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Sample records for direct surface magnetometry

  1. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  2. X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Direct Element Specific Surface Magnetometry of Nanomagnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, James G.

    1997-03-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of xray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the "sum rules."[1] Unfortunately, sum rule analyses are hampered by several limitations [2], including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic Xray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al [3] demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now we [4] have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus [5], it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together [6], this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source. [7,8] This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.T. Thole et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68,1943 (1992); P. Carra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 694 (1993). 2. J.G. Tobin et al Phys. Rev. B 52, 6530 (1995). 3. E. Tamura et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 73, 1533 (1994) 4. J.G. Tobin, K.W. Goodman, F.O. Schumann, R.F. Willis, J

  3. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  4. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  5. Experimental Investigation of High Temperature Superconducting Imaging Surface Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.N.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.

    1999-06-21

    The behavior of high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in the presence of high temperature superconducting surfaces has been investigated. When current sources are placed close to a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) an image current is produced due to the Meissner effect. When a SQUID magnetometer is placed near such a surface it will perform in a gradiometric fashion provided the SQUID and source distances to the SIS are much less than the size of the SIS. We present the first ever experimental verification of this effect for a high temperature SIS. Results are presented for two SQUID-SIS configurations, using a 100 mm diameter YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} disc as the SIS. These results indicate that when the current source and sensor coil (SQUID) are close to the SIS, the behavior is that of a first-order gradiometer. The results are compared to analytic solutions as well as the theoretical predictions of a finite element model.

  6. Fault location in SF/sub 6/ insulated conductors using direct fluxgate magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Itani, A.M.; Houston, J.M.; Perry, M.P.

    1983-02-01

    Gas insulated substations (GIS) are becoming more popular for substation design largely due to reduced space requirements as well as environmental benefits. Isolated phase designs generally consist of a single cylindrical conductor enclosed in a coaxial aluminum tank (or sheath). Pressurized SF/sub 6/ is usually used for electrical insulation. For increased reliability, instrumentation methods have been developed to detect the location of power arcs which occur within the enclosed containers. The authors have developed a new technique in which the location of a fault is detected by directly measuring the axial component of the 60 Hz magnetic field which appears outside the sheath during the flashover. The instrument is a specialized form of ''fluxgate'' magnetometer modified to allow long life using inexpensive batteries. The magnetometer output is coupled directly to a switching circuit which operates a ''magnetic disc'' indicator. When a fault is registered, the disc indicator exhibits a bright color which can be easily read from a distance of 10-15m. The instrument is proposed for use at areas within the substation which are more prone to flashovers, especially near dielectric spacers which support the inner conductor every few meters. Flashover measurements indicate that the sensor reliably detects a fault current of 4 kA or larger under typical substation conditions. This sensor is attractive for retrofitting existing gas-insulated systems in that installation does not require shutting down the system. Since no penetrations or alterations of an existing system are required, there is no way that sensor installation can compromise system operation.

  7. Magnetometry 101

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA satellites use very sensitive devices called magnetometers to measure the magnetic fields of planets. Like very sensitive compasses, these devices can measure both direction and strength of pl...

  8. Magnetometry of ingested particles in pulmonary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Valberg, P A

    1984-05-01

    Sensitive magnetometry has shown that, after inhalation of airborne magnetic dust by humans or animals, particles retained within the lungs rotate. A number of mechanisms for this rotation have been proposed, including motions of breathing, particle thermal energy, cardiac pulsations, surface fluid flows, and macrophage cytoplasmic movements. In this study the cellular mechanism was examined by magnetometry and videomicroscopy of pulmonary macrophages removed from hamster lungs 1 day after inhalation of a maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) aerosol. The field remaining after magnetization was measured in adherent cells and was found to decay rapidly to 30 percent of its initial magnitude within 12 minutes. The remanent-field decay rate was slowed by inhibitors of cytoplasmic motion. Videomicroscopy of pulmonary macrophages with phagocytized gamma-Fe2O3 showed amoeboid motions that rotated the particles away from their original direction of magnetization. The results confirm that macrophage cytoplasmic movement is a primary cause of remanent-field decay in lungs and that magnetometry can be used to quantify intracellular contractile activity. PMID:6710153

  9. Direct heating surface combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shire, L. I.; Mroz, T. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The combustor utilizes a non-adiabatic flame to provide low-emission combustion for gas turbines. A fuel-air mixture is directed through a porous wall, the other side of which serves as a combustion surface. A radiant heat sink disposed adjacent to and spaced from the combustion surface controls the combustor flame temperature in order to prevent the formation of oxides of nitrogen. A secondary air flow cools the heat sink. Additionally, up to 100% of secondary air flow is mixed with the combustion products at the direct heating surface combustor to dilute such products thereby reducing exit temperature. However, if less than 100% secondary air is mixed to the combustor, the remainder may be added to the combustion products further downstream.

  10. Micromachined Silicon Cantilever Magnetometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparala, M. V.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic torque measurements give us a simple and attractive method for characterizing the anisotropic properties of magnetic materials. Silicon torque and force magnetometers have many advantages over traditional torsion fiber torque magnetometers. We have fabricated micromachined silicon torque and force magnetometers employing both capacitive(``Capacitance platform magnetometer for thin film and small crystal superconductor studies'', M. Chaparala et al.), AIP Conf. Proc. (USA), AIP Conference Proceedings, no.273, p. 407 1993. and strain dependent FET detection(``Strain Dependent Characterstics of Silicon MOSFETs and their Applications'', M. Chaparala et al.), ISDRS Conf. Proc. 1997. schemes which realize some of these gains. We will present the pros and cons of each of the different detection schemes and the associated design constraints. We have developed a feedback scheme which enables null detection thus preserving the integrity of the sample orientation. We will present a method of separating out the torque and force terms in the measured signals and will discuss the errors associated with each of the designs. Finally, we present the static magnetic torque measurements on various materials with these devices, including equilibrium properties on sub microgram specimens of superconductors, and dHvA measurements near H_c2. We will also discuss their usefulness in pulsed magnetic fields(``Cantilever magnetometry in pulsed magnetic fields", M. J. Naughton et al.), Rev. of Sci. Instrum., vol.68, p. 4061 1997..

  11. Crawling on directional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidoni, P.; Noselli, G.; DeSimone, A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we study crawling locomotion based on directional frictional interactions, namely, frictional forces that are sensitive to the sign of the sliding velocity. Surface interactions of this type are common in biology, where they arise from the presence of inclined hairs or scales at the crawler/substrate interface, leading to low resistance when sliding 'along the grain', and high resistance when sliding 'against the grain'. This asymmetry can be exploited for locomotion, in a way analogous to what is done in cross-country skiing (classic style, diagonal stride). We focus on a model system, namely, a continuous one-dimensional crawler and provide a detailed study of the motion resulting from several strategies of shape change. In particular, we provide explicit formulae for the displacements attainable with reciprocal extensions and contractions (breathing), or through the propagation of extension or contraction waves. We believe that our results will prove particularly helpful for the study of biological crawling motility and for the design of bio-mimetic crawling robots.

  12. Torque magnetometry in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu

    This thesis describes torque magnetometry studies on unconventional superconductors. Torque magnetometry measures the anisotropic magnetization of samples by recording their torque signals in a tilted magnetic field. Applied to superconductors, this method provides a reliable way to measure the field dependence of magnetization with high resolution under extreme conditions: DC magnetic fields from zero to 45.2 T, and temperature from 300 mK to 300K. The results can be used to determine many important parameters, such as the upper critical field H c2, the superconducting condensation energy, the onset temperature of diamagnetic signals, and so on. We carried out the torque magnetometry measurements on unconventional superconductors---high Tc superconductors and the p-wave superconductor Sr2RuO4---and uncovered new features that do not exist in conventional BCS superconductors. In high Tc superconductors, our torque magnetometry studies focus on the properties of the vortex liquid state. First, by comparing the observed magnetization curves with the Nernst effect results in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta, we confirm that the unusually large Nernst effect signals originate from the surviving vortex liquid state above Tc. Second, the M-H curves near the critical temperature Tc suggest that the nature of the transition is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Near Tc, the magnetization response at low field is strongly nonlinear, and the T dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-field limit approaches the predicted curve from the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Third, the measurements in intense magnetic field up to 45 T reveal the unusual, weak T-dependence of Hc2. These observations strongly support the existence of the vortex liquid state above Tc. The superconducting state is destroyed by the phase fluctuation of the pair condensate, while the pair condensate keeps its amplitude above T c. Further studies in single-layered high Tc superconductors reveal more

  13. Developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Scott Jeffrey

    Alkali-metal magnetometers use the coherent precession of polarized atomic spins to detect and measure magnetic fields. Recent advances have enabled magnetometers to become competitive with SQUIDs as the most sensitive magnetic field detectors, and they now find use in a variety of areas ranging from medicine and NMR to explosives detection and fundamental physics research. In this thesis we discuss several developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry for both practical and fundamental applications. We present a new method of polarizing the alkali atoms by modulating the optical pumping rate at both the linear and quadratic Zeeman resonance frequencies. We demonstrate experimentally that this method enhances the sensitivity of a potassium magnetometer operating in the Earth's field by a factor of 4, and we calculate that it can reduce the orientation-dependent heading error to less than 0.1 nT. We discuss a radio-frequency magnetometer for detection of oscillating magnetic fields with sensitivity better than 0.2 fT/ Hz , which we apply to the observation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from polarized water, as well as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from ammonium nitrate. We demonstrate that a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer can measure all three vector components of the magnetic field in an unshielded environment with comparable sensitivity to other devices. We find that octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) acts as an anti-relaxation coating for alkali atoms at temperatures below 170°C, allowing them to collide with a glass surface up to 2,000 times before depolarizing, and we present the first demonstration of high-temperature magnetometry with a coated cell. We also describe a reusable alkali vapor cell intended for the study of interactions between alkali atoms and surface coatings. Finally, we explore the use of a cesium-xenon SERF comagnetometer for a proposed measurement of the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs

  14. Torque Magnetometry and Susceptometry using Split-Beam Optomechanical Nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, Tayyaba; Wu, Nathanael; Wu, Marcelo; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Losby, Joseph; Barclay, Paul; Freeman, Mark

    A large number of sensitive magnetometry methods are limited to cryogenic operation. We present a highly sensitive torque magnetometer using a photonic crystal optomechanical split-beam nanocavity operating in air at room temperature. The chip-based magnetometer is proficient for probing both the net magnetization and AC susceptibility of individual magnetic microstructures. This is demonstrated through the observation of nanoscale Barkhausen transitions in the magnetic hysteresis of a permalloy thin-film element. Control of the vector direction of the radio frequency drive allows detection of accompanying AC susceptibility terms.

  15. Mx Magnetometry Optimisation in Unshielded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Stuart; Griffin, Paul; Arnold, Aidan; Riis, Erling; Hunter, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    Optically pumped magnetometry in unshielded environments is potentially of great advantage in a wide range of surveying and security applications. Optimisation of OPM modulation schemes and feedback in the Mx scheme offers enhanced sensitivity through noise cancellation and decoherence suppression. The work presented demonstrates capability for software-controlled optimisation of OPM performance in ambient fields in the 0 . 5 G range. Effects on magnetometer bandwidth and sensitivity are discussed. Supported by UK National Quantum Technologies Programme.

  16. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  17. Optimizing phase-estimation algorithms for diamond spin magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusran, N. M.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical and numerical study discussing the application and optimization of phase-estimation algorithms (PEAs) to diamond spin magnetometry. We compare standard Ramsey magnetometry, the nonadaptive PEA (NAPEA), and quantum PEA (QPEA) incorporating error checking. Our results show that the NAPEA requires lower measurement fidelity, has better dynamic range, and greater consistency in sensitivity. We elucidate the importance of dynamic range to Ramsey magnetic imaging with diamond spins, and introduce the application of PEAs to time-dependent magnetometry.

  18. Optomechanical Magnetometry with a Macroscopic Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changqiu; Janousek, Jiri; Sheridan, Eoin; McAuslan, David L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Lam, Ping Koy; Zhang, Yundong; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a centimeter-scale optomechanical magnetometer based on a crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonator. The large size of the resonator, with a magnetic-field integration volume of 0.45 cm3 , allows high magnetic-field sensitivity to be achieved in the hertz-to-kilohertz frequency range. A peak sensitivity of 131 pT Hz-1 /2 is reported, in a magnetically unshielded noncryogenic environment using optical power levels beneath 100 μ W . Femtotesla-range sensitivity may be possible in future devices with the further optimization of laser noise and the physical structure of the resonator, allowing applications in high-performance magnetometry.

  19. High sensitivity ancilla assisted nanoscale DC magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiang; Ajoy, Ashok; Marseglia, Luca; Saha, Kasturi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Sensing slowly varying magnetic fields are particularly relevant to many real world scenarios, where the signals of interest are DC or close to static. Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a versatile platform for such DC magnetometry on nanometer length scales. Using NV centers, the standard technique for measuring DC magnetic fields is via the Ramsey protocol, where sensitivities can approach better than 1 μ T/vHz, but are limited by the sensor fast dephasing time T2*. In this work we instead present a method of sensing DC magnetic fields that is intrinsically limited by the much longer T2 coherence time. The method exploits a strongly-coupled ancillary nuclear spin to achieve high DC field sensitivities potentially exceeding that of the Ramsey method. In addition, through this method we sense the perpendicular component of the DC magnetic field, which in conjunction with the parallel component sensed by the Ramsey method provides a valuable tool for vector DC magnetometry at the nanoscale.

  20. Scanning Cryogenic Magnetometry with a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin; Straquadine, Joshua; Yang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating exotic order manifest in condensed matter systems. We present a novel scanning magnetometer which adds the techniques of ultracold atomic physics to the condensed matter toolbox. Our device, the Scanning Quantum CRyogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) uses a one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of 87 Rb to image magnetic and electric fields near surfaces between room and cryogenic temperatures, and allows for rapid sample changes while retaining UHV compatibility for atomic experiments. We present our characterization of the spatial resolution and magnetic field sensitivity of the device, and discuss the advantages and applications of this magnetometry technique. In particular, we will discuss our plans for performing local transport measurements in technologically relevant materials such as Fe-based superconductors and topological insulators.

  1. Modification of Surface Energy via Direct Laser Ablative Surface Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Belcher, Marcus A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hopkins, John W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Surface energy of a substrate is changed without the need for any template, mask, or additional coating medium applied to the substrate. At least one beam of energy directly ablates a substrate surface to form a predefined topographical pattern at the surface. Each beam of energy has a width of approximately 25 micrometers and an energy of approximately 1-500 microJoules. Features in the topographical pattern have a width of approximately 1-500 micrometers and a height of approximately 1.4-100 micrometers.

  2. Mars, Moon, Mercury: Magnetometry Constrains Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, John E. P.

    2015-04-01

    We have long appreciated that magnetic measurements obtained about a magnetized planet are of great value in probing the deep interior. The existence of a substantial planetary magnetic field implies dynamo action requiring an electrically conducting, fluid core in convective motion and a source of energy to maintain it. Application of the well-known Lowe's spectrum may in some cases identify the dynamo outer radius; where secular variation can be measured, the outer radius can be estimated using the frozen flux approximation. Magnetic induction may be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the mantle and crust. These are useful constraints that together with gravity and/or other observables we may infer the state of the interior and gain insight into planetary evolution. But only recently has it become clear that space magnetometry can do much more, particularly about a planet that once sustained a dynamo that has since disappeared. Mars is the best example of this class: the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft globally mapped a remanent crustal field left behind after the demise of the dynamo. This map is a magnetic record of the planet's evolution. I will argue that this map may be interpreted to constrain the era of dynamo activity within Mars; to establish the reversal history of the Mars dynamo; to infer the magnetization intensity of Mars crustal rock and the depth of the magnetized crustal layer; and to establish that plate tectonics is not unique to planet Earth, as has so often been claimed. The Lunar magnetic record is in contrast one of weakly magnetized and scattered sources, not easily interpreted as yet in terms of the interior. Magnetometry about Mercury is more difficult to interpret owing to the relatively weak field and proximity to the sun, but MESSENGER (and ultimately Beppi Columbo) may yet map crustal anomalies (induced and/or remanent).

  3. Direct mapping of the UV surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Zhou, Liangcheng; Dierolf, Volkmar; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2009-05-01

    Researchers employed various well-developed concepts from conventional optics in designing novel plasmonic devices, which allow us to construct a framework to describe the propagation, diffraction, and interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a chip. Here we present what we believe to be the first direct mapping of the UV SPPs on an Al2O3/Al surface using a UV-compatible near-field scanning optical microscope system. UV SPP modes launched by one-dimensional slits or two-dimensional groove arrays and corresponding interference phenomenon were both observed, which may enrich the studies on subwavelength optics on a chip. PMID:19412260

  4. Directional self-cleaning superoleophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee

    2012-08-14

    In this work, we report the creation of a grooved surface comprising 3 μm grooves (height ~4 μm) separated by 3 μm from each other on a silicon wafer by photolithography. The grooved surface was then modified chemically with a fluorosilane layer (FOTS). The surface property was studied by both static and dynamic contact angle measurements using water, hexadecane, and a polyethylene wax ink as the probing liquids. Results show that the grooved surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. Its observed contact angles agree well with the calculated Cassie-Baxter angles. More importantly, we are able to make a replica of the composite wax ink-air interface and study it by SEM. Microscopy results not only show that the droplet of the wax ink "sits" on air in the composite interface but also further reveal that the ink drop actually pins underneath the re-entrant structure in the side wall of the grooved structure. Contact angle measurement results indicate that wetting on the grooved surface is anisotropic. Although liquid drops are found to have lower static and advancing contact angles in the parallel direction, the drops are found to be more mobile, showing smaller hysteresis and lower sliding angles (as compared to the FOTS wafer surface and a comparable 3-μm-diameter pillar array FOTS surface). The enhanced mobility is attributable to the lowering of the resistance against an advancing liquid because 50% of the advancing area is made of a solid strip where the liquid likes to wet. This also implies that the contact line for advancing is no longer smooth but rather is ragged, having the solid strip area leading the wetting and the air strip area trailing behind. This interpretation is supported by imaging the geometry of the contact lines using molten ink drops recovered from the sliding angle experiments in both the parallel and orthogonal directions. Because the grooved surface is mechanically stronger against mechanical abrasion, the self

  5. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  6. Single spin magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Nicholas Edward Kennedy

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a solid-state point defect with an electronic spin that has accessible quantum mechanical properties. At room temperature, the electronic ground state sub-levels of the NV center can be initialized and read out using optical pumping, as well as coherently controlled using microwave frequency fields. This thesis focuses on using the spin state of the NV center for highly-sensitive magnetometry under ambient conditions. In particular, when the diamond surface is properly prepared, we demonstrate that NV centers can be used to measure the magnetic fluctuations stemming from individual molecules and ions attached or adsorbed to the surface. This thesis begins by introducing the physical and electronic structure of the NV center at room temperature, followed by the fundamental measurements that allow us to use the NV center as a sensitive magnetometer. Combining our sensitive NV center magnetometer with techniques from chemistry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate the all-optical detection of a single-molecule electron spin at room temperature. Finally, we discuss the time-resolved detection of individual electron spins adsorbing onto the surface of nano-diamonds. By extending our techniques to nano-diamonds, we move closer towards textit{in vitro} magnetic field sensing that could be pivotal for better disease diagnosis and drug development.

  7. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  8. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  9. Quantitative magnetometry of ferromagnetic nanorods by microfluidic analytical magnetophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, A. L.; Mair, L. O.; Guo, F.; Hangarter, C.; Mathai, P. P.; McMichael, R. D.; Stavis, S. M.; Unguris, J.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an implementation of magnetophoresis to measure the absolute magnetization of ferromagnetic nanorods dispersed in fluids, by analyzing the velocity of single nanorods under an applied magnetic field gradient. A microfluidic guideway prevents aggregation of nanorods, isolates them, and confines their motion for analysis. We use a three-dimensional imaging system to precisely track nanorod velocity and particle-surface proximity. We test the effect of the guideway on nanorod velocity under field gradient application, finding that it guides magnetophoresis, but imposes insignificant drag beyond that of a planar surface. This result provides insight into the transport of magnetic nanorods at microstructured interfaces and allows the use of an analytical model to accurately determine the reacted viscous drag in the force balance needed for quantitative magnetometry. We also estimate the confining potential of the guideway with Brownian motion measurements and Boltzmann statistics. We use our technique to measure the magnetization of ferromagnetic nanorods with a noise floor of 8.5 × 10-20 A.m2.Hz-½. Our technique is quantitative, rapid, and scalable for determining the absolute magnetization of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with high throughput.

  10. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  11. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  12. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    SciTech Connect

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-07

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1–0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  13. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra; Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1-0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  14. Direct evidence of the surface track potential

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Sakata, Masakazu; Suzuki, Motofumi; Kimura, Kenji

    2010-08-15

    Angular and energy distributions of fragment protons dissociated from HeH{sup +} during grazing-angle scattering from a KCl (001) surface are measured. The surface of KCl (001) is heated at 180 deg. C and the beam current is kept lower than 1 fA to prevent macroscopic surface charging. The angular distribution of the fragment protons shows a well-defined peak similarly to the grazing-angle scattering of atomic ions. The observed peak, however, is shifted from the specular angle toward larger scattering angles. The observed angular shift for the trailing proton is larger than that for the leading proton. These results clearly indicate that the motion of the fragment protons is affected by the surface track potential induced by the partner He ion.

  15. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  16. Directional variations in thermal emission from geologic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Finiol, Gary W.; Henderson, Bradley G.

    1990-01-01

    The directional emission properties of geologic surfaces were investigated using a ground-based, hand-held infrared radiometer and thermistor probe. Field sites involved surfaces ranging from smooth playa and sand surfaces to a very rough aa lava flow. Large directional variations in thermal emission were found; they result from the presence of surface roughness at large scales producing spatial variations in kinetic temperature and at small scales producing emissivity variations. These variations are important in remotely determining surface structure and understanding surface energy balance and emission spectra.

  17. Directional variations in thermal emission from geologic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jakosky, B.M.; Finiol, G.W.; Henderson, B.G. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors investigated the directional emission properties of geologic surfaces using a ground-based, hand-held infrared radiometer and thermistor probe. Field sites involved surfaces ranging from smooth playa and sand surfaces to a very rough aa lava flow in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, NV, as part of the Geological Remote Sensing Field Experiment. Large directional variations in thermal emission were found; they result from the presence of surface roughness--at large scales producing spatial variations in kinetic temperature and at small scales producing emissivity variations. These variations are important in remotely determining surface structure and understanding surface energy balance and emission spectra.

  18. Magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond.

    PubMed

    Rondin, L; Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Roch, J-F; Maletinsky, P; Jacques, V

    2014-05-01

    The isolated electronic spin system of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond offers unique possibilities to be employed as a nanoscale sensor for detection and imaging of weak magnetic fields. Magnetic imaging with nanometric resolution and field detection capabilities in the nanotesla range are enabled by the atomic-size and exceptionally long spin-coherence times of this naturally occurring defect. The exciting perspectives that ensue from these characteristics have triggered vivid experimental activities in the emerging field of 'NV magnetometry'. It is the purpose of this article to review the recent progress in high-sensitivity nanoscale NV magnetometry, generate an overview of the most pertinent results of the last years and highlight perspectives for future developments. We will present the physical principles that allow for magnetic field detection with NV centres and discuss first applications of NV magnetometers that have been demonstrated in the context of nano magnetism, mesoscopic physics and the life sciences. PMID:24801494

  19. Nuclear magnetometry studies of spin dynamics in quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, M. H.; Watanabe, S.; Hirayama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We performed a nuclear magnetometry study on quantum Hall ferromagnet with a bilayer total filling factor of νtot=2 . We found not only a rapid nuclear relaxation but also a sudden change in the nuclear-spin polarization distribution after a one-second interaction with a canted antiferromagnetic phase. We discuss the possibility of observing cooperative phenomena coming from nuclear-spin ensemble triggered by hyperfine interaction in quantum Hall system.

  20. Finite coplanar waveguide width effects in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.L.; Kos, A.B.; Silva, T.J.

    2004-07-12

    The effect of finite coplanar waveguide (CPW) width on the measurement of the resonance frequency in thin ferromagnetic films has been characterized for pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. A shift in resonant frequency is a linear function of the ratio of sample thickness to CPW width. The proportionality constant is experimentally determined to be 0.74{+-}0.1 times the saturation magnetization of the film. The frequency shift may be modeled as arising from an effective magnetic-anisotropy field.

  1. Optimizing the Growth of (111) Diamond for Diamond Based Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Eric; Godwin, Patrick; Samarth, Nitin; Snyder, David; de Las Casas, Charles; Awschalom, David D.

    Magnetometers based on nitrogen vacancy (NV) ensembles have recently achieved sub-picotesla sensitivities [Phys. Rev. X 5, 041001(2015)], putting the technique on par with SQUID and MFM magnetometry.Typically these sensors use (100) oriented diamond with NV centers forming along all four (111) crystal orientations.This allows for vector magnetometry, but is a hindrance to the absolute sensitivity. Diamond grown on (111) oriented substrates through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition(MP-CVD) provides a promising route in this context since such films can exhibit preferential orientation greater than 99% [Appl. Phys. Lett.104, 102407 (2014)]. An important challenge though is to achieve sufficiently high NV center densities required for enhancing the sensitivity of an NV ensemble magnetometer.We report systematic studies of the MP-CVD growth and characterization of (111) oriented diamond, where we vary growth temperature, methane concentration, and nitrogen doping. For each film we study the Nitrogen to NV ratio, the NV- to NV0 ratio, and alignment percentage to minimize sources of decoherence and ensure preferential alignment. From these measurements we determine the optimal growth parameters for high sensitivity, NV center ensemble scalar magnetometry. Funded by NSF-DMR.

  2. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  3. Object silhouettes and surface directions through stereo matching image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kumagai, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the object silhouettes and surface direction through the stereo matching image processing to recognize the position, size and surface direction of the object. For this study we construct the pixel number change distribution of the HSI color component level, the binary component level image by the standard deviation threshold, the 4 directional pixels connectivity filter, the surface elements correspondence by the stereo matching and the projection rule relation. We note that the HSI color component level change tendency of the object image near the focus position is more stable than the HSI color component level change tendency of the object image over the unfocused range. We use the HSI color component level images near the fine focused position to extract the object silhouette. We extract the object silhouette properly. We find the surface direction of the object by the pixel numbers of the correspondence surface areas and the projection cosine rule after the stereo matching image processing by the characteristic areas and the synthesized colors. The epipolar geometry is used in this study because a pair of imager is arranged on the same epipolar plane. The surface direction detection results in the proper angle calculation. The construction of the object silhouettes and the surface direction detection of the object are realized.

  4. Mapping of single-site magnetic anisotropy tensors in weakly coupled spin clusters by torque magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Luca; Cornia, Andrea; Nava, Andrea; Perfetti, Mauro; Boulon, Marie-Emmanuelle; Barra, Anne-Laure; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Park, Kyungwha; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-08-28

    Single-crystal torque magnetometry performed on weakly-coupled polynuclear systems provides access to a complete description of single-site anisotropy tensors. Variable-temperature, variable-field torque magnetometry was used to investigate triiron(III) complex [Fe3La(tea)2(dpm)6] (Fe3La), a lanthanum(III)-centred variant of tetrairon(III) single molecule magnets (Fe4) (H3tea = triethanolamine, Hdpm = dipivaloylmethane). Due to the presence of the diamagnetic lanthanoid, magnetic interactions among iron(III) ions (si = 5/2) are very weak (<0.1 cm(−1)) and the magnetic response of Fe3La is predominantly determined by single-site anisotropies. The local anisotropy tensors were found to have Di > 0 and to be quasi-axial with |Ei/Di| ~ 0.05. Their hard axes form an angle of approximately 70° with the threefold molecular axis, which therefore corresponds to an easy magnetic direction for the molecule. The resulting picture was supported by a High Frequency EPR investigation and by DFT calculations. Our study confirms that the array of peripheral iron(III) centres provides substantially noncollinear anisotropy contributions to the ground state of Fe4 complexes, which are of current interest in molecular magnetism and spintronics. PMID:25014192

  5. Directional dependence of surface morphological stability of heteroepitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Y.; Shintani, K.

    1998-09-01

    Surface morphological stability in coherent heteroepitaxial layers is analyzed focusing on the directional dependence of surface undulations created by surface diffusion. The critical stability condition is defined in terms of the free energy of the system which is assumed to be the sum of the elastic strain energy and the surface free energy. The displacement and stress fields of the semi-infinite anisotropic solid with the slightly undulating surface are calculated by using the surface admittance tensor and the vector complex potential function. Numerical results for the Si1-xGex/Si systems show that the critical wavelength of the <100> surface undulations is smaller than that of the <110> surface undulations, which means that surface undulations are likely to be formed in the <100> directions. It is also found that the critical wavelength decreases with the increase of Ge fraction. These tendencies are in good agreement with the observations in annealing experiments for the Si1-xGex/Si systems in the literature. If the substrate is assumed to be rigid, the range of layer thickness where the system is absolutely stable against a surface undulation of any wavelength exists. Finally, the growth rate of the amplitude of surface undulations is estimated from an evolution equation for the surface shape. It is shown that even if anisotropy is taken into account, the growth rate of the amplitude takes the maximum value when the wavelength is 4/3 times the critical wavelength, which is the same as in the isotropic approximation.

  6. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  7. Plasmon Surface Polariton Dispersion by Direct Optical Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalen, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes several simple experiments that can be used to observe directly the dispersion curve of plasmon surface polaritons (PSP) on flat metal surfaces. A method is described of observing the increonental change in the wave vector of the PSP due to coatings that differ in thickness by a few nanometers. (Author/CS)

  8. Surface-directed modulation of supramolecular gel properties.

    PubMed

    Angelerou, Maria Galini Faidra; Sabri, Akmal; Creasey, Rhiannon; Angelerou, Polyxeni; Marlow, Maria; Zelzer, Mischa

    2016-03-10

    Supramolecular materials are widely studied and used for a variety of applications; in most applications, these materials are in contact with surfaces of other materials. Whilst much focus has been placed on elucidating factors that affect supramolecular material properties, the influence of the material surface on gel formation is poorly characterised. Here, we demonstrate that surface properties directly affect the fibre architecture and mechanical properties of self-assembled cytidine based gel films. PMID:26960905

  9. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  10. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces. PMID:26374026

  11. Nonlinear optical magnetometry with accessible in situ optical squeezing

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstrom, N.; Pooser, R. C.; Lawrie, B. J.

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate compact and accessible squeezed-light magnetometry using four-wave mixing in a single hot rubidium vapor cell. The strong intrinsic coherence of the four-wave mixing process results in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) on each mode of a two-mode relative-intensity squeezed state. Finally, this framework enables 4.7 dB of quantum noise reduction while the opposing polarization rotation signals of the probe and conjugate fields add to increase the total signal to noise ratio.

  12. Torque magnetometry of perpendicular anisotropy exchange-spring heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallobra, P.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Shipton, E. G.; Fullerton, E. E.; Mangin, S.

    2016-07-01

    The field-induced magnetic configurations in a [Co/Pd]15 /TbFeCo exchange-spring system with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are studied using torque magnetometry. The experimental results are compared to a 1D micromagnetic simulation. The good agreement between experiments and simulations allows us to deduce the evolution of the in-depth magnetic configuration as a function of the applied field orientation and amplitude. The chirality transition of the interfacial domain wall developing in the structure can also be determined with this technique.

  13. Direct Mapping of Hippocampal Surfaces with Intrinsic Shape Context

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Rose, Stephen E.; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: 1) it has the advantage of being automatic; 2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results about temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  14. Direct mapping of hippocampal surfaces with intrinsic shape context.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Rose, Stephen E; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-09-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: (1) it has the advantage of being automatic; (2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer's disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results on temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  15. Direct Orthogonal Distance to Quadratic Surfaces in 3D.

    PubMed

    Lott, Gus K

    2014-09-01

    Discovering the orthogonal distance to a quadratic surface is a classic geometric task in vision, modeling, and robotics. I describe a simple, efficient, and stable direct solution for the orthogonal distance (foot-point) to an arbitrary quadratic surface from a general finite 3D point. The problem is expressed as the intersection of three quadratic surfaces, two of which are derived from the requirement of orthogonality of two non-coincident planes with the tangent plane to the quadric. A sixth order single-variable polynomial is directly generated in one coordinate of the surface point. The method detects intersection points at infinity and operates smoothly across all real quadratic surface classes. The method also geometrically detects continuums of orthogonal points (i.e., from the exact center of a sphere). I discuss algorithm performance, compare it to a state-of-the-art estimator, demonstrate the algorithm on synthetic data, and describe extension to arbitrary dimension. PMID:26352239

  16. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves.

    PubMed

    Dockrey, J A; Horsley, S A R; Hooper, I R; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  17. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon.

  18. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  19. MODIS Directional Surface Reflectance Product: Method, Error Estimates and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, Eric; Kotchenova, Svetlana

    The surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) is the ratio between reflected radiance measured in specific observation geometry (zenith and azimuth) within an infinitely small solid angle and irradiance incident on the surface from a direct source of illumination (zenith and azimuth). The BRF is determined from satellite observations through an atmospheric correction (AC) process. When properly retrieved, the surface BRF is fully decoupled from an atmospheric signal, and thus represents the value as measured by an ideal sensor held at the same view geometry and located just above the Earth's surface assuming an absence of atmosphere.

  20. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  1. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  2. Ultrasensitive magnetometry and magnetic resonance imaging using cantilever detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined cantilevers make remarkable magnetometers for nanoscale measurements of magnetic materials and for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present various applications of cantilever magnetometry at low temperature using cantilevers capable of attonewton force sensitivity. Small, unexpected magnetic effects can be seen, such as anomalous damping in magnetic field. A key application is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) of both electron and nuclear spins. In recent experiments with MRFM-based NMR imaging, 3D spatial resolution better than 10 nm was achieved for protons in individual virus particles. The achieved volumetric resolution represents an improvement of 100 million compared to the best conventional MRI. The microscope is sensitive enough to detect NMR signals from adsorbed layers of hydrocarbon contamination, hydrogen in multiwall carbon nanotubes and the phosphorus in DNA. Operating with a force noise on the order of 6 aN per root hertz with a magnetic tip that produces a field gradient in excess of 30 gauss per nanometer, the magnetic moment sensitivity is ˜0.2 Bohr magnetons. The corresponding field sensitivity is ˜3 nT per root hertz. To our knowledge, this combination of high field sensitivity and nanometer spatial resolution is unsurpassed by any other form of nanometer-scale magnetometry.

  3. Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

    2003-04-01

    Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

  4. Magnetometry and Ground-Penetrating Radar Studies in the Sihuas Valley, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnicki, E.; Papadimitrios, K.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Quillcapampa la Antigua site in Peru's Sihuas Valley is a settlement from Peru's Middle Horizon (600-100 A.D.). Archaeological interest in the area stems from the question of whether ancient civilizations were able to have extensive state control of distant groups, or whether state influence occurred through less direct ties (e.g., marriage, religion, or trade). Our geophysical surveys are preliminary to archaeological digging in the area. Ground-penetrating radar and magnetometry attempt to locate areas of interest for focused archaeological excavation, characterize the design of architectural remains and burial mounds in the area, and allow archaeologists to interpret the amount of influence the Wari civilization had on the local residents.

  5. Surface-directed boundary flow in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom T; Taylor, David G; Lim, Kwan Seop; Sedlak, Miroslav; Bashir, Rashid; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2006-07-01

    Channel geometry combined with surface chemistry enables a stable liquid boundary flow to be attained along the surfaces of a 12 microm diameter hydrophilic glass fiber in a closed semi-elliptical channel. Surface free energies and triangular corners formed by PDMS/glass fiber or OTS/glass fiber surfaces are shown to be responsible for the experimentally observed wetting phenomena and formation of liquid boundary layers that are 20-50 microm wide and 12 microm high. Viewing this stream through a 20 microm slit results in a virtual optical window with a 5 pL liquid volume suitable for cell counting and pathogen detection. The geometry that leads to the boundary layer is a closed channel that forms triangular corners where glass fiber and the OTS coated glass slide or PDMS touch. The contact angles and surfaces direct positioning of the fluid next to the fiber. Preferential wetting of corner regions initiates the boundary flow, while the elliptical cross-section of the channel stabilizes the microfluidic flow. The Young-Laplace equation, solved using fluid dynamic simulation software, shows contact angles that exceed 105 degrees will direct the aqueous fluid to a boundary layer next to a hydrophilic fiber with a contact angle of 5 degrees. We believe this is the first time that an explanation has been offered for the case of a boundary layer formation in a closed channel directed by a triangular geometry with two hydrophobic wetting edges adjacent to a hydrophilic surface. PMID:16800710

  6. Direct measurement of surface stress of stretched soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Dufresne, Eric

    The wetting profile of liquid droplets on soft solids is determined by the competition between elasticity and solid surface stress. Near the contact point, the bulk elasticity becomes negligible such that Neumann's classic analysis nicely captures the wetting geometry and provides us an effective approach to directly measure the solid surface stress. Here, we report our experiments using confocal microscopy in studying the wetting of liquids on soft PDMS gels. While the droplets are sitting on the top, the substrates are biaxially strained. We observe that the wetting profiles and the three-phase contact angles are changing dramatically as the substrate is stretched. With Neumann's principle, we obtain the quantitative relation between surface stress of the PDMS and the applied strain. These results suggest a significant strain-dependence of surface energy and surface stress for our PDMS.

  7. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  8. Directional surface enhanced Raman scattering on gold nano-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibert, Raymond; Sarkar, Mitradeep; Bryche, Jean-François; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Moreau, Julien; Besbes, Mondher; Barbillon, Grégory; Bartenlian, Bernard; Canva, Michael; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Directional plasmon excitation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) emission were demonstrated for 1D and 2D gold nanostructure arrays deposited on a flat gold layer. The extinction spectrum of both arrays exhibits intense resonance bands that are redshifted when the incident angle is increased. Systematic extinction analysis of different grating periods revealed that this band can be assigned to a propagated surface plasmon of the flat gold surface that fulfills the Bragg condition of the arrays (Bragg mode). Directional SERS measurements demonstrated that the SERS intensity can be improved by one order of magnitude when the Bragg mode positions are matched with either the excitation or the Raman wavelengths. Hybridized numerical calculations with the finite element method and Fourier modal method also proved the presence of the Bragg mode plasmon and illustrated that the enhanced electric field of the Bragg mode is particularly localized on the nanostructures regardless of their size.

  9. Directional surface enhanced Raman scattering on gold nano-gratings.

    PubMed

    Gillibert, Raymond; Sarkar, Mitradeep; Bryche, Jean-François; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Moreau, Julien; Besbes, Mondher; Barbillon, Grégory; Bartenlian, Bernard; Canva, Michael; Chapelle, Marc Lamy de la

    2016-03-18

    Directional plasmon excitation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) emission were demonstrated for 1D and 2D gold nanostructure arrays deposited on a flat gold layer. The extinction spectrum of both arrays exhibits intense resonance bands that are redshifted when the incident angle is increased. Systematic extinction analysis of different grating periods revealed that this band can be assigned to a propagated surface plasmon of the flat gold surface that fulfills the Bragg condition of the arrays (Bragg mode). Directional SERS measurements demonstrated that the SERS intensity can be improved by one order of magnitude when the Bragg mode positions are matched with either the excitation or the Raman wavelengths. Hybridized numerical calculations with the finite element method and Fourier modal method also proved the presence of the Bragg mode plasmon and illustrated that the enhanced electric field of the Bragg mode is particularly localized on the nanostructures regardless of their size. PMID:26872242

  10. Direct attachment of DNA to semiconducting surfaces for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Shahedipour-Sandvik, Fatemeh; Tokranova, Natalya; Bergkvist, Magnus; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2010-11-01

    In this work we propose a novel method of immobilizing nucleic acids for field effect or high electron mobility transistor-based biosensors. The naturally occurring 5' terminal phosphate group on nucleic acids was used to coordinate with semiconductor and metal oxide surfaces. We demonstrate that DNA can be directly immobilized onto ZrO(2), AlGaN, GaN, and HfO(2) while retaining its ability to hybridize to target sequences with high specificity. By directly immobilizing the probe molecule to the sensor surface, as opposed to conventional crosslinking strategies, the number of steps in device fabrication is reduced. Furthermore, hybridization to target strands occurs closer to the sensor surface, which has the potential to increase device sensitivity by reducing the impact of the Debye screening length. PMID:20869405

  11. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  12. Scanning Cryogenic Magnetometry with a 1D Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straquadine, Joshua; Yang, Fan; Lev, Benjamin

    We present a novel scanning probe magnetometer suitable for cryogenic studies, in which the probe is a Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb. The system is designed for rapid sample changes and operation between 35 K and room temperature while remaining compatible with the UHV requirements of ultracold atom experiments. We demonstrate a spatial resolution (FWHM) of 2.6 μm and a repeatability of 1.9 +/- 1.0 nT. We also show that the system is operating close to the fundamental measurement limits set by photon shot noise and atom shot noise. Our scanning quantum cryogenic atom microscope is suitable for fundamental studies of transport and magnetism in condensed matter systems such as high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. We discuss the advantages and applications of this magnetometry technique.

  13. Optical Magnetometry with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor Marcel

    Precision measurement of magnetic fields is at the heart of many important analytic techniques in materials, geology, biology, medicine, security, space, and the physical sciences. These applications require operation under a wide range of specifications regarding sensitivity, spatial resolution, bandwidth, scalability, and temperature. In this work we have developed the enabling technology for magnetometers based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond which promise to cover a wider portion of this parameter space than existing sensors. We have studied how to prepare diamond material optimized for magnetometry, and we observed the basic optical and spin properties of the NV centers. Using a novel scheme inspired by new information about NV centers gathered from these studies, we constructed a sensor which improved on the state-of-the-art in a number of areas. Finally, we outline a plan for improving these sensors to study micro- and nano-scale magnetic phenomena currently inaccessible using existing technology.

  14. Ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Scanning SQUID microscopy offers a unique combination of high spatial resolution and magnetic field sensitivity that allows for the detection of magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am2. This opens the possibility of extending paleomagnetic analyses to samples that have not been accessible to standard moment magnetometry, for which the detection limit is 10^-12 Am2. Of particular interest are individual terrestrial and extraterrestrial particles of small size (< 500 μm) that may preserve records of planetary dynamos and early nebular magnetic fields. Example targets include impact melt spherules, zircon and other silicate crystals, micrometeorites, cosmic dust, chondrules and refractory inclusions. These grains may be adequately modeled as small uniformly magnetized volumes, such that retrieving their magnetic moments from measured magnetic field maps does not require solving non-unique inverse problems. As a consequence, SQUID microscopes can be utilized as ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometers. We show alternating field and thermal demagnetization data for several grains that demonstrate the performance of this technique. In addition, we compare scanning SQUID microscopy data with net moment measurements of the same samples performed by a commercial superconducting rock magnetometer. The results agree for stronger moments, as expected, but rapidly diverge as net moments fall below the lower 10^-10 Am2 range. These studies underscore the inability of conventional instruments not only to detect very weak moments but also to isolate contamination originating from background sources such as sample holders and mounts. We expect ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry using scanning SQUID microscopy will be a powerful tool in helping elucidate the formation of the solar system and planetary history.

  15. Directional Emissivity Effects on Martian Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Clancy, R. T.; Clayton, G. C.

    2001-11-01

    The angular dependence of thermal emission from the surface of Mars has not been well characterized. Although nadir sequences constitute most of the MGS/TES Martian surface observations [1,2], a significant number scans of Martian surfaces at multiple emission angles (emission phase function (EPF) sequences) also exist. Such data can provide insight into surface structures, thermal inertias, and non-isotropic corrections to thermal emission measurements [3]. The availability of abundant EPF data as well as the added utility of such observations for atmospheric characterization provide the impetus for examining the phenomenon of directional emissivity. We present examples of directional emissivity effects on brightness temperature spectra for a variety of typical Martian surfaces. We examine the theoretical development by Hapke (1993, 1996) [4,5] and compare his algorithm to that of Mishchenko et al. (1999) [6]. These results are then compared to relevant TES EPF data. This work is supported through NASA grant NAGS-9820 (MJW) and JPL contract no. 961471 (RTC). [1] Smith et al. (1998), AAS-DPS meeting # 30, # 11.P07. [2] Kieffer, Mullins, & Titus (1998), EOS, 79, 533. [3] Jakosky, Finiol, & Henderson (1990), JGR, 17, 985--988. [4] Hapke, B. (1993), Theory of Reflectance & Emittance Spectroscopy, Cambridge Univ. Press, NY. [5] Hapke, B. (1996), JGR, 101, E7, 16817--16831. [6] Mishchenko et al. (1999), JQSRT, 63, 409--432.

  16. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    PubMed

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. PMID:22287482

  17. Direct Measurements of the Surface-Atmosphere Exchange of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevlin, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Gregoire, P.

    2012-12-01

    As the dominant atmospheric base, ammonia plays an important role in the formation and growth of inorganic aerosols. Surface-atmosphere exchange of ammonia has been observed to occur as a bidirectional flux governed by the relative magnitudes of atmospheric gas phase concentration and a temperature-dependent surface compensation point. In order to better characterise the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchanges, more direct measurements of these exchanges are necessary. Eddy Covariance (EC) can provide the most direct surface-atmosphere flux measurements, but its requirement for high frequency data combined with the reactive nature of ammonia have limited its application for this species. In order to address this lack, an investigation into the instrumental sensitivity and time response requirements for EC ammonia flux measurements was carried out using a Quantum Cascade-Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) capable of measuring ammonia concentration at 10 Hz. Time response was additionally improved through the use of a heated sample line and custom glass inlet, and the system was deployed over a short grass field in rural Ontario. The ammonia measurements were used along with three dimensional sonic anemometer wind speed data to calculate EC ammonia fluxes. When combined with simultaneous measurements of the inorganic composition of gas and particle phases made by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC), these flux measurements can provide insight into the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchange.

  18. Radiative decay engineering 3. Surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence detection that promises to increase sensitivity by 20- to 1000-fold is described. This method will also decrease the contribution of sample autofluorescence to the detected signal. The method depends on the coupling of excited fluorophores with the surface plasmon resonance present in thin metal films, typically silver and gold. The phenomenon of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) occurs for fluorophores 20–250 nm from the metal surface, allowing detection of fluorophores over substantial distances beyond the metal–sample interface. SPCE depends on interactions of the excited fluorophore with the metal surface. This interaction is independent of the mode of excitation; that is, it does not require evanescent wave or surface-plasmon excitation. In a sense, SPCE is the inverse process of the surface plasmon resonance absorption of thin metal films. Importantly, SPCE occurs over a narrow angular distribution, converting normally isotropic emission into easily collected directional emission. Up to 50% of the emission from unoriented samples can be collected, much larger than typical fluorescence collection efficiencies near 1% or less. SPCE is due only to fluorophores near the metal surface and may be regarded as emission from the induced surface plasmons. Autofluorescence from more distal parts of the sample is decreased due to decreased coupling. SPCE is highly polarized and autofluorescence can be further decreased by collecting only the polarized component or only the light propagating with the appropriate angle. Examples showing how simple optical configurations can be used in diagnostics, sensing, or biotechnology applications are presented. Surface plasmon-coupled emission is likely to find widespread applications throughout the biosciences. PMID:14690679

  19. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    topographically modified surface (R2=0.82). Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels significantly reduced attachment and attachment strength of Navicula and C. marina. These hydrogels also reduced attachment of zoospores of Ulva compared to PDMSe. Attachment of Ulva to microtopographies in PDMSe and PEGDMA-co-HEMA negatively correlated with ERIII*Re (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.99, respectively). Incorporating a surface energy term into this equation created a correlation between the attachment densities of cells from two evolutionarily diverse groups on substrates of two surface chemistries with an equation that describes the various microtopographies and surface chemistries in terms of surface energy (R2 = 0.80). The current Attachment Model can now be used to design engineered antifouling surface microtopographies and chemistries that inhibit the attachment of organisms from three evoluntionarily diverse groups. Hydrogels based on PEGDMA were also chosen as a substratum material for mammalian cell culture. Capturing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and inducing differentiation into the endothelial cell (EC) phenotype is the ideal way to re-endothelialize a small-diameter vascular graft. Substratum elasticity has been reported to direct stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels provided good compliance, high fidelity of topographic features and sites for surface modification with biomolecules. Fibronectin grafting and topography both increased EC attachment. This combination of adjustable elasticity, surface chemistry and topography has the potential to promote the capture and differentiation of EPCs into a confluent EC monolayer. Engineered microtopographies replicated in PDMSe directed elongation and alignment of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) compared to smooth surfaces. Engineered cellular micro-environments were created with specific surface energies defined by chemistry

  20. Site-directed, on-surface assembly of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rebecca; Saccà, Barbara; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional DNA lattices have been assembled from DNA double-crossover (DX) motifs on DNA-encoded surfaces in a site-specific manner. The lattices contained two types of single-stranded protruding arms pointing into opposite directions of the plane. One type of these protruding arms served to anchor the DNA lattice on the solid support through specific hybridization with surface-bound, complementary capture oligomers. The other type of arms allowed for further attachment of DNA-tethered probe molecules on the opposite side of the lattices exposed to the solution. Site-specific lattice assembly and attachment of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides and DNA-protein conjugates was demonstrated using DNA microarrays on flat, transparent mica substrates. Owing to their programmable orientation and addressability over a broad dynamic range from the nanometer to the millimeter length scale, such supramolecular architecture might be used for presenting biomolecules on surfaces, for instance, in biosensor applications. PMID:26306556

  1. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wang, Zuobin; Zhang, Ziang; Yue, Yong; Li, Dayou; Maple, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  2. Vertical directivities of seismic arrays on the ground surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor survey method (MSM) is a technique to estimate subsurface velocity structures by inverting phase velocities of the surface waves in the microtremors. We can explorer the S-wave velocity structures at significantly lower expenses by the MSM than the conventional geophysical techniques because of its passive nature. Coherent waves across an array are identified in the MSM, and, therefore, all the existing velocity inversion methods have been deduced under an implicit assumption of horizontal velocity structure. However, it is expected that the development of the 3D inversion theory would drastically enhance applicability and reliability of the MSM. We, hence, investigated the characteristics of vertical directivities of the arrays deployed on the ground surface as an initial step for deriving the 3D MSM. We have firstly examined the response of an elemental two sensor array to which plane waves propagates from the deep crust with a certain angle of incident, and then examined the characteristics of several types of arrays, including triangular and circular arrays to clarify the characteristics of practical arrays. Real part of the complex coherence function, which has been derived to evaluate coherence of the Rayleigh wave between sensors for plane waves (Shiraishi et al., 2006), has been applied for this investigation. Our results showed that the directivity varies according to a parameter kr ( k : wave number, r : separation of the sensors ). A vertical directivity of two sensor array at kr = π shows a rotationally-symmetrical shape (Figure (a)). In contrast, an equilateral triangle array has a conspicuous directivity toward the vertical direction (cf. Figure (b)). This divergence suggests that the shape of the vertical directivity significantly depend on the geometry, and a sharp directivity toward just beneath the array can be realized by designing the vertical directivity. We concluded from this study that 3D MSM is feasible and further study to

  3. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

    Information stored in magnetic fields plays an important role in everyday life. This information exists over a remarkably wide range of sizes, so that magnetometry at a variety of length scales can extract useful information. Examples at centimeter to millimeter length scales include measurement of spatial and temporal character of fields generated in the human brain and heart, and active manipulation of spins in the human body for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At micron length scales, magnetometry can be used to measure magnetic objects such as flux qubits; at nanometer length scales it can be used to study individual magnetic domains, and even individual spins. The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based magnetometer for two such applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nanoscale magnetometry, are the focus of this thesis. Conventional MRI has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body. This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of protons with the addition application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information. Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems. Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. The prepolarized, SQUID detected ultra-low field MRI (ULF MRI) developed by the Clarke group allows imaging in very weak fields (typically 132 muT, corresponding to a resonant frequency of 5.6 kHz). At these low field strengths, there is enhanced contrast in the longitudinal relaxation time of various tissue types, enabling imaging of objects which are not visible to conventional MRI, for instance prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the contrast between normal and cancerous

  4. Smoothing and roughening of slip surfaces in direct shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, Amir; Badt, Nir; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2015-04-01

    Faults in the upper crust contain discrete slip surfaces which have absorbed a significant part of the shear displacement along them. Field measurements demonstrate that these surfaces are rough at all measurable scales and indicate that surfaces of relatively large-slip faults are statistically smoother than those of small-slip faults. However, post faulting and surface erosion process that might affect the geometry of outcrops cannot be discounted in such measurements. Here we present experimental results for the evolution of shear surface topography as function of slip distance and normal stress in direct shear experiments. A single prismatic fine grain limestone block is first fractured in tension mode using the four-point bending test methodology and then the fracture surface topography is scanned using a laser profilometer. We then shear the obtained tensile fracture surfaces in direct shear, ensuring the original fracture surfaces are in a perfectly matching configuration at the beginning of the shear test. First, shearing is conducted to distances varying from 5 to 15 mm under constant normal stress of 2MPa and a constant displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s using two closed-loop servo controlled hydraulic pistons, supplying normal and shear forces (Davidesko et al., 2014). In the tested configuration peak shear stress is typically attained after a shear displacement of about 2-3 mm, beyond which lower shear stress is required to continue shearing at the preset displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s as is typical for initially rough joints. Following some initial compression the interface begins to dilate and continues to do so until the end of the test. The sheared tensile fracture surface is then scanned again and the geometrical evolution, in term of RMS roughness and power spectral density (PSD) is analyzed. We show that shearing smooth the surface along all our measurements scales. The roughness ratio, measured by initial PSD / final PSD for each wavelength

  5. Land-surface studies with a directional neutron detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Desilets, Darin; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter

    2009-09-01

    Direct measurements of cosmic-ray neutron intensity were recorded with a neutron scatter camera developed at SNL. The instrument used in this work is a prototype originally designed for nuclear non-proliferation work, but in this project it was used to characterize the response of ambient neutrons in the 0.5-10 MeV range to water located on or above the land surface. Ambient neutron intensity near the land surface responds strongly to the presence of water, suggesting the possibility of an indirect method for monitoring soil water content, snow water equivalent depth, or canopy intercepted water. For environmental measurements the major advantage of measuring neutrons with the scatter camera is the limited (60{sup o}) field of view that can be obtained, which allows observations to be conducted at a previously unattainable spatial scales. This work is intended to provide new measurements of directional fluxes which can be used in the design of new instruments for passively and noninvasively observing land-surface water. Through measurements and neutron transport modeling we have demonstrated that such a technique is feasible.

  6. Detection of bottom ferromagnetic electrode oxidation in magnetic tunnel junctions by magnetometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Nam, Dao N. H.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2010-12-01

    Surface oxidation of the bottom ferromagnetic (FM) electrode, one of the major detrimental factors to the performance of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), is difficult to avoid during the fabrication process of the MTJ's tunnel barrier. Since Co rich alloys are commonly used for the FM electrodes in MTJs, overoxidation of the tunnel barrier results in the formation of a CoO antiferromagnetic (AF) interface layer which couples with the bottom FM electrode to form a typical AF/FM exchange bias (EB) system. In this work, surface oxidation of the CoFe and CoFeB bottom electrodes was detected via magnetometry measurements of EB characterizations including the EB field, training effect, uncompensated spin density, and enhanced coercivity. Variations in these parameters were found to be related to the surface oxidation of the bottom electrode, among them the change in coercivity is most sensitive. Annealed samples show evidence for an oxygen migration back to the MgO tunnel barrier by annealing.

  7. High-sensitivity in-plane vector magnetometry using the alternating gradient force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Luc; Rahmani, Anas; Renaudin, Patrice; Wack, André

    2003-05-01

    The alternating gradient force magnetometer is a highly sensitive tool particularly suited for thin films magnetometry. The measurement technique is based upon the alternating force generated on a magnetized sample by a set of field-gradient coils. The so-induced sample oscillation is directly proportional to the sample's magnetization. High sensitivity measurements are achieved by mounting the sample at the end of a cantilever attached to a piezoelectric bimorph element, and by tuning the excitation frequency close to the mechanical resonance of the sample-cantilever assembly. Here we describe a new design that allows to measure both in-plane components of the magnetization of a thin film sample, for any direction of the external magnetic field within the sample's plane. By rotating the sample-probe assembly, we find the output signal to be proportional to the projection of the alternating force along the sense axis of the piezoelectric bimorph. Besides, the resonance frequency of the system remains unchanged. Thus, hysteresis loops can be measured accurately for various angles between the applied field and an in-plane anisotropy axis. The signal only vanishes when the alternating force is orthogonal to the bimorph axis. Moreover, we have designed a set of two pairs of gradient coils, whose axis are orthogonal to one another. By varying the excitation current within these two pairs of coils, it is possible to rotate the alternating gradient direction, to detect magnetization components along or perpendicular to the external field.

  8. Improved Quantum Magnetometry beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, J. B.; Chaves, R.; Kołodyński, J.

    2015-07-01

    Under ideal conditions, quantum metrology promises a precision gain over classical techniques scaling quadratically with the number of probe particles. At the same time, no-go results have shown that generic, uncorrelated noise limits the quantum advantage to a constant factor. In frequency estimation scenarios, however, there are exceptions to this rule and, in particular, it has been found that transversal dephasing does allow for a scaling quantum advantage. Yet, it has remained unclear whether such exemptions can be exploited in practical scenarios. Here, we argue that the transversal-noise model applies to the setting of recent magnetometry experiments and show that a scaling advantage can be maintained with one-axis-twisted spin-squeezed states and Ramsey-interferometry-like measurements. This is achieved by exploiting the geometry of the setup that, as we demonstrate, has a strong influence on the achievable quantum enhancement for experimentally feasible parameter settings. When, in addition to the dominant transversal noise, other sources of decoherence are present, the quantum advantage is asymptotically bounded by a constant, but this constant may be significantly improved by exploring the geometry.

  9. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  10. Interpretation of surface and planetary directional albedos for vegetated regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; i.e., the dependence of planetary albedo upon solar zenith angle. These include an elucidation of processes that influence the variation of planetary albedo with solar zenith angle, as well as emphasizing potential problems associated with converting narrowband planetary albedo measurements to broadband quantities. It is suggested that, for vegetated surfaces, this latter task could be somewhat formidable, since the model simulations indicate that narrowband to broadband conversions strongly depend upon vegetation type. A further aspect of this paper is to illustrate a procedure by which reciprocity inconsistencies within a bidirectional reflectance dataset, if they are not too severe, can be circumvented.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of flow past superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces trap a discontinuous air layer through their texture which, in addition to changing the apparent contact angle of water drops, also changes the friction coefficient of a continuous water flow. Locally this effect can be represented through a slip coefficient (e.g. Lauga & Stone, J. Fluid Mech. 489, 55, 2003), or equivalently through an effective displacement of the wall by a distance (different for each different velocity component) comparable to the spacing of the texture. For this reason they are being considered for drag reduction in turbulent flow, more sensitive to this displacement than laminar flow for its intrisic small features. Since the upper limit on texture size imposed by the destruction of the surface-tension-bound air layer eventually constrains the reduction available, to quantify the effect accurately is essential. In its simplest representation, the superhydrophobic surface may be assumed to be flat and composed of alternating patches of no-slip and free-slip wall. Here direct numerical simulations will be presented of turbulent flow past such a surface, and their results compared with those produced by the corresponding effective wall displacement.

  12. Directional excitation of surface plasmons by dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    An important aim of current research on plasmonics is to develop compact components to manipulate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and specifically to develop efficient SPP couplers. The commonly used metallic resonators are inefficient to couple free-space waves to SPPs and metallic gratings require oblique incidence for achieving unidirectional propagation. In this article, we propose to use nanoscale nonuniform arrays of dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) to realize unidirectional launching of SPPs. DRAs are made of low-loss high-permittivity nanostructures operating on a metal surface. The applications of metallodielectric nanostructures can produce resonances mainly in the low-loss dielectric parts and hence the power dissipated through oscillating current in metal can be reduced. Similar to metallic resonators, DRAs operating near resonance can provide phase control when coupling incident waves into SPPs, adding degrees of freedom in controlling propagation direction. The theoretical analysis in this article, with numerical validation, shows efficient SPPs launching by nonuniform array of cylindrical DRAs into a predesigned direction. Furthermore, with proper patterning, optimal launching can be achieved by avoiding power leakage via deflection into free space. The SPP launching condition and the influence of propagation loss are also mathematically analyzed from the viewpoint of antenna array theory. The SPPs launchers based on DRAs have a potential for applications in highly efficient integrated optics and optical waveguides.

  13. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications. PMID:26247827

  14. Thermal management of VECSELs by front surface direct liquid cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Conor J. C.; Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient thermal management is vital for VECSELs, affecting the output power and several aspects of performance of the device. Presently there exist two distinct methods of effective thermal management which both possess their merits and disadvantages. Substrate removal of the VECSEL gain chip has proved a successful method in devices emitting at a wavelength near 1μm. However for other wavelengths the substrate removal technique has proved less effective primarily due to the thermal impedance of the distributed Bragg reflectors. The second method of thermal management involves the use of crystalline heat spreaders bonded to the gain chip surface. Although this is an effective thermal management scheme, the disadvantages are additional loss and the etalon effect that filters the gain spectrum, making mode locking more difficult and normally resulting in multiple peaks in the spectrum. There are considerable disadvantages associated with both methods attributed to heatspreader cost and sample processing. It is for these reasons that a proposed alternative, front surface liquid cooling, has been investigated in this project. Direct liquid cooling involves flowing a temperature-controlled liquid over the sample's surface. In this project COMSOL was used to model surface liquid cooling of a VECSEL sample in order to investigate and compare its potential thermal management with current standard thermal management techniques. Based on modelling, experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the performance of the technique. While modelling suggests that this is potentially a mid-performance low cost alternative to existing techniques, experimental measurements to date do not reflect the performance predicted from modelling.

  15. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  16. New Possibilities of Magnetometry For The Earthss Crust Oil-gas-bearing Prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymchuk, V.

    Magnetometry has been used traditionally on a regional stage in a complex of geo- physical methods for oil prospecting mainly for basement structure study, deep fault mapping etc. However, as it was shown by the world experience the possibilities of a modern magnetoprospecting have grown substantially due to application of high- accuracy magnetometers, new methods of treatment and interpretation of geomag- netic data, increase of number of geomagnetic field parameters. It enable to use the geomagnetic method for the solution of new and actual problems for oil prospect- ing:1)detection and tracing of active tectonic faults with which carbon deposits are closely connected; 2)detection of fractured zones and earthSs crust disconsolidations; 3)oil and gas direct prospecting. Usage of magnetometry for the solution of the men- tioned above problems is based on the theoretically and experimentally determined facts of existence of the small-amplitude local DFa (up to 10 nT) anomalies and mag- netic field anomalies temporal variations U dynamic geomagnetic anomalies DDFa up to 2-5 nT over the zones of oil-gas-bearing, separate deposits, active tectonic frac- tures. The mechanisms of these anomalies origin can be rather different: chemical, electrokinetic et al. A series of methodologic investigations over some regions of the Dniepr-Donetsk trough has been carried out to study the possibilities of high-accuracy magnetic prospecting for oil-gas-bearing prognosis on the Selukchy oil deposits, on Pryrichna gas-bearing structure. Local magnetic anomalies with amplitude of 6-7 nT were detected on the Selukchy oil deposit. In both cases a magnetic anomaly max- imum shift relative to the structure arch and its timing with biogerm limestone was observed. On the base of the core magnetic properties study and mathematical simu- lation it was concluded that magnetic inhomogeneities in the upper part of the cut (up to 2 km) that can be considered as a result of epigenetic magnetic

  17. Direct versus hydrogen assisted CO dissociation on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2012-02-01

    We present investigations of the formation of precursor hydrocarbon species relevant to production of liquid hydrocarbons on low index surfaces of various important noble and transition metals. The formation could occur via the so-called carbide mechanism where direct CO dissociation takes place, followed by stepwise hydrogenation of C yielding CHx species. Formation of precursor CHx species could also potentially take place through hydrogenated CO intermediates. First-principles calculations of energetics and barriers of CO conversion to hydrocarbons species were performed using plane-wave periodic density functional theory. Our calculations indicate that the two pathways are generally competitive on transition metals. A microkinetic model, with input thermodynamics and kinetic parameters estimated from electronic structure calculations, has been developed. The two pathways will be further examined using microkinetic approach to determine whether the aforementioned finding holds at realistic conditions.

  18. Direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Krpetić, Željka; van Lierop, Danny; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Graham, Duncan

    2015-01-19

    The exploration of the genetic information carried by DNA has become a major scientific challenge. Routine DNA analysis, such as PCR, still suffers from important intrinsic limitations. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has emerged as an outstanding opportunity for the development of DNA analysis, but its application to duplexes (dsDNA) has been largely hampered by reproducibility and/or sensitivity issues. A simple strategy is presented to perform ultrasensitive direct label-free analysis of unmodified dsDNA with the means of SERS by using positively charged silver colloids. Electrostatic adhesion of DNA promotes nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at nanogram level. As potential applications, we report the quantitative recognition of hybridization events as well as the first examples of SERS recognition of single base mismatches and base methylations (5-methylated cytosine and N6-methylated Adenine) in duplexes. PMID:25414148

  19. Novel optical directional coupler based on surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huawei; Guang, Xu Guang; Huang, Jingtang

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and perfect matching layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition are adopted to simulate and analyze a novel optical directional coupler (ODC) based on surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Transmittance at each output port of the novel ODC with different coupling region lengths shows it follows the general regulations of a conventional ODC. Especially, its transverse size is of nanoscale. The extreme power position offset between the two output ports is proved to be connected with the real part of Ag's complex refractive index. The excess loss and isolation of the ODC are, respectively, 0.57 and 25.9 dB for 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength, when the length of the coupling region equals half of its coupling length.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  2. Compact magnetic antennas for directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Palomba, Stefano; Park, Yongshik; Zentgraf, Thomas; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonics is considered as one of the most promising candidates for implementing the next generation of ultrafast and ultracompact photonic circuits. Considerable effort has been made to scale down individual plasmonic components into the nanometer regime. However, a compact plasmonic source that can efficiently generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and deliver SPPs to the region of interest is yet to be realized. Here, bridging the optical antenna theory and the recently developed concept of metamaterials, we demonstrate a subwavelength, highly efficient plasmonic source for directional generation of SPPs. The designed device consists of two nanomagnetic resonators with detuned resonant frequencies. At the operating wavelength, incident photons can be efficiently channeled into SPP waves modulated by the electric field polarization. By tailoring the relative phase at resonance and the separation between the two nanoresonators, SPPs can be steered to predominantly propagate along one specific direction. This novel magnetic nanoantenna paves a new way to manipulate photons in the near-field, and also could be useful for SPP-based nonlinear applications, active modulations, and wireless optical communications. PMID:22845720

  3. Surface modification of PVDF membrane via AGET ATRP directly from the membrane surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Li-Ping; Du, Qi-Yun; Zhang, Yu-Feng

    2011-05-01

    This contribution demonstrates a method for PVDF microporous membrane modification via surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) directly from the membrane surface. Three hydrophilic polymers, poly(2-(N,N-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), poly(2-oligo (ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), were grafted from the PVDF membrane surface in aqueous solution at room temperature. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the successful covalent tethering of the polymer chains onto the PVDF membrane surface. The gravimetry results indicated an approximately linear increase of the graft yields, up to about 330 μg/cm 2 for DMAEMA and 470 μg/cm 2 for both HEMA and OEGMA, with the polymerization time. Block copolymer brushes were prepared by chain extension. Water contact angle decreased over 50% for high yields, indicating improved surface hydrophilicity. The effects of the graft polymerization on membrane surface morphology, pore structure and permeability were investigated. It was found that the surface roughness was decreased and the pore size distribution was narrowed. The membrane permeability increased at low graft yields due to the enhanced hydrophilicity and decreased at high graft yields due to the overall reduction of the pore diameters.

  4. Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG): Probing the Europan Ocean and Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Jia, X.; Joy, S. P.; Khurana, K. K.; Murphy, N.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Weiss, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic induction is a powerful tool for probing the subsurface. The magnetometer on the Galileo mission to Jupiter found compelling evidence for subsurface oceans on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto; however, the single induction frequency measured did not allow characteristics of the ocean to be discerned. The Interior Characterization of Europa using MAGnetometry (ICEMAG) instrument, selected for NASA's Europa mission payload in May 2015, is designed to measure Europa's induction response at multiple frequencies with high accuracy. ICEMAG definitively assesses the ice shell thickness, and the conductivity and thickness of the subsurface ocean. This knowledge informs models of Europa's thermal evolution and allows evaluation of processes that have cycled material between the depths and the surface. Magnetic field measurements also determine the electrical currents associated with coupling of plumes to the corotating magnetospheric plasma and coupling of Europa to the Jovian ionosphere. ICEMAG utilizes UCLA fluxgate magnetic field sensors as well as JPL helium sensors in an integrated magnetic measurement system. The advent of laser-pumped helium sensors and advances in digital signal sampling enables an innovative multi-sensor magnetometer to be flown that is able to monitor spacecraft fields and maintain absolute accuracy of the measurement at a level of ~1 nT over time scales of years, without special maneuvers such as spacecraft rolls.

  5. Simulating narrow nonlinear resonance features for magnetometry in compact cold atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Robinson, Jenn; Kunz, Paul; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating cold atom magnetometry applications and have developed a numeric model of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) and Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation (NMOR) for degenerate two-level systems. While most EIA and NMOR research is done in warm vapors, cold atoms avoid Doppler broadening and better isolate the various optical pumping mechanisms involved. Our model focuses on the effect of transverse magnetic fields on both EIA and NMOR features and shows that critical points of both yield quantitative measures of the magnitude and direction of the transverse field. This dependence reveals the underlying optical pumping mechanisms and makes possible a single, in-situ measurement of the background magnetic field zero to the sub-milligauss level, reducing background fields to enhance sub-Doppler cooling and collectively-enhanced neutral-atom quantum memory lifetimes. Separately, we are pursuing experimental measurements on the relationship between EIA and NMOR in a compact cold atom apparatus. To improve the system's capabilities we are designing our next-generation atom chip to reduce system size and employ versatile geometries enabling multi-site trapping.

  6. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field. PMID:24149467

  7. Direct measurements of World Ocean tidal currents with surface drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Centurioni, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Velocities of surface drifters are analyzed to study tidal currents throughout the World Ocean. The global drifter data set spanning the period 1979-2013 is used to describe the geographical structure of the surface tidal currents at global scale with a resolution of 2°. Harmonic analysis is performed with two semidiurnal, two diurnal, and four inferred tidal constituents. Tidal current characteristics (amplitude of semimajor axis, rotary coefficient, tidal ellipse inclination, and Greenwich phase) are mapped over the World Ocean from direct observations. The M2 currents dominate on all the shallow continental shelves with magnitude exceeding 60 cm/s. They are also substantial (4-5 cm/s) over the main deep topographic features such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the Mariana Ridge. The S2 currents have amplitudes typically half the size of the M2 currents, with a maximum of about 30 cm/s. The K1 and O1 currents are important in many shallow seas. They are large in the vicinity of the turning latitudes near 30°N/S where they merge with inertial motions of the same frequency. They are also substantial in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea. Maps of rotary coefficients indicate that all tidal motions are essentially clockwise (anticlockwise) in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. The rotary coefficient of the tidal currents is compared with the theory of freely and meridionally propagating baroclinic inertia-gravity waves. The Greenwich phase of the M2 constituent has large-scale coherent propagation patterns which could be interpreted as the propagation of the barotropic tide.

  8. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements. [of surface field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1979-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field (in spherical harmonics) from harmonic analysis of direct (in situ) measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends (smoothed spectra) to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low-orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity (range rate) residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in a highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50-km half wavelength) from 1 x 1 deg gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of GEOS 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows that there is about 46 cm of geoid height (rms worldwide) remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  9. Holographic LEED: A direct method for surface crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvakas, John Athanasios

    Since 1960's Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) has been one of the most reliable methods for surface crystallography. It has solved hundreds of structures over the past 20-25 years and continues to be a powerful tool in the hands of crystallographers. Yet, the main disadvantage of the method is the fact that it is very time consuming. The programs that do the multiple scattering calculations can run literally for days! The key part of the method is the initial "guess" of a structure that will be close the one being seeked. A wrong guess would lead to huge amounts of wasted time and effort. We suggest a direct method that can give us a pretty good idea of the structure under determination. We call this method of ours: Holographic LEED (h-LEED) because it is based on the ideas of Dennis Gabor, the inventor of holography. The 3D images h-LEED reconstructs from LEED diffraction patterns can be reliably used to initialize LEED thus reducing the annoying computation time as well as the effort required by the crystallographer. We show that h-LEED produces good images for p(2× 2) reconstruction of adsorbed atoms by testing it on two adsorption systems: O/Ni(001) and K/Ni(001). The images were reconstructed from both diffuse LEED patterns from disordered adsorbates and superstructure Bragg spots from ordered adsorbates.

  10. Bi-directional reflectance studies of prepared compact particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao

    Controlled laboratory BRDF and transmission measurements on layers of polymer and glass spheres have been carried out to investigate the connection between single particle optics and the optics of a packed surface. The measurements show that despite being closely packed, significant features of single scattering, such as the rainbow peaks, are preserved even in aggregated sphere layers. The measurements have been compared to 5 radiative transfer model predictions: the Hapke's model and its improved version, the Lumme-Bowell model, Mishchenko et al.'s BRF algorithm and DISORT. It has been found that strict numerical RTE models predict the measurements well in some regions, but have errors in both forward and backward scattering directions. The discrepancies have been attributed to the non-ideal factors such as internal inhomogeneity and surface roughness and may be corrected using Lumme-Bowell's roughness correction factor for oblique incident light. The inadequacy of the semi-empirical models can be partly attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the models. In-situ BRDF measurements on submerged sediments with grain sizes ranging from 300 mum to over 1000 mum have been carried out. For normally illuminated small grain size samples the BRDF was nearly Lambertian, but samples with larger grain sizes are less Lambertian, with the BRDF decreasing with increasing view angles. Under oblique incident angles the samples become increasingly non-Lambertian; the dominant feature in the BRDF is enhanced backscattering. An empirical model is presented for each sediment type which represents the data within the standard deviation of the sample variation. This model is well behaved at angles out to 90°, and thus can be incorporated into the radiative transfer models to improve the light field predictions in shallow water. The BRDF of both dry and wet ooid sand layers with different particle size distributions and layer thicknesses on a reflecting mirror have

  11. Novel routes for direct preparation of surface-modifying polyelectrolyte layers and patterned polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankhe, Amit Y.

    The focus of this research was on the use of surface-confined atom transfer radical polymerization (SC-ATRP) for growing surface-tethered brushes of electrolytic or charged monomers on solid substrates. The use of SC-ATRP to produce well-defined polymer brushes from monomers with non-ionic functionalities in aprotic solvents has been well documented. Although it is possible to produce PE brushes by postpolymerization chemical conversion of some neutral brushes, this approach limits the types of PE brushes that can be produced and uses organic solvents. Thus, to more widely open the design envelope in terms of types of PE brushes that can be made and to reduce the use of organic solvents, it would be beneficial to directly synthesize PE brushes using more environmentally friendly, "green" solvents, such as water, for the reaction media. But the direct ATRP of hydrophilic monomers with ionic groups presents new challenges due to the complex interactions of the charged monomers and water with the ATRP catalyst. In this dissertation, I report findings on SC-ATRP of charged monomers such as itaconic acid (IA), methacrylic acid (MAA) and sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (SS) in aqueous solutions. Surface-tethered polyelectrolyte brushes comprised of poly(itaconic acid) (PIA), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) and poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were grown using surface-confined atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface-tethered initiator monolayer was formed by self-assembling 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide terminated thiol molecules on gold coated silicon substrates. This polymerization initiator molecule and a copper-based organometallic catalyst allowed tethered polyelectrolyte chains to be grown via radical polymerization at room temperature in aqueous solutions. To suppress consumption of the ATRP deactivator, a halide salt was added to the reaction mixture, which enabled controlled growth of the polyelectrolyte layers. Phase-modulated ellipsometry was used to follow

  12. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  13. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  14. Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Johansson, Erik; Wågberg, Lars; Pettersson, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations. PMID:22924973

  15. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface. PMID:26291621

  16. Method for measuring surface shear stress magnitude and direction using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for determining surface shear magnitude and direction at every point on a surface. The surface is covered with a shear stress sensitive liquid crystal coating and illuminated by white light from a normal direction. A video camera is positioned at an oblique angle above the surface to observe the color of the liquid crystal at that angle. The shear magnitude and direction are derived from the color information. A method of calibrating the device is also provided.

  17. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations for lunar soil breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Spear, R. H.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reaction depth profiling technique previously described by Filleux et al. (1977) has been used to measure the depth distribution of C on grain surfaces for Apollo 11, 15, 16 and 17 soil breccias. The surface C concentration of all samples studied lies between 2 and 8 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, showing no correlation with the volume C, which varies over an order of magnitude. If the observed variation represents the presence of unexposed grains on the surfaces studied, these results indicate a steady state surface C concentration of 5 to 10 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, accumulated over a time scale short compared with that required for the formation of volume-related C and with the mean lifetime of grains at the lunar surface. About one-third to one-half of the total C in lunar soil seems to be surface-correlated.

  18. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  19. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor.

    PubMed

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald; Mühl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  20. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  1. Directional BMP-2 for functionalization of titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Kenji; Tsuji, Toru; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2009-02-01

    Efficient immobilization of biomacromolecules on material surfaces is a key to development in areas of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, strong and irreversible immobilization of cytokines on surfaces often diminishes their biological functionality. A destructive hydrophobic interaction between the material surface and the biomolecule may underlie this inactivation. Alternatively, dissociation of the cytokine from the material may be necessary for signal transduction. Here we propose a new method for immobilizing cytokines on material surfaces: a material-binding artificial peptide is used to mediate reversible interaction between the cytokine and the material surface. We created artificial proteins that contained three copies of a Ti-binding motif, and fused them to the N-terminal of BMP-2. The engineered BMP-2 showed reversible binding to Ti surfaces and induced BMP signaling activity. When a hydrophobic protein devoid of the Ti-binding motif was fused to BMP-2, the protein tightly bound to Ti surfaces but showed little BMP activity, confirming the importance of the mode of immobilization. PMID:19022501

  2. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations. [in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface concentrations of carbon in lunar soils and soil breccias provide information on the origin of carbon in the regolith. The reaction C-12 (d, p sub zero) is used to measure 'surface' and 'volume' concentrations in lunar samples. This method has a depth resolution of 1 micron, which permits only a 'surface' and a 'volume' component to be measured. Three of four Apollo 16 double drive tube samples show a surface carbon concentration of about 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm, whereas the fourth sample gave 4 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. It can be convincingly shown that the measured concentration does not originate from fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon contaminants. Surface adsorbed layers of CO or CO2 are removed by a sputter cleaning procedure using a 2-MeV F beam. It is shown that the residual C concentration of 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm cannot be further reduced by increased F fluence, and it is therefore concluded that it is truly lunar. If one assumes that the measured surface C concentration is a steady-state concentration determined only by a balance between solar-wind implantation and sputtering, a sputter erosion rate of 0.1 A/yr is obtained. However, it would be more profitable to use an independently derived sputter erosion rate to test the hypothesis of a solar-wind origin of the surface carbon.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  4. DEPTH DEPENDENCE OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT PHOTOLYSIS ON SOIL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photolysis depth of direct and indirect photolysis in soils was determined with use of two agrochemicals. he denitroaniline herbicide flumetralin and a dialkyl thioether organophosphorus insecticide disulfoton were homogeneously applied to four soils and irradiated. lumetrali...

  5. Surface vibrational structure of colloidal silica and its direct correlation with surface charge density.

    PubMed

    Lagström, Tove; Gmür, Tobias A; Quaroni, Luca; Goel, Alok; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-03-31

    We show that attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to determine the surface charge density (SCD) of colloidal silica nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution. We identify the Si-O stretch vibrations of neutral surface bound silanol, ≡Si-OH, and of the deprotonated group, ≡Si-O(-). The position of the Si-(OH) stretch vibration is shown to directly correlate with the NPs SCD as determined by traditional potentiometric titrations, shifting to lower wavenumber (cm(-1)) with increasing density of ≡Si-O(-). The origin of this shift is discussed in terms of inductive effects that reduce the ionic character of the Si-(OH) bond after delocalization of the negative charge left on a terminal ≡Si-O(-) group across the atoms within ∼1 nm of the charged site. Using this new methodology, we quantitatively determine the SCD of 9, 14, and 25 nm diameter colloidal silica in varying concentrations of NaCl electrolyte at different bulk pH. This novel spectroscopic approach to investigate SCDs provides several opportunities for in situ coupling, for example, in microfluidic channels or with liquid microjets, and requires only very little sample—all potential advantages over a traditional potentiometric titration. PMID:25761506

  6. Status and directions of modified tribological surfaces by ion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent advances in modifying contacting surfaces in motion by the various ion assisted surface coating/modification processes to reduce and control tribological failures. The ion assisted coating processes and the surface modification processes offer the greatest potential to custom tailor and optimize the tribological performance. Hard, wear resistant and low shear coatings deposited by the ion assisted processes are discussed. Primarily the recent advances of sputtered MoS2 ion plated Au, Ag, Pb lubricating films and sputtered and ion plated hard, wear resistant TiN, HfN, TiC films are described in terms of structural property performance interrelationships which lead to improved adhesion, cohesion, nucleation, morphological growth, density, film thickness as determined by structural and chemical characterization and frictional and wear behavior. Also, the recent tribological advances using the surface modification processes such as ion implantation, ion beam mixing is discussed with emphasis on the development of lubricous high temperature ceramic surfaces.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  8. Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

  9. West Antarctic Surface Melt: Recent Context, Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, D. B.; Schneider, D. P.; Lampkin, D. J.; Karmosky, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Surface melting on ice sheets and ice shelves is a physical threshold of much climatic and geophysical significance. Wetting reduces albedo and encourages additional melt, runoff may contribute to ice-sheet mass loss, and penetration of meltwater to the glacier bed can lubricate faster flow and thereby increase mass loss by calving. Meltwater is also a major factor in ice-shelf collapse through wedging open of crevasses. While fringing ice-shelf collapse along the Antarctic Peninsula is probably the best known example of the cryospheric response to a warming atmosphere (and ocean), surface melting is also present in inland portions of West Antarctica. In addition to potentially contributing to ice sheet dynamics, surface melt occurrence is a valuable proxy for changing atmospheric temperature conditions. Combining satellite remote sensing with atmospheric modeling, we diagnose the meteorological conditions associated with the December 1991/January 1992 surface melt event on the Ross Ice Shelf, the most extensive and longest such event in the period 1987-2008. Through this case study, we examine the utility and skill of our meteorological datasets (reanalyses, Polar WRF, selected CMIP5 GCMs) in the development of diagnostic tools for identifying surface melt as observed by satellite and simulated by regional and global models. To assess GCM model skill in the recent, and to better appraise future predictions to come in later work, we compare warm-season climatologies derived from several CMIP5-class model simulations against observations and the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Sub-daily temperatures are compared where both model output and in-situ observations are available. Trends in the surface climate for the historical period are also examined in order to assess which models simulate the most realistic changes. Self-organizing maps develop grids of generalized patterns organized by similarity to represent the continuum of synoptic weather states found in each model

  10. Directly thiolated modification onto the surface of detonation nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chuang, Hong; Cheng, Fong-Yu; Huang, Ying-Pei; Han, Chien-Chung; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Wu, Dian-Syue; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2014-05-28

    An efficient method for modifying the surface of detonation nanodiamonds (5 and 100 nm) with thiol groups (-SH) by using an organic chemistry strategy is presented herein. Thiolated nanodiamonds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques, and the atomic percentage of sulfur was analyzed by elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The conjugation between thiolated nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles was elucidated by transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis spectrometry. Moreover, the material did not show significant cytotoxicity to the human lung carcinoma cell line and may prospectively be applied in bioconjugated technology. The new method that we elucidated may significantly improve the approach to surface modification of detonation nanodiamonds and build up a new platform for the application of nanodiamonds. PMID:24766528

  11. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  12. Calculation of aberration and direction of a normal to aspherical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikš, Antonín; Novák, Pavel; Novák, Jiří

    2013-02-01

    The work deals with the problem of aspherical surfaces in optics. General relations for the calculation of wave aberration, ray aberrations and the influence of change of radius of the reference sphere on the wave aberration of a normal to aspherical surface are derived. Furthermore, general formulas are derived for the calculation of the direction of the normal to the aspherical surface in case that the directions of the incident and the reflected (or refracted) rays are known. These equations are of a high importance for the design and manufacturing process of aspherical surfaces, design and adjustment of compensation optics in interferometric measurements of aspherical surfaces, measurement of aspherical surfaces by deflectometry, etc.

  13. Direct laser fabrication of nanowires on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    Periodic nanowires are observed from (001) orientation of Si and GaAs when the surfaces are irradiated interferentially by high power laser pulses. These nanowires are self-assembled and can be strain-free while their period is consistent with interference period. The nanowire morphologies are studied by atomic force microscopy. The observed period between nanowires depends on the wavelengths used and interference angle. The nanowire width increases with laser intensity. The narrowest nanowires observed have the width smaller than 20 nm, which is more than 10 times smaller than the interference period.

  14. A direct immunoassay for detecting diatoms in groundwater as an indicator of the direct influence of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, C.E.; Schrock, R.M.; Reilly, T.J.; Baehr, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDISW) is of concern in communities where growing public demand on groundwater resources has resulted in increased withdrawals and hydraulic stress near surface water bodies. Under these conditions, contaminants such as methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) and biological materials have been detected in domestic wells. Other contaminants and pathogens associated with surface water are not routinely tested for in groundwater-supplied systems. To address the need for methods to easily identify potentially vulnerable supplies, a direct immunoassay for the quantitative detection of diatoms in raw water samples was developed as a measure of surface water influence on groundwater. Cell wall preparations from Nitzschia palea Ku??tzing, a freshwater diatom found throughout North America, were used to produce a polyclonal antibody that was applied in a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed to detect the presence of N. palea cell wall components. The direct immunoassay allows detection at 500 cells L-1, a level similar to diatom concentrations observed in samples of groundwater collected near the test site. This investigation was the first attempt to utilize an ELISA as an indicator of surface water influence on groundwater. Further research is needed to develop more specific diatom-based monoclonal antibodies, determine cross-reactivity, and optimize sample processing and ELISA procedures for development of a standardized method. ?? Springer 2005.

  15. Directed Growth of Virus Nanofilaments on a Superhydrophobic Surface.

    PubMed

    Marinaro, Giovanni; Burghammer, Manfred; Costa, Luca; Dane, Thomas; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian

    2015-06-17

    The evaporation of single droplets of colloidal tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanoparticles on a superhydrophobic surface with a hexagonal pillar-pattern results in the formation of coffee-ring type residues. We imaged surface features by optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies. Bulk features were probed by raster-scan X-ray nanodiffraction. At ∼100 pg/μL nanoparticle concentration, the rim of the residue connects to neighboring pillars via fibrous extensions containing flow-aligned crystalline domains. At ∼1 pg/μL nanoparticle concentration, nanofilaments of ≥80 nm diameter and ∼20 μm length are formed, extending normal to the residue-rim across a range of pillars. X-ray scattering is dominated by the nanofilament form-factor but some evidence for crystallinity has been obtained. The observation of sheets composed of stacks of self-assembled nanoparticles deposited on pillars suggests that the nanofilaments are drawn from a structured droplet interface. PMID:25602601

  16. Assessment of groundwater under direct influence of surface water.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Fidelia N; Fulkerson, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Waterborne pathogens are known to reside in surface water systems throughout the U.S. Cryptosporidium outbreaks over recent years are the result of drinking water supplied from such sources. Contamination of aquifers has also led to several reported cases from drinking water wells. With high resistance to typical groundwater treatment procedures, aquifer infiltration by Cryptosporidium poses a serious threat. As groundwater wells are the main source of drinking water supply in the State of Florida, understanding factors that affect the presence of Cryptosporidium would prevent future outbreaks. This study examines karst geology, land use, and hydrogeology in the State of Florida as they influence the risk of groundwater contamination. Microscopic Particulate Analysis (MPA) sampling was performed on 719 wells distributed across Florida. The results of the sampling described each well as having high, moderate, or low risk to surface water influence. The results of this study indicated that the hydrogeology of an area tends to influence the MPA Risk Index (RI) of a well. Certain geologic formations were present for the majority of the high risk wells. Residential land use contained nearly half of the wells sampled. The results also suggested that areas more prone to sinkhole development are likely to contain wells with a positive RI. PMID:15328687

  17. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  18. Electrocatalysis: A Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell and Surface Science Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Hibbitts, David D; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have enabled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis. More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation of C-1 and C-2 alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the influence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis. Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct surface structuring of organometallic resists using nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acikgoz, Canet; Hempenius, Mark A.; Julius Vancso, G.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2009-04-01

    The availability of suitable resist materials is essential for nanoimprint lithography (NIL). In this work, the application of poly(ferrocenylmethylphenylsilane) (PFMPS) as a new type of imprint resist is reported. As PFMPS contains iron and silicon in the main chain, it possesses a very high resistance to reactive ion etching. Polymer patterns formed after imprinting were transferred into silicon substrates owing to the high etch resistivity of PFMPS. The parameters for imprinting, such as polymer molar mass and initial film thickness, were investigated. A decrease in the initial film thickness facilitated the residual layer removal, as well as the pattern transfer. Only upon complete removal of the residual layer with argon plasma did pattern transfer result in aspect ratios up to 4:1 and less surface roughness.

  20. Electrocatalysis: A direct alcohol fuel cell and surface science perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.; Hibbitts, David D

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have ena bled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis.More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation ofC1 and Cz alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the innuence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis.Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields.

  1. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  2. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  3. High-resolution vector microwave magnetometry based on solid-state spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Zhenheng; Huang, Pu; Rong, Xing; Wang, Mengqi; Xu, Xiangkun; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the microwave field is crucial for many developments in microwave technology and related applications. However, measuring microwave fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution under ambient conditions remains elusive. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to measure both the strength and orientation of the microwave magnetic field by utilizing the quantum coherent dynamics of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. An angular resolution of 5.7 mrad and a sensitivity of 1.0 μT Hz−1/2 are achieved at a microwave frequency of 2.6000 GHz, and the microwave magnetic field vectors generated by a copper wire are precisely reconstructed. The solid-state microwave magnetometry with high resolution and wide frequency range that can work under ambient conditions proposed here enables unique potential applications over other state-of-art microwave magnetometry. PMID:25799155

  4. Magneto-optical magnetometry of individual 30 nm cobalt nanowires grown by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulina, E.; Idigoras, O.; Berger, A.; Vavassori, P.; Chuvilin, A.

    2012-04-02

    We show that magnetometry measurements based upon the magneto-optical Kerr effect and high resolution optical microscopy can be used as a noninvasive probe of magnetization reversal for individual nano-structures. Our measurements demonstrate single pass hysteresis loop measurements for sample sizes down to 30 nm width. A quantitative signal-to-noise ratio evaluation shows that our approach achieves an at least 3-fold improvement in sensitivity if compared to focused laser based nano-magnetometry. An analysis of the physical limits of our detection scheme enables us to estimate that measurements for structures with single digit nm widths and magnetic moments of 10{sup -16} Am{sup 2} are feasible.

  5. Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Loretz, M; Rosskopf, T; Boss, J M; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Degen, C L

    2014-10-16

    Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a diamond chip covered by an inorganic salt. The single-proton identity was confirmed by the Zeeman effect and by a quantum coherent rotation of the weakly coupled nuclear spin. Using the hyperfine field of the NV center as an imaging gradient, we determined proton-NV distances of less than 1 nm. PMID:25323696

  6. Determining eyeball surface area directly exposed to the effects of external factors.

    PubMed

    Juliszewski, Tadeusz; Kadłuczka, Filip; Kiełbasa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses determining the surface area of eyeballs of men and women exposed to the direct effects of external factors in the working environment. For one eye, the mean surface is 172-182 mm(2). The determined surface area can be used in formulas for calculating the exposure of eyeballs to harmful chemical substances in workplace air. PMID:26758027

  7. Anisotropie magnetique du La2NiMnO6 multiferroique par magnetometrie statique et spectroscopie de resonance ferromagnetique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, Dany

    In this research, magnetic properties of thin films composed of both double- (La2NiMnO6 or LNMOo) and simple-perovskites (LaNi0.5Mn0.5O3 ou LNMOd) are studied. This mixt phase (LNMOm) possesses two magnetic transitions; one for each phase present. It has previously been shown that this phase possesses a higher Curie temperature than LNMOo, approaching room temperature. This property makes room temperature ferromagnetic resonance measurements possible. Angular FMR measurement has already been achieved, but the magnetic anisotropy resulting isn’t completely understood. The goal of this study is to increase our understanding of this anisotropy to get new informations on the structure of the samples. To achieve this goal, thin films of LNMOm have been deposited by PLD on three different substrates; LSAT(001), LSAT(011) and LSAT(111). LSAT has been chosen for his insulating properties limiting the losses in the microwave cavities used for FMR measurements and for his very smooth surface. One sample of LNMOm on LAO(001) was also fabricated by Mangala Singh from the laboratoire des matériaux quantiques during a summer internship of the author. Some of the results obtained on this sample were used in this work. The samples were first characterized using static magnetometry. All samples possess two magnetic transitions, one at low temperature corresponding to the disordered phase and one at high temperature corresponding to the ordered phase. The temperature of these transitions were obtained with precision using the inflection point method. The high temperature transition was then confirmed using magnetocaloric effect, which gave the exact same values. The transition temperature of the ordered phase of all samples was between 268 and 271 K, while the transition of the disordered phase was between 60 and 110 K. A third transition at really low temperature was observed on some samples. The volume and volumic fraction of the ordered and disordered phases were approximated

  8. Femtosecond laser modification of titanium surfaces: direct imprinting of hydroxylapatite nanopowder and wettability tuning via surface microstructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrey A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Saltuganov, Pavel N.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry V.; Golosov, Evgene V.; Goryainov, Artem A.; Kolobov, Yury R.; Kornieieva, Kateryna A.; Skomorokhov, Andrei N.; Ligachev, Alexander E.

    2013-04-01

    Femtosecond laser modification of titanium surfaces was performed to produce microstructured hydrophilic and biocompatible surface layers. Biocompatible nano/microcoatings were prepared for the first time by dry femtosecond laser imprinting of hydroxylapatite nano/micropowder onto VT6 titanium surfaces. In these experiments HAP was first deposited onto the titanium surfaces and then softly imprinted by multiple femtosecond laser pulses into the laser-melted surface metal layer. The surface relief was modified at the nano- and microscales depending on the incident laser fluence and sample scanning speed. Wetting tests demonstrated that the wetting properties of the pristine Ti surface can be tuned through its laser modification in both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic directions.

  9. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  10. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  11. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Appel, Patrick; Neu, Elke; Ganzhorn, Marc; Barfuss, Arne; Batzer, Marietta; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas; Maletinsky, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes starting from commercially available diamond and show a highly efficient and robust approach for integrating these devices in a generic atomic force microscope. Our scanning probes consisting of a scanning nanopillar (200 nm diameter, 1-2 μm length) on a thin (<1 μm) cantilever structure enable efficient light extraction from diamond in combination with a high magnetic field sensitivity (ηAC≈50±20nT/Hz). As a first application of our scanning probes, we image the magnetic stray field of a single Ni nanorod. We show that this stray field can be approximated by a single dipole and estimate the NV-to-sample distance to a few tens of nanometer, which sets the achievable resolution of our scanning probes. PMID:27370455

  12. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Patrick; Neu, Elke; Ganzhorn, Marc; Barfuss, Arne; Batzer, Marietta; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas; Maletinsky, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes starting from commercially available diamond and show a highly efficient and robust approach for integrating these devices in a generic atomic force microscope. Our scanning probes consisting of a scanning nanopillar (200 nm diameter, 1-2 μm length) on a thin (<1 μm) cantilever structure enable efficient light extraction from diamond in combination with a high magnetic field sensitivity ( η AC ≈ 50 ± 20 nT / √{ Hz } ). As a first application of our scanning probes, we image the magnetic stray field of a single Ni nanorod. We show that this stray field can be approximated by a single dipole and estimate the NV-to-sample distance to a few tens of nanometer, which sets the achievable resolution of our scanning probes.

  13. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-11-30

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 10{sup 3}. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  14. Extending the direct statistical approach to include particle bifurcation between the splitting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Direct Statistical Approach (DSA) to surface splitting and Russian Roulette (RR) is one of the current routes toward automatism in Monte Carlo and is currently applied to fixed source particle transport problems. A general volumetric particle bifurcation capability has been inserted into the Direct Statistical Approach (DSA) surface parameter and cell models. The resulting extended DSA describes the second moment and time functions in terms of phase-space surface splitting/Russian roulette parameters (surface parameter model) or phase-space cell importances (cell model) in the presence of volumetric particle bifurcations including both natural events [such as (n,xn) or gamma production from neutron collisions] and artificial events (such as DXTRAN). At the same time, other limitations in the DSA models (concerning tally scores direct from the source and tracks surviving an event at which a tally score occurs) are removed. Given the second moment and time functions, the foregoing surface or cell parameters may then be optimized.

  15. Visualization of Bloch surface waves and directional propagation effects on one-dimensional photonic crystal substrate.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, I-Sheng

    2016-07-11

    This paper reports a novel approach to the direct observation of Bloch surface waves, wherein a layer of fluorescent material is deposited directly on the surface of a semi-infinite periodic layered cell. A set of surface nano-gratings is used to couple pumping light to Bloch surface waves, while the sample is rotated until the pumping light meets the quasi-phase matching conditions. This study investigated the directional propagation of waves on stripe and circular one-dimensional grating structures by analyzing the dispersion relationship of the first two eigen modes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme in visualizing Bloch surface waves, which could be extended to a variety of other devices. PMID:27410869

  16. Direct Measurement of Sub-Debye-Length Attraction between Oppositely Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Nir; Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Safran, S. A.; Klein, Jacob

    2009-09-01

    Using a surface force balance with fast video analysis, we have measured directly the attractive forces between oppositely charged solid surfaces (charge densities σ+, σ-) across water over the entire range of interaction, in particular, at surface separations D below the Debye screening length λS. At very low salt concentration we find a long-ranged attraction between the surfaces (onset ca. 100 nm), whose variation at D<λS agrees well with predictions based on solving the Poisson-Boltzmann theory, when due account is taken of the independently-determined surface charge asymmetry (σ+≠|σ-|).

  17. Liquid extraction surface analysis in-line coupled with capillary electrophoresis for direct analysis of a solid surface sample.

    PubMed

    Sung, In Hye; Lee, Young Woo; Chung, Doo Soo

    2014-08-01

    A surface-sampling technique of liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) was in-line coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) to expand the specimen types for CE to solid surfaces. The new direct surface analysis method of LESA-CE was applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides, including glufosinate-ammonium, aminomethylphosphonic acid, and glyphosate on the external surface of a fruit such as apple. Without any sample pretreatment, the analytes sprayed on the surface of a half apple were directly extracted into a liquid microjunction formed by dispensing the extractant from the inlet tip of a separation capillary. After extraction, the analytes were derivatized in-capillary with a fluorophore 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole and analyzed with CE-laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The limits of detection for glufosinate-ammonium, aminomethylphosphonic acid, and glyphosate were 2.5, 1, and 10ppb, respectively, which are at least 20 times lower than the tolerance limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Thus, we demonstrated that LESA-CE is a quite sensitive and convenient method to determine analytes on a solid surface avoiding the dilution from sample pretreatment procedures including homogenization of a bulk sample. PMID:25064242

  18. Surface-Charge-Based Micro-Models--A Solid Foundation for Learning about Direct Current Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, P. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores how the use of a surface-charge-based instructional approach affects introductory university level students' understanding of direct current (dc) circuits. The introduced teaching intervention includes electrostatics, surface-charge-based micro-models that explain the existence of an electric field inside the current-carrying…

  19. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2016-07-01

    We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs of magnetometers is demonstrated, confirming the high performance of these instruments. The results presented here, including the characterisation of a Sun-driven disturbance field, form the basis of the correction of the magnetic vector measurements from Swarm which is applied to the Swarm Level 1b magnetic data.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Rapid prototyping of frequency selective surfaces by laser direct-write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Scott A.; Mirotznik, Mark; Good, Brandon L.; Piqué, Alberto

    2007-02-01

    In this work we describe the use of laser direct-write for the rapid prototyping of frequency selective surfaces. Frequency selective surfaces are generally described by a periodic array of conducting or dielectric features (i.e. crosses, loops, grids, etc.) that when properly designed can pass or reject specific frequency bands of incoming electromagnetic radiation. While simple frequency selective surfaces are relatively straight forward to design and fabricate, operational demands, particularly military, have motivated the design and fabrication of much more complicated patterns. These new designs combine features of significantly different length scales, randomly dithered patterns and combinations of passive and active elements. We will demonstrate how laser direct-write is an ideal tool for the rapid prototyping of these new more complicated frequency selective surface designs. We will present experimental results for devices fabricated using several different laser direct-write processes.

  1. The effect of microscopic texture on the direct plasma surface passivation of Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, S.; Xu, S.; Qaemi, A. A.; Shokri, B.; Chan, C. S.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-04-01

    Textured silicon surfaces are widely used in manufacturing of solar cells due to increasing the light absorption probability and also the antireflection properties. However, these Si surfaces have a high density of surface defects that need to be passivated. In this study, the effect of the microscopic surface texture on the plasma surface passivation of solar cells is investigated. The movement of 105 H+ ions in the texture-modified plasma sheath is studied by Monte Carlo numerical simulation. The hydrogen ions are driven by the combined electric field of the plasma sheath and the textured surface. The ion dynamics is simulated, and the relative ion distribution over the textured substrate is presented. This distribution can be used to interpret the quality of the Si dangling bonds saturation and consequently, the direct plasma surface passivation.

  2. The effect of microscopic texture on the direct plasma surface passivation of Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabian, S.; Xu, S.; Qaemi, A. A.; Shokri, B.; Chan, C. S.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-04-15

    Textured silicon surfaces are widely used in manufacturing of solar cells due to increasing the light absorption probability and also the antireflection properties. However, these Si surfaces have a high density of surface defects that need to be passivated. In this study, the effect of the microscopic surface texture on the plasma surface passivation of solar cells is investigated. The movement of 10{sup 5} H{sup +} ions in the texture-modified plasma sheath is studied by Monte Carlo numerical simulation. The hydrogen ions are driven by the combined electric field of the plasma sheath and the textured surface. The ion dynamics is simulated, and the relative ion distribution over the textured substrate is presented. This distribution can be used to interpret the quality of the Si dangling bonds saturation and consequently, the direct plasma surface passivation.

  3. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  4. Torque Magnetometry and Thermomagnetic Capacity Studies on a 2-d Cr^4+ Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Narpinder; Nellutla, Saritha; Jo, Youn-Jung; Balicas, Luis; van Tol, Johan; Dalal, Naresh

    2007-03-01

    We report torque magnetometry and magnetic heat capacity measurements on a rare complex, Cr^IV-Diethylenetriamine diperoxo. The motivation here was to search for a simple spin-gap system that could exhibit a Bose-Einstein type condensation (BEC) of magnons. Our earlier reported magnetization and specific heat (Cp) measurements had indicated that this compound is a 2-d antiferromagnet, with a TN of 2.55 K in zero-field [1]. These magnetization and Cp data have now been augmented by use of additional magnetic fields, and the newly found B-T phase diagram is seen to be clearly parabolic. Torque magnetometry confirmed the Cp data and has enabled measurements close to the T -> 0 K, B ˜ 12.5 T region. Measurements in the dilution fridge are planned to extract the critical exponent (α) from the relation kbTc˜ (Bc-B)^α . We surmise that this system will constitute a simple new model for examining the BEC of magnons in detail. [1] C.M. Ramsey, B. Cage, P. Nguyen, K.A. Abboud, N.S. Dalal, Chem. Mater. 15, 92 (2003).

  5. Magnetic properties of nanomagnetic and biomagnetic systems analyzed using cantilever magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Gysin, Urs; Rast, Simon; Aste, Andreas; Speliotis, Thanassis; Werle, Christoph; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-07-15

    Magnetic properties of nanomagnetic and biomagnetic systems are investigated using cantilever magnetometry. In the presence of a magnetic field, magnetic films or particles deposited at the free end of a cantilever give rise to a torque on the mechanical sensor, which leads to frequency shifts depending on the applied magnetic field. From the frequency response, the magnetic properties of a magnetic sample are obtained. The magnetic field dependences of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic thin films and particles are measured in a temperature range of 5-320 K at a pressure below 10(-6) mbar. We present magnetic properties of the ferromagnetic materials Fe, Co and Ni at room temperature and also for the rare earth elements Gd, Dy and Tb at various temperatures. In addition, the magnetic moments of magnetotactic bacteria are measured under vacuum conditions at room temperature. Cantilever magnetometry is a highly sensitive tool for characterizing systems with small magnetic moments. By reducing the cantilever dimensions the sensitivity can be increased by an order of magnitude. PMID:21659684

  6. Composite-pulse magnetometry with a solid-state quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Clarice D.; Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of quantum magnetometer is challenged by control errors and, especially in the solid state, by their short coherence times. Refocusing techniques can overcome these limitations and improve the sensitivity to periodic fields, but they come at the cost of reduced bandwidth and cannot be applied to sense static or aperiodic fields. Here we experimentally demonstrate that continuous driving of the sensor spin by a composite pulse known as rotary-echo yields a flexible magnetometry scheme, mitigating both driving power imperfections and decoherence. A suitable choice of rotary-echo parameters compensates for different scenarios of noise strength and origin. The method can be applied to nanoscale sensing in variable environments or to realize noise spectroscopy. In a room-temperature implementation, based on a single electronic spin in diamond, composite-pulse magnetometry provides a tunable trade-off between sensitivities in the μTHz-1/2 range, comparable with those obtained with Ramsey spectroscopy, and coherence times approaching T1.

  7. Direct Femtosecond Laser Surface Structuring with Optical Vortex Beams Generated by a q-plate

    PubMed Central

    JJ Nivas, Jijil; He, Shutong; Rubano, Andrea; Vecchione, Antonio; Paparo, Domenico; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bruzzese, Riccardo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Creation of patterns and structures on surfaces at the micro- and nano-scale is a field of growing interest. Direct femtosecond laser surface structuring with a Gaussian-like beam intensity profile has already distinguished itself as a versatile method to fabricate surface structures on metals and semiconductors. Here we present an approach for direct femtosecond laser surface structuring based on optical vortex beams with different spatial distributions of the state of polarization, which are easily generated by means of a q-plate. The different states of an optical vortex beam carrying an orbital angular momentum ℓ = ±1 are used to demonstrate the fabrication of various regular surface patterns on silicon. The spatial features of the regular rippled and grooved surface structures are correlated with the state of polarization of the optical vortex beam. Moreover, scattered surface wave theory approach is used to rationalize the dependence of the surface structures on the local state of the laser beam characteristics (polarization and fluence). The present approach can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional surface structures by exploiting the possibilities offered by femtosecond optical vector fields. PMID:26658307

  8. Direct Femtosecond Laser Surface Structuring with Optical Vortex Beams Generated by a q-plate.

    PubMed

    Nivas, Jijil J J; He, Shutong; Rubano, Andrea; Vecchione, Antonio; Paparo, Domenico; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bruzzese, Riccardo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Creation of patterns and structures on surfaces at the micro- and nano-scale is a field of growing interest. Direct femtosecond laser surface structuring with a Gaussian-like beam intensity profile has already distinguished itself as a versatile method to fabricate surface structures on metals and semiconductors. Here we present an approach for direct femtosecond laser surface structuring based on optical vortex beams with different spatial distributions of the state of polarization, which are easily generated by means of a q-plate. The different states of an optical vortex beam carrying an orbital angular momentum ℓ = ±1 are used to demonstrate the fabrication of various regular surface patterns on silicon. The spatial features of the regular rippled and grooved surface structures are correlated with the state of polarization of the optical vortex beam. Moreover, scattered surface wave theory approach is used to rationalize the dependence of the surface structures on the local state of the laser beam characteristics (polarization and fluence). The present approach can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional surface structures by exploiting the possibilities offered by femtosecond optical vector fields. PMID:26658307

  9. Illustrating Surface Shape in Volume Data via Principal Direction-Driven 3D Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional shape and relative depth of a smoothly curving layered transparent surface may be communicated particularly effectively when the surface is artistically enhanced with sparsely distributed opaque detail. This paper describes how the set of principal directions and principal curvatures specified by local geometric operators can be understood to define a natural 'flow' over the surface of an object, and can be used to guide the placement of the lines of a stroke texture that seeks to represent 3D shape information in a perceptually intuitive way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered isovalue surfaces in volume data, where the particular identity of an individual surface is not generally known a priori and observers will typically wish to view a variety of different level surfaces from the same distribution, superimposed over underlying opaque structures. By advecting an evenly distributed set of tiny opaque particles, and the empty space between them, via 3D line integral convolution through the vector field defined by the principal directions and principal curvatures of the level surfaces passing through each gridpoint of a 3D volume, it is possible to generate a single scan-converted solid stroke texture that may intuitively represent the essential shape information of any level surface in the volume. To generate longer strokes over more highly curved areas, where the directional information is both most stable and most relevant, and to simultaneously downplay the visual impact of directional information in the flatter regions, one may dynamically redefine the length of the filter kernel according to the magnitude of the maximum principal curvature of the level surface at the point around which it is applied.

  10. Current-Driven Supramolecular Motor with In Situ Surface Chiral Directionality Switching.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Puneet; Hill, Jonathan P; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Van Rossom, Wim; Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Grisolia, Maricarmen; Echeverria, Jorge; Ono, Teruo; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Joachim, Christian; Uchihashi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Surface-supported molecular motors are nanomechanical devices of particular interest in terms of future nanoscale applications. However, the molecular motors realized so far consist of covalently bonded groups that cannot be reconfigured without undergoing a chemical reaction. Here we demonstrate that a platinum-porphyrin-based supramolecularly assembled dimer supported on a Au(111) surface can be rotated with high directionality using the tunneling current of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Rotational direction of this molecular motor is determined solely by the surface chirality of the dimer, and most importantly, the chirality can be inverted in situ through a process involving an intradimer rearrangement. Our result opens the way for the construction of complex molecular machines on a surface to mimic at a smaller scale versatile biological supramolecular motors. PMID:26098301

  11. Physical Sensing of Surface Properties by Microswimmers--Directing Bacterial Motion via Wall Slip.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli swim along circular trajectories adjacent to surfaces. Thereby, the orientation (clockwise, counterclockwise) and the curvature depend on the surface properties. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations of a mechano-elastic model of E. coli, with a spherocylindrical body propelled by a bundle of rotating helical flagella, to study quantitatively the curvature of the appearing circular trajectories. We demonstrate that the cell is sensitive to nanoscale changes in the surface slip length. The results are employed to propose a novel approach to directing bacterial motion on striped surfaces with different slip lengths, which implies a transformation of the circular motion into a snaking motion along the stripe boundaries. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by a simulation of active Brownian rods, which also reveals a dependence of directional motion on the stripe width. PMID:25993019

  12. Direct evidence for compressive elastic strain at ground surfaces of nanocomposite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, B. K.; Wu, H. Z.; Roberts, S. G.

    2005-02-01

    High-resolution grazing incidence x-ray powder diffraction has been used to provide direct evidence for the existence of a uniform compressive strain close to the surface of ground alumina/SiC nanocomposites. No such strain is found in ground surfaces of single-phase alumina or polished surfaces of nanocomposite. The strain in the ground nanocomposite is found to be perpendicular to the grinding direction and disappears on annealing at 1250°C. Such a compressive stress provides a mechanism for enhancing the strength of the nanocomposite, by opposing any tensile loading tending to open surface flaws. The origin of the stresses probably lies in the enhanced grain boundary strength in the nanocomposite alumina-silicon carbide compared to alumina.

  13. Physical Sensing of Surface Properties by Microswimmers – Directing Bacterial Motion via Wall Slip

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinglei; Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli swim along circular trajectories adjacent to surfaces. Thereby, the orientation (clockwise, counterclockwise) and the curvature depend on the surface properties. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations of a mechano-elastic model of E. coli, with a spherocylindrical body propelled by a bundle of rotating helical flagella, to study quantitatively the curvature of the appearing circular trajectories. We demonstrate that the cell is sensitive to nanoscale changes in the surface slip length. The results are employed to propose a novel approach to directing bacterial motion on striped surfaces with different slip lengths, which implies a transformation of the circular motion into a snaking motion along the stripe boundaries. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by a simulation of active Brownian rods, which also reveals a dependence of directional motion on the stripe width. PMID:25993019

  14. Increased efficiency of direct nanoimprinting on planar and curved bulk titanium through surface modification☆

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Andrew I.M.; Seunarine, Krishna; Khokhar, Ali Z.; MacLaren, Ian; Brydone, Alistair S.; Moran, David A.J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    In this work the direct transfer of nanopatterns into titanium is demonstrated. The nanofeatures are imprinted at room temperature using diamond stamps in a single step. We also show that the imprint properties of the titanium surface can be altered by anodisation yielding a significant reduction in the required imprint force for pattern transfer. The anodisation process is also utilised for curved titanium surfaces where a reduced imprint force is preferable to avoid sample deformation and damage. We finally demonstrate that our process can be applied directly to titanium rods. PMID:24748699

  15. Surface entropy of liquids via a direct Monte Carlo approach - Application to liquid Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. Q.; Stroud, D.

    1990-01-01

    Two methods are presented for a direct Monte Carlo evaluation of the surface entropy S(s) of a liquid interacting by specified, volume-independent potentials. The first method is based on an application of the approach of Ferrenberg and Swendsen (1988, 1989) to Monte Carlo simulations at two different temperatures; it gives much more reliable results for S(s) in liquid Si than previous calculations based on numerical differentiation. The second method expresses the surface entropy directly as a canonical average at fixed temperature.

  16. Direct epoxidation of propylene over stabilized Cu(+) surface sites on titanium-modified Cu2O.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofang; Kattel, Shyam; Xiong, Ke; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Rykov, Sergei; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Rodriguez, José A; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J; Chen, Jingguang G

    2015-10-01

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate that by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu(+) active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide the epoxidation selectivity can be tuned. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, an oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene. PMID:26215635

  17. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  18. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  19. Direct cortical mapping via solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  20. Surface formation in direct chill (DC) casting of 6082 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface defects in aluminium billet production are a real problem for the subsequent extrusion procedure. Extrusion productivity can be influenced by the surface properties, which is defined as surface appearance, surface segregation zone depth and large Mg2Si and β-particles (Al5FeSi). In this research the surface formation during DC casting of 6082 aluminium billets produced by the air slip technology is studied. The surface microstructures of 6082 aluminium alloys with smooth and wavy surface appearances were investigated, including segregation zone depths and phase formation. The results were discussed based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone. The specific appearance of the wavy surface of 6082 alloys was correlated to how the oxide skin adheres to the underlying mushy zone and coupled to the dendritic coherency and surface tension of the skin. The occurrence of different phases at the very surface and in the layer just below was explained by variations in solidification directions and subsequent segregation patterns.

  1. Direct visualization of surface-plasmon bandgaps in the diffuse background of metallic gratings.

    PubMed

    Depine, Ricardo A; Ledesma, Silvia

    2004-10-01

    When a surface plasmon propagates along a microrough grating, it interacts with the periodic plus the random roughness and emits light into the diffuse background, which can present intensity maxima called diffuse light bands. We reexamine previous studies on these bands within the framework of recent studies on photonic surfaces and show that the phenomenon of diffuse light provides an experimental technique for directly imaging the dispersion relation of surface plasmons, including the gap that, under appropriate circumstances, opens in the reciprocal grating space. PMID:15524359

  2. Direct measurement of the plasma screening length and surface potential near the lunar terminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J.

    1977-01-01

    Direct measurement of the lunar dayside surface potential and screening length has been made by the suprathermal ion detector experiment (Side) near the terminator. In a region 20-30 deg from the terminator at the Apollo 14 and 15 sites the surface potential is found to be approximately 50 V negative, and the screening length to be about 1 km. This value of the screening length is more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the solar wind 'Debye' length. The strong negative surface potential in this region may be due to enhanced temperature and density of the solar wind plasma.

  3. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  4. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  5. Direct measurement of turbulent skin-friction reduction on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Sun, Guangyi; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in superhydrophobic (SHPo) surfaces have spurred a great interest in fluid mechanics because their large slip may result in a significant reduction of skin friction in turbulent flows. However, experimental confirmation of the reduction has been sporadic (only internal flows) and equivocal because most times the surface slip was small and the drag measurement indirect. Here we present a direct measurement of the drag on large-slip surfaces in a turbulent boundary-layer flow. The silicon-micromachined sample has a SHPo (microgrates) next to a reference (smooth) surface, each suspended by identical micro flexure beams. Monolithically fabricated in a batch process and sharing all the variations, the two surfaces shift differently only by the difference in the drag. The drag reduction was measured optically (directly) in a turbulent boundary layer in a water tunnel experiment at a moderate Reynolds number (Reτ ~ 250) over a gas fraction (fraction of the shear-free surface area) of 30 % - 90 % . Unlike other reports, the drag reduction clearly increased with the gas fraction. More than 50 % skin-friction reduction was achieved with 90% gas fraction. During the flow tests, the SHPo surfaces were visually confirmed to contain the air without any loss. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Program (N000141110503).

  6. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  7. Application of an imaging plate system to the direct measurement of a fixed surface contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiro; Kimura, Keiji; Sato, Rumi; Koike, Yuya; Iimoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2014-08-01

    An imaging plate (IP) system was used as an effective detector for direct measurement of radioactive surface contamination. The IP system displayed images designating the locations and extent of fixed surface contamination of uranyl acetate. The amount of radioactive waste produced during decontamination was reduced because the contaminated spots could be isolated; furthermore, creation of radioactive dust during removal of contamination was prevented because the contaminated spots could be removed without being pulverized. The images were used in efficiently and safely isolating the location of fixed surface contamination. The IP system surface contamination detection limit for uranyl acetate was 2.5 × 10 Bq cm, a value much lower than the surface contamination limit and the clearance level. PMID:24978288

  8. Evaluation of Schottky barrier diodes fabricated directly on processed 4H-SiC(0001) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasuhisa; Shirasawa, Yuki; Okamoto, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2011-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a suitable substrate for low-power-consumption power devices and high-temperature applications. However, this material is difficult to machine because of its hardness and chemical inertness, and many machining methods have been studied intensively in recent years. In this paper, we present a simple method to evaluate the electrical properties of the processed surface using the ideal factor n of a Schottky barrier diode (SBD) fabricated directly on the processed surface. Upon comparing the values of n for SBDs fabricated on a damaged SiC surface and a non-damaged SiC surface, we found that there is a significant difference in the dispersion and magnitude of n. Furthermore, by combining this technique with slope etching, we were able to estimate the thickness of the damaged sub-surface layer. PMID:21776636

  9. Directional fluorescence emission co-enhanced by localized and propagating surface plasmons for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Bauch, Martin; Zhang, Qingwen; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Dostalek, Jakub; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-14

    We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 10(2) as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize the efficiency of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for implementation in ultra-sensitive bioassays. PMID:27010223

  10. Direct Observation of Transient Surface Species during Ge Nanowire Growth and Their Influence on Growth Stability.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, Saujan V; Shin, Naechul; Chou, Li-Wei; Filler, Michael A

    2015-08-12

    Surface adsorbates are well-established choreographers of material synthesis, but the presence and impact of these short-lived species on semiconductor nanowire growth are largely unknown. Here, we use infrared spectroscopy to directly observe surface adsorbates, hydrogen atoms and methyl groups, chemisorbed to the nanowire sidewall and show they are essential for the stable growth of Ge nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. We quantitatively determine the surface coverage of hydrogen atoms during nanowire growth by comparing ν(Ge-H) absorption bands from operando measurements (i.e., during growth) to those after saturating the nanowire sidewall with hydrogen atoms. This method provides sub-monolayer chemical information at relevant reaction conditions while accounting for the heterogeneity of sidewall surface sites and their evolution during elongation. Our findings demonstrate that changes to surface bonding are critical to understand Ge nanowire synthesis and provide new guidelines for rationally selecting catalysts, forming heterostructures, and controlling dopant profiles. PMID:26147949

  11. Direct fabrication of superhydrophobic ceramic surfaces with ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihoon; Lee, Sukyung; Yong, Hyungseok; Lee, Sangmin; Park, Yong Tae

    2016-02-01

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces having contact angles > 150° for water are of great interest due to their potential use in a wide variety of applications. Although many reports on the wettability of different surfaces have been published, few or no studies have been done on the formation of a super-hydrophobic surface on a ceramic substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate the creation of a super-hydrophobic surface on a ceramic substrate by using zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) prepared by using a direct hydrothermal method. A self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro- 1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl trichlorosilane (HDFS) lowered the surface energy between the water droplet and the nano-textured surface. The length of the ZnO NWs was found to play a key role in the formation of a nanostructure that increased the surface roughness of the substrate. Furthermore, the length of the ZnO NWs could be controlled by changing the growth time, and HDFS-coated ZnO NWs were found to be super-hydrophobic after a growth time of 3 h. We have demonstrated the potential application of this nanostructure for ceramic tableware by introducing a ZnO-NW-textured surface on a ceramic cup, which resulted in water and alcohol repellency. This method is a simple and practical way to achieve a super-hydrophobic surface; hence, our method is expected to be widely used in various ceramic applications.

  12. Effect of Direct Electric Current on the Cell Surface Properties of Phenol-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qishi; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xihui; Qian, Yi

    2005-01-01

    The change in cell surface properties in the presence of electric currents is of critical concern when the potential to manipulate bacterial movement with electric fields is evaluated. In this study, the effects of different direct electric currents on the cell surface properties involved in bacterial adhesion were investigated by using a mixed phenol-degrading bacterial culture in the exponential growth phase. The traits investigated were surface hydrophobicity (measured by adherence to n-octane), net surface electrostatic charge (determined by measurement of the zeta potential), and the cell surface shape and polymers (determined by scanning electron microscope analysis). The results showed that a lower current (less than 20 mA) induced no significant changes in the surface properties of phenol-degrading bacteria, that an electric current of 20 mA could increase the surface hydrophobicity and flatten the cell shape, and that a higher current (40 mA) could increase the surface extracellular substances and the net negative surface electrostatic charge. The results also revealed that the electric current effects on cell hydrophobicity varied with the suspending medium. We suggest that an electric current greater than 20 mA is not suitable for use in manipulation of the movement of the phenol-degrading bacteria, although such a current might favor the electrophoretic movement of the bacterial species. PMID:15640217

  13. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the 'peristome'--the rim of the pitcher--because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic 'design' principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications. PMID:27078568

  14. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  15. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  16. Droplets Can Rebound toward Both Directions on Textured Surfaces with a Wettability Gradient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Lei, Qing; Wang, Zuankai; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-12

    The impact of water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces with a wettability gradient is studied using the lattice Boltzmann simulation. Droplets impacting such textured surfaces have been previously reported to rebound obliquely following the wettability gradient due to the unbalanced interfacial forces created by the heterogeneous architectures. Here we demonstrate that droplets can rebound toward both directions on textured surfaces with a wettability gradient. Our simulation results indicate that the rebound trajectory of droplets is determined by the competition between the lateral recoil of the liquid and the penetration and capillary emptying of the penetrated liquid from the textures in the vertical direction. When the time scale for the droplet penetration and capillary emptying process is smaller than the time for the lateral spreading, the droplet will rebound following the wettability gradient. By contrast, the droplet will display a bouncing against the wettability gradient direction because of the significant capillary penetration and emptying in the transverse direction. We believe that our study provides important insight for the design of micro/nanotextured surfaces for controlled droplet manipulation. PMID:26669260

  17. Is Agency Skin Deep? Surface Attributes Influence Infants' Sensitivity to Goal-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guajardo, Jose J.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2004-01-01

    Three studies investigated the role of surface attributes in infants' identification of agents, using a habituation paradigm designed to tap infants' interpretation of grasping as goal directed (Woodward, 1998). When they viewed a bare human hand grasping objects, 7- and 12-month-old infants focused on the relation between the hand and its goal.…

  18. Recent near-surface wind directions inferred from mapping sand ripples on Martian dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zac Yung-Chun; Zimbelman, James R.

    2015-11-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) provides the capability to obtain orbital images of Mars that are of sufficient resolution to record wind ripple patterns on the surfaces of sand dunes. Ripple patterns provide valuable insights into aeolian erosion and deposition on Earth and Mars. In this study, we develop a systematic mapping procedure to examine sand ripple orientations and create surface process maps to evaluate the recent wind flow over the dunes, as well as the interplay of wind and dune shape. By carefully examining the morphology of the dunes and the location of grainflow and grainfall on dune slipfaces, the recent near-surface wind direction (short-term wind) can be identified. Results from the analysis of three dune fields on the floors of craters west of Hellas Basin show regional N, NW, SE, and ESE wind directions. In the three adjacent dune fields, surface process and flow maps suggest a complex wind pattern. The comparison of short-term wind with dune-constructing wind (long-term wind) shows NE and ESE winds may be persistent at least for the past thousands of years. The results also show that the orientation of inferred wind direction on linear dunes is correlated with the crestlines, which suggest that form-flow interaction may take place. The results of local wind flow documentation should improve Martian surface wind modeling and advance our understanding of sand transport, as well as the rates of sand mobility on both Mars and Earth.

  19. A direct measurement of the energy flux density in plasma surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart, Remi; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Semmar, Nadjib; Pichon, Laurianne; Bedra, Larbi; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; Lefaucheux, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The energy flux transferred from a plasma to a surface is a key issue for materials processing (sputtering, etching). We present direct measurements made with a Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) in an Ar plasma interacting with the surface of the sensor. The HFM is a thermopile of about one thousand metal couples mounted in parallel. An Inductively Coupled Plasma in Argon was used to make the experiments. Langmuir probe and tuneable laser diode absorption measurements were carried out to estimate the contribution of ions, neutrals (conduction) and metastables. In order to evaluate the ability of the HFM to measure the part due to chemical reactions, a Si surface in contact with the HFM was submitted to an SF6 plasma. The direct measurements are in good agreement with the estimation we made knowing the etch rate and the enthalpy of the reaction. Finally, tests were performed on a sputtering reactor. Additional energy flux provided by condensing atoms (Pt) was also measured.

  20. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.

  1. The DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) computer code user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. )

    1990-06-01

    DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the interaction of plasma with a solid surface, such as a limiter or divertor plate in a tokamak fusion device. Plasma confinement and transport may be studied in a system which includes an applied magnetic field (oriented normal to the solid surface) and/or a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The PIC code DIPSI is an offshoot of the PIC code TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) which was developed to study plasma confinement in mirror devices. The codes DIPSI and TESS are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Improving Ku-band Scatterometer Ocean Surface Wind Direction Retrievals in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Zhang, J.; Black, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are regions of very strong rain and very high winds, both of which present major challenges to surface wind vector retrieval from Ku-band scatterometers. Wind speed and wind direction retrievals can incur severe errors in regions of high rain rates. One particular signature of rain contamination is wind directions in the across-swath direction, which often leads to displaced circulation centers. Recently, Stiles et al. (2014) developed a method for retrieving QuikSCAT tropical cyclone wind speeds using a neural network approach that was tuned using H*WIND surface wind analyses and passive microwave-estimated rain rates from satellites. We are developing a scene-wide methodology by which a set of dynamically-consistent wind directions can be estimated from these wind speeds. The method is based on an iterative use of a tropical cyclone-specific sea-level pressure retrieval technique that we developed. The sea-level pressure analysis uses a boundary layer model that includes the dynamical shallowing of the tropical cyclone boundary layer toward the storm center, a roll-off in surface drag at high wind speeds, and, storm motion-corrected nonlinear mean flow advection effects. Scene-wide consistency is enforced by the integral nature (with respect to the surface wind vector field) of the derived surface pressure pattern and a constraint that the geostrophic contribution to the total flow is non-divergent. We are currently developing methods to evaluate the retrieved wind directions based on HRD aircraft observations and a limited-domain wind vector partitioning of the retrieved wind vectors into irrotational, non-divergent, and, background flow deformation contributions.

  3. Detection of magnetically enhanced cancer tumors using SQUID magnetometry: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenning, G. G.; Rodriguez, R.; Zotev, V. S.; Moslemi, A.; Wilson, S.; Hawel, L.; Byus, C.; Kovach, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Nanoparticles bound to various biological molecules and pharmacological agents can be administered systemically, to humans without apparent toxicity. This opens an era in the targeting of specific tissues and disease processes for noninvasive imaging and treatment. An important class of particles used predominantly for magnetic resonance imaging is based on iron-oxide ferrites. We performed computer simulations using experimentally determined values for concentrations of superparamagnetic particles achievable in specific tissues of the mouse in vivo and concentrations of particles linked to monoclonal antibodies specific to antigens of two human cancer cell lines in vitro. An instrument to target distance of 12cm, into the body, was selected as relevant to our goal of developing a rapid inexpensive method of scanning the body for occult disease. The simulations demonstrate the potential feasibility of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry to detect induced magnetic fields in focal concentrations of superparamagnetic particles targeted, in vivo, to sites of disease.

  4. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  5. High-sensitivity single NV magnetometry by spin-to-charge state mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Shields, Brendan; Bauch, Erik; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Trifonov, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are atom-like quantum system in a solid state matrix whom its structure allows optical readout of the electronic spin. However, the optimal duration of optical readout is limited by a singlet state lifetime making single shot spin readout out of reach. On the other side, the NV center charge state readout can be extremely efficient (up to 99% fidelity) by using excitation at 594 nm. We will present a new method of spin readout utilizing a spin-depending photoionization process to map the electronic spin state of the NV onto the its charge state. Moreover, pre-selection on the charged state allows to minimize data acquisition time. This scheme improves single NV AC magnetometry by a factor of 5 and will benefit other single NV center experiments as well.

  6. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  7. Nanometer-scale scanning magnetometry of spin structures and excitations using Nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovzhenko, Yuliya

    The development of increasingly sensitive scanning techniques has led to new insights into the physics of interacting condensed matter systems. Recently, Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond emerged as a promising scanning magnetic imaging platform capable of operating in a broad range of temperatures and magnetic fields, with sensitivity and resolution capable of imaging a single electron spin with sub-nanometer resolution under ambient conditions. In this talk we will review some of the recent developments in this new scanning platform. We will describe our recent progress in using a single NV center in a scanning diamond nano-pillar to study condensed matter magnetism at both room and low temperatures. In particular, we demonstrate the use of scanning NV magnetometry to image stray fields originating from static chiral spin structures, as well as to detect resonant and off-resonant low-energy spin excitations.

  8. Vector magnetometry based on electromagnetically induced transparency in linearly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dudin, Y. O.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zibrov, A. S.; Zibrov, S. A.

    2010-09-15

    We develop a generalized principle of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) vector magnetometry based on high-contrast EIT resonances and the symmetry of atom-light interaction in the linearly polarized bichromatic fields. Operation of such vector magnetometer on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb has been demonstrated. The proposed compass-magnetometer has an increased immunity to shifts produced by quadratic Zeeman and ac-Stark effects, as well as by atom-buffer gas and atom-atom collisions. In our proof-of-principle experiment the detected angular sensitivity to magnetic field orientation is 10{sup -3} deg/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is limited by laser intensity fluctuations, light polarization quality, and magnitude of the magnetic field.

  9. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C.; Miles, J. J.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Thomson, T.

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  10. Local magnetometry at high fields and low temperatures using InAs Hall sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugel, E.; Shung, E.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Watkins, S. P.

    1997-10-01

    We characterize the temperature (0.3⩽T⩽300 K), magnetic field (0⩽H⩽80 kOe), and thickness (0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 μm) dependence of the Hall response of high purity InAs epilayers grown using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The high sensitivity, linearity, and temperature independence of the response make them attractive for local Hall probe magnetometry, and uniquely qualified for high field applications below liquid helium temperatures. As a stringent test of performance, we use a six element micron-sized array to monitor the internal field gradient during vortex avalanches at milliKelvin temperatures in a single crystal of YBa2Cu3O7-δ.

  11. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 {mu}m{sup 3}, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nT{sub rms} at {approx}110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  12. Directly mapping the surface charge density of lipid bilayers under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhs, Thomas; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-03-01

    The surface charge density of lipid bilayers governs the cellular uptake of charged particles and guides cell-cell and cell-surface interactions. Direct probing of the potential requires sub nanometer distances as the electrostatic potential is screened by high physiological salt concentrations. This prevented direct measurement of the SCD under physiological conditions. In this study we investigate supported bilayers of lipid mixtures that form domains of distinct surface charges, submerged in 150mM NaCl. We use a scanning ion-conductance microscope (SICM) setup to measure the ionic current through a nanopipette as the pipette is scanned several nanometers above the sample. The charged headgroups of the lipids attract counter ions leading to a charge dependent enhancement of the ion concentration near the surface. This creates a measurable change of conductivity in the vicinity of the surface. As the dependency of the current on the SCD and pipette potential is non-trivial we characterized it using numerical solutions to Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Based on the simulation results we propose an imaging method. We confirm feasibility of the proposed method by experimentally mapping the local surface charge density of phase separated lipid bilayers.

  13. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  14. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-05-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology.

  15. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  16. Efficient directional excitation of surface plasmons by a single-element nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenjie; Liu, Shang; Liao, Huimin; Li, Zhi; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    Directional light scattering is important in basic research and real applications. This area has been successfully downscaled to wavelength and subwavelength scales with the development of optical antennas, especially single-element nanoantennas. Here we show, by adding an auxiliary resonant structure to a single-element plasmonic nanoantenna, the highly efficient lowest-order antenna mode can be effectively transferred into inactive higher-order modes. Based on this mode conversion, scattered optical fields can be well manipulated by utilizing the interference between different antenna modes. Both broadband directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and inversion of SPP launching direction at different wavelengths are experimentally demonstrated as typical examples. The proposed strategy based on mode conversion and mode interference provides new opportunities for the design of nanoscale optical devices, especially directional nanoantennas.

  17. NOx Direct Decomposition: Potentially Enhanced Thermodynamics and Kinetics on Chemically Modified Ferroelectric Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-03-01

    NOx are regulated pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design catalysts for NOx decomposition that operate in oxygen rich environment and permit greater fuel efficiency, we study chemistry of NOx on (001) ferroelectric surfaces. Changing the polarization at such surfaces modifies electronic properties and leads to switchable surface chemistry. Using first principles theory, our previous work has shown that addition of catalytic RuO2 monolayer on ferroelectric PbTiO3 surface makes direct decomposition of NO thermodynamically favorable for one polarization. Furthermore, the usual problem of blockage of catalytic sites by strong oxygen binding is overcome by flipping polarization that helps desorb the oxygen. We describe a thermodynamic cycle for direct NO decomposition followed by desorption of N2 and O2. We provide energy barriers and transition states for key steps of the cycle as well as describing their dependence on polarization direction. We end by pointing out how a switchable order parameter of substrate,in this case ferroelectric polarization, allows us to break away from some standard compromises for catalyst design(e.g. the Sabatier principle). This enlarges the set of potentially catalytic metals. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  18. Surface modification of polypropylene battery separator by direct fluorination with different gas components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoyin; Gao, Jie; Wang, Xu; Fan, Cong; Wang, Huina; Liu, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in hydrophilicity of polypropylene (PP) separator and its stability is essential for enhancing the comprehensive performance of battery. In this study, the PP separators were surface modified by direct fluorination with F2/N2 and F2/O2/N2 gas atmosphere. The alkali absorption ratios (AARs) of these two kinds of fluorinated separators are 302.7% and 418.4%, respectively, which is about nine and twelve times than that of the virgin PP separator. At the same time, the AARs of the fluorinated separators stored for 90 days at ambient temperature in air environment still remain. The surface energy of PP separators is increased from 37.8 mN/m to 47.7 mN/m and 48.9 mN/m determined by contact angle measurement after direct fluorination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) results indicate that polar groups, such as sbnd Cdbnd O(OH) and sbnd Csbnd Fx, are introduced into the polymeric structures of the two fluorinated separator surfaces. Larger quantity of polar groups, especially sbnd Cdbnd O(OH), are introduced on separator surface by the F2/O2/N2 modified route, which results in the difference of the AARs and behavior of alkali absorption. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) demonstrates that the size and shape of micropores of PP separators remain almost unchanged after direct fluorination.

  19. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials. PMID:26855206

  20. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans --> cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ* excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ*-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ*-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  1. Generating grids directly on CAD database surfaces using a parametric evaluator approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatzhe, Timothy D.; Melson, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    A very important, but often overlooked step in grid generation is acquiring a suitable geometry definition of the vehicle to be analyzed. In the past, geometry was usually obtained by generating a number of cross-sections of each component. A number of recent efforts have focussed on non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces (NURBS) to provide as single type of analytic surface to deal with inside the grid generator. This approach has required the development of tools to read other types of surfaces and convert them, either exactly or by approximation, into a NURBS surface. This paper describes a more generic parametric evaluator approach, which does not rely on a particular surface type internal to the grid generation system and is less restrictive in the number of surface types that can be represented exactly. This approach has been implemented in the McDonnell Douglas grid generation system, MACGS, and offers direct access to all types of surfaces from a Unigraphics part file.

  2. Surface Structure Formation in Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Nazlin; Carlberg, Torbjörn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of the surface zone formation during direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum billets produced by the air slip technology. The depth of the shell zone, with compositions deviating from the bulk, is of large importance for the subsequent extrusion productivity and quality of final products. The surface microstructures of 6060 and 6005 aluminum alloys in three different surface appearances—defect free, wavy surface, and spot defects—were studied. The surface microstructures and outer appearance, segregation depth, and phase formation were investigated for the mentioned cases. The results were discussed and explained based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone and the fact that the exudated liquid is contained within a surface oxide skin. Outward solidification in the surface layer was quantitatively analyzed, and the oxide skin movements explained meniscus line formation. Phases forming at different positions in the segregation zone were analyzed and coupled to a cellular solidification in the exudated layer.

  3. Surface-relief gratings with high spatial frequency fabricated using direct glass imprinting process.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Hasegawa, K; Hatano, T; Kasa, H; Kintaka, K; Nishii, J

    2008-03-01

    Surface-relief gratings with high spatial frequencies were first fabricated using a direct imprinting process with a glassy carbon mold at the softening temperature of phosphate glass. A grating with maximum height of 730 nm and 500 nm period was formed on the glass surface by the pressing at the softening temperature of glass under constant pressure of 0.4 kN/cm(2). Phase retardation of 0.1 lambda was observed between TE-polarized and TM-polarized light at 600 nm wavelength. PMID:18311281

  4. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  5. Five-vertex Archimedean surface tessellation by lanthanide-directed molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Écija, David; Urgel, José I.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Joshi, Sushobhan; Auwärter, Willi; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Fischer, Sybille; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.

    2013-01-01

    The tessellation of the Euclidean plane by regular polygons has been contemplated since ancient times and presents intriguing aspects embracing mathematics, art, and crystallography. Significant efforts were devoted to engineer specific 2D interfacial tessellations at the molecular level, but periodic patterns with distinct five-vertex motifs remained elusive. Here, we report a direct scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on the cerium-directed assembly of linear polyphenyl molecular linkers with terminal carbonitrile groups on a smooth Ag(111) noble-metal surface. We demonstrate the spontaneous formation of fivefold Ce–ligand coordination motifs, which are planar and flexible, such that vertices connecting simultaneously trigonal and square polygons can be expressed. By tuning the concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of rare-earth metal centers to ligands, a hierarchic assembly with dodecameric units and a surface-confined metal–organic coordination network yielding the semiregular Archimedean snub square tiling could be fabricated. PMID:23576764

  6. Molecular simulation of protein-surface interactions: Benefits, problems, solutions, and future directions (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    While the importance of protein adsorption to materials surfaces is widely recognized, little is understood at this time regarding how to design surfaces to control protein adsorption behavior. All-atom empirical force field molecular simulation methods have enormous potential to address this problem by providing an approach to directly investigate the adsorption behavior of peptides and proteins at the atomic level. As with any type of technology, however, these methods must be appropriately developed and applied if they are to provide realistic and useful results. Three issues that are particularly important for the accurate simulation of protein adsorption behavior are the selection of a valid force field to represent the atomic-level interactions involved, the accurate representation of solvation effects, and system sampling. In this article, each of these areas is addressed and future directions for continued development are presented. PMID:19809597

  7. Laser desorption with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct surface detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Sabo, M; Malásková, M; Matejčík, S

    2014-10-21

    We present a new highly sensitive technique for the detection of explosives directly from the surface using laser desorption-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (LD-CD-IMS). We have developed LD based on laser diode modules (LDM) and the technique was tested using three different LDM (445, 532 and 665 nm). The explosives were detected directly from the surface without any further preparation. We discuss the mechanism of the LD and the limitations of this technique such as desorption time, transport time and desorption area. After the evaluation of experimental data, we estimated the potential limits of detection of this method to be 0.6 pg for TNT, 2.8 pg for RDX and 8.4 pg for PETN. PMID:25118619

  8. Directed aerosol writing of ordered silica nanostructures on arbitrary surfaces with self-assembling inks.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiebin; Stuecker, John N; Jiang, Yingbing; Bhakta, Ajay J; Branson, Eric D; Li, Peng; Cesarano, Joseph; Sutton, David; Calvert, Paul; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of micro- and macropatterns of ordered mesostructured silica on arbitrary flat and curved surfaces using a facile robot-directed aerosol printing process. Starting with a homogenous solution of soluble silica, ethanol, water, and surfactant as a self-assembling ink, a columnated stream of aerosol droplets is directed to the substrate surface. For deposition at room temperature droplet coalescence on the substrates and attendant solvent evaporation result in continuous, highly ordered mesophases. The pattern profiles are varied by changing any number of printing parameters such as material deposition rate, printing speed, and aerosol-head temperature. Increasing the aerosol temperature results in a decrease of the mesostructure ordering, since faster solvent evaporation and enhanced silica condensation at higher temperatures kinetically impede the molecular assembly process. This facile technique provides powerful control of the printed materials at both the nanoscale and microscale through chemical self-assembly and robotic engineering, respectively. PMID:18581410

  9. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  10. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Directional Enhanced Raman Scattering by Means of the Reverse Kretschmann Configuration.

    PubMed

    Huo, Si-Xin; Liu, Qian; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Cai, Wei-Peng; Meng, Ling-Yan; Xie, Kai-Xin; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Zong, Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a unique analytical technique that provides fingerprint spectra, yet facing the obstacle of low collection efficiency. In this study, we demonstrated a simple approach to measure surface plasmon-coupled directional enhanced Raman scattering by means of the reverse Kretschmann configuration (RK-SPCR). Highly directional and p-polarized Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was observed on a nanoparticle-on-film substrate at 46° through the prism coupler with a sharp angle distribution (full width at half-maximum of ∼3.3°). Because of the improved collection efficiency, the Raman scattering signal was enhanced 30-fold over the conventional SERS mode; this was consistent with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The effect of nanoparticles on the coupling efficiency of propagated surface plasmons was investigated. Possessing straightforward implementation and directional enhancement of Raman scattering, RK-SPCR is anticipated to simplify SERS instruments and to be broadly applicable to biochemical assays. PMID:26266494

  11. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  12. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Wang, Jia-jian; Li, Zi-wei; Liu, Wei; Lin, Feng; Fang, Zhe-yu; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale. Based on the principle of optical spin’s effect for the geometric phase of light, the nanostructures were designed. The inclination of the structures decides the spin-related geometric phase and their relative positions decide the distance-related phase. Hence, the propagation direction of the generated surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be controlled by the spin of photons. Numerical simulations by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method have verified our theoretical prediction. Our structure is fabricated on the Au film by using a focused ion beam etching technique. The total size of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) launcher is 320 nm by 180 nm. The observation of the SPP launching by using scanning near-field optical microscopy is in agreement with our theory and simulations. This result may provide a new way of spin-controlled directional launching of SPP. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176120, 61378059, 60977015, 61422501, and 11374023), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB933004 and 2015CB932403), and Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. L140007).

  14. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  15. Novel surface treatment materials for aligning block-co-polymer in directed self-assembly processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Yasunobu; Wakayama, Hiroyuki; Endo, Takafumi; Sakamoto, Rikimaru

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) process is one of the attractive processes for creating the very fine pitch pattern. Especially, the contact hole shrink processes with block-co-polymer (BCP) or polymer blend materials were attractive processes for creating very small size hole patterns with better CD uniformity compare to general photo-lithography patterning. In general contact hole shrink process, the pattern of Spin-on Carbon Hardmask (SOC) or the photo Resist pattern created by Negative-Tone Development (NTD) process were selected for guide patterns. Since the alignment property of BCP was affected by the surface of these guide materials, it is important to control the surface condition of guide in order to obtain good shrunk contact hole patterns. In this study, we will report the surface treatment materials to control the surface condition of guide patterns such as SOC or NTD resist to achieve the better contact hole shrink performance. These materials were attached to guide pattern surface and controlled the surface energy.

  16. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  17. Directional fluorescence emission co-enhanced by localized and propagating surface plasmons for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Bauch, Martin; Zhang, Qingwen; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Dostalek, Jakub; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize the efficiency of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for implementation in ultra-sensitive bioassays.We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize

  18. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-01

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  19. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  20. Direct coupling of photonic modes and surface plasmon polaritons observed in 2-photon PEEM.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Joseph P S; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2013-12-16

    We report the direct microscopic observation of optical energy transfer from guided photonic modes in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at the surfaces of a single crystalline gold platelet. The photonic and SPP modes appear as an interference pattern in the photoelectron emission yield across the surface of the specimen. We explore the momentum match between the photonic and SPP modes in terms of simple waveguide theory and the three-layer slab model for bound SPP modes of thin metal films. We show that because the gold is thin (30-40 nm), two SPP modes exist and that momentum of the spatially confined asymmetric field mode coincides with the dominant mode of the ITO waveguide. The results demonstrate that photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) can be an important tool for the observation of photonic to SPP interactions in the study of integrated photonic circuits. PMID:24514628

  1. NASA Workshop on future directions in surface modeling and grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Smith, R. E.; Choo, Y. K.; Birckelbaw, L. D.; Vogel, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a summary of the paper sessions and panel discussions of the NASA Workshop on Future Directions in Surface Modeling and Grid Generation held a NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, December 5-7, 1989. The purpose was to assess U.S. capabilities in surface modeling and grid generation and take steps to improve the focus and pace of these disciplines within NASA. The organization of the workshop centered around overviews from NASA centers and expert presentations from U.S. corporations and universities. Small discussion groups were held and summarized by group leaders. Brief overviews and a panel discussion by representatives from the DoD were held, and a NASA-only session concluded the meeting. In the NASA Program Planning Session summary there are five recommended steps for NASA to take to improve the development and application of surface modeling and grid generation.

  2. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  3. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  4. Topcoat approaches for directed-assembly of copolymer films with blocks exhibiting differences in surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyo Seon; in Lee, Jeong; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Tada, Yasuhiko; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Fabricating patterns with feature dimensions smaller than 10 nm scale using block copolymer lithography requires the use of materials with large Flory-Huggins interaction parameters. Because such block copolymers (BCPs) typically show the large differences in surface energy between the blocks, one block (with lower surface energy) tends to segregate to the free surface of films and precludes the assembly of the desired through-film perpendicularly oriented structures. Here we describe a generalizable strategy to overcome this limitation. By coating the BCP film with an additional layer, a topcoat, thermodynamically favorable boundary conditions at the top surface of the film can be engineered for directed self-assembly. The allowable properties of the topcoats depend on the interfacial energies of the layer with the blocks of the copolymer, and the block-block interfacial energy. The strategy is demonstrated experimentally by directing the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly-2-vinylpyridine (PS- b-P2VP) films on chemically nanopatterned substrates with different topcoat materials.

  5. Using Surface Observations to Constrain the Direction and Magnitude of Mantle Flow Beneath Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, W. E.; Silver, P. G.

    2001-12-01

    While the motions of the surface tectonic plates are well determined, the accompanying horizontal mantle flow is not. Observations of surface deformation (GPS velocities and Quaternary fault slip rates) and upper mantle seismic anisotropy are combined for the first time, to provide a direct estimate of this flow field. We apply our investigation to western North America where seismic tomography shows a relatively thin lithosphere. Here the likely source of shear wave anisotropy results from a deformation fabric associated with the differential horizontal motion between the base of the lithosphere and the underlying mantle. For a vertically propagating shear wave recorded at a single station, and for mantle strains of order unity, the fast polarization direction, φ , of a split shear wave will be parallel to the direction of progressive simple shear, defined by this differential motion between lithosphere and underlying mantle. If the motion of the overlying lithospehre is known both within and across a plate boundary zone, such as western North America, then the direction and magnitude of mantle flow beneath the plate boundary zone can be uniquely determined with three or more observations of fast polarization directions. Within the Pacific-North American Plate boundary zone in western North America we find that the mantle velocity is 5.0+/-1.5 cm/yr and directed E-NE in a hotspot frame, nearly opposite to the direction of North American plate motion (WSW). The flow is only weakly coupled to the motion of the surface plates, producing a weak drag force. This flow field is most likely due to mantle density heterogeneity associated with the sinking of the old Farallon slab beneath North America. The last few decades have seen the development of two basically incompatible views of the plate-mantle system. The tectonophysical view assumes effective decoupling between the plate and a stationary mantle by a well developed asthenosphere. The plates are essentially 'self

  6. Direct laser beam interference patterning technique for fast high aspect ratio surface structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrisiunas, Simonas; Voisiat, Bogdan; Žukauskas, Airidas; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2015-03-01

    New results on development of the Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) technique using the interference of several beams to directly ablate the material are presented. The method is capable of producing sub-wavelength features not limited by a beam spot size and is an effective method of forming two-dimensional periodic structures on relatively large area with just a single laser shot. Surface texturing speed of DLIP method and the direct laser writing was compared. Fabrication time reduction up to a few orders of magnitude using DLIP was evaluated. The sub-period scanning technique was applied for formation of the complex periodic structures. A new method of laser scanning for fabrication of periodic structures on large areas without any visible stitching signs between laser irradiation spots was tested.

  7. Effects of rock wool on the lungs evaluated by magnetometry and biopersistence test

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Yuichiro; Kotani, Makoto; Tomita, Masayuki; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Background Asbestos has been reported to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and its use has been banned all over the world. The related industries are facing an urgent need to develop a safer fibrous substance. Rock wool (RW), a kind of asbestos substitute, is widely used in the construction industry. In order to evaluate the safety of RW, we performed a nose-only inhalation exposure study in rats. After one-month observation period, the potential of RW fibers to cause pulmonary toxicity was evaluated based on lung magnetometry findings, pulmonary biopersistence, and pneumopathology. Methods Using the nose-only inhalation exposure system, 6 male Fischer 344 rats (6 to 10 weeks old) were exposed to RW fibers at a target fiber concentration of 100 fibers/cm3 (length [L] > 20 μm) for 6 hours daily, for 5 consecutive days. As a magnetometric indicator, 3 mg of triiron tetraoxide suspended in 0.2 mL of physiological saline was intratracheally administered after RW exposure to these rats and 6 unexposed rats (controls). During one second magnetization in 50 mT external magnetic field, all magnetic particles were aligned, and immediately afterwards the strength of their remanent magnetic field in the rat lungs was measured in both groups. Magnetization and measurement of the decay (relaxation) of this remanent magnetic field was performed over 40 minutes on 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after RW exposure, and reflected cytoskeleton dependent intracellular transport within macrophages in the lung. Similarly, 24 and 12 male Fisher 344-rats were used for biopersistence test and pathologic evaluation, respectively. Results In the lung magnetometric evaluation, biopersistence test and pathological evaluation, the arithmetic mean value of the total fiber concentration was 650.2, 344.7 and 390.7 fibers/cm3, respectively, and 156.6, 93.1 and 95.0 fibers/cm3 for fibers with L > 20 μm, respectively. The lung magnetometric evaluation revealed that impaired relaxation indicating cytoskeletal

  8. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. Aims: We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Methods: Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. Results: We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured barriers for O atoms are consistent with recent independent estimations and prove to be much higher than previously believed ( Edes = 1410-160+290; Edif = 990 -360+530 K on ASW). As for oxygen atoms, we propose that the combination Edes - Edif = 1320-750 K is a sensible choice among the possible pairs of solutions. Also, we managed to measure the desorption and diffusion energy of N atoms for the first time (Edes = 720-80+160; Edif = 525-200+260 K on ASW) in the thermal hopping regime and propose that the combination Edes-Edif = 720-400 K can be reasonably adopted in models. The value of Edif for N atoms is slightly lower than previously suggested, which implies that the N chemistry on dust grains might be richer.

  9. Direct imaging of CdTe(001) surface reconstructions by high-resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Smith, David J.

    1991-08-01

    Novel reconstructions of the CdTe(001) surface have been directly observed using high-resolution electron microscopy in the profile-imaging geometry. The CdTe(001) surface, obtained by in situ annealing under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, is found to have a (2 × 1) structure at temperatures of less than about 200° C, but it transforms reversibly into a (3 × 1) structure at temperatures above 200 °C. Structural models for the reconstructions have been proposed and confirmed by extensive computer simulations. The (2 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Cd atoms, consists of a {1}/{2} monolayer of Cd vacancies and a large inward relaxation of the remaining surface Cd atoms, similar to the (2 × 1) reconstruction previously proposed for the GaAs(001) surface. The (3 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Te atoms, involves formation of surface dimers and the presence of vacancies. In both reconstructions, atomic displacements are observed that extend a few layers into the bulk and serve to reduce the strain energy.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.