relationship between network nodes. To approach the question of directionality in resting state signals, we recorded resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) and electrocorticography (ECoG) from four human subjects undergoing invasive epilepsy monitoring. Using a seed-point based approach, we employed phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) and biPhase Locking Values (bPLV), two measures of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) to explore both outgoing and incoming connections between the seed and all non-seed, site electrodes. We observed robust PAC between a wide range of low-frequency phase and high frequency amplitude estimates. However, significant bPLV, a CFC measure of phase-phase synchrony, was only observed at specific narrow low and high frequency bandwidths. Furthermore, the spatial patterns of outgoing PAC connectivity were most closely associated with the rsfMRI connectivity maps. Our results support the hypothesis that PAC is relatively ubiquitous phenomenon serving as a mechanism for coordinating high-frequency amplitudes across distant neuronal assemblies even in absence of overt task structure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the spatial distribution of a seed-point rsfMRI sensorimotor network is strikingly similar to specific patterns of directional PAC. Specifically, the high frequency activities of distal patches of cortex owning membership in a rsfMRI sensorimotor network were most likely to be entrained to the phase of a low frequency rhythm engendered from the

  13. Mapping somatosensory connectivity in adult mice using diffusion MRI tractography and super-resolution track density imaging.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kay; Calamante, Fernando; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Sadeghian, Farnoosh; Retchford, Alexander R; Jones, Gabriel Davis; Reid, Christopher A; Reutens, David C; Ordidge, Roger; Connelly, Alan; Petrou, Steven

    2014-11-15

    In this study we combined ultra-high field diffusion MRI fiber tracking and super-resolution track density imaging (TDI) to map the relay locations and connectivity of the somatosensory pathway in paraformaldehyde fixed, C57Bl/6J mouse brains. Super-resolution TDI was used to achieve 20 μm isotropic resolution to inform the 3D topography of the relay locations including thalamic barreloids and brainstem barrelettes, not described previously using MRI methodology. TDI-guided mapping results for thalamo-cortical connectivity were consistent with thalamo-cortical projections labeled using virus mediated fluorescent protein expression. Trigemino-thalamic TDI connectivity maps were concordant with results obtained using anterograde dye tracing from brainstem to thalamus. Importantly, TDI mapping overcame the constraint of tissue distortion observed in mechanically sectioned tissue, enabling 3D reconstruction and long-range connectivity data. In conclusion, our results showed that diffusion micro-imaging at ultra-high field MRI revealed the stereotypical pattern of somatosensory connectivity and is a valuable tool to complement histologic methods, achieving 3D spatial preservation of whole brain networks for characterization in mouse models of human disease. PMID:25087481

  14. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  15. Mapping average axon diameters in porcine spinal cord white matter and rat corpus callosum using d-PFG MRI

    PubMed Central

    Komlosh, M.E.; Özarslan, E.; Lizak, M. J.; Horkayne-Szakaly, I.; Freidlin, R. Z.; Horkay, F.; Basser, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of microstructural features of nerve fascicles, such as axon diameter, is crucial for understanding normal function in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as assessing changes due to pathologies. In this study double-pulsed field gradient (d-PFG) filtered MRI was used to map the average axon diameter (AAD) in porcine spinal cord, which was then compared to AADs measured with optical microscopy of the same specimen, as a way to further validate this MRI method. A novel 3D acquisition scheme was then used to obtain AADs in each voxel of a coronal slice of rat brain corpus callosum. AAD measurements were also acquired using optical microscopy performed on histological sections and validated using a novel MRI glass capillary array phantom. PMID:23583426

  16. Direct shear mapping - a new weak lensing tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Burgh-Day, C. O.; Taylor, E. N.; Webster, R. L.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new technique called direct shear mapping (DSM) to measure gravitational lensing shear directly from observations of a single background source. The technique assumes the velocity map of an unlensed, stably rotating galaxy will be rotationally symmetric. Lensing distorts the velocity map making it asymmetric. The degree of lensing can be inferred by determining the transformation required to restore axisymmetry. This technique is in contrast to traditional weak lensing methods, which require averaging an ensemble of background galaxy ellipticity measurements, to obtain a single shear measurement. We have tested the efficacy of our fitting algorithm with a suite of systematic tests on simulated data. We demonstrate that we are in principle able to measure shears as small as 0.01. In practice, we have fitted for the shear in very low redshift (and hence unlensed) velocity maps, and have obtained null result with an error of ±0.01. This high-sensitivity results from analysing spatially resolved spectroscopic images (i.e. 3D data cubes), including not just shape information (as in traditional weak lensing measurements) but velocity information as well. Spirals and rotating ellipticals are ideal targets for this new technique. Data from any large Integral Field Unit (IFU) or radio telescope is suitable, or indeed any instrument with spatially resolved spectroscopy such as the Sydney-Australian-Astronomical Observatory Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph (SAMI), the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  17. fMRI brain mapping during motion capture and FES induced motor tasks: signal to noise ratio assessment.

    PubMed

    Gandolla, Marta; Ferrante, Simona; Casellato, Claudia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco; Martegani, Alberto; Frattini, Tiziano; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-10-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a well known clinical rehabilitation procedure, however the neural mechanisms that underlie this treatment at Central Nervous System (CNS) level are still not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a suitable tool to investigate effects of rehabilitative treatments on brain plasticity. Moreover, monitoring the effective executed movement is needed to correctly interpret activation maps, most of all in neurological patients where required motor tasks could be only partially accomplished. The proposed experimental set-up includes a 1.5 T fMRI scanner, a motion capture system to acquire kinematic data, and an electro-stimulation device. The introduction of metallic devices and of stimulation current in the MRI room could affect fMRI acquisitions so as to prevent a reliable activation maps analysis. What we are interested in is that the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal, marker of neural activity, could be detected within a given experimental condition and set-up. In this paper we assess temporal Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) as image quality index. BOLD signal change is about 1-2% as revealed by a 1.5 T scanner. This work demonstrates that, with this innovative set-up, in the main cortical sensorimotor regions 1% BOLD signal change can be detected at least in the 93% of the sub-volumes, and almost 100% of the sub-volumes are suitable for 2% signal change detection. The integrated experimental set-up will therefore allows to detect FES induced movements fMRI maps simultaneously with kinematic acquisitions so as to investigate FES-based rehabilitation treatments contribution at CNS level. PMID:21550290

  18. Implementation of a semi-automated post-processing system for parametric MRI mapping of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert E; Welch, E Brian; Cobb, Jared G; Sinha, Tuhin; Gore, John C; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2009-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations of breast cancer incorporate computationally intense techniques to develop parametric maps of pathophysiological tissue characteristics. Common approaches employ, for example, quantitative measurements of T (1), the apparent diffusion coefficient, and kinetic modeling based on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). In this paper, an integrated medical image post-processing and archive system (MIPAS) is presented. MIPAS demonstrates how image post-processing and user interface programs, written in the interactive data language (IDL) programming language with data storage provided by a Microsoft Access database, and the file system can reduce turnaround time for creating MRI parametric maps and provide additional organization for clinical trials. The results of developing the MIPAS are discussed including potential limitations of the use of IDL for the application framework and how the MIPAS design supports extension to other programming languages and imaging modalities. We also show that network storage of images and metadata has a significant (p < 0.05) increase in data retrieval time compared to collocated storage. The system shows promise for becoming both a robust research picture archival and communications system working with the standard hospital PACS and an image post-processing environment that extends to other medical image modalities. PMID:18446412

  19. Statistical modeling and MAP estimation for body fat quantification with MRI ratio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wilbur C. K.; Johnson, David H.; Wilson, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We are developing small animal imaging techniques to characterize the kinetics of lipid accumulation/reduction of fat depots in response to genetic/dietary factors associated with obesity and metabolic syndromes. Recently, we developed an MR ratio imaging technique that approximately yields lipid/{lipid + water}. In this work, we develop a statistical model for the ratio distribution that explicitly includes a partial volume (PV) fraction of fat and a mixture of a Rician and multiple Gaussians. Monte Carlo hypothesis testing showed that our model was valid over a wide range of coefficient of variation of the denominator distribution (c.v.: 0-0:20) and correlation coefficient among the numerator and denominator (ρ 0-0.95), which cover the typical values that we found in MRI data sets (c.v.: 0:027-0:063, ρ: 0:50-0:75). Then a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate for the fat percentage per voxel is proposed. Using a digital phantom with many PV voxels, we found that ratio values were not linearly related to PV fat content and that our method accurately described the histogram. In addition, the new method estimated the ground truth within +1.6% vs. +43% for an approach using an uncorrected ratio image, when we simply threshold the ratio image. On the six genetically obese rat data sets, the MAP estimate gave total fat volumes of 279 +/- 45mL, values 21% smaller than those from the uncorrected ratio images, principally due to the non-linear PV effect. We conclude that our algorithm can increase the accuracy of fat volume quantification even in regions having many PV voxels, e.g. ectopic fat depots.

  20. Vascular Origins of BOLD and CBV fMRI Signals: Statistical Mapping and Histological Sections Compared.

    PubMed

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Mayhew, John E; Redgrave, Peter; Berwick, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of 3T blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) activation maps to histological sections enables the spatial discrimination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal changes into different vascular compartments. We use a standard gradient echo-echo planar imaging technique to measure BOLD signal changes in the somatosensory cortex in response to whisker stimulation. Corresponding changes in CBV were estimated following the infusion of a super-paramagnetic contrast agent. We imaged in a tangential imaging plane that covered the cortical surface. Images were associated with post mortem histological sections showing both the surface vasculature and cytochrome oxidase stained whisker barrel cortex. We found a significant BOLD signal change in the large draining veins which occurred in the absence of a corresponding CBV change. Results suggest that in the venous drainage system, ~3mm distant from the area of activity, there is a robust change in blood oxygen saturation with little or no volume change. CBV changes are localised over the somatosensory barrel cortex and overlying arterial supply, supporting the theory that CBV changes are greater in the arterial than in the venous vasculature. This work investigating BOLD signal and underlying hemodynamics provides more information on the vascular origins of these important neuroimaging signals. PMID:20563253

  1. Desktop MRI as a promising tool for mapping intra-aneurismal flow.

    PubMed

    Perlo, Josefina; Silletta, Emilia V; Danieli, Ernesto; Cattaneo, Giorgio; Acosta, Rodolfo H; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2015-04-01

    In this work we evaluate the performance of a 40-mm diameter bore 0.2T desktop Halbach tomograph to obtain 2D and 3D velocity maps for studying intra-aneurismal flow in the presence or absence of nitinol meshed implants with the aim of optimizing the flow diverter efficacy. Phantoms with known spatial velocity distribution were used to determine the performance of the MRI system. Maximum velocities of about 200mm/s could be measured with a precision of 1% at a spatial resolution of 0.5×0.5×1mm(3). This accuracy is suitable to evaluate in vitro intra-aneurismal flow under different conditions such as variable flow rates, different vessel-aneurysm geometry, as well as the influence of metallic flow diverters on the intra-aneurismal flow distribution. The information obtained non-invasively with desktop tomographs can be used to complement in vivo studies in order to decide the optimum flow diverter. PMID:25527392

  2. Quantitative evaluation of fMRI retinotopic maps, from V1 to V4, for cognitive experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bordier, Cécile; Hupé, Jean-Michel; Dojat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    FMRI retinotopic mapping is a non-invasive technique for the delineation of low-level visual areas in individual subjects. It generally relies upon the analysis of functional responses to periodic visual stimuli that encode eccentricity or polar angle in the visual field. This technique is used in vision research when the precise assignation of brain activation to retinotopic areas is an issue. It involves processing steps computed with different algorithms and embedded in various software suites. Manual intervention may be needed for some steps. Although the diversity of the available processing suites and manual interventions may potentially introduce some differences in the final delineation of visual areas, no documented comparison between maps obtained with different procedures has been reported in the literature. To explore the effect of the processing steps on the quality of the maps obtained, we used two tools, BALC, which relies on a fully automated procedure, and BrainVoyager, where areas are delineated “by hand” on the brain surface. To focus on the mapping procedures specifically, we used the same SPM pipeline for pretreatment and the same tissue segmentation tool. We document the consistency and differences of the fMRI retinotopic maps obtained from “routine retinotopy” experiments on 10 subjects. The maps obtained by skilled users are never fully identical. However, the agreement between the maps, around 80% for low-level areas, is probably sufficient for most applications. Our results also indicate that assigning cognitive activations, following a specific experiment (here, color perception), to individual retinotopic maps is not free of errors. We provide measurements of this error, that may help for the cautious interpretation of cognitive activation projection onto fMRI retinotopic maps. On average, the magnitude of the error is about 20%, with much larger differences in a few subjects. More variability may even be expected with less

  3. In Vivo MRI Mapping of Brain Iron Deposition across the Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Matthew J.; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Yang, Shan; Nestor, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of iron homeostasis as a consequence of aging is thought to cause iron levels to increase, potentially promoting oxidative cellular damage. Therefore, understanding how this process evolves through the lifespan could offer insights into both the aging process and the development of aging-related neurodegenerative brain diseases. This work aimed to map, in vivo for the first time with an unbiased whole-brain approach, age-related iron changes using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM)—a new postprocessed MRI contrast mechanism. To this end, a full QSM standardization routine was devised and a cohort of N = 116 healthy adults (20–79 years of age) was studied. The whole-brain and ROI analyses confirmed that the propensity of brain cells to accumulate excessive iron as a function of aging largely depends on their exact anatomical location. Whereas only patchy signs of iron scavenging were observed in white matter, strong, bilateral, and confluent QSM–age associations were identified in several deep-brain nuclei—chiefly the striatum and midbrain—and across motor, premotor, posterior insular, superior prefrontal, and cerebellar cortices. The validity of QSM as a suitable in vivo imaging technique with which to monitor iron dysregulation in the human brain was demonstrated by confirming age-related increases in several subcortical nuclei that are known to accumulate iron with age. The study indicated that, in addition to these structures, there is a predilection for iron accumulation in the frontal lobes, which when combined with the subcortical findings, suggests that iron accumulation with age predominantly affects brain regions concerned with motor/output functions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study used a whole-brain imaging approach known as quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to provide a novel insight into iron accumulation in the brain across the adult lifespan. Validity of the method was demonstrated by showing concordance with ROI

  4. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (β-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to β-lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with β-lactamase in Freund’s adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund’s adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. PMID:16754878

  5. Multishot versus Single-Shot Pulse Sequences in Very High Field fMRI: A Comparison Using Retinotopic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.; Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla) human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm) using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI. PMID:22514646

  6. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  7. MRI technique for the snapshot imaging of quantitative velocity maps using RARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiko, G.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2012-03-01

    A quantitative PGSE-RARE pulse sequence was developed and successfully applied to the in situ dissolution of two pharmaceutical formulations dissolving over a range of timescales. The new technique was chosen over other existing fast velocity imaging techniques because it is T2 weighted, not T2∗ weighted, and is, therefore, robust for imaging time-varying interfaces and flow in magnetically heterogeneous systems. The complex signal was preserved intact by separating odd and even echoes to obtain two phase maps which are then averaged in post-processing. Initially, the validity of the technique was shown when imaging laminar flow in a pipe. Subsequently, the dissolution of two drugs was followed in situ, where the technique enables the imaging and quantification of changes in the form of the tablet and the flow field surrounding it at high spatial and temporal resolution. First, the complete 3D velocity field around an eroding salicylic acid tablet was acquired at a resolution of 98 × 49 μm2, within 20 min, and monitored over ˜13 h. The tablet was observed to experience a heterogeneous flow field and, hence a heterogeneous shear field, which resulted in the non-symmetric erosion of the tablet. Second, the dissolution of a fast dissolving immediate release tablet was followed using one-shot 2D velocity images acquired every 5.2 s at a resolution of 390 × 390 μm2. The quantitative nature of the technique and fast acquisition times provided invaluable information on the dissolution behaviour of this tablet, which had not been attainable previously with conventional quantitative MRI techniques.

  8. Improved T1 mapping by motion correction and template based B1 correction in 3T MRI brain studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Yao, Jianhua; Lee, Christabel; Pang, Yuxi; Baker, Eva; Butman, John; Thomasson, David

    2009-02-01

    Accurate estimation of relaxation time T1 from MRI images is increasingly important for some clinical applications. Low noise, high resolution, fast and accurate T1 maps from MRI images of the brain can be performed using a dual flip angle method. However, accuracy is limited by the scanners ability to deliver the prescribed flip angle due to the B1 inhomogeneity, particularly at high field strengths (e.g. 3T). One of the most accurate methods to correct that inhomogeneity is to acquire a subject-specific B1 map. However, since B1 map acquisition takes up precious scanning time and most retrospective studies do not have B1 map, it would be desirable to perform that correction from a template. For this work a dual repetition time method was used for B1 map acquisition in five normal subjects. Inaccuracies due to misregistration of acquired T1-weighted images were corrected by rigid registration, and the effects of misalignment were compared to those of B1 inhomogeneity. T1-intensity histograms were produced and three-Gaussian curves were fitted for every fully-, partially- and non-corrected histogram in order to estimate and compare the white and gray matter peaks. In addition, in order to reduce the scanning time we designed a template based correction strategy. Images from different subjects were aligned using a twelve-parameter affine registration, and B1 maps were aligned according to that transformation. Recomputed T1 maps showed a significant improvement with respect to non-corrected ones. These results are very promising and have the potential for clinical application.

  9. Improved Quantification and Mapping of Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Flow With Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI and Interactive Streamline Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Albert; Yousaf, Ufra; Alley, Marcus T.; Lustig, Michael; Chan, Frandics Pak; Newman, Beverley; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac MRI is routinely performed for quantification of shunt flow in patients with anomalous pulmonary veins, but can be technically-challenging to perform. Four-dimensional phase-contrast (4D-PC) MRI has potential to simplify this exam. We sought to determine whether 4D-PC may be a viable clinical alternative to conventional 2D phase-contrast MR imaging. Methods With institutional review board approval and HIPAA-compliance, we retrospectively identified all patients with anomalous pulmonary veins who underwent cardiac MRI at either 1.5 Tesla (T) or 3T with parallel-imaging compressed-sensing (PI-CS) 4D-PC between April, 2011 and October, 2013. A total of 15 exams were included (10 male, 5 female). Algorithms for interactive streamline visualization were developed and integrated into in-house software. Blood flow was measured at the valves, pulmonary arteries and veins, cavae, and any associated shunts. Pulmonary veins were mapped to their receiving atrial chamber with streamlines. The intraobserver, interobserver, internal consistency of flow measurements, and consistency with conventional MRI were then evaluated with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Triplicate measurements of blood flow from 4D-PC were highly consistent, particularly at the aortic and pulmonary valves (cv 2–3%). Flow measurements were reproducible by a second observer (ρ = 0.986–0.999). Direct measurements of shunt volume from anomalous veins and intracardiac shunts matched indirect estimates from the outflow valves (ρ = 0.966). Measurements of shunt fraction using 4D-PC using any approach were more consistent with ventricular volumetric displacements than conventional 2D-PC (ρ = 0.972–0.991 versus 0.929). Conclusion Shunt flow may be reliably quantified with 4D-PC MRI, either indirectly or with detailed delineation of flow from multiple shunts. The 4D-PC may be a more accurate alternative to conventional MRI. PMID:25914149

  10. Bingham-NODDI: Mapping anisotropic orientation dispersion of neurites using diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Maira; Schneider, Torben; Alexander, Daniel C; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents Bingham-NODDI, a clinically-feasible technique for estimating the anisotropic orientation dispersion of neurites. Direct quantification of neurite morphology on clinical scanners was recently realised by a diffusion MRI technique known as neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI). However in its current form NODDI cannot estimate anisotropic orientation dispersion, which is widespread in the brain due to common fanning and bending of neurites. This work proposes Bingham-NODDI that extends the NODDI formalism to address this limitation. Bingham-NODDI characterises anisotropic orientation dispersion by utilising the Bingham distribution to model neurite orientation distribution. The new model estimates the extent of dispersion about the dominant orientation, separately along the primary and secondary dispersion orientations. These estimates are subsequently used to estimate the overall dispersion about the dominant orientation and the dispersion anisotropy. We systematically evaluate the ability of the new model to recover these key parameters of anisotropic orientation dispersion with standard NODDI protocol, both in silico and in vivo. The results demonstrate that the parameters of the proposed model can be estimated without additional acquisition requirements over the standard NODDI protocol. Thus anisotropic dispersion can be determined and has the potential to be used as a marker for normal brain development and ageing or in pathology. We additionally find that the original NODDI model is robust to the effects of anisotropic orientation dispersion, when the quantification of anisotropic dispersion is not of interest. PMID:26826512

  11. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Anthony B.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna M.; Daniel, Bruce; Rieke, Viola; Butts, R. Kim; Sommer, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either 90° sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD × 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm × 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n = 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the 90° tubular applicator (9-15 W, 12 min, 8 MHz) produced coagulated zones covering an 80° wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, ~8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of ~30° extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30° each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270° contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  12. MAPL: Tissue microstructure estimation using Laplacian-regularized MAP-MRI and its application to HCP data.

    PubMed

    Fick, Rutger H J; Wassermann, Demian; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Deriche, Rachid

    2016-07-01

    The recovery of microstructure-related features of the brain's white matter is a current challenge in diffusion MRI. To robustly estimate these important features from multi-shell diffusion MRI data, we propose to analytically regularize the coefficient estimation of the Mean Apparent Propagator (MAP)-MRI method using the norm of the Laplacian of the reconstructed signal. We first compare our approach, which we call MAPL, with competing, state-of-the-art functional basis approaches. We show that it outperforms the original MAP-MRI implementation and the recently proposed modified Spherical Polar Fourier (mSPF) basis with respect to signal fitting and reconstruction of the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) and Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) in noisy, sparsely sampled data of a physical phantom with reference gold standard data. Then, to reduce the variance of parameter estimation using multi-compartment tissue models, we propose to use MAPL's signal fitting and extrapolation as a preprocessing step. We study the effect of MAPL on the estimation of axon diameter using a simplified Axcaliber model and axonal dispersion using the Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) model. We show the positive effect of using it as a preprocessing step in estimating and reducing the variances of these parameters in the Corpus Callosum of six different subjects of the MGH Human Connectome Project. Finally, we correlate the estimated axon diameter, dispersion and restricted volume fractions with Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and clearly show that changes in FA significantly correlate with changes in all estimated parameters. Overall, we illustrate the potential of using a well-regularized functional basis together with multi-compartment approaches to recover important microstructure tissue parameters with much less variability, thus contributing to the challenge of better understanding microstructure-related features of the brain's white matter. PMID:27043358

  13. Infant-directed prosody helps infants map sounds to meanings

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Katharine Graf; Hurley, Karinna

    2012-01-01

    Adults typically use an exaggerated, distinctive speaking style when addressing infants. However, the effects of infant-directed (ID) speech on infants’ learning is not yet well understood. This research investigates how ID speech affects how infants perform a key function in language acquisition, associating the sounds of words with their meanings. Seventeen-month-old infants were presented with two label-object pairs in a habituation-based word learning task. In Experiment 1, the labels were produced in adult-directed (AD) speech. In Experiment 2, the labels were produced in ID prosody; they had higher pitch, greater pitch variation, and longer durations than the AD labels. We found that infants failed to learn the labels in AD speech, but succeeded in learning the same labels when they were produced in ID speech. Experiment 3 investigated the role of variability in learning from ID speech. When the labels were presented in ID prosody with no variation across tokens, infants failed to learn them. Our findings indicate that ID prosody can affect how readily infants map sounds to meanings and that the variability in prosody that is characteristic of ID speech may play a key role in its effect on learning new words. PMID:24244106

  14. Direct cortical mapping via solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  15. Effects of Non-Local Diffusion on Structural MRI Preprocessing and Default Network Mapping: Statistical Comparisons with Isotropic/Anisotropic Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Xing, Xiu-Xia

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging community usually employs spatial smoothing to denoise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, e.g., Gaussian smoothing kernels. Such an isotropic diffusion (ISD) based smoothing is widely adopted for denoising purpose due to its easy implementation and efficient computation. Beyond these advantages, Gaussian smoothing kernels tend to blur the edges, curvature and texture of images. Researchers have proposed anisotropic diffusion (ASD) and non-local diffusion (NLD) kernels. We recently demonstrated the effect of these new filtering paradigms on preprocessing real degraded MRI images from three individual subjects. Here, to further systematically investigate the effects at a group level, we collected both structural and functional MRI data from 23 participants. We first evaluated the three smoothing strategies' impact on brain extraction, segmentation and registration. Finally, we investigated how they affect subsequent mapping of default network based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) data. Our findings suggest that NLD-based spatial smoothing maybe more effective and reliable at improving the quality of both MRI data preprocessing and default network mapping. We thus recommend NLD may become a promising method of smoothing structural MRI images of R-fMRI pipeline. PMID:22066005

  16. On-the-Fly Mapping for Calibrating Directional Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David; Richter, Paul; Withington, Philip

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of calibrating a large directional radio antenna of the type used in deep-space communication and radio astronomy has been developed. This method involves a raster-scanning-and-measurement technique denoted on-the-fly (OTF) mapping, applied in consideration of the results of a systematic analysis of the entire measurement procedure. Phenomena to which particular attention was paid in the analysis include (1) the noise characteristics of a total-power radiometer (TPR) that is used in the measurements and (2) tropospherically induced radiometer fluctuations. The method also involves the use of recently developed techniques for acquisition and reduction of data. In comparison with prior methods used to calibrate such antennas, this method yields an order-of-magnitude improvement in the precision of determinations of antenna aperture efficiency, and improvement by a factor of five or more in the precision of determination of pointing error and beam width. Prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present method is some background information concerning three aspects of the problem of calibrating an antenna of the type in question: In OTF mapping measurements in which a TPR is used, the desired data are the peak temperature corresponding to a radio source, the pointing offset when the antenna is commanded to point toward the source, and the shape of the main lobe of the antenna beam, all as functions of the antenna beam elevation and azimuth angles. These data enable one to calculate the (1) antenna aperture efficiency by comparing the measured peak temperature with that expected for a 100-percent-efficient antenna, (2) the mechanical pointing error resulting from small misalignments of various parts of the antenna structure, and (3) misalignments of the antenna subreflector and other mirrors. For practical reasons having to do with obtaining adequate angular resolution and all-sky coverage, it is necessary to perform azimuth and elevation scans

  17. Goal-Directed Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory Detection.

    PubMed

    Uncapher, Melina R; Boyd-Meredith, J Tyler; Chow, Tiffany E; Rissman, Jesse; Wagner, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    Remembering a past event elicits distributed neural patterns that can be distinguished from patterns elicited when encountering novel information. These differing patterns can be decoded with relatively high diagnostic accuracy for individual memories using multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data. Brain-based memory detection--if valid and reliable--would have clear utility beyond the domain of cognitive neuroscience, in the realm of law, marketing, and beyond. However, a significant boundary condition on memory decoding validity may be the deployment of "countermeasures": strategies used to mask memory signals. Here we tested the vulnerability of fMRI-based memory detection to countermeasures, using a paradigm that bears resemblance to eyewitness identification. Participants were scanned while performing two tasks on previously studied and novel faces: (1) a standard recognition memory task; and (2) a task wherein they attempted to conceal their true memory state. Univariate analyses revealed that participants were able to strategically modulate neural responses, averaged across trials, in regions implicated in memory retrieval, including the hippocampus and angular gyrus. Moreover, regions associated with goal-directed shifts of attention and thought substitution supported memory concealment, and those associated with memory generation supported novelty concealment. Critically, whereas MVPA enabled reliable classification of memory states when participants reported memory truthfully, the ability to decode memory on individual trials was compromised, even reversing, during attempts to conceal memory. Together, these findings demonstrate that strategic goal states can be deployed to mask memory-related neural patterns and foil memory decoding technology, placing a significant boundary condition on their real-world utility. PMID:26041920

  18. High-Resolution fMRI Maps of Cortical Activation in Nonhuman Primates: Correlation with Intrinsic Signal Optical Images

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Anna W.; Chen, Li Min

    2009-01-01

    One of the most widely used functional brain mapping tools is blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This method has contributed to new understandings of the functional roles of different areas in the human brain. However, its ability to map cerebral cortex at high spatial (submillimeter) resolution is still unknown. Other methods such as single- and multiunit electrophysiology and intrinsic signal optical imaging have revealed submillimeter resolution of sensory topography and cortical columnar activations. However, they are limited either by spatial scale (electrophysiology characterizes only local groups of neurons) or by the inability to monitor deep structures in the brain (i.e., cortical regions buried in sulci or subcortical structures). A method that could monitor all regions of the brain at high spatial resolution would be ideal. This capacity would open the doors to investigating, for example, how networks of cerebral cortical columns relate to or produce behavior. In this article we demonstrate that, without benefit of contrast agents, at a magnetic field strength of 9.4 tesla, BOLD fMRI can reveal millimeter-sized topographic maps of digit representation in the somatosensory cortex of the anesthetized squirrel monkey. Furthermore, by mapping the “funneling illusion,” it is possible to detect even submillimeter shifts in activation in the cortex. Our data suggest that at high magnetic field strength, the positive BOLD signal can be used to reveal high spatial resolution maps of brain activity, a finding that weakens previous notions about the ultimate spatial specificity of the positive BOLD signal. PMID:18172338

  19. Statistical parametric mapping of LORETA using high density EEG and individual MRI: application to mismatch negativities in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Kwon, Jun Soo; Youn, Tak; Pae, Ji Soo; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Myung-Sun; Ha, Kyoo-Seob

    2002-11-01

    We describe a method for the statistical parametric mapping of low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) using high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) to investigate the characteristics of the mismatch negativity (MMN) generators in schizophrenia. LORETA, using a realistic head model of the boundary element method derived from the individual anatomy, estimated the current density maps from the scalp topography of the 128-channel EEG. From the current density maps that covered the whole cortical gray matter (up to 20,000 points), volumetric current density images were reconstructed. Intensity normalization of the smoothed current density images was used to reduce the confounding effect of subject specific global activity. After transforming each image into a standard stereotaxic space, we carried out statistical parametric mapping of the normalized current density images. We applied this method to the source localization of MMN in schizophrenia. The MMN generators, produced by a deviant tone of 1,200 Hz (5% of 1,600 trials) under the standard tone of 1,000 Hz, 80 dB binaural stimuli with 300 msec of inter-stimulus interval, were measured in 14 right-handed schizophrenic subjects and 14 age-, gender-, and handedness-matched controls. We found that the schizophrenic group exhibited significant current density reductions of MMN in the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior parietal gyrus (P < 0. 0005). This study is the first voxel-by-voxel statistical mapping of current density using individual MRI and high-density EEG. PMID:12391570

  20. Compensation for z-directional non-uniformity of a monopole antenna at 7T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nambeom; Woo, Myung-Kyun; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2016-06-01

    The research was conducted to find ways to compensate for z-directional non-uniformity at a monopole antenna array (MA) coil by using a tilted optimized non-saturating excitation (TONE) pulse and to evaluate the feasibility of using the MA coil with the TONE pulse for anatomical and angiographic imaging. The sensitivity of a MA coil along the z-direction was measured by using an actual flip angle imaging pulse sequence with an oil phantom to evaluate the flip angle distributions of the MA coil for 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The effects on the z-directional uniformity were examined by using slow and fast TONE pulses, i.e., TONE SLOW and TONE FAST. T1- and T2* -weighted images of the human brain were also examined. The z-directional profiles of the TONE pulses were analyzed by using the average signal intensity throughout the brain. The effect of the TONE pulses on cerebral vessels was further examined by analyzing maximal intensity projections of T1-weighted images. With increasing the applied flip angles, the sensitivity slope slightly increased (0.044 per degree). For the MA coil, the TONE SLOWpulse yielded a compensated profile along the z-direction while the TONE HIGH pulse, which has a flat excitation profile along the z-direction, exhibited a tilted signal intensity toward the coil end, clearly indicating an intrinsic property of the MA coil. Similar to the phantom study, human brain images revealed z-directional symmetry around the peak value for the averaged signal intensity of the TONE SLOW pulse while the TONE HIGH pulse exhibited a tilted signal intensity toward the coil end. In vascular system imaging, the MA coil also clearly demonstrated a beneficial effect on the cerebral vessels, either with or without the TONE pulses. This study demonstrates that TONE pulses could compensate for the intrinsic z-directional non-uniformity of MA coils that exhibit strong uniformity in the x-y plane. Furthermore, tilted pulses, such as TONE pulses, were

  1. Accelerating parallel transmit array B1 mapping in high field MRI with slice undersampling and interpolation by kriging.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel; Cloos, Martijn A; Amadon, Alexis; Wackernagel, Hans

    2014-08-01

    Transmit arrays have been developed to mitigate the RF field inhomogeneity commonly observed in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), typically above 3T. To this end, the knowledge of the RF complex-valued B1 transmit-sensitivities of each independent radiating element has become essential. This paper details a method to speed up a currently available B1-calibration method. The principle relies on slice undersampling, slice and channel interleaving and kriging, an interpolation method developed in geostatistics and applicable in many domains. It has been demonstrated that, under certain conditions, kriging gives the best estimator of a field in a region of interest. The resulting accelerated sequence allows mapping a complete set of eight volumetric field maps of the human head in about 1 min. For validation, the accuracy of kriging is first evaluated against a well-known interpolation technique based on Fourier transform as well as to a B1-maps interpolation method presented in the literature. This analysis is carried out on simulated and decimated experimental B1 maps. Finally, the accelerated sequence is compared to the standard sequence on a phantom and a volunteer. The new sequence provides B1 maps three times faster with a loss of accuracy limited potentially to about 5%. PMID:24816550

  2. A similarity retrieval method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) statistical maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungaraza, R. F.; Guan, J.; Rolfe, S.; Atmosukarto, I.; Poliakov, A.; Kleinhans, N. M.; Aylward, E.; Ojemann, J.; Brinkley, J. F.; Shapiro, L. G.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a method for retrieving similar fMRI statistical images given a query fMRI statistical image. Our method thresholds the voxels within those images and extracts spatially distinct regions from the voxels that remain. Each region is defined by a feature vector that contains the region centroid, the region area, the average activation value for all the voxels within that region, the variance of those activation values, the average distance of each voxel within that region to the region's centroid, and the variance of the voxel's distance to the region's centroid. The similarity between two images is obtained by the summed minimum distance of their constituent feature vectors. Results on a dataset of fMRI statistical images from experiments involving distinct cognitive tasks are shown.

  3. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  4. The Effects of Reciprocal Teaching and Direct Instruction Approaches on Knowledge Map (K-Map) Generation Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Görgen, Izzet

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study is to investigate whether reciprocal teaching approach or direct instruction approach is more effective in the teaching of k-map generation skill. Secondary purpose of the study is to determine which of the k-map generation principles are more challenging for students to apply. The results of the study…

  5. The Effects of Reciprocal Teaching and Direct Instruction Approaches on Knowledge Map (k-map) Generation Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorgen, Izzet

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study is to investigate whether reciprocal teaching approach or direct instruction approach is more effective in the teaching of k-map generation skill. Secondary purpose of the study is to determine which of the k-map generation principles are more challenging for students to apply. The results of the study…

  6. Mapping of the prostate in endorectal coil-based MRI/MRSI and CT: A deformable registration and validation study

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, J.; Xing, L.; Hunjan, S.; Dumoulin, C.; Levin, J.; Lo, A.; Watkins, R.; Rohling, K.; Giaquinto, R.; Kim, D.; Spielman, D.; Daniel, B.

    2004-11-01

    The endorectal coil is being increasingly used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to obtain anatomic and metabolic images of the prostate with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In practice, however, the use of endorectal probe inevitably distorts the prostate and other soft tissue organs, making the analysis and the use of the acquired image data in treatment planning difficult. The purpose of this work is to develop a deformable image registration algorithm to map the MRI/MRSI information obtained using an endorectal probe onto CT images and to verify the accuracy of the registration by phantom and patient studies. A mapping procedure involved using a thin plate spline (TPS) transformation was implemented to establish voxel-to-voxel correspondence between a reference image and a floating image with deformation. An elastic phantom with a number of implanted fiducial markers was designed for the validation of the quality of the registration. Radiographic images of the phantom were obtained before and after a series of intentionally introduced distortions. After mapping the distorted phantom to the original one, the displacements of the implanted markers were measured with respect to their ideal positions and the mean error was calculated. In patient studies, CT images of three prostate patients were acquired, followed by 3 Tesla (3 T) MR images with a rigid endorectal coil. Registration quality was estimated by the centroid position displacement and image coincidence index (CI). Phantom and patient studies show that TPS-based registration has achieved significantly higher accuracy than the previously reported method based on a rigid-body transformation and scaling. The technique should be useful to map the MR spectroscopic dataset acquired with ER probe onto the treatment planning CT dataset to guide radiotherapy planning.

  7. Evaluation of distance maps from fast GRE MRI as a tool to study the knee joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Lerner, Amy L.; Yao, Jiang; Salo, Arthur D.; Totterman, Saara

    2003-05-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) method of evaluating the joint space from fast GRE MRI has been developed that allows the reconstruction of the two dimensional (2D) distance map between the femur and the tibia bone plates. This method uses the MRI data, an automated 3D segmentation, and an unsupervised joint space extraction algorithm that identify the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint. The extracted medial and lateral compartments of the tibia-femur joint space were analyzed by 2D distance maps, where visual as well quantitative information was extracted. This method was applied to study the dynamic behavior of the knee joint space under axial load. Three healthy volunteers' knees were imaged using fast GRE sequences in a clinical scanner under unloaded (normal) conditions and with an axial load that mimics the person's standing load. Furthermore, one volunteer's knee was imaged at four regular time intervals while the load was applied and at four regular intervals without load. The results show that changes of 50 microns in the average distance between bones can be measured and that normal axial loads reduce the joint space width significantly and can be detected by this method.

  8. Quantitative mapping of cerebrovascular reactivity using resting-state BOLD fMRI: Validation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Golestani, Ali M; Wei, Luxi L; Chen, J Jean

    2016-09-01

    In conventional neuroimaging, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is quantified primarily using the blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signal, specifically, as the BOLD response to intravascular carbon dioxide (CO2) modulations, in units of [%ΔBOLD/mmHg]. While this method has achieved wide appeal and clinical translation, the tolerability of CO2-related tasks amongst patients and the elderly remains a challenge in more routine and large-scale applications. In this work, we propose an improved method to quantify CVR by exploiting intrinsic fluctuations in CO2 and corresponding changes in the resting-state BOLD signal (rs-qCVR). Our rs-qCVR approach requires simultaneous monitoring of PETCO2, cardiac pulsation and respiratory volume. In 16 healthy adults, we compare our quantitative CVR estimation technique to the prospective CO2-targeting based CVR quantification approach (qCVR, the "standard"). We also compare our rs-CVR to non-quantitative alternatives including the resting-state fluctuation amplitude (RSFA), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and global-signal regression. When all subjects were pooled, only RSFA and ALFF were significantly associated with qCVR. However, for characterizing regional CVR variations within each subject, only the PETCO2-based rs-qCVR measure is strongly associated with standard qCVR in 100% of the subjects (p≤0.1). In contrast, for the more qualitative CVR measures, significant within-subject association with qCVR was only achieved in 50-70% of the subjects. Our work establishes the feasibility of extracting quantitative CVR maps using rs-fMRI, opening the possibility of mapping functional connectivity and qCVR simultaneously. PMID:27177763

  9. CRISPR-directed mitotic recombination enables genetic mapping without crosses.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Meru J; Bloom, Joshua S; Day, Laura; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2016-05-27

    Linkage and association studies have mapped thousands of genomic regions that contribute to phenotypic variation, but narrowing these regions to the underlying causal genes and variants has proven much more challenging. Resolution of genetic mapping is limited by the recombination rate. We developed a method that uses CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) to build mapping panels with targeted recombination events. We tested the method by generating a panel with recombination events spaced along a yeast chromosome arm, mapping trait variation, and then targeting a high density of recombination events to the region of interest. Using this approach, we fine-mapped manganese sensitivity to a single polymorphism in the transporter Pmr1. Targeting recombination events to regions of interest allows us to rapidly and systematically identify causal variants underlying trait differences. PMID:27230379

  10. FUNCTIONAL BRAIN MAPPING AT 9.4T USING A NEW MRI COMPATIBLE ELECTRODE CHRONICALLY IMPLANTED IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Jeff F.; Tuor, Ursula I.; Kmech, Jonn; Young, Nicole A.; Henderson, Amy K.; Jackson, Jesse C.; Valentine, Pamela A.; Teskey, G. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for acute and chronic stimulation of the brain within the MRI for studies of epilepsy, as well as of deep brain stimulation for movement and behavioral disorders. This paper describes the production and characteristics of carbon fiber based electrodes for acute and chronic stimulation in the brain. Increasing MRI field strengths are making it increasingly difficult to introduce foreign objects without a susceptibility artifact. This paper describes the production of, and the characteristics of carbon fiber based electrodes. These are biocompatible and can be implanted for chronic studies. We show the use of these electrodes at 9.4T for studying functional activation. Data are presented showing regional connectivity. Activation not only occurs near the electrode, but at sites distant and often contralateral to the electrode. In addition, there were sites showing strong negative activation to stimulation both with direct stimulation and during a kindling associated seizure. PMID:19097225

  11. Characterizing Information Flux Within the Distributed Pediatric Expressive Language Network: A Core Region Mapped Through fMRI-Constrained MEG Effective Connectivity Analyses.

    PubMed

    Kadis, Darren S; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Toro-Serey, Claudio A; Smith, Mary Lou; Holland, Scott K

    2016-02-01

    Using noninvasive neuroimaging, researchers have shown that young children have bilateral and diffuse language networks, which become increasingly left lateralized and focal with development. Connectivity within the distributed pediatric language network has been minimally studied, and conventional neuroimaging approaches do not distinguish task-related signal changes from those that are task essential. In this study, we propose a novel multimodal method to map core language sites from patterns of information flux. We retrospectively analyze neuroimaging data collected in two groups of children, ages 5-18 years, performing verb generation in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (n = 343) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n = 21). The fMRI data were conventionally analyzed and the group activation map parcellated to define node locations. Neuronal activity at each node was estimated from MEG data using a linearly constrained minimum variance beamformer, and effective connectivity within canonical frequency bands was computed using the phase slope index metric. We observed significant (p ≤ 0.05) effective connections in all subjects. The number of suprathreshold connections was significantly and linearly correlated with participant's age (r = 0.50, n = 21, p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that core language sites emerge as part of the normal developmental trajectory. Across frequencies, we observed significant effective connectivity among proximal left frontal nodes. Within the low frequency bands, information flux was rostrally directed within a focal, left frontal region, approximating Broca's area. At higher frequencies, we observed increased connectivity involving bilateral perisylvian nodes. Frequency-specific differences in patterns of information flux were resolved through fast (i.e., MEG) neuroimaging. PMID:26456242

  12. Characterizing Information Flux Within the Distributed Pediatric Expressive Language Network: A Core Region Mapped Through fMRI-Constrained MEG Effective Connectivity Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Toro-Serey, Claudio A.; Smith, Mary Lou; Holland, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Using noninvasive neuroimaging, researchers have shown that young children have bilateral and diffuse language networks, which become increasingly left lateralized and focal with development. Connectivity within the distributed pediatric language network has been minimally studied, and conventional neuroimaging approaches do not distinguish task-related signal changes from those that are task essential. In this study, we propose a novel multimodal method to map core language sites from patterns of information flux. We retrospectively analyze neuroimaging data collected in two groups of children, ages 5–18 years, performing verb generation in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (n = 343) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n = 21). The fMRI data were conventionally analyzed and the group activation map parcellated to define node locations. Neuronal activity at each node was estimated from MEG data using a linearly constrained minimum variance beamformer, and effective connectivity within canonical frequency bands was computed using the phase slope index metric. We observed significant (p ≤ 0.05) effective connections in all subjects. The number of suprathreshold connections was significantly and linearly correlated with participant's age (r = 0.50, n = 21, p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that core language sites emerge as part of the normal developmental trajectory. Across frequencies, we observed significant effective connectivity among proximal left frontal nodes. Within the low frequency bands, information flux was rostrally directed within a focal, left frontal region, approximating Broca's area. At higher frequencies, we observed increased connectivity involving bilateral perisylvian nodes. Frequency-specific differences in patterns of information flux were resolved through fast (i.e., MEG) neuroimaging. PMID:26456242

  13. A Hybrid Technique for Thickness-Map Visualization of the Hip Cartilages in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaiezadeh; Nishii, Takashi; Tanaka, Hisashi; Sato, Yoshinobu

    Quantification of the hip cartilages is clinically important. In this study, we propose an automatic technique for segmentation and visualization of the acetabular and femoral head cartilages based on clinically obtained multi-slice T1-weighted MR data and a hybrid approach. We follow a knowledge based approach by employing several features such as the anatomical shapes of the hip femoral and acetabular cartilages and corresponding image intensities. We estimate the center of the femoral head by a Hough transform and then automatically select the volume of interest. We then automatically segment the hip bones by a self-adaptive vector quantization technique. Next, we localize the articular central line by a modified canny edge detector based on the first and second derivative filters along the radial lines originated from the femoral head center and anatomical constraint. We then roughly segment the acetabular and femoral head cartilages using derivative images obtained in the previous step and a top-hat filter. Final masks of the acetabular and femoral head cartilages are automatically performed by employing the rough results, the estimated articular center line and the anatomical knowledge. Next, we generate a thickness map for each cartilage in the radial direction based on a Euclidian distance. Three dimensional pelvic bones, acetabular and femoral cartilages and corresponding thicknesses are overlaid and visualized. The techniques have been implemented in C++ and MATLAB environment. We have evaluated and clarified the usefulness of the proposed techniques in the presence of 40 clinical hips multi-slice MR images.

  14. Prostate Cancer Discrimination in the Peripheral Zone With a Reduced Field-of-View T2-mapping MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Fernando I.; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Chu, Renxin; Maier, Stephan E.; Tempany, Clare M.C.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Panych, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the performance of T2 mapping in discriminating prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in the peripheral zone using a practical reduced field-of-view MRI sequence requiring less than 3 minutes of scan time. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients with biopsy-proven peripheral zone prostate cancer without prior treatment underwent routine multiparametric MRI at 3.0T with an endorectal coil. An Inner-Volume Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill imaging sequence that required 2.8 minutes to obtain data for quantitative T2 mapping covering the entire prostate gland was added to the routine multiparametric protocol. Suspected cancer (SC) and suspected healthy (SH) tissue in the peripheral zone were identified in consensus by three radiologists and were correlated with available biopsy results. Differences in mean T2 values in SC and SH ROIs were tested for significance using unpaired Student’s two-tailed t test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the optimal threshold T2 value for cancer discrimination. Results ROI analyses revealed significantly (p<0.0001) shorter T2 values in SC (85.4 ± 12.3 ms) compared to SH (169.6 ± 38.7 ms). An estimated T2 threshold of 99 ms yielded a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 97% for prostate cancer discrimination. Conclusions Quantitative values derived from this clinically practical T2-mapping sequence allow high precision discrimination between healthy and cancerous peripheral zone in the prostate. PMID:25687187

  15. The Connectome Mapper: An Open-Source Processing Pipeline to Map Connectomes with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Daducci, Alessandro; Gerhard, Stephan; Griffa, Alessandra; Lemkaddem, Alia; Cammoun, Leila; Gigandet, Xavier; Meuli, Reto; Hagmann, Patric; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Researchers working in the field of global connectivity analysis using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can count on a wide selection of software packages for processing their data, with methods ranging from the reconstruction of the local intra-voxel axonal structure to the estimation of the trajectories of the underlying fibre tracts. However, each package is generally task-specific and uses its own conventions and file formats. In this article we present the Connectome Mapper, a software pipeline aimed at helping researchers through the tedious process of organising, processing and analysing diffusion MRI data to perform global brain connectivity analyses. Our pipeline is written in Python and is freely available as open-source at www.cmtk.org. PMID:23272041

  16. Mapping three-dimensional oil distribution with π-EPI MRI measurements at low magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Xiao, Dan; Romero-Zerón, Laura; Marica, Florea; MacMillan, Bryce; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a robust tool to image oil saturation distribution in rock cores during oil displacement processes. However, a lengthy measurement time for 3D measurements at low magnetic field can hinder monitoring the displacement. 1D and 2D MRI measurements are instead often undertaken to monitor the oil displacement since they are faster. However, 1D and 2D images may not completely reflect the oil distribution in heterogeneous rock cores. In this work, a high-speed 3D MRI technique, π Echo Planar Imaging (π-EPI), was employed at 0.2 T to monitor oil displacement. Centric scan interleaved sampling with view sharing in k-t space was employed to improve the temporal resolution of the π-EPI measurements. A D2O brine was employed to distinguish the hydrocarbon and water phases. A relatively homogenous glass bead pack and a heterogeneous Spynie core plug were employed to show different oil displacement behaviors. High quality 3D images were acquired with π-EPI MRI measurements. Fluid quantification with π-EPI compared favorably with FID, CPMG, 1D-DHK-SPRITE, 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) and 3D Conical SPRITE measurements. π-EPI greatly reduced the gradient duty cycle and improved sensitivity, compared to FSE and Conical SPRITE measurements, enabling dynamic monitoring of oil displacement processes. For core plug samples with sufficiently long lived T2, T2∗, π-EPI is an ideal method for rapid 3D saturation imaging.

  17. Mapping three-dimensional oil distribution with π-EPI MRI measurements at low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Xiao, Dan; Romero-Zerón, Laura; Marica, Florea; MacMillan, Bryce; Balcom, Bruce J

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a robust tool to image oil saturation distribution in rock cores during oil displacement processes. However, a lengthy measurement time for 3D measurements at low magnetic field can hinder monitoring the displacement. 1D and 2D MRI measurements are instead often undertaken to monitor the oil displacement since they are faster. However, 1D and 2D images may not completely reflect the oil distribution in heterogeneous rock cores. In this work, a high-speed 3D MRI technique, π Echo Planar Imaging (π-EPI), was employed at 0.2T to monitor oil displacement. Centric scan interleaved sampling with view sharing in k-t space was employed to improve the temporal resolution of the π-EPI measurements. A D2O brine was employed to distinguish the hydrocarbon and water phases. A relatively homogenous glass bead pack and a heterogeneous Spynie core plug were employed to show different oil displacement behaviors. High quality 3D images were acquired with π-EPI MRI measurements. Fluid quantification with π-EPI compared favorably with FID, CPMG, 1D-DHK-SPRITE, 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) and 3D Conical SPRITE measurements. π-EPI greatly reduced the gradient duty cycle and improved sensitivity, compared to FSE and Conical SPRITE measurements, enabling dynamic monitoring of oil displacement processes. For core plug samples with sufficiently long lived T2, T2(∗), π-EPI is an ideal method for rapid 3D saturation imaging. PMID:27208417

  18. Bi-Directional Tuning of Amygdala Sensitivity in Combat Veterans Investigated with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Brashers-Krug, Tom; Jorge, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Combat stress can be followed by persistent emotional consequences. It is thought that these emotional consequences are caused in part by increased amygdala reactivity. It is also thought that amygdala hyper-reactivity results from decreased inhibition from portions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in which activity is negatively correlated with activity in the amygdala. However, experimental support for these proposals has been inconsistent. Methods We showed movies of combat and civilian scenes during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session to 50 veterans of recent combat. We collected skin conductance responses (SCRs) as measures of emotional arousal. We examined the relation of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala and ACC to symptom measures and to SCRs. Results Emotional arousal, as measured with SCR, was greater during the combat movie than during the civilian movie and did not depend on symptom severity. As expected, amygdala signal during the less-arousing movie increased with increasing symptom severity. Surprisingly, during the more-arousing movie amygdala signal decreased with increasing symptom severity. These differences led to the unexpected result that amygdala signal in highly symptomatic subjects was lower during the more-arousing movie than during the less-arousing movie. Also unexpectedly, we found no significant inverse correlation between any portions of the amygdala and ACC. Rather, signal throughout more than 80% of the ACC showed a strong positive correlation with signal throughout more than 90% of the amygdala. Conclusions Amygdala reactivity can be tuned bi-directionally, either up or down, in the same person depending on the stimulus and the degree of post-traumatic symptoms. The exclusively positive correlations in BOLD activity between the amygdala and ACC contrast with findings that have been cited as evidence for inhibitory control of the amygdala by the ACC. The

  19. Noninvasive quantitative mapping of conductivity and dielectric distributions using RF wave propagation effects in high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han

    2003-06-01

    In this paper I show with phantom and animal experiments a non-invasive and quantitative method for measuring the conductivity and dielectric distributions based on high field magnetic resonance imaging. High field MRI is accompanied by significant RF wave propagation effects. They are observed as phase and magnitude variations of the image that cannot be removed by optimizing the static field homogeneity, or by improving the RF coils. These variations reflect the RF field distribution in the sample, and in fact obey a modified Helmholtz equation. By mapping both the phase and magnitude of the field with MRI techniques, both the conductivity and the dielectric constant are determined non-invasively. In phantom experiments at 1.5 tesla, conductivity values were measured at 4 mm resolution to 0.5 S/m accuracy. At 4.7 tesla, the accuracy was improved to 0.2 S/m, and the dielectric constant was measured to an accuracy of 5 (relative to vacuum) for 2cm regions.

  20. Pulse artifact detection in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording based on EEG map topography.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Giannina R; Pittau, Francesca; Michel, Christoph M; Vulliemoz, Serge; Grouiller, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    One of the major artifact corrupting electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the pulse artifact (PA). It is mainly due to the motion of the head and attached electrodes and wires in the magnetic field occurring after each heartbeat. In this study we propose a novel method to improve PA detection by considering the strong gradient and inversed polarity between left and right EEG electrodes. We acquired high-density EEG-fMRI (256 electrodes) with simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) at 3 T. PA was estimated as the voltage difference between right and left signals from the electrodes showing the strongest artifact (facial and temporal). Peaks were detected on this estimated signal and compared to the peaks in the ECG recording. We analyzed data from eleven healthy subjects, two epileptic patients and four healthy subjects with an insulating layer between electrodes and scalp. The accuracy of the two methods was assessed with three criteria: (i) standard deviation, (ii) kurtosis and (iii) confinement into the physiological range of the inter-peak intervals. We also checked whether the new method has an influence on the identification of epileptic spikes. Results show that estimated PA improved artifact detection in 15/17 cases, when compared to the ECG method. Moreover, epileptic spike identification was not altered by the correction. The proposed method improves the detection of pulse-related artifacts, particularly crucial when the ECG is of poor quality or cannot be recorded. It will contribute to enhance the quality of the EEG increasing the reliability of EEG-informed fMRI analysis. PMID:25307731

  1. A Pilot Study of Quantitative MRI Parametric Response Mapping of Bone Marrow Fat for Treatment Assessment in Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Luker, Gary D.; Nguyen, Huong (Marie); Hoff, Benjamin A.; Galbán, Craig J.; Hernando, Diego; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Talpaz, Moshe; Ross, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a hematologic neoplasm arising as a primary disease or secondary to other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Both primary and secondary MF are uniquely associated with progressive bone marrow fibrosis, displacing normal hematopoietic cells from the marrow space and disrupting normal production of mature blood cells. Activation of the JAK2 signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cells commonly causes MF, and ruxolitinib, a drug targeting this pathway, is the treatment of choice for many patients. However, current measures of disease status in MF do not necessarily predict response to treatment with ruxolitinib or other drugs in MF. Bone marrow biopsies are invasive and prone to sampling error, while measurements of spleen volume only indirectly reflect bone marrow status. Toward the goal of developing an imaging biomarker for treatment response in MF, we present preliminary results from a prospective clinical study evaluating parametric response mapping (PRM) of quantitative Dixon MRI bone marrow fat fraction maps in four MF patients treated with ruxolitinib. PRM allows for the voxel-wise identification of significant change in quantitative imaging readouts over time, in this case the bone marrow fat content. We identified heterogeneous response patterns of bone marrow fat among patients and within different bone marrow sites in the same patient. We also observed discordance between changes in bone marrow fat fraction and reductions in spleen volume, the standard imaging metric for treatment efficacy. This study provides initial support for PRM analysis of quantitative MRI of bone marrow fat to monitor response to therapy in MF, setting the stage for larger studies to further develop and validate this method as a complementary imaging biomarker for this disease. PMID:27213182

  2. Dynamic in vivo mapping of model moisturiser ingress into human skin by GARfield MRI.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Elisabetta; van Ginkel, Michael; McDonald, Peter J; Pitts, Simon; Bonnist, Eleanor Y M; Singleton, Scott; Williamson, Ann-Marie

    2011-02-01

    We describe the development of in vivo one-dimensional MRI (profiling) using a GARField (Gradient At Right angles to Field) magnet for the characterisation of side-of-hand human skin. For the first time and in vivo, we report measurements of the NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation parameters and self-diffusivity of the upper layers of human skin with a nominal spatial resolution better than 10 µm. The results are correlated with in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements of water concentration and natural moisturiser factors, and discussed in terms of known skin biology and microstructure of the stratum corneum and viable epidermis. The application of model moisturiser solutions to the skin is followed and their dynamics of ingress are characterised using the MRI methodology developed. Selected hydrophilic and lipophilic formulations are studied. The results are corroborated by standard in vivo measurements of transepidermal water loss and hydration status. A further insight into moisturisation mechanisms is gained. The effect of two different penetration enhancers on a commonly used skin care oil is also discussed, and different timescales of oil penetration into the skin are reported depending on the type of enhancer. PMID:20842757

  3. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Kennis, M.; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Kahn, R.S.; Geuze, E.; Leemans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically – e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction – this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety are of paramount importance, acquisition specifications are preferred that minimize scan time, typically resulting in data obtained with only one PE direction. In this work, we investigated whether choosing a different polarity of the PE direction would affect the outcome of a specific clinical research study. To address this methodological question, fractional anisotropy (FA) estimates of FreeSurfer brain regions were obtained in civilian and combat controls, remitted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, and persistent PTSD patients before and after trauma-focused therapy and were compared between diffusion MRI data sets acquired with different polarities of the PE direction (posterior-to-anterior, PA and anterior-to-posterior, AP). Our results demonstrate that regional FA estimates differ on average in the order of 5% between AP and PA PE data. In addition, when comparing FA estimates between different subject groups for specific cingulum subdivisions, the conclusions for AP and PA PE data were not in agreement. These findings increase our understanding of how one of the most pronounced data artifacts in diffusion MRI can impact group analyses and should encourage users to be more cautious when interpreting and reporting study outcomes derived from data acquired along a single PE direction. PMID:27158586

  4. Synergetic fMRI-EEG brain mapping in alpha-rhythm voluntary control mode.

    PubMed

    Shtark, M B; Verevkin, E G; Kozlova, L I; Mazhirina, K G; Pokrovskii, M A; Petrovskii, E D; Savelov, A A; Starostin, A S; Yarosh, S V

    2015-03-01

    For the first time in neurobiology-related issues, the synergistic spatial dynamics of EEG and fMRI (BOLD phenomenon) was studied during cognitive alpha biofeedback training in the operant conditioning mode (acoustic reinforcement of alpha-rhythm development and stability). Significant changes in alpha-rhythm intensity were found in T6 electrode area (Brodmann area 37). Brodmann areas related to solving alpha-training tasks and maximally involved in the formation of new neuronal network were middle and superior temporal gyri (areas 21, 22, and 37), fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus (areas 4, 6, and 46), anterior cingulate gyrus (areas 23 and 24), cuneus, and precuneus (area 7). Wide involvement of Brodmann areas is determined by psychological architecture of alpha-rhythm generating system control that includes complex cognitive activities: decision making, retrieval of long-term memory, evaluation of the reward and control efficiency during alpha-EEG biofeedback. PMID:25778652

  5. Visualising inter-subject variability in fMRI using threshold-weighted overlap maps.

    PubMed

    Seghier, Mohamed L; Price, Cathy J

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies are revealing the neural systems sustaining many sensory, motor and cognitive abilities. A proper understanding of these systems requires an appreciation of the degree to which they vary across subjects. Some sources of inter-subject variability might be easy to measure (demographics, behavioural scores, or experimental factors), while others are more difficult (cognitive strategies, learning effects, and other hidden sources). Here, we introduce a simple way of visualising whole-brain consistency and variability in brain responses across subjects using threshold-weighted voxel-based overlap maps. The output quantifies the proportion of subjects activating a particular voxel or region over a wide range of statistical thresholds. The sensitivity of our approach was assessed in 30 healthy adults performing a matching task with their dominant hand. We show how overlap maps revealed many effects that were only present in a subsample of our group; we discuss how overlap maps can provide information that may be missed or misrepresented by standard group analysis, and how this information can help users to understand their data. In particular, we emphasize that functional overlap maps can be particularly useful when it comes to explaining typical (or atypical) compensatory mechanisms used by patients following brain damage. PMID:26846561

  6. Visualising inter-subject variability in fMRI using threshold-weighted overlap maps

    PubMed Central

    Seghier, Mohamed L.; Price, Cathy J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies are revealing the neural systems sustaining many sensory, motor and cognitive abilities. A proper understanding of these systems requires an appreciation of the degree to which they vary across subjects. Some sources of inter-subject variability might be easy to measure (demographics, behavioural scores, or experimental factors), while others are more difficult (cognitive strategies, learning effects, and other hidden sources). Here, we introduce a simple way of visualising whole-brain consistency and variability in brain responses across subjects using threshold-weighted voxel-based overlap maps. The output quantifies the proportion of subjects activating a particular voxel or region over a wide range of statistical thresholds. The sensitivity of our approach was assessed in 30 healthy adults performing a matching task with their dominant hand. We show how overlap maps revealed many effects that were only present in a subsample of our group; we discuss how overlap maps can provide information that may be missed or misrepresented by standard group analysis, and how this information can help users to understand their data. In particular, we emphasize that functional overlap maps can be particularly useful when it comes to explaining typical (or atypical) compensatory mechanisms used by patients following brain damage. PMID:26846561

  7. New perspectives in EEG/MEG brain mapping and PET/fMRI neuroimaging of human pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, A C

    2001-10-01

    With the maturation of EEG/MEG brain mapping and PET/fMRI neuroimaging in the 1990s, greater understanding of pain processing in the brain now elucidates and may even challenge the classical theory of pain mechanisms. This review scans across the cultural diversity of pain expression and modulation in man. It outlines the difficulties in defining and studying human pain. It then focuses on methods of studying the brain in experimental and clinical pain, the cohesive results of brain mapping and neuroimaging of noxious perception, the implication of pain research in understanding human consciousness and the relevance to clinical care as well as to the basic science of human psychophysiology. Non-invasive brain studies in man start to unveil the age-old puzzles of pain-illusion, hypnosis and placebo in pain modulation. The neurophysiological and neurohemodynamic brain measures of experimental pain can now largely satisfy the psychophysiologist's dream, unimaginable only a few years ago, of modelling the body-brain, brain-mind, mind-matter duality in an inter-linking 3-P triad: physics (stimulus energy); physiology (brain activities); and psyche (perception). For neuropsychophysiology greater challenges lie ahead: (a) how to integrate a cohesive theory of human pain in the brain; (b) what levels of analyses are necessary and sufficient; (c) what constitutes the structural organisation of the pain matrix; (d) what are the modes of processing among and across the sites of these structures; and (e) how can neural computation of these processes in the brain be carried out? We may envision that modular identification and delineation of the arousal-attention, emotion-motivation and perception-cognition neural networks of pain processing in the brain will also lead to deeper understanding of the human mind. Two foreseeable impacts on clinical sciences and basic theories from brain mapping/neuroimaging are the plausible central origin in persistent pain and integration of

  8. Mapping Alzheimer’s disease progression in 1309 MRI scans: Power estimates for different inter-scan intervals☆

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Yanovsky, Igor; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Harvey, Danielle J.; Kornak, John; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging centers and pharmaceutical companies are working together to evaluate treatments that might slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a common but devastating late-life neuropathology. Recently, automated brain mapping methods, such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) of structural MRI, have outperformed cognitive measures in their precision and power to track disease progression, greatly reducing sample size estimates for drug trials. In the largest TBM study to date, we studied how sample size estimates for tracking structural brain changes depend on the time interval between the scans (6–24 months). We analyzed 1309 brain scans from 91 probable AD patients (age at baseline: 75.4±7.5 years) and 189 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; 74.6±7.1 years), scanned at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Statistical maps revealed 3D patterns of brain atrophy at each follow-up scan relative to the baseline; numerical summaries were used to quantify temporal lobe atrophy within a statistically-defined region-of-interest. Power analyses revealed superior sample size estimates over traditional clinical measures. Only 80, 46, and 39 AD patients were required for a hypothetical clinical trial, at 6, 12, and 24 months respectively, to detect a 25% reduction in average change using a two-sided test (α=0.05, power=80%). Correspondingly, 106, 79, and 67 subjects were needed for an equivalent MCI trial aiming for earlier intervention. A 24-month trial provides most power, except when patient attrition exceeds 15–16%/year, in which case a 12-month trial is optimal. These statistics may facilitate clinical trial design using voxel-based brain mapping methods such as TBM. PMID:20139010

  9. Refining the Sensory and Motor Ratunculus of the Rat Upper Extremity Using fMRI and Direct Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that the different regions of the body have cortical representations in proportion to the degree of innervation. Our current understanding of the rat upper extremity has been enhanced using functional MRI (fMRI), but these studies are often limited to the rat forepaw. The purpose of this study is to describe a new technique that allows us to refine the sensory and motor representations in the cerebral cortex by surgically implanting electrodes on the major nerves of the rat upper extremity and providing direct electrical nerve stimulation while acquiring fMRI images. This technique was used to stimulate the ulnar, median, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves in the rat upper extremity using four different stimulation sequences that varied in frequency (5 Hz vs. 10 Hz) and current (0.5 mA vs. 1.0 mA). A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve. The higher stimulation current resulted in a dramatic increase in the level of cortical activation. The higher stimulation frequency resulted in both increases and attenuation of cortical activation in different regions of the brain, depending on which nerve was stimulated. PMID:17969116

  10. Mapping the distribution of malaria: current approaches and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Leah R.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; McNally, Amy; Mordecai, Erin A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the distribution of malaria has received substantial attention because the disease is a major source of illness and mortality in humans, especially in developing countries. It also has a defined temporal and spatial distribution. The distribution of malaria is most influenced by its mosquito vector, which is sensitive to extrinsic environmental factors such as rainfall and temperature. Temperature also affects the development rate of the malaria parasite in the mosquito. Here, we review the range of approaches used to model the distribution of malaria, from spatially explicit to implicit, mechanistic to correlative. Although current methods have significantly improved our understanding of the factors influencing malaria transmission, significant gaps remain, particularly in incorporating nonlinear responses to temperature and temperature variability. We highlight new methods to tackle these gaps and to integrate new data with models.

  11. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  12. Functional Lung MRI in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Comparison of T1 Mapping, Oxygen-Enhanced T1 Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Triphan, Simon M. F.; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Anjorin, Angela; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Biederer, Jürgen; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI. Materials and Methods 20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV) underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung) at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1), oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1) and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach. Results Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001), and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001). In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1). The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05), ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05) and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05) showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage. Conclusion Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast. PMID:25822195

  13. Effect of sound intensity on tonotopic fMRI maps in the unanesthetized monkey

    PubMed Central

    Tanji, Kazuyo; Leopold, David; Ye, Frank; Zhu, Charles; Malloy, Megan; Saunders, Richard C.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2009-01-01

    The monkey’s auditory cortex includes a core region on the supratemporal plane (STP) made up of the tonotopically organized areas A1, R, and RT, together with a surrounding belt and a lateral parabelt region. The functional studies that yielded the tonotopic maps and corroborated the anatomical division into core, belt, and parabelt typically used low-amplitude pure tones that were often restricted to threshold-level intensities. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake rhesus monkeys to determine whether, and if so how, the tonotopic maps and the pattern of activation in core, belt, and parabelt are affected by systematic changes in sound intensity. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to groups of low- and high-frequency pure tones 3-4 octaves apart were measured at multiple sound intensity levels. The results revealed tonotopic maps in the auditory core that reversed at the putative areal boundaries between A1 and R and between R and RT. Although these reversals of the tonotopic representations were present at all intensity levels, the lateral spread of activation depended on sound amplitude, with increasing recruitment of the adjacent belt areas as the intensities increased. Tonotopic organization along the STP was also evident in frequency-specific deactivation (i.e. “negative BOLD”), an effect that was intensity-specific as well. Regions of positive and negative BOLD were spatially interleaved, possibly reflecting lateral inhibition of high frequency areas during activation of adjacent low frequency areas, and vice versa. These results, which demonstrate the strong influence of tonal amplitude on activation levels, identify sound intensity as an important adjunct parameter for mapping the functional architecture of auditory cortex. PMID:19631273

  14. Effect of sound intensity on tonotopic fMRI maps in the unanesthetized monkey.

    PubMed

    Tanji, Kazuyo; Leopold, David A; Ye, Frank Q; Zhu, Charles; Malloy, Megan; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2010-01-01

    The monkey's auditory cortex includes a core region on the supratemporal plane (STP) made up of the tonotopically organized areas A1, R, and RT, together with a surrounding belt and a lateral parabelt region. The functional studies that yielded the tonotopic maps and corroborated the anatomical division into core, belt, and parabelt typically used low-amplitude pure tones that were often restricted to threshold-level intensities. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake rhesus monkeys to determine whether, and if so how, the tonotopic maps and the pattern of activation in core, belt, and parabelt are affected by systematic changes in sound intensity. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to groups of low- and high-frequency pure tones 3-4 octaves apart were measured at multiple sound intensity levels. The results revealed tonotopic maps in the auditory core that reversed at the putative areal boundaries between A1 and R and between R and RT. Although these reversals of the tonotopic representations were present at all intensity levels, the lateral spread of activation depended on sound amplitude, with increasing recruitment of the adjacent belt areas as the intensities increased. Tonotopic organization along the STP was also evident in frequency-specific deactivation (i.e. "negative BOLD"), an effect that was intensity-specific as well. Regions of positive and negative BOLD were spatially interleaved, possibly reflecting lateral inhibition of high-frequency areas during activation of adjacent low-frequency areas, and vice versa. These results, which demonstrate the strong influence of tonal amplitude on activation levels, identify sound intensity as an important adjunct parameter for mapping the functional architecture of auditory cortex. PMID:19631273

  15. The average baboon brain: MRI templates and tissue probability maps from 89 individuals.

    PubMed

    Love, Scott A; Marie, Damien; Roth, Muriel; Lacoste, Romain; Nazarian, Bruno; Bertello, Alice; Coulon, Olivier; Anton, Jean-Luc; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-05-15

    The baboon (Papio) brain is a remarkable model for investigating the brain. The current work aimed at creating a population-average baboon (Papio anubis) brain template and its left/right hemisphere symmetric version from a large sample of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images collected from 89 individuals. Averaging the prior probability maps output during the segmentation of each individual also produced the first baboon brain tissue probability maps for gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The templates and the tissue probability maps were created using state-of-the-art, freely available software tools and are being made freely and publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/haiko89/ or http://lpc.univ-amu.fr/spip.php?article589. It is hoped that these images will aid neuroimaging research of the baboon by, for example, providing a modern, high quality normalization target and accompanying standardized coordinate system as well as probabilistic priors that can be used during tissue segmentation. PMID:26975558

  16. Simultaneous in vivo pH and temperature mapping using a PARACEST-MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    McVicar, Nevin; Li, Alex X; Suchý, Mojmír; Hudson, Robert H E; Menon, Ravi S; Bartha, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Altered tissue temperature and/or pH is a common feature in pathological conditions, where metabolic demand exceeds oxygen supply such as in tumors and following stroke. Therefore, in vivo tissue temperature and pH may become valuable biomarkers for disease detection and the monitoring of disease progression or treatment response in conditions with altered metabolic demand. In this study, pH is measured using the amide protons of a thulium (Tm(3+)) complex with a DOTAM-Glycine-Lysine (ligand: Tm(3+)-DOTAM-Gly-Lys). The pH was uniquely determined from the linewidth of the asymmetry curve of the chemical exchange saturation transfer spectrum, independent of contrast agent concentration, or temperature for a given saturation pulse. pH maps with an inter-pixel standard deviation of less than 0.1 pH units were obtained in 10 mM Tm(3+)-DOTAM-Gly-Lys solutions with pH ranging from 6.0 to 8.0 pH units at 37°C. Temperature maps were simultaneously obtained using the chemical shift of the chemical exchange saturation transfer peak. Temperature and pH maps are demonstrated in the mouse leg (N = 3), where the mean and standard deviation for pH was 7.2 ± 0.2 pH unit and temperature was 37.4 ± 0.5°C. PMID:23165779

  17. Writing Direction Affects How People Map Space Onto Time

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Benjamin K.; Chan Lau, Ting Ting

    2012-01-01

    What determines which spatial axis people use to represent time? We investigate effects of writing direction. English, like Mandarin Chinese in mainland China, is written left to right and then top to bottom. But in Taiwan, characters are written predominantly top to bottom and then right to left. Because being a fluent reader–writer entails thousands of hours of experience with eye and hand movement in the direction dictated by one’s writing system, it could be that writing system direction affects the axis used to represent time in terms of space. In a behavioral experiment, we had native speakers of English, Mandarin Chinese from mainland China, and Mandarin Chinese from Taiwan place sets of cards in temporal order. These cards depicted stages of development of plants and animals, for instance: tadpole, froglet, frog. Results showed that English speakers always represented time as moving from left to right (LR). Mainland Chinese participants trended in the same direction, but a small portion laid the cards out from top to bottom. Taiwanese participants were just as likely to depict time as moving from LR as from top to bottom, with a large minority depicting it as moving from right to left. Native writing system affects how people represent time spatially. PMID:22514546

  18. A Method for Automated Classification of Parkinson's Disease Diagnosis Using an Ensemble Average Propagator Template Brain Map Estimated from Diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Monami; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E; Vemuri, Baba C

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that affects patients in all countries and of all nationalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging techniques utilized for detection of neurologic diseases. Changes in structural biomarkers will likely play an important future role in assessing progression of many neurological diseases inclusive of PD. In this paper, we derived structural biomarkers from diffusion MRI (dMRI), a structural modality that allows for non-invasive inference of neuronal fiber connectivity patterns. The structural biomarker we use is the ensemble average propagator (EAP), a probability density function fully characterizing the diffusion locally at a voxel level. To assess changes with respect to a normal anatomy, we construct an unbiased template brain map from the EAP fields of a control population. Use of an EAP captures both orientation and shape information of the diffusion process at each voxel in the dMRI data, and this feature can be a powerful representation to achieve enhanced PD brain mapping. This template brain map construction method is applicable to small animal models as well as to human brains. The differences between the control template brain map and novel patient data can then be assessed via a nonrigid warping algorithm that transforms the novel data into correspondence with the template brain map, thereby capturing the amount of elastic deformation needed to achieve this correspondence. We present the use of a manifold-valued feature called the Cauchy deformation tensor (CDT), which facilitates morphometric analysis and automated classification of a PD versus a control population. Finally, we present preliminary results of automated discrimination between a group of 22 controls and 46 PD patients using CDT. This method may be possibly applied to larger population sizes and other parkinsonian syndromes in the near future. PMID

  19. A Method for Automated Classification of Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosis Using an Ensemble Average Propagator Template Brain Map Estimated from Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monami; Okun, Michael S.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Vemuri, Baba C.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that affects patients in all countries and of all nationalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging techniques utilized for detection of neurologic diseases. Changes in structural biomarkers will likely play an important future role in assessing progression of many neurological diseases inclusive of PD. In this paper, we derived structural biomarkers from diffusion MRI (dMRI), a structural modality that allows for non-invasive inference of neuronal fiber connectivity patterns. The structural biomarker we use is the ensemble average propagator (EAP), a probability density function fully characterizing the diffusion locally at a voxel level. To assess changes with respect to a normal anatomy, we construct an unbiased template brain map from the EAP fields of a control population. Use of an EAP captures both orientation and shape information of the diffusion process at each voxel in the dMRI data, and this feature can be a powerful representation to achieve enhanced PD brain mapping. This template brain map construction method is applicable to small animal models as well as to human brains. The differences between the control template brain map and novel patient data can then be assessed via a nonrigid warping algorithm that transforms the novel data into correspondence with the template brain map, thereby capturing the amount of elastic deformation needed to achieve this correspondence. We present the use of a manifold-valued feature called the Cauchy deformation tensor (CDT), which facilitates morphometric analysis and automated classification of a PD versus a control population. Finally, we present preliminary results of automated discrimination between a group of 22 controls and 46 PD patients using CDT. This method may be possibly applied to larger population sizes and other parkinsonian syndromes in the near future. PMID

  20. Analysis of 2D Phase Contrast MRI in Renal Arteries by Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R.

    We present an approach based on self organizing maps to segment renal arteries from 2D PC Cine MR, images to measure blood velocity and flow. Such information are important in grading renal artery stenosis and support the decision on surgical interventions like percu-tan transluminal angioplasty. Results show that the renal arteries could be extracted automatically. The corresponding velocity profiles show high correlation (r=0.99) compared those from manual delineated vessels. Furthermore, the method could detect possible blood flow patterns within the vessel.

  1. Noninvasive functional cardiac electrical source imaging: combining MRI and ECG mapping for imaging electrical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilg, Bernhard; Modre, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Roithinger, Franz

    2002-04-01

    Inverse electrocardiography has been developing for several years. By coupling electrocardiographic mapping and 3D+time anatomical data, the electrical excitation sequence can be imaged completely noninvasively in the human heart. In this study, a bidomain theory based surface heart model activation time imaging approach was applied to single beat data of atrial and ventricular depolarization. For sinus and paced rhythms, the sites of early activation and the areas with late activation were estimated with sufficient accuracy. In particular for focal arrhythmias, this model-based imaging approach might allow the guidance and evaluation of antiarrhythmic interventions, for instance, in case of catheter ablation or drug therapy.

  2. Estimation of Directed Effective Connectivity from fMRI Functional Connectivity Hints at Asymmetries of Cortical Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Matthieu; Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Ritter, Petra; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The brain exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns of activity. This phenomenon is governed by an interplay between the internal neural dynamics of cortical areas and their connectivity. Uncovering this complex relationship has raised much interest, both for theory and the interpretation of experimental data (e.g., fMRI recordings) using dynamical models. Here we focus on the so-called inverse problem: the inference of network parameters in a cortical model to reproduce empirically observed activity. Although it has received a lot of interest, recovering directed connectivity for large networks has been rather unsuccessful so far. The present study specifically addresses this point for a noise-diffusion network model. We develop a Lyapunov optimization that iteratively tunes the network connectivity in order to reproduce second-order moments of the node activity, or functional connectivity. We show theoretically and numerically that the use of covariances with both zero and non-zero time shifts is the key to infer directed connectivity. The first main theoretical finding is that an accurate estimation of the underlying network connectivity requires that the time shift for covariances is matched with the time constant of the dynamical system. In addition to the network connectivity, we also adjust the intrinsic noise received by each network node. The framework is applied to experimental fMRI data recorded for subjects at rest. Diffusion-weighted MRI data provide an estimate of anatomical connections, which is incorporated to constrain the cortical model. The empirical covariance structure is reproduced faithfully, especially its temporal component (i.e., time-shifted covariances) in addition to the spatial component that is usually the focus of studies. We find that the cortical interactions, referred to as effective connectivity, in the tuned model are not reciprocal. In particular, hubs are either receptors or feeders: they do not exhibit both strong incoming

  3. Estimation of Directed Effective Connectivity from fMRI Functional Connectivity Hints at Asymmetries of Cortical Connectome.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Ritter, Petra; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    The brain exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns of activity. This phenomenon is governed by an interplay between the internal neural dynamics of cortical areas and their connectivity. Uncovering this complex relationship has raised much interest, both for theory and the interpretation of experimental data (e.g., fMRI recordings) using dynamical models. Here we focus on the so-called inverse problem: the inference of network parameters in a cortical model to reproduce empirically observed activity. Although it has received a lot of interest, recovering directed connectivity for large networks has been rather unsuccessful so far. The present study specifically addresses this point for a noise-diffusion network model. We develop a Lyapunov optimization that iteratively tunes the network connectivity in order to reproduce second-order moments of the node activity, or functional connectivity. We show theoretically and numerically that the use of covariances with both zero and non-zero time shifts is the key to infer directed connectivity. The first main theoretical finding is that an accurate estimation of the underlying network connectivity requires that the time shift for covariances is matched with the time constant of the dynamical system. In addition to the network connectivity, we also adjust the intrinsic noise received by each network node. The framework is applied to experimental fMRI data recorded for subjects at rest. Diffusion-weighted MRI data provide an estimate of anatomical connections, which is incorporated to constrain the cortical model. The empirical covariance structure is reproduced faithfully, especially its temporal component (i.e., time-shifted covariances) in addition to the spatial component that is usually the focus of studies. We find that the cortical interactions, referred to as effective connectivity, in the tuned model are not reciprocal. In particular, hubs are either receptors or feeders: they do not exhibit both strong incoming

  4. Analysis of short single rest/activation epoch fMRI by self-organizing map neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erberich, Stephan G.; Dietrich, Thomas; Kemeny, Stefan; Krings, Timo; Willmes, Klaus; Thron, Armin; Oberschelp, Walter

    2000-04-01

    Functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a standard non invasive brain imaging technique delivering high spatial resolution. Brain activation is determined by magnetic susceptibility of the blood oxygen level (BOLD effect) during an activation task, e.g. motor, auditory and visual tasks. Usually box-car paradigms have 2 - 4 rest/activation epochs with at least an overall of 50 volumes per scan in the time domain. Statistical test based analysis methods need a large amount of repetitively acquired brain volumes to gain statistical power, like Student's t-test. The introduced technique based on a self-organizing neural network (SOM) makes use of the intrinsic features of the condition change between rest and activation epoch and demonstrated to differentiate between the conditions with less time points having only one rest and one activation epoch. The method reduces scan and analysis time and the probability of possible motion artifacts from the relaxation of the patients head. Functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI) of patients for pre-surgical evaluation and volunteers were acquired with motor (hand clenching and finger tapping), sensory (ice application), auditory (phonological and semantic word recognition task) and visual paradigms (mental rotation). For imaging we used different BOLD contrast sensitive Gradient Echo Planar Imaging (GE-EPI) single-shot pulse sequences (TR 2000 and 4000, 64 X 64 and 128 X 128, 15 - 40 slices) on a Philips Gyroscan NT 1.5 Tesla MR imager. All paradigms were RARARA (R equals rest, A equals activation) with an epoch width of 11 time points each. We used the self-organizing neural network implementation described by T. Kohonen with a 4 X 2 2D neuron map. The presented time course vectors were clustered by similar features in the 2D neuron map. Three neural networks were trained and used for labeling with the time course vectors of one, two and all three on/off epochs. The results were also compared by using a

  5. The average pathlength map: a diffusion MRI tractography-derived index for studying brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Pannek, Kerstin; Mathias, Jane L; Bigler, Erin D; Brown, Greg; Taylor, Jamie D; Rose, Stephen E

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tractography provides a powerful tool for the assessment of white matter architecture in vivo. Quantitative tractography metrics, such as streamline length, have successfully been used in the study of brain pathology. To date, these studies have relied on a priori knowledge of which tracts are affected by injury or pathology and manual delineation of regions of interest (ROIs) for use as waypoints in tractography. This limits the analyses to specific tracts under investigation and relies on the accurate and consistent placement of ROIs. We present a fully automated technique for the voxel-wise analysis of streamline length within the entire brain, the Average Pathlength Map (APM). We highlight the precision and reproducibility of voxel-wise average streamline length over time, and assess normal variability of pathlength values in a cohort of 43 healthy participants. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by performing voxel-wise comparison between pathlength values obtained from a patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI, Glasgow Coma Scale Score=7) and those from control participants. Our analysis shows that voxel-wise average pathlength values are comparable to fractional anisotropy (FA) in terms of reproducibility and variability. For the TBI patient, we observed a significant reduction in streamline pathlength in the genu of the corpus callosum and its projections into the frontal lobe. This study demonstrates that the average pathlength map can be used for voxel-based analysis of a quantitative tractography metric within the whole brain, removing both the dependence on a priori knowledge of affected pathways and time-consuming manual delineation of ROIs. PMID:21147236

  6. Microtesla MRI of the human brain combined with MEG

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Savukov, Igor M.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Gomez, John J.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the challenges in functional brain imaging is integration of complementary imaging modalities, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MEG, which uses highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to directly measure magnetic fields of neuronal currents, cannot be combined with conventional high-field MRI in a single instrument. Indirect matching of MEG and MRI data leads to significant co-registration errors. A recently proposed imaging method-SQUID-based microtesla MRI-can be naturally combined with MEG in the same system to directly provide structural maps for MEG-localized sources. It enables easy and accurate integration of MEG and MRI/fMRI, because microtesla MR images can be precisely matched to structural images provided by high-field MRI and other techniques. Here we report the first images of the human brain by microtesla MRI, together with auditory MEG (functional) data, recorded using the same seven-channel SQUID system during the same imaging session. The images were acquired at 46 microtesla measurement field with pre-polarization at 30 mT. We also estimated transverse relaxation times for different tissues at microtesla fields. Our results demonstrate feasibility and potential of human brain imaging by microtesla MRI. They also show that two new types of imaging equipment-low-cost systems for anatomical MRI of the human brain at microtesla fields, and more advanced instruments for combined functional (MEG) and structural (microtesla MRI) brain imaging-are practical. PMID:18619876

  7. Detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding derived from in utero MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Kim, Kio; Roosta, Ahmad; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Understanding human brain development in utero and detecting cortical abnormalities related to specific clinical conditions is an important area of research. In this paper, we describe and evaluate methodology for detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding from population-based studies of fetal brain anatomies imaged in utero. We use a general linear modeling framework to describe spatiotemporal changes in curvature of the developing brain and explore the ability to detect and localize delays in cortical folding in the presence of uncertainty in estimation of the fetal age. We apply permutation testing to examine which regions of the brain surface provide the most statistical power to detect a given folding delay at a given developmental stage. The presented methodology is evaluated using MR scans of fetuses with normal brain development and gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 27.86 weeks. This period is critical in early cortical folding and the formation of the primary and secondary sulci. Finally, we demonstrate a clinical application of the framework for detection and localization of folding delays in fetuses with isolated mild ventriculomegaly.

  8. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  9. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  10. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  11. Stable Atlas-based Mapped Prior (STAMP) Machine-learning Segmentation for Multicenter Large-scale MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Liu, Dawei; Johnson, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning (ML)-based segmentation methods are a common technique in the medical image processing field. In spite of numerous research groups that have investigated ML-based segmentation frameworks, there remains unanswered aspects of performance variability for the choice of two key components: ML-algorithm and intensity normalization. This investigation reveals that the choice of those elements plays a major part in determining segmentation accuracy and generalizability. The approach we have used in this study aims to evaluate relative benefits of the two elements within a subcortical MRI segmentation framework. Experiments were conducted to contrast eight machine-learning algorithm configurations and 11 normalization strategies for our brain MR segmentation framework. For the intensity normalization, a stable atlas-based mapped prior (STAMP) was utilized to take better account of contrast along boundaries of structures. Comparing eight machine learning algorithms on down-sampled segmentation MR data, it was obvious that a significant improvement was obtained using ensemble-based ML algorithms (i.e., random forest) or ANN algorithms. Further investigation between these two algorithms also revealed that the random forest results provided exceptionally good agreement with manual delineations by experts. Additional experiments showed that the effect of STAMP-based intensity normalization also improved the robustness of segmentation for multicenter data sets. The constructed framework obtained good multicenter reliability and was successfully applied on a large multicenter MR data set (n > 3000). Less than 10% of automated segmentations were recommended for minimal expert intervention. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the ML-based segmentation tools for processing large amount of multicenter MR images. We demonstrated dramatically different result profiles in segmentation accuracy according to the choice of ML algorithm and intensity

  12. On tests of activation map dimensionality for fMRI-based studies of learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juemin; Shmuelof, Lior; Xiao, Luo; Krakauer, John W; Caffo, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for investigating learning is developed using activation distributions, as opposed to standard voxel-level interaction tests. The approach uses tests of dimensionality to consider the ensemble of paired changes in voxel activation. The developed method allows for the investigation of non-focal and non-localized changes due to learning. In exchange for increased power to detect learning-based changes, this procedure sacrifices the localization information gained via voxel-level interaction testing. The test is demonstrated on an arc-pointing motor task for the study of motor learning, which served as the motivation for this methodological development. The proposed framework considers activation distribution, while the specific proposed test investigates linear tests of dimensionality. This paper includes: the development of the framework, a large scale simulation study, and the subsequent application to a study of motor learning in healthy adults. While the performance of the method was excellent when model assumptions held, complications arose in instances of massive numbers of null voxels or varying angles of principal dimension across subjects. Further analysis found that careful masking addressed the former concern, while an angle correction successfully resolved the latter. The simulation results demonstrated that the study of linear dimensionality is able to capture learning effects. The motivating data set used to illustrate the method evaluates two similar arc-pointing tasks, each over two sessions, with training on only one of the tasks in between sessions. The results suggests different activation distribution dimensionality when considering the trained and untrained tasks separately. Specifically, the untrained task evidences greater activation distribution dimensionality than the trained task. However, the direct comparison between the two tasks did not yield a significant result. The nature of the indication for greater dimensionality in

  13. Regional Mapping of Gas Uptake by Blood and Tissue in the Human Lung using Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Ruppert, Kai; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Shim, Y. Michael; Wang, Chengbo; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Altes, Talissa A.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a breath-hold acquisition for regional mapping of ventilation and the fractions of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (Xe129) dissolved in tissue (lung parenchyma and plasma) and red blood cells (RBCs), and to perform an exploratory study to characterize data obtained in human subjects. Materials and Methods A three-dimensional, multi-echo, radial-trajectory pulse sequence was developed to obtain ventilation (gaseous Xe129), tissue and RBC images in healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. Signal ratios (total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, RBC-to-gas and RBC-to-tissue) were calculated from the images for quantitative comparison. Results Healthy subjects demonstrated generally uniform values within coronal slices, and a gradient in values along the anterior-to-posterior direction. In contrast, images and associated ratio maps in smokers and asthmatics were generally heterogeneous and exhibited values mostly lower than those in healthy subjects. Whole-lung values of total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, and RBC-to-gas ratios in healthy subjects were significantly larger than those in diseased subjects. Conclusion Regional maps of tissue and RBC fractions of dissolved Xe129 were obtained from a short breath-hold acquisition, well tolerated by healthy volunteers and subjects with obstructive lung disease. Marked differences were observed in spatial distributions and overall amounts of Xe129 dissolved in tissue and RBCs among healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. PMID:23681559

  14. Asymmetric friction of nonmotor MAPs can lead to their directional motion in active microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Forth, Scott; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2014-04-10

    Diverse cellular processes require microtubules to be organized into distinct structures, such as asters or bundles. Within these dynamic motifs, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are frequently under load, but how force modulates these proteins' function is poorly understood. Here, we combine optical trapping with TIRF-based microscopy to measure the force dependence of microtubule interaction for three nonmotor MAPs (NuMA, PRC1, and EB1) required for cell division. We find that frictional forces increase nonlinearly with MAP velocity across microtubules and depend on filament polarity, with NuMA's friction being lower when moving toward minus ends, EB1's lower toward plus ends, and PRC1's exhibiting no directional preference. Mathematical models predict, and experiments confirm, that MAPs with asymmetric friction can move directionally within actively moving microtubule pairs they crosslink. Our findings reveal how nonmotor MAPs can generate frictional resistance in dynamic cytoskeletal networks via micromechanical adaptations whose anisotropy may be optimized for MAP localization and function within cellular structures. PMID:24725408

  15. Microtesla MRI of the human brain combined with MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Savukov, Igor M.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Gomez, John J.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges in functional brain imaging is integration of complementary imaging modalities, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MEG, which uses highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to directly measure magnetic fields of neuronal currents, cannot be combined with conventional high-field MRI in a single instrument. Indirect matching of MEG and MRI data leads to significant co-registration errors. A recently proposed imaging method—SQUID-based microtesla MRI—can be naturally combined with MEG in the same system to directly provide structural maps for MEG-localized sources. It enables easy and accurate integration of MEG and MRI/fMRI, because microtesla MR images can be precisely matched to structural images provided by high-field MRI and other techniques. Here we report the first images of the human brain by microtesla MRI, together with auditory MEG (functional) data, recorded using the same seven-channel SQUID system during the same imaging session. The images were acquired at 46 μT measurement field with pre-polarization at 30 mT. We also estimated transverse relaxation times for different tissues at microtesla fields. Our results demonstrate feasibility and potential of human brain imaging by microtesla MRI. They also show that two new types of imaging equipment—low-cost systems for anatomical MRI of the human brain at microtesla fields, and more advanced instruments for combined functional (MEG) and structural (microtesla MRI) brain imaging—are practical.

  16. Solar global horizontal and direct normal irradiation maps in Spain derived from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Solar radiation derived from satellite imagery is a powerful and highly accurate technique for solar resource assessment due to its maturity and to the long term database of observation images available. This work presents the methodology developed at CIEMAT for mapping solar radiation from geostationary satellite information and it also shows solar irradiation maps of global horizontal and direct normal components elaborated for Spain. The maps presented here have been developed from daily solar irradiation estimated for eleven years of satellite images (2001-2011). An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty of the presented maps is made using ground measurements from 27 meteorological stations available in Spain for global horizontal irradiation obtained from the World Radiation Data Centre. In the case of direct normal irradiation the ground measurement database was scarce, having available only six ground stations with measurements for a period of 4 years. Yearly values of global horizontal irradiation are around 1800 kWh m-2 in most of the country and around 1950-2000 kWh m-2 for annual direct normal irradiation. Root mean square errors in monthly means were of 11% and of 29% for global horizontal and direct normal irradiation, respectively.

  17. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  18. Direct dose mapping versus energy/mass transfer mapping for 4D dose accumulation: fundamental differences and dosimetric consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haisen S.; Zhong, Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Gulam, Misbah; Nurushev, Teamour S.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2014-01-01

    The direct dose mapping (DDM) and energy/mass transfer (EMT) mapping are two essential algorithms for accumulating the dose from different anatomic phases to the reference phase when there is organ motion or tumor/tissue deformation during the delivery of radiation therapy. DDM is based on interpolation of the dose values from one dose grid to another and thus lacks rigor in defining the dose when there are multiple dose values mapped to one dose voxel in the reference phase due to tissue/tumor deformation. On the other hand, EMT counts the total energy and mass transferred to each voxel in the reference phase and calculates the dose by dividing the energy by mass. Therefore it is based on fundamentally sound physics principles. In this study, we implemented the two algorithms and integrated them within the Eclipse treatment planning system. We then compared the clinical dosimetric difference between the two algorithms for ten lung cancer patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery treatment, by accumulating the delivered dose to the end-of-exhale (EE) phase. Specifically, the respiratory period was divided into ten phases and the dose to each phase was calculated and mapped to the EE phase and then accumulated. The displacement vector field generated by Demons-based registration of the source and reference images was used to transfer the dose and energy. The DDM and EMT algorithms produced noticeably different cumulative dose in the regions with sharp mass density variations and/or high dose gradients. For the planning target volume (PTV) and internal target volume (ITV) minimum dose, the difference was up to 11% and 4% respectively. This suggests that DDM might not be adequate for obtaining an accurate dose distribution of the cumulative plan, instead, EMT should be considered.

  19. Modulation of large-scale brain networks by transcranial direct current stimulation evidenced by resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Gómez, Cleofé; Sala-Lonch, Roser; Junqué, Carme; Clemente, Immaculada C.; Vidal, Dídac; Bargalló, Núria; Falcón, Carles; Valls-Solé, Josep; Pascual-Leone, Álvaro; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain areas interact mutually to perform particular complex brain functions such as memory or language. Furthermore, under resting-state conditions several spatial patterns have been identified that resemble functional systems involved in cognitive functions. Among these, the default-mode network (DMN), which is consistently deactivated during task periods and is related to a variety of cognitive functions, has attracted most attention. In addition, in resting-state conditions some brain areas engaged in focused attention (such as the anticorrelated network, AN) show a strong negative correlation with DMN; as task demand increases, AN activity rises, and DMN activity falls. Objective We combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate these brain network dynamics. Methods Ten healthy young volunteers underwent four blocks of resting-state fMRI (10-minutes), each of them immediately after 20 minutes of sham or active tDCS (2 mA), on two different days. On the first day the anodal electrode was placed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (part of the AN) with the cathode over the contralateral supraorbital area, and on the second day, the electrode arrangement was reversed (anode right-DLPFC, cathode left-supraorbital). Results After active stimulation, functional network connectivity revealed increased synchrony within the AN components and reduced synchrony in the DMN components. Conclusions Our study reveals a reconfiguration of intrinsic brain activity networks after active tDCS. These effects may help to explain earlier reports of improvements in cognitive functions after anodal-tDCS, where increasing cortical excitability may have facilitated reconfiguration of functional brain networks to address upcoming cognitive demands. PMID:21962981

  20. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Comesaña, D.; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez-Grande, E.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has extensively been used for many years to locate sound sources. However, it is not yet well defined when two sources should be regarded as resolved by means of direct sound mapping. This paper derives the limits of the direct representation of sound pressure, particle velocity and sound intensity by exploring the relationship between spatial resolution, noise level and geometry. The proposed expressions are validated via simulations and experiments. It is shown that particle velocity mapping yields better results for identifying closely spaced sound sources than sound pressure or sound intensity, especially in the acoustic near-field.

  1. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI instruments at low-field.

    PubMed

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to "enjoy" from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed. PMID:24287540

  2. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI Instruments at Low-Field

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to “enjoy” from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed. PMID:24287540

  3. A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of directed functional connectivity maps

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Adriene M.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2015-01-01

    A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of neural directed functional connectivity maps is rare. This is striking because models that require sequential independence among residuals are regularly implemented. The aim of the current study was (a) to apply to directed functional connectivity maps of functional magnetic resonance imaging data an a posteriori model validation procedure (i.e., white noise tests of one-step-ahead prediction errors combined with decision criteria for revising the maps based upon Lagrange Multiplier tests), and (b) to demonstrate how the procedure applies to single-subject simulated, single-subject task-related, and multi-subject resting state data. Directed functional connectivity was determined by the unified structural equation model family of approaches in order to map contemporaneous and first order lagged connections among brain regions at the group- and individual-levels while incorporating external input, then white noise tests were run. Findings revealed that the validation procedure successfully detected unmodeled sequential dependencies among residuals and recovered higher order (greater than one) simulated connections, and that the procedure can accommodate task-related input. Findings also revealed that lags greater than one were present in resting state data: With a group-level network that contained only contemporaneous and first order connections, 44% of subjects required second order, individual-level connections in order to obtain maps with white noise residuals. Results have broad methodological relevance (e.g., temporal validation is necessary after directed functional connectivity analyses because the presence of unmodeled higher order sequential dependencies may bias parameter estimates) and substantive implications (e.g., higher order lags may be common in resting state data). PMID:26379489

  4. A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of directed functional connectivity maps.

    PubMed

    Beltz, Adriene M; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of neural directed functional connectivity maps is rare. This is striking because models that require sequential independence among residuals are regularly implemented. The aim of the current study was (a) to apply to directed functional connectivity maps of functional magnetic resonance imaging data an a posteriori model validation procedure (i.e., white noise tests of one-step-ahead prediction errors combined with decision criteria for revising the maps based upon Lagrange Multiplier tests), and (b) to demonstrate how the procedure applies to single-subject simulated, single-subject task-related, and multi-subject resting state data. Directed functional connectivity was determined by the unified structural equation model family of approaches in order to map contemporaneous and first order lagged connections among brain regions at the group- and individual-levels while incorporating external input, then white noise tests were run. Findings revealed that the validation procedure successfully detected unmodeled sequential dependencies among residuals and recovered higher order (greater than one) simulated connections, and that the procedure can accommodate task-related input. Findings also revealed that lags greater than one were present in resting state data: With a group-level network that contained only contemporaneous and first order connections, 44% of subjects required second order, individual-level connections in order to obtain maps with white noise residuals. Results have broad methodological relevance (e.g., temporal validation is necessary after directed functional connectivity analyses because the presence of unmodeled higher order sequential dependencies may bias parameter estimates) and substantive implications (e.g., higher order lags may be common in resting state data). PMID:26379489

  5. Not all declarative memories are created equal: Fast Mapping as a direct route to cortical declarative representations.

    PubMed

    Merhav, Maayan; Karni, Avi; Gilboa, Asaf

    2015-08-15

    Memory formation for newly acquired associations typically depends on hippocampal-neocortical interactions. Through the process of system-consolidation, the mnemonic binding role of the hippocampus is subsequently replaced by cortical hubs, such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) or the anterior temporal lobe (ATL). Here, using BOLD-fMRI, we compared retrieval of semantic associations acquired through Fast Mapping (FM), an incidental, exclusion-based learning procedure, to retrieval of similar associations that were intentionally acquired through Explicit Encoding (EE). Despite an identical retrieval task, the encoding histories of the retrieved semantic associations (FM vs. EE) induced distinct neural substrates and disparate related neural dynamics in time. Retrieval of associations acquired through EE engaged the expected hippocampal and vmPFC related networks. Furthermore, retrieval intentionally encoded associations gave rise to a typical overnight increase in engagement of the vmPFC and increased vmPFC-hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity. On the other hand, retrieval of associations acquired through FM immediately engaged an ATL related network that typically supports well-established semantic knowledge, a network that did not engage the hippocampus and the vmPFC. Moreover, FM learning was associated with minimal overnight changes in the BOLD responses and in the functional connectivity. Our findings indicate that FM may induce a direct, ATL-mediated acquisition and retention of novel arbitrary associations, bypassing the initial hippocampal-cortical representation phase. A direct, ATL-mediated vocabulary acquisition through FM could support the learning and retention of new associations in young children with presumably an immature hippocampal system, and possibly even in amnesic adults with hippocampal lesions. PMID:25988227

  6. The Validation of Complete Fourier Direct MR Method for Diffusion MRI via Biological and Numerical Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay; Quirk, James D.; Wang, Yong; Wang, Qing; Sun, Peng; Spees, William M.; Song, Sheng–Kwei

    2012-01-01

    The equations of the Complete Fourier Direct (CFD) MR model are explicitly derived for diffusion weighted NMR experiments. The CFD–MR theory is validated by comparing a biological phantom constructed from nerve bundles and agar gel with its numerical implementation. The displacement integral distribution function estimated from the experimental data is in high agreement with the numerical phantom. CFD–MR’s ability to estimate accurately and fully spin diffusion properties demonstrated here, provides the experimental validation of the theoretical CFD–MR model. PMID:22255156

  7. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on

  8. Population Average T2 MRI Maps Reveal Quantitative Regional Transformations in the Degenerating Rabbit Intervertebral Disc that Vary by Lumbar Level

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John T.; Collins, Christopher M.; Mauck, Robert L.; Ikuta, Kensuke; Elliott, Dawn M.; Zhang, Yeija; Anderson, D. Greg; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.; Arlet, Vincent; Smith, Harvey E.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighting is routinely performed to assess intervertebral disc degeneration. Standard clinical evaluations of MR images are qualitative, however, and do not focus on region-specific alterations in the disc. Utilizing a rabbit needle puncture model, T2 mapping was performed on injured discs to develop a quantitative description of the degenerative process following puncture. To do so, an 18G needle was inserted into four discs per rabbit (L3/L4 to L6/L7) and T2 maps were generated pre- and 4 weeks post-injury. Individual T2 maps were normalized to a disc-specific coordinate system and then averaged for pre- and post-injury population composite T2 maps. We also developed a method to automatically segment the nucleus pulposus by 2-D and 3-D curve fitting routines. Puncture injury produced alterations in MR signal intensity in a region-specific manner mirroring human degeneration. Population average T2 maps provided a quantitative representation of the injury response, and identified deviations of individual degenerate discs from the pre-injury population. We found that the response to standardized injury was modest at lower lumbar levels, likely as a result of increased disc dimensions. These tools will be valuable for the quantitative characterization of disc degeneration in future clinical and pre-clinical studies. PMID:25273831

  9. SILC: a new Planck internal linear combination CMB temperature map using directional wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present new clean maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies (as measured by Planck) constructed with a novel internal linear combination (ILC) algorithm using directional, scale-discretized wavelets - scale-discretized, directional wavelet ILC or Scale-discretised, directional wavelet Internal Linear Combination (SILC). Directional wavelets, when convolved with signals on the sphere, can separate the anisotropic filamentary structures which are characteristic of both the CMB and foregrounds. Extending previous component separation methods, which use the frequency, spatial and harmonic signatures of foregrounds to separate them from the cosmological background signal, SILC can additionally use morphological information in the foregrounds and CMB to better localize the cleaning algorithm. We test the method on Planck data and simulations, demonstrating consistency with existing component separation algorithms, and discuss how to optimize the use of morphological information by varying the number of directional wavelets as a function of spatial scale. We find that combining the use of directional and axisymmetric wavelets depending on scale could yield higher quality CMB temperature maps. Our results set the stage for the application of SILC to polarization anisotropies through an extension to spin wavelets.

  10. Recent near-surface wind directions inferred from mapping sand ripples on Martian dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zac Yung-Chun; Zimbelman, James R.

    2015-11-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) provides the capability to obtain orbital images of Mars that are of sufficient resolution to record wind ripple patterns on the surfaces of sand dunes. Ripple patterns provide valuable insights into aeolian erosion and deposition on Earth and Mars. In this study, we develop a systematic mapping procedure to examine sand ripple orientations and create surface process maps to evaluate the recent wind flow over the dunes, as well as the interplay of wind and dune shape. By carefully examining the morphology of the dunes and the location of grainflow and grainfall on dune slipfaces, the recent near-surface wind direction (short-term wind) can be identified. Results from the analysis of three dune fields on the floors of craters west of Hellas Basin show regional N, NW, SE, and ESE wind directions. In the three adjacent dune fields, surface process and flow maps suggest a complex wind pattern. The comparison of short-term wind with dune-constructing wind (long-term wind) shows NE and ESE winds may be persistent at least for the past thousands of years. The results also show that the orientation of inferred wind direction on linear dunes is correlated with the crestlines, which suggest that form-flow interaction may take place. The results of local wind flow documentation should improve Martian surface wind modeling and advance our understanding of sand transport, as well as the rates of sand mobility on both Mars and Earth.

  11. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, E.; Hirose, J.; Okamoto, N.; Yamabe, S.; Mizuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify the appearance of the reparative tissue on the articular surface and to analyse the properties of the reparative tissue after hemicallotasis osteotomy (HCO) using MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Methods Coronal T1ρ and T2 mapping and three-dimensional gradient-echo images were obtained from 20 subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis. We set the regions of interest (ROIs) on the full-thickness cartilage of the medial femoral condyle (MFC) and medial tibial plateau (MTP) of the knee and measured the cartilage thickness (mm) and T1ρ and T2 relaxation times (ms). Statistical analysis of time-dependent changes in the cartilage thickness and the T1ρ and T2 relaxation times was performed using one-way analysis of variance, and Scheffe’s test was employed for post hoc multiple comparison. Results The cartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the cartilage surface of the medial compartment post-operatively, and the cartilage thickness showed a significant increase between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.003, MTP; p < 0.001). The T1ρ values of the cartilage-like repair tissue showed no difference over time, however, the T2 values showed a significant decrease between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.004, MTP; p = 0.040). Conclusion This study clarified that the fibrocartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the articular surface of the medial compartment after HCO as evidenced by MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Cite this article: H. Nishioka, E. Nakamura, J. Hirose, N. Okamoto, S. Yamabe, H. Mizuta. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:294–300. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0057.R1. PMID:27421285

  12. [Interest of EEG recording during direct electrical stimulation for brain mapping function in surgery].

    PubMed

    Trebuchon, A; Guye, M; Tcherniack, V; Tramoni, E; Bruder, N; Metellus, P

    2012-06-01

    Brain tumor surgery is at risk when lesions are located in eloquent areas. The interindividual anatomo-functional variability of the central nervous system implies that brain surgery within eloquent regions may induce neurological sequelae. Brain mapping using intraoperative direct electrical stimulation in awake patients has been for long validated as the standard for functional brain mapping. Direct electrical stimulation inducing a local transient electrical and functional disorganization is considered positive if the task performed by the patient is disturbed. The brain area stimulated is then considered as essential for the function tested. However, the exactitude of the information provided by this technique is cautious because the actual impact of cortical direct electrical stimulation is not known. Indeed, the possibility of false negative (insufficient intensity of the stimulation due to the heterogeneity of excitability threshold of different cortical areas) or false positive (current spread, interregional signal propagation responsible for remote effects, which make difficult the interpretation of positive or negative behavioural effects) constitute a limitation of this technique. To improve the sensitivity and specificity of this technique, we used an electrocorticographic recording system allowing a real time visualization of the local. We provide here evidence that direct cortical stimulation combined with electrocorticographic recording could be useful to detect remote after discharge and to adjust stimulation parameters. In addition this technique offers new perspective to better assess connectivity of cerebral networks. PMID:22683402

  13. Regularization of diffusion-based direction maps for the tracking of brain white matter fascicles.

    PubMed

    Poupon, C; Clark, C A; Frouin, V; Régis, J; Bloch, I; Le Bihan, D; Mangin, J

    2000-08-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information about fiber local directions in brain white matter. This paper addresses inference of the connectivity induced by fascicles made up of numerous fibers from such diffusion data. The usual fascicle tracking idea, which consists of following locally the direction of highest diffusion, is prone to erroneous forks because of problems induced by fiber crossing. In this paper, this difficulty is partly overcomed by the use of a priori knowledge of the low curvature of most of the fascicles. This knowledge is embedded in a model of the bending energy of a spaghetti plate representation of the white matter used to compute a regularized fascicle direction map. A new tracking algorithm is then proposed to highlight putative fascicle trajectories from this direction map. This algorithm takes into account potential fan shaped junctions between fascicles. A study of the tracking behavior according to the influence given to the a priori knowledge is proposed and concrete tracking results obtained with in vivo human brain data are illustrated. These results include putative trajectories of some pyramidal, commissural, and various association fibers. PMID:10913324

  14. Retinotopic Maps, Spatial Tuning, and Locations of Human Visual Areas in Surface Coordinates Characterized with Multifocal and Blocked fMRI Designs

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Linda; Karvonen, Juha; Salminen-Vaparanta, Niina; Railo, Henry; Vanni, Simo

    2012-01-01

    The localization of visual areas in the human cortex is typically based on mapping the retinotopic organization with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The most common approach is to encode the response phase for a slowly moving visual stimulus and to present the result on an individual's reconstructed cortical surface. The main aims of this study were to develop complementary general linear model (GLM)-based retinotopic mapping methods and to characterize the inter-individual variability of the visual area positions on the cortical surface. We studied 15 subjects with two methods: a 24-region multifocal checkerboard stimulus and a blocked presentation of object stimuli at different visual field locations. The retinotopic maps were based on weighted averaging of the GLM parameter estimates for the stimulus regions. In addition to localizing visual areas, both methods could be used to localize multiple retinotopic regions-of-interest. The two methods yielded consistent retinotopic maps in the visual areas V1, V2, V3, hV4, and V3AB. In the higher-level areas IPS0, VO1, LO1, LO2, TO1, and TO2, retinotopy could only be mapped with the blocked stimulus presentation. The gradual widening of spatial tuning and an increase in the responses to stimuli in the ipsilateral visual field along the hierarchy of visual areas likely reflected the increase in the average receptive field size. Finally, after registration to Freesurfer's surface-based atlas of the human cerebral cortex, we calculated the mean and variability of the visual area positions in the spherical surface-based coordinate system and generated probability maps of the visual areas on the average cortical surface. The inter-individual variability in the area locations decreased when the midpoints were calculated along the spherical cortical surface compared with volumetric coordinates. These results can facilitate both analysis of individual functional anatomy and comparisons of visual cortex topology

  15. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  16. Multispectral X-ray Imagaing for Core Temperature and Density Maps Retrieval in Direct Drive Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Izumi, N; Welser, L A; Mancini, R C; Delettrez, J; Regan, S; Smalyuk, V

    2006-04-26

    We report on the experiments aimed at obtaining core temperature and density maps in direct drive implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility using multi-monochromatic X-ray imagers. These instruments use an array of pinholes and a flat multilayer mirror to provide unique multi-spectral images distributed over a wide spectral range. Using Argon as a dopant in the DD-filled plastic shells produces emission images in the Ar He-b and Ly-b spectral regions. These images allow the retrieval of temperature and density maps of the plasma. We deployed three identical multi-monochromatic X-ray imagers in a quasi-orthogonal line-of-sight configuration to allow tomographic reconstruction of the structure of the imploding core.

  17. Integration of quantitative DCE-MRI and ADC mapping to monitor treatment response in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Lepage, Martin; Chakravarthy, Anuradha; Broome, Elizabeth E.; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Kelley, Mark C.; Meszoely, Ingrid; Mayer, Ingrid A.; Herman, Cheryl R.; McManus, Kevin; Price, Ronald R.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to assess changes in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and in pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from the fast-exchange regime (FXR) modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Materials and Methods Eleven patients with locally advanced breast cancer underwent MRI examination prior to and after chemotherapy but prior to surgery. A 1.5-T scanner was used to obtain T1, ADC and DCE-MRI data. DCE-MRI data were analyzed by the FXR model returning estimates of Ktrans (volume transfer constant), νe (extravascular extracellular volume fraction) and τsi (average intracellular water lifetime). Histogram and correlation analyses assessed parameter changes post-treatment. Results Significant ( P <.05) changes or trends towards significance ( P <.10) were seen in all parameters except τi, although there was qualitative reduction in τi values post-treatment. In particular, there was reduction ( P <.035) in voxels with Ktrans values in the range 0.2–0.5 min-1 and a decrease ( P <.05) in voxels with ADC values in the range 0.99×10-3 to 1.35×10-3 mm2/s. ADC and νe were negatively correlated (r = -.60, P <.02). Parameters sensitive to water distribution and geometry (T1, νe,τsi and ADC) correlated with a multivariable linear regression model. Conclusion The analysis presented here is sensitive to longitudinal changes in breast tumor status; Ktrans and ADC are most sensitive to these changes. Relationships between parameters provide information on water distribution and geometry in the tumor environment. PMID:17222711

  18. Perceptual Learning of Motion Direction Discrimination with Suppressed and Unsuppressed MT in Humans: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Benjamin; Tjan, Bosco S.; Liu, Zili

    2013-01-01

    The middle temporal area of the extrastriate visual cortex (area MT) is integral to motion perception and is thought to play a key role in the perceptual learning of motion tasks. We have previously found, however, that perceptual learning of a motion discrimination task is possible even when the training stimulus contains locally balanced, motion opponent signals that putatively suppress the response of MT. Assuming at least partial suppression of MT, possible explanations for this learning are that 1) training made MT more responsive by reducing motion opponency, 2) MT remained suppressed and alternative visual areas such as V1 enabled learning and/or 3) suppression of MT increased with training, possibly to reduce noise. Here we used fMRI to test these possibilities. We first confirmed that the motion opponent stimulus did indeed suppress the BOLD response within hMT+ compared to an almost identical stimulus without locally balanced motion signals. We then trained participants on motion opponent or non-opponent stimuli. Training with the motion opponent stimulus reduced the BOLD response within hMT+ and greater reductions in BOLD response were correlated with greater amounts of learning. The opposite relationship between BOLD and behaviour was found at V1 for the group trained on the motion-opponent stimulus and at both V1 and hMT+ for the group trained on the non-opponent motion stimulus. As the average response of many cells within MT to motion opponent stimuli is the same as their response to non-directional flickering noise, the reduced activation of hMT+ after training may reflect noise reduction. PMID:23326433

  19. Mind over chatter: plastic up-regulation of the fMRI salience network directly after EEG neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Ros, Tomas; Théberge, Jean; Frewen, Paul A; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Densmore, Maria; Calhoun, Vince D; Lanius, Ruth A

    2013-01-15

    Neurofeedback (NFB) involves a brain-computer interface that allows users to learn to voluntarily control their cortical oscillations, reflected in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Although NFB is being pioneered as a noninvasive tool for treating brain disorders, there is insufficient evidence on the mechanism of its impact on brain function. Furthermore, the dominant rhythm of the human brain is the alpha oscillation (8-12 Hz), yet its behavioral significance remains multifaceted and largely correlative. In this study with 34 healthy participants, we examined whether during the performance of an attentional task, the functional connectivity of distinct fMRI networks would be plastically altered after a 30-min session of voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (n=17) versus a sham-feedback condition (n=17). We reveal that compared to sham-feedback, NFB induced an increase of connectivity within regions of the salience network involved in intrinsic alertness (dorsal anterior cingulate), which was detectable 30 min after termination of training. The increase in salience network (default-mode network) connectivity was negatively (positively) correlated with changes in 'on task' mind-wandering as well as resting state alpha rhythm. Crucially, we observed a causal dependence between alpha rhythm synchronization during NFB and its subsequent change at resting state, not exhibited by the SHAM group. Our findings provide neurobehavioral evidence for the brain's exquisite functional plasticity, and for a temporally direct impact of NFB on a key cognitive control network, suggesting a promising basis for its use to treat cognitive disorders under physiological conditions. PMID:23022326

  20. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  1. Combining self-organizing mapping and supervised affinity propagation clustering approach to investigate functional brain networks involved in motor imagery and execution with fMRI measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Huafu; Yuan, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Deng, Lihua; Lu, Fengmei; Zhang, Junpeng; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Mingwen; Chen, Liangyin

    2015-01-01

    Clustering analysis methods have been widely applied to identifying the functional brain networks of a multitask paradigm. However, the previously used clustering analysis techniques are computationally expensive and thus impractical for clinical applications. In this study a novel method, called SOM-SAPC that combines self-organizing mapping (SOM) and supervised affinity propagation clustering (SAPC), is proposed and implemented to identify the motor execution (ME) and motor imagery (MI) networks. In SOM-SAPC, SOM was first performed to process fMRI data and SAPC is further utilized for clustering the patterns of functional networks. As a result, SOM-SAPC is able to significantly reduce the computational cost for brain network analysis. Simulation and clinical tests involving ME and MI were conducted based on SOM-SAPC, and the analysis results indicated that functional brain networks were clearly identified with different response patterns and reduced computational cost. In particular, three activation clusters were clearly revealed, which include parts of the visual, ME and MI functional networks. These findings validated that SOM-SAPC is an effective and robust method to analyze the fMRI data with multitasks. PMID:26236217

  2. Investigation and direct mapping of the persistent spin helix in confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, Markus; Weingartner, Matthias; Völkl, Roland; Oltscher, Martin; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Korn, Tobias; Schüller, Christian

    The spin-orbit field in GaAs-based quantum well (QW) structures typically consists of two different contributions: Dresselhaus and Rashba field. The geometry of the Dresselhaus field, which arises due to the bulk inversion asymmetry, is mostly determined by the growth direction of the quantum well. The Rashba field instead is caused by a structure inversion asymmetry, which can be controlled, e.g. by the modulation doping. For the specific case of a (001)-grown GaAs quantum well with equal strength of Dresselhaus and Rashba fields, the effective spin-orbit field is oriented along the in-plane [110] direction for all k values and the spin splitting for this direction vanishes. For optically injected spins, which are initially oriented perpendicular to the QW plane, a persistent spin helix (PSH) state forms. We use a femtosecond pulsed TiSa-Laser system combined with a magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for time- and space-resolved mapping of the PSH. With this technique, we investigate the PSH behavior in confined structures, e.g., thin channels along the helix direction. Hence we find that lateral confinement increases the effective PSH lifetime drastically. In more complex structures, we observe that PSH formation is even stable under a forced direction change. Financial support by the DFG via SFB 689 and SPP 1285 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Spatial Mapping of Flow-Induced Molecular Alignment in a Noncrystalline Biopolymer Fluid Using Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) (23)Na MRI.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Flow-induced molecular alignment was observed experimentally in a non-liquid-crystalline bioplymeric fluid during developed tubular flow. The fluid was comprised of rigid rods of the polysaccharide xanthan and exhibited shear-thinning behavior. Without a requirement for optical transparency or the need for an added tracer, (23)Na magic angle (MA) double quantum filtered (DQF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled the mapping of the anisotropic molecular arrangement under flow conditions. A regional net molecular alignment was found in areas of high shear values in the vicinity of the tube wall. Furthermore, the xanthan molecules resumed random orientations after the cessation of flow. The observed flow-induced molecular alignment was correlated with the rheological properties of the fluid. The work demonstrates the ability of (23)Na MA DQF magnetic resonance to provide a valuable molecular-mechanical link. PMID:26277955

  4. Neural network models for spatial data mining, map production, and cortical direction selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Olga

    A family of ARTMAP neural networks for incremental supervised learning has been developed over the last decade. The Sensor Exploitation Group of MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) has incorporated an early version of this network as the recognition engine of a hierarchical system for fusion and data mining of multiple registered geospatial images. The LL system has been successfully fielded, but it is limited to target vs. non-target identifications and does not produce whole maps. This dissertation expands the capabilities of the LL system so that it learns to identify arbitrarily many target classes at once and can thus produce a whole map. This new spatial data mining system is designed particularly to cope with the highly skewed class distributions of typical mapping problems. Specification of a consistent procedure and a benchmark testbed has permitted the evaluation of candidate recognition networks as well as pre- and post-processing and feature extraction options. The resulting default ARTMAP network and mapping methodology set a standard for a variety of related mapping problems and application domains. The second part of the dissertation investigates the development of cortical direction selectivity. The possible role of visual experience and oculomotor behavior in the maturation of cells in the primary visual cortex is studied. The responses of neurons in the thalamus and cortex of the cat are modeled when natural scenes are scanned by several types of eye movements. Inspired by the Hebbian-like synaptic plasticity, which is based upon correlations between cell activations, the second-order statistical structure of thalamo-cortical activity is examined. In the simulations, patterns of neural activity that lead to a correct refinement of cell responses are observed during visual fixation, when small ocular movements occur, but are not observed in the presence of large saccades. Simulations also replicate experiments in which kittens are reared under stroboscopic

  5. Directed percolation criticality due to stochastic switching between attractive and repulsive coupling in coupled circle maps.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Abhijeet R

    2010-05-01

    We study a lattice model where the coupling stochastically switches between repulsive (subtractive) and attractive (additive) at each site with probability p at every time instant. We observe that such a kind of coupling stabilizes the local fixed point of a circle map, with the resultant globally stable attractor providing a unique absorbing state. Interestingly, a continuous phase transition is observed from the absorbing state to spatiotemporal chaos via spatiotemporal intermittency for a range of values of p . It is interesting to note that the transition falls in class of directed percolation. Static and spreading exponents along with relevant scaling laws are found to be obeyed confirming the directed percolation universality class in spatiotemporal intermittency regime. PMID:20866306

  6. Rapid geodesic mapping of brain functional connectivity: implementation of a dedicated co-processor in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and application to resting state functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Minati, Ludovico; Cercignani, Mara; Chan, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    Graph theory-based analyses of brain network topology can be used to model the spatiotemporal correlations in neural activity detected through fMRI, and such approaches have wide-ranging potential, from detection of alterations in preclinical Alzheimer's disease through to command identification in brain-machine interfaces. However, due to prohibitive computational costs, graph-based analyses to date have principally focused on measuring connection density rather than mapping the topological architecture in full by exhaustive shortest-path determination. This paper outlines a solution to this problem through parallel implementation of Dijkstra's algorithm in programmable logic. The processor design is optimized for large, sparse graphs and provided in full as synthesizable VHDL code. An acceleration factor between 15 and 18 is obtained on a representative resting-state fMRI dataset, and maps of Euclidean path length reveal the anticipated heterogeneous cortical involvement in long-range integrative processing. These results enable high-resolution geodesic connectivity mapping for resting-state fMRI in patient populations and real-time geodesic mapping to support identification of imagined actions for fMRI-based brain-machine interfaces. PMID:23746911

  7. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, T.; Avital, I.; Stojadinovic, A.; Brücher, B.L.D.M.; Cote, E.; Yu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs. PMID:23412660

  8. Non-invasive mapping of deep-tissue lymph nodes in live animals using a multimodal PET/MRI nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Ulmert, David; Diop, Ndeye-Fatou M.; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Doran, Michael G.; Huang, Ruimin; Abou, Diane S.; Larson, Steven M.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The invasion status of tumour-draining lymph nodes (LNs) is a critical indicator of cancer stage and is important for treatment planning. Clinicians currently use planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-radiocolloid to guide biopsy and resection of LNs. However, emerging multimodality approaches such as positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) detect sites of disease with higher sensitivity and accuracy. Here we present a multimodal nanoparticle, 89Zr-ferumoxytol, for the enhanced detection of LNs with PET/MRI. For genuine translational potential, we leverage a clinical iron oxide formulation, altered with minimal modification for radiolabelling. Axillary drainage in naive mice and from healthy and tumour-bearing prostates was investigated. We demonstrate that 89Zr-ferumoxytol can be used for high-resolution tomographic studies of lymphatic drainage in preclinical disease models. This nanoparticle platform has significant translational potential to improve preoperative planning for nodal resection and tumour staging. PMID:24445347

  9. In vivo electric conductivity of cervical cancer patients based on B_{1}^{+} maps at 3T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidemaj, E.; de Boer, P.; van Lier, A. L. H. M. W.; Remis, R. F.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Westerveld, G. H.; Nederveen, A. J.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Crezee, J.

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo electric conductivity (σ) values of tissue are essential for accurate electromagnetic simulations and specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment for applications such as thermal dose computations in hyperthermia. Currently used σ-values are mostly based on ex vivo measurements. In this study the conductivity of human muscle, bladder content and cervical tumors is acquired non-invasively in vivo using MRI. The conductivity of 20 cervical cancer patients was measured with the MR-based electric properties tomography method on a standard 3T MRI system. The average in vivo σ-value of muscle is 14% higher than currently used in human simulation models. The σ-value of bladder content is an order of magnitude higher than the value for bladder wall tissue that is used for the complete bladder in many models. Our findings are confirmed by various in vivo animal studies from the literature. In cervical tumors, the observed average conductivity was 13% higher than the literature value reported for cervical tissue. Considerable deviations were found for the electrical conductivity observed in this study and the commonly used values for SAR assessment, emphasizing the importance of acquiring in vivo conductivity for more accurate SAR assessment in various applications.

  10. Non-invasive mapping of deep-tissue lymph nodes in live animals using a multimodal PET/MRI nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, David; Diop, Ndeye-Fatou M.; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Doran, Michael G.; Huang, Ruimin; Abou, Diane S.; Larson, Steven M.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The invasion status of tumour-draining lymph nodes (LNs) is a critical indicator of cancer stage and is important for treatment planning. Clinicians currently use planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-radiocolloid to guide biopsy and resection of LNs. However, emerging multimodality approaches such as positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) detect sites of disease with higher sensitivity and accuracy. Here we present a multimodal nanoparticle, 89Zr-ferumoxytol, for the enhanced detection of LNs with PET/MRI. For genuine translational potential, we leverage a clinical iron oxide formulation, altered with minimal modification for radiolabelling. Axillary drainage in naive mice and from healthy and tumour-bearing prostates was investigated. We demonstrate that 89Zr-ferumoxytol can be used for high-resolution tomographic studies of lymphatic drainage in preclinical disease models. This nanoparticle platform has significant translational potential to improve preoperative planning for nodal resection and tumour staging.

  11. Direct mapping of local director field of nematic liquid crystals at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Serra, Francesca; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall

    2015-03-01

    The director field in liquid crystals (LCs) has been characterized mainly via polarized optical microscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, all of which are limited by optical wavelengths - from hundreds of nanometers to several micrometers. Since LC orientation cannot be resolved directly by these methods, theory is needed to interpret the local director field of LC alignment. In this work, we introduce a new approach to directly visualize the local director field of a nematic LC (NLC) at the nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A new type of NLC monomer bearing crosslinkable groups was designed and synthesized. It can be well-oriented at particle surfaces and patterned polymer substrates, including micron-sized silica colloids, porous membranes, micropillar arrays, and 1D channels. After carefully crosslinking, the molecular orientation of NLCs around the particles or within the patterns could be directly visualized by SEM, showing oriented nanofibers representing LC director from the fractured samples. Here, we could precisely resolve not only the local director field by this approach, but the defect structures of NLCs, including hedgehogs and line defects. The direct mapping of LC directors at the nanoscale using this method will improve our understanding of NLC local director field, and thus their manipulation and applications. More importantly, a theoretical interpretation will no longer be a necessity to resolve a new material system in this field.

  12. Rupture Directivity Effect on the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps in the Marmara Region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Akinci, A.; Herrero, A.; Pucci, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we attempt to incorporate the rupture directivity effects into seismic hazard analysis in the Marmara region, Turkey. We introduce information about the fault segments by focusing on the fault rupture characteristics, near source directivity effects and its influence on the probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) accounting for the azimuthal variations of the ground motion spatial distribution. An analytical model developed by Spudich and Chiou (2008) is used as a corrective factor that modifies four ground motion predictive equations (GMPEs) (Abrahamson & Silva 2008; Boore & Atkinson 2008; Campbell & Bozorgnia 2008; Chiou &Youngs 2008) and accounts for rupture related parameters that generally lump together into the term directivity effect. In this paper, we only use the relation calibrated for the Abrahamson & Silva (2008) and Boore & Atkinson (2008). In order to evaluate the impact of the rupture directivity effects to ground motion hazard in the near source we attempt to calculate the fault-based probabilistic seismic hazard maps (PSHA) of mean Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) having 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years on rock site condition. Therefore the PSHMs for the Marmara region is produced incorporating detailed knowledge of active faulting and tectonic rates in earthquake recurrence models using the available database and the most innovative approaches. In order to test the impact of the corrective factor on seismic hazard we first considered its effect on a normal fault and on a strike slip fault as a function of magnitude. Seismic hazard is given in terms of Spectral Acceleration (SA) at seven different periods. We also report the percentage ratio between the seismic hazards computed with the directivity model and without it, over the seismic hazard resulting from the standard practice. Finally, we improve the seismic hazard maps in the near fault source incorporating the directivity effects in the ground motion prediction in

  13. Nanoscale direct mapping of localized and induced noise sources on conducting polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Cho, Duckhyung; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-Guk; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-12-01

    The localized noise-sources and those induced by external-stimuli were directly mapped by using a conducting-AFM integrated with a custom-designed noise measurement set-up. In this method, current and noise images of a poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-polymer-film on a conducting-substrate were recorded simultaneously, enabling the mapping of the resistivity and noise source density (NT). The polymer-films exhibited separate regions with high or low resistivities, which were attributed to the ordered or disordered phases, respectively. A larger number of noise-sources were observed in the disordered-phase-regions than in the ordered-phase regions, due to structural disordering. Increased bias-voltages on the disordered-phase-regions resulted in increased NT, which is explained by the structural deformation at high bias-voltages. On photo-illumination, the ordered-phase-regions exhibited a rather large increase in the conductivity and NT. Presumably, the illumination released carriers from deep-traps which should work as additional noise-sources. These results show that our methods provide valuable insights into noise-sources and, thus, can be powerful tools for basic research and practical applications of conducting polymer films.The localized noise-sources and those induced by external-stimuli were directly mapped by using a conducting-AFM integrated with a custom-designed noise measurement set-up. In this method, current and noise images of a poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-polymer-film on a conducting-substrate were recorded simultaneously, enabling the mapping of the resistivity and noise source density (NT). The polymer-films exhibited separate regions with high or low resistivities, which were attributed to the ordered or disordered phases, respectively. A larger number of noise-sources were observed in the disordered-phase-regions than in the ordered-phase regions, due to structural disordering. Increased bias-voltages on the disordered-phase-regions resulted in

  14. Mapping the reading circuitry for skilled deaf readers: an fMRI study of semantic and phonological processing.

    PubMed

    Emmorey, Karen; Weisberg, Jill; McCullough, Stephen; Petrich, Jennifer A F

    2013-08-01

    We examined word-level reading circuits in skilled deaf readers whose primary language is American Sign Language, and hearing readers matched for reading ability (college level). During fMRI scanning, participants performed a semantic decision (concrete concept?), a phonological decision (two syllables?), and a false-font control task (string underlined?). The groups performed equally well on the semantic task, but hearing readers performed better on the phonological task. Semantic processing engaged similar left frontotemporal language circuits in deaf and hearing readers. However, phonological processing elicited increased neural activity in deaf, relative to hearing readers, in the left precentral gyrus, suggesting greater reliance on articulatory phonological codes, and in bilateral parietal cortex, suggesting increased phonological processing effort. Deaf readers also showed stronger anterior-posterior functional segregation between semantic and phonological processes in left inferior prefrontal cortex. Finally, weaker phonological decoding ability did not alter activation in the visual word form area for deaf readers. PMID:23747332

  15. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-04-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT.

  16. Rapid Exploration of Configuration Space with Diffusion Map-directed-Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenwei; Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The gap between the timescale of interesting behavior in macromolecular systems and that which our computational resources can afford oftentimes limits Molecular Dynamics (MD) from understanding experimental results and predicting what is inaccessible in experiments. In this paper, we introduce a new sampling scheme, named Diffusion Map-directed-MD (DM-d-MD), to rapidly explore molecular configuration space. The method uses diffusion map to guide MD on the fly. DM-d-MD can be combined with other methods to reconstruct the equilibrium free energy, and here we used umbrella sampling as an example. We present results from two systems: alanine dipeptide and alanine-12. In both systems we gain tremendous speedup with respect to standard MD both in exploring the configuration space and reconstructing the equilibrium distribution. In particular, we obtain 3 orders of magnitude of speedup over standard MD in the exploration of the configurational space of alanine-12 at 300K with DM-d-MD. The method is reaction coordinate free and minimally dependent on a priori knowledge of the system. We expect wide applications of DM-d-MD to other macromolecular systems in which equilibrium sampling is not affordable by standard MD. PMID:23865517

  17. A direct approach to generalised multiple mapping conditioning for selected turbulent diffusion flame cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Brruntha; Klimenko, Alexander Yuri; Cleary, Matthew John; Ge, Yipeng

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a direct and transparent interpretation of two concepts for modelling turbulent combustion: generalised Multiple Mapping Conditioning (MMC) and sparse-Lagrangian Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The MMC approach is presented as a hybrid between the Probability Density Function (PDF) method and approaches based on conditioning (e.g. Conditional Moment Closure, flamelet, etc.). The sparse-Lagrangian approach, which allows for a dramatic reduction of computational cost, is viewed as an alternative interpretation of the Filtered Density Function (FDF) methods. This work presents simulations of several turbulent diffusion flame cases and discusses the universality of the localness parameter between these cases and the universality of sparse-Lagrangian FDF methods with MMC.

  18. Methods of mapping from phase to sine amplitude in direct digital synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vankka, J

    1997-01-01

    There are many methods for performing functional mapping from phase to sine amplitude (e.g., ROM look-up, coarse/fine segmentation into multiple ROM's, Taylor series, CORDIC algorithm). The spectral purity of the conventional direct digital synthesizer (DDS) is also determined by the resolution of the values stored in the sine table ROM. Therefore, it is desirable to increase the resolution of the ROM. Unfortunately, larger ROM storage means higher power consumption, lower reliability, lower speed, and greatly increased costs. Different memory compression and algorithmic techniques and their effect on distortion and trade-offs are investigated in detail. A computer program has been created to simulate the effects of the memory compression and algorithmic techniques on the output spectrum of the DDS. For each memory compression and algorithmic technique, the worst case spurious response is calculated using the computer program. PMID:18244150

  19. Large scale directional anomalies in the WMAP 5yr ILC map

    SciTech Connect

    Gruppuso, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    We study the alignments of the low multipoles of CMB anisotropies with specific directions in the sky (i.e. the dipole, the north Ecliptic pole, the north Galactic pole and the north Super Galactic pole). Performing 10{sup 5} random extractions we have found that: 1) separately quadrupole and octupole are mildly orthogonal to the dipole but when they are considered together, in analogy to Copi2006, we find an unlikely orthogonality at the level of 0.8% C.L.; 2) the multipole vectors associated to l = 4 are unlikely aligned with the dipole at 99.1% C.L.; 3) the multipole vectors associated to l = 5 are mildly orthogonal to the dipole but when we consider only maps that show exactly the same correlation among the multipoles as in the observed WMAP 5yr ILC, these multipole vectors are unlikely orthogonal to the dipole at 99.7% C.L.

  20. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment. PMID:26924804

  1. MAP6-F is a temperature sensor that directly binds to and protects microtubules from cold-induced depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Delphin, Christian; Bouvier, Denis; Seggio, Maxime; Couriol, Emilie; Saoudi, Yasmina; Denarier, Eric; Bosc, Christophe; Valiron, Odile; Bisbal, Mariano; Arnal, Isabelle; Andrieux, Annie

    2012-10-12

    Microtubules are dynamic structures that present the peculiar characteristic to be ice-cold labile in vitro. In vivo, microtubules are protected from ice-cold induced depolymerization by the widely expressed MAP6/STOP family of proteins. However, the mechanism by which MAP6 stabilizes microtubules at 4 °C has not been identified. Moreover, the microtubule cold sensitivity and therefore the needs for microtubule stabilization in the wide range of temperatures between 4 and 37 °C are unknown. This is of importance as body temperatures of animals can drop during hibernation or torpor covering a large range of temperatures. Here, we show that in the absence of MAP6, microtubules in cells below 20 °C rapidly depolymerize in a temperature-dependent manner whereas they are stabilized in the presence of MAP6. We further show that in cells, MAP6-F binding to and stabilization of microtubules is temperature- dependent and very dynamic, suggesting a direct effect of the temperature on the formation of microtubule/MAP6 complex. We also demonstrate using purified proteins that MAP6-F binds directly to microtubules through its Mc domain. This binding is temperature-dependent and coincides with progressive conformational changes of the Mc domain as revealed by circular dichroism. Thus, MAP6 might serve as a temperature sensor adapting its conformation according to the temperature to maintain the cellular microtubule network in organisms exposed to temperature decrease. PMID:22904321

  2. Directly mapping the surface charge density of lipid bilayers under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhs, Thomas; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-03-01

    The surface charge density of lipid bilayers governs the cellular uptake of charged particles and guides cell-cell and cell-surface interactions. Direct probing of the potential requires sub nanometer distances as the electrostatic potential is screened by high physiological salt concentrations. This prevented direct measurement of the SCD under physiological conditions. In this study we investigate supported bilayers of lipid mixtures that form domains of distinct surface charges, submerged in 150mM NaCl. We use a scanning ion-conductance microscope (SICM) setup to measure the ionic current through a nanopipette as the pipette is scanned several nanometers above the sample. The charged headgroups of the lipids attract counter ions leading to a charge dependent enhancement of the ion concentration near the surface. This creates a measurable change of conductivity in the vicinity of the surface. As the dependency of the current on the SCD and pipette potential is non-trivial we characterized it using numerical solutions to Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Based on the simulation results we propose an imaging method. We confirm feasibility of the proposed method by experimentally mapping the local surface charge density of phase separated lipid bilayers.

  3. Implementing the effect of the rupture directivity on PSHA maps: Application to the Marmara Region (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Andre; Spagnuolo, Elena; Akinci, Aybige; Pucci, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    seismic potential of the Marmara region to derive a statistical distribution for nucleation position. Our results suggest that accounting for rupture related parameters in a PSHA using deterministic information from dynamic models is feasible and in particular, the use of a non-uniform statistical distribution for nucleation position has serious consequences on the hazard assessment. Since the directivity effect is conditional on the nucleation position the hazard map changes with the assumptions made. A worst case scenario (both the faults are rupturing towards the city of Istanbul) predicts up to 25% change than the standard formulation at 2 sec and increases with longer periods. The former result is heavily different if a deterministically based nucleation position is assumed.

  4. Task-specific Aspects of Goal-directed Word Generation Identified via Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Klovatch, Ilana; Nathan, Dana; Oren, Noga; Hendler, Talma

    2016-09-01

    Generating words according to a given rule relies on retrieval-related search and postretrieval control processes. Using fMRI, we recently characterized neural patterns of word generation in response to episodic, semantic, and phonemic cues by comparing free recall of wordlists, category fluency, and letter fluency [Shapira-Lichter, I., Oren, N., Jacob, Y., Gruberger, M., & Hendler, T. Portraying the unique contribution of the default mode network to internally driven mnemonic processes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A., 110, 4950-4955, 2013]. Distinct selectivity for each condition was evident, representing discrete aspects of word generation-related memory retrieval. For example, the precuneus, implicated in processing spatiotemporal information, emerged as a key contributor to the episodic condition, which uniquely requires this information. Gamma band is known to play a central role in memory, and increased gamma power has been observed before word generation. Yet, gamma modulation in response to task demands has not been investigated. To capture the task-specific modulation of gamma power, we analyzed the EEG data recorded simultaneously with the aforementioned fMRI, focusing on the activity locked to and immediately preceding word articulation. Transient increases in gamma power were identified in a parietal electrode immediately before episodic and semantic word generation, however, within a different time frame relative to articulation. Gamma increases were followed by an alpha-theta decrease in the episodic condition, a gamma decrease in the semantic condition. This pattern indicates a task-specific modulation of the gamma signal corresponding to the specific demands of each word generation task. The gamma power and fMRI signal from the precuneus were correlated during the episodic condition, implying the existence of a common cognitive construct uniquely required for this task, possibly the reactivation or processing of

  5. Annual Research Review: Current limitations and future directions in MRI studies of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Horga, Guillermo; Kaur, Tejal; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies has generated many investigations that have measured brain structure and function in vivo throughout development, often generating great excitement over our ability to visualize the living, developing brain using the attractive, even seductive images that these studies produce. Often lost in this excitement is the recognition that brain imaging generally, and MRI in particular, is simply a technology, one that does not fundamentally differ from any other technology, be it a blood test, a genotyping assay, a biochemical assay, or behavioral test. No technology alone can generate valid scientific findings. Rather, it is only technology coupled with a strong experimental design that can generate valid and reproducible findings that lead to new insights into the mechanisms of disease and therapeutic response. In this review we discuss selected studies to illustrate the most common and important limitations of MRI study designs as most commonly implemented thus far, as well as the misunderstanding that the interpretations of findings from those studies can create for our theories of developmental psychopathologies. Those limitations are in large part responsible thus far for the generally poor reproducibility of findings across studies, poor generalizability to the larger population, failure to identify developmental trajectories, inability to distinguish causes from effects of illness, and poor ability to infer causal mechanisms in most MRI studies of developmental psychopathologies. For each of these limitations in study design and the difficulties they entail for the interpretation of findings, we discuss various approaches that numerous laboratories are now taking to address those difficulties, which have in common the yoking of brain imaging technologies to studies with inherently stronger designs that permit more valid and more powerful

  6. Comparison of cardiac stroke volume measurement determined using stereological analysis of breath-hold cine MRI and phase contrast velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Graves, M J; Dommett, D M

    2000-08-01

    Cine MRI of the heart using segmented k-space pulse sequences permits multiphase images to be acquired in a single breath-hold. Whilst image quality is improved compared with conventional (non-segmented) cine imaging, subsequent analysis can be relatively time consuming. In this study, multiple slice breath-hold cine imaging of the heart was performed in 11 normal volunteers. Left and right ventricular stroke volume (SV) was estimated from the images by application of the Cavalieri method of modern design stereology in combination with point counting. The measured SVs were compared with those obtained by cine phase contrast velocity mapping in the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery. Excellent agreement was found between the SVs determined by the two techniques, with mean differences (+/- one SD) of 0.41 +/- 3.00 ml and 0.41 +/- 4.78 ml for left and right ventricles, respectively. Comparison of left and right ventricular SV using stereology yielded a mean difference of 0.84 +/- 5.70 ml. Breath-hold data acquisition together with stereological analysis is demonstrated to be an accurate and unbiased technique for the rapid assessment of cardiac function. PMID:11026856

  7. Quantitative Measurement of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Human Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI with Fast T1 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Saeid; Gasparovic, Charles; Shah, Nadim Jon; Rosenberg, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), occurring in many neurological diseases, has been difficult to measure noninvasively in humans. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging measures BBB permeability. However, important technical challenges remain and normative data from healthy humans is lacking. We report the implementation of a method for measuring BBB permeability, originally developed in animals, to estimate BBB permeability in both healthy subjects and patients with white matter pathology. Fast T1 mapping was used to measure the leakage of contrast agent Gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) from plasma into brain. A quarter of the standard Gd-DTPA dose for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was found to give both sufficient contrast-to-noise and high T1 sensitivity. The Patlak graphical approach was used to calculate the permeability from changes in 1/T1. Permeability constants were compared with cerebrospinal fluid albumin index. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for white matter BBB permeability for normal subjects was 3 × 10−4 L/g min. MRI measurements correlated strongly with levels of cerebrospinal fluid albumin in those subjects undergoing lumbar puncture. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with low dose Gd-DTPA and fast T1 imaging is a sensitive method to measure subtle differences in BBB permeability in humans and may have advantages over techniques based purely on the measurement of pixel contrast changes. PMID:21413067

  8. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics

    PubMed Central

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle—namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  9. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics.

    PubMed

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2016-08-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle-namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  10. Discretized aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Mawet, Dimitri; Jolissaint, Laurent; Carbillet, Marcel; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mourard, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Discretized Aperture Mapping (DAM) appears as an original filtering technique easy to play with existing adaptive optics (AO) systems. In its essential DAM operates as an optical passive filter removing part of the phase residuals in the wavefront without introducing any difficult-to-align component in the Fourier conjugate of the entrance pupil plane. DAM reveals as a new interferometric technique combined with spatial filtering allowing direct imaging over a narrow field of view (FOV). In fact, the entrance pupil of a single telescope is divided into many sub-pupils so that the residual phase in each sub-pupil is filtered up to the DAM cut-off frequency. DAM enables to smooth the small scale wavefront defects which correspond to high spatial frequencies in the pupil plane and to low angular frequencies in the image plane. Close to the AO Nyquist frequency, such pupil plane spatial frequencies are not well measured by the wavefront sensor (WFS) due to aliasing. Once bigger than the AO Nyquist frequency, they are no more measured by the WFS due to the fitting limit responsible for the narrow AO FOV. The corresponding image plane angular frequencies are not transmitted by DAM and are useless to image small FOVs, as stated by interferometry. That is why AO and DAM are complementary assuming that the DAM cut-off frequency is equal to the AO Nyquist frequency. Here we describe the imaging capabilities when DAM is placed downstream an AO system, over a convenient pupil which precedes the scientific detector. We show firstly that the imaging properties are preserved on a narrow FOV allowing direct imaging throughout interferometry. Then we show how the residual pupil plane spatial frequencies bigger than the AO Nyquist one are filtered out, as well as the residual halo in the image is dimmed.

  11. Asymmetric friction of non-motor MAPs can lead to their directional motion in active microtubule networks

    PubMed Central

    Forth, Scott; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes require microtubules to be organized into distinct structures, such as asters or bundles. Within these dynamic motifs, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are frequently under load, but how force modulates these proteins’ function is poorly understood. Here, we combine optical-trapping with TIRF-based microscopy to measure the force-dependence of microtubule interaction for three non-motor MAPs (NuMA, PRC1, and EB1) required for cell division. We find that frictional forces increase non-linearly with MAP velocity across microtubules and depend on filament polarity, with NuMA’s friction being lower when moving towards minus-ends, EB1’s lower towards plus-ends, and PRC1 exhibiting no directional preference. Mathematical models predict, and experiments confirm, that MAPs with asymmetric friction can move directionally within active microtubule pairs they crosslink. Our findings reveal how non-motor MAPs can generate frictional resistance in dynamic cytoskeletal networks via micromechanical adaptations whose anisotropy may be optimized for MAP localization and function within cellular structures. PMID:24725408

  12. Glioma localization and excision using direct electrical stimulation for language mapping during awake surgery

    PubMed Central

    LI, TIANDONG; BAI, HONGMIN; WANG, GUOLIANG; WANG, WEIMIN; LIN, JIAN; GAO, HAN; WANG, LIMIN; XIA, LIHUI; XIE, XUEMIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the method and significance of the application of direct electrical stimulation (DES) to the brain mapping of language functions during glioma surgery. A retrospective analysis of clinical data was performed for 91 cases of brain functional area glioma surgery under DES from January 2003 until January 2012. Following cortical electrical stimulation, 88 patients exhibited seizures involving facial or hand movements and 91 cases experienced language disorders such as counting interruption, naming errors or anomia. The most commonly observed areas of counting interruption were distributed on the posterior part of the left anterior central gyrus (47.7%), the operculum of the left inferior frontal gyrus (24.4%) and the triangular part of the left inferior frontal gyrus (12.8%). Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that overall excision was achieved in 53 cases and sub-overall excision was performed in 31 cases. A total of 42 cases (46.2%) exhibited no postoperative neurological dysfunction, 39 cases (42.9%) exhibited brief language dysfunction, 27 cases (29.7%) experienced brief limb movement disorder, and one case appeared to have permanent neurological dysfunction. DES was indicated to be a reliable and noninvasive method for the intraoperative positioning of language areas, and was able to resect gliomas in the language area with maximal safety. PMID:26136923

  13. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  14. Identifying effective connectivity parameters in simulated fMRI: a direct comparison of switching linear dynamic system, stochastic dynamic causal, and multivariate autoregressive models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jason F.; Chen, Kewei; Pillai, Ajay S.; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The number and variety of connectivity estimation methods is likely to continue to grow over the coming decade. Comparisons between methods are necessary to prune this growth to only the most accurate and robust methods. However, the nature of connectivity is elusive with different methods potentially attempting to identify different aspects of connectivity. Commonalities of connectivity definitions across methods upon which base direct comparisons can be difficult to derive. Here, we explicitly define “effective connectivity” using a common set of observation and state equations that are appropriate for three connectivity methods: dynamic causal modeling (DCM), multivariate autoregressive modeling (MAR), and switching linear dynamic systems for fMRI (sLDSf). In addition while deriving this set, we show how many other popular functional and effective connectivity methods are actually simplifications of these equations. We discuss implications of these connections for the practice of using one method to simulate data for another method. After mathematically connecting the three effective connectivity methods, simulated fMRI data with varying numbers of regions and task conditions is generated from the common equation. This simulated data explicitly contains the type of the connectivity that the three models were intended to identify. Each method is applied to the simulated data sets and the accuracy of parameter identification is analyzed. All methods perform above chance levels at identifying correct connectivity parameters. The sLDSf method was superior in parameter estimation accuracy to both DCM and MAR for all types of comparisons. PMID:23717258

  15. The cerebral basis of mapping nonsymbolic numerical quantities onto abstract symbols: an fMRI training study.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Ian M; Ansari, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Although significant insights into the neural basis of numerical and mathematical processing have been made, the neural processes that enable abstract symbols to become numerical remain largely unexplored in humans. In the present study, adult participants were trained to associate novel symbols with nonsymbolic numerical magnitudes (arrays of dots). Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the neural correlates of numerical comparison versus recognition of the novel symbols after each of two training stages. A left-lateralized fronto-parietal network, including the intraparietal sulcus, the precuneus, and the dorsal prefrontal cortex, was more active during numerical comparison than during perceptual recognition. In contrast, a network including bilateral temporal-occipital regions was more active during recognition than comparison. A whole-brain three-way interaction revealed that those individuals who had higher scores on a postscan numerical task (measuring their understanding of the global numerical organization of the novel symbols) exhibited increasing segregation between the two tasks in the bilateral intraparietal sulci as a function of increased training. Furthermore, whole-brain regression analysis showed that activity in the left intraparietal sulcus was systematically related to the effect of numerical distance on accuracy. These data provide converging evidence that parietal and left prefrontal cortices are involved in learning to map numerical quantities onto visual symbols. Only the parietal cortex, however, appeared systematically related to the degree to which individuals learned to associate novel symbols with their numerical referents. We conclude that the left parietal cortex, in particular, may play a central role in imbuing visual symbols with numerical meaning. PMID:18823231

  16. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  17. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  18. Hide, Map and Seek: Assessing Students' Understanding of Location and Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Leicha

    2013-01-01

    In this article Leicha Bragg introduces an open-ended assessment task that gives students the opportunity to access skills and knowledge from the Measurement and Geometry strand. Students take on the roles of cartographer and map user to "hide, map and seek."

  19. Seismic Hazard Maps for Seattle, Washington, Incorporating 3D Sedimentary Basin Effects, Nonlinear Site Response, and Rupture Directivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Stephenson, William J.; Carver, David L.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Rhea, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This report presents probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Seattle, Washington, based on over 500 3D simulations of ground motions from scenario earthquakes. These maps include 3D sedimentary basin effects and rupture directivity. Nonlinear site response for soft-soil sites of fill and alluvium was also applied in the maps. The report describes the methodology for incorporating source and site dependent amplification factors into a probabilistic seismic hazard calculation. 3D simulations were conducted for the various earthquake sources that can affect Seattle: Seattle fault zone, Cascadia subduction zone, South Whidbey Island fault, and background shallow and deep earthquakes. The maps presented in this document used essentially the same set of faults and distributed-earthquake sources as in the 2002 national seismic hazard maps. The 3D velocity model utilized in the simulations was validated by modeling the amplitudes and waveforms of observed seismograms from five earthquakes in the region, including the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps presented here depict 1 Hz response spectral accelerations with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years. The maps are based on determinations of seismic hazard for 7236 sites with a spacing of 280 m. The maps show that the most hazardous locations for this frequency band (around 1 Hz) are soft-soil sites (fill and alluvium) within the Seattle basin and along the inferred trace of the frontal fault of the Seattle fault zone. The next highest hazard is typically found for soft-soil sites in the Duwamish Valley south of the Seattle basin. In general, stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin exhibit higher hazard than stiff-soil sites outside the basin. Sites with shallow bedrock outside the Seattle basin have the lowest estimated hazard for this frequency band.

  20. Mapping Primary Gyrogenesis During Fetal Development in Primate Brains: High-Resolution in Utero Structural MRI of Fetal Brain Development in Pregnant Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Castro, Carlos; Davis, Duff; Dudley, Donald; Brewer, Jordan; Zhang, Yi; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Purdy, David; Fox, Peter T.; Simerly, Calvin; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17–25 of 26 weeks total gestation). Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of 10 primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length) axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth) axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r = −0.60; p < 0.10), while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p = 0.3; p = 0.40). These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates. PMID:20631812

  1. Quality assurance for diffusion tensor imaging using an ACR phantom: Comparative analysis with 6, 15, and 32 directions at 1.5T and 3.0T MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Young; Lee, Do-Wan; Jung, Jin-Young; Song, Kyu-Ho; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-07-01

    Although diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been widely used for the quantitative analyses of the integrity of white matter in the brain in clinical and research fields, quality assurance (QA) for DTI has not been fully established. Thus, we suggest a QA guideline for DTI using the American College of Radiology (ACR) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) head phantom. In this study, the geometric accuracy, slice-position accuracy, image intensity uniformity, percent signalghosting, low-contrast object detectability, image distortion, fractional anisotropy (FA), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured and evaluated in 1.5T and 3.0T MRI scanners equipped with an 8-channel SENSE head coil. The standard axial spin echo (SE) T1-weighted MR images and DTI with 6, 15 and 32 directions were obtained. Concerning geometric accuracy, image twisting in the three directions was observed due to the inhomogeneity of echo planar imaging (EPI). Image intensity uniformity was significantly lower for DTI than for the standard SE T1-weighted MR images. Percent signal ghosting was higher for images from 3.0T MRI than for images from 1.5T MRI. Low-contrast object detectability was visually identified and measured at a low contrasttonoise ratio (CNR) and a low signaltonoise ratio (SNR). Image distortion changed remarkably to the phaseencoding direction. The present study using the ACR MRI phantom suggests a QA method for DTI with high reproducibility and easy accessibility.

  2. Direct/Delayed Response Project: Field operations and quality-assurance report for watershed mapping in the Mid-Appalachian region of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, J.S.; Lammers, D.A.; Cassell, D.L.; Campbell, W.G.

    1990-05-01

    The report documents the mapping program of the Direct/Delayed Response Project in the Mid-Appalachian Region of the United States. The objectives of the report is to document the planning activities, field operations, and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the mapping. The protocols, QA plan, and soil legend for the watershed mapping are presented as appendices.

  3. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Padgett, K; Stoyanova, R; Johnson, P; Dogan, N; Pollack, A; Piper, J; Javorek, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare rigid and deformable registrations of the prostate in the multi-modality setting (diagnostic-MRI to planning-CT) by utilizing a planning-MRI as a surrogate. The surrogate allows for the direct quantitative analysis which can be difficult in the multi-modality domain where intensity mapping differs. Methods: For ten subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day in which the planning CT was collected (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was deformed to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. The deformed MRI was then rigidly aligned to the planning MRI which was used as the surrogate for the planning-CT. Agreement between the two MRI datasets was scored using intensity based metrics including Pearson correlation and normalized mutual information, NMI. A local analysis was performed by looking only within the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles, penile bulb and combined areas. A similar method was used to assess a rigid registration between the diagnostic-MRI and planning-CT. Results: Utilizing the NMI, the deformable registrations were superior to the rigid registrations in 9 of 10 cases demonstrating a 15.94% improvement (p-value < 0.001) within the combined area. The Pearson correlation showed similar results with the deformable registration superior in the same number of cases and demonstrating a 6.97% improvement (p-value <0.011). Conclusion: Validating deformable multi-modality registrations using spatial intensity based metrics is difficult due to the inherent differences in intensity mapping. This population provides an ideal testing ground for MRI to CT deformable registrations by obviating the need

  4. EMRinger: Side-chain-directed model and map validation for 3D Electron Cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barad, Benjamin A; Echols, Nathaniel; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Cheng, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Adams, Paul D; Fraser, James S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high resolution electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) have been accompanied by the development of validation metrics to independently assess map quality and model geometry. EMRinger assesses the precise fitting of an atomic model into the map during refinement and shows how radiation damage alters scattering from negatively charged amino acids. EMRinger will be useful for monitoring progress in resolving and modeling high-resolution features in cryo-EM. PMID:26280328

  5. Cerebral blood flow quantification in the rat: a direct comparison of arterial spin labeling MRI with radioactive microsphere PET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) has been recognised as a valuable method for non-invasive assessment of cerebral blood flow but validation studies regarding quantification accuracy by comparison against an accepted gold standard are scarce, especially in small animals. We have conducted the present study with the aim of comparing ASL flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR)-derived unidirectional water uptake (K1) and 68Ga/64Cu microsphere (MS)-derived blood flow (f) in the rat brain. Methods In 15 animals, K1and f were determined successively in dedicated small animal positron emission tomography and MR scanners. The Renkin-Crone model modified by a scaling factor was used for the quantification of f and K1. Results Below about 1 mL/min/mL, we obtain an approximately linear relationship between f and K1. At higher flow values, the limited permeability of water at the blood brain barrier becomes apparent. Within the accessed dynamic flow range (0.2 to 1.9 mL/min/mL), the data are adequately described by the Renkin-Crone model yielding a permeability surface area product of (1.53±0.46) mL/min/mL. Conclusion The ASL-FAIR technique is suitable for absolute blood flow quantification in the rat brain when using a one-compartment model including a suitable extraction correction for data evaluation. Trial registration 24-9168.21-4/2004-1 (registered in Freistadt Sachsen, Landesdirektion Dresden) PMID:22978819

  6. A Concept-Mapping Strategy for Assessing Conceptual Change in a Student-Directed, Research-Based Geoscience Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebich, S.

    2003-12-01

    The concept mapping technique has been proposed as a method for examining the evolving nature of students' conceptualizations of scientific concepts, and promises insight into a dimension of learning different from the one accessible through more conventional classroom testing techniques. The theory behind concept mapping is based on an assumption that knowledge acquisition is accomplished through "linking" of new information to an existing knowledge framework, and that meaningful (as opposed to arbitrary or verbatim) links allow for deeper understanding and conceptual change. Reflecting this theory, concept maps are constructed as a network of related concepts connected by labeled links that illustrate the relationship between the concepts. Two concepts connected by one such link make up a "proposition", the basic element of the concept map structure. In this paper, we examine the results of a pre- and post-test assessment program for an upper-division undergraduate geography course entitled "Mock Environmental Summit," which was part of a research project on assessment. Concept mapping was identified as a potentially powerful assessment tool for this course, as more conventional tools such as multiple-choice tests did not seem to provide a reliable indication of the learning students were experiencing as a result of the student-directed research, presentations, and discussions that make up a substantial portion of the course. The assessment program began at the beginning of the course with a one-hour training session during which students were introduced to the theory behind concept mapping, provided with instructions and guidance for constructing a concept map using the CMap software developed and maintained by the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition at the University of West Florida, and asked to collaboratively construct a concept map on a topic not related to the one to be assessed. This training session was followed by a 45-minute "pre-test" on the

  7. Resting-state functional MRI in an intraoperative MRI setting: proof of feasibility and correlation to clinical outcome of patients.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Charyasz-Leks, Edyta; Breitkopf, Martin; Decker, Karlheinz; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively. METHODS Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)-fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed. RESULTS iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge. CONCLUSIONS The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes. PMID:26722852

  8. Mapping Soil Salinity with ECa-Directed Soil Sampling: History, Protocols, Guidelines, Applications, and Future Research Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    Soil salinity is a spatially complex and dynamic property of soil that influences crop yields when the threshold salinity level is exceeded. Mapping soil salinity is necessary for soil classification, reclamation, crop selection, and site-specific irrigation management of salt-affected soils in the arid and semi-arid agricultural regions of the world. Because of its spatial and temporal heterogeneity soil salinity is difficult to map and monitor at field scales. There are various methods for characterizing soil salinity variability, but none of these approaches has been as extensively investigated and is as reliable and cost effective as apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) directed soil sampling. Geospatial measurements of ECa are well-suited for characterizing soil salinity spatial distribution because they are reliable, quick, and easy to take with GPS-based mobilized ECa measurement equipment. However, ECa is influenced by a variety of soil properties, which makes the measurement of soil salinity at field scale problematic. It is the goal of this presentation to provide an overview of the field-scale characterization of soil salinity distribution using ECa-directed soil sampling. A historical perspective, protocols and guidelines, strengths and limitations, applications, and future trends are presented for characterizing spatial and temporal variation in soil salinity using ECa-directed soil sampling. Land resource managers, farmers, extension specialists, soil classification specialists, and Natural Resource Conservation Service field staff are the beneficiaries of field-scale maps of soil salinity.

  9. EMRinger: side chain–directed model and map validation for 3D cryo-electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barad, Benjamin A.; Echols, Nathaniel; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Cheng, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-08-17

    Advances in high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) require the development of validation metrics to independently assess map quality and model geometry. We report that EMRinger is a tool that assesses the precise fitting of an atomic model into the map during refinement and shows how radiation damage alters scattering from negatively charged amino acids. EMRinger (https://github.com/fraser-lab/EMRinger) will be useful for monitoring progress in resolving and modeling high-resolution features in cryo-EM.

  10. Direct Mapping Of Density Response in Recombinant Inbred Lines of Maize (Zea mays L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding for adaptation to higher densities in maize has greatly increased maize yield potential per unit area but the genetic basis for this plant response to density is unknown as is its stability over environments. To elucidate the genetic basis of plant response to density in Maize, we mapped QT...