Science.gov

Sample records for direct uniparental mitochondrial

  1. Uniparental Inheritance and Replacement of Mitochondrial DNA in Neurospora Tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. B.; Taylor, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    This study tested mechanisms proposed for maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in Neurospora: (1) exclusion of conidial mitochondria by the specialized female reproductive structure, trichogyne, due to mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility and (2) mitochondrial input bias favoring the larger trichogyne over the smaller conidium. These mechanisms were tested by determining the modes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and transmission in the absence of mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility following crosses of uninucleate strains of Neurospora tetrasperma with trichogyne (trichogyne inoculated by conidia) and without trichogyne (hyphal fusion). Maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance was observed in 136 single ascospore progeny following both mating with and without trichogyne using mtDNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms to distinguish parental types. This suggests that maternal mitochondrial inheritance following hyphal fusions is due to some mechanism other than those that implicate the trichogyne. Following hyphal fusion, mututally exclusive nuclear migration permitted investigation of reciprocal interactions. Regardless of which strain accepted nuclei following seven replicate hyphal fusion matings, acceptor mtDNA was the only type detected in 34 hyphal plug and tip samples taken from the contact and acceptor zones. No intracellular mtDNA mixtures were detected. Surprisingly, 3 days following hyphal fusion, acceptor mtDNA replaced donor mtDNA throughout the entire colony. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete mitochondrial replacement during mating in a filamentous fungus. PMID:8104158

  2. Uniparental Mitochondrial Transmission in the Cultivated Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianru; Horgen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    A uniparental mitochondrial (mt) transmission pattern has been previously observed in laboratory matings of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus on petri dishes. In this study, four sets of specific matings were further examined by taking mycelial plugs from the confluent zone of mated homokaryons and inoculating these plugs into rye grain for laboratory fruiting and for fruiting under industrial conditions. Examination of the mt genotype of each individual fruit body for mt-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms further confirmed that the mt genome was inherited uniparentally. The vegetative radial growth and the fruiting activity of two pairs of intraspecific heterokaryons, each pair carrying the same combination of nuclear genomes but different mt genotypes, were compared. Our results suggested that the mt genotype did not appreciably affect radial growth or fruiting activity. The failure to recover both heterokaryons, each carrying either parental mt genotype in any given cross, therefore clearly indicated that in matings of A. bisporus, the mt genome from one of the parental homokaryons is either selectively excluded in the newly formed heterokaryon or selectively eliminated in the immediate heterokaryotic mitotic progeny of the newly formed heterokaryon. Images PMID:16349461

  3. Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondrial Genes in Yeast: Dependence on Input Bias of Mitochondrial DNA and Preliminary Investigations of the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Birky, C. William; Demko, Catherine A.; Perlman, Philip S.; Strausberg, Robert

    1978-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previous studies on the inheritance of mitochondrial genes controlling antibiotic resistance have shown that some crosses produce a substantial number of uniparental zygotes , which transmit to their diploid progeny mitochondrial alleles from only one parent. In this paper, we show that uniparental zygotes are formed especially when one parent (majority parent) contributes substantially more mitochondrial DNA molecules to the zygote than does the other (minority) parent. Cellular contents of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are increased in these experiments by treatment with cycloheximide, alpha-factor, or the uvsρ5 nuclear mutation. In such a biased cross, some zygotes are uniparental for mitochondrial alleles from the majority parent, and the frequency of such zygotes increases with increasing bias. In two- and three-factor crosses, the cap1, ery1, and oli1 loci behave coordinately, rather than independently; minority markers tend to be transmitted or lost as a unit, suggesting that the uniparental mechanism acts on entire mtDNA molecules rather than on individual loci. This rules out the possibility that uniparental inheritance can be explained by the conversion of minority markers to the majority alleles during recombination. Exceptions to the coordinate behavior of different loci can be explained by marker rescue via recombination. Uniparental inheritance is largely independent of the position of buds on the zygote. We conclude that it is due to the failure of minority markers to replicate in some zygotes, possibly involving the rapid enzymatic destruction of such markers. We have considered two general classes of mechanisms: (1) random selection of molecules for replication, as for example by competition for replicating sites on a membrane; and (2) differential marking of mtDNA molecules in the two parents, possibly by modification enzymes, followed by a mechanism that "counts" molecules and replicates only the majority type. These

  4. The mitochondrial plasmid of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum bypasses uniparental inheritance by promoting mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Rakusa; Nomura, Hideo; Moriyam, Yohsuke; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2004-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited maternally in most eukaryotes. Linear mitochondrial plasmids in higher plants and fungi are also transmitted from the maternal parent to the progeny. However, mF, which is a mitochondrial linear plasmid of Physarum polycephalum, evades uniparental mitochondrial inheritance. We examined 36 myxamoebal strains of Physarum and isolated three novel mF+ strains (JE8, TU111, NG111) that harbored free mF plasmids. These strains were mated with the mF- strain KM88. Of the three mF- x mF+ crosses, only KM88 x JE8 displayed complete uniparental inheritance. However, in KM88 x TU111 and KM88 x NG111, the mtDNA of KM88 and mF of TU111 and NG111 were inherited by the plasmodia and showed recombination. For example, although the mtDNA of TU111 was eliminated, the mF of TU111 persisted and became inserted into the mtDNA of KM88, such that recombinant mtDNA represented 80% of the total mtDNA. The parental mitochondria fused to yield giant mitochondria with two or more mitochondrial nucleoids. The mF appears to exchange mitochondria from the recipient (paternal) to the donor (maternal) by promoting mitochondrial fusion. PMID:15179521

  5. Presence of two mitochondrial genomes in the mytilid Perumytilus purpuratus: Phylogenetic evidence for doubly uniparental inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jaime; Pérez, Montse; Toro, Jorge; Astorga, Marcela P.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents evidence, using sequences of ribosomal 16S and COI mtDNA, for the presence of two mitochondrial genomes in Perumytilus purpuratus. This may be considered evidence of doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance. The presence of the two types of mitochondrial genomes differentiates females from males. The F genome was found in the somatic and gonadal tissues of females and in the somatic tissues of males; the M genome was found in the gonads and mantle of males only. For the mitochondrial 16S region, ten haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.004), and 7 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.001), with a distance Dxy of 0.125 and divergence Kxy of 60.33%. For the COI gene 17 haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.009), and 10 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.010), with a genetic distance Dxy of 0.184 and divergence Kxy of 99.97%. Our results report the presence of two well-differentiated, sex-specific types of mitochondrial genome (one present in the male gonad, the other in the female gonad), implying the presence of DUI in P. purpuratus. These results indicate that care must be taken in phylogenetic comparisons using mtDNA sequences of P. purpuratus without considering the sex of the individuals. PMID:26273220

  6. Presence of two mitochondrial genomes in the mytilid Perumytilus purpuratus: Phylogenetic evidence for doubly uniparental inheritance.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jaime; Pérez, Montse; Toro, Jorge; Astorga, Marcela P

    2015-05-01

    This study presents evidence, using sequences of ribosomal 16S and COI mtDNA, for the presence of two mitochondrial genomes in Perumytilus purpuratus. This may be considered evidence of doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance. The presence of the two types of mitochondrial genomes differentiates females from males. The F genome was found in the somatic and gonadal tissues of females and in the somatic tissues of males; the M genome was found in the gonads and mantle of males only. For the mitochondrial 16S region, ten haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.004), and 7 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.001), with a distance Dxy of 0.125 and divergence Kxy of 60.33%. For the COI gene 17 haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.009), and 10 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.010), with a genetic distance Dxy of 0.184 and divergence Kxy of 99.97%. Our results report the presence of two well-differentiated, sex-specific types of mitochondrial genome (one present in the male gonad, the other in the female gonad), implying the presence of DUI in P. purpuratus. These results indicate that care must be taken in phylogenetic comparisons using mtDNA sequences of P. purpuratus without considering the sex of the individuals. PMID:26273220

  7. Mitochondrial genomes and Doubly Uniparental Inheritance: new insights from Musculista senhousia sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs (Bivalvia Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is a fascinating exception to matrilinear inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Species with DUI are characterized by two distinct mtDNAs that are inherited either through females (F-mtDNA) or through males (M-mtDNA). DUI sex-linked mitochondrial genomes share several unusual features, such as additional protein coding genes and unusual gene duplications/structures, which have been related to the functionality of DUI. Recently, new evidence for DUI was found in the mytilid bivalve Musculista senhousia. This paper describes the complete sex-linked mitochondrial genomes of this species. Results Our analysis highlights that both M and F mtDNAs share roughly the same gene content and order, but with some remarkable differences. The Musculista sex-linked mtDNAs have differently organized putative control regions (CR), which include repeats and palindromic motifs, thought to provide sites for DNA-binding proteins involved in the transcriptional machinery. Moreover, in male mtDNA, two cox2 genes were found, one (M-cox2b) 123bp longer. Conclusions The complete mtDNA genome characterization of DUI bivalves is the first step to unravel the complex genetic signals allowing Doubly Uniparental Inheritance, and the evolutionary implications of such an unusual transmission route in mitochondrial genome evolution in Bivalvia. The observed redundancy of the palindromic motifs in Musculista M-mtDNA may have a role on the process by which sperm mtDNA becomes dominant or exclusive of the male germline of DUI species. Moreover, the duplicated M-COX2b gene may have a different, still unknown, function related to DUI, in accordance to what has been already proposed for other DUI species in which a similar cox2 extension has been hypothesized to be a tag for male mitochondria. PMID:21896183

  8. Early replication dynamics of sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs in the doubly uniparental inheritance species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Guerra, D; Ghiselli, F; Milani, L; Breton, S; Passamonti, M

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy, which is maintained by strictly maternal inheritance and a series of bottlenecks, is thought to be an adaptive condition for metazoans. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is a unique mode of mitochondrial transmission found in bivalve species, in which two distinct mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) lines are present, one inherited through eggs (F) and one through sperm (M). During development, the two lines segregate in a sex- and tissue-specific manner: females lose M during embryogenesis, whereas males actively segregate it in the germ line. These two pivotal events are still poorly characterized. Here we investigated mtDNA replication dynamics during embryogenesis and pre-adulthood of the venerid Ruditapes philippinarum using real-time quantitative PCR. We found that both mtDNAs do not detectably replicate during early embryogenesis, and that the M line might be lost from females around 24 h of age. A rise in mtDNA copy number was observed before the first reproductive season in both sexes, with the M mitochondrial genome replicating more than the F in males, and we associate these boosts to the early phase of gonad production. As evidence indicates that DUI relies on the same molecular machine of mitochondrial maternal inheritance that is common in most animals, our data are relevant not only to DUI but also to shed light on how differential segregations of mtDNA variants, in the same nuclear background, may be controlled during development. PMID:26626575

  9. Uniparental Genetic Heritage of Belarusians: Encounter of Rare Middle Eastern Matrilineages with a Central European Mitochondrial DNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Sivitskaya, Larysa; Danilenko, Nina; Novogrodskii, Tadeush; Tsybovsky, Iosif; Kiseleva, Anna; Kotova, Svetlana; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reidla, Maere; Rootsi, Siiri; Parik, Jüri; Reisberg, Tuuli; Achilli, Alessandro; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Gandini, Francesca; Olivieri, Anna; Behar, Doron M.; Torroni, Antonio; Davydenko, Oleg; Villems, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups – a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations – Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively. PMID:23785503

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial ORFans: New Clues on Their Origin and Role in Species with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Guerra, Davide; Breton, Sophie; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Despite numerous comparative mitochondrial genomics studies revealing that animal mitochondrial genomes are highly conserved in terms of gene content, supplementary genes are sometimes found, often arising from gene duplication. Mitochondrial ORFans (ORFs having no detectable homology and unknown function) were found in bivalve molluscs with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria. In DUI animals, two mitochondrial lineages are present: one transmitted through females (F-type) and the other through males (M-type), each showing a specific and conserved ORF. The analysis of 34 mitochondrial major Unassigned Regions of Musculista senhousia F- and M-mtDNA allowed us to verify the presence of novel mitochondrial ORFs in this species and to compare them with ORFs from other species with ascertained DUI, with other bivalves and with animals showing new mitochondrial elements. Overall, 17 ORFans from nine species were analyzed for structure and function. Many clues suggest that the analyzed ORFans arose from endogenization of viral genes. The co-option of such novel genes by viral hosts may have determined some evolutionary aspects of host life cycle, possibly involving mitochondria. The structure similarity of DUI ORFans within evolutionary lineages may also indicate that they originated from independent events. If these novel ORFs are in some way linked to DUI establishment, a multiple origin of DUI has to be considered. These putative proteins may have a role in the maintenance of sperm mitochondria during embryo development, possibly masking them from the degradation processes that normally affect sperm mitochondria in species with strictly maternal inheritance. PMID:23824218

  11. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Bruce W.; Gell, Richard M.; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B.; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing. PMID:26731416

  12. Selection against Heteroplasmy Explains the Evolution of Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Joshua R.; Schaerf, Timothy M.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Why are mitochondria almost always inherited from one parent during sexual reproduction? Current explanations for this evolutionary mystery include conflict avoidance between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, clearing of deleterious mutations, and optimization of mitochondrial-nuclear coadaptation. Mathematical models, however, fail to show that uniparental inheritance can replace biparental inheritance under any existing hypothesis. Recent empirical evidence indicates that mixing two different but normal mitochondrial haplotypes within a cell (heteroplasmy) can cause cell and organism dysfunction. Using a mathematical model, we test if selection against heteroplasmy can lead to the evolution of uniparental inheritance. When we assume selection against heteroplasmy and mutations are neither advantageous nor deleterious (neutral mutations), uniparental inheritance replaces biparental inheritance for all tested parameter values. When heteroplasmy involves mutations that are advantageous or deleterious (non-neutral mutations), uniparental inheritance can still replace biparental inheritance. We show that uniparental inheritance can evolve with or without pre-existing mating types. Finally, we show that selection against heteroplasmy can explain why some organisms deviate from strict uniparental inheritance. Thus, we suggest that selection against heteroplasmy explains the evolution of uniparental inheritance. PMID:25880558

  13. Uniparental ancestry markers in Chilean populations.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Machado, Camilla Dutra; Tostes, Maluah; Alves, Gabrielle; Nazer, Julio; Martinez, Liliana; Wettig, Elisabeth; Pizarro Rivadeneira, Oscar; Diaz Caamaño, Marcela; Larenas Ascui, Jessica; Pavez, Pedro; Dutra, Maria da Graça; Castilla, Eduardo Enrique; Orioli, Ieda Maria

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans has led to the development of a multi-ethnic, admixed population in Chile. This study aimed to contribute to the characterization of the uniparental genetic structure of three Chilean regions. Newborns from seven hospitals in Independencia, Providencia, Santiago, Curicó, Cauquenes, Valdívia, and Puerto Montt communes, belonging to the Chilean regions of Santiago, Maule, and Los Lagos, were studied. The presence of Native American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and two markers present in the non-recombinant region of the Y chromosome, DYS199 and DYS287, indicative of Native American and African ancestry, respectively, was determined. A high Native American matrilineal contribution and a low Native American and African patrilineal contributions were found in all three studied regions. As previously found in Chilean admixed populations, the Native American matrilineal contribution was lower in Santiago than in the other studied regions. However, there was an unexpectedly higher contribution of Native American ancestry in one of the studied communes in Santiago, probably due to the high rate of immigration from other regions of the country. The population genetic sub-structure we detected in Santiago using few uniparental markers requires further confirmation, owing to possible stratification for autosomal and X-chromosome markers. PMID:27494198

  14. Reciprocal uniparental disomy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Sabrina L.; Petes, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    In the diploid cells of most organisms, including humans, each chromosome is usually distinguishable from its partner homolog by multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms. One common type of genetic alteration observed in tumor cells is uniparental disomy (UPD), in which a pair of homologous chromosomes are derived from a single parent, resulting in loss of heterozygosity for all single-nucleotide polymorphisms while maintaining diploidy. Somatic UPD events are usually explained as reflecting two consecutive nondisjunction events. Here we report a previously undescribed mode of chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one cell division produces daughter cells with reciprocal UPD for the same pair of chromosomes without an aneuploid intermediate. One pair of sister chromatids is segregated into one daughter cell and the other pair is segregated into the other daughter cell, mimicking a meiotic chromosome segregation pattern. We term this process “reciprocal uniparental disomy.” PMID:22665764

  15. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-04-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  16. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  17. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 directs polar replication fork pausing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonghong; Posse, Viktor; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Jacobs, Howard T.; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.

    2016-01-01

    During replication of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), clashes with the transcription apparatus can cause replication fork collapse and genomic instability. To avoid this problem, a replication fork barrier protein is situated downstream of rDNA, there preventing replication in the direction opposite rDNA transcription. A potential candidate for a similar function in mitochondria is the mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 (MTERF1, also denoted mTERF), which binds to a sequence just downstream of the ribosomal transcription unit. Previous studies have shown that MTERF1 prevents antisense transcription over the ribosomal RNA genes, a process which we here show to be independent of the transcription elongation factor TEFM. Importantly, we now demonstrate that MTERF1 arrests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication with distinct polarity. The effect is explained by the ability of MTERF1 to act as a directional contrahelicase, blocking mtDNA unwinding by the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. This conclusion is also supported by in vivo evidence that MTERF1 stimulates TWINKLE pausing. We conclude that MTERF1 can direct polar replication fork arrest in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:27112570

  18. Asymmetrical directional mutation pressure in the mitochondrial genome of mammals.

    PubMed

    Reyes, A; Gissi, C; Pesole, G; Saccone, C

    1998-08-01

    The base composition of 25 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes has been analyzed taking into account all three codon positions (P1230 and fourfold degenerate sites (P4FD) of H-strand genes. In the nontranscribed L strand, G is the less represented base and A is the most represented one in all cases, while C and T differ among species. H-strand protein-coding genes show an asymmetric distribution of the four bases between the two strands. The asymmetry indexes AT and GC skews on P4FD are much higher than those on P123, suggesting the existence of asymmetrical directional mutation pressure. Relationships between the compositional features and transcription of replication processes have been investigated in order to find a possible mechanism that could explain the origin of this asymmetry. AT and GC skews, the base composition in fourfold degenerate sites, and the number of variable sites for each gene are significantly correlated with the duration of single-stranded state of the H-stranded genes during replication. We tested different replication-related hypotheses, such as the existence of biased dNTP pools, gamma DNA polymerase mispairing, and the asymmetric replication itself. Most of them failed to explain the observed results, hydrolytic deaminations being the only one in agreement with our data. Thus, we hypothesize that one of the crucial processes for the origin of asymmetric and biased base composition of mammalian mitochondrial genomes is the spontaneous deamination of C and A in the H strand during replication. PMID:9718723

  19. Novel mitochondrial extensions provide evidence for a link between microtubule-directed movement and mitochondrial fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, Timothy; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2008-11-07

    Mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in a large number of cellular processes. Previously, we reported that treatment of mammalian cells with the cysteine-alkylators, N-ethylmaleimide and ethacrynic acid, induced rapid mitochondrial fusion forming a large reticulum approximately 30 min after treatment. Here, we further investigated this phenomenon using a number of techniques including live-cell confocal microscopy. In live cells, drug-induced fusion coincided with a cessation of fast mitochondrial movement which was dependent on microtubules. During this loss of movement, thin mitochondrial tubules extending from mitochondria were also observed, which we refer to as 'mitochondrial extensions'. The formation of these mitochondrial extensions, which were not observed in untreated cells, depended on microtubules and was abolished by pretreatment with nocodazole. In this study, we provide evidence that these extensions result from of a block in mitochondrial fission combined with continued application of motile force by microtubule-dependent motor complexes. Our observations strongly suggest the existence of a link between microtubule-based mitochondrial trafficking and mitochondrial fission.

  20. Mitochondrial pyruvate transport: a historical perspective and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    McCommis, Kyle S.; Finck, Brian N.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate is the end-product of glycolysis, a major substrate for oxidative metabolism, and a branching point for glucose, lactate, fatty acid and amino acid synthesis. The mitochondrial enzymes that metabolize pyruvate are physically separated from cytosolic pyruvate pools and rely on a membrane transport system to shuttle pyruvate across the impermeable inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Despite long-standing acceptance that transport of pyruvate into the mitochondrial matrix by a carrier-mediated process is required for the bulk of its metabolism, it has taken almost 40 years to determine the molecular identity of an IMM pyruvate carrier. Our current understanding is that two proteins, mitochondrial pyruvate carriers MPC1 and MPC2, form a hetero-oligomeric complex in the IMM to facilitate pyruvate transport. This step is required for mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation and carboxylation – critical reactions in intermediary metabolism that are dysregulated in several common diseases. The identification of these transporter constituents opens the door to the identification of novel compounds that modulate MPC activity, with potential utility for treating diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and other common causes of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of the present review is to detail the historical, current and future research investigations concerning mitochondrial pyruvate transport, and discuss the possible consequences of altered pyruvate transport in various metabolic tissues. PMID:25748677

  1. Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and identification of a heterozygous Alu-associated deletion and a uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 in two patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    AOYAMA, YUKA; YAMAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI; SAKAGUCHI, NAOMI; ISHIGE, MIKA; TANAKA, TOJU; ICHIHARA, TOMOKO; OHARA, KATSUAKI; KOUZAN, HIROKO; KINOSADA, YASUTOMI; FUKAO, TOSHIYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the leucine catabolic pathway and ketone body synthesis, and is clinically characterized by metabolic crises with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. In the present study, we initially used PCR with genomic followed by direct sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of HMGCL deficiency in two patients clinically diagnosed with the condition. Although we identified a mutation in each patient, the inheritance patterns of these mutations were not consistent with disease causation. Therefore, we investigated HMGCL using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to determine the copy numbers of all exons. A heterozygous deletion that included exons 2–4 was identified in one of the patients. MLPA revealed that the other patient had two copies for all HMGCL exons. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 was confirmed in this patient by microarray analysis. These findings indicate that MLPA is useful for the identification of genomic aberrations and mutations other than small-scale nucleotide alterations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMGCL deficiency caused by uniparental disomy. PMID:25872961

  2. Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and identification of a heterozygous Alu-associated deletion and a uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 in two patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Naomi; Ishige, Mika; Tanaka, Toju; Ichihara, Tomoko; Ohara, Katsuaki; Kouzan, Hiroko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the leucine catabolic pathway and ketone body synthesis, and is clinically characterized by metabolic crises with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. In the present study, we initially used PCR with genomic followed by direct sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of HMGCL deficiency in two patients clinically diagnosed with the condition. Although we identified a mutation in each patient, the inheritance patterns of these mutations were not consistent with disease causation. Therefore, we investigated HMGCL using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to determine the copy numbers of all exons. A heterozygous deletion that included exons 2-4 was identified in one of the patients. MLPA revealed that the other patient had two copies for all HMGCL exons. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 was confirmed in this patient by microarray analysis. These findings indicate that MLPA is useful for the identification of genomic aberrations and mutations other than small-scale nucleotide alterations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMGCL deficiency caused by uniparental disomy. PMID:25872961

  3. Mosaicism and uniparental disomy in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Thomas; Soellner, Lukas; Buiting, Karin; Kotzot, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    Chromosomal mosaicism is the presence of numerous cell lines with different chromosomal complements in the same individual. Uniparental disomy (UPD) is the inheritance of two homologous chromosomes from the same parent. These genetic anomalies arise from errors in meiosis and/or mitosis and can occur independently or in combination. Due to the formation mechanisms of UPD, low-level or undetected mosaicisms are assumed for a significant number of UPD cases. The pre- and postnatal clinical consequences of mosaicism for chromosomal aberrations and/or UPD depend on the gene content of the involved chromosome. In prenatal evaluation of chromosomal mosaicism and UPD, genetic counseling should be offered before any laboratory testing. PMID:25547535

  4. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition for Cytoprotection: Direct versus Indirect Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Cécile; Huynh, Le Ha; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Brenner, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are fascinating organelles, which fulfill multiple cellular functions, as diverse as energy production, fatty acid β oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and detoxification, and cell death regulation. The coordination of these functions relies on autonomous mitochondrial processes as well as on sustained cross-talk with other organelles and/or the cytosol. Therefore, this implies a tight regulation of mitochondrial functions to ensure cell homeostasis. In many diseases (e.g., cancer, cardiopathies, nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases), mitochondria can receive harmful signals, dysfunction and then, participate to pathogenesis. They can undergo either a decrease of their bioenergetic function or a process called mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) that can coordinate cell death execution. Many studies present evidence that protection of mitochondria limits disease progression and severity. Here, we will review recent strategies to preserve mitochondrial functions via direct or indirect mechanisms of MPT inhibition. Thus, several mitochondrial proteins may be considered for cytoprotective-targeted therapies. PMID:22675634

  5. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  6. Caspase-2 resides in the mitochondria and mediates apoptosis directly from the mitochondrial compartment

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Cruzan, M; Sharma, R; Tiwari, M; Karbach, S; Holstein, D; Martin, C R; Lechleiter, J D; Herman, B

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-2 plays an important role in apoptosis induced by several stimuli, including oxidative stress. However, the subcellular localization of caspase-2, particularly its presence in the mitochondria, is unclear. It is also not known if cytosolic caspase-2 translocates to the mitochondria to trigger the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis or if caspase-2 is constitutively present in the mitochondria that then selectively mediates this apoptotic effect. Here, we demonstrate the presence of caspase-2 in purified mitochondrial fractions from in vitro-cultured cells and in liver hepatocytes using immunoblots and confocal microscopy. We show that mitochondrial caspase-2 is functionally active by performing fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses using a mitochondrially targeted substrate flanked by donor and acceptor fluorophores. Cell-free apoptotic assays involving recombination of nuclear, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions from the livers of wild type and Casp2−/− mice clearly point to a direct functional role for mitochondrial caspase-2 in apoptosis. Furthermore, cytochrome c release from Casp2−/− cells is decreased as compared with controls upon treatment with agents inducing mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, we show that Casp2−/− primary skin fibroblasts are protected from oxidants that target the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Taken together, our results demonstrate that caspase-2 exists in the mitochondria and that it is essential for mitochondrial oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:27019748

  7. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  8. Direct human mitochondrial transfer: a novel concept based on the endosymbiotic theory.

    PubMed

    Kitani, T; Kami, D; Kawasaki, T; Nakata, M; Matoba, S; Gojo, S

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in eukaryotes, and mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in several diseases. Therefore, intercellular mitochondrial transfer has been proposed as a mechanism for cell-based therapy. In addition, internalization of isolated mitochondria cells by simple coincubation was reported to improve mitochondrial function in the recipient cells. However, substantial evidence for internalization of isolated mitochondria is still lacking, and its precise mechanism remains elusive. We tested whether enriched mitochondria can be internalized into cultured human cells by simple coincubation using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Mitochondria were isolated from endometrial gland-derived mesenchymal cells (EMCs) or EMCs stably expressing mitochondrial-targeted red fluorescent protein (EMCs-DsRed-mito), and enriched by anti-mitochondrial antibody-conjugated microbeads. They were coincubated with isogeneic EMCs stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Live fluorescence imaging clearly showed that DsRed-labeled mitochondria accumulated in the cytoplasm of EMCs stably expressing GFP around the nucleus. Flow cytometry confirmed the presence of a distinct population of GFP and DsRed double-positive cells within the recipient cells. In addition, transfer efficiency depended on mitochondrial concentration, indicating that human cells may possess the inherent ability to internalize mitochondria. Therefore, this study supports the application of direct transfer of isogeneic mitochondria as a novel approach for the treatment of diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24815168

  9. Confined placental mosaicisms and uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalousek, D.K.; Langlois, S.; Harrison, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 2% of pregnancies studied with chorionic villous sampling (CVS) show confined placental mosaicism (CPM) which persists to term in 50-70% of cases. An increased frequency of complications, such as intrauterine fetal growth restriction or intrauterine death, is observed in these pregnancies. As trisomic zygote rescue is a common mechanism responsible for CPM, fetal uniparental disomy (UPD), resulting from the loss of the extra trisomic chromosome in the embryonic stem cells, would be expected to occur in a proportion of pregnancies with CPM. We have studied 27 pregnancies with CPM involving trisomies for chromosomes 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, and 16 for involvement of specific cell lineage(s) and levels of mosaicism in term placentas. Also, DNA from the parents and infant was analyzed for UPD or biparental disomy (BPD). Five infants with UPD for chromosome 16 and one infant with UPD for chromosome 7 were detected. All other infants showed BPD for the chromosome involved in CPM. For trisomy 16 mosaic gestations, a close correlation between high levels of trisomic cells in placenta and intrauterine fetal growth restriction has been found irrespective of the type of disomy present in the infant. The effect of other trisomies (2, 7, 9, 10, 12) on placental function appears to be similar, but the low numbers of pregnancies studied and lack of detection of UPD for chromosomes 2, 9, 10 and 12 does not allow a definitive conclusion.

  10. Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Reactive Aldehydes Directly and Differentially Impair Spinal Cord and Brain Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Singh, Indrapal N.; Miller, Darren M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction in traumatic spinal cord and brain injury is associated with post-traumatic free radical–mediated oxidative damage to proteins and lipids. Lipid peroxidation by-products, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein, can form adducts with proteins and exacerbate the effects of direct free radical–induced protein oxidation. The aim of the present investigation was to determine and compare the direct contribution of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein to spinal cord and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Ficoll gradient–isolated mitochondria from normal rat spinal cords and brains were treated with carefully selected doses of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or acrolein, followed by measurement of complex I– and complex II–driven respiratory rates. Both compounds were potent inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal significantly compromised spinal cord mitochondrial respiration at a 0.1-μM concentration, whereas 10-fold greater concentrations produced a similar effect in brain. Acrolein was more potent than 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, significantly decreasing spinal cord and brain mitochondrial respiration at 0.01 μM and 0.1 μM concentrations, respectively. The results of this study show that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein can directly and differentially impair spinal cord and brain mitochondrial function, and that the targets for the toxic effects of aldehydes appear to include pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I–associated proteins. Furthermore, they suggest that protein modification by these lipid peroxidation products may directly contribute to post-traumatic mitochondrial damage, with spinal cord mitochondria showing a greater sensitivity than those in brain. PMID:20392143

  11. The mitochondrial receptor complex: Mom22 is essential for cell viability and directly interacts with preproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hönlinger, A; Kübrich, M; Moczko, M; Gärtner, F; Mallet, L; Bussereau, F; Eckerskorn, C; Lottspeich, F; Dietmeier, K; Jacquet, M

    1995-01-01

    A multisubunit complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane is responsible for targeting and membrane translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins. This receptor complex contains two import receptors, a general insertion pore and the protein Mom22. It was unknown if Mom22 directly interacts with preproteins, and two views existed about the possible functions of Mom22: a central role in transfer of preproteins from both receptors to the general insertion pore or a more limited function dependent on the presence of the receptor Mom19. For this report, we identified and cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae MOM22 and investigated whether it plays a direct role in targeting of preproteins. A preprotein accumulated at the mitochondrial outer membrane was cross-linked to Mom22. The cross-linking depended on the import stage of the preprotein. Overexpression of Mom22 suppressed the respiratory defect of yeast cells lacking Mom19 and increased preprotein import into mom19 delta mitochondria, demonstrating that Mom22 can function independently of Mom19. Overexpression of Mom22 even suppressed the lethal phenotype of a double deletion of the two import receptors known so far (mom19 delta mom72 delta). Deletion of the MOM22 gene was lethal for yeast cells, identifying Mom22 as one of the few mitochondrial membrane proteins essential for fermentative growth. These results suggest that Mom22 plays an essential role in the mitochondrial receptor complex. It directly interacts with preproteins in transit and can perform receptor-like activities. PMID:7760834

  12. Historical Perspective on Mitochondrial Medicine

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Garone, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we trace the origins and follow the development of mitochondrial medicine from the pre-molecular era (1962-1988) based on clinical clues, muscle morphology, and biochemistry into the molecular era that started in 1988 and is still advancing at a brisk pace. We have tried to stress conceptual advances, such as endosymbiosis, uniparental inheritance, intergenomic signaling and its defects, and mitochondrial dynamics. We hope that this historical review also provides an update on mitochondrial medicine, although we fully realize that the speed of progress in this area makes any such endeavor akin to writing on water. PMID:20818724

  13. Direct induction of apoptosis using an optimal mitochondrially targeted p53.

    PubMed

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Matissek, Karina J; Okal, Abood; Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-05-01

    Targeting the tumor suppressor p53 to the mitochondria triggers a rapid apoptotic response as efficiently as transcription-dependent p53. (1, 2) p53 forms a complex with the antiapoptotic Bcl-XL, which leads to Bak and Bax oligomerization resulting in apoptosis via mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. (3, 4) Although p53 performs its main role in the mitochondrial outer membrane, it also interacts with different proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix. (5, 6) To further investigate mitochondrial activity of p53, EGFP-p53 was fused to different mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) directing it to the mitochondrial outer membrane ("XL-MTS" from Bcl-XL; "TOM-MTS" from TOM20), the inner membrane ("CCO-MTS" from cytochrome c oxidase), or matrix ("OTC-MTS" from ornithine transcarbamylase). Fluorescence microscopy and a p53 reporter dual luciferase assay demonstrated that fusing MTSs to p53 increased mitochondrial localization and nuclear exclusion depending on which MTS was used. To examine if the MTSs initiate mitochondrial damage, we fused each individual MTS to EGFP (a nontoxic protein) as negative controls. We performed caspase-9, TUNEL, annexin-V, and 7-AAD apoptosis assays on T47D breast cancer cells transfected with mitochondrial constructs. Except for EGFP-XL, apoptotic potential was observed in all MTS-EGFP-p53 and MTS-EGFP constructs. In addition, EGFP-p53-XL showed the greatest significant increase in programmed cell death compared to its nontoxic MTS control (EGFP-XL). The apoptotic mechanism for each construct was further investigated using pifithrin-α (an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity), pifithrin-μ (a small molecule that reduces binding of p53 to Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL), and overexpressing the antiapoptotic Bcl-XL. Unlike the MTSs from TOM, CCO, and OTC, which showed different apoptotic mechanisms, we conclude that p53 fused to the MTS from Bcl-XL performs its apoptotic potential exclusively through the p53/Bcl

  14. DIRECT INDUCTION OF APOPTOSIS USING AN OPTIMAL MITOCHONDRIALLY TARGETED P53

    PubMed Central

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Matissek, Karina J.; Okal, Abood; Constance, Jonathan E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the tumor suppressor p53 to the mitochondria triggers a rapid apoptotic response as efficiently as transcription-dependent p53.1, 2 p53 forms a complex with the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL, which leads to Bak and Bax oligomerization resulting in apoptosis via mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization.3, 4 Although p53 performs its main role in the mitochondrial outer membrane it also interacts with different proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix.5, 6 To further investigate mitochondrial activity of p53, EGFP-p53 was fused to different mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) directing it to the mitochondrial outer membrane (“XL-MTS” from Bcl-XL; “TOM-MTS” from TOM20), the inner membrane (“CCO-MTS” from cytochrome c oxidase) or matrix (“OTC-MTS” from ornithine transcarbamylase). Fluorescence microscopy and a p53 reporter dual luciferase assay demonstrated that fusing MTSs to p53 increased mitochondrial localization and nuclear exclusion depending on which MTS was used. To examine if the MTSs initiate mitochondrial damage, we fused each individual MTS to EGFP (a non-toxic protein) as negative controls. We performed caspase-9, TUNEL, Annexin-V, and 7-AAD apoptosis assays on T47D breast cancer cells transfected with mitochondrial constructs. Except for EGFP-XL, apoptotic potential was observed in all MTS-EGFP-p53 and MTS-EGFP constructs. In addition, EGFP-p53-XL showed the greatest significant increase in programmed cell death compared to its non-toxic MTS control (EGFP-XL). The apoptotic mechanism for each construct was further investigated using pifithrin-α (an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity), pifithrin-μ (a small molecule that reduces binding of p53 to Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL), and over-expressing the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL. Unlike the MTSs from TOM, CCO, and OTC, which showed different apoptotic mechanisms, we conclude that p53 fused to the MTS from Bcl-XL performs its apoptotic potential exclusively through p53/Bcl

  15. Direct Estimation of the Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Rate in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Haag-Liautard, Cathy; Coffey, Nicole; Houle, David; Lynch, Michael; Charlesworth, Brian; Keightley, Peter D

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants are widely used in evolutionary genetics as markers for population history and to estimate divergence times among taxa. Inferences of species history are generally based on phylogenetic comparisons, which assume that molecular evolution is clock-like. Between-species comparisons have also been used to estimate the mutation rate, using sites that are thought to evolve neutrally. We directly estimated the mtDNA mutation rate by scanning the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster lines that had undergone approximately 200 generations of spontaneous mutation accumulation (MA). We detected a total of 28 point mutations and eight insertion-deletion (indel) mutations, yielding an estimate for the single-nucleotide mutation rate of 6.2 × 10−8 per site per fly generation. Most mutations were heteroplasmic within a line, and their frequency distribution suggests that the effective number of mitochondrial genomes transmitted per female per generation is about 30. We observed repeated occurrences of some indel mutations, suggesting that indel mutational hotspots are common. Among the point mutations, there is a large excess of G→A mutations on the major strand (the sense strand for the majority of mitochondrial genes). These mutations tend to occur at nonsynonymous sites of protein-coding genes, and they are expected to be deleterious, so do not become fixed between species. The overall mtDNA mutation rate per base pair per fly generation in Drosophila is estimated to be about 10× higher than the nuclear mutation rate, but the mitochondrial major strand G→A mutation rate is about 70× higher than the nuclear rate. Silent sites are substantially more strongly biased towards A and T than nonsynonymous sites, consistent with the extreme mutation bias towards A+T. Strand-asymmetric mutation bias, coupled with selection to maintain specific nonsynonymous bases, therefore provides an explanation for the extreme base composition of

  16. Gem1 and ERMES Do Not Directly Affect Phosphatidylserine Transport from ER to Mitochondria or Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology. PMID:22409400

  17. Uniparental Markers of Contemporary Italian Population Reveals Details on Its Pre-Roman Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Fondevila, Manuel; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Carracedo, Ángel; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Capelli, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Background According to archaeological records and historical documentation, Italy has been a melting point for populations of different geographical and ethnic matrices. Although Italy has been a favorite subject for numerous population genetic studies, genetic patterns have never been analyzed comprehensively, including uniparental and autosomal markers throughout the country. Methods/Principal Findings A total of 583 individuals were sampled from across the Italian Peninsula, from ten distant (if homogeneous by language) ethnic communities — and from two linguistic isolates (Ladins, Grecani Salentini). All samples were first typed for the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and selected coding region SNPs (mtSNPs). This data was pooled for analysis with 3,778 mtDNA control-region profiles collected from the literature. Secondly, a set of Y-chromosome SNPs and STRs were also analyzed in 479 individuals together with a panel of autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs) from 441 samples. The resulting genetic record reveals clines of genetic frequencies laid according to the latitude slant along continental Italy – probably generated by demographical events dating back to the Neolithic. The Ladins showed distinctive, if more recent structure. The Neolithic contribution was estimated for the Y-chromosome as 14.5% and for mtDNA as 10.5%. Y-chromosome data showed larger differentiation between North, Center and South than mtDNA. AIMs detected a minor sub-Saharan component; this is however higher than for other European non-Mediterranean populations. The same signal of sub-Saharan heritage was also evident in uniparental markers. Conclusions/Significance Italy shows patterns of molecular variation mirroring other European countries, although some heterogeneity exists based on different analysis and molecular markers. From North to South, Italy shows clinal patterns that were most likely modulated during Neolithic times. PMID:23251386

  18. Meclizine inhibits mitochondrial respiration through direct targeting of cytosolic phosphoethanolamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Zhu, Lin; Baker, Charli D; Cracan, Valentin; Yaseen, Abbas; Jain, Mohit; Clish, Clary B; Brookes, Paul S; Bakovic, Marica; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2013-12-01

    We recently identified meclizine, an over-the-counter drug, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Curiously, meclizine blunted respiration in intact cells but not in isolated mitochondria, suggesting an unorthodox mechanism. Using a metabolic profiling approach, we now show that treatment with meclizine leads to a sharp elevation of cellular phosphoethanolamine, an intermediate in the ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Metabolic labeling and in vitro enzyme assays confirmed direct inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PCYT2). Inhibition of PCYT2 by meclizine led to rapid accumulation of its substrate, phosphoethanolamine, which is itself an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Our work identifies the first pharmacologic inhibitor of the Kennedy pathway, demonstrates that its biosynthetic intermediate is an endogenous inhibitor of respiration, and provides key mechanistic insights that may facilitate repurposing meclizine for disorders of energy metabolism. PMID:24142790

  19. Meclizine Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration through Direct Targeting of Cytosolic Phosphoethanolamine Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Zhu, Lin; Baker, Charli D.; Cracan, Valentin; Yaseen, Abbas; Jain, Mohit; Clish, Clary B.; Brookes, Paul S.; Bakovic, Marica; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified meclizine, an over-the-counter drug, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Curiously, meclizine blunted respiration in intact cells but not in isolated mitochondria, suggesting an unorthodox mechanism. Using a metabolic profiling approach, we now show that treatment with meclizine leads to a sharp elevation of cellular phosphoethanolamine, an intermediate in the ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Metabolic labeling and in vitro enzyme assays confirmed direct inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PCYT2). Inhibition of PCYT2 by meclizine led to rapid accumulation of its substrate, phosphoethanolamine, which is itself an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Our work identifies the first pharmacologic inhibitor of the Kennedy pathway, demonstrates that its biosynthetic intermediate is an endogenous inhibitor of respiration, and provides key mechanistic insights that may facilitate repurposing meclizine for disorders of energy metabolism. PMID:24142790

  20. HIV-1 Tat protein directly induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and inactivates cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lecoeur, H; Borgne-Sanchez, A; Chaloin, O; El-Khoury, R; Brabant, M; Langonné, A; Porceddu, M; Brière, J-J; Buron, N; Rebouillat, D; Péchoux, C; Deniaud, A; Brenner, C; Briand, J-P; Muller, S; Rustin, P; Jacotot, E

    2012-01-01

    The Trans-activator protein (Tat) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a pleiotropic protein involved in different aspects of AIDS pathogenesis. As a number of viral proteins Tat is suspected to disturb mitochondrial function. We prepared pure synthetic full-length Tat by native chemical ligation (NCL), and Tat peptides, to evaluate their direct effects on isolated mitochondria. Submicromolar doses of synthetic Tat cause a rapid dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as well as cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, heart, and brain. Accordingly, Tat decreases substrate oxidation by mitochondria isolated from these tissues, with oxygen uptake being initially restored by adding cytochrome c. The anion-channel inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS) protects isolated mitochondria against Tat-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), whereas ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor blocker, does not. Pharmacologic inhibitors of the permeability transition pore, Bax/Bak inhibitors, and recombinant Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins do not reduce Tat-induced MMP. We finally observed that Tat inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in disrupted mitochondria isolated from liver, heart, and brain of both mouse and human samples, making it the first described viral protein to be a potential COX inhibitor. PMID:22419111

  1. The N-terminal region of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase can direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, S; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Quagliariello, E

    1994-06-30

    Two fused genes were constructed which encode for two chimeric proteins in which either 10 or 191 N-terminal amino acids of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase had been attached to the entire polypeptide chain of cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase. The precursor and mature form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, dihydrofolate reductase and both chimeric proteins were synthesized in vitro and their import into isolated mitochondria was studied. Both chimeric proteins were taken up by isolated organelles, where they became protease resistant, thus indicating the ability of the N-terminal portion of the mature moiety of the precursor of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria. PMID:8024546

  2. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads—a baiting and iterative mapping approach

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data—mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim. PMID:23661685

  3. Distinct phenotype in maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, S.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; McGill, J.; Battersby, M.

    1994-06-01

    We report on the occurrence of maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 (mUPD14) in a 4-year-old girl with a de novo Robertsonian translocation, 45,XX,t (13q,14q). The child has arrested hydrocephalus, short stature, minor anomalies, small hands with hyperextensible joints, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Comparison of her phenotype with those of three previously described individuals show some common distinct traits which suggest a mUPD14 syndrome. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pathogenesis and Consequences of Uniparental Disomy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Hideki; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic application of new genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays has demonstrated that somatically acquired regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without changes in copy number frequently occur in many types of cancer. Until recently, the ubiquity of this type of chromosomal defect had remained unrecognized as it cannot be detected using routine cytogenetic technologies. Random and recurrent patterns of copy-neutral LOH, also referred to as uniparental disomy (UPD), can be found in specific cancer types and probably contribute to clonal outgrowth owing to various mechanisms. In this review we explore the types, topography, genesis, pathophysiological consequences and clinical implications of UPD. PMID:21518781

  5. Uniparental Markers in Italy Reveal a Sex-Biased Genetic Structure and Different Historical Strata

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Harmant, Christine; Useli, Antonella; Sanz, Paula; Yang-Yao, Daniele; Manry, Jeremy; Ciani, Graziella; Luiselli, Donata; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David; Pettener, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Located in the center of the Mediterranean landscape and with an extensive coastal line, the territory of what is today Italy has played an important role in the history of human settlements and movements of Southern Europe and the Mediterranean Basin. Populated since Paleolithic times, the complexity of human movements during the Neolithic, the Metal Ages and the most recent history of the two last millennia (involving the overlapping of different cultural and demic strata) has shaped the pattern of the modern Italian genetic structure. With the aim of disentangling this pattern and understanding which processes more importantly shaped the distribution of diversity, we have analyzed the uniparentally-inherited markers in ∼900 individuals from an extensive sampling across the Italian peninsula, Sardinia and Sicily. Spatial PCAs and DAPCs revealed a sex-biased pattern indicating different demographic histories for males and females. Besides the genetic outlier position of Sardinians, a North West–South East Y-chromosome structure is found in continental Italy. Such structure is in agreement with recent archeological syntheses indicating two independent and parallel processes of Neolithisation. In addition, date estimates pinpoint the importance of the cultural and demographic events during the late Neolithic and Metal Ages. On the other hand, mitochondrial diversity is distributed more homogeneously in agreement with older population events that might be related to the presence of an Italian Refugium during the last glacial period in Europe. PMID:23734255

  6. Analysis of Imprinted Gene Expression in Normal Fertilized and Uniparental Preimplantation Porcine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Hun; Uh, Kyung-Jun; Mulligan, Brendan P.; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Ka, Hakhyun; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    In the present study quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression status of eight imprinted genes (GRB10, H19, IGF2R, XIST, IGF2, NNAT, PEG1 and PEG10) during preimplantation development, in normal fertilized and uniparental porcine embryos. The results demonstrated that, in all observed embryo samples, a non imprinted gene expression pattern up to the 16-cell stage of development was common for most genes. This was true for all classes of embryo, regardless of parental-origins and the direction of imprint. However, several differentially expressed genes (H19, IGF2, XIST and PEG10) were detected amongst the classes at the blastocyst stage of development. Most interestingly and despite the fact that maternally and paternally expressed genes should not be expressed in androgenones and parthenogenones, respectively, both uniparental embryos expressed these genes when tested for in this study. In order to account for this phenomenon, we compared the expression patterns of eight imprinted genes along with the methylation status of the IGF2/H19 DMR3 in haploid and diploid parthenogenetic embryos. Our findings revealed that IGF2, NNAT and PEG10 were silenced in haploid but not diploid parthenogenetic blastocysts and differential methylation of the IGF2/H19 DMR3 was consistently observed between haploid and diploid parthenogenetic blastocysts. These results appear to suggest that there exists a process to adjust the expression status of imprinted genes in diploid parthenogenetic embryos and that this phenomenon may be associated with altered methylation at an imprinting control region. In addition we believe that imprinted expression occurs in at least four genes, namely H19, IGF2, XIST and PEG10 in porcine blastocyst stage embryos. PMID:21804912

  7. Normal phenotype with paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, J.L.; Avramopoulos, D. ); Pangalos, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) involving several different chromosomes has been described in several cases of human pathologies. In order to investigate whether UPD for chromosome 21 is associated with abnormal phenotypes, the authors analyzed DNA polymorphisms in DNA from a family with de novo Robertsonian translocation t(21q;21q). The proband was a healthy male with 45 dup(21q) who was ascertained through his trisomy 21 offspring. No phenotypic abnormalities were noted in the physical exam, and his past medical history was unremarkable. The authors obtained genotypes for the proband and his parents' leukocyte DNAs from 17 highly informative short sequence repeat polymorphisms that map in the pericentromeric region and along the entire length of 21q. The order of the markers has been previously determined through the linkage and physical maps of this chromosome. For the nine informative markers there was no maternal allele contribution to the genotype of the proband; in addition, there was always reduction to homozygosity of a paternal allele. These data indicated that there was paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 21 (pUPiD21). The authors conclude that pUPiD21 is not associated with abnormal phenotypes and that there are probably no imprinted genes on chromosome 21. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Do Uniparental Sanderlings Calidris alba Increase Egg Heat Input to Compensate for Low Nest Attentiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Reneerkens, Jeroen; Grond, Kirsten; Schekkerman, Hans; Tulp, Ingrid; Piersma, Theunis

    2011-01-01

    Birds breeding in cold environments regularly have to interrupt incubation to forage, causing a trade-off between two mutually exclusive behaviours. Earlier studies showed that uniparental Arctic sandpipers overall spend less time incubating their eggs than biparental species, but interspecific differences in size and ecology were potential confounding factors. This study reports on a within-species comparison of breeding schedules and metal egg temperatures in uni- and biparental sanderlings (Calidris alba) in Northeast Greenland in relation to ambient temperature. We recorded incubation schedules with nest temperature loggers in 34 sanderling clutches (13 uniparentals, 21 biparentals). The temperature of a metal egg placed within the clutch of 17 incubating birds (6 uniparentals, 9 biparentals) was measured as an indicator of the heat put into eggs. Recess frequency, recess duration and total recess time were higher in uniparentals than in biparentals and positively correlated with ambient temperatures in uniparentals only. Uniparental sanderlings maintained significantly higher metal egg temperatures during incubation than biparentals (1.4°C difference on average). Our results suggest that uniparental sanderlings compensate for the lower nest attendance, which may prolong the duration of the incubation period and negatively affect the condition of the hatchlings, by maintaining a higher heat flux into the eggs. PMID:21347377

  9. Recombinant Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Induces Mitophagy by Directly Targeting Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hep G2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Rong; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are essential targets for cancer chemotherapy and other disease treatments. Recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI), a member of the potato type I proteinase inhibitor family, was derived from tartary buckwheat extracts. Our results showed that rBTI directly targeted mitochondria and induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. This occurs through enhanced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with the rise of the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) content, and changes in the GSH/oxidized glutathione ratio. Mild and transient ROS induced by rBTI were shown to be important signaling molecules required to induce Hep G2 mitophagy to remove dysfunctional mitochondria. Furthermore, rBTI could directly induce mitochondrial fragmentation. It was also noted that rBTI highly increased colocalization of mitochondria in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. Tom 20, a subunit of the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane complex responsible for recognizing mitochondrial presequences, may be the direct target of rBTI. PMID:26301894

  10. Bloom syndrome and maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Woodage, T.; Prasad, M.; Trent, R.J.; Smith, A. ); Dixon, J.W.; Romain, D.R.; Columbano-Green, L.M.; Selby, R.E. ); Graham, D. ); Rogan, P.K. )

    1994-07-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increases in the frequency of sister-chromatid exchange and in the incidence of malignancy. Chromosome-transfer studies have shown the BS locus to map to chromosome 15q. This report describes a subject with features of both BS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Molecular analysis showed maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Meiotic recombination between the two disomic chromosomes 15 has resulted in heterodisomy for proximal 15q and isodisomy for distal 15q. In this individual BS is probably due to homozygosity for a gene that is telomeric to D15S95 (15q25), rather than to genetic imprinting, the mechanism responsible for the development of PWS. This report represents the first application of disomy analysis to the regional localization of a disease gene. This strategy promises to be useful in the genetic mapping of other uncommon autosomal recessive conditions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Maternal uniparental disomy 22 has no impact on the phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Schinzel, A. A.; Basaran, S.; Bernasconi, F.; Karaman, B.; Yüksel-Apak, M.; Robinson, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    A 25-year-old normal healthy male was karyotyped because five of his wife's pregnancies terminated in spontaneous abortions at 6-14 wk of gestation. Cytogenetic investigation disclosed a de novo balanced Robertsonian t(22q;22q) translocation. Molecular studies revealed maternal only inheritance for chromosome 22 markers. Reduction to homozygosity for all informative markers indicates that the rearranged chromosome is an isochromosome derived from one of the maternal chromosomes 22. Except for the possibility of homozygosity for recessive mutations, maternal uniparental disomy 22 does not seem to have an adverse impact on the phenotype, apart from causing reproductive failure. It can be concluded that no maternally imprinted genes with major effect map to chromosome 22. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8279466

  12. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. PMID:26219535

  13. Direct interaction of mitochondrial targeting presequences with purified components of the TIM23 protein complex.

    PubMed

    Marom, Milit; Dayan, Dana; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-12-23

    Precursor proteins that are imported from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria carry positively charged amphipathic presequences and cross the inner membrane with the help of vital components of the TIM23 complex. It is currently unclear which subunits of the TIM23 complex recognize and directly bind to presequences. Here we analyzed the binding of presequence peptides to purified components of the TIM23 complex. The interaction of three different presequences with purified soluble domains of yeast Tim50 (Tim50IMS), Tim23 (Tim23IMS), and full-length Tim44 was examined. Using chemical cross-linking and surface plasmon resonance we demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of purified Tim50IMS and Tim44 to interact directly with the yeast Hsp60 presequence. We also analyzed their interaction with presequences derived from precursors of yeast mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp70) and of bovine cytochrome P450SCC. Moreover, we characterized the nature of the interactions and determined their KDs. On the basis of our results, we suggest a mechanism of translocation where stronger interactions of the presequences on the trans side of the channel support the import of precursor proteins through TIM23 into the matrix. PMID:21969381

  14. Direct Interaction of Mitochondrial Targeting Presequences with Purified Components of the TIM23 Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Milit; Dayan, Dana; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-01-01

    Precursor proteins that are imported from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria carry positively charged amphipathic presequences and cross the inner membrane with the help of vital components of the TIM23 complex. It is currently unclear which subunits of the TIM23 complex recognize and directly bind to presequences. Here we analyzed the binding of presequence peptides to purified components of the TIM23 complex. The interaction of three different presequences with purified soluble domains of yeast Tim50 (Tim50IMS), Tim23 (Tim23IMS), and full-length Tim44 was examined. Using chemical cross-linking and surface plasmon resonance we demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of purified Tim50IMS and Tim44 to interact directly with the yeast Hsp60 presequence. We also analyzed their interaction with presequences derived from precursors of yeast mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp70) and of bovine cytochrome P450SCC. Moreover, we characterized the nature of the interactions and determined their KDs. On the basis of our results, we suggest a mechanism of translocation where stronger interactions of the presequences on the trans side of the channel support the import of precursor proteins through TIM23 into the matrix. PMID:21969381

  15. Mitochondrial metabolism directs stemness and differentiation in P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Naredo, I; Loureiro, R; Mesquita, K A; Barbosa, I A; Tavares, L C; Branco, A F; Erickson, J R; Holy, J; Perkins, E L; Carvalho, R A; Oliveira, P J

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and cell viability and differentiation in stem cells (SCs) remains poorly understood. In the present study, we compared mitochondrial physiology and metabolism between P19SCs before/after differentiation and present a unique fingerprint of the association between mitochondrial activity, cell differentiation and stemness. In comparison with their differentiated counterparts, pluripotency of P19SCs was correlated with a strong glycolytic profile and decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and complexity: round, low-polarized and inactive mitochondria with a closed permeability transition pore. This decreased mitochondrial capacity increased their resistance against dichloroacetate. Thus, stimulation of mitochondrial function by growing P19SCs in glutamine/pyruvate-containing medium reduced their glycolytic phenotype, induced loss of pluripotent potential, compromised differentiation and became P19SCs sensitive to dichloroacetate. Because of the central role of this type of SCs in teratocarcinoma development, our findings highlight the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in stemness, proliferation, differentiation and chemoresistance. In addition, the present work suggests the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism as a tool for inducing cell differentiation in stem line therapies. PMID:24832466

  16. Loss of Miro1-directed mitochondrial movement results in a novel murine model for neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tammy T.; Oh, Sang S.; Weaver, David; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Maxfield, Dane; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Smith, Nathan K.; Macfarlane, Jane; Saunders, Gerald; Palmer, Cheryl A.; Debattisti, Valentina; Koshiba, Takumi; Pulst, Stefan; Feldman, Eva L.; Hajnóczky, György; Shaw, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Defective mitochondrial distribution in neurons is proposed to cause ATP depletion and calcium-buffering deficiencies that compromise cell function. However, it is unclear whether aberrant mitochondrial motility and distribution alone are sufficient to cause neurological disease. Calcium-binding mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases attach mitochondria to motor proteins for anterograde and retrograde transport in neurons. Using two new KO mouse models, we demonstrate that Miro1 is essential for development of cranial motor nuclei required for respiratory control and maintenance of upper motor neurons required for ambulation. Neuron-specific loss of Miro1 causes depletion of mitochondria from corticospinal tract axons and progressive neurological deficits mirroring human upper motor neuron disease. Although Miro1-deficient neurons exhibit defects in retrograde axonal mitochondrial transport, mitochondrial respiratory function continues. Moreover, Miro1 is not essential for calcium-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial movement or mitochondrial calcium buffering. Our findings indicate that defects in mitochondrial motility and distribution are sufficient to cause neurological disease. PMID:25136135

  17. Loss of Miro1-directed mitochondrial movement results in a novel murine model for neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Oh, Sang S; Weaver, David; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Maxfield, Dane; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Smith, Nathan K; Macfarlane, Jane; Saunders, Gerald; Palmer, Cheryl A; Debattisti, Valentina; Koshiba, Takumi; Pulst, Stefan; Feldman, Eva L; Hajnóczky, György; Shaw, Janet M

    2014-09-01

    Defective mitochondrial distribution in neurons is proposed to cause ATP depletion and calcium-buffering deficiencies that compromise cell function. However, it is unclear whether aberrant mitochondrial motility and distribution alone are sufficient to cause neurological disease. Calcium-binding mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases attach mitochondria to motor proteins for anterograde and retrograde transport in neurons. Using two new KO mouse models, we demonstrate that Miro1 is essential for development of cranial motor nuclei required for respiratory control and maintenance of upper motor neurons required for ambulation. Neuron-specific loss of Miro1 causes depletion of mitochondria from corticospinal tract axons and progressive neurological deficits mirroring human upper motor neuron disease. Although Miro1-deficient neurons exhibit defects in retrograde axonal mitochondrial transport, mitochondrial respiratory function continues. Moreover, Miro1 is not essential for calcium-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial movement or mitochondrial calcium buffering. Our findings indicate that defects in mitochondrial motility and distribution are sufficient to cause neurological disease. PMID:25136135

  18. Genetic characterization of uniparental lineages in populations from Southwest Iberia with past malaria endemicity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vânia; Gomes, Verónica; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; João Prata, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Malaria endemicity in Southwest Iberia afforded conditions for an increase of sickle cell disease (SCD), which in the region follows a clinal pattern toward the south, where foci of high prevalence were found. SCD distribution is associated with specific geographical areas, and therefore, its introduction into Iberia may be related to the migration of different populations. We have analyzed the variation of uniparental markers in Portuguese populations with high frequency of SCD--Coruche, Pias, and Alcacer do Sal--to evaluate if their present-day pattern of neutral diversity could provide evidence about people inhabiting the area over different time periods. Two hundred and eighty-five individuals were sampled in Coruche, Pias, and Alcacer do Sal. All were analyzed for the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); males were additionally examined for Y-chromosome markers. Results were then compared with data from other Portuguese and non-Portuguese populations. In Coruche, the genetic profile was similar to the profile usually found in Portugal. In Alcacer do Sal, the frequency of sub-Saharan mtDNA L lineages was the highest ever reported (22%) in Europe. In Pias, mtDNA diversity revealed higher frequencies of Mediterranean haplogroups I, J, and T than usually found in surrounding populations. The presence of Sub-Saharan maternal lineages in Alcacer do Sal is likely associated with the influx of African slaves between the 15th and 19th centuries, whereas in Pias, the Mediterranean influence might be traced to ancient contacts with Greeks, Phoenicians, and Carthaginians, who established important trading networks in southern Iberia. PMID:20737604

  19. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  20. Nuclear HMGA1 nonhistone chromatin proteins directly influence mitochondrial transcription, maintenance, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, Gregory A.; Maloney, Scott C.; Reeves, Raymond . E-mail: reevesr@mail.wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins translocate from the nucleus to mitochondria and bind to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) at the D-loop control region [G.A. Dement, N.R. Treff, N.S. Magnuson, V. Franceschi, R. Reeves, Dynamic mitochondrial localization of nuclear transcription factor HMGA1, Exp. Cell Res. 307 (2005) 388-401.] [11]. To elucidate possible physiological roles for such binding, we employed methods to analyze mtDNA transcription, mitochondrial maintenance, and other organelle functions in transgenic human MCF-7 cells (HA7C) induced to over-express an HA-tagged HMGA1 protein and control (parental) MCF-7 cells. Quantitative real-time (RT) PCR analyses demonstrated that mtDNA levels were reduced approximately 2-fold in HMGA1 over-expressing HA7C cells and flow cytometric analyses further revealed that mitochondrial mass was significantly reduced in these cells. Cellular ATP levels were also reduced in HA7C cells and survival studies showed an increased sensitivity to killing by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a glycolysis-specific inhibitor. Flow cytometric analyses revealed additional mitochondrial abnormalities in HA7C cells that are consistent with a cancerous phenotype: namely, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Additional RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that gene transcripts from both the heavy (ND2, COXI, ATP6) and light (ND6) strands of mtDNA were up-regulated approximately 3-fold in HA7C cells. Together, these mitochondrial changes are consistent with many previous reports and reveal several possible mechanisms by which HMGA1 over-expression, a common feature of naturally occurring cancers, may affect tumor progression.

  1. Fertilization and Uniparental Chromosome Elimination during Crosses with Maize Haploid Inducers1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Xu, Xiaowei; Xie, Hongxia; Chen, Shaojiang; Jin, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Producing maternal haploids via a male inducer can greatly accelerate maize (Zea mays) breeding process. However, the mechanism underlying haploid formation remains unclear. In this study, we constructed two inducer lines containing cytogenetic marker B chromosome or alien centromeric histone H3 variant-yellow fluorescent protein vector to investigate the mechanism. The two inducer lines as the pollinators were crossed with a hybrid ZhengDan958. B chromosomes were detected in F1 haploids at a low frequency, which was direct evidence to support the occurrence of selective chromosome elimination during haploid formation. We found that most of the inducer chromosomes were eliminated in haploid embryonic cells during the first week after pollination. The gradual elimination of chromosomes was also detected in the endosperm of defective kernels, although it occurred only in some endosperm cells as late as 15 d after pollination. We also performed a genome-wide identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers in the inducers, noninducer inbred lines, and 42 derived haploids using a 50K single nucleotide polymorphism array. We found that an approximately 44-Mb heterozygous fragment from the male parent was detected in a single haploid, which further supported the occurrence of paternal introgression. Our results suggest that selective elimination of uniparental chromosomes leads to the formation of haploid and possible defective kernels in maize as well, which is accompanied with unusual paternal introgression in haploid cells. PMID:24014577

  2. Directed alteration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA by biolistic transformation and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fox, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently the only species in which genetic transformation of mitochondria can be used to generate a wide variety of defined alterations in mtDNA. DNA sequences can be delivered into yeast mitochondria by microprojectile bombardment (biolistic transformation) and subsequently incorporated into mtDNA by the highly active homologous recombination machinery present in the organelle. While transformation frequencies are relatively low, the availability of strong mitochondrial selectable markers for the yeast system, both natural and synthetic, makes the isolation of transformants routine. The strategies and procedures reviewed here allow the researcher to insert defined mutations into endogenous mitochondrial genes, and to insert new genes into mtDNA. These methods provide powerful in vivo tools for the study of mitochondrial biology. PMID:18314724

  3. Acquired uniparental disomy of chromosome 9p in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linghua; Wheeler, David A; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-08-01

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common and recurrent molecular event in human cancers that leads to homozygosity for tumor suppressor genes as well as oncogenes, while retaining the diploid chromosomal complement. Because of the lack of copy number change, aUPD is undetectable by comparative genome hybridization, so the magnitude of this genetic change was underappreciated in the past. 9p aUPD was first described in 2002 in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). Since then, systematic application of genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays has indicated that 9p aUPD is the most common chromosomal aberration in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), contributing to discovery of the PV-defining mutation JAK2V617F21. It was also found in other myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, though at a relatively lower frequency. By leading to JAK2V617F 23 homozygosity, 9p aUPD plays a causal role in the development of PV and is also associated with less favorable clinical outcomes. It is also possible that new targets other than JAK2V617F 25 are present within 9p aUPD that may contribute to diversity of PV outcome and phenotype. This review summarizes recent discoveries on 9p aUPD in hematologic malignancies and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and potential roles of 9p aUPD in the pathogenesis of PV, the relationship between 9p aUPD and JAK2V617F29, and possible new cancer-related targets within the 9p aUPD region. PMID:26646991

  4. Mosaic uniparental disomy in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, R E; Elliott, M; Welham, K; Carrera, M; Schofield, P N; Barton, D E; Maher, E R

    1994-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital overgrowth syndrome with variable expression. The major features are anterior abdominal wall defects, macroglossia, and gigantism and less commonly neonatal hypoglycaemia, organomegaly, congenital renal anomalies, hemihypertrophy and embryonal tumours occur. BWS is a genetically heterogeneous disorder; most cases are sporadic but approximately 15% are familial and a small number of BWS patients have cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome 11p15. Genomic imprinting effects have been implicated in familial and non-familial BWS, and uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 11 has been reported in sporadic cases. We investigated the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical associations of UPD in 49 patients with non-familial BWS and a normal karyotype. UPD for chromosome 11p15 was detected in nine of 32 (28%) informative patients. A further two patients appeared to be disomic at the WT1 locus in chromosome 11p13, but were uninformative at chromosome 11p15.5 loci tested. In all cases with UPD the affected person was mosaic for a paternal isodisomy and a normal cell line indicating that UPD had arisen as a postzygotic event. Compared to cases in which paternal isodisomy for chromosomes 11p15.5 had been excluded (n = 23), BWS patients with UPD was more likely to have hemihypertrophy (6/9 versus 1/23, p < 0.001) and less likely to have exomphalos (0/9 versus 13/23, p < 0.01), but there were no significant differences between disomic and non-disomic cases in the incidence of hypoglycaemia, nephromegaly, neoplasia, and developmental delay. The detection of UPD in BWS patients allows accurate genetic counselling to be provided and provides an insight into the molecular pathogenesis of BWS. Images PMID:7837249

  5. Direct electric current treatment modifies mitochondrial function and lipid body content in the A549 cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Holandino, Carla; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; de Oliveira, Felipe Alves Gomes; Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Siqueira, Camila Monteiro; Messeder, Douglas Jardim; de Aguiar, Fernanda Silva; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Miranda, Kildare; Galina, Antonio; Capella, Marcia Alves Marques; Morales, Marcelo Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical therapy (EChT) entails treatment of solid tumors with direct electric current (DC). This work evaluated the specific effects of anodic flow generated by DC on biochemical and metabolic features of the A549 human lung cancer cell line. Apoptosis was evaluated on the basis of caspase-3 activity and mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation. Cell morphology was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, and lipid droplets were studied through morphometric analysis and X-ray qualitative elemental microanalysis. High-resolution respirometry was used to assess mitochondrial respiratory parameters. Results indicated A549 viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a prominent drop between 18 and 24h after treatment (p<0.001), together with a two-fold increase in caspase-3 activity. AF-treatment induced a significantly increase (p<0.01) in the cell number with disrupted mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, treated cells demonstrated important ultrastructural mitochondria damage and a three-fold increase in the cytoplasmic lipid bodies' number, quantified by morphometrical analyses. Conversely, 24h after treatment, the cells presented a two-fold increase of residual oxygen consumption, accounting for 45.3% of basal oxygen consumption. These results show remarkable alterations promoted by anodic flow on human lung cancer cells which are possibly involved with the antitumoral effects of EChT. PMID:27243447

  6. Out-of-Africa, the peopling of continents and islands: tracing uniparental gene trees across the map

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Genetic relationships between human groups were first studied by comparisons of relative allele frequency at multiple loci. Geographical study of detailed, highly resolved trees of single, non-recombining uniparental loci (mitochondrial DNA: mtDNA and Y chromosome/non-recombining Y: NRY), following specific lineages rather than populations, then revolutionized knowledge of the peopling of the world, although, curiously, the use of geographically highly specific mutations that protect against malaria, found on individual autosomal globin genes, were first in single-locus phylogeography. mtDNA, with its high single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutation rates and relative ease of dating, led the way and gave stronger proof of the recent near replacement of all human species by anatomically modern humans (AMH). AMH left Africa via a single southern exit about 70 000 years ago and rapidly spread around the Indian Ocean towards the Antipodes, long before a small branch left a South Asian colony, earlier on the trail, to populate Europe. The worldwide skeleton phylogeny of mtDNA is fully resolved, but a regional analysis will continue to illuminate subsequent migrations. NRY with a lower SNP mutation rate still has a dating problem relating to use the of single tandem repeats (STRs), but has validated mtDNA results and with more geographical specificity and genomic size, as with the autosomal human genome, has much more detail to offer for the future. PMID:22312044

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor isoforms direct distinct mitochondrial programs to regulate ATP production.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David J; Poolman, Toryn M; Williamson, Andrew J K; Wang, Zichen; Clark, Neil R; Ma'ayan, Avi; Whetton, Anthony D; Brass, Andrew; Matthews, Laura C; Ray, David W

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a nuclear receptor and major drug target, has a highly conserved minor splice variant, GRγ, which differs by a single arginine within the DNA binding domain. GRγ, which comprises 10% of all GR transcripts, is constitutively expressed and tightly conserved through mammalian evolution, suggesting an important non-redundant role. However, to date no specific role for GRγ has been reported. We discovered significant differences in subcellular localisation, and nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling in response to ligand. In addition the GRγ transcriptome and protein interactome was distinct, and with a gene ontology signal for mitochondrial regulation which was confirmed using Seahorse technology. We propose that evolutionary conservation of the single additional arginine in GRγ is driven by a distinct, non-redundant functional profile, including regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:27226058

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor isoforms direct distinct mitochondrial programs to regulate ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, David J.; Poolman, Toryn M.; Williamson, Andrew J. K.; Wang, Zichen; Clark, Neil R.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Whetton, Anthony D.; Brass, Andrew; Matthews, Laura C.; Ray, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a nuclear receptor and major drug target, has a highly conserved minor splice variant, GRγ, which differs by a single arginine within the DNA binding domain. GRγ, which comprises 10% of all GR transcripts, is constitutively expressed and tightly conserved through mammalian evolution, suggesting an important non-redundant role. However, to date no specific role for GRγ has been reported. We discovered significant differences in subcellular localisation, and nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling in response to ligand. In addition the GRγ transcriptome and protein interactome was distinct, and with a gene ontology signal for mitochondrial regulation which was confirmed using Seahorse technology. We propose that evolutionary conservation of the single additional arginine in GRγ is driven by a distinct, non-redundant functional profile, including regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:27226058

  9. Strategies for maximizing ATP supply in the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi: direct binding of mitochondria to the parasitophorous vacuole and clustering of the mitochondrial porin VDAC

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Christian; Howell, Matthew; Bhella, David; Lucocq, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites with extremely reduced genomes and a dependence on host-derived ATP. The microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi proliferates within a membranous vacuole and we investigated how the ATP supply is optimized at the vacuole–host interface. Using spatial EM quantification (stereology), we found a single layer of mitochondria coating substantial proportions of the parasitophorous vacuole. Mitochondrial binding occurred preferentially over the vegetative ‘meront’ stages of the parasite, which bulged into the cytoplasm, thereby increasing the membrane surface available for mitochondrial interaction. In a broken cell system mitochondrial binding was maintained and was typified by electron dense structures (< 10 nm long) bridging between outer mitochondrial and vacuole membranes. In broken cells mitochondrial binding was sensitive to a range of protease treatments. The function of directly bound mitochondria, as measured by the membrane potential sensitive dye JC-1, was indistinguishable from other mitochondria in the cell although there was a generalized depression of the membrane potential in infected cells. Finally, quantitative immuno-EM revealed that the ATP-delivering mitochondrial porin, VDAC, was concentrated atthe mitochondria-vacuole interaction site. Thus E. cuniculi appears to maximize ATP supply by direct binding of mitochondria to the parasitophorous vacuole bringing this organelle within 0.020 microns of the growing vegetative form of the parasite. ATP-delivery is further enhanced by clustering of ATP transporting porins in those regions of the outer mitochondrial membrane lying closest to the parasite. PMID:24245785

  10. Direct evidence of mitochondrial G-quadruplex DNA by using fluorescent anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Zi-Fu; Wang, Chiung-Lin; Hsu, Tsu-Ning; Li, Pei-Tzu; Chen, Chin-Tin; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lou, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2015-12-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is a promising target for anti-cancer treatment. In this paper, we provide the first evidence supporting the presence of G4 in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of live cells. The molecular engineering of a fluorescent G4 ligand, 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium) carbazole diiodide (BMVC), can change its major cellular localization from the nucleus to the mitochondria in cancer cells, while remaining primarily in the cytoplasm of normal cells. A number of BMVC derivatives with sufficient mitochondrial uptake can induce cancer cell death without damaging normal cells. Fluorescence studies of these anti-cancer agents in live cells and in isolated mitochondria from HeLa cells have demonstrated that their major target is mtDNA. In this study, we use fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to verify the existence of mtDNA G4s in live cells. Bioactivity studies indicate that interactions between these anti-cancer agents and mtDNA G4 can suppress mitochondrial gene expression. This work underlines the importance of fluorescence in the monitoring of drug-target interactions in cells and illustrates the emerging development of drugs in which mtDNA G4 is the primary target. PMID:26487635

  11. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  12. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 in a baby with trisomy 2 mosaicism in amniotic fluid culture

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.; Eisenger, K.; Brown, S.

    1995-08-28

    We describe the first case of a baby with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2. Growth failure, hypothyroidism, and hyaline membrane disease were present at birth, and the first year of life was complicated by bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At age 14 months, motor and intellectual development were normal, but growth remained below the 10th centile. The baby was investigated for uniparental disomy because trisomy 2 mosaicism had been detected in a second trimester amniocentesis. This is the first reported case in which amniotic fluid chromosome mosaicism has been associated with uniparental disomy. Implications for prenatal diagnosis are considered. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 in a baby with trisomy 2 mosaicism in amniotic fluid culture

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.B.; Eisenger, K.; Brown, S.

    1994-09-01

    We describe the first case of a baby with maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 2. Growth failure, hypothyroidism and hyaline membrane disease were present at birth, and the first year of life was complicated by bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At 14 months, motor and intellectual development appear to be normal, but growth remains below the 10th percentile. The baby was investigated for uniparental disomy because trisomy 2 mosaicism had been detected in a second trimester amniocentesis. This is the first reported case in which amniotic fluid chromosome mosaicism has been associated with uniparental disomy. Implications for prenatal diagnosis are considered.

  14. The Complete Female- and Male-Transmitted Mitochondrial Genome of Meretrix lamarckii

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bivalve mitochondrial genomes show many uncommon features, like additional genes, high rates of gene rearrangement, high A-T content. Moreover, Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is a distinctive inheritance mechanism allowing some bivalves to maintain and transmit two separate sex-linked mitochondrial genomes. Many bivalve mitochondrial features, such as gene extensions or additional ORFs, have been proposed to be related to DUI but, up to now, this topic is far from being understood. Several species are known to show this unusual organelle inheritance but, being widespread only among Unionidae and Mytilidae, DUI distribution is unclear. We sequenced and characterized the complete female- (F) and male-transmitted (M) mitochondrial genomes of Meretrix lamarckii, which, in fact, is the second species of the family Veneridae where DUI has been demonstrated so far. The two mitochondrial genomes are comparable in length and show roughly the same gene content and order, except for three additional tRNAs found in the M one. The two sex-linked genomes show an average nucleotide divergence of 16%. A 100-aminoacid insertion in M. lamarckii M-cox2 gene was found; moreover, additional ORFs have been found in both F and M Long Unassigned Regions of M. lamarckii. Even if no direct involvement in DUI process has been demonstrated so far, the finding of cox2 insertions and supernumerary ORFs in M. lamarckii both strengthens this hypothesis and widens the taxonomical distribution of such unusual features. Finally, the analysis of inter-sex genetic variability shows that DUI species form two separate clusters, namely Unionidae and Mytilidae+Veneridae; this dichotomy is probably due to different DUI regimes acting on separate taxa. PMID:27083010

  15. The Complete Female- and Male-Transmitted Mitochondrial Genome of Meretrix lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Bettinazzi, Stefano; Plazzi, Federico; Passamonti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bivalve mitochondrial genomes show many uncommon features, like additional genes, high rates of gene rearrangement, high A-T content. Moreover, Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is a distinctive inheritance mechanism allowing some bivalves to maintain and transmit two separate sex-linked mitochondrial genomes. Many bivalve mitochondrial features, such as gene extensions or additional ORFs, have been proposed to be related to DUI but, up to now, this topic is far from being understood. Several species are known to show this unusual organelle inheritance but, being widespread only among Unionidae and Mytilidae, DUI distribution is unclear. We sequenced and characterized the complete female- (F) and male-transmitted (M) mitochondrial genomes of Meretrix lamarckii, which, in fact, is the second species of the family Veneridae where DUI has been demonstrated so far. The two mitochondrial genomes are comparable in length and show roughly the same gene content and order, except for three additional tRNAs found in the M one. The two sex-linked genomes show an average nucleotide divergence of 16%. A 100-aminoacid insertion in M. lamarckii M-cox2 gene was found; moreover, additional ORFs have been found in both F and M Long Unassigned Regions of M. lamarckii. Even if no direct involvement in DUI process has been demonstrated so far, the finding of cox2 insertions and supernumerary ORFs in M. lamarckii both strengthens this hypothesis and widens the taxonomical distribution of such unusual features. Finally, the analysis of inter-sex genetic variability shows that DUI species form two separate clusters, namely Unionidae and Mytilidae+Veneridae; this dichotomy is probably due to different DUI regimes acting on separate taxa. PMID:27083010

  16. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    SciTech Connect

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  17. Calpeptin, not calpain, directly inhibits an ion channel of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Derksen, Maria; Vorwerk, Christian; Siemen, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) of inner mitochondrial membranes is a large conductance pathway for ions up to 1500 Da which opening is responsible for ion equilibration and loss of membrane potential in apoptosis and thus in several neurodegenerative diseases. The PTP can be regulated by the Ca(2+)-activated mitochondrial K channel (BK). Calpains are Ca(2+)-activated cystein proteases; calpeptin is an inhibitor of calpains. We wondered whether calpain or calpeptin can modulate activity of PTP or BK. Patch clamp experiments were performed on mitoplasts of rat liver (PTP) and of an astrocytoma cell line (BK). Channel-independent open probability (P o) was determined (PTP) and, taking into account the number of open levels, NPo by single channel analysis (BK). We find that PTP in the presence of Ca(2+) (200 μM) is uninfluenced by calpain (13 nM) and shows insignificant decrease by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (1 μM). The NPo of the BK is insensitive to calpain (54 nM), too. However, it is significantly and reversibly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (IC50 = 42 μM). The results agree with calpeptin-induced activation of the PTP via inhibition of the BK. Screening experiments with respirometry show calpeptin effects, fitting to inhibition of the BK by calpeptin, and strong inhibition of state 3 respiration. PMID:26108743

  18. Shikonin Directly Targets Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiench, Benjamin; Eichhorn, Tolga; Paulsen, Malte; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment. Due to increased drug resistance and the severe side effects of currently used therapeutics, new candidate compounds are required for improvement of therapy success. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone, was used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different inflammatory diseases and recent studies revealed the anticancer activities of shikonin. We found that shikonin has strong cytotoxic effects on 15 cancer cell lines, including multidrug-resistant cell lines. Transcriptome-wide mRNA expression studies showed that shikonin induced genetic pathways regulating cell cycle, mitochondrial function, levels of reactive oxygen species, and cytoskeletal formation. Taking advantage of the inherent fluorescence of shikonin, we analyzed its uptake and distribution in live cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Shikonin was specifically accumulated in the mitochondria, and this accumulation was associated with a shikonin-dependent deregulation of cellular Ca2+ and ROS levels. This deregulation led to a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction of microtubules, cell-cycle arrest, and ultimately induction of apoptosis. Seeing as both the metabolism and the structure of mitochondria show marked differences between cancer cells and normal cells, shikonin is a promising candidate for the next generation of chemotherapy. PMID:23118796

  19. Accelerated Mitochondrial Evolution and “Darwin's Corollary”: Asymmetric Viability of Reciprocal F1 Hybrids in Centrarchid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Bolnick, Daniel I.; Turelli, Michael; López-Fernández, Hernán; Wainwright, Peter C.; Near, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Reciprocal crosses between species can yield hybrids with different viabilities. The high frequency of this asymmetric hybrid viability (“Darwin's corollary”) places it alongside Haldane's rule and the “large-X effect” as a general feature of postmating reproductive isolation. Recent theory suggests that reciprocal cross asymmetries can arise from stochastic substitutions in uniparentally inherited loci such as mitochondrial genomes, although large systematic differences in mitochondrial substitution rates can also contribute to asymmetries. Although the magnitude of asymmetry will be relatively insensitive to unequal rates of mitochondrial evolution in diverging species, we show here that rate asymmetries can have a large effect on the direction of viability asymmetries. In reciprocal crosses between species, the maternal parent with faster mitochondrial evolution will tend to produce less viable F1 hybrids owing to an increased probability of mito-nuclear incompatibilities. We test this prediction using data on reciprocal hybrid viability and molecular evolution rates from a clade of freshwater fishes, Centrarchidae. As predicted, species with accelerated mitochondrial evolution tend to be the worse maternal parent for F1 hybrids, providing the first comparative evidence for a systematic basis to Darwin's corollary. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that mito-nuclear incompatibilities can play an important role in reproductive isolation. Such asymmetrical reproductive isolation may help explain the asymmetrical mitochondrial introgression observed between many hybridizing species. However, as with any comparative study, we cannot rule out the possibility that our results arise from a mutual correlation with a third variable such as body size. PMID:18245356

  20. Cell-penetrating peptides do not cross mitochondrial membranes even when conjugated to a lipophilic cation: evidence against direct passage through phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides) facilitate the cellular uptake of covalently attached oligonucleotides, proteins and other macromolecules, but the mechanism of their uptake is disputed. Two models are proposed: direct movement through the phospholipid bilayer and endocytic uptake. Mitochondria are a good model system to distinguish between these possibilities, since they have no vesicular transport systems. Furthermore, CPP-mediated delivery of macromolecules to the mitochondrial matrix would be a significant breakthrough in the study of mitochondrial function and dysfunction, and could also lead to new therapies for diseases caused by mitochondrial damage. Therefore we investigated whether two CPPs, penetratin and Tat, could act as mitochondrial delivery vectors. We also determined whether conjugation of the lipophilic cation TPP (triphenylphosphonium) to penetratin or Tat facilitated their uptake into mitochondria, since TPP leads to uptake of attached molecules into mitochondria driven by the membrane potential. Neither penetratin nor Tat, nor their TPP conjugates, are internalized by isolated mitochondria, indicating that these CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers. Tat and TPP–Tat are taken up by cells, but they accumulate in endosomes and do not reach mitochondria. We conclude that CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, and therefore cannot deliver macromolecules directly to mitochondria. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of uptake of CPPs by cells. The lack of direct movement of CPPs through mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, along with the observed endosomal accumulation of Tat and TPP–Tat in cells, makes it unlikely that CPPs enter cells by direct membrane passage, and instead favours cellular uptake via an endocytic pathway. PMID:15270716

  1. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chupin, Stéphanie; Baron, Stéphanie; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Vessières, Emilie; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM), resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM) it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed. PMID:26684010

  2. SiO2 nanoparticle-induced impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism in hepatocytes directly and through a Kupffer cell-mediated pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Tingting; Sun, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    The liver has been shown to be a primary target organ for SiO2 nanoparticles in vivo, and may be highly susceptible to damage by these nanoparticles. However, until now, research focusing on the potential toxic effects of SiO2 nanoparticles on mitochondria-associated energy metabolism in hepatocytes has been lacking. In this work, SiO2 nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter were evaluated for their ability to induce dysfunction of mitochondrial energy metabolism. First, a buffalo rat liver (BRL) cell line was directly exposed to SiO2 nanoparticles, which induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial damage accompanied by decreases in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, enzymatic expression in the Krebs cycle, and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV. Second, the role of rat-derived Kupffer cells was evaluated. The supernatants from Kupffer cells treated with SiO2 nanoparticles were transferred to stimulate BRL cells. We observed that SiO2 nanoparticles had the ability to activate Kupffer cells, leading to release of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species from these cells and subsequently to inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity in BRL cells. PMID:24959077

  3. Mitochondrial maintenance failure in aging and role of sexual dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression changes during aging are partly conserved across species, and suggest that oxidative stress, inflammation and proteotoxicity result from mitochondrial malfunction and abnormal mitochondrial-nuclear signaling. Mitochondrial maintenance failure may result from trade-offs between mitochondrial turnover versus growth and reproduction, sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and genetic conflicts resulting from uni-parental mitochondrial transmission, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear mutations and loss of epigenetic regulation. Aging phenotypes and interventions are often sex-specific, indicating that both male and female sexual differentiation promote mitochondrial failure and aging. Studies in mammals and invertebrates implicate autophagy, apoptosis, AKT, PARP, p53 and FOXO in mediating sex-specific differences in stress resistance and aging. The data support a model where the genes Sxl in Drosophila, sdc-2 in C. elegans, and Xist in mammals regulate mitochondrial maintenance across generations and in aging. Several interventions that increase life span cause a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt), and UPRmt is also observed during normal aging, indicating hormesis. The UPRmt may increase life span by stimulating mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, and/or by inhibiting the production of hormones and toxic metabolites. The data suggest that metazoan life span interventions may act through a common hormesis mechanism involving liver UPRmt, mitochondrial maintenance and sexual differentiation. PMID:25447815

  4. Trisomy 15 mosaicism and uniparental disomy (UPD) in a liveborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Milunsky, J.M.; Wyandt, H.E.; Milunsky, A.

    1996-01-22

    We describe a liveborn infant with uniparental disomy (UPD) with trisomy 15 mosaicism. Third trimester amniocentesis yielded a 46,XX/47,XX,+15 karyotype. Symmetrical growth retardation, distinct craniofacies, congenital heart disease, severe hypotonia and minor skeletal anomalies were noted. The infant died at 6 weeks of life. Peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes were {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} 46,XX in 100 cells. Parental lymphocyte chromosomes were normal. Skin biopsy showed 47,XX,+15 in 80% of fibroblasts and results were equivalent in fibroblasts from autopsy lung tissue. Molecular analysis revealed maternal uniparental heterodisomy for chromosome 15 in the 46,XX cell line. We describe an emerging phenotype of trisomy 15 mosaicism, confirm that more than one tissue should be studied in all cases of suspected mosaicism, and suggest that UPD be considered in all such cases. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Direct real-time quantification of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in permeabilized skeletal muscle myofibers.

    PubMed

    Lark, Daniel S; Torres, Maria J; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) efficiency, defined as the ATP-to-O ratio, is a critical feature of mitochondrial function that has been implicated in health, aging, and disease. To date, however, the methods to measure ATP/O have primarily relied on indirect approaches or entail parallel rather than simultaneous determination of ATP synthesis and O2 consumption rates. The purpose of this project was to develop and validate an approach to determine the ATP/O ratio in permeabilized fiber bundles (PmFBs) from simultaneous measures of ATP synthesis (JATP) and O2 consumption (JO2 ) rates in real time using a custom-designed apparatus. JO2 was measured via a polarigraphic oxygen sensor and JATP via fluorescence using an enzyme-linked assay system (hexokinase II, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) linked to NADPH production. Within the dynamic linear range of the assay system, ADP-stimulated increases in steady-state JATP mirrored increases in steady-state JO2 (r(2) = 0.91, P < 0.0001, n = 57 data points). ATP/O ratio was less than one under low rates of respiration (15 μM ADP) but increased to more than two at moderate (200 μM ADP) and maximal (2,000 μM ADP) rates of respiration with an interassay coefficient of variation of 24.03, 16.72, and 11.99%, respectively. Absolute and relative (to mechanistic) ATP/O ratios were lower in PmFBs (2.09 ± 0.251, 84%) compared with isolated mitochondria (2.44 ± 0.124, 98%). ATP/O ratios in PmFBs were not affected by the activity of adenylate kinase or creatine kinase. These findings validate an enzyme-linked respiratory clamp system for measuring OXPHOS efficiency in PmFBs and provide evidence that OXPHOS efficiency increases as energy demand increases. PMID:27335172

  6. A Fetus with Hb Bart's Disease Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy for Chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Au, Patrick K C; Kan, Anita S Y; Tang, Mary H Y; Leung, Kwok Y; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Tang, Tommy W F; Lau, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    We here report an unusual case of Hb Bart's (γ4) disease. Thalassemia screening of a couple showed that the wife was an α(0)-thalassemia (α(0)-thal) carrier and her husband's mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was normal. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed at 13 weeks' gestation for positive Down syndrome screening and chromosomal study of the cultured CVS showed a normal karyotype. Ultrasound examination at 22 weeks' gestation showed fetal cardiomegaly and raised middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity. Cordocentesis confirmed fetal anemia and showed Hb Bart's disease. Multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) for α-thal deletions on DNA extracted from the CVS showed the presence of a homozygous α(0)-thal - -(SEA) (Southeast Asian) deletion. The husband was found to be a carrier of the α(+)-thal -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion. Non paternity was excluded by fluorescent PCR using short tandem repeat (STR) markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. A de novo terminal deletion of chromosome 16 was excluded by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Detection of uniparental disomy (UPD), using STR markers on chromosome 16 showed maternal uniparental isodisomy from 16pter to 16p13.2, and uniparental heterodisomy from 16p13.13 to 16qter. PMID:26574185

  7. The Genetic History of Peruvian Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas: Uniparental DNA Patterns among Autochthonous Amazonian and Andean Populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José R; Lacerda, Daniela R; Acosta, Oscar; Jota, Marilza S; Robles-Ruiz, Paulo; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Paz-Y-Miño, César; Fujita, Ricardo; Santos, Fabricio R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the genetic history of the Quechua-Lamistas, inhabitants of the Lamas Province in the San Martin Department, Peru, who speak their own distinct variety of the Quechua family of languages. It has been suggested that different pre-Columbian ethnic groups from the Peruvian Amazonia, like the Motilones or "shaven heads", assimilated the Quechua language and then formed the current native population of Lamas. However, many Quechua-Lamistas claim to be direct descendants of the Chankas, a famous pre-Columbian indigenous group that escaped from Inca rule in the Andes. To investigate the Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas' ancestries, we compared uniparental genetic profiles (17 STRs of Q-M3 Y-chromosome and mtDNA complete control region haplotypes) among autochthonous Amazonian and Andean populations from Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses indicate a fairly heterogeneous ancestry for the Quechua-Lamistas, while they are closely related to their neighbours who speak Amazonian languages, presenting no direct relationships with populations from the region where the ancient Chankas lived. On the other hand, the genetic profiles of self-identified Chanka descendants living in Andahuaylas (located in the Apurimac Department, Peru, in the Central Andes) were closely related to those living in Huancavelica and the assumed Chanka Confederation area before the Inca expansion. PMID:26879156

  8. Direct inhibition of plant mitochondrial respiration by elevated CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Meler, M.A.; Drake, B.G.; Ribas-Carbo, M.; Siedow, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    Doubling the concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} often inhibits plant respiration, but the mechanistic basis of this effect is unknown. We investigated the direct effects of increasing the concentration of CO{sub 2} by 360 {mu}L L{sup -1} above ambient on O{sub 2} uptake in isolated mitochondria from soybean (Glycine max L. cv Ransom) cotyledons. Increasing the CO{sub 2} concentration inhibited the oxidation of succinate, external NADH, and succinate and external NADH combined. The inhibition was greater when mitochondria were preincubated for 10 min in the presence of the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration inhibited the salicylhydroxamic acid-resistant cytochrome pathway. We also investigated the direct effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentration on the activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and found that the activity of both enzymes was inhibited. The kinetics of inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase were time-dependent. The level of SDH inhibition depended on the concentration of succinate in the reaction mixture. Direct inhibition of respiration by elevated CO{sub 2} in plants and intact tissues may be due at least in part to the inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and SDH. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fibroadenoma in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11p15.5.

    PubMed

    Takama, Yuichi; Kubota, Akio; Nakayama, Masahiro; Higashimoto, Ken; Jozaki, Kosuke; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2014-12-01

    Herein is described a case of breast fibroadenomas in a 16-year-old girl with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 11p15.5. She was clinically diagnosed with BWS and direct closure was performed for an omphalocele at birth. Subtotal and 90% pancreatectomy were performed for nesidioblastosis at the ages 2 months and 8 years, respectively. Bilateral multiple breast fibroadenomas were noted at the age of 16 and 17 years. In this case, paternal UPD of chromosome 11p15.5 was identified on microsatellite marker analysis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, and UPD of chromosome 11p15 is a risk factor for BWS-associated tumorigenicity. Chromosome 11p15.5 consists of imprinting domains of IGF2, the expression of which is associated with the tumorigenesis of various breast cancers. This case suggests that fibroadenomas occurred in association with BWS. PMID:25521982

  10. Are mutagenic non D-loop direct repeat motifs in mitochondrial DNA under a negative selection pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Lakshmi Narayanan; Gruber, Jan; Halliwell, Barry; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2015-01-01

    Non D-loop direct repeats (DRs) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been commonly implicated in the mutagenesis of mtDNA deletions associated with neuromuscular disease and ageing. Further, these DRs have been hypothesized to put a constraint on the lifespan of mammals and are under a negative selection pressure. Using a compendium of 294 mammalian mtDNA, we re-examined the relationship between species lifespan and the mutagenicity of such DRs. Contradicting the prevailing hypotheses, we found no significant evidence that long-lived mammals possess fewer mutagenic DRs than short-lived mammals. By comparing DR counts in human mtDNA with those in selectively randomized sequences, we also showed that the number of DRs in human mtDNA is primarily determined by global mtDNA properties, such as the bias in synonymous codon usage (SCU) and nucleotide composition. We found that SCU bias in mtDNA positively correlates with DR counts, where repeated usage of a subset of codons leads to more frequent DR occurrences. While bias in SCU and nucleotide composition has been attributed to nucleotide mutational bias, mammalian mtDNA still exhibit higher SCU bias and DR counts than expected from such mutational bias, suggesting a lack of negative selection against non D-loop DRs. PMID:25855815

  11. Negative regulation of mitochondrial transcription by mitochondrial topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, Stefan; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Pommier, Yves; Bornholz, Beatrice; Kalfalah, Faiza; Zhang, Hongliang; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; von Kleist-Retzow, Jürgen-Christoph; Hillebrand, Frank; Schaal, Heiner; Mielke, Christian; Christensen, Morten O.; Boege, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial topoisomerase I is a genetically distinct mitochondria-dedicated enzyme with a crucial but so far unknown role in the homeostasis of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Here, we present data suggesting a negative regulatory function in mitochondrial transcription or transcript stability. Deficiency or depletion of mitochondrial topoisomerase I increased mitochondrial transcripts, whereas overexpression lowered mitochondrial transcripts, depleted respiratory complexes I, III and IV, decreased cell respiration and raised superoxide levels. Acute depletion of mitochondrial topoisomerase I triggered neither a nuclear mito-biogenic stress response nor compensatory topoisomerase IIβ upregulation, suggesting the concomitant increase in mitochondrial transcripts was due to release of a local inhibitory effect. Mitochondrial topoisomerase I was co-immunoprecipitated with mitochondrial RNA polymerase. It selectively accumulated and rapidly exchanged at a subset of nucleoids distinguished by the presence of newly synthesized RNA and/or mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The inactive Y559F-mutant behaved similarly without affecting mitochondrial transcripts. In conclusion, mitochondrial topoisomerase I dampens mitochondrial transcription and thereby alters respiratory capacity. The mechanism involves selective association of the active enzyme with transcriptionally active nucleoids and a direct interaction with mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The inhibitory role of topoisomerase I in mitochondrial transcription is strikingly different from the stimulatory role of topoisomerase I in nuclear transcription. PMID:23982517

  12. Robertsonian (15q;15q) translocation in a child with Angelman syndrome: Evidence of uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Tonk, V.; Schultz, R.A.; Wilson, G.N.; Schultz, R.A.

    1996-12-30

    A balanced Robertsonian translocation 45,XY,t(15q15q) was detected in a patient with mental retardation, microcephaly, and hypertonia. Deletion of the 15q11q13 region was unlikely based on fluorescence in situ hybridization studies that revealed hybridization of appropriate DNA probes to both arms of the Robertsonian chromosome. Inheritance of alleles from 13 highly polymorphic DNA markers on chromosome 15 showed paternal uniparental isodisomy. The clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular results are consistent with a diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable. PMID:26501689

  14. Biparental inheritance of organelles in Pelargonium: evidence for intergenomic recombination of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Janina; Weihe, Andreas; Pohlheim, Frank; Börner, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While uniparental transmission of mtDNA is widespread and dominating in eukaryotes leaving mutation as the major source of genotypic diversity, recently, biparental inheritance of mitochondrial genes has been demonstrated in reciprocal crosses of Pelargonium zonale and P. inquinans. The thereby arising heteroplasmy carries the potential for recombination between mtDNAs of different descent, i.e. between the parental mitochondrial genomes. We have analyzed these Pelargonium hybrids for mitochondrial intergenomic recombination events by examining differences in DNA blot hybridization patterns of the mitochondrial genes atp1 and cob. Further investigation of these genes and their flanking regions using nucleotide sequence polymorphisms and PCR revealed DNA segments in the progeny, which contained both P. zonale and P. inquinans sequences suggesting an intergenomic recombination in hybrids of Pelargonium. This turns Pelargonium into an interesting subject for studies of recombination and evolutionary dynamics of mitochondrial genomes. PMID:23053540

  15. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed. PMID:21902672

  16. De novo 11q13.4q14.3 tetrasomy with uniparental isodisomy for 11q14.3qter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Xu, Huihui; Ye, Hui; Hu, Qin; Chen, Yingwei; Qiu, Wenjuan

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial triplications in conjunction with uniparental disomy (UPD) have been rarely reported. Here we report on a patient with de novo triplication at 11q13.4-q14.3 and UPD for 11q14.3-qter. Chromosomal analysis showed a karyotype of 46, XYqh+, der (11), and normal parental karyotypes. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array detected an 18.7 Mb copy number gain consistent with tetrasomy for 11q13.4-q14.3 (chr11:71,002,347 bp-89,725,167 bp, hg19) and absence of heterozygosity for a 45 Mb stretch on 11q and consistent with uniparental isodisomy at 11q14.3-qter (chr11:89,843,477 bp-134,930,689 bp, hg19) in our patient. FISH analysis using two probes on both sides of the tetrasomic region showed an inverted 11q13.4-q14.3 region between two direct oriented 11q13.4-q14.3 segments (11q13.4-q14.3::11q14.3-q13.4::11q13.4-qter). Previously reported features of duplication overlapping 11q13-q14 showed clinical variability. Our patient presented with some of those frequently described features, such as development delay, facial dysmorphism, and microcephaly but without congenital heart disease. Moreover, our patient had in addition a brain anomaly (absence of cerebellar vermis and partial absence of corpus callosum) which has not been reported. To our knowledge, this is the sixth patient reported an intrachromosomal triplication together with UPD. Interstitial 11q duplication overlapping 11q13-q14 is associated with intellectual disability/development delay, microcephaly, and facial dysmorphism but also other malformations. PMID:26061664

  17. Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15: A milder phenotype?

    SciTech Connect

    Bottani, A.; Robinson, W.P.; DeLoizer-Blanchet, C.D.; Engel, E.; Morris, M.A.; Schmitt, Thun-Hohenstein, L.; Schinzel, A.

    1994-05-15

    The Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, seizures, gait disturbances, and a typical age-dependent facial phenotype. Most cases are due to an interstitial deletion on the maternally inherited chromosome 15, in the critical region q11-q13. Rare cases also result from paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In a group of 14 patients with sporadic AS diagnosed in Switzerland, we found 2 unrelated females with paternal isodisomy for the entire chromosome 15. Their phenotypes were milder than usually seen in this syndrome: one girl did not show the typical AS facial changes; both patients had late-onset mild seizures; as they grow older, they had largely undisturbed gross motor functions, in particular no severe ataxia. Both girls were born to older fathers (45 and 43 years old, respectively). The apparent association of a relatively milder phenotype in AS with paternal uniparental disomy will have to be confirmed by detailed clinical descriptions of further patients. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Myoclonus-dystonia and Silver-Russell syndrome resulting from maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M B; Bytyci Telegrafi, A; Stinnett, V; Umeh, C C; Mari, Z; Dawson, T M; Bodurtha, J; Batista, D A S

    2013-10-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a movement disorder that is often associated with mutations in epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), a maternally imprinted gene at 7q21.3. We report a 24-year-old male with short stature (<5th percentile) and a movement disorder clinically consistent with M-D. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array did not identify significant copy number changes, but revealed three long continuous stretches of homozygosity on chromosome 7 suggestive of uniparental disomy. Parental SNP arrays confirmed that the proband had maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) with regions of heterodisomy and isodisomy. mUPD7 is the cause of approximately 5-10% of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS), a disorder characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. Although SRS was not suspected in our patient, these findings explain his short stature. SGCE methylation testing showed loss of the unmethylated paternal allele. Our findings provide a unifying diagnosis for his short stature and M-D and help to optimize his medication regimen. In conclusion, we show that M-D is a clinical feature that may be associated with SRS due to mUPD7. Individuals with mUPD7 should be monitored for the development of movement disorders. Conversely, individuals with M-D and short stature should be evaluated for SRS. PMID:23237735

  19. Flexible compensation of uniparental care: female poison frogs take over when males disappear

    PubMed Central

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Huber, Ludwig; Hödl, Walter; Ringler, Max

    2015-01-01

    Parental care systems are shaped by costs and benefits to each sex of investing into current versus future progeny. Flexible compensatory parental care is mainly known in biparental species, particularly where parental desertion or reduction of care by 1 parent is common. The other parent can then compensate this loss by either switching parental roles and/or by increasing its own parental effort. In uniparental species, desertion of the caregiver usually leads to total brood loss. In the poison frog, Allobates femoralis, obligatory tadpole transport (TT) is generally performed by males, whereas females abandon their clutches after oviposition. Nevertheless, in a natural population we previously observed 7.8% of TT performed by females, which we could link to the absence of the respective fathers. In the following experiment, under laboratory conditions, all tested A. femoralis females flexibly took over parental duties, but only when their mates were removed. Our findings provide clear evidence for compensatory flexibility in a species with unisexual parental care. Contrary to the view of amphibian parental care as being stereotypical and fixed, these results demonstrate behavioral flexibility as an adaptive response to environmental and social uncertainty. Behavioral flexibility might actually represent a crucial step in the evolutionary transition from uniparental to biparental care in poison frogs. We suspect that across animal species flexible parental roles are much more common than previously thought and suggest the idea of a 3-dimensional continuum regarding flexibility, parental involvement, and timing, when thinking about the evolution of parental care. PMID:26167099

  20. Uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 14 in two cases: An abnormal child and a normal adult

    SciTech Connect

    Papenhausen, P.R.; Mueller, O.T.; Sutcliffe, M.; Diamond, T.M.; Kousseff, B.G.; Johnson, V.P.

    1995-11-20

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of a number of different chromosomes has been found in association with abnormal phenotypes. A growing body of evidence for an imprinting effect involving chromosome 14 has been accumulating. We report on a case of paternal UPD of chromosome 14 studied in late gestation due to polyhydramnios and a ventral wall hernia. A prenatal karyotype documented a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation. The baby was born prematurely with hairy forehead, retrognathia, mild puckering of the lips and finger contractures. Hypotonia has persisted since birth and at age one year, a tracheostomy for laryngomalacia and gastrostomy for feeding remain necessary. Absence of maternal VNTR polymorphisms and homozygosity of paternal polymorphisms using chromosome 14 specific probes at D14S22 and D14S13 loci indicated paternal uniparental isodisomy (pUPID). Parental chromosomes were normal. We also report on a case of maternal LTPD in a normal patient with a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation and a history of multiple miscarriages. Five previous reports of chromosome 14 UPD suggest that an adverse developmental effect may be more severe whenever the UPD is paternal in origin. This is the second reported patient with paternal UPD and the fifth reported with maternal UPD, and only few phenotypic similarities are apparent. Examination of these chromosome 14 UPD cases of maternal and paternal origin suggests that there are syndromic imprinting effects. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Directional mitochondrial introgression and character displacement due to reproductive interference in two closely related Pterostichus ground beetle species.

    PubMed

    Kosuda, S; Sasakawa, K; Ikeda, H

    2016-06-01

    Reproductive interference due to interspecific hybridization can lead to character displacement among related species with overlapping ranges. However, no studies have examined which reproductive traits are most important in reducing reproductive interference. We conducted molecular analyses of two nuclear genes (28S and Wingless) and a mitochondrial gene (COI) from two closely related ground beetle species, Pterostichus thunbergi and Pterostichus habui (Coleoptera: Carabidae), with overlapping distributions. In addition, we examined four reproductive traits (body size, organ morphologies of intromittent and non-intromittent male genital organs, and female reproductive period) in sympatric and allopatric habitats. We compared male genital morphology using geometric morphometric analysis. The species determined by morphology were classified into separate groups based on the phylogenetic tree constructed by the nuclear gene (Wingless). However, according to the mitochondrial genes examined, P. thunbergi was not monophyletic, whereas at the sympatric sites, these species formed a monophyletic clade. This incongruence suggests that interspecific hybridization and subsequent mitochondrial introgression from P. habui to P. thunbergi have occurred. Concerning genital morphology, both of the intromittent and nonintromittent organs of P. thunbergi differed more from P. habui at the sympatric sites than between allopatric sites, suggesting reproductive character displacement. Pterostichus thunbergi, which likely arrived in P. habui habitat in small numbers, would have experienced stronger selection pressures than P. habui. PMID:26914395

  2. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs. PMID:26243311

  3. [Mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chang-Huang

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondria is an intracellular double membrane-bound structure and it can provide energy for intracellular metabolism. The metabolism includes Krebs cycle, beta-oxidation and lipid synthesis. The density of mitochondria is different in various tissues dependent upon the demands of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial diseases can occur by defects either in mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 mRNAs that are translated in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial genetic diseases are most resulted from defects in the mtDNA which may be point mutations, deletions, or mitochondrial DNA depletion. These patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial diseases include sporadic, maternally inherited, or of Mendelian inheritance. Mitochondrial DNA depletion is caused by defects in the nuclear genes that are responsible for maintenance of integrity of mtDNA or deoxyribonucelotide pools and mtDNA biogenesis. The mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS) includes the following categories: progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), predominant myopathy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), sensory-ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) and hepato-encephalopathy. The most common tissues or organs involved in MDS and related disorders include the brain, liver and muscles. These involved genes are divided into two groups including 1) DNA polymerase gamma (POLG, POLG2) and Twinkle genes whose products function directly at the mtDNA replication fork, and 2) adenine nucleotide translocator 1, thymidine phosphorylase, thymidine kinase 2, deoxyguanosine kinase, ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase ligase, MPV17 whose products supply the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pools needed for mtDNA replication, and possible mutation in the RRM2B gene. The development has provided new information about the importance of the biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotides for mtDNA replication

  4. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome, leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes showed that the noncoding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, in each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection, promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission. PMID:27270106

  5. The human mitochondrial transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Tim R.; Neph, Shane; Dinger, Marcel E.; Crawford, Joanna; Smith, Martin A.; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Haugen, Eric; Bracken, Cameron P.; Rackham, Oliver; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Mattick, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human mitochondrial genome comprises a distinct genetic system transcribed as precursor polycistronic transcripts that are subsequently cleaved to generate individual mRNAs, tRNAs and rRNAs. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the human mitochondrial transcriptome across multiple cell lines and tissues. Using directional deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends, we demonstrate wide variation in mitochondrial transcript abundance and precisely resolve transcript processing and maturation events. We identify previously undescribed transcripts, including small RNAs, and observe the enrichment of several nuclear RNAs in mitochondria. Using high-throughput in vivo DNaseI footprinting, we establish the global profile of DNA-binding protein occupancy across the mitochondrial genome at single nucleotide resolution, revealing regulatory features at mitochondrial transcription initiation sites and functional insights into disease-associated variants. This integrated analysis of the mitochondrial transcriptome reveals unexpected complexity in the regulation, expression, and processing of mitochondrial RNA, and provides a resource for future studies of mitochondrial function (accessed at mitochondria.matticklab.com). PMID:21854988

  6. Paternal Uniparental Isodisomy of Chromosome 6 Causing a Complex Syndrome Including Complete IFN-γ Receptor 1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Grant, Audrey; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Bustamante, Jacinta; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Chapgier, Ariane; Rose, Yoann; Jannière, Lucile; Rizzardi, Elena; Zhang, Qiuping; Shanahan, Catherine M; Viollet, Louis; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Abel, Laurent; Ruga, Ezia Maria; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacterial species. Interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is a genetic etiology of MSMD. We describe the clinical and genetic features of a seven-year-old Italian boy suffering from MSMD associated with a complex phenotype, including neonatal hyperglycemia, neuromuscular disease, and dysmorphic features. The child also developed necrotizing pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi. The child is homozygous for a nonsense mutation in exon 3 of IFNGR1 as a result of paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of the entire chromosome 6. This is the first reported case of uniparental disomy resulting in a complex phenotype including MSMD. PMID:20186794

  7. XX true hemaphroditism in Southern Africa blacks: Exclusion of SRY sequences and uniparental disomy of the X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Spurdle, A.B.; Shankman, S.; Ramsay, M.

    1995-01-02

    A molecular investigation of 16 Bantu-speaking Black XX true hermaphrodites was undertaken in an attempt to determine the cause of the disorder. Y-specific sequences, including sequences mapping to the sex-determining region of the Y, were shown to be absent from lymphocyte tissue of all 16 patients tested. Y chromosome sequences were also absent from the ovarian and testicular components of both ovotestes of a single XX true hermaphrodite, thus excluding gonadal mosaicism involving Y chromosome sequences. Since there is evidence of Xp genes involved in testis determination/differentiation, uniparental disomy of the X chromosome was investigated in 14 XXTH families. Uniparental disomy was excluded in 12 of the 14 families, and isodisomy was excluded in the remaining two cases. 29 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. ...

  9. Clinical Features of Three Girls With Mosaic Genome-Wide Paternal Uniparental Isodisomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, Jennifer M.; Conlin, Laura K.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Dubbs, Holly A.; Harris, Mary Catherine; Izumi, Kosuke; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol; Mulchandani, Surabhi; Saitta, Sulagna; States, Lisa J.; Swarr, Daniel T.; Wilkens, Alisha B.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Zelley, Kristin; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Nichols, Kim E.; Palladino, Andrew A.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe three subjects with mosaic genome-wide paternal uniparental isodisomy (GWpUPD) each of whom presented initially with overgrowth, hemihyperplasia (HH), and hyperinsulinism (HI). Due to the severity of findings and the presence of additional features, SNP array testing was performed, which demonstrated mosaic GWpUPD. Comparing these individuals to 10 other live-born subjects reported in the literature, the predominant phenotype is that of pUPD11 and notable for a very high incidence of tumor development. Our subjects developed non-metastatic tumors of the adrenal gland, kidney, and/or liver.AllthreesubjectshadpancreatichyperplasiaresultinginHI. Notably, our subjects to date display minimal features of other diseases associated with paternal UPD loci. Both children who survived the neonatal period have displayed near-normal cognitive development, likely due to a favorable tissue distribution of the mosaicism.Tounderstandthe rangeofUPDmosaicismlevels, we studied multiple tissues using SNP array analysis and detected levels of 5–95%, roughly correlating with the extent of tissue involvement.Giventherapidityoftumorgrowthandthedifficulty distinguishing malignant and benign tumors in these GWpUPD subjects, we have utilized increased frequency of ultrasound (US) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) screening in the first years of life. Because of a later age of onset of additional tumors, continued tumor surveillance into adolescence may need to be considered in these rare patients. PMID:23804593

  10. Comparison of phenotype in uniparental disomy and deletion Prader-Willi syndrome: Sex specific differences

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Langlois, S.; Robinson, W.P.

    1996-10-16

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results primarily from either a paternal deletion of 15q11-q13 or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15. Birth parameters and clinical presentation of 79 confirmed UPD cases and 43 deletion patients were compared in order to test whether any manifestations differ between the two groups. There were no major clinical differences between the two classes analyzed as a whole, other than the presence of hypopigmentation predominantly in the deletion group. However, there was a significant bias in sex-ratio (P<.001) limited to the UPD group with a predominance (68%) of males. An equal number of males and females was observed in the deletion group. When analyzed by sex, several significant differences between the UPD and deletion groups were observed. Female UPD patients were found to be less severely affected than female deletion patients in terms of length of gavage feeding and a later onset of hyperphagia. Although these traits are likely to be influenced by external factors, they may reflect a milder presentation of female UPD patients which could explain the observed sex bias by causing under-ascertainment of female UPD. Alternatively, there may be an effect of sex on either early trisomy 15 survival or the probability of somatic loss of a chromosome from a trisomic conceptus. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Uniparental disomy of the entire X chromosome in a female with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Quan, F; Janas, J; Toth-Fejel, S; Johnson, D B; Wolford, J K; Popovich, B W

    1997-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, progressive, X-linked muscle-wasting disorder with an incidence of approximately 1/3,500 male births. Females are also affected, in rare instances. The manifestation of mild to severe symptoms in female carriers of dystrophin mutations is often the result of the preferential inactivation of the X chromosome carrying the normal dystrophin gene. The severity of the symptoms is dependent on the proportion of cells that have inactivated the normal X chromosome. A skewed pattern of X inactivation is also responsible for the clinical manifestation of DMD in females carrying X;autosome translocations, which disrupt the dystrophin gene. DMD may also be observed in females with Turner syndrome (45,X), if the remaining X chromosome carries a DMD mutation. We report here the case of a karyotypically normal female affected with DMD as a result of homozygosity for a deletion of exon 50 of the dystrophin gene. PCR analysis of microsatellite markers spanning the length of the X chromosome demonstrated that homozygosity for the dystrophin gene mutation was caused by maternal isodisomy for the entire X chromosome. This finding demonstrates that uniparental isodisomy of the X chromosome is an additional mechanism for the expression of X-linked recessive disorders. The proband's clinical presentation is consistent with the absence of imprinted genes (i.e., genes that are selectively expressed based on the parent of origin) on the X chromosome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8981959

  12. Complete paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 resulting in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Fassihi, H; Wessagowit, V; Ashton, G H S; Moss, C; Ward, R; Denyer, J; Mellerio, J E; McGrath, J A

    2005-01-01

    Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is an autosomal recessive mechanobullous disorder that results from loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the basement membrane component, laminin 5. Typically, there are frameshift, splice site or nonsense mutations on both alleles of either the LAMA3, LAMB3 or LAMC2 genes, with affected individuals inheriting one mutated allele from each parent. In this report, we describe a patient with Herlitz JEB in whom DNA analysis revealed homozygosity for the recurrent nonsense mutation R635X in LAMB3, located on chromosome 1q32.2. However, screening of parental DNA showed that although the patient's father was a heterozygous carrier of this mutation, the mother's DNA showed only wild-type sequence. Subsequent genotype analysis using 13 microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 1 revealed that the affected child was homozygous for the entire series of markers tested and that all of the alleles originated from the father. These results indicate that the Herlitz JEB phenotype in this patient is due to complete paternal isodisomy of chromosome 1 and reduction to homozygosity of the mutant LAMB3 gene locus. This is the fourth case of uniparental disomy to be described in Herlitz JEB, but it represents the first example of complete paternal isodisomy for chromosome 1 with a pathogenic mutation in the LAMB3 gene. These findings have important implications for mutation screening in JEB and for genetic counselling. PMID:15663509

  13. Uniparental isodisomy for paternal 7p and maternal 7q in a child with growth retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Eggerding, F. A.; Schonberg, S. A.; Chehab, F. F.; Norton, M. E.; Cox, V. A.; Epstein, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Uniparental isodisomy resulting from the simultaneous presence of isochromosomes of the p and q arms of a chromosome and absence of a normal homologue is an exceptionally rare event. We have observed a growth-retarded female infant in whom the normal chromosome 7 homologues were replaced by what appeared cytogenetically to be isochromosomes of 7p and 7q. Polymorphic microsatellite loci spanning the length of 7p and 7q were analyzed in the proband and her parents to ascertain the parental origin and extent of heterozygosity of the proband's rearranged chromosomes. These studies demonstrated that the 7p alleles of the proband were derived only from the father, the 7q alleles were derived only from the mother, and there was homozygosity for all chromosome 7 loci analyzed. The mechanisms leading to the formation of the proband's isochromosomes could reflect abnormalities of cell division occurring at meiosis, postfertilization mitosis, or both. We believe that the present case may result from incomplete mitotic interchange in the pericentromeric regions of chromosome 7 homologues, with resolution by sister-chromatid reunion in an early, if not first, zygotic division. Phenotypically, our proband resembled three previously reported cases of maternal isodisomy for chromosome 7, suggesting that lack of paternal genes from 7q may result in a phenotype of short stature and growth retardation. Images Figure 1 PMID:7913578

  14. A search for uniparental disomy associated with Cornelia de Lange syndrome and with spontaneous abortion

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.J.; Upadhyaya, M.; Clarke, A.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) is the inheritance of a pair of homologous chromosomes from one parent with no corresponding homologue from the other, in an individual with an apparently normal karyotype. Polymorphic DNA markers for the appropriate chromosome will therefore lack alleles from the non-contributing parent. There may be pathological consequences of UPD if an imprinted gene(s) resides on the affected chromosome. A number of human developmental disorders of unknown etiology, including Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and spontaneous abortion, may be caused by imprinted genes yet to be discovered. There are a number of reports of chromosome 3q rearrangements associated with CdLS, therefore excluding whole-chromosome 3 UPD as a cause in these patients. We are also examining DNA markers for all autosomes in a series of 42 karyotypically normal spontaneous abortions and their parents. To date, no UPD has been observed for chromosomes 3, 17, 20, 21 and 22. Further work is in progress, both here and using the DNA typing facilities at Geneathon, France.

  15. Genome-wide uniparental disomy screen in human discarded morphologically abnormal embryos

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Meixiang; Niu, Wenbin; Yao, Guidong; Sun, Bo; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to be rare in human normal blastocysts, but its frequency in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and its relevance to embryonic self-correction of aneuploid remains unknown. The aim of this study was to detect UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Both discarded morphologically abnormal embryos, including zero-pronuclear zygotes (0PN), one-pronuclear zygotes (1PN), three-pronuclear zygotes (3PN) and 2PN embryos scored as low development potential were cultured into blastocysts then underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Genome-wide UPD screening of the trophectoderm of 241 discarded morphologically abnormal embryo sourced blastocysts showed that UPD occurred in nine embryos. Five embryos exhibited UPDs with euploid chromosomes, and four displayed UPDs with chromosomal aneuploid. The percentage of UPDs among the morphologically abnormal sourced blastocysts was 3.73%, which is significant higher than the percentage observed in normal blastocysts. The frequency of UPD in 3PN-sourced blastocysts was 7.69%, which is significantly higher than that in normal blastocysts. This study provides the first systematic genome-wide profile of UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Our results indicated that UPD may be a common phenomenon in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and may be relevant to human embryonic self-correction. PMID:26194013

  16. Clinical features of three girls with mosaic genome-wide paternal uniparental isodisomy.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Jennifer M; Conlin, Laura K; Bhatti, Tricia R; Dubbs, Holly A; Harris, Mary Catherine; Izumi, Kosuke; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol; Mulchandani, Surabhi; Saitta, Sulagna; States, Lisa J; Swarr, Daniel T; Wilkens, Alisha B; Zackai, Elaine H; Zelley, Kristin; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Nichols, Kim E; Palladino, Andrew A; Spinner, Nancy B; Deardorff, Matthew A

    2013-08-01

    Here we describe three subjects with mosaic genome-wide paternal uniparental isodisomy (GWpUPD) each of whom presented initially with overgrowth, hemihyperplasia (HH), and hyperinsulinism (HI). Due to the severity of findings and the presence of additional features, SNP array testing was performed, which demonstrated mosaic GWpUPD. Comparing these individuals to 10 other live-born subjects reported in the literature, the predominant phenotype is that of pUPD11 and notable for a very high incidence of tumor development. Our subjects developed non-metastatic tumors of the adrenal gland, kidney, and/or liver. All three subjects had pancreatic hyperplasia resulting in HI. Notably, our subjects to date display minimal features of other diseases associated with paternal UPD loci. Both children who survived the neonatal period have displayed near-normal cognitive development, likely due to a favorable tissue distribution of the mosaicism. To understand the range of UPD mosaicism levels, we studied multiple tissues using SNP array analysis and detected levels of 5-95%, roughly correlating with the extent of tissue involvement. Given the rapidity of tumor growth and the difficulty distinguishing malignant and benign tumors in these GWpUPD subjects, we have utilized increased frequency of ultrasound (US) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) screening in the first years of life. Because of a later age of onset of additional tumors, continued tumor surveillance into adolescence may need to be considered in these rare patients. PMID:23804593

  17. Maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 14: association with autosomal recessive rod monochromacy.

    PubMed Central

    Pentao, L; Lewis, R A; Ledbetter, D H; Patel, P I; Lupski, J R

    1992-01-01

    Rod monochromacy (complete congenital achromatopsia) is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait of unknown genetic location. The disorder is characterized by total absence of color discrimination because retinal cone photoreceptors do not develop; systemic features do not occur. A 20-year-old white female with rod monochromacy presented with short stature (less than 5th percentile), mild developmental delay, premature puberty, small hands and feet (length less than 5th percentile), minimal dysmorphism, and a reproductive history of three consecutive first-trimester miscarriages. Cytogenetic analysis showed 45,XX,rob(14;14) in all 30 cells examined. Southern analysis of DNA from the patient and her phenotypically normal mother and two brothers (her father is deceased) ascertained the parental origin of the 14;14 Robertsonian translocation. Analysis of RFLPs associated with nine VNTR probes and two dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms from chromosome 14 demonstrated that the patient had inherited two copies of a single allele, each of which was maternally derived. A fully informative RFLP analysis of three probes from chromosome 14 enabled reconstruction of the paternal haplotype and showed the lack of any paternal contribution to the subject. These data are consistent with maternal isodisomy for all portions of chromosome 14 tested by these markers. This finding suggests that rod monochromacy maps to chromosome 14, and it emphasizes the importance of uniparental isodisomy to provide a putative chromosomal assignment of a gene for a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1347967

  18. Genome-wide uniparental disomy screen in human discarded morphologically abnormal embryos.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Meixiang; Niu, Wenbin; Yao, Guidong; Sun, Bo; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to be rare in human normal blastocysts, but its frequency in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and its relevance to embryonic self-correction of aneuploid remains unknown. The aim of this study was to detect UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Both discarded morphologically abnormal embryos, including zero-pronuclear zygotes (0PN), one-pronuclear zygotes (1PN), three-pronuclear zygotes (3PN) and 2PN embryos scored as low development potential were cultured into blastocysts then underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Genome-wide UPD screening of the trophectoderm of 241 discarded morphologically abnormal embryo sourced blastocysts showed that UPD occurred in nine embryos. Five embryos exhibited UPDs with euploid chromosomes, and four displayed UPDs with chromosomal aneuploid. The percentage of UPDs among the morphologically abnormal sourced blastocysts was 3.73%, which is significant higher than the percentage observed in normal blastocysts. The frequency of UPD in 3PN-sourced blastocysts was 7.69%, which is significantly higher than that in normal blastocysts. This study provides the first systematic genome-wide profile of UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Our results indicated that UPD may be a common phenomenon in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and may be relevant to human embryonic self-correction. PMID:26194013

  19. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  20. Mitochondrial vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-05-26

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  1. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  2. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  3. Prader-Willi syndrome and Tay-Sachs disease in association with mixed maternal uniparental isodisomy and heterodisomy 15 in a girl who also had isochromosome Xq.

    PubMed

    Zeesman, Susan; McCready, Elizabeth; Sadikovic, Bekim; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata Jm

    2015-01-01

    Malsegregation of chromosomes during reproduction can result in uniparental disomy when associated with trisomy rescue, monosomy rescue or gamete complementation. Pathogenicity stemming from uniparental disomy in liveborns results from imprinting disorders or autozygosity for autosomal recessive disorders. We report on a girl with Prader-Willi syndrome and Tay-Sachs disease resulting from maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. The child also had an isochromosome Xq. To further characterize the etiology of the aberrant chromosome 15 and the isochromosome Xq, SNP loci from both chromosomes were assessed in the proband and parents, and genome-wide DNA methylation analysis was performed. SNP and DNA methylation analysis confirmed maternal uniparental heterodisomy around the Prader-Willi locus, while the region around the HEXA locus showed maternal uniparental isodisomy. This result is consistent with trisomy rescue of a maternal meiosis l error in a chromosome 15 with two meiotic recombinations. SNP analysis of the X chromosomes is consistent with a maternal origin for the isochromosome. PMID:25287655

  4. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  5. Importing Mitochondrial Proteins: Machineries and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Koehler, Carla M.; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Lithgow, Trevor; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be imported across one or both mitochondrial membranes. There is an amazingly versatile set of machineries and mechanisms, and at least four different pathways, for the importing and sorting of mitochondrial precursor proteins. The translocases that catalyze these processes are highly dynamic machines driven by the membrane potential, ATP, or redox reactions, and they cooperate with molecular chaperones and assembly complexes to direct mitochondrial proteins to their correct destinations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the importing and sorting of mitochondrial proteins and their contributions to mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19703392

  6. Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Iain P; Al Shahrani, Mesfer; Wainwright, Luke; Heales, Simon J R

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and ATP synthase (complex V) play an essential role in cellular energy production by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. In addition to inborn errors of metabolism, as well as secondary causes from disease pathophysiology, an impairment of oxidative phosphorylation can result from drug toxicity. These 'off-target' pharmacological effects can occur from a direct inhibition of MRC enzyme activity, an induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress, an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, an impairment of mitochondrial membrane structure or a disruption in the replication of mitochondrial DNA. The purpose of this review is to focus on the off-target mitochondrial toxicity associated with both commonly used pharmacotherapies and a topical 'weight loss' agent. The mechanisms of drug-induced mitochondrial impairment will be discussed together with putative therapeutic strategies to counteract the adverse effects of the pharmacotherapy. PMID:26992920

  7. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Sándor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects. PMID:21843534

  8. Maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 by secondary nondisjunction of a initial trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Morichon-Delvallez, N.; Segues, B.; Pinson, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    Three cases of maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 (UD 14) have been described in the literature. In all three cases, the UD was found in carriers of Robertsonian translocations (13q14q or 14q and 14q). Here, we report on a new case of UD for chromosome 14 in a fetus in which the UD arose presumably by secondary nondisjunction of a trisomy 14. Prenatal diagnosis was performed on a 40-year-old woman by trans-abdominal chorionic villi sampling. Cytogenetic analysis showed a confined placental mosaicism (CPM) for trisomy 14 (100% of cells trisomic in short term preparations and 20% trisomic in cultured villi). The ultrasound examination was normal and after counselling the parents agreed to continue the pregnancy. Amniocentesis was performed and a normal 46,XX karyotype was found in the 70 cells examined. Molecular analysis of the parental origin of the fetus`s chromosome 14 was performed using microsatellite DNA markers evenly distributed on chromosome 14. Molecular results suggested a maternal heterodisomy. Another ultrasound examination was normal and after genetic counselling based on the small number of cases reported in the literature, the parents decided to keep the pregnancy. At birth, the clinical examination was normal. In conclusion, among the different mechanisms leading to UD, the correction of an initial trisomy by secondary nondisjunction might also be an important one. CPM is observed in about 2% of CVS studies and theoretically 1/3 of corrected trisomies could result in UD for the chromosomal pair that was originally trisomic. In order to provide adequate genetic counselling in these cases, it will be important to undergo molecular studies in the instances of confined placental mosaicism.

  9. Trisomy 15 mosaicism and uniparental disomy (UPD) in a liveborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Milunsky, J.M. |; Wyandt, H.E.; Amos, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a liveborn infant with UPD in association with trisomy 15 mosaicism. Third trimester amniocentesis was performed for suspected IUGR. Results revealed 46,XX/47,XX,+15. The infant initially had respiratory distress and fed poorly. Symmetrical growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism, excess nuchal folds, a heart murmur, hypermobile joints, minor limb abnormalities, absent spontaneous movement and an abnormal cry were noted. Further study showed complex heart defects, including VSD and PDA, a left choroid plexus cyst, 13 ribs bilaterally, abnormal optic discs, abnormal visual evoked potentials and abnormal auditory brain stem responses. The infant died at 6 weeks of life from cardio-respiratory complications. Blood chromosomes were normal, 46,XX in 100 cells. Parental blood chromosomes were normal. Skin biopsy revealed 46,XX/47,XX,+15 in 40/50 (80%) cells as did autopsy lung tissue. Molecular analysis of the infant`s blood revealed maternal uniparental heterodisomy for chromosome 15 in the 46,XX cell line. Microsatellite analysis demonstrated that the extra chromosome originated from a maternal meiosis I nondisjunction. To our knowledge, this is the first liveborn infant with mosaic trisomy 15 and UPD in the diploid cells. Trisomy 15, heretofore, has been regarded as nonviable, even in mosaic form. While maternal UPD is associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype, mosaicism for trisomy 15 has been reported only when confined to the placenta. UPD in this case generally complicated prediction of the phenotype and raises the question whether all cases with UPD 15 should have more than one tissue studied to determine undetected trisomy 15.

  10. Differentially methylated regions in maternal and paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Muurinen, Mari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Reinius, Lovisa E; Ezer, Sini; Greco, Dario; Kere, Juha

    2014-03-01

    DNA methylation is a hallmark of genomic imprinting and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are found near and in imprinted genes. Imprinted genes are expressed only from the maternal or paternal allele and their normal balance can be disrupted by uniparental disomy (UPD), the inheritance of both chromosomes of a chromosome pair exclusively from only either the mother or the father. Maternal UPD for chromosome 7 (matUPD7) results in Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) with typical features and growth retardation, but no gene has been conclusively implicated in SRS. In order to identify novel DMRs and putative imprinted genes on chromosome 7, we analyzed eight matUPD7 patients, a segmental matUPD7q31-qter, a rare patUPD7 case and ten controls on the Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip with 30 017 CpG methylation probes for chromosome 7. Genome-scale analysis showed highly significant clustering of DMRs only on chromosome 7, including the known imprinted loci GRB10, SGCE/PEG10, and PEG/MEST. We found ten novel DMRs on chromosome 7, two DMRs for the predicted imprinted genes HOXA4 and GLI3 and one for the disputed imprinted gene PON1. Quantitative RT-PCR on blood RNA samples comparing matUPD7, patUPD7, and controls showed differential expression for three genes with novel DMRs, HOXA4, GLI3, and SVOPL. Allele specific expression analysis confirmed maternal only expression of SVOPL and imprinting of HOXA4 was supported by monoallelic expression. These results present the first comprehensive map of parent-of-origin specific DMRs on human chromosome 7, suggesting many new imprinted sites. PMID:24247273

  11. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 16 in offsprings of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) patients treated with colchicine

    SciTech Connect

    Korenstein, A.; Avivi, L.; Ravia, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD), an altered mode of Mendelian inheritance, may reveal expression of recessive alleles due to the loss of heterozygosity, as well as imprinted genes. The mechanism causing UPD can be best elucidated in offsprings of individuals at high risk for chromosomal non-disjunction. Such individuals are Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) patients, who are routinely treated with the antimitotic agent colchicine, and, therefore, are expected to be at an increased risk for aneuploidy. A dominant mode of inheritance was observed in four FMF offsprings having one parent exhibiting the FMF phenotype (homozygote recessive) while the other was free of the mutant allele (as assumed from his ethnic background). Out of these, two exhibited UPD of chromosome 16, which carries the FMF gene, as judged from four different RFLP markers along this chromosome. Since in both case the UPD was of maternal origin, it is suggested that the colchicine-treated FMF mothers contributed two doses of chromosome 16, presumably due to meiotic non-disjunction, followed by a somatic loss of the paternal chromosome 16 in the embryo. The somatic chromosome loss is also assumed to be caused by the antimitotic drug since the mother continued to receive it during pregnancy. Whether the UPD arises from the colchicine treatment, from the high tendency of chromosome 16 to maternal non-disjunction or from both remains to be elucidated. Our results highlighted the importance of taking UPD into account when counseling individuals who are either treated with antimitotic agents or are carriers of recessive mutant alleles which are mapped to chromosomes prone to aneuploidy.

  12. Profound parental bias associated with chromosome 14 acquired uniparental disomy indicates targeting of an imprinted locus.

    PubMed

    Chase, A; Leung, W; Tapper, W; Jones, A V; Knoops, L; Rasi, C; Forsberg, L A; Guglielmelli, P; Zoi, K; Hall, V; Chiecchio, L; Eder-Azanza, L; Bryant, C; Lannfelt, L; Docherty, L; White, H E; Score, J; Mackay, D J G; Vannucchi, A M; Dumanski, J P; Cross, N C P

    2015-10-01

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common finding in myeloid malignancies and typically acts to convert a somatically acquired heterozygous mutation to homozygosity. We sought to identify the target of chromosome 14 aUPD (aUPD14), a recurrent abnormality in myeloid neoplasms and population cohorts of elderly individuals. We identified 29 cases with aUPD14q that defined a minimal affected region (MAR) of 11.2 Mb running from 14q32.12 to the telomere. Exome sequencing (n=7) did not identify recurrently mutated genes, but methylation-specific PCR at the imprinted MEG3-DLK1 locus located within the MAR demonstrated loss of maternal chromosome 14 and gain of paternal chromosome 14 (P<0.0001), with the degree of methylation imbalance correlating with the level of aUPD (r=0.76; P=0.0001). The absence of driver gene mutations in the exomes of three individuals with aUPD14q but no known haematological disorder suggests that aUPD14q may be sufficient to drive clonal haemopoiesis. Analysis of cases with both aUPD14q and JAK2 V617F (n=11) indicated that aUPD14q may be an early event in some cases but a late event in others. We conclude that aUPD14q is a recurrent abnormality that targets an imprinted locus and may promote clonal haemopoiesis either as an initiating event or as a secondary change. PMID:26114957

  13. Uniparental Disomy in Somatic Mosaicism 45,X/46,XY/46,XX Associated with Ambiguous Genitalia.

    PubMed

    Serra, Alexandre; Denzer, Friederike; Hiort, Olaf; Barth, Thomas F; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Barbi, Gotthold; Rettenberger, Günther; Wabitsch, Martin; Just, Walter; Leriche, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) affect the development of chromosomal, gonadal and/or anatomical sex. We analyzed a patient with ambiguous genitalia aiming to correlate the genetic findings with the phenotype. Blood and tissue samples from a male patient with penoscrotal hypospadias were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, karyotyping and FISH. DNA was sequenced for the AR, SRY and DHH genes, and further 26 loci in different sex chromosomes were analyzed by MLPA. The gonosomal origin was evaluated by simple tandem repeat (STR) analysis and SNP array. Histopathology revealed a streak gonad, a fallopian tube and a rudimentary uterus, positive for placental alkaline phosphatase, cytokeratin-7 and c-kit, and negative for estrogen, androgen and progesterone receptors, alpha-inhibin, alpha-1-fetoprotein, β-hCG, and oct-4. Karyotyping showed a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, yet FISH showed both 46,XX/46,XY mosaicism (gonad and urethral plate), 46,XX (uterus and tube) and 46,XY karyotypes (rudimentary testicular tissue). DNA sequencing revealed intact sequences in SOX9, WNT4, NR0B1, NR5A1, CYP21A2, SRY, AR, and DHH. STR analysis showed only one maternal allele for all X chromosome markers (uniparental isodisomy, UPD), with a weaker SRY signal and a 4:1 ratio in the X:Y signal. Our findings suggest that the observed complex DSD phenotype is the result of somatic gonosomal mosaicism and UPD despite a normal blood karyotype. The presence of UPD warrants adequate genetic counseling for the family and frequent, lifelong, preventive follow-up controls in the patient. PMID:26043854

  14. Differentially methylated regions in maternal and paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7

    PubMed Central

    Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Muurinen, Mari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Reinius, Lovisa E; Ezer, Sini; Greco, Dario; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a hallmark of genomic imprinting and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are found near and in imprinted genes. Imprinted genes are expressed only from the maternal or paternal allele and their normal balance can be disrupted by uniparental disomy (UPD), the inheritance of both chromosomes of a chromosome pair exclusively from only either the mother or the father. Maternal UPD for chromosome 7 (matUPD7) results in Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) with typical features and growth retardation, but no gene has been conclusively implicated in SRS. In order to identify novel DMRs and putative imprinted genes on chromosome 7, we analyzed eight matUPD7 patients, a segmental matUPD7q31-qter, a rare patUPD7 case and ten controls on the Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip with 30 017 CpG methylation probes for chromosome 7. Genome-scale analysis showed highly significant clustering of DMRs only on chromosome 7, including the known imprinted loci GRB10, SGCE/PEG10, and PEG/MEST. We found ten novel DMRs on chromosome 7, two DMRs for the predicted imprinted genes HOXA4 and GLI3 and one for the disputed imprinted gene PON1. Quantitative RT-PCR on blood RNA samples comparing matUPD7, patUPD7, and controls showed differential expression for three genes with novel DMRs, HOXA4, GLI3, and SVOPL. Allele specific expression analysis confirmed maternal only expression of SVOPL and imprinting of HOXA4 was supported by monoallelic expression. These results present the first comprehensive map of parent-of-origin specific DMRs on human chromosome 7, suggesting many new imprinted sites. PMID:24247273

  15. Ketamine-Induced Apoptosis in Normal Human Urothelial Cells: A Direct, N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor-Independent Pathway Characterized by Mitochondrial Stress.

    PubMed

    Baker, Simon C; Shabir, Saqib; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos T; Southgate, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Recreational abuse of ketamine has been associated with the emergence of a new bladder pain syndrome, ketamine-induced cystitis, characterized by chronic inflammation and urothelial ulceration. We investigated the direct effects of ketamine on normal human urothelium maintained in organ culture or as finite cell lines in vitro. Exposure of urothelium to ketamine resulted in apoptosis, with cytochrome c release from mitochondria and significant subsequent caspase 9 and 3/7 activation. The anesthetic mode-of-action for ketamine is mediated primarily through N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism; however, normal (nonimmortalized) human urothelial cells were unresponsive to NMDAR agonists or antagonists, and no expression of NMDAR transcript was detected. Exposure to noncytotoxic concentrations of ketamine (≤1 mmol/L) induced rapid release of ATP, which activated purinergic P2Y receptors and stimulated the inositol trisphosphate receptor to provoke transient release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol. Ketamine concentrations >1 mmol/L were cytotoxic and provoked a larger-amplitude increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration that was unresolved. The sustained elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was associated with pathological mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP deficiency. Damage to the urinary barrier initiates bladder pain and, in ketamine-induced cystitis, loss of urothelium from large areas of the bladder wall is a reported feature. This study offers first evidence for a mechanism of direct toxicity of ketamine to urothelial cells by activating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27001627

  16. Investigating sex-specific dynamics using uniparental markers: West New Guinea as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Mona, Stefano; Mordret, Ernest; Veuille, Michel; Tommaseo-Ponzetta, Mila

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome (NRY) genetic markers have been often contrasted to investigate sex-specific dynamics. Traditionally, isolation by distance, intrapopulation genetic diversity and population differentiation are estimated from both markers and compared. Two possible sources of bias are often neglected. First, kilometric distances are frequently used as predictor of the connectivity between groups, hiding the role played by environmental features at a microgeographic scale. Second, the comparison of intrapopulation diversity and population differentiation between mtDNA and NRY is hampered by their different mutational mechanisms and rates. Here, we show how to account for these biases by analyzing from a different perspective a published dataset of eight West New Guinea (WNG) populations for which mtDNA control region sequences and seven linked NRY microsatellites had been typed. First, we modeled the connectivity among sampled populations by computing the number of days required to travel between groups. Then, we investigated the differences between the two sexes accounting for the molecular characteristics of the markers examined to obtain estimates on the product of the effective population size and the migration rate among demes (Nm). We achieved this goal by studying the shape of the gene genealogy at several sampling levels and using spatial explicit simulations. Both the direction and the rate of migration differ between male and females, with an Nm estimated to be >6 times higher in the latter under many evolutionary scenarios. We finally highlight the importance of applying metapopulation models when analyzing the genetic diversity of a species. We have applied the prediction of the sampling theory in a meta-population and we have corroborated our finding using spatial explicit simulations. Both approaches are fundamentally meant to deal with structured populations: we strongly believe in the importance of tacking structure

  17. Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Mock

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria contain the respiratory chain enzyme complexes that carry out oxidative phosphorylation and produce the main part of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Although several proteins related with signalling, assembling, transporting, and enzymatic function can be impaired in mitochondrial diseases, most frequently the activity of the respiratory chain protein complexes is primarily or secondarily affected, leading to impaired oxygen utilization and reduced energy production. Mitochondrial diseases usually show a chronic, slowly progressive course and present with multiorgan involvement with varying onset between birth and late adulthood. Neuromuscular system is frequently affected in mitochondrial diseases. Although there is actually no specific therapy and cure for mitochondrial diseases, the understanding of the pathophysiology may further facilitate the diagnostic approach and open perspectives to future in mitochondrial diseases. PMID:24649452

  18. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  19. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Lombes, A; Bonilla, E; Dimauro, S

    1989-01-01

    Increasingly numerous studies are being devoted to mitochondrial diseases, notably those which involve the neuromuscular system. Our knowledge and understanding of these diseases is progressing rapidly. We owe to Luft et al. (1962) the first description of this type of diseases. Their patient, a woman, presented with clinical symptoms suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction, major histological abnormalities of skeletal muscle mitochondria and defective oxidative phosphorylation coupling clearly demonstrated in mitochondria isolated from muscle. This clinical, histological and biochemical triad led to the definition of mitochondrial myopathies. Subsequently, the triad was seldom encountered, and most mitochondrial myopathies were primarily defined by the presence of morphological abnormalities of muscle mitochondria. This review deals with the morphological, clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. The various morphological abnormalities of mitochondria are described. These are not specific of any particular disease. They may be present in some non-mitochondrial diseases and may be lacking in diseases due to specific defects of mitochondrial enzymes (e.g. carnitine palmityl-transferase or pyruvate dehydrogenase). The clinical classification of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies is discussed. There are two main schools of thought: the "lumpers" do not recognize specific syndromes within the spectrum of mitochondrial "cytopathies", the "splitters" try to identify specific syndromes while recognizing the existence of borderline cases. The following syndromes are described: chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), MERRF syndrome (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers), MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) and Leigh and Alpers syndromes. The biochemical classification comprises five types of abnormalities: defects of transport

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    of human diseases arising from defects in mitochondrial ion and ROS homeostasis, energy production and morphology [1]. Parkinson´s Disease (PD) is a very good example of this important mitochondrial component on neurodegenerative diseases. Anuradha Yadav, Swati Agrawal, Shashi Kant Tiwari, and Rajnish K. Chaturvedi (CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research / Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, India) [6] remark in their review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD with special focus on the role of oxidative stress and bioenergetic deficits. These alterations may have their origin on pathogenic gene mutations in important genes such as DJ-1, -syn, parkin, PINK1 or LRRK2. These mutations, in turn, may cause defects in mitochondrial dynamics (key events like fission/fusion, biogenesis, trafficking in retrograde and anterograde directions, and mitophagy). This work reviews different strategies to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics in order to ameliorate the neurodegenerative process, with an emphasis on clinical trials reports that indicate their potential. Among them creatine, Coenzyme Q10 and mitochondrial targeted antioxidants/peptides are reported to have the most remarkable effects in clinical trials. They highlight a dual effect of PGC-1α expression on PD prognosis. Whereas a modest expression of this transcriptional co-activator results in positive effects, a moderate to substantial overexpession may have deleterious consequences. As strategies to induce PGC-1α activation, these authors remark the possibility to activate Sirt1 with resveratrol, to use PPAR agonists such as pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, fenofibrate and bezafibrate. Other strategies include the triggering of Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway by triterpenoids (derivatives of oleanolic acid) or by Bacopa monniera, the enhancement of ATP production by carnitine and -lipoic acid. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are the prime source of neurodegenerative diseases and

  1. Altered Mating-Type Identity in the Fungus Podospora Anserina Leads to Selfish Nuclei, Uniparental Progeny, and Haploid Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zickler, D.; Arnaise, S.; Coppin, E.; Debuchy, R.; Picard, M.

    1995-01-01

    In wild-type crosses of the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina, after fertilization, only nuclei of opposite mating type can form dikaryons that undergo karyogamy and meiosis, producing biparental progeny. To determine the role played by the mating type in these steps, the four mat genes were mutagenized in vitro and introduced into a strain deleted for its mat locus. Genetic and cytological analyses of these mutant strains, crossed to each other and to wild type, showed that mating-type information is required for recognition of nuclear identity during the early steps of sexual reproduction. In crosses with strains carrying a mating-type mutation, two unusual developmental patterns were observed: monokaryotic cells, resulting in haploid meiosis, and uniparental dikaryotic cells providing, after karyogamy and meiosis, a uniparental progeny. Altered mating-type identity leads to selfish behavior of the mutant nucleus: it migrates alone or paired, ignoring its wild-type partner in all mutant X wild-type crosses. This behavior is nucleus-autonomous because, in the same cytoplasm, the wild-type nuclei form only biparental dikaryons. In P. anserina, mat genes are thus required to ensure a biparental dikaryotic state but appear dispensable for later stages, such as meiosis and sporulation. PMID:7498731

  2. Whole exome sequencing in congenital pain insensitivity identifies a novel causative intronic NTRK1-mutation due to uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Ingo; Baumgartner, Manuela; Schabhüttl, Maria; Tomni, Cecilia; Windhager, Reinhard; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Gremel, Kurt; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2016-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), is characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained high fever, loss of pain perception and temperature sensation, absent sweating, repeated traumatic and thermal injuries, and mild mental retardation. After exclusion of obviously pathogenic mutations in NTRK1, the most common cause of CIPA, whole exome sequencing (WES) was carried out in a CIPA patient with unrelated parents. No mutations in known HSAN genes were identified. However, filtering for genes carrying two rare sequence variations detected 13 homozygous single nucleotide variants (SNV), all being located on chromosome 1. Further analysis strongly suggested that this finding might be best explained by uniparental disomy of chromosome 1. Because NTRK1 is also located on chromosome 1, we re-evaluated WES data and detected a novel intronic sequence variation at position c.2188-12 C>A, homozygously because of uniparental disomy. Subsequent analysis of NTRK1 transcripts in peripheral blood cells of the patient revealed an influence of the variant on mRNA splicing. The C>A transversion generated a novel splice-site, which led to the incorporation of 10 intronic bases into the NTRK1 mRNA and consequently to a non-functional gene product. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184211

  3. Coalescence with Background and Balancing Selection in Systems with Bi- and Uniparental Reproduction: Contrasting Partial Asexuality and Selfing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aneil F; Hartfield, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Uniparental reproduction in diploids, via asexual reproduction or selfing, reduces the independence with which separate loci are transmitted across generations. This is expected to increase the extent to which a neutral marker is affected by selection elsewhere in the genome. Such effects have previously been quantified in coalescent models involving selfing. Here we examine the effects of background selection and balancing selection in diploids capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction (i.e., partial asexuality). We find that the effect of background selection on reducing coalescent time (and effective population size) can be orders of magnitude greater when rates of sex are low than when sex is common. This is because asexuality enhances the effects of background selection through both a recombination effect and a segregation effect. We show that there are several reasons that the strength of background selection differs between systems with partial asexuality and those with comparable levels of uniparental reproduction via selfing. Expectations for reductions in Ne via background selection have been verified using stochastic simulations. In contrast to background selection, balancing selection increases the coalescence time for a linked neutral site. With partial asexuality, the effect of balancing selection is somewhat dependent upon the mode of selection (e.g., heterozygote advantage vs. negative frequency-dependent selection) in a manner that does not apply to selfing. This is because the frequency of heterozygotes, which are required for recombination onto alternative genetic backgrounds, is more dependent on the pattern of selection with partial asexuality than with selfing. PMID:26584901

  4. Recessive congenital methemoglobinemia caused by a rare mechanism: maternal uniparental heterodisomy with segmental isodisomy of a chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Tai, Chang-Long; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Wu, Tina Jui-Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Recessive congenital methemoglobinemia (RCM) is a very rare disorder caused by NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r) deficiency. Two distinct clinical forms, types I and II, caused by cb5r deficiency have been recognized. In type I, the enzyme deficiency is restricted only to erythrocytes with cyanosis being the only major symptom. In contrast, in type II, the enzyme deficiency is generalized to all tissues and associated with neurological impairment, mental and growth retardation and reduced life expectancy, in addition to cyanosis. Recently, we conducted a study on an 11-year-old boy with cb5r deficiency type I. The mutational analysis of the CYB5R3 gene revealed that the boy is homozygous for L72P mutation. Surprisingly, his mother is heterozygous for this L72P mutant, but not his father. Thirteen microsatellite markers of chromosome 22 were selected to analyze the origins of the patient's chromosome 22. The result showed that both of the chromosome 22(s) of this patient came from the maternal side (uniparental heterodisomy of chromosome 22 with segmental isodisomy). This is the first case report of a patient with cb5r deficiency type I resulting from uniparental disomy and also discloses an alternate mechanism whereby this enzymatic disorder can be derived from a single parent. PMID:22658170

  5. Introducing the Algerian Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Profiles into the North African Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Bekada, Asmahan; Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M.; Larruga, José M.; Pestano, José; Benhamamouch, Soraya; González, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    North Africa is considered a distinct geographic and ethnic entity within Africa. Although modern humans originated in this Continent, studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome genealogical markers provide evidence that the North African gene pool has been shaped by the back-migration of several Eurasian lineages in Paleolithic and Neolithic times. More recent influences from sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean Europe are also evident. The presence of East-West and North-South haplogroup frequency gradients strongly reinforces the genetic complexity of this region. However, this genetic scenario is beset with a notable gap, which is the lack of consistent information for Algeria, the largest country in the Maghreb. To fill this gap, we analyzed a sample of 240 unrelated subjects from a northwest Algeria cosmopolitan population using mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome biallelic polymorphisms, focusing on the fine dissection of haplogroups E and R, which are the most prevalent in North Africa and Europe respectively. The Eurasian component in Algeria reached 80% for mtDNA and 90% for Y-chromosome. However, within them, the North African genetic component for mtDNA (U6 and M1; 20%) is significantly smaller than the paternal (E-M81 and E-V65; 70%). The unexpected presence of the European-derived Y-chromosome lineages R-M412, R-S116, R-U152 and R-M529 in Algeria and the rest of the Maghreb could be the counterparts of the mtDNA H1, H3 and V subgroups, pointing to direct maritime contacts between the European and North African sides of the western Mediterranean. Female influx of sub-Saharan Africans into Algeria (20%) is also significantly greater than the male (10%). In spite of these sexual asymmetries, the Algerian uniparental profiles faithfully correlate between each other and with the geography. PMID:23431392

  6. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  7. Assignment of two mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides to human mitochondrial DNA and their use in the study of intracellular mitochondrial interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, N.A.; Wallace, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrially synthesized marker polypeptides, MV-1 and MV-2, were found in human HeLa and HT1080 cells. These were assigned to the mitochondrial DNA in HeLa-HT1080 hybrids and hybrids by demonstrating their linkage to cytoplasmic genetic markers. These markers include mitochondrial DNA restriction site polymorphisms and resistance to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. In the absence of chloramphenicol, the expression of MV-1 and MV-2 in hybrids and hybrids was found to be directly proportional to the ratio of the parental mitochondrial DNAs. In the presence of chloramphenicol, the marker polypeptide linked to the chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial DNA continued to be expressed. This demonstrated that resistant and sensitive mitochondrial DNAs can cooperate within a cell for gene expression and that the CAP-resistant allele was dominant or codominant to sensitive. Such cooperation suggests that mitochondrial DNAs can be exchanged between mitochondria.

  8. Diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes: Evidence from a genetically directed Ca2+ probe, mitycam-E31Q

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, Sarah; Cleemann, Lars; Kettlewell, Sarah; Smith, Godfrey L.; Morad, Martin

    2014-01-01

    ICa-gated Ca2+ release (CICR) from the cardiac SR is the main mechanism mediating the rise of cytosolic Ca2+, but the extent to which mitochondria contribute to the overall Ca2+ signaling remains controversial. To examine the possible role of mitochondria in Ca2+ signaling, we developed a low affinity mitochondrial Ca2+ probe, mitycam-E31Q (300–500 MOI, 48–72h) and used it in conjunction with Fura-2AM to obtain simultaneous TIRF images of mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+ in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Mitycam-E31Q staining of adult feline cardiomyocytes showed the typical mitochondrial longitudinal fluorescent bandings similar to that of TMRE staining, while neonatal rat cardiomyocytes had a disorganized tubular or punctuate appearance. Caffeine puffs produced rapid increases in cytosolic Ca2+ while simultaneously measured global mitycam-E31Q signals decreased more slowly (increased mitochondrial Ca2+) before decaying to baseline levels. Similar, but oscillating mitycam-E31Q signals were seen in spontaneously pacing cells. Withdrawal of Na+ increased global cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ signals in one population of mitochondria, but unexpectedly decreased it (release of Ca2+) in another mitochondrial population. Such mitochondrial Ca2+ release signals were seen not only during long lasting Na+ withdrawal, but also when Ca2+ loaded cells were exposed to caffeine-puffs, and during spontaneous rhythmic beating. Thus, mitochondrial Ca2+ transients appear to activate with a delay following the cytosolic rise of Ca2+ and show diversity in subpopulations of mitochondria that could contribute to the plasticity of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling. PMID:24994483

  9. Epigenetic modification and uniparental inheritance of H19 in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Catchpoole, D; Lam, W W; Valler, D; Temple, I K; Joyce, J A; Reik, W; Schofield, P N; Maher, E R

    1997-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital overgrowth syndrome associated with a characteristic pattern of visceromegaly and predisposition to childhood tumours. BWS is a genetically heterogeneous disorder; most cases are sporadic but approximately 15% are familial and a small number of BWS patients have cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome 11p15. Genomic imprinting effects have been implicated in familial and non-familial BWS. We have investigated the molecular pathology of 106 sporadic BWS cases; 17% (14/83) of informative cases had uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 11p15.5. In each case UPD appeared to result from a postzygotic event resulting in mosaicism for segmental paternal isodisomy. The critical region for isodisomy was refined to a 25 cM interval between D11S861 and D11S2071 which contained the IGF2, H19, and p57(KIP2) genes. In three cases isodisomy for 11q markers was detected but this did not extend further than 11q13-q21 suggesting that complete chromosome 11 disomy may not produce a BWS phenotype. The allele specific methylation status of the H19 gene was investigated in 80 sporadic BWS cases. All 13 cases with UPD tested displayed hypermethylation consistent with an excess of paternal H19 alleles. In addition, five of 63 (8%) cases with normal biparental inheritance had H19 hypermethylation consistent with an "imprinting centre" mutation (ICM) or "imprinting error" (IE) lesion. The phenotype of patients with putative ICM/IE mutations was variable and overlapped with that of non-UPD sporadic BWS cases with normal H19 methylation. However, exomphalos was significantly (p < 0.05) more common in the latter group. These findings may indicate differential effects on the expression of imprinted genes in chromosome 11p15 according to the precise molecular pathology. Analysis of H19 methylation is useful for the diagnosis of both UPD or altered imprinting in BWS and shows that a variety of molecular mechanisms may cause relaxation of

  10. Trisomy rescue mechanism: the case of concomitant mosaic trisomy 14 and maternal uniparental disomy 14 in a 15-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Balbeur, Samuel; Grisart, Bernard; Parmentier, Benoit; Sartenaer, Daniel; Leonard, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ullmann, Urielle; Boulanger, Sébastien; Leroy, Luc; Ngendahayo, Placide; Lungu-Silviu, Constantin; Lysy, Philippe; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 (upd(14)mat) is responsible for a Prader-Willi-like syndrome with precocious puberty. Although upd(14) is often hypothesized to result from trisomy rescue mechanism, T14 cell lines are usually not found with postnatal cytogenetic investigations. We report the coexistence of both chromosomal abnormalities in a 15-year-old girl. PMID:27014449

  11. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  12. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... line and are therefore called the electron transport chain, and complex V actually churns out ATP, so ... coQ10 , is a component of the electron transport chain, which uses oxygen to manufacture ATP. Some mitochondrial ...

  13. Mitochondrial Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are small structures that produce energy in ...

  14. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ragged-red fibers, and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. The symptoms of ... riboflavin, coenzyme Q, and carnitine (a specialized amino acid) may provide subjective improvement in fatigue and energy ...

  15. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory chain Complexes I and IV are impaired by β-amyloid via direct interaction and through Complex I-dependent ROS production, respectively.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Amadoro, G; Valenti, D; Corsetti, V; Lassandro, R; Atlante, A

    2013-07-01

    Here we investigate the effect of β-amyloid on mitochondrial respiratory function, i.e. mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation as well as the individual activities of both the mitochondrial Complexes I-IV, that compose mitochondrial electron transport chain, and the ATP synthase, by using homogenate from cerebellar granule cells, treated with low concentrations of β-amyloid, and Alzheimer synaptic-enriched brain samples. We found that β-amyloid caused both a selective defect in Complex I activity associated with an increase (5 fold) of intracellular reactive oxygen species and an impairment of Complex IV likely due to membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, a 130% increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio was measured in Alzheimer brains with respect to age-matched controls. Knowing the mechanisms of action of β-amyloid could allow to mitigate or even to interrupt the toxic cascade that leads a cell to death. The results of this study represent an important innovation because they offer the possibility to act at mitochondrial level and on specific sites to protect cells, for example by preventing the interaction of β-amyloid with the identified targets, by stabilizing or by restoring mitochondrial function or by interfering with the energy metabolism. PMID:23562762

  17. Mitochondrial DNA in metazoa: degree of freedom in a frozen event.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Cecilia; Gissi, Carmela; Reyes, Aurelio; Larizza, Alessandra; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Pesole, Graziano

    2002-03-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), due to its peculiar features such as exclusive presence of orthologous genes, uniparental inheritance, lack of recombination, small size and constant gene content, certainly represents a major model system in studies on evolutionary genomics in metazoan. In 800 million years of evolution the gene content of metazoan mitochondrial genomes has remained practically frozen but several evolutionary processes have taken place. These processes, reviewed here, include rearrangements of gene order, changes in base composition and arising of compositional asymmetry between the two strands, variations in the genetic code and evolution of codon usage, lineage-specific nucleotide substitution rates and evolutionary patterns of mtDNA control regions. PMID:11943454

  18. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Barron, Martin J.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Gospel, Amy; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Samuels, David C.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Plusa, Stefan M.; Needham, Stephanie J.; Greaves, Laura C.; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of the respiratory chain and has remarkable genetics based on uniparental inheritance. Within human populations, the mitochondrial genome has a high rate of sequence divergence with multiple polymorphic variants and thus has played a major role in examining the evolutionary history of our species. In recent years it has also become apparent that pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations play an important role in neurological and other diseases. Patients harbor many different mtDNA mutations, some of which are mtDNA mutations, some of which are inherited, but others that seem to be sporadic. It has also been suggested that mtDNA mutations play a role in aging and cancer, but the evidence for a causative role in these conditions is less clear. The accumulated data would suggest, however, that mtDNA mutations occur on a frequent basis. In this article we describe a new phenomenon: the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells that result in a significant biochemical defect in their progeny. These studies have important consequences not only for understanding of the finding of mtDNA mutations in aging tissues and tumors, but also for determining the frequency of mtDNA mutations within a cell. PMID:14597761

  19. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics. PMID:20140454

  20. Mitochondrial biology, targets, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Trivedi, Malav; Singh, Amit; Talekar, Meghna; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, mitochondrial medicine has emerged as a new discipline resting at the intersection of mitochondrial biology, pathology, and pharmaceutics. The central role of mitochondria in critical cellular processes such as metabolism and apoptosis has placed mitochondria at the forefront of cell science. Advances in mitochondrial biology have revealed that these organelles continually undergo fusion and fission while functioning independently and in complex cellular networks, establishing direct membrane contacts with each other and with other organelles. Understanding the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria has contributed to understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease states. Polyplasmy and heteroplasmy contribute to mitochondrial phenotypes and associated dysfunction. Residing at the center of cell biology, cellular functions, and disease pathology and being laden with receptors and targets, mitochondria are beacons for pharmaceutical modification. This review presents the current state of mitochondrial medicine with a focus on mitochondrial function, dysfunction, and common disease; mitochondrial receptors, targets, and substrates; and mitochondrial drug design and drug delivery with a focus on the application of nanotechnology to mitochondrial medicine. Mitochondrial medicine is at the precipice of clinical translation; the objective of this review is to aid in the advancement of mitochondrial medicine from infancy to application. PMID:25841699

  1. Mitochondrial Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineages, and the organelle itself is increasingly viewed as a genetic and functional mosaic, with the bulk of the mitochondrial proteome having an evolutionary origin outside Alphaproteobacteria. New data continue to reshape our views regarding mitochondrial evolution, particularly raising the question of whether the mitochondrion originated after the eukaryotic cell arose, as assumed in the classical endosymbiont hypothesis, or whether this organelle had its beginning at the same time as the cell containing it. PMID:22952398

  2. Identification of consensus motifs associated with mitotic recombination and clinical characteristics in patients with paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yasufumi; Higashimoto, Ken; Oka, Takehiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Jozaki, Kosuke; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Kawahara, Kozo; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Matsuo, Muneaki; Nishioka, Kenichi; Joh, Keiichiro; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2016-04-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) is defined as the inheritance of both homologs of a given genomic region from only one parent. The majority of UPD includes an entire chromosome. However, the extent of UPD is sometimes limited to a subchromosomal region (segmental UPD). Mosaic paternal UPD (pUPD) of chromosome 11 is found in approximately 20% of patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and almost all pUPDs are segmental isodisomic pUPDs resulting from mitotic recombination at an early embryonic stage. A mechanism initiating a DNA double strand break (DSB) within 11p has been predicted to lead to segmental pUPD. However, no consensus motif has yet been found. Here, we analyzed 32 BWS patients with pUPD by SNP array and searched for consensus motifs. We identified four consensus motifs frequently appearing within breakpoint regions of segmental pUPD. These motifs were found in another nine BWS patients with pUPD. In addition, the seven motifs found in meiotic recombination hot spots could not be found within pUPD breakpoint regions. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, a marker of DSB initiation, could not be found either. These findings suggest that the mechanism(s) of mitotic recombination leading to segmental pUPD are different from that of meiotic recombination. Furthermore, we found seven patients with paternal uniparental diploidy (PUD) mosaicism. Comparison of clinical features between segmental pUPDs and PUDs showed that developmental disability and cardiac abnormalities were additional characteristic features of PUD mosaicism, along with high risk of tumor development. We also found that macroglossia was characteristic of segmental pUPD mosaicism. PMID:26908620

  3. Identification and uniparental expression of a novel gene from the Prader-Willi region of chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Wevrick, R.; Kerns, J.A.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder which occurs at a frequency of about 1/25,000. Most patients ({approximately}70%) have a cytogentic deletion of their paternal 15q11-q13 region, while {approximately}30% have uniparental maternal disomy. The parent of origin dependence of the phenotype is thought to be reflective of the uniparental pattern of expression of genes in the region, a phenomenon known as genomic imprinting. A small subset of PWS patient with a typical cytogenetic rearrangements has defined a critical region for genes involved in PWS. We have used STSs from the region to construct a YAC contig including the entire PWS critical region, which is about 350 kb considering presently characterized deletions. We are now using these YACs to isolate and characterize novel genes potentially involved in PWS. Overlapping YACs from the critical region were subjected to the technique of cDNA selection. Gel-purified YAC DNA was biotinylated during PCR amplification and annealed in solution to amplified cDNA. cDNAs remaining after hybridization washing, and denaturation of the hybrids were tested for localization within the YAC contig. One such cDNA mapped back to the YAC contig and was further analyzed. A full length cDNA clone was isolated from a fetal brain library and sequenced. The pattern of expression was determined in cell lines derived from Prader-Willi and Angelman patients and in normal individuals. The gene was found to have monoallelic, paternal expression in normal individuals and is marginally or not expressed in cell lines derived form Prader-Willi individuals. Expression in cell lines from Angelman patients, who are deleted for the same region on the maternal chromosome 15, was normal. Thus this apparently maternally imprinted gene is a candidate for involvement in the Prader-Willi phenotype.

  4. Uniparental disomy of the entire X chromosome in Turner syndrome patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Zhu, Detu; Du, Rong; Gong, Yu; Xie, Chun; Xu, Xiangye; Fan, Yong; Yu, Bolan; Sun, Xiaofang; Chen, Yaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technique promises to provide an unlimited, reliable source of genetically matched pluripotent cells for personalized therapy and disease modeling. Recently, it is observed that cells with ring chromosomes 13 or 17 autonomously correct the defects via compensatory uniparental disomy during cellular reprogramming to iPSCs. This breakthrough finding suggests a potential therapeutic approach to repair large-scale chromosomal aberrations. However, due to the scarceness of ring chromosome samples, the reproducibility of this approach in different individuals is not carefully evaluated yet. Moreover, the underlying mechanism and the applicability to other types of chromosomal aberrations remain unknown. Here we generated iPSCs from four 45,X chorionic villous fibroblast lines and found that only one reprogrammed line acquired 46,XX karyotype via uniparental disomy of the entire X chromosome. The karyotype correction was reproducible in the same cell line by either retroviral or episomal reprogramming. The karyotype-corrected iPSCs were subject to X chromosome inactivation and obtained better colony morphology and higher proliferation rate than other uncorrected ones. Further transcriptomic comparison among the fibroblast lines identified a distinct expression pattern of cell cycle regulators in the uncorrectable ones. These findings demonstrate that the iPSC technique holds the potential to correct X monosomy, but the correction rate is very low, probably due to differential regulation of cell cycle genes between individuals. Our data strongly suggest that more systematic investigations are needed before defining the iPSC technique as a novel means of chromosome therapy.

  5. Cuba: exploring the history of admixture and the genetic basis of pigmentation using autosomal and uniparental markers.

    PubMed

    Marcheco-Teruel, Beatriz; Parra, Esteban J; Fuentes-Smith, Evelyn; Salas, Antonio; Buttenschøn, Henriette N; Demontis, Ditte; Torres-Español, María; Marín-Padrón, Lilia C; Gómez-Cabezas, Enrique J; Alvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio; Carracedo, Angel; Børglum, Anders D; Mors, Ole

    2014-07-01

    We carried out an admixture analysis of a sample comprising 1,019 individuals from all the provinces of Cuba. We used a panel of 128 autosomal Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) to estimate the admixture proportions. We also characterized a number of haplogroup diagnostic markers in the mtDNA and Y-chromosome in order to evaluate admixture using uniparental markers. Finally, we analyzed the association of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with quantitative estimates of skin pigmentation. In the total sample, the average European, African and Native American contributions as estimated from autosomal AIMs were 72%, 20% and 8%, respectively. The Eastern provinces of Cuba showed relatively higher African and Native American contributions than the Western provinces. In particular, the highest proportion of African ancestry was observed in the provinces of Guantánamo (40%) and Santiago de Cuba (39%), and the highest proportion of Native American ancestry in Granma (15%), Holguín (12%) and Las Tunas (12%). We found evidence of substantial population stratification in the current Cuban population, emphasizing the need to control for the effects of population stratification in association studies including individuals from Cuba. The results of the analyses of uniparental markers were concordant with those observed in the autosomes. These geographic patterns in admixture proportions are fully consistent with historical and archaeological information. Additionally, we identified a sex-biased pattern in the process of gene flow, with a substantially higher European contribution from the paternal side, and higher Native American and African contributions from the maternal side. This sex-biased contribution was particularly evident for Native American ancestry. Finally, we observed that SNPs located in the genes SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 are strongly associated with melanin levels in the sample. PMID:25058410

  6. Cuba: Exploring the History of Admixture and the Genetic Basis of Pigmentation Using Autosomal and Uniparental Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Smith, Evelyn; Salas, Antonio; Buttenschøn, Henriette N.; Demontis, Ditte; Torres-Español, María; Marín-Padrón, Lilia C.; Gómez-Cabezas, Enrique J.; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio; Carracedo, Ángel; Børglum, Anders D.; Mors, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an admixture analysis of a sample comprising 1,019 individuals from all the provinces of Cuba. We used a panel of 128 autosomal Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) to estimate the admixture proportions. We also characterized a number of haplogroup diagnostic markers in the mtDNA and Y-chromosome in order to evaluate admixture using uniparental markers. Finally, we analyzed the association of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with quantitative estimates of skin pigmentation. In the total sample, the average European, African and Native American contributions as estimated from autosomal AIMs were 72%, 20% and 8%, respectively. The Eastern provinces of Cuba showed relatively higher African and Native American contributions than the Western provinces. In particular, the highest proportion of African ancestry was observed in the provinces of Guantánamo (40%) and Santiago de Cuba (39%), and the highest proportion of Native American ancestry in Granma (15%), Holguín (12%) and Las Tunas (12%). We found evidence of substantial population stratification in the current Cuban population, emphasizing the need to control for the effects of population stratification in association studies including individuals from Cuba. The results of the analyses of uniparental markers were concordant with those observed in the autosomes. These geographic patterns in admixture proportions are fully consistent with historical and archaeological information. Additionally, we identified a sex-biased pattern in the process of gene flow, with a substantially higher European contribution from the paternal side, and higher Native American and African contributions from the maternal side. This sex-biased contribution was particularly evident for Native American ancestry. Finally, we observed that SNPs located in the genes SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 are strongly associated with melanin levels in the sample. PMID:25058410

  7. Novel targets for mitochondrial medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Tian, Rong

    2016-02-17

    Mitochondria-classically viewed as the powerhouses of the cell-have taken center stage in disease pathogenesis and resolution. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which originates from primary defects within the organelle or is induced by environmental stresses, plays a critical role in human disease. Despite their central role in human health and disease, there are no approved drugs that directly target mitochondria. We present possible new druggable targets in mitochondrial biology, including protein modification, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) transport, and dynamics, as we move into a new era of mitochondrial medicine. PMID:26888432

  8. Mitochondrial Morphology in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondria are the cellular energy-producing organelles and are at the crossroad of determining cell life and death. As such, the function of mitochondria has been intensely studied in metabolic disorders, including diabetes and associated maladies commonly grouped under all-inclusive pathological condition of metabolic syndrome. More recently, the altered metabolic profiles and function of mitochondria in these ailments have been correlated with their aberrant morphologies. This review describes an overview of mitochondrial fission and fusion machineries, and discusses implications of mitochondrial morphology and function in these metabolic maladies. Recent Advances: Mitochondria undergo frequent morphological changes, altering the mitochondrial network organization in response to environmental cues, termed mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial fission and fusion mediate morphological plasticity of mitochondria and are controlled by membrane-remodeling mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in diabetes establishment and progression as well as associated ailments, including, but not limited to, metabolism–secretion coupling in the pancreas, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Critical Issues: While mitochondrial dynamics are intimately associated with mitochondrial bioenergetics, their cause-and-effect correlation remains undefined in metabolic diseases. Future Directions: The involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in metabolic diseases is in its relatively early stages. Elucidating the role of mitochondrial dynamics in pathological metabolic conditions will aid in defining the intricate form–function correlation of mitochondria in metabolic pathologies and should provide not only important clues to metabolic disease progression, but also new therapeutic targets. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 415–430. PMID:22793999

  9. Structure, Transcription, and Variability of Metazoan Mitochondrial Genome: Perspectives from an Unusual Mitochondrial Inheritance System

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Guerra, Davide; Chang, Peter L.; Breton, Sophie; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Despite its functional conservation, the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) presents strikingly different features among eukaryotes, such as size, rearrangements, and amount of intergenic regions. Nonadaptive processes such as random genetic drift and mutation rate play a fundamental role in shaping mtDNA: the mitochondrial bottleneck and the number of germ line replications are critical factors, and different patterns of germ line differentiation could be responsible for the mtDNA diversity observed in eukaryotes. Among metazoan, bivalve mollusc mtDNAs show unusual features, like hypervariable gene arrangements, high mutation rates, large amount of intergenic regions, and, in some species, an unique inheritance system, the doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). The DUI system offers the possibility to study the evolutionary dynamics of mtDNAs that, despite being in the same organism, experience different genetic drift and selective pressures. We used the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum to study intergenic mtDNA functions, mitochondrial transcription, and polymorphism in gonads. We observed: 1) the presence of conserved functional elements and novel open reading frames (ORFs) that could explain the evolutionary persistence of intergenic regions and may be involved in DUI-specific features; 2) that mtDNA transcription is lineage-specific and independent from the nuclear background; and 3) that male-transmitted and female-transmitted mtDNAs have a similar amount of polymorphism but of different kinds, due to different population size and selection efficiency. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses that mtDNA evolution is strongly dependent on the dynamics of germ line formation, and that the establishment of a male-transmitted mtDNA lineage can increase male fitness through selection on sperm function. PMID:23882128

  10. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  11. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 with reduction to homozygosity of the LAMB3 locus in a patient with Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Bullrich, F; Czarnecki, P; Weiss, L; Uitto, J

    1997-09-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by blister formation at the level of the lamina lucida within the cutaneous basement-membrane zone. Classic lethal JEB (Herlitz type [H-JEB]; OMIM 226700) is frequently associated with premature-termination-codon mutations in both alleles of one of the three genes (LAMA3, LAMC2, or LAMB3) encoding the subunit polypeptides (alpha3, beta3, and gamma2) of laminin 5. In this study, we describe a unique patient with H-JEB, who was homozygous for a nonsense mutation, Q243X, in the LAMB3 gene on chromosome 1 and who had normal karyotype 46,XY. The mother was found to be a carrier of the Q243X mutation, whereas the father had two normal LAMB3 alleles. Nonpaternity was excluded by use of 11 microsatellite markers from six different chromosomes. The use of 17 partly or fully informative microsatellite markers spanning the entire chromosome 1 revealed that the patient had both maternal uniparental meroisodisomy of a 35-cM region on 1q containing the maternal LAMB3 mutation and maternal uniparental heterodisomy of other regions of chromosome 1. Thus, the results suggested that reduction to homozygosity of the 1q region containing the maternal LAMB3 mutation caused the H-JEB phenotype. The patient was normally developed at term and did not show overt dysmorphisms or malformations. This is the first description of uniparental disomy of human chromosome 1. PMID:9326326

  12. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-05

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect.

  13. Direct mitochondrial dysfunction precedes reactive oxygen species production in amiodarone-induced toxicity in human peripheral lung epithelial HPL1A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolescu, Adrian C. Ji, Yanbin; Comeau, Jeannette L.; Hill, Bruce C.; Takahashi, Takashi; Brien, James F.; Racz, William J.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-15

    Amiodarone (AM), a drug used in the treatment of cardiac dysrrhythmias, can produce severe pulmonary adverse effects, including fibrosis. Although the pathogenesis of AM-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is not clearly understood, several hypotheses have been advanced, including increased inflammatory mediator release, mitochondrial dysfunction, and free-radical formation. The hypothesis that AM induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was tested in an in vitro model relevant for AIPT. Human peripheral lung epithelial HPL1A cells, as surrogates for target cells in AIPT, were susceptible to the toxicity of AM and N-desethylamiodarone (DEA), a major AM metabolite. Longer incubations ({>=} 6 h) of HPL1A cells with 100 {mu}M AM significantly increased ROS formation. In contrast, shorter incubations (2 h) of HPL1A cells with AM resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoplasmic cytochrome c translocation. Preexposure of HPL1A cells to ubiquinone and {alpha}-tocopherol was more effective than that with Trolox C (registered) or 5,5-dimethylpyrolidine N-oxide (DMPO) at preventing AM cytotoxicity. These data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction, rather than ROS overproduction, represents an early event in AM-induced toxicity in peripheral lung epithelial cells that may be relevant for triggering AIPT, and antioxidants that target mitochondria may potentially have beneficial effects in AIPT.

  14. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers! Want to help? Enroll now in the Mitochondrial Disease Community Registry to advance the development of treatments and cures. HOME What is Mitochondrial Disease Types of Mitochondrial Disease Possible Symptoms Getting a ...

  15. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  16. Complete male mitochondrial genome of Anodonta anatina (Mollusca: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Soroka, Marianna; Burzyński, Artur

    2016-05-01

    Anodonta anatina is a freshwater mussel of the family Unionidae. These mussels have a unique mitochondria inheritance system named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Under DUI males have two, potentially very divergent mitochondrial genomes: F-type inherited from mother and M-type inherited from father. F-type is present in soma whereas M-type is present in gonadal tissues and sperm. Here we report two M-type sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes from Anodonta anatina. They are 16,906 bp long and their sequences are similar (0.1% divergence). The genome organization is identical to the other Unionidean M-type genomes published to date. There are 38 genes, including the recently described M-type specific M ORF. The presence of tRNA-like repeat in one of the noncoding regions, suggests that the control region is located in this area. Nucleotide composition is quite extreme, with AT content (66.2%) higher than in any other of the six published Unionidean M genomes. PMID:25317641

  17. Validation of Mitochondrial Gene Delivery in Liver and Skeletal Muscle via Hydrodynamic Injection Using an Artificial Mitochondrial Reporter DNA Vector.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Ishikawa, Takuya; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-12-01

    For successful mitochondrial transgene expression, two independent processes, i.e., developing a mitochondrial gene delivery system and construction of DNA vector to achieve mitochondrial gene expression, are required. To date, very few studies dealing with mitochondrial gene delivery have been reported and, in most cases, transgene expression was not validated, because the construction of a reporter DNA vector for mitochondrial gene expression is the bottleneck. In this study, mitochondrial transgene expression by the in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery of an artificial mitochondrial reporter DNA vector via hydrodynamic injection is demonstrated. In the procedure, a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) is rapidly injected. We designed and constructed pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) as a mitochondrial reporter DNA vector that possesses a mitochondrial heavy strand promoter (HSP) and an artificial mitochondrial genome with the reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase gene that records adjustments to the mitochondrial codon system. We delivered the pDNA into mouse liver mitochondria by hydrodynamic injection, and detected exogenous mRNA in the liver using reverse transcription PCR analysis. The hydrodynamic injection of pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) resulted in the expression of the Nluc luciferase protein in liver and skeletal muscle. Our mitochondrial transgene expression reporter system would contribute to mitochondrial gene therapy and further studies directed at mitochondrial molecular biology. PMID:26567847

  18. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  19. Mitochondrial Cyclic AMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Mediates Mitochondrial Gene Expression and Neuronal Survival*S

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Simon, David K.; Aminova, Lyaylya R.; Andreyev, Alexander Y.; Kushnareva, Yulia E.; Murphy, Anne N.; Lonze, Bonnie E.; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Ginty, David D.; Ferrante, Robert J.; Ryu, Hoon; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a widely expressed transcription factor whose role in neuronal protection is now well established. Here we report that CREB is present in the mitochondrial matrix of neurons and that it binds directly to cyclic AMP response elements (CREs) found within the mitochondrial genome. Disruption of CREB activity in the mitochondria decreases the expression of a subset of mitochondrial genes, including the ND5 subunit of complex I, down-regulates complex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration, and increases susceptibility to 3-nitropropionic acid, a mitochondrial toxin that induces a clinical and pathological phenotype similar to Huntington disease. These results demonstrate that regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by mitochondrial CREB, in part, underlies the protective effects of CREB and raise the possibility that decreased mitochondrial CREB activity contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal loss associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16207717

  20. Autosomal recessive cystinuria caused by genome-wide paternal uniparental isodisomy in a patient with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Y; Higashimoto, K; Sasaki, K; Jozaki, K; Yoshinaga, H; Okamoto, N; Takama, Y; Kubota, A; Nakayama, M; Yatsuki, H; Nishioka, K; Joh, K; Mukai, T; Yoshiura, K-i; Soejima, H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 20% of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) cases are caused by mosaic paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11 (pUPD11). Although pUPD11 is usually limited to the short arm of chromosome 11, a small minority of BWS cases show genome-wide mosaic pUPD (GWpUPD). These patients show variable clinical features depending on mosaic ratio, imprinting status of other chromosomes, and paternally inherited recessive mutations. To date, there have been no reports of a mosaic GWpUPD patient with an autosomal recessive disease caused by a paternally inherited recessive mutation. Here, we describe a patient concurrently showing the clinical features of BWS and autosomal recessive cystinuria. Genetic analyses revealed that the patient has mosaic GWpUPD and an inherited paternal homozygous mutation in SLC7A9. This is the first report indicating that a paternally inherited recessive mutation can cause an autosomal recessive disease in cases of GWpUPD mosaicism. Investigation into recessive mutations and the dysregulation of imprinting domains is critical in understanding precise clinical conditions of patients with mosaic GWpUPD. PMID:25171146

  1. Rapid Diagnosis of Imprinting Disorders Involving Copy Number Variation and Uniparental Disomy Using Genome-Wide SNP Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Rui; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Huimin; Yu, Guojiu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS), can be detected via methylation analysis, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA), or other methods. In this study, we applied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based chromosomal microarray analysis to detect copy number variations (CNVs) and uniparental disomy (UPD) events in patients with suspected imprinting disorders. Of 4 patients, 2 had a 5.25-Mb microdeletion in the 15q11.2q13.2 region, 1 had a 38.4-Mb mosaic UPD in the 11p15.4 region, and 1 had a 60-Mb detectable UPD between regions 14q13.2 and 14q32.13. Although the 14q32.2 region was classified as normal by SNP array for the 14q13 UPD patient, it turned out to be a heterodisomic UPD by short tandem repeat marker analysis. MS-MLPA analysis was performed to validate the variations. In conclusion, SNP-based microarray is an efficient alternative method for quickly and precisely diagnosing PWS, AS, BWS, and other imprinted gene-associated disorders when considering aberrations due to CNVs and most types of UPD. PMID:26184742

  2. Genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy as a cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome associated with recurrent virilizing adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Bertoin, F; Letouzé, E; Grignani, P; Patey, M; Rossignol, S; Libé, R; Pasqual, C; Lardière-Deguelte, S; Hoeffel-Fornes, C; Gaillard, D; Previderè, C; Delemer, B; Lalli, E

    2015-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by fetal macrosomia, macroglossia, and abdominal wall defects. BWS patients are at risk to develop Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, and adrenal tumors. A young woman with BWS features, but with inconclusive genetic evidence for the disease, came to clinical observation for signs of virilization at the age of 16 years. An adrenocortical tumor was diagnosed and surgically resected. The tumor underwent 2 local relapses that were also surgically treated. The patient was also operated to remove a breast fibroadenoma. SNP arrays were used to analyze chromosome abnormalities in normal and tumor samples from the patient and her parents. The patient presented genome-wide mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD) both in the adrenocortical and the breast tumors, with different degrees of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The more recent relapses of the adrenocortical tumor showed a loss of part of chromosome 17p that was absent in the first tumor. Analysis of a skin biopsy sample also showed mosaic patUPD with partial LOH, while no LOH was detected in leukocyte DNA. This case shows that virilizing adrenocortical tumors may be a clinical feature of patients with BWS. The SNP array technology is useful to diagnose genome-wide patUPD mosaicism in BWS patients with an inconclusive molecular diagnosis and underlines the tumorigenic potential of the absence of the maternal genome combined with an excess of the paternal genome. PMID:25365508

  3. Maternal uniparental isodisomy and heterodisomy on chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 gene mutation causing 3M syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Okamoto, N; Kosaki, K; Yorifuji, T; Shimokawa, O; Mishima, H; Yoshiura, K-i; Harada, N

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of segmental uniparental maternal hetero- and isodisomy involving the whole of chromosome 6 (mat-hUPD6 and mat-iUPD6) and a cullin 7 (CUL7) gene mutation in a Japanese patient with 3M syndrome. 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation that was recently reported to involve mutations in the CUL7 or obscurin-like 1 (OBSL1) genes. We encountered a patient with severe growth retardation, an inverted triangular gloomy face, an inverted triangle-shaped head, slender long bones, inguinal hernia, hydrocele testis, mild ventricular enlargement, and mild mental retardation. Sequence analysis of the CUL7 gene of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.2975G>C. Genotype analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed two mat-hUPD and two mat-iUPD regions involving the whole of chromosome 6 and encompassing CUL7. 3M syndrome caused by complete paternal iUPD of chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation has been reported, but there have been no reports describing 3M syndrome with maternal UPD of chromosome 6. Our results represent a combination of iUPDs and hUPDs from maternal chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation causing 3M syndrome. PMID:21166787

  4. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  5. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca(2+) homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca(2+) transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25911325

  6. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Sirtuins Alters Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Function in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbi de Moura, Michelle; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Van Houten, Bennett; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose) all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak. PMID:25165814

  7. A Distinct Mitochondrial Genome with DUI-Like Inheritance in the Ocean Quahog Arctica islandica

    PubMed Central

    Dégletagne, Cyril; Abele, Doris; Held, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternally inherited in metazoans. The major exception to this rule has been found in many bivalve species which allow the presence of different sex-linked mtDNA molecules. This mechanism, named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), is characterized by the presence of two mtDNAs: The female mtDNA is found in somatic tissue and female gonads, whereas the male mtDNA is usually found in male gonads and sperm. In this study we highlight the existence of two divergent mitochondrial haplotypes with a low genetic difference around 6–8% in Arctica islandica, a long-lived clam belonging to the Arcticidae, a sister group to the Veneridae in which DUI has been found. Phylogenetic analysis on cytochrome b and 16S sequences from somatic and gonadic tissues of clams belonging to different populations reveals the presence of the “divergent” type in male gonads only and the “normal” type in somatic tissues and female gonads. This peculiar segregation of divergent mtDNA types speaks for the occurrence of the DUI mechanism in A. islandica. This example also highlights the difficulties to assess the presence of such particular mitochondrial inheritance system and underlines the possible misinterpretations in phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies of bivalve species linked to the presence of two poorly differentiated mitochondrial genomes. PMID:26486872

  8. A Distinct Mitochondrial Genome with DUI-Like Inheritance in the Ocean Quahog Arctica islandica.

    PubMed

    Dégletagne, Cyril; Abele, Doris; Held, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternally inherited in metazoans. The major exception to this rule has been found in many bivalve species which allow the presence of different sex-linked mtDNA molecules. This mechanism, named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), is characterized by the presence of two mtDNAs: The female mtDNA is found in somatic tissue and female gonads, whereas the male mtDNA is usually found in male gonads and sperm. In this study we highlight the existence of two divergent mitochondrial haplotypes with a low genetic difference around 6-8% in Arctica islandica, a long-lived clam belonging to the Arcticidae, a sister group to the Veneridae in which DUI has been found. Phylogenetic analysis on cytochrome b and 16S sequences from somatic and gonadic tissues of clams belonging to different populations reveals the presence of the "divergent" type in male gonads only and the "normal" type in somatic tissues and female gonads. This peculiar segregation of divergent mtDNA types speaks for the occurrence of the DUI mechanism in A. islandica. This example also highlights the difficulties to assess the presence of such particular mitochondrial inheritance system and underlines the possible misinterpretations in phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies of bivalve species linked to the presence of two poorly differentiated mitochondrial genomes. PMID:26486872

  9. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  10. Drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán V; Ferdinandy, Peter; Liaudet, Lucas; Pacher, Pál

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria has an essential role in myocardial tissue homeostasis; thus deterioration in mitochondrial function eventually leads to cardiomyocyte and endothelial cell death and consequent cardiovascular dysfunction. Several chemical compounds and drugs have been known to directly or indirectly modulate cardiac mitochondrial function, which can account both for the toxicological and pharmacological properties of these substances. In many cases, toxicity problems appear only in the presence of additional cardiovascular disease conditions or develop months/years following the exposure, making the diagnosis difficult. Cardiotoxic agents affecting mitochondria include several widely used anticancer drugs [anthracyclines (Doxorubicin/Adriamycin), cisplatin, trastuzumab (Herceptin), arsenic trioxide (Trisenox), mitoxantrone (Novantrone), imatinib (Gleevec), bevacizumab (Avastin), sunitinib (Sutent), and sorafenib (Nevaxar)], antiviral compound azidothymidine (AZT, Zidovudine) and several oral antidiabetics [e.g., rosiglitazone (Avandia)]. Illicit drugs such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and synthetic cannabinoids (spice, K2) may also induce mitochondria-related cardiotoxicity. Mitochondrial toxicity develops due to various mechanisms involving interference with the mitochondrial respiratory chain (e.g., uncoupling) or inhibition of the important mitochondrial enzymes (oxidative phosphorylation, Szent-Györgyi-Krebs cycle, mitochondrial DNA replication, ADP/ATP translocator). The final phase of mitochondrial dysfunction induces loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, eventually culminating into cell death. This review aims to discuss the mechanisms of mitochondrion-mediated cardiotoxicity of commonly used drugs and some potential cardioprotective strategies to prevent these toxicities. PMID:26386112

  11. Mitochondrial Plasticity in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jelenik, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Insulin resistance and its related diseases, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), have been linked to changes in aerobic metabolism, pointing to a possible role of mitochondria in the development of insulin resistance. Recent Advances: Refined methodology of ex vivo high-resolution respirometry and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy now allows describing several features of mitochondria in humans. In addition to measuring mitochondrial function at baseline and after exercise-induced submaximal energy depletion, the response of mitochondria to endocrine and metabolic challenges, termed mitochondrial plasticity, can be assessed using hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. While insulin resistant states do not uniformly relate to baseline and post-exercise mitochondrial function, mitochondrial plasticity is typically impaired in insulin resistant relatives of T2DM, in overt T2DM and even in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Critical Issues: The variability of baseline mitochondrial function in the main target tissue of insulin action, skeletal muscle and liver, may be attributed to inherited and acquired changes in either mitochondrial quantity or quality. In addition to certain gene polymorphisms and aging, circulating glucose and lipid concentrations correlate with both mitochondrial function and plasticity. Future Directions: Despite the associations between features of mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity, the question of a causal relationship between compromised mitochondrial plasticity and insulin resistance in the development of obesity and T2DM remains to be resolved. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 258–268. PMID:22938510

  12. The Neuro-Ophthalmology of Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, J. Alexander; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases frequently manifest neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Because of the predilection of mitochondrial disorders to involve the optic nerves, extraocular muscles, retina, and even the retrochiasmal visual pathways, the ophthalmologist is often the first physician to be consulted. Disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction can result from abnormalities in either the mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial proteins. Inheritance of these mutations will follow patterns specific to their somatic or mitochondrial genetics. Genotype-phenotype correlations are inconstant, and considerable overlap may occur among these syndromes. The diagnostic approach to the patient with suspected mitochondrial disease entails a detailed personal and family history, careful ophthalmic, neurologic, and systemic examination, directed investigations, and attention to potentially life-threatening sequelae. Although curative treatments for mitochondrial disorders are currently lacking, exciting research advances are being made, particularly in the area of gene therapy. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, with its window of opportunity for timely intervention and its accessibility to directed therapy, offers a unique model to study future therapeutic interventions. Most patients and their relatives benefit from informed genetic counseling. PMID:20471050

  13. Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control: The Mechanisms Guarding Mitochondrial Health

    PubMed Central

    Bohovych, Iryna; Chan, Sherine S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondria are complex dynamic organelles pivotal for cellular physiology and human health. Failure to maintain mitochondrial health leads to numerous maladies that include late-onset neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, a decline in mitochondrial health is prevalent with aging. A set of evolutionary conserved mechanisms known as mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is involved in recognition and correction of the mitochondrial proteome. Recent Advances: Here, we review current knowledge and latest developments in MQC. We particularly focus on the proteolytic aspect of MQC and its impact on health and aging. Critical Issues: While our knowledge about MQC is steadily growing, critical gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of how MQC modules sense damage and preserve mitochondrial welfare, particularly in higher organisms. Future Directions: Delineating how coordinated action of the MQC modules orchestrates physiological responses on both organellar and cellular levels will further elucidate the current picture of MQC's role and function in health, cellular stress, and degenerative diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 977–994. PMID:25546710

  14. MORPHOLOGICAL CONTROL OF MITOCHONDRIAL BIOENERGETICS

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianzheng; Wang, Li; Yoon, Yisang

    2015-01-01

    The major function of mitochondria is production and supply of cellular energy. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing frequent shape changes via fission and fusion. Many studies have elucidated the molecular components mediating fission and fusion and their regulatory mechanisms, and mitochondrial shape change is now recognized as an essential cellular process that is closely associated with functional states of mitochondria. This review updates the recent advancements in fission and fusion mechanisms, and discusses the bi-directional relationship between mitochondrial morphology and energetic states in physio-pathological settings. PMID:25553448

  15. Genome-Wide Uniparental Disomy and Copy Number Variations in Renal Cell Carcinomas Associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iribe, Yasuhiro; Yao, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko; Kuroda, Naoto; Nagashima, Yoji; Nakatani, Yukio; Furuya, Mitsuko

    2016-02-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an inherited disorder caused by germline mutations of the folliculin gene (FLCN). The affected patients are prone to developing renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). Most mutant FLCN-associated RCCs (mFLCN-RCCs) are histologically chromophobe RCCs and hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors. It is incompletely understood whether mFLCN-RCCs have different chromosomal abnormalities compared with their sporadic histological counterparts. Herein, we describe somatic mutations of FLCN and DNA-copy number abnormalities using a high-density, whole-genome, single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The histological types included chromophobe RCC (n = 12), hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumor (n = 5), and clear-cell RCC (n = 2). Of 19 tumors, 8 had pathological somatic mutations of FLCN. Among 11 mFLCN-RCCs investigated by single-nucleotide polymorphism array, 8 showed balanced genomic profiles, 2 had gains in chromosome 3q, and 1 had gains in chromosomes 1q and 7. All had copious numbers of loss of heterozygosity in a wide range of chromosomes. The common loss-of-heterozygosity regions were chromosomes 3p24, 8q11, 16q11, Xp22-21, Xp11, Xq11, Xq13, and Xq23. Most of the loss of heterozygosity was because of uniparental disomy. Common uniparental disomy patterns in chromophobe RCCs and hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors indicated that these types were relatively similar in cytogenetic events. Two clear-cell RCCs also shared several uniparental disomy regions with chromophobe RCCs and hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors. mFLCN-RCCs may have common therapeutic targets among different histological types. PMID:26776076

  16. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 15 satellites resulting in Prader-Willi syndrome suggest a complex mechanism for uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fijel, S.; Gunter, K.; Olson, S.

    1994-09-01

    We report two cases of PWS in which there was abnormal meiosis I segregation of chromosome 15 following a rare translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and an apparent meiotic recombination in the unstable region of 15q11.2. PWS and normal appearing chromosomes in case one prompted a chromosome 15 origin analysis. PCR analysis indicated maternal isodisomy for the long arm of chromosome. However, only one chromosome 15 had short arm heteromorphisms consistent with either paternal or maternal inheritance. VNTR DNA analysis and heteromorphism data suggest that a maternal de novo translocation between chromosome 14 and 15 occurred prior to meiosis I. This was followed by recombination between D15Z1 and D15S11 and subsequent meiosis I nondisjunction. Proband and maternal karyotype display a distamycin A-DAPI positive region on the chromosome 14 homolog involved in the translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of ONCOR probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S11 and GABRB 3 were normal, consistent with the molecular data. Case two received a Robertsonian translocation t(14;15)(p13;p13) of maternal origin. Chromosome analysis revealed a meiosis I error producing UPD. FISH analysis of the proband and parents showed normal hybridization of ONCOR probes D15Z1, D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3. In both cases the PWS probands received a structurally altered chromosome 15 that had rearranged with chromosome 14 prior to meiosis. If proper meiotic segregation is dependent on the resolution of chiasmata and/or the binding to chromosome-specific spindle fibers, then it may be possible that rearrangements of pericentric or unstable regions of the genome disrupt normal disjunction and lead to uniparental disomy.

  17. DNA Methylation Profiling of Uniparental Disomy Subjects Provides a Map of Parental Epigenetic Bias in the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ricky S; Garg, Paras; Zaitlen, Noah; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Watson, Corey T; Azam, Nidha; Ho, Daniel; Li, Xin; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Brunner, Han G; Buiting, Karin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Coffee, Bradford; Eggermann, Thomas; Francis, David; Geraedts, Joep P; Gimelli, Giorgio; Jacobson, Samuel G; Le Caignec, Cedric; de Leeuw, Nicole; Liehr, Thomas; Mackay, Deborah J; Montgomery, Stephen B; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Papenhausen, Peter; Robinson, David O; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Schwartz, Charles; Steiner, Bernhard; Stevenson, David A; Surti, Urvashi; Wassink, Thomas; Sharp, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Genomic imprinting is a mechanism in which gene expression varies depending on parental origin. Imprinting occurs through differential epigenetic marks on the two parental alleles, with most imprinted loci marked by the presence of differentially methylated regions (DMRs). To identify sites of parental epigenetic bias, here we have profiled DNA methylation patterns in a cohort of 57 individuals with uniparental disomy (UPD) for 19 different chromosomes, defining imprinted DMRs as sites where the maternal and paternal methylation levels diverge significantly from the biparental mean. Using this approach we identified 77 DMRs, including nearly all those described in previous studies, in addition to 34 DMRs not previously reported. These include a DMR at TUBGCP5 within the recurrent 15q11.2 microdeletion region, suggesting potential parent-of-origin effects associated with this genomic disorder. We also observed a modest parental bias in DNA methylation levels at every CpG analyzed across ∼1.9 Mb of the 15q11-q13 Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region, demonstrating that the influence of imprinting is not limited to individual regulatory elements such as CpG islands, but can extend across entire chromosomal domains. Using RNA-seq data, we detected signatures consistent with imprinted expression associated with nine novel DMRs. Finally, using a population sample of 4,004 blood methylomes, we define patterns of epigenetic variation at DMRs, identifying rare individuals with global gain or loss of methylation across multiple imprinted loci. Our data provide a detailed map of parental epigenetic bias in the human genome, providing insights into potential parent-of-origin effects. PMID:27569549

  18. Patterns and frequencies of acquired and constitutional uniparental isodisomies in pediatric and adult B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Kristina B; Olsson, Linda; Safavi, Setareh; Biloglav, Andrea; Paulsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays are increasingly being used in clinical routine for genetic analysis of pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias (BCP ALL). Because constitutional DNA is not readily available as a control at the time of diagnosis, it is important to be able to distinguish between acquired and constitutional aberrations in a diagnostic setting. In the present study we focused on uniparental isodisomies (UPIDs). SNP array analyses of 143 pediatric and 38 adult B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias and matched remission samples revealed acquired whole chromosome or segmental UPIDs (wUPIDs, sUPIDs) in 32 cases (18%), without any age- or gender-related frequency differences. Acquired sUPIDs were larger than the constitutional ones (mean 35.3 Mb vs. 10.7 Mb; P < 0.0001) and were more often terminally located in the chromosomes (69% vs. 4.5%; P < 0.0001). Chromosomes 3, 5, and 9 were most often involved in acquired wUPIDs, whilst recurrent acquired sUPIDs targeted 6p, 9p, 9q, and 14q. The majority (56%) of sUPID9p was associated with homozygous CDKN2A deletions. In pediatric ALL, all wUPIDs were found in high hyperdiploid (51-67 chromosomes) cases and an extended analysis, also including unmatched diagnostic samples, revealed a higher frequency of wUPID-positivity in higher modal number (56-67 chromosomes) than in lower modal number (51-55 chromosomes) high hyperdiploid cases (34% vs. 11%; P = 0.04), suggesting different underlying mechanisms of formation of these subtypes of high hyperdiploidy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773847

  19. Genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy mosaicism in a woman with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and ovarian steroid cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Gogiel, Magdalena; Begemann, Matthias; Spengler, Sabrina; Soellner, Lukas; Göretzlehner, Ulf; Eggermann, Thomas; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud

    2013-07-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of single chromosomes is a well-known molecular aberration in a group of congenital diseases commonly known as imprinting disorders (IDs). Whereas maternal and/or paternal UPD of chromosomes 6, 7, 11, 14 and 15 are associated with specific IDs (Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, Silver-Russell syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), upd(14)-syndromes, Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelman Syndrome), the other autosomes are not. UPD of the whole genome is not consistent with life, in case of non-mosaic genome-wide paternal UPD (patUPD) it leads to hydatidiform mole. In contrast, mosaic genome-wide patUPD might be compatible with life. Here we present a 19-year-old woman with BWS features and initially diagnosed to be carrier of a mosaic patUPD of chromosome 11p15. However, the patient presented further clinical findings not typically associated with BWS, including nesidioblastosis, fibroadenoma, hamartoma of the liver, hypoglycaemia and ovarian steroid cell tumour. Additional molecular investigations revealed a mosaic genome-wide patUPD. So far, only nine cases with mosaic genome-wide patUPD and similar clinical findings have been reported, but these patients were nearly almost diagnosed in early childhood. Summarising the data from the literature and those from our patient, it can be concluded that the mosaic genome-wide patUPD (also known as androgenic/biparental mosaicism) might explain unusual BWS phenotypes. Thus, these findings emphasise the need for multilocus testing in IDs to efficiently detect cases with disturbances affecting more than one chromosome. PMID:23188046

  20. An Ancient Mediterranean Melting Pot: Investigating the Uniparental Genetic Structure and Population History of Sicily and Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Boattini, Alessio; Carta, Marilisa; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Yao, Daniele Yang; Ciani, Graziella; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata

    2014-01-01

    Due to their strategic geographic location between three different continents, Sicily and Southern Italy have long represented a major Mediterranean crossroad where different peoples and cultures came together over time. However, its multi-layered history of migration pathways and cultural exchanges, has made the reconstruction of its genetic history and population structure extremely controversial and widely debated. To address this debate, we surveyed the genetic variability of 326 accurately selected individuals from 8 different provinces of Sicily and Southern Italy, through a comprehensive evaluation of both Y-chromosome and mtDNA genomes. The main goal was to investigate the structuring of maternal and paternal genetic pools within Sicily and Southern Italy, and to examine their degrees of interaction with other Mediterranean populations. Our findings show high levels of within-population variability, coupled with the lack of significant genetic sub-structures both within Sicily, as well as between Sicily and Southern Italy. When Sicilian and Southern Italian populations were contextualized within the Euro-Mediterranean genetic space, we observed different historical dynamics for maternal and paternal inheritances. Y-chromosome results highlight a significant genetic differentiation between the North-Western and South-Eastern part of the Mediterranean, the Italian Peninsula occupying an intermediate position therein. In particular, Sicily and Southern Italy reveal a shared paternal genetic background with the Balkan Peninsula and the time estimates of main Y-chromosome lineages signal paternal genetic traces of Neolithic and post-Neolithic migration events. On the contrary, despite showing some correspondence with its paternal counterpart, mtDNA reveals a substantially homogeneous genetic landscape, which may reflect older population events or different demographic dynamics between males and females. Overall, both uniparental genetic structures and TMRCA

  1. Increased body mass in infancy and early toddlerhood in Angelman syndrome patients with uniparental disomy and imprinting center defects.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Marie-Luise; Adam, Margaret P; Seaver, Laurie H; Myers, Angela; Schelley, Susan; Zadeh, Neda; Hudgins, Louanne; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Angelman syndrome (AS) is based on clinical features and genetic testing. Developmental delay, severe speech impairment, ataxia, atypical behavior and microcephaly by two years of age are typical. Feeding difficulties in young infants and obesity in late childhood can also be seen. The NIH Angelman-Rett-Prader-Willi Consortium and others have documented genotype-phenotype associations including an increased body mass index in children with uniparental disomy (UPD) or imprinting center (IC) defects. We recently encountered four cases of infantile obesity in non-deletion AS cases, and therefore examined body mass measures in a cohort of non-deletion AS cases. We report on 16 infants and toddlers (ages 6 to 44 months; 6 female, and 10 male) with severe developmental delay. Birth weights were appropriate for gestational age in most cases, >97th% in one case and not available in four cases. The molecular subclass case distribution consisted of: UPD (n = 2), IC defect (n = 3), UPD or IC defect (n = 3), and UBE3A mutation (n = 8). Almost all (7 out of 8) UPD, IC and UPD/IC cases went on to exhibit >90th% age- and gender-appropriate weight for height or BMI within the first 44 months. In contrast, no UBE3A mutation cases exhibited obesity or pre-obesity measures (percentiles ranged from <3% to 55%). These findings demonstrate that increased body mass may be evident as early as the first year of life and highlight the utility of considering the diagnosis of AS in the obese infant or toddler with developmental delay, especially when severe. Although a mechanism explaining the association of UPD, and IC defects with obesity has not been identified, recognition of this correlation may inform investigation of imprinting at the PWS/AS locus and obesity. PMID:25402239

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and biogenesis: do ICU patients die from mitochondrial failure?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions include production of energy, activation of programmed cell death, and a number of cell specific tasks, e.g., cell signaling, control of Ca2+ metabolism, and synthesis of a number of important biomolecules. As proper mitochondrial function is critical for normal performance and survival of cells, mitochondrial dysfunction often leads to pathological conditions resulting in various human diseases. Recently mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to multiple organ failure (MOF) often leading to the death of critical care patients. However, there are two main reasons why this insight did not generate an adequate resonance in clinical settings. First, most data regarding mitochondrial dysfunction in organs susceptible to failure in critical care diseases (liver, kidney, heart, lung, intestine, brain) were collected using animal models. Second, there is no clear therapeutic strategy how acquired mitochondrial dysfunction can be improved. Only the benefit of such therapies will confirm the critical role of mitochondrial dysfunction in clinical settings. Here we summarized data on mitochondrial dysfunction obtained in diverse experimental systems, which are related to conditions seen in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Particular attention is given to mechanisms that cause cell death and organ dysfunction and to prospective therapeutic strategies, directed to recover mitochondrial function. Collectively the data discussed in this review suggest that appropriate diagnosis and specific treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in ICU patients may significantly improve the clinical outcome. PMID:21942988

  3. The Mitochondrial Genome Impacts Respiration but Not Fermentation in Interspecific Saccharomyces Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Michel; Salin, Benedicte; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has high rate of nucleotide substitution leading to different mitochondrial haplotypes called mitotypes. However, the impact of mitochondrial genetic variant on phenotypic variation has been poorly considered in microorganisms because mtDNA encodes very few genes compared to nuclear DNA, and also because mitochondrial inheritance is not uniparental. Here we propose original material to unravel mitotype impact on phenotype: we produced interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum species, using fully homozygous diploid parental strains. For two different interspecific crosses involving different parental strains, we recovered 10 independent hybrids per cross, and allowed mtDNA fixation after around 80 generations. We developed PCR-based markers for the rapid discrimination of S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum mitochondrial DNA. For both crosses, we were able to isolate fully isogenic hybrids at the nuclear level, yet possessing either S. cerevisiae mtDNA (Sc-mtDNA) or S. uvarum mtDNA (Su-mtDNA). Under fermentative conditions, the mitotype has no phenotypic impact on fermentation kinetics and products, which was expected since mtDNA are not necessary for fermentative metabolism. Alternatively, under respiratory conditions, hybrids with Sc-mtDNA have higher population growth performance, associated with higher respiratory rate. Indeed, far from the hypothesis that mtDNA variation is neutral, our work shows that mitochondrial polymorphism can have a strong impact on fitness components and hence on the evolutionary fate of the yeast populations. We hypothesize that under fermentative conditions, hybrids may fix stochastically one or the other mt-DNA, while respiratory environments may increase the probability to fix Sc-mtDNA. PMID:24086452

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  5. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. PMID:22283595

  6. Causal variants screened by whole exome sequencing in a patient with maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 10 and a complicated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    LI, NIU; DING, YU; YU, TINGTING; LI, JUAN; SHEN, YONGNIAN; WANG, XIUMIN; FU, QIHUA; SHEN, YIPING; HUANG, XIAODONG; WANG, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD), which is the abnormal situation in which both copies of a chromosomal pair have been inherited from one parent, may cause clinical abnormalities by affecting genomic imprinting or causing autosomal recessive variation. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) are powerful technologies used to search for underlying causal variants. In the present study, WES was used to screen for candidate causal variants in the genome of a Chinese pediatric patient, who had been shown by CMA to have maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 10. This was associated with numerous severe medical problems, including bilateral deafness, binocular blindness, stunted growth and leukoderma. A total of 13 rare homozygous variants of these genes were identified on chromosome 10. These included a classical splice variant in the HPS1 gene (c.398+5G>A), which causes Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 and may explain the patient's ocular and dermal disorders. In addition, six likely pathogenic genes on other chromosomes were found to be associated with the subject's ocular and aural disorders by phenotypic analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that WES and CMA may be successfully combined in order to identify candidate causal genes. Furthermore, a connection between phenotype and genotype was established in this patient. PMID:27284308

  7. Mitochondrial Structure and Function Are Disrupted by Standard Isolation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Taivassalo, Tanja; Ritchie, Darmyn; Wright, Kathryn J.; Thomas, Melissa M.; Romestaing, Caroline; Hepple, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria regulate critical components of cellular function via ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, Ca2+ handling and apoptotic signaling. Two classical methods exist to study mitochondrial function of skeletal muscles: isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers. Whereas mitochondrial isolation removes a portion of the mitochondria from their cellular environment, myofiber permeabilization preserves mitochondrial morphology and functional interactions with other intracellular components. Despite this, isolated mitochondria remain the most commonly used method to infer in vivo mitochondrial function. In this study, we directly compared measures of several key aspects of mitochondrial function in both isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers of rat gastrocnemius muscle. Here we show that mitochondrial isolation i) induced fragmented organelle morphology; ii) dramatically sensitized the permeability transition pore sensitivity to a Ca2+ challenge; iii) differentially altered mitochondrial respiration depending upon the respiratory conditions; and iv) dramatically increased H2O2 production. These alterations are qualitatively similar to the changes in mitochondrial structure and function observed in vivo after cellular stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, but are generally of much greater magnitude. Furthermore, mitochondrial isolation markedly altered electron transport chain protein stoichiometry. Collectively, our results demonstrate that isolated mitochondria possess functional characteristics that differ fundamentally from those of intact mitochondria in permeabilized myofibers. Our work and that of others underscores the importance of studying mitochondrial function in tissue preparations where mitochondrial structure is preserved and all mitochondria are represented. PMID:21512578

  8. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  9. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome microstructure in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ennafaa, Hajer; Fregel, Rosa; Khodjet-El-Khil, Houssein; González, Ana M; Mahmoudi, Hejer Abdallah El; Cabrera, Vicente M; Larruga, José M; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome variation has been studied in Bou Omrane and Bou Saâd, two Tunisian Berber populations. In spite of their close geographic proximity, genetic distances between them were high and significant with both uniparental markers. A global analysis, including all previously studied Tunisian samples, confirmed the existence of a high female and male population structure in this country. Analyses of molecular variance analysis evidenced that this differentiation was not attributable to ethnic differences. Mantel test showed that, in all cases, Y-chromosome haplotypic distances correlated poorly with geography, whereas after excluding the more isolated samples of Bou Omrane and Bou Saâd, the mtDNA pattern of variation is significantly correlated with geography. Congruently, the N(m) ratio of males versus females pointed to a significant excess of female migration rate across localities, which could be explained by patrilocality, a common marriage system in rural Tunisia. In addition, it has been observed that cultural isolation in rural communities promotes, by the effect of genetic drift, stronger loss of diversity and larger genetic differentiation levels than those observed in urban areas as deduced from comparisons of their respective mean genetic diversity and their respective mean genetic distances among populations. It is likely that the permanent exodus from rural to urban areas will have important repercussions in the future genetic structure of this country. PMID:21833004

  10. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    PubMed

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  11. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Niescier, Robert F.; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T.; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  12. Development of pharmacological strategies for mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kanabus, M; Heales, S J; Rahman, S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an unusually genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders, which are extremely challenging to treat. Currently, apart from supportive therapy, there are no effective treatments for the vast majority of mitochondrial diseases. Huge scientific effort, however, is being put into understanding the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial disease pathology and developing potential treatments. To date, a variety of treatments have been evaluated by randomized clinical trials, but unfortunately, none of these has delivered breakthrough results. Increased understanding of mitochondrial pathways and the development of many animal models, some of which are accurate phenocopies of human diseases, are facilitating the discovery and evaluation of novel prospective treatments. Targeting reactive oxygen species has been a treatment of interest for many years; however, only in recent years has it been possible to direct antioxidant delivery specifically into the mitochondria. Increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, whether by pharmacological approaches, dietary manipulation or exercise therapy, is also currently an active area of research. Modulating mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy and the mitochondrial membrane lipid milieu have also emerged as possible treatment strategies. Recent technological advances in gene therapy, including allotopic and transkingdom gene expression and mitochondrially targeted transcription activator-like nucleases, have led to promising results in cell and animal models of mitochondrial diseases, but most of these techniques are still far from clinical application. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24116962

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed. PMID:20307565

  14. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  15. p53 and Mitochondrial Function in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David B.; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Morrison, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in dictating cell survival and death as a cellular sensor for a myriad of stresses including DNA damage, oxidative and nutritional stress, ischemia and disruption of nucleolar function. Activation of p53-dependent apoptosis leads to mitochondrial apoptotic changes via the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways triggering cell death execution most notably by release of cytochrome c and activation of the caspase cascade. Although it was previously believed that p53 induces apoptotic mitochondrial changes exclusively through transcription-dependent mechanisms, recent studies suggest that p53 also regulates apoptosis via a transcription-independent action at the mitochondria. Recent evidence further suggests that p53 can regulate necrotic cell death and autophagic activity including mitophagy. An increasing number of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism and respiration are regulated by p53, which influences mitochondrial ROS production as well. Cellular redox homeostasis is also directly regulated by p53 through modified expression of pro- and anti-oxidant proteins. Proper regulation of mitochondrial size and shape through fission and fusion assures optimal mitochondrial bioenergetic function while enabling adequate mitochondrial transport to accommodate local energy demands unique to neuronal architecture. Abnormal regulation of mitochondrial dynamics has been increasingly implicated in neurodegeneration, where elevated levels of p53 may have a direct contribution as the expression of some fission/fusion proteins are directly regulated by p53. Thus, p53 may have a much wider influence on mitochondrial integrity and function than one would expect from its well-established ability to transcriptionally induce mitochondrial apoptosis. However, much of the evidence demonstrating that p53 can influence mitochondria through nuclear, cytosolic or intra-mitochondrial sites of action has yet to be

  16. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gibellini, Lara; Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu), resveratrol (RSV), and curcumin (Cur) being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation), by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications. PMID:26167193

  17. Evolution of Buchloë dactyloides based on cloning and sequencing of matK, rbcL, and cob genes from plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Budak, Hikmet; Shearman, Robert C; Dweikat, Ismail

    2005-06-01

    Buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Englem), a C4 turfgrass species, is native to the Great Plains region of North America. The evolutionary implications of buffalograss are unclear. Sequencing of rbcL and matK genes from plastid and the cob gene from mitochondrial genomes was examined to elucidate buffalo grass evolution. This study is the first to report sequencing of these genes from organelle genomes in the genus Buchloë. Comparisons of sequence data from the mitochondrial and plastid genome revealed that all genotypes contained the same cytoplasmic origin. There were some rearrangements detected in mitochondrial genome. The buffalograss genome appears to have evolved through the rearrangements of convergent subgenomic domains. Combined analyses of plastid genes suggest that the evolutionary process in Buchloë accessions studied was monophyletic rather than polyphyletic. However, since plastid and mitochondrial genomes are generally uniparentally inherited, the evolutionary history of these genomes may not reflect the evolutionary history of the organism, especially in a species in which out-crossing is common. The sequence information obtained from this study can be used as a genome-specific marker for investigation of the buffalograss polyploidy complex and testing of the mode of plastid and mitochondrial transmission in genus Buchloë. PMID:16121238

  18. Mitochondrial fragmentation in excitotoxicity requires ROCK activation.

    PubMed

    Martorell-Riera, Alejandro; Segarra-Mondejar, Marc; Reina, Manuel; Martínez-Estrada, Ofelia M; Soriano, Francesc X

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria morphology constantly changes through fission and fusion processes that regulate mitochondrial function, and it therefore plays a prominent role in cellular homeostasis. Cell death progression is associated with mitochondrial fission. Fission is mediated by the mainly cytoplasmic Drp1, which is activated by different post-translational modifications and recruited to mitochondria to perform its function. Our research and other studies have shown that in the early moments of excitotoxic insult Drp1 must be nitrosylated to mediate mitochondrial fragmentation in neurons. Nonetheless, mitochondrial fission is a multistep process in which filamentous actin assembly/disassembly and myosin-mediated mitochondrial constriction play prominent roles. Here we establish that in addition to nitric oxide production, excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial fragmentation also requires activation of the actomyosin regulator ROCK. Although ROCK1 has been shown to phosphorylate and activate Drp1, experiments using phosphor-mutant forms of Drp1 in primary cortical neurons indicate that in excitotoxic conditions, ROCK does not act directly on Drp1 to mediate fission, but may act on the actomyosin complex. Thus, these data indicate that a wider range of signaling pathways than those that target Drp1 are amenable to be inhibited to prevent mitochondrial fragmentation as therapeutic option. PMID:25789413

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A; Maclean, Kirsteen H; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Milasta, Sandra; Steeves, Meredith; Dorsey, Frank C; Cleveland, John L; Green, Douglas R; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in DNA damage responses, and its loss leads to development of T-cell malignancies. Here, we show that ATM loss also leads to intrinsic mitochondrial abnormalities in thymocytes, including elevated reactive oxygen species, increased aberrant mitochondria, high cellular respiratory capacity, and decreased mitophagy. A fraction of ATM protein is localized in mitochondria, and it is rapidly activated by mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, allelic loss of the autophagy regulator Beclin-1 significantly delayed tumor development in ATM-null mice. This effect was not associated with rescue of DNA damage signaling but rather with a significant reversal of the mitochondrial abnormalities. These data support a model in which ATM plays direct roles in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and associated increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species contribute to the cancer-prone phenotype observed in organisms lacking ATM. Thus, ataxia-telangiectasia should be considered, at least in part, as a mitochondrial disease. PMID:22144182

  20. Mitochondrial phospholipids: role in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential components of eukaryotic cells and are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes that include ATP production, cellular signalling, apoptosis and cell growth. These organelles are thought to have originated from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotic cells in an effort to provide a bioenergetic jump and thus, the greater complexity observed in eukaryotes (Lane and Martin 2010). Mitochondrial processes are required not only for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, but also allow cell to cell and tissue to tissue communication (Nunnari and Suomalainen 2012). Mitochondrial phospholipids are important components of this system. Phospholipids make up the characteristic outer and inner membranes that give mitochondria their shape. In addition, these membranes house sterols, sphingolipids and a wide variety of proteins. It is the phospholipids that also give rise to other characteristic mitochondrial structures such as cristae (formed from the invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the matrix (area within cristae) and the intermembrane space (IMS) which separates the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Phospholipids are the building blocks that make up these structures. However, the phospholipid composition of the OMM and IMM is unique in each membrane. Mitochondria are able to synthesize some of the phospholipids it requires, but the majority of cellular lipid biosynthesis takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in conjunction with the Golgi apparatus (Fagone and Jackowski 2009). In this review, we will focus on the role that mitochondrial phospholipids play in specific cellular functions and discuss their biosynthesis, metabolism and transport as well as the differences between the OMM and IMM phospholipid composition. Finally, we will focus on the human diseases that result from disturbances to mitochondrial phospholipids and the current research being performed to help

  1. Methods for Assessing Mitochondrial Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.; Lanza, Ian R.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes. PMID:23520284

  2. Mitochondrial transplantation for therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    McCully, James D; Levitsky, Sidney; Del Nido, Pedro J; Cowan, Douglas B

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in the homeostasis of the vast majority of the body's cells. In the myocardium where mitochondria constitute 30 % of the total myocardial cell volume, temporary attenuation or obstruction of blood flow and as a result oxygen delivery to myocardial cells (ischemia) severely alters mitochondrial structure and function. These alterations in mitochondrial structure and function occur during ischemia and continue after blood flow and oxygen delivery to the myocardium is restored, and significantly decrease myocardial contractile function and myocardial cell survival. We hypothesized that the augmentation or replacement of mitochondria damaged by ischemia would provide a mechanism to enhance cellular function and cellular rescue following the restoration of blood flow. To test this hypothesis we have used a model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Our studies demonstrate that the transplantation of autologous mitochondria, isolated from the patient's own body, and then directly injected into the myocardial during early reperfusion augment the function of native mitochondria damaged during ischemia and enhances myocardial post-ischemic functional recovery and cellular viability. The transplanted mitochondria act both extracellularly and intracellularly. Extracellularly, the transplanted mitochondria enhance high energy synthesis and cellular adenosine triphosphate stores and alter the myocardial proteome. Once internalized the transplanted mitochondria rescue cellular function and replace damaged mitochondrial DNA. There is no immune or auto-immune reaction and there is no pro-arrhythmia as a result of the transplanted mitochondria. Our studies and those of others demonstrate that mitochondrial transplantation can be effective in a number of cell types and diseases. These include cardiac and skeletal muscle, pulmonary and hepatic tissue and cells and in neuronal tissue. In this review we discuss the mechanisms leading to mitochondrial

  3. Mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cardiac manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Noh, Yeonhee; Xu, Zhelong; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, have their own DNA (mtDNA). They regulate the transport of metabolites and ions, which determine cell physiology, survival, and death. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including impaired oxidative phosphorylation, preferentially affects heart function via imbalance of energy supply and demand. Recently, mitochondrial mutations and associated mitochondrial dysfunction were suggested as a causal factor of cardiac manifestations. Oxidative stress largely influences mtDNA stability due to oxidative modifications of mtDNA. Furthermore, the continuous replicative state of mtDNA and presence of minimal nucleoid structure render mitochondria vulnerable to oxidative damage and subsequent mutations, which impair mitochondrial functions. However, the occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in the same mitochondrion or cell and presence of nuclear DNA-encoded mtDNA repair systems raise questions regarding whether oxidative stress-mediated mtDNA mutations are the major driving force in accumulation of mtDNA mutations. Here, we address the possible causes of mitochondrial DNA mutations and their involvement in cardiac manifestations. Current strategies for treatment related to mitochondrial mutations and/or dysfunction in cardiac manifestations are briefly discussed. PMID:27100514

  4. Mitochondrial loss, dysfunction and altered dynamics in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Moody, Jennifer P.; Edgerly, Christina K.; Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Although a direct causative pathway from the gene mutation to the selective neostriatal neurodegeneration remains unclear in Huntington's disease (HD), one putative pathological mechanism reported to play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of this neurological disorder is mitochondrial dysfunction. We examined mitochondria in preferentially vulnerable striatal calbindin-positive neurons in moderate-to-severe grade HD patients, using antisera against mitochondrial markers of COX2, SOD2 and cytochrome c. Combined calbindin and mitochondrial marker immunofluorescence showed a significant and progressive grade-dependent reduction in the number of mitochondria in spiny striatal neurons, with marked alteration in size. Consistent with mitochondrial loss, there was a reduction in COX2 protein levels using western analysis that corresponded with disease severity. In addition, both mitochondrial transcription factor A, a regulator of mtDNA, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-co-activator gamma-1 alpha, a key transcriptional regulator of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, were also significantly reduced with increasing disease severity. Abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics were observed, showing a significant increase in the fission protein Drp1 and a reduction in the expression of the fusion protein mitofusin 1. Lastly, mitochondrial PCR array profiling in HD caudate nucleus specimens showed increased mRNA expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial localization, membrane translocation and polarization and transport that paralleled mitochondrial derangement. These findings reveal that there are both mitochondrial loss and altered mitochondrial morphogenesis with increased mitochondrial fission and reduced fusion in HD. These findings provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:20660112

  5. An unusual case of gender-associated mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy: the mytilid Musculista senhousia (Mollusca Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) represents the most outstanding exception to matrilinear inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), typical of Metazoa. In a few bivalve mollusks, two sex-linked mtDNAs (the so-called M and F) are inherited in a peculiar way: both daughters and sons receive their F from the mother, whereas sons inherit M from the father (males do not transmit F to their progeny). This realizes a double mechanism of transmission, in which M and F mtDNAs are inherited uniparentally. DUI systems represent a unique experimental model for testing the evolutionary mechanisms that apply to mitochondrial genomes and their transmission patterns as well as to mtDNA recombination. Results A new case of DUI is described in Musculista senhousia (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae). Its heteroplasmy pattern is in line with standard DUI. Sequence variability analysis evidenced two main results: F haplotypes sequence variability is higher than that of M haplotypes, and F mitochondrial haplotypes experience a higher mutation rate in males' somatic tissues than in females' ones. Phylogenetic analysis revealed also that M. senhousia M and F haplotypes cluster separately from that of the other mytilids. Conclusion Sequence variability analysis evidenced some unexpected traits. The inverted variability pattern (the F being more variable than M) was new and it challenges most of the rationales proposed to account for sex-linked mtDNA evolution. We tentatively related this to the history of the Northern Adriatic populations analyzed. Moreover, F sequences evidenced a higher mutation level in male's soma, this variability being produced de novo each generation. This suggests that mechanisms evolved to protect mtDNA in females (f.i. antioxidant gene complexes) might be under relaxed selection in males. Phylogenetic analysis of sex-linked haplotypes confirmed that they have switched their roles during the evolutionary history of mytilids, at variance to what has

  6. PERFORMANCE OF CONVENTIONAL PCRs BASED ON PRIMERS DIRECTED TO NUCLEAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL GENES FOR THE DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Estela Gallucci; Geraldo Junior, Carlos Alberto; Marcili, Arlei; Silva, Ricardo Duarte; Keid, Lara Borges; Oliveira, Trícia Maria Ferreira da Silva; Soares, Rodrigo Martins

    2016-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the detection of the agent is of paramount importance to identify reservoirs of infection. Here, we evaluated the diagnostic attributes of PCRs based on primers directed to cytochrome-B (cytB), cytochrome-oxidase-subunit II (coxII), cytochrome-C (cytC), and the minicircle-kDNA. Although PCRs directed to cytB, coxII, cytC were able to detect different species of Leishmania, and the nucleotide sequence of their amplicons allowed the unequivocal differentiation of species, the analytical and diagnostic sensitivity of these PCRs were much lower than the analytical and diagnostic sensitivity of the kDNA-PCR. Among the 73 seropositive animals, the asymptomatic dogs had spleen and bone marrow samples collected and tested; only two animals were positive by PCRs based on cytB, coxII, and cytC, whereas 18 were positive by the kDNA-PCR. Considering the kDNA-PCR results, six dogs had positive spleen and bone marrow samples, eight dogs had positive bone marrow results but negative results in spleen samples and, in four dogs, the reverse situation occurred. We concluded that PCRs based on cytB, coxII, and cytC can be useful tools to identify Leishmania species when used in combination with automated sequencing. The discordance between the results of the kDNA-PCR in bone marrow and spleen samples may indicate that conventional PCR lacks sensitivity for the detection of infected dogs. Thus, primers based on the kDNA should be preferred for the screening of infected dogs. PMID:27253743

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis and multiple organ failure remain leading causes of death in intensive care patients. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes include a likely prominent role for mitochondria. Patient studies have shown that the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the eventual outcome. Associated mechanisms include damage to mitochondria or inhibition of the electron transport chain enzymes by nitric oxide and other reactive oxygen species (the effects of which are amplified by co-existing tissue hypoxia), hormonal influences that decrease mitochondrial activity, and downregulation of mitochondrial protein expression. Notably, despite these findings, there is minimal cell death seen in most affected organs, and these organs generally regain reasonably normal function should the patient survive. It is thus plausible that multiple organ failure following sepsis may actually represent an adaptive state whereby the organs temporarily 'shut down' their normal metabolic functions in order to protect themselves from an overwhelming and prolonged insult. A decrease in energy supply due to mitochondrial inhibition or injury may trigger this hibernation/estivation-like state. Likewise, organ recovery may depend on restoration of normal mitochondrial respiration. Data from animal studies show histological recovery of mitochondria after a septic insult that precedes clinical improvement. Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis could offer a new therapeutic approach for patients in multi-organ failure. This review will cover basic aspects of mitochondrial function, mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis, and approaches to prevent, mitigate or speed recovery from mitochondrial injury. PMID:20509844

  8. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  9. MYC and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Hockenbery, David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, face two imperatives concerning biogenesis. The first is the requirement for dividing cells to replicate their mitochondrial content by growth of existing mitochondria. The second is the dynamic regulation of mitochondrial content in response to organismal and cellular cues (e.g., exercise, caloric restriction, energy status, temperature). MYC provides the clearest example of a programmed expansion of mitochondrial content linked to the cell cycle. As an oncogene, MYC also presents intriguing questions about the role of its mitochondrial targets in cancer-related phenotypes, such as the Warburg effect and MYC-dependent apoptosis. PMID:24789872

  10. Mitochondria-type GPAT is required for mitochondrial fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Yohsuke; Sakuragi, Takeshi; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Tomioka, Naoko H; Kono, Nozomu; Imae, Rieko; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken; Ishihara, Naotada; Inoue, Takao; Mitani, Shohei; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) is involved in the first step in glycerolipid synthesis and is localized in both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. To clarify the functional differences between ER-GPAT and mitochondrial (Mt)-GPAT, we generated both GPAT mutants in C. elegans and demonstrated that Mt-GPAT is essential for mitochondrial fusion. Mutation of Mt-GPAT caused excessive mitochondrial fragmentation. The defect was rescued by injection of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a direct product of GPAT, and by inhibition of LPA acyltransferase, both of which lead to accumulation of LPA in the cells. Mitochondrial fragmentation in Mt-GPAT mutants was also rescued by inhibition of mitochondrial fission protein DRP-1 and by overexpression of mitochondrial fusion protein FZO-1/mitofusin, suggesting that the fusion/fission balance is affected by Mt-GPAT depletion. Mitochondrial fragmentation was also observed in Mt-GPAT-depleted HeLa cells. A mitochondrial fusion assay using HeLa cells revealed that Mt-GPAT depletion impaired mitochondrial fusion process. We postulate from these results that LPA produced by Mt-GPAT functions not only as a precursor for glycerolipid synthesis but also as an essential factor of mitochondrial fusion. PMID:23572076

  11. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  12. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress

    PubMed Central

    Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L.; Losón, Oliver C.; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P.; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA–linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:26816379

  14. Metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Erin Quan; Herzig, Sébastien; Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L; Losón, Oliver C; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C; Shaw, Reuben J

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA-linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:26816379

  15. Analysis of uniparental lineages in two villages of Santiago Del Estero, Argentina, seat of Pueblos de Indios in colonial times.

    PubMed

    Pauro, Maia; García, Angelina; Nores, Rodrigo; Demarchi, Darío A

    2013-10-01

    Based on the analysis of the mitochondrial control region and seven biallelic markers of the Y chromosome, we investigated the genetic composition of two rural populations of southern Santiago del Estero, Argentina, that were seats in colonial times of pueblos de indios, a colonial practice that consisted of concentrating the indigenous populations in organized and accessible settlements, to facilitate Christianizing and policing. We found the Native American Y chromosome haplogroup Q1a3a in only 11% (3 of 27) of the males. Haplogroup R, common in European populations, is the most frequent haplogroup in Santiago del Estero (55%). In contrast, the persistence of Native American maternal lineages is extremely high (95%). This finding is most likely due to the low incidence in that region of the 20th century European wave of migration and to the existence of pueblos de indios from 1612 to the first decades of the 19th century. In contrast to archeological records that suggest Santiago del Estero late pre-Hispanic groups were strongly influenced by the Andean world, we did not find genetic evidence in support of significant gene fl ow. On the other hand, these populations share many mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region I (HVRI) haplotypes with other populations from the Sierras Pampeanas (particularly with Córdoba) and the Gran Chaco regions. PMID:25078956

  16. Chemerin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qihai; Deng, Yujie; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Yang, Ying; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2015-05-01

    Chemerin is a novel adipocyte-derived factor that induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. However, the effect of chemerin on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has received little attention. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of chemerin-mediated insulin resistance. In this study, we used recombinant adenovirus to express murine chemerin in C57BL/6 mice. The mitochondrial function and structure were evaluated in isolated soleus muscles from mice. The oxidative mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured C2C12 myotubes exposed to recombinant chemerin was analysed by western blotting, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The overexpression of chemerin in mice reduced the muscle mitochondrial content and increased mitochondrial autophagy, as determined by the increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and higher expression levels of Beclin1 and autophagy-related protein-5 and 7. The chemerin treatment of C2C12 myotubes increased the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, concomitant with a reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased the occurrence of mitochondrial protein carbonyls and mitochondrial DNA deletions. Knockdown of the expression of chemokine-like receptor 1 or the use of mitochondria-targeting antioxidant Mito-TEMPO restored the mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemerin. Furthermore, chemerin exposure in C2C12 myotubes not only reduced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) but also dephosphorylated forkhead box O3α (FoxO3α). Chemerin-induced mitochondrial autophagy likely through an AKT-FoxO3α-dependent signalling pathway. These findings provide direct evidence that chemerin may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial remodelling and function in skeletal muscle. PMID:25754411

  17. Mitochondrial divergence between slow- and fast-aging garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial function has long been hypothesized to be intimately involved in aging processes--either directly through declining efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and ATP production with advancing age, or indirectly, e.g., through increased mitochondrial production of damaging free radicals with age. Yet we lack a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genotypes and phenotypes across diverse animal models, particularly in species that have extremely labile physiology. Here, we measure mitochondrial genome-types and transcription in ecotypes of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) that are adapted to disparate habitats and have diverged in aging rates and lifespans despite residing in close proximity. Using two RNA-seq datasets, we (1) reconstruct the garter snake mitochondrial genome sequence and bioinformatically identify regulatory elements, (2) test for divergence of mitochondrial gene expression between the ecotypes and in response to heat stress, and (3) test for sequence divergence in mitochondrial protein-coding regions in these slow-aging (SA) and fast-aging (FA) naturally occurring ecotypes. At the nucleotide sequence level, we confirmed two (duplicated) mitochondrial control regions one of which contains a glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gene expression of protein-coding genes was higher in FA snakes relative to SA snakes for most genes, but was neither affected by heat stress nor an interaction between heat stress and ecotype. SA and FA ecotypes had unique mitochondrial haplotypes with amino acid substitutions in both CYTB and ND5. The CYTB amino acid change (Isoleucine → Threonine) was highly segregated between ecotypes. This divergence of mitochondrial haplotypes between SA and FA snakes contrasts with nuclear gene-flow estimates, but correlates with previously reported divergence in mitochondrial function (mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP production, and reactive oxygen species consequences). PMID:26403677

  18. Mitochondrial syndromes with leukoencephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2012-02-01

    White matter involvement has recently been recognized as a common feature in patients with multisystem mitochondrial disorders that may be caused by molecular defects in either the mitochondrial genome or the nuclear genes. It was first realized in classical mitochondrial syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, such as mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), Leigh's disease, and Kearns-Sayre's syndrome. Deficiencies in respiratory chain complexes I, II, IV, and V often cause Leigh's disease; most of them are due to nuclear defects that may lead to severe early-onset leukoencephalopathies. Defects in a group of nuclear genes involved in the maintenance of mtDNA integrity may also affect the white matter; for example, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) caused by thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, Navajo neurohepatopathy (NNH) due to MPV17 mutations, and Alpers syndrome due to defects in DNA polymerase gamma (POLG). More recently, leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) has been reported to be caused by autosomal recessive mutations in a mitochondrial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, DARS2 gene. A patient with leukoencephalopathy and neurologic complications in addition to a multisystem involvement warrants a complete evaluation for mitochondrial disorders. A definite diagnosis may be achieved by molecular analysis of candidate genes based on the biochemical, clinical, and imaging results. PMID:22422207

  19. Myoclonus in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Michelangelo; Orsucci, Daniele; Angelini, Corrado; Bertini, Enrico; Catteruccia, Michela; Pegoraro, Elena; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria L; Comi, Giacomo P; Minetti, Carlo; Bruno, Claudio; Moggio, Maurizio; Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; Mongini, Tiziana; Vercelli, Liliana; Primiano, Guido; Servidei, Serenella; Tonin, Paola; Scarpelli, Mauro; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Santorelli, Filippo M; Nesti, Claudia; Filosto, Massimiliano; Lamperti, Costanza; Zeviani, Massimo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Myoclonus is a possible manifestation of mitochondrial disorders, and its presence is considered, in association with epilepsy and the ragged red fibers, pivotal for the syndromic diagnosis of MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers). However, its prevalence in mitochondrial diseases is not known. The aims of this study are the evaluation of the prevalence of myoclonus in a big cohort of mitochondrial patients and the clinical characterization of these subjects. Based on the database of the "Nation-wide Italian Collaborative Network of Mitochondrial Diseases," we reviewed the clinical and molecular data of mitochondrial patients with myoclonus among their clinical features. Myoclonus is a rather uncommon clinical feature of mitochondrial diseases (3.6% of 1,086 patients registered in our database). It is not strictly linked to a specific genotype or phenotype, and only 1 of 3 patients with MERRF harbors the 8344A>G mutation (frequently labeled as "the MERRF mutation"). Finally, myoclonus is not inextricably linked to epilepsy in MERRF patients, but more to cerebellar ataxia. In a myoclonic patient, evidences of mitochondrial dysfunction must be investigated, even though myoclonus is not a common sign of mitochondriopathy. Clinical, histological, and biochemical data may predict the finding of a mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutation. Finally, this study reinforces the notion that myoclonus is not inextricably linked to epilepsy in MERRF patients, and therefore the term "myoclonic epilepsy" seems inadequate and potentially misleading. PMID:24510442

  20. Twin Mitochondrial Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Yosr; Martinez, Selena; Gong, Henry; Dumas, Kevin; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-09-01

    When applying genome-wide sequencing technologies to disease investigation, it is increasingly important to resolve sequence variation in regions of the genome that may have homologous sequences. The human mitochondrial genome challenges interpretation given the potential for heteroplasmy, somatic variation, and homologous nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts). Identical twins share the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from early life, but whether the mitochondrial sequence remains similar is unclear. We compared an adult monozygotic twin pair using high throughput-sequencing and evaluated variants with primer extension and mitochondrial pre-enrichment. Thirty-seven variants were shared between the twin individuals, and the variants were verified on the original genomic DNA. These studies support highly identical genetic sequence in this case. Certain low-level variant calls were of high quality and homology to the mitochondrial DNA, and they were further evaluated. When we assessed calls in pre-enriched mitochondrial DNA templates, we found that these may represent numts, which can be differentiated from mtDNA variation. We conclude that twin identity extends to mitochondrial DNA, and it is critical to differentiate between numts and mtDNA in genome sequencing, particularly since significant heteroplasmy could influence genome interpretation. Further studies on mtDNA and numts will aid in understanding how variation occurs and persists. PMID:24040623

  1. Mitochondrial transmission during mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by mitochondrial fusion and fission and the intramitochondrial segregation of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nunnari, J; Marshall, W F; Straight, A; Murray, A; Sedat, J W; Walter, P

    1997-01-01

    To gain insight into the process of mitochondrial transmission in yeast, we directly labeled mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and observed their fate after the fusion of two cells. To this end, mitochondrial proteins in haploid cells of opposite mating type were labeled with different fluorescent dyes and observed by fluorescence microscopy after mating of the cells. Parental mitochondrial protein markers rapidly redistributed and colocalized throughout zygotes, indicating that during mating, parental mitochondria fuse and their protein contents intermix, consistent with results previously obtained with a single parentally derived protein marker. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of mitochondria in living cells with wide-field fluorescence microscopy indicated that mitochondria form a single dynamic network, whose continuity is maintained by a balanced frequency of fission and fusion events. Thus, the complete mixing of mitochondrial proteins can be explained by the formation of one continuous mitochondrial compartment after mating. In marked contrast to the mixing of parental mitochondrial proteins after fusion, mtDNA (labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromodeoxyuridine) remained distinctly localized to one half of the zygotic cell. This observation provides a direct explanation for the genetically observed nonrandom patterns of mtDNA transmission. We propose that anchoring of mtDNA within the organelle is linked to an active segregation mechanism that ensures accurate inheritance of mtDNA along with the organelle. Images PMID:9243504

  2. Mitochondrial Therapeutics for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Raquel S.; Lee, Pamela; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria represent approximately one-third of the mass of the heart and play a critical role in maintaining cellular function—however, they are also a potent source of free radicals and pro-apoptotic factors. As such, maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis is essential to cell survival. As the dominant source of ATP, continuous quality control is mandatory to ensure their ongoing optimal function. Mitochondrial quality control is accomplished by the dynamic interplay of fusion, fission, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. This review examines these processes in the heart and considers their role in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Interventions that modulate mitochondrial turnover, including pharmacologic agents, exercise, and caloric restriction are discussed as a means to improve mitochondrial quality control, ameliorate cardiovascular dysfunction, and enhance longevity. PMID:21718247

  3. Targeted Nanoparticles in Mitochondrial Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rakesh K.; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the so-called “energy factory of cells” not only produce energy but also contribute immensely in cellular mortality management. Mitochondrial dysfunctions result in various diseases including but not limited to cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the recent years, targeting mitochondria emerged as an attractive strategy to control mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Despite the desire to direct therapeutics to the mitochondria, the actual task is more difficult due to the highly complex nature of the mitochondria. The potential benefits of integrating nanomaterials with properties such as biodegradability, magnetization, fluorescence, and near-infrared absorption into a single object of nanoscale dimensions can lead to the development of hybrid nano-medical platforms for targeting therapeutics to the mitochondria. Only a handful of nanoparticles based on metal oxides, gold nanoparticles, dendrons, carbon nanotubes, and liposomes were recently engineered to target mitochondria. Most of these materials face tremendous challenges when administered in vivo due to their limited biocompatibility. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles emerged as eminent candidates for effective drug delivery. In this review we highlight the current advancements in the development of biodegradable nanoparticle platforms as effective targeting tools for mitochondrial medicine. PMID:25348382

  4. Regulation of Mitochondrial Transport in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei-Yao; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are cellular power plants that supply ATP to power various biological activities essential for neuronal growth, survival, and function. Due to unique morphological features, neurons face exceptional challenges to maintain ATP and Ca2+ homeostasis. Neurons require specialized mechanisms distributing mitochondria to distal areas where energy and Ca2+ buffering are in high demand, such as synapses and axonal branches. These distal compartments also undergo development- and activity-dependent remodeling, thereby altering mitochondrial trafficking and distribution. Mitochondria move bi-directionally, pause briefly, and move again, frequently changing direction. In mature neurons, only one-third of axonal mitochondria are motile. Stationary mitochondria serve as local energy sources and buffer intracellular Ca2+. The balance between motile and stationary mitochondria responds quickly to changes in axonal and synaptic physiology. Furthermore, neurons are postmitotic cells surviving for the lifetime of the organism; thus, mitochondria need to be removed when they become aged or dysfunction. Mitochondria also alter their motility under stress conditions or when their integrity is impaired. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial transport is essential to meet altered metabolic requirements and to remove aged and damaged mitochondria or replenish healthy ones to distal terminals. Defects in mitochondrial transport and altered distribution are implicated in the pathogenesis of several major neurological disorders. Thus, research into the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial motility is an important emerging frontier in neurobiology. This short review provides an updated overview on motor-adaptor machineries that drive and regulate mitochondrial transport and docking receptors that anchor axonal mitochondria in response to the changes in synaptic activity, metabolic requirement, and altered mitochondrial integrity. The review focuses on microtubule (MT

  5. Cytoprotection by the Modulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain: The Emerging Role of Mitochondrial STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, Karol; Chen, Qun; Larner, Andrew C.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The down regulation of mitochondrial electron transport is an emerging mechanism of cytoprotective intervention that is effective in pathologic settings such as myocardial ischemia and reperfusion when the continuation of mitochondrial respiration produces reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial calcium overload, and the release of cytochrome c to activate cell death programs. The initial target of deranged electron transport is the mitochondria themselves. In the first part of this review, we describe this concept and summarize different approaches used to regulate mitochondrial respiration by targeting complex I as a proximal site in the electron transport chain (ETC) in order to favor the cytoprotection. The second part of the review highlights the emerging role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the direct, non-transcriptional regulation of ETC, as an example of a genetic approach to modulate respiration. Recent studies indicate that a pool of STAT3 resides in the mitochondria where it is necessary for the maximal activity of complexes I and II of the electron transport chain (ETC). The over expression of mitochondrial-targeted STAT3 results in a partial blockade of electron transport at complexes I and II that does not impair mitochondrial membrane potential nor enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The targeting of transcriptionally-inactive STAT3 to mitochondria attenuates damage to mitochondria during cell stress, resulting in decreased production of ROS and retention of cytochrome c by mitochondria. The overexpression of STAT3 targeted to mitochondria unveils a novel protective approach mediated by modulation of mitochondrial respiration that is independent of STAT3 transcriptional activity. The limitation of mitochondrial respiration under pathologic circumstances can be approached by activation and over expression of endogenous signaling mechanisms in addition to pharmacologic means. The regulation of

  6. Primary Mitochondrial Disease and Secondary Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Importance of Distinction for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Niyazov, Dmitriy M; Kahler, Stephan G; Frye, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to abnormal oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos). Primary mitochondrial disease (PMD) is diagnosed clinically and ideally, but not always, confirmed by a known or indisputably pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutation. The PMD genes either encode oxphos proteins directly or they affect oxphos function by impacting production of the complex machinery needed to run the oxphos process. However, many disorders have the 'mitochondrial' phenotype without an identifiable mtDNA or nDNA mutation or they have a variant of unknown clinical significance. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction (SMD) can be caused by genes encoding neither function nor production of the oxphos proteins and accompanies many hereditary non-mitochondrial diseases. SMD may also be due to nongenetic causes such as environmental factors. In our practice, we see many patients with clinical signs of mitochondrial dysfunction based on phenotype, biomarkers, imaging, muscle biopsy, or negative/equivocal mtDNA or nDNA test results. In these cases, it is often tempting to assign a patient's phenotype to 'mitochondrial disease', but SMD is often challenging to distinguish from PMD. Fortunately, rapid advances in molecular testing, made possible by next generation sequencing, have been effective at least in some cases in establishing accurate diagnoses to distinguish between PMD and SMD. This is important, since their treatments and prognoses can be quite different. However, even in the absence of the ability to distinguish between PMD and SMD, treating SMD with standard treatments for PMD can be effective. We review the latest findings regarding mitochondrial disease/dysfunction and give representative examples in which differentiation between PMD and SMD has been crucial for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27587988

  7. Treatment of Mitochondrial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Sreenivas; Parikh, Sumit; Demarest, Scott; Kurz, Jonathan; Gropman, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement While numerous treatments for mitochondrial disorders have been suggested, relatively few have undergone controlled clinical trials. Treatment of these disorders is challenging, as only symptomatic therapy is available. In this review we will focus on newer drugs and treatment trials in mitochondrial diseases, with a special focus on medications to avoid in treating epilepsy and ICU patient with mitochondrial disease, which has not been included in such a review. Readers are also referred to the opinion statement in A Modern Approach to the Treatment of Mitochondrial Disease published in Current Treatment Options in Neurology 2009. Many of the supplements used for treatment were reviewed in the previous abstract, and dosing guidelines were provided. The focus of this review is on items not previously covered in depth, and our discussion includes more recently studied compounds as well as any relevant updates on older compounds. We review a variety of vitamins and xenobiotics, including dichloroacetate (DCA), arginine, coenzyme Q10, idebenone, EPI-743, and exercise training. Treatment of epilepsy, which is a common feature in many mitochondrial phenotypes, warrants special consideration due to the added toxicity of certain medications, and we provide a discussion of these unique treatment challenges. Interesting, however, with only a few exceptions, the treatment strategies for epilepsy in mitochondrial cytopathies are the same as for epilepsy without mitochondrial dysfunction. We also discuss intensive care management, building upon similar reviews, adding new dimensions, and demonstrating the complexity of overall care of these patients. PMID:24700433

  8. The mitochondrial connection

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Mendez, Alejandro; Todd, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Arg catabolism to cytoplasmic urea and glutamate is initiated by two mitochondrial enzymes, arginase and ornithine aminotransferase. Mutation of either enzyme leads to Arg sensitivity, and at least in the former, an arginine-induced seedling morphology similar to exogenous auxin treatment. We reported that single mutants lacking either of two arginase isozymes exhibited more NO accumulation and efflux, and increased responses to auxin (measured by DR5 reporter expression and auxin-induced lateral roots). We discuss evidence for stimulation of NO by arginine, either directly, or via polyamines derived from arginine. We favor the “direct” route because mitochondria are sites of NO ‘hot spots,’ and the location of arginine-degrading enzymes and the NO-associated protein1. The polyamine “branch” invokes more than one cell compartment, at least two intermediates (polyamines and H2O2) between Arg and NO, and is not consistent with enhanced lateral root formation in arginine decarboxylase mutants. Genetic tools are at our disposal to test the two possible routes of arginine-derived NO. PMID:19704448

  9. In vitro inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory rate by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2012-09-18

    Mitochondria represent a possible drug target with unexplored therapeutic and toxicological potential. The possibility was suggested that antidepressants, mood stabilizers and other drugs may show some therapeutic and/or toxic effects through their action on mitochondrial functions. There are no sufficient data about the effect of these drugs on mitochondrial respiration in the brain. We investigated the in vitro effects of amitriptyline, fluoxetine, tianeptine, ketamine, lithium, valproate, olanzapine, chlorpromazine and propranolol on mitochondrial respiration in crude mitochondrial fractions of pig brains. Respiration was energized using substrates of complex I or complex II and dose dependent drug-induced changes in mitochondrial respiratory rate were measured by high-resolution respirometry. Antidepressants, but not mood stabilizers, ketamine and propranolol were found to inhibit mitochondrial respiratory rate. The effective dose of antidepressants reaching half the maximal respiratory rate was in the range of 0.07-0.46 mmol/L. Partial inhibition was found for all inhibitors. Differences between individual drugs with similar physicochemical properties indicate selectivity of drug-induced changes in mitochondrial respiratory rate. Our findings suggest that mood stabilizers do not interfere with brain mitochondrial respiration, whereas direct mitochondrial targeting is involved in mechanisms of action of pharmacologically different antidepressants. PMID:22842584

  10. Mitochondrial [dys]function; culprit in pre-eclampsia?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal Michael; Kenny, Louise Clare

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are extensively identified for their bioenergetic capacities; however, recently these metabolic hubs are increasingly being appreciated as critical regulators of numerous cellular signalling systems. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species have evolved as a mode of cross-talk between mitochondrial function and physiological systems, to sustain equipoise and foster adaption to cellular stress. Redox signalling mediated by exaggerated mitochondrial-ROS (reactive oxygen species) has been incriminated in a plethora of disease pathologies. Excessive production of mitochondrial ROS is intrinsically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction is a key facilitator of oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and metabolism. These are key pathogenic intermediaries of pre-eclampsia, hence we hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction is a pathogenic mediator of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants may restrain production of ROS-mediated deleterious redox signalling pathways. If our hypothesis proves correct, therapeutic strategies directly targeting mitochondrial superoxide scavenging should be actively pursued as they may alleviate maternal vascular dysfunction and dramatically improve maternal and fetal health worldwide. PMID:27252404

  11. FUS Interacts with HSP60 to Promote Mitochondrial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jianwen; Yang, Mengxue; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianghong; Sun, Shufeng; Cheng, Haipeng; Li, Yang; Bigio, Eileen H.; Mesulam, Marsel; Xu, Qi; Du, Sidan; Fushimi, Kazuo; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jane Y.

    2015-01-01

    FUS-proteinopathies, a group of heterogeneous disorders including ALS-FUS and FTLD-FUS, are characterized by the formation of inclusion bodies containing the nuclear protein FUS in the affected patients. However, the underlying molecular and cellular defects remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for mitochondrial localization of FUS and its induction of mitochondrial damage. Remarkably, FTLD-FUS brain samples show increased FUS expression and mitochondrial defects. Biochemical and genetic data demonstrate that FUS interacts with a mitochondrial chaperonin, HSP60, and that FUS translocation to mitochondria is, at least in part, mediated by HSP60. Down-regulating HSP60 reduces mitochondrially localized FUS and partially rescues mitochondrial defects and neurodegenerative phenotypes caused by FUS expression in transgenic flies. This is the first report of direct mitochondrial targeting by a nuclear protein associated with neurodegeneration, suggesting that mitochondrial impairment may represent a critical event in different forms of FUS-proteinopathies and a common pathological feature for both ALS-FUS and FTLD-FUS. Our study offers a potential explanation for the highly heterogeneous nature and complex genetic presentation of different forms of FUS-proteinopathies. Our data also suggest that mitochondrial damage may be a target in future development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for FUS-proteinopathies, a group of devastating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26335776

  12. Mitochondrial diseases and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bindoff, Laurence A; Engelsen, Bernt A

    2012-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final common pathway for energy production. Defects affecting this pathway can give rise to disease that presents at any age and affects any tissue. However, irrespective of genetic defect, epilepsy is common and there is a significant risk of status epilepticus. This review summarizes our current understanding of the epilepsy that occurs in mitochondrial disease, focusing on three of the most common disorders: mitochondrial myopathy encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF), and polymerase gamma (POLG) related disease. In addition, we review the pathogenesis and possible treatment of these disorders. PMID:22946726

  13. The pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease as modeled in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, WeiWei

    2009-01-01

    It is now clear that mitochondrial defects are associated with a plethora of clinical phenotypes in man and mouse. This is the result of the mitochondria's central role in energy production, reactive oxygen species (ROS) biology, and apoptosis, and because the mitochondrial genome consists of roughly 1500 genes distributed across the maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the Mendelian nuclear DNA (nDNA). While numerous pathogenic mutations in both mtDNA and nDNA mitochondrial genes have been identified in the past 21 years, the causal role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the common metabolic and degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging is still debated. However, the development of mice harboring mitochondrial gene mutations is permitting demonstration of the direct cause-and-effect relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Mutations in nDNA-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, apoptosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP), mitochondrial fusion, and mtDNA biogenesis have already demonstrated the phenotypic importance of mitochondrial defects. These studies are being expanded by the recent development of procedures for introducing mtDNA mutations into the mouse. These studies are providing direct proof that mtDNA mutations are sufficient by themselves to generate major clinical phenotypes. As more different mtDNA types and mtDNA gene mutations are introduced into various mouse nDNA backgrounds, the potential functional role of mtDNA variation in permitting humans and mammals to adapt to different environments and in determining their predisposition to a wide array of diseases should be definitively demonstrated. PMID:19651984

  14. Shot-gun proteomic analysis of mitochondrial D-loop DNA binding proteins: identification of mitochondrial histones.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yon-Sik; Hoon Jeong, Jae; Min, Hye-Ki; Jung, Hee-Jung; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim Pak, Youngmi

    2011-05-01

    Transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are regulated by nuclear DNA-encoded proteins that are targeted into mitochondria. A decrease in mtDNA copy number results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which may lead to insulin resistance and metabolic syndromes. We analyzed mitochondrial proteins that physically bind to human mitochondrial D-loop DNA using a shot-gun proteomics approach following protein enrichment by D-loop DNA-linked affinity chromatography. A total of 152 D-loop DNA binding proteins were identified by peptide sequencing using ultra high pressure capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 68 were mitochondrial proteins, 96 were DNA/RNA/protein binding proteins and 114 proteins might form a complex via protein-protein interactions. Histone family members of H1, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, were detected in abundance among them. In particular, histones H2A and H2B were present in the mitochondrial membrane as integral membrane proteins and not bound directly to mtDNA inside the organelle. Histones H1.2, H3 and H4 were associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Silencing of H2AX expression inhibited mitochondrial protein transport. Our data suggests that many mitochondrial proteins may reside in multiple subcellular compartments like H2AX and exert multiple functions. PMID:21359316

  15. Overview of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Vitor M C

    2012-01-01

    Bioenergetic Science started in seventh century with the pioneer works by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier on photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. New developments were implemented by Pasteur in 1860s with the description of fermentations associated to microorganisms, further documented by Buchner brothers who discovered that fermentations also occurred in cell extracts in the absence of living cells. In the beginning of twentieth century, Harden and Young demonstrated that orthophosphate and other heat-resistant compounds (cozymase), later identified as NAD, ADP, and metal ions, were mandatory in the fermentation of glucose. The full glycolysis pathway has been detailed in 1940s with the contributions of Embden, Meyeroff, Parnas, Warburg, among others. Studies on the citric acid cycle started in 1910 (Thunberg) and were elucidated by Krebs et al. in the 1940s. Mitochondrial bioenergetics gained emphasis in the late 1940s and 1950s with the works of Lenhinger, Racker, Chance, Boyer, Ernster, and Slater, among others. The prevalent "chemical coupling hypothesis" of energy conservation in oxidative phosphorylation was challenged and replaced by the "chemiosmotic hypothesis" originally formulated in 1960s by Mitchell and later substantiated and extended to energy conservation in bacteria and chloroplasts, besides mitochondria, with clear-cut identification of molecular proton pumps. After identification of most reactive mechanisms, emphasis has been directed to structure resolution of molecular complex clusters, e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, complex III, complex II, ATP synthase, photosystem I, photosynthetic water splitting center, and energy collecting antennæ of several photosynthetic systems. Modern trends concern to the reactivity of radical and other active species in association with bioenergetic activities. A promising trend concentrates on the cell redox status quantified in terms of redox potentials. In spite of significant development and

  16. Cytonuclear Interactions in the Evolution of Animal Mitochondrial tRNA Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of mitochondrial information processing pathways, including replication, transcription and translation, is characterized by the gradual replacement of mitochondrial-encoded proteins with nuclear-encoded counterparts of diverse evolutionary origins. Although the ancestral enzymes involved in mitochondrial transcription and replication have been replaced early in eukaryotic evolution, mitochondrial translation is still carried out by an apparatus largely inherited from the α-proteobacterial ancestor. However, variation in the complement of mitochondrial-encoded molecules involved in translation, including transfer RNAs (tRNAs), provides evidence for the ongoing evolution of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we investigate the evolution of the mitochondrial translational machinery using recent genomic and transcriptomic data from animals that have experienced the loss of mt-tRNAs, including phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, as well as some representatives of all four classes of Porifera. We focus on four sets of mitochondrial enzymes that directly interact with tRNAs: Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, tRNAIle lysidine synthetase, and RNase P. Our results support the observation that the fate of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins is influenced by the evolution of molecules encoded in mitochondrial DNA, but in a more complex manner than appreciated previously. The data also suggest that relaxed selection on mitochondrial translation rather than coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear subunits is responsible for elevated rates of evolution in mitochondrial translational proteins. PMID:26116918

  17. Cytonuclear Interactions in the Evolution of Animal Mitochondrial tRNA Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of mitochondrial information processing pathways, including replication, transcription and translation, is characterized by the gradual replacement of mitochondrial-encoded proteins with nuclear-encoded counterparts of diverse evolutionary origins. Although the ancestral enzymes involved in mitochondrial transcription and replication have been replaced early in eukaryotic evolution, mitochondrial translation is still carried out by an apparatus largely inherited from the α-proteobacterial ancestor. However, variation in the complement of mitochondrial-encoded molecules involved in translation, including transfer RNAs (tRNAs), provides evidence for the ongoing evolution of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we investigate the evolution of the mitochondrial translational machinery using recent genomic and transcriptomic data from animals that have experienced the loss of mt-tRNAs, including phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, as well as some representatives of all four classes of Porifera. We focus on four sets of mitochondrial enzymes that directly interact with tRNAs: Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase, and RNase P. Our results support the observation that the fate of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins is influenced by the evolution of molecules encoded in mitochondrial DNA, but in a more complex manner than appreciated previously. The data also suggest that relaxed selection on mitochondrial translation rather than coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear subunits is responsible for elevated rates of evolution in mitochondrial translational proteins. PMID:26116918

  18. Sepsis-induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with altered mitochondrial Src and PTP1B levels.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Juanjuan; Zheng, Guilang; Chen, Zhijiang; Wang, Bin; Tao, Shaohua; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Huang, Jinda; Liu, Cui; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-09-16

    Sepsis-induced brain dysfunction (SIBD) is often the first manifestation of sepsis, and its pathogenesis is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the roles of the tyrosine kinase Src and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in brain mitochondrial dysfunction using a rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. We found that there was a gradual and significant increase of PTP1B levels in the rat brain after sepsis induction. In contrast, brain Src levels were reduced in parallel with the PTP1B increase. Sepsis led to significantly reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes I, II and III. Pretreatment of mitochondrial proteins with active PTP1B significantly inhibited complexes I and III activities in vitro, whereas Src enhanced complexes I, II, and III activities. PTP1B and Src were each co-immunoprecipitated with OXPHOS complexes I and III, suggesting direct interactions between both proteins and complexes I and III. Src also directly interacted with complex II. Furthermore, pretreatment of mitochondrial proteins with active PTP1B resulted in overproduction of reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with active Src produced the opposite effect. These results suggest that brain mitochondrial dysfunction following LPS-induced sepsis in rats is partly attributed to PTP1B and Src mediated decrease in mitochondrial protein tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:25998537

  19. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  20. A narrow segment of maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7q31-qter in Silver-Russell syndrome delimits a candidate gene region.

    PubMed

    Hannula, K; Lipsanen-Nyman, M; Kontiokari, T; Kere, J

    2001-01-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7), the inheritance of both chromosomes from only the mother, is observed in approximately 10% of patients with Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). It has been suggested that at least one imprinted gene that regulates growth and development resides on human chromosome 7. To date, three imprinted genes-PEG1/MEST, gamma2-COP, and GRB10-have been identified on chromosome 7, but their role in the etiology of SRS remains uncertain. In a systematic screening with microsatellite markers, for matUPD7 cases among patients with SRS, we identified a patient who had a small segment of matUPD7 and biparental inheritance of the remainder of chromosome 7. Such a pattern may be explained by somatic recombination in the zygote. The matUPD7 segment at 7q31-qter extends for 35 Mb and includes the imprinted gene cluster of PEG1/MEST and gamma2-COP at 7q32. GRB10 at 7p11.2-p12 is located within a region of biparental inheritance. Although partial UPD has previously been reported for chromosomes 6, 11, 14, and 15, this is the first report of a patient with SRS who has segmental matUPD7. Our findings delimit a candidate imprinted region sufficient to cause SRS. PMID:11112662

  1. An atypical human induced pluripotent stem cell line with a complex, stable, and balanced genomic rearrangement including a large de novo 1q uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Clara; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Luce, Eléanor; Pineau, Dominique; Dianat, Noushin; Hannoun, Zara; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy through their use as vital tools for regenerative and personalized medicine. However, the genomic integrity of hiPSCs still raises some concern and is one of the barriers limiting their use in clinical applications. Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of aneuploidies, copy number variations, or single point mutations in hiPSCs, and nonintegrative reprogramming strategies have been developed to minimize the impact of the reprogramming process on the hiPSC genome. Here, we report the characterization of an hiPSC line generated by daily transfections of modified messenger RNAs, displaying several genomic abnormalities. Karyotype analysis showed a complex genomic rearrangement, which remained stable during long-term culture. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the hiPSC line showing that this karyotype is balanced. Interestingly, single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis revealed the presence of a large 1q region of uniparental disomy (UPD), demonstrating for the first time that UPD can occur in a noncompensatory context during nonintegrative reprogramming of normal fibroblasts. PMID:25650439

  2. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease. PMID:25578555

  3. Identification of a homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation caused by acquired uniparental disomy in a relapsed early T-cell precursor ALL patient.

    PubMed

    Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Seki, Masafumi; Kato, Motohiro; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Atsuya; Kaneda, Daisuke; Fujiki, Atsushi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Nakatani, Takuya; Osone, Shinya; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Taki, Tomohiko; Takita, Junko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Hosoi, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of genetic alterations associated with relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may help to identify druggable targets for specific therapies. Early T-cell precursor ALL (ETP-ALL) is a subtype of T-ALL with poor prognosis. Although the genetic landscape of ETP-ALL has been determined, genetic alterations related to the relapse of ETP-ALL have not been fully investigated. Here, we report the first patient with relapsed pediatric ETP-ALL to exhibit a homozygous JAK3 activating mutation, V674A, caused by acquired uniparental disomy (UPD). Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed acquired UPD (aUPD) at the 19p13.3-p12 locus only in leukemic cells at relapse. Sanger sequence of the JAK3 gene, which was located at 19p13.1 and frequently mutated in ETP-ALL, was performed in paired leukemic samples to determine homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation only in relapsed leukemic cells. In contrast, leukemic cells at initial diagnosis harbored hemizygous JAK3 V674A mutation. Further, whole-exome sequencing revealed mutations in 18 genes only in relapsed samples, although none of these was recurrent in T-ALL. These findings suggest that aUPD at 19p13.1 is partly associated with relapse in this patient. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 may be therapeutic in such cases. PMID:25430085

  4. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in a girl caused by heterozygous WASP mutation and extremely skewed X-chromosome inactivation: a novel association with maternal uniparental isodisomy 6.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Tomohito; Takada, Hidetoshi; Ishimura, Masataka; Kirino, Makiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked disease characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema and immune deficiency, caused primarily by mutations in the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) gene. Female carriers are usually asymptomatic because of the preferential activation of the normal, nonmutated X-chromosome in their hematopoietic cells. We report our observations of a female child with WAS, who displayed symptoms of congenital thrombocytopenia. DNA sequencing analysis of the WASP gene revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10. The expressions of WASP and normal WASP mRNA were defective. We found preferential inactivation of the X-chromosome on which wild-type WASP was located. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray testing and the analysis of the polymorphic variable number of tandem repeat regions revealed maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 6 (UPD6). Our results underscore the importance of WASP evaluation in females with congenital thrombocytopenia and suggest that UPD6 might be related to the pathophysiology of nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25633059

  5. Traces of medieval migrations in a socially stratified population from Northern Italy. Evidence from uniparental markers and deep-rooted pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Boattini, A; Sarno, S; Pedrini, P; Medoro, C; Carta, M; Tucci, S; Ferri, G; Alù, M; Luiselli, D; Pettener, D

    2015-01-01

    Social and cultural factors had a critical role in determining the genetic structure of Europe. Therefore, socially stratified populations may help to focus on specific episodes of European demographic history. In this study, we use uniparental markers to analyse the genetic structure of Partecipanza in San Giovanni in Persiceto (Northern Italy), a peculiar institution whose origins date back to the Middle Ages and whose members form the patrilineal descent of a group of founder families. From a maternal point of view (mtDNA), Partecipanza is genetically homogeneous with the rest of the population. However, we observed a significant differentiation for Y-chromosomes. In addition, by comparing 17 Y-STR profiles with deep-rooted paternal pedigrees, we estimated a Y-STR mutation rate equal to 3.90 * 10−3 mutations per STR per generation and an average generation duration time of 33.38 years. When we used these values for tentative dating, we estimated 1300-600 years ago for the origins of the Partecipanza. These results, together with a peculiar Y-chromosomal composition and historical evidence, suggest that Germanic populations (Lombards in particular) settled in the area during the Migration Period (400–800 AD, approximately) and may have had an important role in the foundation of this community. PMID:25204305

  6. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif ‘YxxI’, suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  7. Characteristics of Mitochondrial Transformation into Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, E. E.; Saada-Reich, A.; Lorberboum-Galski, H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria can be incorporated into mammalian cells by simple co-incubation of isolated mitochondria with cells, without the need of transfection reagents or any other type of intervention. This phenomenon was termed mitochondrial transformation, and although it was discovered in 1982, currently little is known regarding its mechanism(s). Here we demonstrate that mitochondria can be transformed into recipient cells very quickly, and co-localize with endogenous mitochondria. The isolated mitochondria interact directly with cells, which engulf the mitochondria with cellular extensions in a way, which may suggest the involvement of macropinocytosis or macropinocytosis-like mechanisms in mitochondrial transformation. Indeed, macropinocytosis inhibitors but not clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibition-treatments, blocks mitochondria transformation. The integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane and its proteins is essential for the transformation of the mitochondria into cells; cells can distinguish mitochondria from similar particles and transform only intact mitochondria. Mitochondrial transformation is blocked in the presence of the heparan sulfate molecules pentosan polysulfate and heparin, which indicate crucial involvement of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the mitochondrial transformation process. PMID:27184109

  8. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif 'YxxI', suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  9. Mitochondrial Ryanodine Receptors and Other Mitochondrial Ca2+ Permeable Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Beutner, Gisela; Dirksen, Robert T.; Kinnally, Kathleen W.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ channels that underlie mitochondrial Ca2+ transport first reported decades ago have now just recently been precisely characterized electrophysiologically. Numerous data indicate that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake via these channels regulates multiple intracellular processes by shaping cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ transients, as well as altering the cellular metabolic and redox state. On the other hand, mitochondrial Ca2+ overload also initiates a cascade of events that leads to cell death. Thus, characterization of mitochondrial Ca2+ channels is central to a comprehensive understanding of cell signaling. Here, we discuss recent progresses in the biophysical and electrophysiological characterization of several distinct mitochondrial Ca2+ channels. PMID:20096690

  10. Indirubin-3'-oxime impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and prevents mitochondrial permeability transition induction

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Ana T.; Gomes, Ana P.; Simoes, Anabela M.; Teodoro, Joao S.; Duarte, Filipe V.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2008-12-01

    Indirubin, a red colored 3,2'-bisindole isomer, is a component of Indigo naturalis and is an active ingredient used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases. The family of indirubin derivatives, such as indirubin-3'-oxime, has been suggested for various therapeutic indications. However, potential toxic interactions such as indirubin effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics are still unknown. This study evaluated the action of indirubin-3'-oxime on the function of isolated rat liver mitochondria contributing to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of indirubin. Indirubin-3'-oxime incubated with isolated rat liver mitochondria, at concentrations above 10{mu}M, significantly depresses the phosphorylation efficiency of mitochondria as inferred from the decrease in the respiratory control and ADP/O ratios, the perturbations in mitochondrial membrane potential and in the phosphorylative cycle induced by ADP. Furthermore, indirubin-3'-oxime at up to 25{mu}M stimulates the rate of state 4 respiration and inhibits state 3 respiration. The increased lag phase of repolarization was associated with a direct inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase. Indirubin-3'-oxime significantly inhibited the activity of complex II and IV thus explaining the decreased FCCP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria pre-incubated with indirubin-3'-oxime exhibits decreased susceptibility to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. This work shows for the first time multiple effects of indirubin-3'-oxime on mitochondrial bioenergetics thus indicating a potential mechanism for indirubin-3'-oxime effects on cell function.

  11. Cytoplasmic irradiation results in mitochondrial dysfunction and DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Zhou, Hongning; Wang, Chunxin; Walker, Winsome F.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-01-01

    Direct DNA damage is often considered the primary cause of cancer in patients exposed to ionizing radiation or environmental carcinogens. While mitochondria are known to play an important role in radiation-induced cellular response, the mechanisms by which cytoplasmic stimuli modulate mitochondrial dynamics and functions are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined changes in mitochondrial dynamics and functions triggered by α particle damage to the mitochondria in human small airway epithelial cells, using a precision microbeam irradiator with a beam width of one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation using this device resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation and a reduction of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activity, when compared with nonirradiated controls, suggesting a reduction in respiratory chain function. Additionally, mitochondrial fragmentation or fission was associated with increased expression of the dynamin-like protein DRP1, which promotes mitochondrial fission. DRP1 inhibition by the drug mdivi-1 prevented radiation-induced mitochondrial fission, but respiratory chain function in mitochondria inhibited by radiation persisted for 12 hr. Irradiated cells also showed an increase in mitochondria-derived superoxide that could be quenched by dimethyl sulfoxide. Taken together, our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the extranuclear, non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:24080278

  12. Rolling Circle Amplification of Complete Nematode Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2005-01-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80°C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing. PMID:19262866

  13. Correcting human mitochondrial mutations with targeted RNA import.

    PubMed

    Wang, Geng; Shimada, Eriko; Zhang, Jin; Hong, Jason S; Smith, Geoffrey M; Teitell, Michael A; Koehler, Carla M

    2012-03-27

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are implicated in neuromuscular diseases, metabolic defects, and aging. An efficient and simple mechanism for neutralizing deleterious mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations has unfortunately remained elusive. Here, we report that a 20-ribonucleotide stem-loop sequence from the H1 RNA, the RNA component of the human RNase P enzyme, appended to a nonimported RNA directs the import of the resultant RNA fusion transcript into human mitochondria. The methodology is effective for both noncoding RNAs, such as tRNAs, and mRNAs. The RNA import component, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPASE), facilitates transfer of this hybrid RNA into the mitochondrial matrix. In addition, nucleus-encoded mRNAs for mitochondrial proteins, such as the mRNA of human mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12), contain regulatory sequences in their 3'-untranslated region (UTR) that confers localization to the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is postulated to aid in protein translocation after translation. We show that for some mitochondrial-encoded transcripts, such as COX2, a 3'-UTR localization sequence is not required for mRNA import, whereas for corrective mitochondrial-encoded tRNAs, appending the 3'-UTR localization sequence was essential for efficient fusion-transcript translocation into mitochondria. In vivo, functional defects in mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) translation and cell respiration were reversed in two human disease lines. Thus, this study indicates that a wide range of RNAs can be targeted to mitochondria by appending a targeting sequence that interacts with PNPASE, with or without a mitochondrial localization sequence, providing an exciting, general approach for overcoming mitochondrial genetic disorders. PMID:22411789

  14. How mitochondrial dynamism orchestrates mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shirihai, Orian; Song, Moshi; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic, except in adult cardiomyocytes. Yet, the fission and fusion-promoting proteins that mediate mitochondrial dynamism are highly expressed in, and essential to the normal functioning of, hearts. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting important roles for mitochondrial fission and fusion in cardiac mitochondrial quality control, focusing on the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway.Based in part on recent findings from in vivo mouse models in which mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial fusion or Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission were conditionally interrupted in cardiac myocytes, we propose several new concepts that may provide insight into the cardiac mitochondrial dynamism-mitophagy interactome. PMID:25999423

  15. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Maize.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial genome encodes proteins essential for mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Nuclear gene products, however, are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and the elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. We are exploiting a unique collection of maiz...

  16. Hypoxamirs and Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cottrill, Katherine A.; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Chronic hypoxia can drive maladaptive responses in numerous organ systems, leading to a multitude of chronic mammalian diseases. Oxygen homeostasis is intimately linked with mitochondrial metabolism, and dysfunction in these systems can combine to form the backbone of hypoxic-ischemic injury in multiple tissue beds. Increased appreciation of the crucial roles of hypoxia-associated miRNA (hypoxamirs) in metabolism adds a new dimension to our understanding of the regulation of hypoxia-induced disease. Recent Advances: Myriad factors related to glycolysis (e.g., aldolase A and hexokinase II), tricarboxylic acid cycle function (e.g., glutaminase and iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein 1/2), and apoptosis (e.g., p53) have been recently implicated as targets of hypoxamirs. In addition, several hypoxamirs have been implicated in the regulation of the master transcription factor of hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, clarifying how the cellular program of hypoxia is sustained and resolved. Critical Issues: Central to the discussion of metabolic change in hypoxia is the Warburg effect, a shift toward anaerobic metabolism that persists after normal oxygen levels have been restored. Many newly discovered targets of hypoxia-driven microRNA converge on pathways known to be involved in this pathological phenomenon and the apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with it. Future Directions: The often synergistic functions of miRNA may make them ideal therapeutic targets. The use of antisense inhibitors is currently being considered in diseases in which hypoxia and metabolic dysregulation predominate. In addition, exploration of pleiotripic miRNA functions will likely continue to offer unique insights into the mechanistic relationships of their downstream target pathways and associated hypoxic phenotypes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1189–1201. PMID:24111795

  17. Strong genetic admixture in the Altai at the Middle Bronze Age revealed by uniparental and ancestry informative markers.

    PubMed

    Hollard, Clémence; Keyser, Christine; Giscard, Pierre-Henri; Tsagaan, Turbat; Bayarkhuu, Noost; Bemmann, Jan; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    The Altai Mountains have been a long-term boundary zone between the Eurasian Steppe populations and South and East Asian populations. To disentangle some of the historical population movements in this area, 14 ancient human specimens excavated in the westernmost part of the Mongolian Altai were studied. Thirteen of them were dated from the Middle to the End of the Bronze Age and one of them to the Eneolithic period. The environmental conditions encountered in this region led to the good preservation of DNA in the human remains. Therefore, a multi-markers approach was adopted for the genetic analysis of identity, ancestry and phenotype markers. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that the ancient Altaians studied carried both Western (H, U, T) and Eastern (A, C, D) Eurasian lineages. In the same way, the patrilineal gene pool revealed the presence of different haplogroups (Q1a2a1-L54, R1a1a1b2-Z93 and C), probably marking different origins for the male paternal lineages. To go further in the search of the origin of these ancient specimens, phenotypical characters (i.e. hair and eye color) were determined. For this purpose, we adapted the HIrisPlex assay recently described to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In addition, some ancestry informative markers were analyzed with this assay. The results revealed mixed phenotypes among this group confirming the probable admixed ancestry of the studied Altaian population at the Middle Bronze Age. The good results obtained from ancient DNA samples suggest that this approach might be relevant for forensic casework too. PMID:25016250

  18. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  19. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  20. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  1. Mitochondrial Approaches to Protect Against Cardiac Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.; Bienengraeber, Martin; Stowe, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review will examine the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular diseases and will explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the organelle in attenuating the disease process. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate or manipulate mitochondrial function, to the use of light therapy directed to the mitochondrial function, and to modification of the mitochondrial genome for potential therapeutic benefit. The approach to rationally treat mitochondrial dysfunction could lead to more effective interventions in cardiovascular diseases that to date have remained elusive. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases (e.g., ischemic heart disease), alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction will contribute to mitigating the severity or progression of the disease. To this end, this review will provide an overview of our current understanding of mitochondria function in cardiovascular diseases as well as the potential role for targeting mitochondria with potential drugs or other interventions that lead to protection against cell injury. PMID:21559063

  2. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  3. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene mcu

    PubMed Central

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E.; Hines, Kevin J.; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R.; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L.; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function and, when cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations become too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+-permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+-regulated transcription factor CREB directly bound the mcu promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulate mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+-dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+-uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  4. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  5. Mitochondrial Ion Channels/Transporters as Sensors and Regulators of Cellular Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and the electron transport chain (ETC) serve as key sensors and regulators for cellular redox signaling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) in mitochondria, and balancing cell survival and death. Although the functional and pharmacological characteristics of mitochondrial ion transport mechanisms have been extensively studied for several decades, the majority of the molecular identities that are responsible for these channels/transporters have remained a mystery until very recently. Recent Advances: Recent breakthrough studies uncovered the molecular identities of the diverse array of major mitochondrial ion channels/transporters, including the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter pore, mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. This new information enables us to form detailed molecular and functional characterizations of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and their roles in mitochondrial redox signaling. Critical Issues: Redox-mediated post-translational modifications of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and ETC serve as key mechanisms for the spatiotemporal control of mitochondrial ROS/RNS generation. Future Directions: Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms for redox-mediated regulation of mitochondrial ion channels will enable us to find novel therapeutic targets for many diseases that are associated with cellular redox signaling and mitochondrial ion channels/transporters. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 987–1006. PMID:24180309

  6. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  7. Association of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Fatigue: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Filler, Kristin; Lyon, Debra; Bennett, James; McCain, Nancy; Elswick, Ronald; Lukkahatai, Nada; Saligan, Leorey N

    2014-06-01

    Fatigue is often described by patients as a lack of energy, mental or physical tiredness, diminished endurance, and prolonged recovery after physical activity. Etiologic mechanisms underlying fatigue are not well understood; however, fatigue is a hallmark symptom of mitochondrial disease, making mitochondrial dysfunction a putative biological mechanism for fatigue. Therefore, this review examined studies that investigated the association of markers of mitochondrial dysfunction with fatigue and proposes possible research directions to enhance understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in fatigue. A thorough search using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase databases returned 1,220 articles. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 25 articles meeting eligibility criteria were selected for full review. Dysfunctions in the mitochondrial structure, mitochondrial function (mitochondrial enzymes and oxidative/nitrosative stress), mitochondrial energy metabolism (ATP production and fatty acid metabolism), immune response, and genetics were investigated as potential contributors to fatigue. Carnitine was the most investigated mitochondrial function marker. Dysfunctional levels were reported in all the studies investigating carnitine; however, the specific type of carnitine that was dysfunctional varied. Genetic profiles were the second most studied mitochondrial parameter. Six common pathways were proposed: metabolism, energy production, protein transport, mitochondrial morphology, central nervous system dysfunction and post-viral infection. Coenzyme Q10 was the most commonly investigated mitochondrial enzyme. Low levels of Coenzyme Q10 were consistently associated with fatigue. Potential targets for further investigation were identified as well as gaps in the current literature. PMID:25147756

  8. Association of mitochondrial dysfunction and fatigue: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Filler, Kristin; Lyon, Debra; Bennett, James; McCain, Nancy; Elswick, Ronald; Lukkahatai, Nada; Saligan, Leorey N.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is often described by patients as a lack of energy, mental or physical tiredness, diminished endurance, and prolonged recovery after physical activity. Etiologic mechanisms underlying fatigue are not well understood; however, fatigue is a hallmark symptom of mitochondrial disease, making mitochondrial dysfunction a putative biological mechanism for fatigue. Therefore, this review examined studies that investigated the association of markers of mitochondrial dysfunction with fatigue and proposes possible research directions to enhance understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in fatigue. A thorough search using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase databases returned 1220 articles. After the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 25 articles meeting eligibility criteria were selected for full review. Dysfunctions in the mitochondrial structure, mitochondrial function (mitochondrial enzymes and oxidative/nitrosative stress), mitochondrial energy metabolism (ATP production and fatty acid metabolism), immune response, and genetics were investigated as potential contributors to fatigue. Carnitine was the most investigated mitochondrial function marker. Dysfunctional levels were reported in all the studies investigating carnitine; however, the specific type of carnitine that was dysfunctional varied. Genetic profiles were the second most studied mitochondrial parameter. Six common pathways were proposed: metabolism, energy production, protein transport, mitochondrial morphology, central nervous system dysfunction and post-viral infection. Coenzyme Q10 was the most commonly investigated mitochondrial enzyme. Low levels of Coenzyme Q10 were consistently associated with fatigue. Potential targets for further investigation were identified as well as gaps in the current literature. PMID:25147756

  9. Mitochondrial emitted electromagnetic signals mediate retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that mitochondria regulate nuclear transcriptional activity both in normal and cell stress conditions, known as retrograde signaling. Under normal mitochondrial function, retrograde signaling is associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, normal cell phenotype and metabolic profile. In contrast, mitochondrial dysfunction leads to abnormal (oncogenic) cell phenotype and altered bio-energetic profile (nucleus reprogramming). Despite intense research efforts, a concrete mechanism through which mitochondria determine the group of genes expressed by the nucleus is still missing. The present paper proposes a novel hypothesis regarding retrograde signaling. More specifically, it reveals the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the accompanied strong electromagnetic field (EF) as key regulatory factors of nuclear activity. Mitochondrial emitted EFs extend in long distance and affect the function of nuclear membrane receptors. Depending on their frequencies, EFs can directly activate or deactivate different groups of nuclear receptors and so determine nuclear gene expression. One of the key features of the above hypothesis is that nuclear membrane receptors, besides their own endogenous or chemical ligands (hormones, lipids, etc.), can also be activated by electromagnetic signals. Moreover, normal MMP values (about -140 mV) are associated with the production of high ATP quantities and small levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while the hyperpolarization observed in all cancer cell types leads to a dramatic fall in ATP production and an analogous increase in ROS. The diminished ATP and increased ROS production negatively affect the function of all cellular systems including nucleus. Restoration of mitochondrial function, which is characterized by the fluctuation of MMP and EF values within a certain (normal) range, is proposed as a necessary condition for normal nuclear function and cancer therapy. PMID:26474928

  10. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  11. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we will discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23435289

  12. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. The intra-mitochondrial availability of molecular oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor drives the evolutionary fashioned chemiosmotic production of ATP as a high-efficiency biological process. The mechanistic bases of carcinogenesis have demonstrated profound alteration of normative mitochondrial function, notably dysregulated respiratory processes. Accordingly, the classic Warburg effect functionally links aerobic glycolysis, aberrant production and release of lactate, and metabolic down-regulation of mitochondrial oxidative processes with the carcinogenetic phenotype. We surmise, however, that aerobic fermentation by cancer cells may also represent a developmental re-emergence of an evolutionarily conserved early phenotype, which was “sidelined” with the emergence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary mechanism for ATP production in normal cells. Regardless of state-dependent physiological status in mixed populations of cancer cells, it has been established that mitochondria are functionally linked to the initiation of cancer and its progression. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological differences in cancer cell mitochondria, notably mtDNA heteroplasmy and allele-specific expression of selected nuclear genes, may represent major focal points for novel targeting and elimination of cancer cells in metastatic disease afflicting human populations. To date, and despite considerable research efforts, the practical realization of advanced

  13. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU): Molecular Identity and Physiological Roles*

    PubMed Central

    Patron, Maria; Raffaello, Anna; Granatiero, Veronica; Tosatto, Anna; Merli, Giulia; De Stefani, Diego; Wright, Lauren; Pallafacchina, Giorgia; Terrin, Anna; Mammucari, Cristina; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    The direct measurement of mitochondrial [Ca2+] with highly specific probes demonstrated that major swings in organellar [Ca2+] parallel the changes occurring in the cytosol and regulate processes as diverse as aerobic metabolism and cell death by necrosis and apoptosis. Despite great biological relevance, insight was limited by the complete lack of molecular understanding. The situation has changed, and new perspectives have emerged following the very recent identification of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, the channel allowing rapid Ca2+ accumulation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:23400777

  14. Ancestry of the Iban Is Predominantly Southeast Asian: Genetic Evidence from Autosomal, Mitochondrial, and Y Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Tatum S.; Xing, Jinchuan; Jerah, Edward; Loa, Peter; Zhang, Yuhua; Watkins, W. Scott; Witherspoon, David J.; Huff, Chad D.; Woodward, Scott; Mowry, Bryan; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data. PMID:21305013

  15. Ancestry of the Iban is predominantly Southeast Asian: genetic evidence from autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S; Xing, Jinchuan; Barrett, Robert; Jerah, Edward; Loa, Peter; Zhang, Yuhua; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Huff, Chad D; Woodward, Scott; Mowry, Bryan; Jorde, Lynn B

    2011-01-01

    Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data. PMID:21305013

  16. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    PubMed Central

    Aanen, Duur K.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is relaxed. Furthermore, because mtDNA replication is not strictly regulated, within-cell selection may favour mtDNA variants with a replication advantage, but a deleterious effect on cell fitness. The opportunities for selfish mtDNA mutations to spread are restricted by various organism-level adaptations, such as uniparental transmission, germline mtDNA bottlenecks, germline selection and, during somatic growth, regular alternation between fusion and fission of mitochondria. These mechanisms are all hypothesized to maintain functional mtDNA. However, the strength of selection for maintenance of functional mtDNA progressively declines with age, resulting in age-related diseases. Furthermore, organismal adaptations that most probably evolved to restrict the opportunities for selfish mtDNA create secondary problems. Owing to predominantly maternal mtDNA transmission, recombination among mtDNA from different individuals is highly restricted or absent, reducing the scope for repair. Moreover, maternal inheritance precludes selection against mtDNA variants with male-specific effects. We finish by discussing the consequences of life-history differences among taxa with respect to mtDNA evolution and make a case for the use of microorganisms to experimentally manipulate levels of selection. PMID:24864309

  17. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  18. Late Mitochondrial Acquisition, Really?

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely critique of a recent Nature paper by Pittis and Gabaldón that has suggested a late origin of mitochondria in eukaryote evolution. It shows that the inferred ancestry of many mitochondrial proteins has been incorrectly assigned by Pittis and Gabaldón to bacteria other than the aerobic proteobacteria from which the ancestor of mitochondria originates, thereby questioning the validity of their suggestion that mitochondrial acquisition may be a late event in eukaryote evolution. The analysis and approach presented here may guide future studies to resolve the true ancestry of mitochondria. PMID:27289097

  19. Mitochondrial DNA damage induced autophagy, cell death, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Bennett; Hunter, Senyene E.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria contain multiple small genomes. While these organelles have efficient base excision removal of oxidative DNA lesions and alkylation damage, many DNA repair systems that work on nuclear DNA damage are not active in mitochondria. What is the fate of DNA damage in the mitochondria that cannot be repaired or that overwhelms the repair system? Some forms of mitochondrial DNA damage can apparently trigger mitochondrial DNA destruction, either via direct degradation or through specific forms of autophagy, such as mitophagy. However, accumulation of certain types of mitochondrial damage, in the absence of DNA ligase III (Lig3) or exonuclease G (EXOG), enzymes required for repair, can directly trigger cell death. This review examines the cellular effects of persistent damage to mitochondrial genomes and discusses the very different cell fates that occur in response to different kinds of damage. PMID:26709760

  20. "Mitochondrial" photochemical drugs do not release toxic amounts of 1O(2) within the mitochondrial matrix space.

    PubMed

    Petrat, Frank; Pindiur, Stanislaw; Kirsch, Michael; de Groot, Herbert

    2003-04-15

    Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondrial NAD(P)H is the primary target of singlet oxygen (1O(2)) generated by photoactivation of mitochondria-selective rhodamine derivatives. Hence, local NAD(P)H oxidation/fluorescence decrease may be used to reveal the site of intracellular 1O(2) generation. Therefore, in addition to the previously used tetramethylrhodamine methylester (TMRM), 2('),4('),5('),7(')-tetrabromorhodamine 123 bromide (TBRB) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123), we tested here whether mitochondrial NAD(P)H of cultured hepatocytes is directly oxidized upon irradiation of different "mitochondrial" photosensitizers (Photofrin; protoporphyrin IX; Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid; meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine dihydrochloride; Visudyne). In contrast to TMRM and Rho 123, which directly oxidized NAD(P)H upon irradiation, irradiation of intracellular TBRB and the photochemical drugs only indirectly affected mitochondrial NAD(P)H due to loss of mitochondrial integrity. In line with this result only TMRM and Rho 123 exclusively localized within the mitochondrial matrix. Due to these results it is doubtful whether real mitochondrial photosensitizers actually exist among the photochemical drugs applicable/used for photodynamic therapy. PMID:12667484

  1. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Mayuko; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Minae; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Oka, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Context Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD). Objective Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12. Materials and Methods A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array. Results The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father’s allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents) showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium. Conclusions This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance. PMID:26153892

  2. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 in a boy with t(14q14q) associated with a paternal t(13q14q)

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, D.J.; Waye, J.S.; Whelan, D.T.

    1994-09-01

    An 11-year-old boy was referred for chromosomal analysis because of precocious development and behavioral problems suggestive of the fragile X syndrome. The cytogenetic fragile X studies were normal, but a routine GTG-banded karyotype revealed an abnormal male karyotype with a Robertsonian translocation between the two chromosome 14`s: 46,XY,t(14q14q). Paternal karyotyping revealed another abnormal karyotype: 46,XY,t(13q14q). A brother had the same karyotype as the father; the mother was deceased. In order to determine if the apparently balanced t(14q14q) in the proband might be the cause of the clinical findings, molecular analysis of the origin of the chromosome 14`s was initiated. Southern blotting and hybridization with D4S13 showed that the proband had two copies of one maternal allele which was shared by his brother. The brother`s second allele corresponded to one of the paternal alleles; the proband had no alleles from the father. Analysis of four other VNTRs demonstrated the probability of paternity to be greater than 99%. Thus, the t(14q14q) was most likely composed of two maternal chromosome 14`s. Further characterization of the t(14q14q) by dinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers is in progress to determine whether it has arisen from maternal isodisomy or heterodisomy. Several cases of uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 have been reported recently. Paternal disomy appears to be associated with more severe congenital anomalies and mental retardation, whereas maternal disomy may be associated with premature puberty and minimal intellectual impairment. The origin of the t(14q14q) in the present case may be related to the paternal translocation, as the segregation of the t(13q14q) in meiosis could lead to sperm that are nullisomic for chromosome 14.

  3. Autism spectrum disorders and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors in Japanese patients with Prader-Willi syndrome: a comparison between maternal uniparental disomy and deletion cases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ihara, Hiroshi; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Gito, Masao; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to compare maternal uniparental disomy 15 (mUPD) and a paternal deletion of 15q11-13 (DEL) of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) in regard to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty-five Japanese individuals with PWS were recruited from a single recruitment center. The participants consisted of 22 children (aged from 6 to 12) and 23 adolescents (aged from 13 to 19). Six children and seven adolescents were confirmed as having mUPD. Sixteen children and 16 adolescents were confirmed as having DEL. Under blindness to the participants' genotypes, a single psychologist carried out behavioral and psychological assessments, including the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Pervasive Developmental Disorders Autism Society Japan Rating Scale (PARS), and ADHD-Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV). Two comparisons were made: one between mUPD and DEL children and another between mUPD and DEL adolescents. In children, no significant differences were found between mUPD and DEL participants in terms of autistic (PARS childhood, P = 0.657) and impulsive behaviors (ADHD-RS-IV hyperactive/impulsive, P = 0.275). In adolescents, mUPD patients showed significantly more autistic symptomatology (PARS adolescent, P = 0.027) and significantly more impulsive behavior (ADHD-RS-IV hyperactive/impulsive, P = 0.01) than DEL patients. Our findings about Japanese PWS patients were consistent with previous researches from western countries not focused on Asian patients, indicating that mUPD cases would be more prone to ASD than DEL cases, regardless of ethnoregional differences. In addition, our data suggested that the behavioral difference between mUPD and DEL cases in terms of autistic and impulsive symptoms tend to be unrecognizable in their childhood. PMID:24850752

  4. EUCROMIC (European Collaborative Research on Mosaicism in Chorionic Villus Sampling): New initiatives concerning uniparental disomy research and long-term clinical follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    DeLozier-Blanchet, C.D.; Hahnemann, J.M.; Vejersley, L.O.

    1994-09-01

    Since 1986 the European collaborative study on mosaicism in chorionic villus sampling (CVS), based in Glostrup, Denmark. has been collecting cytogenetic and clinical data on pregnancies in which testing revealed mosaicism or fetal/extrafetal chromosomal discrepancies. From 1986-1992, data on 60,823 samples, including 751 mosaics and 241 nonmosaic discrepancies, was collected. This information has proven helpful in prenatal counseling, by indicating which chromosomes are most often involved in mosaicism, whether the latter is likely to be confirmed in the fetus and/or placenta, and the relationship of cytogenetic results obtained by different culture techniques to pregnancy outcome. Since December 1, 1993 the European collaborative study has been funded by the European Community and by the Swiss government as a concertation project, {open_quotes}EUCROMIC{close_quotes}, a step which has allowed enlargement of the database and broadening of the project goals. Forty-five genetics centers are currently involved in this effort to monitor not only CVS, but changing trends in prenatal diagnosis in Europe. Two ancillary projects, based in Geneva, were initiated in early 1993: long-term clinical follow-up of children born after CVS mosaicism, and a search for uniparental disomy (UPD) in these same children (as well as in abortuses). Clinical data is collected from the initial reporting centers via questionnaires; at the time of writing, clinical follow-up has been obtained for over 250 children liveborn after CVS mosaicism. UPD testing results are received from the individual centers; for those not having the possibility to do the parental origin analyses themselves, testing is offered in one of several EUCROMIC-UPD laboratories.

  5. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13; 14) trisomy 14

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E.; Blouin, J.L.; Maher, J.; Avramopoulos, D.; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C.C. Jr. )

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. The authors recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hyperchloesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, they have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed -- and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed -- that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a [open quotes]maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome[close quotes] is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The control of brain mitochondrial energization by cytosolic calcium: the mitochondrial gas pedal.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, Frank Norbert; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Gainutdinov, Timur; Muth, Katharina; Seppet, Enn; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vielhaber, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    This review focuses on problems of the intracellular regulation of mitochondrial function in the brain via the (i) supply of mitochondria with ADP by means of ADP shuttles and channels and (ii) the Ca(2+) control of mitochondrial substrate supply. The permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane for adenine nucleotides is low. Therefore rate dependent concentration gradients exist between the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the cytosol. The existence of dynamic ADP gradients is an important precondition for the functioning of ADP shuttles, for example CrP-shuttle. Cr at mM concentrations instead of ADP diffuses from the cytosol through the porin pores into the intermembrane space. The CrP-shuttle isoenzymes work in different directions which requires different metabolite concentrations mainly caused by dynamic ADP compartmentation. The ADP shuttle mechanisms alone cannot explain the load dependent changes in mitochondrial energization, and a complete model of mitochondrial regulation have to account the Ca(2+) -dependent substrate supply too. According to the old paradigmatic view, Ca(2+) (cyt) taken up by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activates dehydrogenases within the matrix. However, recently it was found that Ca(2+) (cyt) at low nM concentrations exclusively activates the state 3 respiration via aralar, the mitochondrial glutamate/aspartate carrier. At higher Ca(2+) (cyt) (> 500 nM), brain mitochondria take up Ca(2+) for activation of substrate oxidation rates. Since brain mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation is only slightly influenced by Ca(2+) (cyt) , it was proposed that the cytosolic formation of pyruvate from its precursors is tightly controlled by the Ca(2+) dependent malate/aspartate shuttle. At low (50-100 nM) Ca(2+) (cyt) the pyruvate formation is suppressed, providing a substrate limitation control in neurons. This so called "gas pedal" mechanism explains why the energy metabolism of neurons in the nucleus suprachiasmaticus could be down

  7. Construction of a yeast strain devoid of mitochondrial introns and its use to screen nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Séraphin, B; Boulet, A; Simon, M; Faye, G

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed a respiring yeast strain devoid of mitochondrial introns to screen nuclear pet- mutants for those that play a direct role in mitochondrial intron excision. Intron-less mitochondria are introduced by cytoduction into pet- strains that have been made rho0; cytoductants therefrom recover respiratory competency if the original pet- mutation is required only for mitochondrial splicing. By this means, we have identified 11 complementation groups of such genes. Their total number may be estimated as about 18. Images PMID:3309947

  8. Restriction enzyme analysis of the mitochondrial genome in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Turnbull, D M; Mehta, A B; Wilson, J; Gardiner, R M

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders some of which may be caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial DNA from 10 patients with mitochondrial myopathy and their mothers was analysed using five restriction enzymes and 11 mitochondrial probes in bacteriophage M13. No abnormalities were found in seven out of the 10 patients. Polymorphisms which have not previously been reported were detected in three patients and two of their mothers. These results exclude the presence of deletions or insertions of greater than 60 bp in the region of the mitochondrial genome examined. Any causative mitochondrial DNA mutations in these disorders are therefore likely to be point mutations or small structural rearrangements. Images PMID:2903249

  9. Mitochondrial transport in neurons: impact on synaptic homeostasis and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zu-Hang; Cai, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have a number of essential roles in neuronal function. Their complex mobility patterns within neurons are characterized by frequent changes in direction. Mobile mitochondria can become stationary or pause in regions that have a high metabolic demand and can move again rapidly in response to physiological changes. Defects in mitochondrial transport are implicated in the pathogenesis of several major neurological disorders. Research into the mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport is thus an important emerging frontier. PMID:22218207

  10. A role for septin 2 in Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Pagliuso, Alessandro; Tham, To Nam; Stevens, Julia K; Lagache, Thibault; Persson, Roger; Salles, Audrey; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Oddos, Stéphane; Spang, Anne; Cossart, Pascale; Stavru, Fabrizia

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential eukaryotic organelles often forming intricate networks. The overall network morphology is determined by mitochondrial fusion and fission. Among the multiple mechanisms that appear to regulate mitochondrial fission, the ER and actin have recently been shown to play an important role by mediating mitochondrial constriction and promoting the action of a key fission factor, the dynamin-like protein Drp1. Here, we report that the cytoskeletal component septin 2 is involved in Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission in mammalian cells. Septin 2 localizes to a subset of mitochondrial constrictions and directly binds Drp1, as shown by immunoprecipitation of the endogenous proteins and by pulldown assays with recombinant proteins. Depletion of septin 2 reduces Drp1 recruitment to mitochondria and results in hyperfused mitochondria and delayed FCCP-induced fission. Strikingly, septin depletion also affects mitochondrial morphology in Caenorhabditis elegans, strongly suggesting that the role of septins in mitochondrial dynamics is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27215606

  11. Biosynthesis and Roles of Phospholipids in Mitochondrial Fusion, Division and Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Tamura, Yasushi; Roy, Madhuparna; Adachi, Yoshihiro; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria move, fuse and divide in cells. The dynamic behavior of mitochondria is central to the control of their structure and function. Three conserved mitochondrial dynamin-related GTPases (i.e., mitofusin, Opa1 and Drp1 in mammals and Fzo1, Mgm1 and Dnm1 in yeast) mediate mitochondrial fusion and division. In addition to dynamins, recent studies demonstrated that phospholipids in mitochondria also play key roles in mitochondrial dynamics by interacting with dynamin GTPases and by directly changing the biophysical properties of the mitochondrial membranes. Changes in phospholipid composition also promote mitophagy, which is a selective mitochondrial degradation process that is mechanistically coupled to mitochondrial division. In this review, we will discuss the biogenesis and function of mitochondrial phospholipids. PMID:24866973

  12. Mitochondrial Chemical Biology: New Probes Elucidate the Secrets of the Powerhouse of the Cell.

    PubMed

    Wisnovsky, Simon; Lei, Eric K; Jean, Sae Rin; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles with essential functions in cell biology, and mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a wide range of human diseases. Efforts to better understand mitochondrial biology have been limited by the lack of tools for manipulating and detecting processes occurring within the organelle. Here, we highlight recent significant advances in mitochondrial chemical biology that have produced new tools and techniques for studying mitochondria. Specifically, we focus on the development of chemical tools to perturb mitochondrial biochemistry, probes allowing precise measurement of mitochondrial function, and new techniques for high-throughput characterization of the mitochondrial proteome. Taken together, these advances in chemical biology will enable exciting new directions in mitochondrial research. PMID:27478157

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Parkinson's Disease: Focus on Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Xiao-Hui; Grace, Lim Gui-Yin; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Despite intensive efforts devoted to drug discovery, the disease remains incurable. To provide more effective medical therapy for PD, better understanding of the underlying causes of the disease is clearly necessary. Recent Advances: A broad range of studies conducted over the past few decades have collectively implicated aberrant mitochondrial homeostasis as a key contributor to the development of PD. Supporting this, mutations in several PD-linked genes are directly or indirectly linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In particular, recent discoveries have identified parkin, whose mutations are causative of recessive parkinsonism, as a key regulator of mitochondrial homeostasis. Critical Issues: Parkin appears to be involved in the entire spectrum of mitochondrial dynamics, including organelle biogenesis, fusion/fission, and clearance via mitophagy. How a single protein can regulate such diverse mitochondrial events is as intriguing as it is amazing; the mechanism underlying this is currently under intense research. Here, we provide an overview of mitochondrial dynamics and its relationship with neurodegenerative diseases and discuss current evidence and controversies surrounding the role of parkin in mitochondrial quality control and its relevance to PD pathogenesis. Future Directions: Although the emerging field of parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control has proven to be exciting, it is important to recognize that PD pathogenesis is likely to involve an intricate network of interacting pathways. Elucidating the reciprocity of pathways, particularly how other PD-related pathways potentially influence mitochondrial homeostasis, may hold the key to therapeutic development. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 935–949. PMID:21668405

  14. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  15. ENERGETICS, EPIGENETICS, MITOCHONDRIAL GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The epigenome has been hypothesized to provide the interface between the environment and the nuclear DNA (nDNA) genes. Key factors in the environment are the availability of calories and demands on the organism’s energetic capacity. Energy is funneled through glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the cellular bioenergetic systems. Since there are thousands of bioenergetic genes dispersed across the chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), both cis and trans regulation of the nDNA genes is required. The bioenergetic systems convert environmental calories into ATP, acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), and reduced NAD+. When calories are abundant, ATP and acetyl-CoA phosphorylate and acetylate chromatin, opening the nDNA for transcription and replication. When calories are limiting, chromatin phosphorylation and acetylation are lost and gene expression is suppressed. DNA methylaton via SAM can also be modulated by mitochondrial function. Phosphorylation and acetylation are also pivotal to regulating cellular signal transduction pathways. Therefore, bioenergetics provides the interface between the environment and the epigenome. Consistent with this conclusion, the clinical phenotypes of bioenergetic diseases are strikingly similar to those observed in epigenetic diseases (Angelman, Rett, Fragile X Syndromes, the laminopathies, cancer, etc.), and an increasing number of epigenetic diseases are being associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This bioenergetic-epigenomic hypothesis has broad implications for the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of a wide range of common diseases. PMID:19796712

  16. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  17. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  18. The genetics of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M

    2011-11-01

    The discovery that defects in mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA could cause human disease has led to the development of a rapidly expanding group of disorders known as mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial disease is so named because of the common feature of impaired mitochondrial function. The main function of the mitochondrion is to produce energy for the cell in the form of ATP. ATP is generated by the respiratory chain, a series of complex proteins that are located in the mitochondrial membrane, and are encoded for by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Consequently, mitochondrial disease can be caused by mutations in either mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Given the distribution of mitochondria throughout the body, the specific properties of mitochondrial DNA, and the mitochondrion's dependence on nuclear genes for its normal function, the clinical presentation of mitochondrial disease can be highly variable. Thus, familiarity with typical clinical presentations and knowledge of the genes that contribute to mitochondrial function will aid the clinician in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients with this group of diverse disorders. PMID:22266889

  19. Digestive smooth muscle mitochondrial myopathy in patients with mitochondrial-neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE).

    PubMed

    Blondon, Hugues; Polivka, Marc; Joly, Francisca; Flourie, Bernard; Mikol, Jacqueline; Messing, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    We report 3 new cases of Mitochondrial-Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) (or Pseudo-Obstruction-Leukoencephalopathy-Intestinal-Pseudoobstruction Syndrome [POLIP]), a rare disease that associates chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) and neurological symptoms. A review of the 72 reported cases together with these 3 cases revealed that this condition was associated with (a) a specific cluster of neurological symptoms including leukoencephalopathy (96%), polyneuropathy (96%), ophthalmoplegia (91%) and hearing loss (55%); (b) a CIPO syndrome with the presence of small bowel diverticulae (53%); and (c) mitochondrial cytopathy in 36 of the 37 tested patients (2 of our 3 cases), and thymidine phosphorylase gene mutations in all the 37 tested patients (2 of our cases). The etiology of POLIP/MNGIE syndrome appears therefore to be due to a mitochondrial cytopathy secondary to thymidine phosphorylase gene mutation(s). In 3 cases, including 2 of our 3 patients, mitochondrial abnormalities were evidenced at the ultrastructural level in digestive smooth muscle demonstrating that the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal involvement was directly related to mitochondrial alterations in digestive smooth muscle cells. PMID:16294144

  20. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  1. Mitochondrial Turnover in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial quality control is increasingly recognized as an essential element in maintaining optimally functioning tissues. Mitochondrial quality control depends upon a balance between biogenesis and autophagic destruction. Mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) allows for the redistribution of mitochondrial components. We speculate that this permits sorting of highly functional components into one end of a mitochondrion, while damaged components are segregated at the other end, to be jettisoned by asymmetric fission followed by selective mitophagy. Ischemic preconditioning requires autophagy/mitophagy, resulting in selective elimination of damaged mitochondria, leaving behind a population of robust mitochondria with a higher threshold for opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. In this review we will consider the factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and destruction, the machinery involved in both processes, and the biomedical consequences associated with altered mitochondrial turnover. PMID:21147177

  2. The mitochondrial p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vaseva, Angelina V.; Moll, Ute M.

    2010-01-01

    p53 is one of the most mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers and as such has been intensively studied for a long time. p53 is a major orchestrator of the cellular response to a broad array of stress types by regulating apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, senescence, DNA repair and genetic stability. For a long time it was thought that these functions of p53 solely rely on its function as a transcription factor, and numerous p53 target genes have been identified [1]. In the last 8 years however, a novel transcription-independent proapoptotic function mediated by the cytoplasmic pool of p53 has been revealed. p53 participates directly in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by interacting with the multidomain members of the Bcl-2 family to induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Our review will discuss these studies, focusing on recent advances in the field. PMID:19007744

  3. Mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Martin; Horvath, Susanne E; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria possess two membranes of different architecture. The outer membrane surrounds the organelle, whereas the inner membrane consists of two domains. The inner boundary membrane that is adjacent to the outer membrane harbors many protein translocases. The inner membrane cristae form deep invaginations that carry respiratory chain complexes and the ATP synthase. It has remained enigmatic how crista junctions that connect inner boundary membrane and cristae are formed. The identification of a large protein complex, the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS), provided important insights. MICOS is a multi-subunit machinery with two core components, Mic10 and Mic60, organized into subcomplexes. The Mic10-containing subcomplex forms the structural basis of crista junctions, whereas the Mic60-containing subcomplex is crucial for connecting mitochondrial inner and outer membranes at contact sites. Numerous diseases have been directly or indirectly linked to MICOS. MICOS forms a network of interactions with further mitochondrial machineries and can be seen as an organizing center of mitochondrial architecture and biogenesis. PMID:27062547

  4. Maintenance and Expression of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins that are essential for the function of the oxidative phosphorylation system, which is composed of four respiratory-chain complexes and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Remarkably, the maintenance and expression of mtDNA depend on the mitochondrial import of hundreds of nuclear-encoded proteins that control genome maintenance, replication, transcription, RNA maturation, and mitochondrial translation. The importance of this complex regulatory system is underscored by the identification of numerous mutations of nuclear genes that impair mtDNA maintenance and expression at different levels, causing human mitochondrial diseases with pleiotropic clinical manifestations. The basic scientific understanding of the mechanisms controlling mtDNA function has progressed considerably during the past few years, thanks to advances in biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology. The challenges for the future will be to understand how mtDNA maintenance and expression are regulated and to what extent direct intramitochondrial cross talk between different processes, such as transcription and translation, is important. PMID:27023847

  5. Mitochondrial Redox Dysfunction and Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondria are structurally and biochemically diverse, even within a single type of cell. Protein complexes localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane synthesize ATP by coupling electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. The organelles produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondrial oxygen and ROS can, in turn, alter the function and expression of proteins used for aerobic respiration by post-translational and transcriptional regulation. Recent Advances: New interest is emerging not only into the roles of mitochondria in disease development and progression but also as a target for environmental toxicants. Critical Issues: Dysregulation of respiration has been linked to cell death and is a major contributor to acute neuronal trauma, peripheral diseases, as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Future Directions: Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the sensitivity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes to redox modulation, as well as examine the effects of environmental contaminants that have well-characterized mitochondrial toxicity. The contaminants discussed in this review are some of the most prevalent and potent environmental contaminants that have been linked to neurological dysfunction, altered cellular respiration, and oxidation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 578–595. PMID:25826672

  6. The use of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Seth D; Shaw, Dennis W W; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L; Saneto, Russell P

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation of symptoms is suggestive of mitochondrial disease, neuroimaging features may be diagnostic and suggestive, can help direct further workup, and can help to further characterize the underlying brain abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging changes may be nonspecific, such as atrophy (both general and involving specific structures, such as cerebellum), more suggestive of particular disorders such as focal and often bilateral lesions confined to deep brain nuclei, or clearly characteristic of a given disorder such as stroke-like lesions that do not respect vascular boundaries in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS). White matter hyperintensities with or without associated gray matter involvement may also be observed. Across patients and discrete disease subtypes (e.g., MELAS, Leigh syndrome, etc.), patterns of these features are helpful for diagnosis. However, it is also true that marked variability in expression occurs in all mitochondrial disease subtypes, illustrative of the complexity of the disease process. The present review summarizes the role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis and characterization of patients with suspected mitochondrial disease. PMID:20818727

  7. Mitochondrial Haplotypes Influence Metabolic Traits in Porcine Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanghui; Xiang, Hai; Tian, Jianhui; Yin, Jingdong; Pinkert, Carl A.; Li, Qiuyan; Zhao, Xingbo

    2015-01-01

    In farm animals, mitochondrial DNA mutations exist widely across breeds and individuals. In order to identify differences among mtDNA haplotypes, two porcine transmitochondrial cybrids were generated by fusion of a Lantang pig cell line devoid of mitochondrial DNA with enucleated cytoplasm from either a Large White pig or a Xiang pig harboring potentially divergent mitochondrial haplotypes. These cybrid cells were subjected to mitochondrial genome sequencing, copy number detecting and analysis of biochemical traits including succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, ATP content and susceptibility to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The Lantang and Xiang mitochondrial genomes were highly homologous with only 18 polymorphic sites, and differed radically from the Large White with 201 and 198 mutations respectively. The Large White and Xiang cybrids exhibited similar mtDNA copy numbers and different values among biochemical traits, generated greater ROS production (P < 0.05) and less SDH activity (P < 0.05) and a lesser ATP content (P < 0.05). The results show that functional differences exist between cybrid cells which differ in mitochondrial genomic background. In conclusion, transmitochondrial cybrids provide the first direct evidence on pig biochemical traits linking different mitochondrial genome haplotypes. PMID:26285652

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Launches Dexamethasone-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy via AMPK/FOXO3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Peng, Yunhua; Wang, Xun; Fan, Yingying; Qin, Chuan; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Cao, Ke; Li, Hua; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-01-01

    Muscle atrophy occurs in several pathologic conditions such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as after long-term clinical administration of synthesized glucocorticoid, where increased circulating glucocorticoid accounts for the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy. Others and we previously reported mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle atrophy-related conditions and that mitochondria-targeting nutrients efficiently prevent kinds of muscle atrophy. However, whether and how mitochondrial dysfunction involves glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we measured mitochondrial function in dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro, and we found that mitochondrial respiration was compromised on the 3rd day following after dexamethasone administration, earlier than the increases of MuRF1 and Fbx32, and dexamethasone-induced loss of mitochondrial components and key mitochondrial dynamics proteins. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment caused intracellular ATP deprivation and robust AMPK activation, which further activated the FOXO3/Atrogenes pathway. By directly impairing mitochondrial respiration, FCCP leads to similar readouts in C2C12 myotubes as dexamethasone does. On the contrary, resveratrol, a mitochondrial nutrient, efficiently reversed dexamethasone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle atrophy in both C2C12 myotubes and mice, by improving mitochondrial function and blocking AMPK/FOXO3 signaling. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction acts as a central role in dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and that nutrients or drugs targeting mitochondria might be beneficial in preventing or curing muscle atrophy. PMID:26592738

  9. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    He, J.; Cooper, H. M.; Reyes, A.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Litwin, T. R.; Gao, J.; Neuman, K. C.; Fearnley, I. M.; Spinazzola, A.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion. PMID:22453275

  10. Mitochondrial flashes: new insights into mitochondrial ROS signalling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingting; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory mitochondria undergo stochastic, intermittent bursts of superoxide production accompanied by transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential and reversible opening of the membrane permeability transition pore. These discrete events were named 'superoxide flashes' for the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal involved, and 'mitochondrial flashes' (mitoflashes) for the entirety of the multifaceted and intertwined mitochondrial processes. In contrast to the flashless basal ROS production of 'homeostatic ROS' for redox regulation, bursting ROS production during mitoflashes may provide 'signalling ROS' at the organelle level, fulfilling distinctly different cell functions. Mounting evidence indicates that mitoflash frequency is richly regulated over a broad range, and represents a novel, universal, and 'digital' readout of mitochondrial functional status and of the mitochondrial stress response. An emerging view is that mitoflashes participate in vital processes including metabolism, cell differentiation, the stress response and ageing. These recent advances shed new light on the role of mitochondrial functional dynamics in health and disease. PMID:25038239

  11. Microangiopathy in the cerebellum of patients with mitochondrial DNA disease

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Reeve, Amy K.; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Jaros, Evelyn; Taylor, Robert W.; Kalaria, Raj N.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathological findings in mitochondrial DNA disease vary and are often dependent on the type of mitochondrial DNA defect. Many reports document neuronal cell loss, demyelination, gliosis and necrotic lesions in post-mortem material. However, previous studies highlight vascular abnormalities in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects, particularly in those with the m.3243A>G mutation in whom stroke-like events are part of the mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. We investigated microangiopathic changes in the cerebellum of 16 genetically and clinically well-defined patients. Respiratory chain deficiency, high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA and increased mitochondrial mass were present within the smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells comprising the vessel wall in patients. These changes were not limited to those harbouring the m.3243A>G mutation frequently associated with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, but were documented in patients harbouring m.8344A>G and autosomal recessive polymerase (DNA directed), gamma (POLG) mutations. In 8 of the 16 patients, multiple ischaemic-like lesions occurred in the cerebellar cortex suggestive of vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction. Indeed, changes in vascular smooth muscle and endothelium distribution and cell size are indicative of vascular cell loss. We found evidence of blood–brain barrier breakdown characterized by plasma protein extravasation following fibrinogen and IgG immunohistochemistry. Reduced immunofluorescence was also observed using markers for endothelial tight junctions providing further evidence in support of blood–brain barrier breakdown. Understanding the structural and functional changes occurring in central nervous system microvessels in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects will provide an important insight into mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mitochondrial DNA disease. Since therapeutic

  12. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  13. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. AgMC1 silencing reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in increased proton-leak and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic changes reduce midgut ROS generation and increase A. gambiae susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. Conclusion We provide direct experimental evidence indicating that ROS derived from mitochondria can modulate mosquito epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. PMID:22815925

  14. Molecular diversity and pleiotropic role of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Marta; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2015-07-01

    The long awaited molecular identification of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in 2011 has opened an exciting phase in the study of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis. On the one hand, MCU proved to be the core of a complex signaling system, composed of a channel moiety (MCU itself and the related MCUb protein) and a family of essential regulators (the MICUs, MCUR, EMRE). On the other hand, the availability of molecular information and tools opened the possibility of directly altering mitochondrial calcium homeostasis in cell cultures or intact organisms, thus obtaining new insight into its role in physiological and pathological events. We will review here these exciting advancements, summarizing the current knowledge of the molecular composition of the MCU complex and of its role in shaping mitochondrial and cytosolic [Ca(2+)] signals. PMID:26048007

  15. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. PMID:23274056

  16. Endosymbionts and mitochondrial origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility is put forth that the mitochondrion did not originate from an endosymbiosis 1-2 billion years ago involving an aerobic bacterium. Rather, it arose by endosymbiosis in a much earlier anaerobic period and was initially a photosynthetic organelle analogous to the modern chloroplast. This suggestion arises from a reconsideration of the nature of endosymbiosis. It explains the remarkable diversity in mitochondrial information storage and processing systems.

  17. Modifying the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Patananan, Alexander N; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-05-10

    Human mitochondria produce ATP and metabolites to support development and maintain cellular homeostasis. Mitochondria harbor multiple copies of a maternally inherited, non-nuclear genome (mtDNA) that encodes for 13 subunit proteins of the respiratory chain. Mutations in mtDNA occur mainly in the 24 non-coding genes, with specific mutations implicated in early death, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. A significant barrier to new insights in mitochondrial biology and clinical applications for mtDNA disorders is our general inability to manipulate the mtDNA sequence. Microinjection, cytoplasmic fusion, nucleic acid import strategies, targeted endonucleases, and newer approaches, which include the transfer of genomic DNA, somatic cell reprogramming, and a photothermal nanoblade, attempt to change the mtDNA sequence in target cells with varying efficiencies and limitations. Here, we discuss the current state of manipulating mammalian mtDNA and provide an outlook for mitochondrial reverse genetics, which could further enable mitochondrial research and therapies for mtDNA diseases. PMID:27166943

  18. Mitochondrial sirtuins and metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pirinen, Eija; Sasso, Giuseppe Lo; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of metabolic homeostasis requires the well-orchestrated network of several pathways of glucose, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Mitochondria integrate these pathways and serve not only as the prime site of cellular energy harvesting but also as the producer of many key metabolic intermediates. The sirtuins are a family of NAD+-dependent enzymes, which have a crucial role in the cellular adaptation to metabolic stress. The mitochondrial sirtuins SIRT3, SIRT4 and SIRT5 together with the nuclear SIRT1 regulate several aspects of mitochondrial physiology by controlling posttranslational modifications of mitochondrial protein and transcription of mitochondrial genes. Here we discuss current knowledge how mitochondrial sirtuins and SIRT1 govern mitochondrial processes involved in different metabolic pathways. PMID:23168278

  19. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion have been observed, and their importance revealed, in almost every tissue and cell type except adult cardiac myocytes. As each human heart is uniquely dependent upon mitochondria to generate massive amounts of ATP that fuel its approximately 38 million contractions per year, it seems odd that cardiac myocytes are the sole exception to the general rule that mitochondrial dynamism is important to function. Here, I briefly review the mechanisms for mitochondrial fusion and fission and examine current data that dispel the previous notion that mitochondrial fusion is dispensable in the heart. Rare and generally overlooked examples of cardiomyopathies linked either to naturally-occurring mutations or to experimentally-induced mutagenesis of mitochondrial fusion/fission genes are described. New findings from genetically targeted Drosophila and mouse models wherein mitochondrial fusion deficiency has specifically been induced in cardiac myocytes are discussed. PMID:22450031

  20. Progressive mitochondrial myopathy, deafness, and sporadic seizures associated with a novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) gene.

    PubMed

    Cardaioli, Elena; Malfatti, Edoardo; Da Pozzo, Paola; Gallus, Gian Nicola; Carluccio, Maria Alessandra; Rufa, Alessandra; Volpi, Nila; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2011-04-15

    We sequenced the mitochondrial genome from a patient with progressive mitochondrial myopathy associated with deafness, sporadic seizures, and histological and biochemical features of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Direct sequencing showed a heteroplasmic mutation at nucleotide 12262 in the tRNASer(AGY) gene. RFLP analysis confirmed that 63% of muscle mtDNA harboured the mutation, while it was absent in all the other tissues. The mutation is predicted to influence the functional behaviour of the aminoacyl acceptor stem of the tRNA. Several point mutations on mitochondrial tRNA genes have been reported in patients affected by encephalomyopathies, but between them only four were reported for tRNASer(AGY). PMID:21257182

  1. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  2. Mitochondrial Fusion in Yeast Requires the Transmembrane GTPase Fzo1p

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Greg J.; Thatcher, John W.; Mills, John P.; Hales, Karen G.; Fuller, Margaret T.; Nunnari, Jodi; Shaw, Janet M.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane fusion is required to establish the morphology and cellular distribution of the mitochondrial compartment. In Drosophila, mutations in the fuzzy onions (fzo) GTPase block a developmentally regulated mitochondrial fusion event during spermatogenesis. Here we report that the yeast orthologue of fuzzy onions, Fzo1p, plays a direct and conserved role in mitochondrial fusion. A conditional fzo1 mutation causes the mitochondrial reticulum to fragment and blocks mitochondrial fusion during yeast mating. Fzo1p is a mitochondrial integral membrane protein with its GTPase domain exposed to the cytoplasm. Point mutations that alter conserved residues in the GTPase domain do not affect Fzo1p localization but disrupt mitochondrial fusion. Suborganellar fractionation suggests that Fzo1p spans the outer and is tightly associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. This topology may be required to coordinate the behavior of the two mitochondrial membranes during the fusion reaction. We propose that the fuzzy onions family of transmembrane GTPases act as molecular switches to regulate a key step in mitochondrial membrane docking and/or fusion. PMID:9786948

  3. HUMMR, a hypoxia- and HIF-1α–inducible protein, alters mitochondrial distribution and transport

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Lim, Seung; Hoffman, David; Aspenstrom, Pontus; Federoff, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial transport is critical for maintenance of normal neuronal function. Here, we identify a novel mitochondria protein, hypoxia up-regulated mitochondrial movement regulator (HUMMR), which is expressed in neurons and is markedly induced by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Interestingly, HUMMR interacts with Miro-1 and Miro-2, mitochondrial proteins that are critical for mediating mitochondrial transport. Interestingly, knockdown of HUMMR or HIF-1 function in neurons exposed to hypoxia markedly reduces mitochondrial content in axons. Because mitochondrial transport and distribution are inextricably linked, the impact of reduced HUMMR function on the direction of mitochondrial transport was also explored. Loss of HUMMR function in hypoxia diminished the percentage of motile mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction and enhanced the percentage moving in the retrograde direction. Thus, HUMMR, a novel mitochondrial protein induced by HIF-1 and hypoxia, biases mitochondria transport in the anterograde direction. These findings have broad implications for maintenance of neuronal viability and function during physiological and pathological states. PMID:19528298

  4. Comparative mitochondrial genomics within and among species of killifish

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was motivated by the observation of unusual mitochondrial haplotype distributions and associated physiological differences between populations of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus distributed along the Atlantic coast of North America. A distinct "northern" haplotype is fixed in all populations north of New Jersey, and does not appear south of New Jersey except in extreme upper-estuary fresh water habitats, and northern individuals are known to be more tolerant of hyposmotic conditions than southern individuals. Complete mitochondrial genomes were sequenced from individuals from northern coastal, southern coastal, and fresh water populations (and from out-groups). Comparative genomics approaches were used to test multiple evolutionary hypotheses proposed to explain among-population genome variation including directional selection and hybridization. Results Structure and organization of the Fundulus mitochondrial genome is typical of animals, yet subtle differences in substitution patterns exist among populations. No signals of directional selection or hybridization were detected. Mitochondrial genes evolve at variable rates, but all genes exhibit very low dN/dS ratios across all lineages, and the southern population harbors more synonymous polymorphism than other populations. Conclusion Evolution of mitochondrial genomes within Fundulus is primarily governed by interaction between strong purifying selection and demographic influences, including larger historical population size in the south. Though directional selection and hybridization hypotheses were not supported, adaptive processes may indirectly contribute to partitioning of variation between populations. PMID:19144111

  5. DJ-1 binds to mitochondrial complex I and maintains its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Takuya; Ishimori, Chikako; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Kim, Yun-chul; Maita, Hiroshi; Maita, Chinatsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death, and oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be responsible for onset of PD. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress. The possible mitochondrial function of DJ-1 has been proposed, but its exact function remains unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to NDUFA4 and ND1, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I, respectively, and was colocalized with complex I and that complex I activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockdown NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is an integral mitochondrial protein and that DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity.

  6. Abnormal Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bo; Wang, Xinglong; Zheng, Ling; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases. A deeper understanding of the remarkably dynamic nature of mitochondria, characterized by a delicate balance of fission and fusion, has helped to fertilize a recent wave of new studies demonstrating abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease and discusses how these abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. We propose that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics represents a key common pathway that mediates or amplifies mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal dysfunction during the course of neurodegeneration. PMID:19799998

  7. Mitochondrial organization and motility probed by two-photon microscopy in cultured mouse brainstem neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Michael . E-mail: mike@neuro-physiol.med.uni-goettingen.de; Mironov, Sergej L.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Schmidt, Joerg; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2005-02-01

    Two-photon microscopy of rhodamine 123-labeled mitochondria revealed that mitochondria of neurons cultured from mouse respiratory center form functionally coupled, dynamically organized aggregates such as chains and clusters, while single mitochondria were rarely seen. Mitochondrial chain structures predominate in dendrites, while irregularly shaped mitochondrial clusters are mostly found in the soma. Both types of mitochondrial structures showed chaotic Brownian motions and the mitochondrial chains also revealed well-directed movements. The latter dislocations were arrested upon mitochondrial depolarization or blockade of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Depolymerization of microtubules by colchicine or nocodazole or inhibition of protein phosphatases by calyculin A disrupted mitochondrial chains and the mitochondria accumulated in the soma. Forskolin and IBMX reversibly blocked directed movements of mitochondria, but did not affect their overall spatial distribution. Thus, protein phosphorylation seems to control both mitochondrial transport and organization. Protein phosphorylation downstream of enhanced cytosolic cAMP levels apparently regulates the transition from motile to non-motile mitochondria, while phosphorylation resulting from inhibition of types 1 and 2A protein phosphatases massively disturbs mitochondrial organization. The complex phosphorylation processes seem to control the close interaction of mitochondria and cytoskeleton which may guarantee that mitochondria are immobilized at energetic hot spots and rearranged in response to changes in local energy demands.

  8. Cutaneous mitochondrial respirometry: non-invasive monitoring of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Harms, Floor A; Bodmer, Sander I A; Raat, Nicolaas J H; Mik, Egbert G

    2015-08-01

    The recently developed technique for measuring cutaneous mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) by means of the Protoporphyrin IX-Triplet State Lifetime Technique (PpIX-TSLT) provides new opportunities for assessing mitochondrial function in vivo. The aims of this work were to study whether cutaneous mitochondrial measurements reflect mitochondrial status in other parts of the body and to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for potential clinical use. The first part of this paper demonstrates a correlation between alterations in mitochondrial parameters in skin and other tissues during endotoxemia. Experiments were performed in rats in which mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by a lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis (n = 5) and a time control group (n = 5). MitoPO2 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption (mitoVO2) were measured using PpIX-TSLT in skin, liver and buccal mucosa of the mouth. Both skin and buccal mucosa show a significant mitoPO2-independent decrease (P < 0.05) in mitoVO2 after LPS infusion (a decrease of 37 and 39% respectively). In liver both mitoPO2 and mitoVO2 decreased significantly (33 and 27% respectively). The second part of this paper describes the clinical concept of monitoring cutaneous mitochondrial respiration in man. A first prototype of a clinical PpIX-TSLT monitor is described and its usability is demonstrated on human skin. We expect that clinical implementation of this device will greatly contribute to our understanding of mitochondrial oxygenation and oxygen metabolism in perioperative medicine and in critical illness. Our ultimate goal is to develop a clinical monitor for mitochondrial function and the current results are an important step forward. PMID:25388510

  9. Mitochondrial Sirtuins and Their Relationships with Metabolic Disease and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Maintenance of metabolic homeostasis is critical for cellular and organismal health. Proper regulation of mitochondrial functions represents a crucial element of overall metabolic homeostasis. Mitochondrial sirtuins (SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5) play pivotal roles in promoting this homeostasis by regulating numerous aspects of mitochondrial metabolism in response to environmental stressors. Recent Advances: New work has illuminated multiple links between mitochondrial sirtuins and cancer. SIRT5 has been shown to regulate the recently described post-translational modifications succinyl-lysine, malonyl-lysine, and glutaryl-lysine. An understanding of these modifications is still in its infancy. Enumeration of SIRT3 and SIRT5 targets via advanced proteomic techniques promises to dramatically enhance insight into functions of these proteins. Critical Issues: In this review, we highlight the roles of mitochondrial sirtuins and their targets in cellular and organismal metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, we discuss emerging roles for mitochondrial sirtuins in suppressing and/or promoting tumorigenesis, depending on the cellular and molecular context. Future Directions: Currently, hundreds of potential SIRT3 and SIRT5 molecular targets have been identified in proteomic experiments. Future studies will need to validate the major targets of these enzymes, and elucidate how acetylation and/or acylation modulate their functionality. A great deal of interest exists in targeting sirtuins pharmacologically; this endeavor will require development of sirtuin-specific modulators (activators and inhibitors) as potential treatments for cancer and metabolic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1060–1077. PMID:25545135

  10. Mitochondrial translocation of APE1 relies on the MIA pathway.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, Arianna; Wasilewski, Michal; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Tell, Gianluca; Vascotto, Carlo

    2015-06-23

    APE1 is a multifunctional protein with a fundamental role in repairing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions caused by oxidative and alkylating agents. Unfortunately, comprehensions of the mechanisms regulating APE1 intracellular trafficking are still fragmentary and contrasting. Recent data demonstrate that APE1 interacts with the mitochondrial import and assembly protein Mia40 suggesting the involvement of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on the disulfide transfer system, to be responsible of APE1 trafficking into the mitochondria. The MIA pathway is an import machinery that uses a redox system for cysteine enriched proteins to drive them in this compartment. It is composed by two main proteins: Mia40 is the oxidoreductase that catalyzes the formation of the disulfide bonds in the substrate, while ALR reoxidizes Mia40 after the import. In this study, we demonstrated that: (i) APE1 and Mia40 interact through disulfide bond formation; and (ii) Mia40 expression levels directly affect APE1's mitochondrial translocation and, consequently, play a role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity. In summary, our data strongly support the hypothesis of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on Mia40, in controlling APE1 translocation into the mitochondrial inner membrane space and thus highlight the role of this protein transport pathway in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA stability and cell survival. PMID:25956655

  11. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  12. Sealing the mitochondrial respirasome.

    PubMed

    Winge, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the structures of supercomplexes and the factors that mediate their stability. PMID:22586278

  13. Mitochondrial form and function

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Nunnari, Jodi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of the major ancient endomembrane systems in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their ability to produce ATP through respiration, they became a driving force in evolution. As an essential step in the process of eukaryotic evolution, the size of the mitochondrial chromosome was drastically reduced, and the behaviour of mitochondria within eukaryotic cells radically changed. Recent advances have revealed how the organelle’s behaviour has evolved to allow the accurate transmission of its genome and to become responsive to the needs of the cell and its own dysfunction. PMID:24429632

  14. CCN6 regulates mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Patra, Milan; Mahata, Sushil K; Padhan, Deepesh K; Sen, Malini

    2016-07-15

    Despite established links of CCN6, or Wnt induced signaling protein-3 (WISP3), with progressive pseudo rheumatoid dysplasia, functional characterization of CCN6 remains incomplete. In light of the documented negative correlation between accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and CCN6 expression, we investigated whether CCN6 regulates ROS accumulation through its influence on mitochondrial function. We found that CCN6 localizes to mitochondria, and depletion of CCN6 in the chondrocyte cell line C-28/I2 by using siRNA results in altered mitochondrial electron transport and respiration. Enhanced electron transport chain (ETC) activity of CCN6-depleted cells was reflected by increased mitochondrial ROS levels in association with augmented mitochondrial ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential and Ca(2+) Additionally, CCN6-depleted cells display ROS-dependent PGC1α (also known as PPARGC1A) induction, which correlates with increased mitochondrial mass and volume density, together with altered mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, transcription factor Nrf2 (also known as NFE2L2) repressed CCN6 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that CCN6 acts as a molecular brake, which is appropriately balanced by Nrf2, in regulating mitochondrial function. PMID:27252383

  15. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  16. The Expression of a Novel Mitochondrially-Encoded Gene in Gonadic Precursors May Drive Paternal Inheritance of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Pecci, Andrea; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Passamonti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have an active role in germ line development, and their inheritance dynamics are relevant to this process. Recently, a novel protein (RPHM21) was shown to be encoded in sperm by the male-transmitted mtDNA of Ruditapes philippinarum, a species with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria. In silico analyses suggested a viral origin of RPHM21, and we hypothesized that the endogenization of a viral element provided sperm mitochondria of R. philippinarum with the ability to invade male germ line, thus being transmitted to the progeny. In this work we investigated the dynamics of germ line development in relation to mitochondrial transcription and expression patterns using qPCR and specific antibodies targeting the germ line marker VASPH (R. philippinarum VASA homolog), and RPHM21. Based on the experimental results we conclude that both targets are localized in the primordial germ cells (PGCs) of males, but while VASPH is detected in all PGCs, RPHM21 appears to be expressed only in a subpopulation of them. Since it has been predicted that RPHM21 might have a role in cell proliferation and migration, we here suggest that PGCs expressing it might gain advantage over others and undertake spermatogenesis, accounting for RPHM21 presence in all spermatozoa. Understanding how foreign sequence endogenization and co-option can modify the biology of an organism is of particular importance to assess the impact of such events on evolution. PMID:26339998

  17. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  18. Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis, Import, and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrion is arguably the most complex organelle in the budding yeast cell cytoplasm. It is essential for viability as well as respiratory growth. Its innermost aqueous compartment, the matrix, is bounded by the highly structured inner membrane, which in turn is bounded by the intermembrane space and the outer membrane. Approximately 1000 proteins are present in these organelles, of which eight major constituents are coded and synthesized in the matrix. The import of mitochondrial proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm, and their direction to the correct soluble compartments, correct membranes, and correct membrane surfaces/topologies, involves multiple pathways and macromolecular machines. The targeting of some, but not all, cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial proteins begins with translation of messenger RNAs localized to the organelle. Most proteins then pass through the translocase of the outer membrane to the intermembrane space, where divergent pathways sort them to the outer membrane, inner membrane, and matrix or trap them in the intermembrane space. Roughly 25% of mitochondrial proteins participate in maintenance or expression of the organellar genome at the inner surface of the inner membrane, providing 7 membrane proteins whose synthesis nucleates the assembly of three respiratory complexes. PMID:23212899

  19. MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S; Pinsky, Michael R; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high-energy adenosine triphosphate production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered, and end organ dysfunction is not only common, but also predictive of long-term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used both as a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  20. [Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease].

    PubMed

    Benureau, A; Meyer, P; Maillet, O; Leboucq, N; Legras, S; Jeziorski, E; Fournier-Favre, S; Jeandel, C; Gaignard, P; Slama, A; Rivier, F; Roubertie, A; Carneiro, M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the TYMP gene, located at 22q13. The mutation induces a thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficit, which leads to a nucleotide pool imbalance and to instability of the mitochondrial DNA. The clinical picture regroups gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. The prognosis is unfavorable. We present the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian female whose symptoms started in early childhood. The diagnosis was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed given the atypical features of mental anorexia, which revealed white matter abnormalities. She presented chronic vomiting, postprandial abdominal pain, and problems gaining weight accompanied by cachexia. This diagnosis led to establishing proper care, in particular an enteral and parenteral nutrition program. There is no known specific effective treatment, but numerous studies are in progress. In this article, after reviewing the existing studies, we discuss the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. We argue for the necessity of performing a cerebral MRI given the atypical features of a patient with suspected mental anorexia (or when the clinical pattern of a patient with mental anorexia seems atypical), so that MNGIE can be ruled out. PMID:25282463

  1. The mitochondrial genome in embryo technologies.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, S; Wolf, E

    2003-08-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial genome encodes for 37 genes which are involved in a broad range of cellular functions. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is commonly assumed to be inherited through oocyte cytoplasm in a clonal manner, and apparently species-specific mechanisms have evolved to eliminate the contribution of sperm mitochondria after natural fertilization. However, recent evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance in embryos and offspring questions the general validity of this model, particularly in the context of assisted reproduction and embryo biotechnology. In addition to normal mt DNA haplotype variation, oocytes and spermatozoa show remarkable differences in mtDNA content and may be affected by inherited or acquired mtDNA aberrations. All these parameters have been correlated with gamete quality and reproductive success rates. Nuclear transfer (NT) technology provides experimental models for studying interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Recent studies demonstrated (i) a significant effect of mtDNA haplotype or other maternal cytoplasmic factors on the efficiency of NT; (ii) phenotypic differences between transmitochondrial clones pointing to functionally relevant nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions; and (iii) neutral or non-neutral selection of mtDNA haplotypes in heteroplasmic conditions. Mitochondria form a dynamic reticulum, enabling complementation of mitochondrial components and possibly mixing of different mtDNA populations in heteroplasmic individuals. Future directions of research on mtDNA in the context of reproductive biotechnology range from the elimination of adverse effects of artificial heteroplasmy, e.g. created by ooplasm transfer, to engineering of optimized constellations of nuclear and cytoplasmic genes for the production of superior livestock. PMID:12887568

  2. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART II: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS IN REGULATORY FACTORS AND OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Iommarini, Luisa; Peralta, Susana; Torraco, Alessandra; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are defined as defects that affect the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). They are characterized by a heterogeneous array of clinical presentations due in part to a wide variety of factors required for proper function of the components of the OXPHOS system. There is no cure for these disorders owing our poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of disease. To understand the mechanisms of human disease numerous mouse models have been developed in recent years. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to those factors affecting mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, translation as well to other proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control which affect mitochondrial OXPHOS function without been intrinsic components of the system. We discuss how these models have contributed to our understanding of mitochondrial diseases and their pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25640959

  3. Mitochondrial DNA with a large-scale deletion causes two distinct mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-09-01

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (ΔmtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ΔmtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ΔmtDNA (mito-miceΔ). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ΔmtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ΔmtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ΔmtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-miceΔ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ΔmtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice. PMID:23853091

  4. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype. Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+), or oncometabolites are important in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promising strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy. PMID:27022139

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  6. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  7. Cognitive dysfunction in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2012-07-01

    Among the various central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs), cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized and diagnosed (mitochondrial cognitive dysfunction). Aim of the review was to summarize recent findings concerning the aetiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cognitive decline in MIDs. Among syndromic MIDs due to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, cognitive impairment occurs in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres syndrome, mitochondrial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa syndrome and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness. Among syndromic MIDs due to nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutations, cognitive decline has been reported in myo-neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalopathy, mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia with encephalopathy, Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome, leuko-encephalopathy; brain and spinal cord involvement and lactic acidosis, CMT2, Wolfram syndrome, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and Leigh syndrome. In addition to syndromic MIDs, a large number of non-syndromic MIDs due to mtDNA as well as nDNA mutations have been reported, which present with cognitive impairment as the sole or one among several other CNS manifestations of a MID. Delineation of mitochondrial cognitive impairment from other types of cognitive impairment is essential to guide the optimal management of these patients. Treatment of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is largely limited to symptomatic and supportive measures. Cognitive impairment may be a CNS manifestation of syndromic as well as non-syndromic MIDs. Correct diagnosis of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is a prerequisite for the optimal management of these patients. PMID:22335339

  8. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. PMID:26276815

  9. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid but not docosahexaenoic acid restores skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity in old mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew L; Lalia, Antigoni Z; Dasari, Surendra; Pallauf, Maximilian; Fitch, Mark; Hellerstein, Marc K; Lanza, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is often observed in aging skeletal muscle and is implicated in age-related declines in physical function. Early evidence suggests that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) improve mitochondrial function. Here, we show that 10 weeks of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation partially attenuated the age-related decline in mitochondrial function in mice, but this effect was not observed with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The improvement in mitochondrial function with EPA occurred in the absence of any changes in mitochondrial abundance or biogenesis, which was evaluated from RNA sequencing, large-scale proteomics, and direct measurements of muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates. We find that EPA improves muscle protein quality, specifically by decreasing mitochondrial protein carbamylation, a post-translational modification that is driven by inflammation. These results demonstrate that EPA attenuated the age-related loss of mitochondrial function and improved mitochondrial protein quality through a mechanism that is likely linked with anti-inflammatory properties of n-3 PUFAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EPA and DHA exert some common biological effects (anticoagulation, anti-inflammatory, reduced FXR/RXR activation), but also exhibit many distinct biological effects, a finding that underscores the importance of evaluating the therapeutic potential of individual n-3 PUFAs. PMID:26010060

  11. Mitochondrial proteolytic stress induced by loss of mortalin function is rescued by Parkin and PINK1

    PubMed Central

    Burbulla, L F; Fitzgerald, J C; Stegen, K; Westermeier, J; Thost, A-K; Kato, H; Mokranjac, D; Sauerwald, J; Martins, L M; Woitalla, D; Rapaport, D; Riess, O; Proikas-Cezanne, T; Rasse, T M; Krüger, R

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial chaperone mortalin was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of its reduced levels in the brains of PD patients and disease-associated rare genetic variants that failed to rescue impaired mitochondrial integrity in cellular knockdown models. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mortalin-related neurodegeneration, we dissected the cellular surveillance mechanisms related to mitochondrial quality control, defined the effects of reduced mortalin function at the molecular and cellular levels and investigated the functional interaction of mortalin with Parkin and PINK1, two PD-related proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that reduced mortalin function leads to: (1) activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), (2) increased susceptibility towards intramitochondrial proteolytic stress, (3) increased autophagic degradation of fragmented mitochondria and (4) reduced mitochondrial mass in human cells in vitro and ex vivo. These alterations caused increased vulnerability toward apoptotic cell death. Proteotoxic perturbations induced by either partial loss of mortalin or chemical induction were rescued by complementation with native mortalin, but not disease-associated mortalin variants, and were independent of the integrity of autophagic pathways. However, Parkin and PINK1 rescued loss of mortalin phenotypes via increased lysosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance and required intact autophagic machinery. Our results on loss of mortalin function reveal a direct link between impaired mitochondrial proteostasis, UPR(mt) and PD and show that effective removal of dysfunctional mitochondria via either genetic (PINK1 and Parkin overexpression) or pharmacological intervention (rapamycin) may compensate mitochondrial phenotypes. PMID:24743735

  12. Analyzing Population Genetics Using the Mitochondrial Control Region and Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Takumi; Phillips, Bonnie; Latourelle, Sandra M.; Elwess, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    The 14-base pair hypervariable region in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Asian populations, specifically Japanese and Chinese students at Plattsburgh State University, was examined. Previous research on this 14-base pair region showed it to be susceptible to mutations and as a result indicated direct correlation with specific ethnic populations.…

  13. Self-similar mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Nestor N; Glazier, James A

    2004-01-01

    We show that repeated sequences, like palindromes (local repetitions) and homologies between two different nucleotide sequences (motifs along the genome), compose a self-similar (fractal) pattern in mitochondrial DNA. This self-similarity comes from the looplike structures distributed along the genome. The looplike structures generate scaling laws in a pseudorandom DNA walk constructed from the sequence, called a Lévy flight. We measure the scaling laws from the generalized fractal dimension and singularity spectrum for mitochondrial DNA walks for 35 different species. In particular, we report characteristic loop distributions for mammal mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15371639

  14. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  15. Mitochondrial Energetics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei; Procaccio, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a wide range of degenerative and metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. All these clinical manifestations arise from the central role of bioenergetics in cell biology. Although genetic therapies are maturing as the rules of bioenergetic genetics are clarified, metabolic therapies have been ineffectual. This failure results from our limited appreciation of the role of bioenergetics as the interface between the environment and the cell. A systems approach, which, ironically, was first successfully applied over 80 years ago with the introduction of the ketogenic diet, is required. Analysis of the many ways that a shift from carbohydrate glycolytic metabolism to fatty acid and ketone oxidative metabolism may modulate metabolism, signal transduction pathways, and the epigenome gives us an appreciation of the ketogenic diet and the potential for bioenergetic therapeutics. PMID:20078222

  16. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  17. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    paraplegia, and multiple sclerosis, where mitochondrial dysfunction is also thought to be an important pathophysiological player. A number of vertebrate and invertebrate disease models has recently been established to circumvent the lack of human tissues, and these have already provided considerable insight by allowing direct RGC experimentation. The ultimate goal is to translate these research advances into clinical practice and new treatment strategies are currently being investigated to improve the visual prognosis for patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies. PMID:21112411

  18. Automated detection of whole-cell mitochondrial motility and its dependence on cytoarchitectural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Chou, Philip; Eckmann, David M

    2015-07-01

    Current methodologies used for mitochondrial motility analysis tend to either overlook individual mitochondrial tracks or analyze only peripheral mitochondria instead of mitochondria in all regions of the cell. Furthermore, motility analysis of an individual mitochondrion is usually quantified by establishing an arbitrary threshold for "directed" motion. In this work, we created a custom, publicly available computational algorithm based on a previously published approach (Giedt et al., 2012. Ann Biomed Eng 40:1903-1916) in order to characterize the distribution of mitochondrial movements at the whole-cell level, while still preserving information about single mitochondria. Our technique is easy to use, robust, and computationally inexpensive. Images are first pre-processed for increased resolution, and then individual mitochondria are tracked based on object connectivity in space and time. When our method is applied to microscopy fields encompassing entire cells, we reveal that the mitochondrial net distances in fibroblasts follow a lognormal distribution within a given cell or group of cells. The ability to model whole-cell mitochondrial motility as a lognormal distribution provides a new quantitative paradigm for comparing mitochondrial motility in naïve and treated cells. We further demonstrate that microtubule and microfilament depolymerization shift the lognormal distribution in directions which indicate decreased and increased mitochondrial movement, respectively. These findings advance earlier work on neuronal axons (Morris and Hollenbeck, 1993. J Cell Sci 104:917-927) by relating them to a different cell type, applying them on a global scale, and automating measurement of mitochondrial motility in general. PMID:25678368

  19. Actin Turnover Is Required for Myosin-Dependent Mitochondrial Movements in Arabidopsis Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Maozhong; Beck, Martina; Müller, Jens; Chen, Tong; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Feng; Wang, Qinli; Wang, Yuqing; Baluška, František; Logan, David C.; Šamaj, Jozef; Lin, Jinxing

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that plant mitochondrial movements are myosin-based along actin filaments, which undergo continuous turnover by the exchange of actin subunits from existing filaments. Although earlier studies revealed that actin filament dynamics are essential for many functions of the actin cytoskeleton, there are little data connecting actin dynamics and mitochondrial movements. Methodology/Principal Findings We addressed the role of actin filament dynamics in the control of mitochondrial movements by treating cells with various pharmaceuticals that affect actin filament assembly and disassembly. Confocal microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs expressing GFP-FABD2 as an actin filament reporter showed that mitochondrial distribution was in agreement with the arrangement of actin filaments in root hairs at different developmental stages. Analyses of mitochondrial trajectories and instantaneous velocities immediately following pharmacological perturbation of the cytoskeleton using variable-angle evanescent wave microscopy and/or spinning disk confocal microscopy revealed that mitochondrial velocities were regulated by myosin activity and actin filament dynamics. Furthermore, simultaneous visualization of mitochondria and actin filaments suggested that mitochondrial positioning might involve depolymerization of actin filaments on the surface of mitochondria. Conclusions/Significance Base on these results we propose a mechanism for the regulation of mitochondrial speed of movements, positioning, and direction of movements that combines the coordinated activity of myosin and the rate of actin turnover, together with microtubule dynamics, which directs the positioning of actin polymerization events. PMID:19536333

  20. Mitochondrial dynamics: molecular mechanisms and the role in the heart.

    PubMed

    Jazbutyte, V

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles which actively move along the cytoskeleton within the cell, change their shape and undergo fusion and fission. The heart is a metabolically active organ with high energy demands and rich in mitochondria. Mitochondria not only supply the heart with the high energy compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but also actively participate in cell signaling and apoptotic events and communicate with the cytosol. Recent advantages in molecular biology and imaging techniques helped to study mitochondrial dynamics directly in the cell and under real time conditions. In this review, I will briefly summarize current knowledge about molecular machinery mediating mitochondrial fusion/ fission, its link to apoptosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20440252

  1. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  2. MISC-1/OGC Links Mitochondrial Metabolism, Apoptosis and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Marco; Park, Donha; Luciani, Dan S.; Kida, Katarzyna; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Blacque, Oliver E.; Johnson, James D.; Riddle, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    We identified MISC-1 (Mitochondrial Solute Carrier) as the C. elegans orthologue of mammalian OGC (2-oxoglutarate carrier). OGC was originally identified for its ability to transfer α-ketoglutarate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. However, we found that MISC-1 and OGC are not solely involved in metabolic control. Our data show that these orthologous proteins participate in phylogenetically conserved cellular processes, like control of mitochondrial morphology and induction of apoptosis. We show that MISC-1/OGC is required for proper mitochondrial fusion and fission events in both C. elegans and human cells. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that loss of MISC-1 results in a decreased number of mitochondrial cristae, which have a blebbed appearance. Furthermore, our pull-down experiments show that MISC-1 and OGC interact with the anti-apoptotic proteins CED-9 and Bcl-xL, respectively, and with the pro-apoptotic protein ANT. Knock-down of misc-1 in C. elegans and OGC in mouse cells induces apoptosis through the caspase cascade. Genetic analysis suggests that MISC-1 controls apoptosis through the physiological pathway mediated by the LIN-35/Rb-like protein. We provide genetic and molecular evidence that absence of MISC-1 increases insulin secretion and enhances germline stem cell proliferation in C. elegans. Our study suggests that the mitochondrial metabolic protein MISC-1/OGC integrates metabolic, apoptotic and insulin secretion functions. We propose a novel mechanism by which mitochondria integrate metabolic and cell survival signals. Our data suggest that MISC-1/OGC functions by sensing the metabolic status of mitochondria and directly activate the apoptotic program when required. Our results suggest that controlling MISC-1/OGC function allows regulation of mitochondrial morphology and cell survival decisions by the metabolic needs of the cell. PMID:21448454

  3. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  4. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  5. The mitochondrial PHB complex: roles in mitochondrial respiratory complex assembly, ageing and degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Nijtmans, L G J; Artal, Sanz M; Grivell, L A; Coates, P J

    2002-01-01

    Although originally identified as putative negative regulators of the cell cycle, recent studies have demonstrated that the PHB proteins act as a chaperone in the assembly of subunits of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. The two PHB proteins, Phblp and Phb2p, are located in the mitochondrial inner membrane where they form a large complex that represents a novel type of membrane-bound chaperone. On the basis of its native molecular weight, the PHB-complex should contain 12-14 copies of both Phblp and Phb2p. The PHB complex binds directly to newly synthesised mitochondrial translation products and stabilises them against degradation by membrane-bound metalloproteases belonging to the family of mitochondrial triple-A proteins. Sequence homology assigns Phb1p and Phb2p to a family of proteins which also contains stomatins, HflKC, flotillins and plant defence proteins. However, to date only the bacterial HflKC proteins have been shown to possess a direct functional homology with the PHB complex. Previously assigned actions of the PHB proteins, including roles in tumour suppression, cell cycle regulation, immunoglobulin M receptor binding and apoptosis seem unlikely in view of any hard evidence in their support. Nevertheless, because the proteins are probably indirectly involved in ageing and cancer, we assess their possible role in these processes. Finally, we suggest that the original name for these proteins, the prohibitins, should be amended to reflect their roles as proteins that hold badly formed subunits, thereby keeping the nomenclature already in use but altering its meaning to reflect their true function more accurately. PMID:11852914

  6. Mitochondrial death functions of p53

    PubMed Central

    Marchenko, N D; Moll, U M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor network plays a fundamental surveillance role in both homeostatic and adaptive cell biology. p53 is one of the most important barriers against malignant derailment of normal cells, orchestrating growth arrest, senescence, or cell death by linking many different pathways in response to genotoxic and non-genotoxic insults. p53 is the key broadband sensor for numerous cellular stresses such as DNA damage, hypoxia, oxidative stress, oncogenic signaling, and nucleolar stress. The crucial tumor suppressive and tissue homeostasis activity of p53 is its ability to activate cell death via multiple different pathways. A well-characterized biochemical function of p53 in the regulation of apoptosis is its role as a potent transcriptional regulator. p53 activates a panel of proapoptotic genes from the mitochondrial apoptotic and death receptor programs while repressing antiapoptotic Bcl2 family genes. In addition, over the last 10 y a growing body of evidence has also defined direct extranuclear non-transcriptional p53 activities within mitochondria-mediated cell death pathways that are based on p53 protein accumulation in cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments and protein-protein interactions. To date, transcription-independent p53-mediated cell death regulation has been described for apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Because mitochondrial dysregulation is central to the development of a number of pathologic processes such as cancer and neurodegenerative and age-related diseases, understanding the direct roles of p53 protein in mitochondria has high translational impact and could facilitate the development of novel drug targets to combat these diseases. In this review we will mainly focus on mechanisms of p53-mediated transcription-independent cell death pathways at mitochondria. PMID:27308326

  7. Mitochondrial division in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gandre, Shilpa; van der Bliek, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial division proteins has largely focused on yeast and mammalian cells. We describe methods to use Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model for studying mitochondrial division, taking advantage of the many wonderful resources provided by the C. elegans community. Our methods are largely based on manipulation of gene expression using classic and molecular genetic techniques combined with fluorescence microscopy. Some biochemical methods are also included. As antibodies become available, these biochemical methods are likely to become more sophisticated. PMID:18314747

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  9. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  10. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    PubMed

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  11. Mitochondrial sirtuins in the heart.

    PubMed

    Bugger, Heiko; Witt, Constantin N; Bode, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD(+)-dependent enzymes that catalyze deacylation of protein lysine residues. In mammals, seven sirtuins have been identified, SIRT1-7. SIRT3-5 are mainly or exclusively localized within mitochondria and mainly participate in the regulation of energy metabolic pathways. Since mitochondrial ATP regeneration is inevitably linked to the maintenance of cardiac pump function, it is not surprising that recent studies revealed a role for mitochondrial sirtuins in the regulation of myocardial energetics and function. In addition, mitochondrial sirtuins modulate the extent of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury and the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Thus, targeting mitochondrial sirtuins has been proposed as a novel approach to improve myocardial mitochondrial energetics, which is frequently impaired in cardiac disease and considered an important underlying cause contributing to several cardiac pathologies, including myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury and heart failure. In the current review, we present and discuss the available literature on mitochondrial sirtuins and their potential roles in cardiac physiology and disease. PMID:27295248

  12. Mitochondrial Epigenetics and Environmental Exposure.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Luca; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2016-09-01

    The rising toll of chronic and debilitating diseases brought about by the exposure to an ever expanding number of environmental pollutants and socio-economic factors is calling for action. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the effects of environmental exposures can lead to the development of biomarkers that can support the public health fields of both early diagnosis and intervention to limit the burden of environmental diseases. The study of mitochondrial epigenetics carries high hopes to provide important biomarkers of exposure and disease. Mitochondria are in fact on the frontline of the cellular response to the environment. Modifications of the epigenetic factors regulating the mitochondrial activity are emerging as informative tools that can effectively report on the effects of the environment on the phenotype. Here, we will discuss the emerging field of mitochondrial epigenetics. This review describes the main epigenetic phenomena that modify the activity of the mitochondrial DNA including DNA methylation, long and short non-coding RNAs. We will discuss the unique pattern of mitochondrial DNA methylation, describe the challenges of correctly measuring it, and report on the existing studies that have analysed the correlation between environmental exposures and mitochondrial DNA methylation. Finally, we provide a brief account of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria currently under consideration. PMID:27344144

  13. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function☆

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Angel Gabriel; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy. PMID:24024153

  14. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  15. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengsong; Chen, Dan; Shen, Yiping; Ye, Baodong

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a haploid filamentous fungus that is common in the environment and has been implicated in human infections. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. flavus has been determined by high-throughput sequencing technology in this work. Our study revealed that the mitochondrial genome of A. flavus is 31,602 bp long, with an A + T content of 74.83%, which consists of a usual set of mitochondrial proteins and RNA genes, including large and small ribosomal RNAs, 15 proteins, and 20 tRNA genes and contains two introns. Notably, it also contains two hypothetical proteins without obvious homology to any known proteins. All structural genes are located on one strand and are apparently transcribed in one direction. Codon usage analysis indicated that all protein coding genes employ the standard fungal mitochondrial start and stop codons; and the nucleotide bias toward AT was also reflected in the codon usage. The complete mitochondrial genomes of A. flavus would be useful for future investigation of the genetic, evolution, and clinical identification of Aspergillus species. PMID:25922962

  17. Mitochondrial function in the brain links anxiety with social subordination

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Fiona; van der Kooij, Michael A.; Zanoletti, Olivia; Lozano, Laura; Cantó, Carles; Sandi, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are integral aspects of social groups, yet whether personality traits may predispose individuals to a particular rank remains unclear. Here we show that trait anxiety directly influences social dominance in male outbred rats and identify an important mediating role for mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens. High-anxious animals that are prone to become subordinate during a social encounter with a low-anxious rat exhibit reduced mitochondrial complex I and II proteins and respiratory capacity as well as decreased ATP and increased ROS production in the nucleus accumbens. A causal link for these findings is indicated by pharmacological approaches. In a dyadic contest between anxiety-matched animals, microinfusion of specific mitochondrial complex I or II inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens reduced social rank, mimicking the low probability to become dominant observed in high-anxious animals. Conversely, intraaccumbal infusion of nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3 known to enhance brain energy metabolism, prevented the development of a subordinate status in high-anxious individuals. We conclude that mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens is crucial for social hierarchy establishment and is critically involved in the low social competitiveness associated with high anxiety. Our findings highlight a key role for brain energy metabolism in social behavior and point to mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens as a potential marker and avenue of treatment for anxiety-related social disorders. PMID:26621716

  18. Mitochondrial function in the brain links anxiety with social subordination.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Fiona; van der Kooij, Michael A; Zanoletti, Olivia; Lozano, Laura; Cantó, Carles; Sandi, Carmen

    2015-12-15

    Dominance hierarchies are integral aspects of social groups, yet whether personality traits may predispose individuals to a particular rank remains unclear. Here we show that trait anxiety directly influences social dominance in male outbred rats and identify an important mediating role for mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens. High-anxious animals that are prone to become subordinate during a social encounter with a low-anxious rat exhibit reduced mitochondrial complex I and II proteins and respiratory capacity as well as decreased ATP and increased ROS production in the nucleus accumbens. A causal link for these findings is indicated by pharmacological approaches. In a dyadic contest between anxiety-matched animals, microinfusion of specific mitochondrial complex I or II inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens reduced social rank, mimicking the low probability to become dominant observed in high-anxious animals. Conversely, intraaccumbal infusion of nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3 known to enhance brain energy metabolism, prevented the development of a subordinate status in high-anxious individuals. We conclude that mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens is crucial for social hierarchy establishment and is critically involved in the low social competitiveness associated with high anxiety. Our findings highlight a key role for brain energy metabolism in social behavior and point to mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens as a potential marker and avenue of treatment for anxiety-related social disorders. PMID:26621716

  19. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  20. ND5 is a hot-spot for multiple atypical mitochondrial DNA deletions in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Marti, Ramon; Hirano, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder associated with depletion, multiple deletions and site-specific point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). MNGIE is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP; endothelial cell growth factor 1). Deficiency of TP leads to dramatically elevated levels of circulating thymidine and deoxyuridine. The alterations of pyrimidine nucleoside metabolism are hypothesized to cause imbalances of mitochondrial nucleotide pools that, in turn, may cause somatic alterations of mtDNA. We have now identified five major forms of mtDNA deletions in the skeletal muscle of MNGIE patients. While direct repeats and imperfectly homologous sequences appear to mediate the formation of mtDNA deletions, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 5 gene is a hot-spot for these rearrangements. A novel aspect of the mtDNA deletions in MNGIE is the presence of microdeletions at the imperfectly homologous breakpoints. PMID:14613972

  1. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  2. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  3. Yeast Mitochondrial Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H.; Jacq, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d’ětre of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  4. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  6. BDE-154 induces mitochondrial permeability transition and impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lílian Cristina; Miranda, Luiz Felippe Cabral; de Souza, Alecsandra Oliveira; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants are used in various consumer goods to make these materials difficult to burn. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which are representative of this class of retardants, consist of two benzene rings linked by an oxygen atom, and contain between 1 and 10 bromine atoms in their chemical structure, with the possibility of up to 209 different congeners. Among these congeners, BDE-154 (hexa-BDE) is persistent in the environment and easy to detect in the biota, but no apparent information regarding the mechanism underlying action and toxicity is available. Mitochondria, as the main energy-producing organelles, play an important role in the maintenance of various cellular functions. Therefore, mitochondria were used in the present study as an experimental model to determine the effects of BDE-154 congener at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM. Our results demonstrated that BDE-154 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane, preferably by inserting into the hydrophobic core of the mitochondrial membrane, which partially inhibits respiration, dissipates Δψ, and permeabilizes the inner mitochondrial membrane to deplete ATP. These effects are more pronounced at concentrations equal to or higher than 10 μM. Results also showed that BDE-154 did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation within the mitochondria, indicating the absence of oxidative stress. Therefore, BDE-154 impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics and permeabilizes the mitochondrial membrane, potentially leading to cell death but not via mechanisms involving oxidative stress. PMID:24555644

  7. Mitochondrial damage contributes to Pseudomonas aeruginosa activation of the inflammasome and is downregulated by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Majid Sakhi; Hopkins, Lee; Ritchie, Neil D; Ullah, Ihsan; Bayes, Hannah K; Li, Dong; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Lupton, Alison; Puleston, Daniel; Simon, Anna Katharina; Bryant, Clare; Evans, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing family caspase recruitment domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome can be activated by pathogenic bacteria via products translocated through the microbial type III secretion apparatus (T3SS). Recent work has shown that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is downregulated by autophagy, but the influence of autophagy on NLRC4 activation is unclear. We set out to determine how autophagy might influence this process, using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which activates the NLRC4 inflammasome via its T3SS. Infection resulted in T3SS-dependent mitochondrial damage with increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates and release of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibiting mitochondrial reactive oxygen release or degrading intracellular mitochondrial DNA abrogated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Moreover, macrophages lacking mitochondria failed to activate NLRC4 following infection. Removal of damaged mitochondria by autophagy significantly attenuated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA bound specifically to NLRC4 immunoprecipitates and transfection of mitochondrial DNA directly activated the NLRC4 inflammasome; oxidation of the DNA enhanced this effect. Manipulation of autophagy altered the degree of inflammasome activation and inflammation in an in vivo model of P. aeruginosa infection. Our results reveal a novel mechanism contributing to NLRC4 activation by P. aeruginosa via mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial DNA triggered by the bacterial T3SS that is downregulated by autophagy. PMID:25700738

  8. The PINK1-Parkin pathway is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeehye; Lee, Gina; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2009-01-16

    The two Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, are linked in a common pathway which affects mitochondrial integrity and function. However, it is still not known what this pathway does in the mitochondria. Therefore, we investigated its physiological function in Drosophila. Because Drosophila PINK1 and parkin mutants show changes in mitochondrial morphology in both indirect flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons, we here investigated whether the PINK1-Parkin pathway genetically interacts with the regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission such as Drp1, which promotes mitochondrial fission, and Opa1 or Marf, which induces mitochondrial fusion. Surprisingly, DrosophilaPINK1 and parkin mutant phenotypes were markedly suppressed by overexpression of Drp1 or downregulation of Opa1 or Marf, indicating that the PINK1-Parkin pathway regulates mitochondrial remodeling process in the direction of promoting mitochondrial fission. Therefore, we strongly suggest that mitochondrial fusion and fission process could be a prominent therapeutic target for the treatment of PD.

  9. Acute mitochondrial dysfunction after blast exposure: potential role of mitochondrial glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Oguntayo, Samuel; Wang, Ying; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2013-10-01

    Use of improvised explosive devices has significantly increased the incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated neuropsychiatric deficits in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Acute deleterious effects of single and repeated blast exposure can lead to long-term neurobiological effects and neuropsychiatric deficits. Using in vitro and in vivo shock tube models of blast-induced TBI, we studied changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism after blast exposure. Single and repeated blast exposures in vitro resulted in significant decreases in neuronal adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels at 6 h post-blast that returned towards normal levels by 24 h. Similar changes in ATP also were observed in the cerebral cortices of mice subjected to single and repeated blast exposures. In neurons, mitochondrial glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT2) plays a critical role in metabolism and energy production. Proteomic analysis of brain cortices showed a significant decrease in GOT2 levels 6 h after repeated blast exposures, which was further confirmed by Western blotting. Western blot analysis of GOT2 and pyruvate dehydrogenase in the cortex showed direct correlation only between GOT2 and ATP levels. Activity of GOT2 in the isolated cortical mitochondria also showed significant decrease at 6 h supporting the results of proteomic and Western blot analyses. Knowing the significant role of GOT2 in the neuronal mitochondrial energy metabolism, it is quite likely that the down regulation of GOT2 after blast exposure is playing a significant role in mitochondrial dysfunction after blast exposure. PMID:23600763

  10. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Moro, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with cancer development and progression. Recent evidences suggest that pathogenic mutations or depletion of the mitochondrial genome can contribute to development of chemoresistance in malignant tumors. In this review we will describe the current knowledge on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of chemoresistance in cancer. We will also discuss the significance of this research topic in the context of development of more effective, targeted therapeutic modalities and diagnostic strategies for cancer patients, with a particular focus on the potential use of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients displaying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We will discuss recent studies highlighting the importance of the cross-talk between the tumor microenvironment and mitochondrial functionality in determining selective response to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Finally, owing to the similarities between cancer and yeast cell metabolism, we will point out the use of yeast as a model system to study cancer-related genes and for anti-cancer drugs screening. PMID:25107705

  12. Targeting mitochondria for cancer treatment - two types of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Kobilková, Jitka; Jandová, Anna; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Two basic types of cancers were identified – those with the mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells (the Warburg effect) or in fibroblasts supplying energy rich metabolites to a cancer cell with functional mitochondria (the reverse Warburg effect). Inner membrane potential of the functional and dysfunctional mitochondria measured by fluorescent dyes (e.g. by Rhodamine 123) displays low and high values (apparent potential), respectively, which is in contrast to the level of oxidative metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction (full function) results in reduced (high) oxidative metabolism, low (high) real membrane potential, a simple layer (two layers) of transported protons around mitochondria, and high (low) damping of microtubule electric polar vibrations. Crucial modifications are caused by ordered water layer (exclusion zone). For the high oxidative metabolism one proton layer is at the mitochondrial membrane and the other at the outer rim of the ordered water layer. High and low damping of electric polar vibrations results in decreased and increased electromagnetic activity in cancer cells with the normal and the reverse Warburg effect, respectively. Due to nonlinear properties the electromagnetic frequency spectra of cancer cells and transformed fibroblasts are shifted in directions corresponding to their power deviations resulting in disturbances of interactions and escape from tissue control. The cancer cells and fibroblasts of the reverse Warburg effect tumors display frequency shifts in mutually opposite directions resulting in early generalization. High oxidative metabolism conditions high aggressiveness. Mitochondrial dysfunction, a gate to malignancy along the cancer transformation pathway, forms a narrow neck which could be convenient for cancer treatment. PMID:25626329

  13. Inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy improves health in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Ostrovsky, Julian; Kwon, Young Joon; Polyak, Erzsebet; Licata, Joseph; Tsukikawa, Mai; Marty, Eric; Thomas, Jeffrey; Felix, Carolyn A.; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Gasser, David L.; Argon, Yair; Falk, Marni J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease therapies directed at intra-mitochondrial pathology are largely ineffective. Recognizing that RC dysfunction invokes pronounced extra-mitochondrial transcriptional adaptations, particularly involving dysregulated translation, we hypothesized that translational dysregulation is itself contributing to the pathophysiology of RC disease. Here, we investigated the activities, and effects from direct inhibition, of a central translational regulator (mTORC1) and its downstream biological processes in diverse genetic and pharmacological models of RC disease. Our data identify novel mechanisms underlying the cellular pathogenesis of RC dysfunction, including the combined induction of proteotoxic stress, the ER stress response and autophagy. mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin partially ameliorated renal disease in B6.Pdss2kd/kd mice with complexes I–III/II–III deficiencies, improved viability and mitochondrial physiology in gas-1(fc21) nematodes with complex I deficiency, and rescued viability across a variety of RC-inhibited human cells. Even more effective was probucol, a PPAR-activating anti-lipid drug that we show also inhibits mTORC1. However, directly inhibiting mTORC1-regulated downstream activities yielded the most pronounced and sustained benefit. Partial inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, or of autophagy by lithium chloride, rescued viability, preserved cellular respiratory capacity and induced mitochondrial translation and biogenesis. Cycloheximide also ameliorated proteotoxic stress via a uniquely selective reduction of cytosolic protein translation. RNAseq-based transcriptome profiling of treatment effects in gas-1(fc21) mutants provide further evidence that these therapies effectively restored altered translation and autophagy pathways toward that of wild-type animals. Overall, partially inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy offer novel treatment strategies to improve health across the diverse

  14. Inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy improves health in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min; Ostrovsky, Julian; Kwon, Young Joon; Polyak, Erzsebet; Licata, Joseph; Tsukikawa, Mai; Marty, Eric; Thomas, Jeffrey; Felix, Carolyn A; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Gasser, David L; Argon, Yair; Falk, Marni J

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease therapies directed at intra-mitochondrial pathology are largely ineffective. Recognizing that RC dysfunction invokes pronounced extra-mitochondrial transcriptional adaptations, particularly involving dysregulated translation, we hypothesized that translational dysregulation is itself contributing to the pathophysiology of RC disease. Here, we investigated the activities, and effects from direct inhibition, of a central translational regulator (mTORC1) and its downstream biological processes in diverse genetic and pharmacological models of RC disease. Our data identify novel mechanisms underlying the cellular pathogenesis of RC dysfunction, including the combined induction of proteotoxic stress, the ER stress response and autophagy. mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin partially ameliorated renal disease in B6.Pdss2(kd/kd) mice with complexes I-III/II-III deficiencies, improved viability and mitochondrial physiology in gas-1(fc21) nematodes with complex I deficiency, and rescued viability across a variety of RC-inhibited human cells. Even more effective was probucol, a PPAR-activating anti-lipid drug that we show also inhibits mTORC1. However, directly inhibiting mTORC1-regulated downstream activities yielded the most pronounced and sustained benefit. Partial inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, or of autophagy by lithium chloride, rescued viability, preserved cellular respiratory capacity and induced mitochondrial translation and biogenesis. Cycloheximide also ameliorated proteotoxic stress via a uniquely selective reduction of cytosolic protein translation. RNAseq-based transcriptome profiling of treatment effects in gas-1(fc21) mutants provide further evidence that these therapies effectively restored altered translation and autophagy pathways toward that of wild-type animals. Overall, partially inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy offer novel treatment strategies to improve health across the diverse array

  15. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  16. Regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in cancer.

    PubMed

    Senft, Daniela; Ronai, Ze'ev A

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics encompasses processes associated with mitochondrial fission and fusion, affecting their number, degree of biogenesis, and the induction of mitophagy. These activities determine the balance between mitochondrial energy production and cell death programs. Processes governing mitochondrial dynamics are tightly controlled in physiological conditions and are often deregulated in cancer. Mitochondrial protein homeostasis, transcriptional regulation, and post-translational modification are among processes that govern the control of mitochondrial dynamics. Cancer cells alter mitochondrial dynamics to resist apoptosis and adjust their bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs to support tumor initiating and transformation properties including proliferation, migration, and therapeutic resistance. This review focuses on key regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and their role in cancer. PMID:26896558

  17. Pharmacological approaches to restore mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is not only a hallmark of rare inherited mitochondrial disorders, but is also implicated in age-related diseases, including those that affect the metabolic and nervous system, such as type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Numerous pathways maintain and/or restore proper mitochondrial function, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. New and powerful phenotypic assays in cell-based models, as well as multicellular organisms, have been developed to explore these different aspects of mitochondrial function. Modulating mitochondrial function has therefore emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases, which has spurred active drug discovery efforts in this area. PMID:23666487

  18. Mitochondrial role in cell aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies on the mitochondria of insect and mammalian cells are examined with a view to an analysis of intrinsic mitochondrial senescence, and its relation to the age-related changes in other cell organelles. The fine structural and biochemical data support the concept that the mitochondria of fixed postmitotic cells may be the site of intrinsic aging because of the attack by free radicals and lipid peroxides originating in the organelles as a by-product of oxygen reduction during respiration. Although the cells have numerous mechanisms for counteracting lipid peroxidation injury, there is a slippage in the antioxidant protection. Intrinsic mitochondrial aging could thus be considered as a specific manifestation of oxygen toxicity. It is proposed that free radical injury renders an increasing number of the mitochondria unable to divide, probably because of damage to the lipids of the inner membrane and to mitochondrial DNA.

  19. Emerging therapies for mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Helen; Pfeffer, Gerald; Bargiela, David; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a diverse group of debilitating conditions resulting from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations that affect multiple organs, often including the central and peripheral nervous system. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms, effective treatments have not been forthcoming. For over five decades patients have been treated with different vitamins, co-factors and nutritional supplements, but with no proven benefit. There is therefore a clear need for a new approach. Several new strategies have been proposed acting at the molecular or cellular level. Whilst many show promise in vitro, the clinical potential of some is questionable. Here we critically appraise the most promising preclinical developments, placing the greatest emphasis on diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. With new animal and cellular models, longitudinal deep phenotyping in large patient cohorts, and growing interest from the pharmaceutical industry, the field is poised to make a breakthrough. PMID:27190030

  20. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  1. Emerging therapies for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Helen; Pfeffer, Gerald; Bargiela, David; Horvath, Rita; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a diverse group of debilitating conditions resulting from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations that affect multiple organs, often including the central and peripheral nervous system. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms, effective treatments have not been forthcoming. For over five decades patients have been treated with different vitamins, co-factors and nutritional supplements, but with no proven benefit. There is therefore a clear need for a new approach. Several new strategies have been proposed acting at the molecular or cellular level. Whilst many show promise in vitro, the clinical potential of some is questionable. Here we critically appraise the most promising preclinical developments, placing the greatest emphasis on diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. With new animal and cellular models, longitudinal deep phenotyping in large patient cohorts, and growing interest from the pharmaceutical industry, the field is poised to make a breakthrough. PMID:27190030

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  3. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  4. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, A A; Liu, T T

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, fission and fusion, were first identified in yeast with investigation in heart cells beginning only in the last 5 to 7 years. In the ensuing time, it has become evident that these processes are not only required for healthy mitochondria, but also, that derangement of these processes contributes to disease. The fission and fusion proteins have a number of functions beyond the mitochondrial dynamics. Many of these functions are related to their membrane activities, such as apoptosis. However, other functions involve other areas of the mitochondria, such as OPA1's role in maintaining cristae structure and preventing cytochrome c leak, and its essential (at least a 10 kDa fragment of OPA1) role in mtDNA replication. In heart disease, changes in expression of these important proteins can have detrimental effects on mitochondrial and cellular function. PMID:26756641

  5. Mitochondrial pharmacology: its future is now.

    PubMed

    Szeto, H H; James, L P; Atkinson, A J

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial medicine is an evolving discipline whose importance derives from the central function of mitochondria in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, generation of reactive oxygen species, and cell death by necrosis or apoptosis. Consequently, mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the progression of aging and the pathophysiology of many common diseases and off-target drug effects. This provides an impetus for the development of mitochondrial pharmacology, and some promising therapeutic targets for mitochondrial protective therapy have been identified. PMID:25399706

  6. Mitochondrial Ion Channels in Cancer Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Madamba, Stephen M.; Damri, Kevin N.; Dejean, Laurent M.; Peixoto, Pablo M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer transformation involves reprograming of mitochondrial function to avert cell death mechanisms, monopolize energy metabolism, accelerate mitotic proliferation, and promote metastasis. Mitochondrial ion channels have emerged as promising therapeutic targets because of their connection to metabolic and apoptotic functions. This mini review discusses how mitochondrial channels may be associated with cancer transformation and expands on the possible involvement of mitochondrial protein import complexes in pathophysiological process. PMID:26090338

  7. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by six hours after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by twelve hours after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and “foaming” of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence

  8. The mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers do not transport glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Booty, Lee M.; King, Martin S.; Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Majd, Homa; James, Andrew M.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione carries out vital protective roles within mitochondria, but is synthesised in the cytosol. Previous studies have suggested that the mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers were responsible for glutathione uptake. We set out to characterise the putative glutathione transport by using fused membrane vesicles of Lactococcus lactis overexpressing the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers. Although transport of the canonical substrates could be measured readily, an excess of glutathione did not compete for substrate uptake nor could transport of glutathione be measured directly. Thus these mitochondrial carriers do not transport glutathione and the identity of the mitochondrial glutathione transporter remains unknown. PMID:25637873

  9. The mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers do not transport glutathione.

    PubMed

    Booty, Lee M; King, Martin S; Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Majd, Homa; James, Andrew M; Kunji, Edmund R S; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-02-27

    Glutathione carries out vital protective roles within mitochondria, but is synthesised in the cytosol. Previous studies have suggested that the mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers were responsible for glutathione uptake. We set out to characterise the putative glutathione transport by using fused membrane vesicles of Lactococcus lactis overexpressing the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers. Although transport of the canonical substrates could be measured readily, an excess of glutathione did not compete for substrate uptake nor could transport of glutathione be measured directly. Thus these mitochondrial carriers do not transport glutathione and the identity of the mitochondrial glutathione transporter remains unknown. PMID:25637873

  10. The action of structural analogues of ethidium bromide on the mitochondrial genome of yeast.

    PubMed

    Hall, R M; Mattick, J S; Nagley, P; Cobon, G S; Eastwood, F W; Linnane, A W

    1977-12-01

    We have studied the effects on the yeast mitochondrial genome of four analogues of ethidium bromide, in which the phenyl moieyt has been replaced by linear alkyl chains of lengths varying from seven to fifteen carbon atoms. These analogues are more efficient than ethidium bromide in inducing petite mutants in Saccharomyces cervisiae. The drugs also cause a loss of mtDNA from the cells in vivo; however these analogues are in fact less effective inhibitors of mitochondrial DNA replication per se, as shown by direct in vitro studies. It is concluded that these analogues are more efficient than ethidium bromide in causing the fragmentation of mitochondrial DNA in S. cervisiae. PMID:339057

  11. Age decreases mitochondrial motility and increases mitochondrial size in vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Susan; Saunter, Christopher D.; Girkin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    μm long, 0.4% had length:width ratio >3). The extent of mitochondrial motility also varied. 1/811 mitochondria observed moved slightly (∼0.5 μm) in myocytes from older animals, whereas, in the younger animals, directed and Brownian‐like motility occurred regularly (215 of 1135 mitochondria moved within 10 min, up to distance of 12 μm). Mitochondria positioned closer to the cell periphery showed a greater tendency to move. In conclusion, cerebral vascular myocytes from young rats contained small, motile mitochondria. In aged rats, mitochondria were larger, immobile and could be highly‐elongated. These age‐associated alterations in mitochondrial behaviour may contribute to alterations in cell signalling, energy supply or the onset of proliferation. PMID:26959407

  12. Mitochondrial health, the epigenome and healthspan.

    PubMed

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Food nutrients and metabolic supply-demand dynamics constitute environmental factors that interact with our genome influencing health and disease states. These gene-environment interactions converge at the metabolic-epigenome-genome axis to regulate gene expression and phenotypic outcomes. Mounting evidence indicates that nutrients and lifestyle strongly influence genome-metabolic functional interactions determining disease via altered epigenetic regulation. The mitochondrial network is a central player of the metabolic-epigenome-genome axis, regulating the level of key metabolites [NAD(+), AcCoA (acetyl CoA), ATP] acting as substrates/cofactors for acetyl transferases, kinases (e.g. protein kinase A) and deacetylases (e.g. sirtuins, SIRTs). The chromatin, an assembly of DNA and nucleoproteins, regulates the transcriptional process, acting at the epigenomic interface between metabolism and the genome. Within this framework, we review existing evidence showing that preservation of mitochondrial network function is directly involved in decreasing the rate of damage accumulation thus slowing aging and improving healthspan. PMID:27358026

  13. Organization of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic BAK Pore

    PubMed Central

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-01

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX “BH3-in-groove homodimer.” Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a “worm hole.” PMID:24337568

  14. Mitochondrial fusion through membrane automata.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Konstantinos; Andronikos, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that malfunctions in mitochondrial processes can be blamed for diseases. However, the mechanism behind these operations is yet not sufficiently clear. In this work we present a novel approach to describe a biomolecular model for mitochondrial fusion using notions from the membrane computing. We use a case study defined in BioAmbient calculus and we show how to translate it in terms of a P automata variant. We combine brane calculi with (mem)brane automata to produce a new scheme capable of describing simple, realistic models. We propose the further use of similar methods and the test of other biomolecular models with the same behaviour. PMID:25417022

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Ashu

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Here, we provide a concise overview of the major findings in recent years highlighting the importance of healthy mitochondria for a healthy neuron. PMID:22700435

  16. Metabolic regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are renowned for their central bioenergetic role in eukaryotic cells, where they act as powerhouses to generate adenosine triphosphate from oxidation of nutrients. At the same time, these organelles are highly dynamic and undergo fusion, fission, transport, and degradation. Each of these dynamic processes is critical for maintaining a healthy mitochondrial population. Given the central metabolic function of mitochondria, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics reciprocally influence each other. We review the dynamic properties of mitochondria, with an emphasis on how these processes respond to cellular signaling events and how they affect metabolism. PMID:26858267

  17. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  18. Overexpression of the Mitochondrial T3 Receptor Induces Skeletal Muscle Atrophy during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Casas, François; Pessemesse, Laurence; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Seyer, Pascal; Baris, Olivier; Gueguen, Naïg; Ramonatxo, Christelle; Perrin, Florence; Fouret, Gilles; Lepourry, Laurence; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, we characterized a new hormonal pathway involving a mitochondrial T3 receptor (p43) acting as a mitochondrial transcription factor. In in vitro and in vivo studies, we have shown that p43 increases mitochondrial transcription and mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle stimulates mitochondrial respiration and induces a shift in metabolic and contractile features of muscle fibers which became more oxidative. Here we have studied the influence of p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle of mice during aging. We report that p43 overexpression initially increased mitochondrial mass. However, after the early rise in mitochondrial DNA occurring at 2 months of age in transgenic mice, we observed a progressive decrease of mitochondrial DNA content which became 2-fold lower at 23 months of age relatively to control animals. Moreover, p43 overexpression induced an oxidative stress characterized by a strong increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in quadriceps muscle, although antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase and superoxide dismutase) were stimulated. In addition, muscle atrophy became detectable at 6 months of age, probably through a stimulation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway via two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases E3, Atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a prolonged stimulation of mitochondrial activity induces muscle atrophy. In addition, these data underline the importance of a tight control of p43 expression and suggest that a deregulation of the direct T3 mitochondrial pathway could be one of the parameters involved in the occurrence of sarcopenia. PMID:19462004

  19. Inorganic polyphosphate is a potent activator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Seidlmayer, Lea K.; Gomez-Garcia, Maria R.; Blatter, Lothar A.; Pavlov, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by excessive Ca2+ accumulation is a major contributor to cardiac cell and tissue damage during myocardial infarction and ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). At the molecular level, mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by Ca2+-dependent opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, which leads to the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), disruption of adenosine triphosphate production, and ultimately cell death. Although the role of Ca2+ for induction of mPTP opening is established, the exact molecular mechanism of this process is not understood. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the adverse effect of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation is mediated by its interaction with inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a polymer of orthophosphates linked by phosphoanhydride bonds. We found that cardiac mitochondria contained significant amounts (280 ± 60 pmol/mg of protein) of short-chain polyP with an average length of 25 orthophosphates. To test the role of polyP for mPTP activity, we investigated kinetics of Ca2+ uptake and release, ΔΨm and Ca2+-induced mPTP opening in polyP-depleted mitochondria. polyP depletion was achieved by mitochondria-targeted expression of a polyP-hydrolyzing enzyme. Depletion of polyP in mitochondria of rabbit ventricular myocytes led to significant inhibition of mPTP opening without affecting mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration by itself. This effect was observed when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was stimulated by increasing cytosolic [Ca2+] in permeabilized myocytes mimicking mitochondrial Ca2+ overload observed during IRI. Our findings suggest that inorganic polyP is a previously unrecognized major activator of mPTP. We propose that the adverse effect of polyphosphate might be caused by its ability to form stable complexes with Ca2+ and directly contribute to inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. PMID:22547663

  20. Clueless, a protein required for mitochondrial function, interacts with the PINK1-Parkin complex in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditya; Kalvakuri, Sreehari; Bodmer, Rolf; Cox, Rachel T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of mitochondrial function often leads to neurodegeneration and is thought to be one of the underlying causes of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise events linking mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death remain elusive. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin (Park), either of which, when mutated, are responsible for early-onset PD, mark individual mitochondria for destruction at the mitochondrial outer membrane. The specific molecular pathways that regulate signaling between the nucleus and mitochondria to sense mitochondrial dysfunction under normal physiological conditions are not well understood. Here, we show that Drosophila Clueless (Clu), a highly conserved protein required for normal mitochondrial function, can associate with Translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) 20, Porin and PINK1, and is thus located at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Previously, we found that clu genetically interacts with park in Drosophila female germ cells. Here, we show that clu also genetically interacts with PINK1, and our epistasis analysis places clu downstream of PINK1 and upstream of park. In addition, Clu forms a complex with PINK1 and Park, further supporting that Clu links mitochondrial function with the PINK1-Park pathway. Lack of Clu causes PINK1 and Park to interact with each other, and clu mutants have decreased mitochondrial protein levels, suggesting that Clu can act as a negative regulator of the PINK1-Park pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that Clu directly modulates mitochondrial function, and that Clu's function contributes to the PINK1-Park pathway of mitochondrial quality control. PMID:26035866

  1. Bnip3 mediates doxorubicin-induced cardiac myocyte necrosis and mortality through changes in mitochondrial signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Rimpy; Margulets, Victoria; Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Thliveris, James; Jassal, Davinder; Fernyhough, Paul; Dorn, Gerald W.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is widely used for treating human cancers, but can induce heart failure through an undefined mechanism. Herein we describe a previously unidentified signaling pathway that couples DOX-induced mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and necrotic cell death to the BH3-only protein Bcl-2-like 19kDa-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3). Cellular defects, including vacuolization and disrupted mitochondria, were observed in DOX-treated mice hearts. This coincided with mitochondrial localization of Bnip3, increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, and necrosis. Interestingly, a 3.1-fold decrease in maximal mitochondrial respiration was observed in cardiac mitochondria of mice treated with DOX. In vehicle-treated control cells undergoing normal respiration, the respiratory chain complex IV subunit 1 (COX1) was tightly bound to uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), but this complex was disrupted in cells treated with DOX. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by DOX was accompanied by contractile failure and necrotic cell death. Conversely, shRNA directed against Bnip3 or a mutant of Bnip3 defective for mitochondrial targeting abrogated DOX-induced loss of COX1-UCP3 complexes and respiratory chain defects. Finally, Bnip3−/− mice treated with DOX displayed relatively normal mitochondrial morphology, respiration, and mortality rates comparable to those of saline-treated WT mice, supporting the idea that Bnip3 underlies the cardiotoxic effects of DOX. These findings reveal a new signaling pathway in which DOX-induced mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and necrotic cell death are mutually dependent on and obligatorily linked to Bnip3 gene activation. Interventions that antagonize Bnip3 may prove beneficial in preventing mitochondrial injury and heart failure in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:25489073

  2. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Martins, L. Miguel; Kahle, Philipp J.; Krueger, Rejko

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  4. The Fragmented Mitochondrial Ribosomal RNAs of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Jean E.; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Lee, Jung C.; Coe, Kevin J.; Sands, Bryan H.; Cannone, Jamie J.; Tami, Germaine; Schnare, Murray N.; Gutell, Robin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is most unusual. Over half the genome is composed of the genes for three classic mitochondrial proteins: cytochrome oxidase subunits I and III and apocytochrome b. The remainder encodes numerous small RNAs, ranging in size from 23 to 190 nt. Previous analysis revealed that some of these transcripts have significant sequence identity with highly conserved regions of large and small subunit rRNAs, and can form the expected secondary structures. However, these rRNA fragments are not encoded in linear order; instead, they are intermixed with one another and the protein coding genes, and are coded on both strands of the genome. This unorthodox arrangement hindered the identification of transcripts corresponding to other regions of rRNA that are highly conserved and/or are known to participate directly in protein synthesis. Principal Findings The identification of 14 additional small mitochondrial transcripts from P. falcipaurm and the assignment of 27 small RNAs (12 SSU RNAs totaling 804 nt, 15 LSU RNAs totaling 1233 nt) to specific regions of rRNA are supported by multiple lines of evidence. The regions now represented are highly similar to those of the small but contiguous mitochondrial rRNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. The P. falciparum rRNA fragments cluster on the interfaces of the two ribosomal subunits in the three-dimensional structure of the ribosome. Significance All of the rRNA fragments are now presumed to have been identified with experimental methods, and nearly all of these have been mapped onto the SSU and LSU rRNAs. Conversely, all regions of the rRNAs that are known to be directly associated with protein synthesis have been identified in the P. falciparum mitochondrial genome and RNA transcripts. The fragmentation of the rRNA in the P. falciparum mitochondrion is the most extreme example of any rRNA fragmentation discovered. PMID:22761677

  5. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K+ ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K+ ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K+ ionophore) and nigericin (K+/H+ exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K+/H+ exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary fibroblasts. The

  6. Rescue of Heart Failure by Mitochondrial Recovery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a multifactorial disease brought about by numerous, and oftentimes complex, etiological mechanisms. Although well studied, HF continues to affect millions of people worldwide and current treatments can only prevent further progression of HF. Mitochondria undoubtedly play an important role in the progression of HF, and numerous studies have highlighted mitochondrial components that contribute to HF. This review presents an overview of the role of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore in HF, discusses ongoing studies that attempt to address the disease through mitochondrial targeting, and provides an insight on how these studies can affect future research on HF treatment. PMID:27032551

  7. Modeling of Mitochondrial Donut Formation.

    PubMed

    Long, Qi; Zhao, Danyun; Fan, Weimin; Yang, Liang; Zhou, Yanshuang; Qi, Juntao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xingguo

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic cell organelles. Continual cycles of fusion and fission play an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and cellular signaling. Previously, a novel mitochondrial morphology, the donut, was reported in cells after hypoxia-reoxygenation or osmotic pressure changes. However, the mechanism of donut formation remained elusive. Here, we obtained the distribution of donut diameters (D = 2R) and found that 95% are >0.8 μm. We also performed highly precise measurements of the mitochondrial tubule diameters using superresolution and electron microscopy. Then, we set up a model by calculating the mitochondrial bending energy and osmotic potential during donut formation. It shows that the bending energy is increased as the radius of curvature, R, gets smaller in the process of donut formation, especially for radii <0.4 μm, creating a barrier to donut formation. The calculations also show that osmotic potential energy release can balance the rising bending energy through volume expansion. Finally, we revealed the donut formation process in a Gibbs free-energy-dependent model combining calculations and measurements. PMID:26331247

  8. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  9. Historical Perspective on Mitochondrial Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Garone, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we trace the origins and follow the development of mitochondrial medicine from the premolecular era (1962-1988) based on clinical clues, muscle morphology, and biochemistry into the molecular era that started in 1988 and is still advancing at a brisk pace. We have tried to stress conceptual advances, such as endosymbiosis,…

  10. Applied proteomics: mitochondrial proteins and effect on function.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Mary F; Melov, Simon

    2002-03-01

    The identification of a majority of the polypeptides in mitochondria would be invaluable because they play crucial and diverse roles in many cellular processes and diseases. The endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major limiter of life as illustrated by studies in which the transgenic overexpression in invertebrates of catalytic antioxidant enzymes results in increased lifespans. Mitochondria have received considerable attention as a principal source---and target---of ROS. Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been implicated in heart disease including myocardial preconditioning, ischemia/reperfusion, and other pathologies. In addition, oxidative stress in the mitochondria is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as aging itself. The rapidly emerging field of proteomics can provide powerful strategies for the characterization of mitochondrial proteins. Current approaches to mitochondrial proteomics include the creation of detailed catalogues of the protein components in a single sample or the identification of differentially expressed proteins in diseased or physiologically altered samples versus a reference control. It is clear that for any proteomics approach prefractionation of complex protein mixtures is essential to facilitate the identification of low-abundance proteins because the dynamic range of protein abundance within cells has been estimated to be as high as 10(7). The opportunities for identification of proteins directly involved in diseases associated with or caused by mitochondrial dysfunction are compelling. Future efforts will focus on linking genomic array information to actual protein levels in mitochondria. PMID:11884366

  11. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I.; Janecka, Jan E.; Lesk, Arthur M.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Packard, Mike; Zhang, Yeting; McClellan, Lindsay R.; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Dalén, Love; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Ericson, Per G.P.; Huson, Daniel H.; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.; Götherström, Anders; Schuster, Stephan C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%–15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting at a very low genetic diversity shortly before extinction. Despite the samples’ heavy contamination with bacterial and human DNA and their temperate storage history, we estimate that as much as one-third of the total DNA in each sample is from the thylacine. The microbial content of the two thylacine samples was subjected to metagenomic analysis, and showed striking differences between a wild-captured individual and a born-in-captivity one. This study therefore adds to the growing evidence that extensive sequencing of museum collections is both feasible and desirable, and can yield complete genomes. PMID:19139089

  12. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Sung; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu; Jeong, Seung-Hun; Lee, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nari; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Ko, Kyung Soo; Han, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading to apoptosome formation, which activates the intrinsic pathway. This is modulated by the extent of mitochondrial oxidative stress. The peroxiredoxin (Prx) system is a cellular defense system against oxidative stress, and mitochondria in cancer cells are known to contain high levels of Prx III. Here, we review accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress is involved in cancer, and discuss the role of the mitochondrial Prx III antioxidant system as a potential target for cancer therapy. We hope that this review will provide the basis for new strategic approaches in the development of effective cancer treatments. PMID:22072940

  13. Mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO): From physiology to cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Morin, Didier; Musman, Julien; Pons, Sandrine; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    The mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol binding protein which is primarily located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it has been shown to interact with proteins implicated in mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) formation. TSPO is found in different species and is expressed at high levels in tissues that synthesize steroids but is also present in other peripheral tissues especially in the heart. TSPO has been involved in the import of cholesterol into mitochondria, a key step in steroidogenesis. This constitutes the main established function of the protein which was recently challenged by genetic studies. TSPO has also been associated directly or indirectly with a wide range of cellular functions such as apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, regulation of mitochondrial function or porphyrin transport. In the heart the role of TSPO remains undefined but a growing body of evidence suggests that TSPO plays a critical role in regulating physiological cardiac function and that TSPO ligands may represent interesting drugs to protect the heart under pathological conditions. This article briefly reviews current knowledge regarding TSPO and discusses its role in the cardiovascular system under physiological and pathologic conditions. More particularly, it provides evidence that TSPO can represent an alternative strategy to develop new pharmacological agents to protect the myocardium against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26688086

  14. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  15. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  16. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I; Janecka, Jan E; Lesk, Arthur M; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P; Packard, Mike; Zhang, Yeting; McClellan, Lindsay R; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Dalén, Love; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Ericson, Per G P; Huson, Daniel H; Helgen, Kristofer M; Murphy, William J; Götherström, Anders; Schuster, Stephan C

    2009-02-01

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%-15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting at a very low genetic diversity shortly before extinction. Despite the samples' heavy contamination with bacterial and human DNA and their temperate storage history, we estimate that as much as one-third of the total DNA in each sample is from the thylacine. The microbial content of the two thylacine samples was subjected to metagenomic analysis, and showed striking differences between a wild-captured individual and a born-in-captivity one. This study therefore adds to the growing evidence that extensive sequencing of museum collections is both feasible and desirable, and can yield complete genomes. PMID:19139089

  17. Respiratory-deficient human fibroblasts exhibiting defective mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, A G; Cooper, J M; Leonard, J V; Schapira, A H

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized cultured skin fibroblasts from two siblings affected with a fatal mitochondrial disease caused by a nuclear genetic defect. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain function was severely decreased in these cells. Southern-blot analysis showed that the fibroblasts had reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mtDNA was unstable and was eliminated from the cultured cells over many generations, generating the rho0 genotype. As the mtDNA level decreased, the cells became more dependent upon pyruvate and uridine for growth. Nuclear-encoded subunits of respiratory-chain complexes were synthesized and imported into the mitochondria of the mtDNA-depleted cells, albeit at reduced levels compared with the controls. Mitochondrial protein synthesis directed by the residual mtDNA indicated that the mtDNA was expressed and that the defect specifically involves the replication or maintenance of mtDNA. This is a unique example of a respiratory-deficient human cell line exhibiting defective mtDNA replication. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7848281

  18. Mitochondrial Rejuvenation After Induced Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Tjong, Jonathan; Alcasid, Nathan; Perkins, Guy A.; Goissis, Marcelo D.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Perez, Gloria I.; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2010-01-01

    Background As stem cells of the early embryo mature and differentiate into all tissues, the mitochondrial complement undergoes dramatic functional improvement. Mitochondrial activity is low to minimize generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species during pre-implantation development and increases following implantation and differentiation to meet higher metabolic demands. It has recently been reported that when the stem cell type known as induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) are re-differentiated for several weeks in vitro, the mitochondrial complement progressively re-acquires properties approximating input fibroblasts, suggesting that despite the observation that IPSC conversion “resets” some parameters of cellular aging such as telomere length, it may have little impact on other age-affected cellular systems such as mitochondria in IPSC-derived cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have examined the properties of mitochondria in two fibroblast lines, corresponding IPSCs, and fibroblasts re-derived from IPSCs using biochemical methods and electron microscopy, and found a dramatic improvement in the quality and function of the mitochondrial complement of the re-derived fibroblasts compared to input fibroblasts. This observation likely stems from two aspects of our experimental design: 1) that the input cell lines used were of advanced cellular age and contained an inefficient mitochondrial complement, and 2) the re-derived fibroblasts were produced using an extensive differentiation regimen that may more closely mimic the degree of growth and maturation found in a developing mammal. Conclusions/Significance These results — coupled with earlier data from our laboratory — suggest that IPSC conversion not only resets the “biological clock”, but can also rejuvenate the energetic capacity of derived cells. PMID:21124794

  19. Mitochondrial Copy Number and D-Loop Variants in Pompe Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bahreini, Fatemeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Modaresi, Mohammad Hossein; Tonekaboni, Hassan; Nafissi, Shahriar; Nazari, Ferdoss; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pompe disease is a rare neuromuscular genetic disorder and is classified into two forms of early and late-onset. Over the past two decades, mitochondrial abnor- malities have been recognized as an important contributor to an array of neuromuscular diseases. We therefore aimed to compare mitochondrial copy number and mitochondrial displacement-loop sequence variation in infantile and adult Pompe patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, the mitochondrial D-loop sequence was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing to detect pos- sible variation in 28 Pompe patients (17 infants and 11 adults). Results were compared with 100 healthy controls and sequences of all individuals were compared with the Cam- bridge reference sequence. Real-time PCR was used to quantify mitochondrial DNA copy number. Results Among 59 variants identified, 37(62.71%) were present in the infant group, 14(23.333%) in the adult group and 8(13.333%) in both groups. Mitochondrial copy number in infant patients was lower than adults (P<0.05). A significant frequency differ- ence was seen between the two groups for 12 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). A novel insertion (317-318 ins CCC) was observed in patients and six SNPs were iden- tified as neutral variants in controls. There was an inverse association between mito- chondrial copy number and D-loop variant number (r=0.54). Conclusion The 317-318 ins CCC was detected as a new mitochondrial variant in Pompe patients. PMID:27602323

  20. Calcium-induced contraction of sarcomeres changes the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Anmann, Tiia; Eimre, Margus; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Andrienko, Tatiana; Kaambre, Tuuli; Sikk, Peeter; Seppet, Evelin; Tiivel, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko; Seppet, Enn; Saks, Valdur A

    2005-06-01

    The relationships between cardiac cell structure and the regulation of mitochondrial respiration were studied by applying fluorescent confocal microscopy and analysing the kinetics of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, during calcium-induced contraction in permeabilized cardiomyocytes and myocardial fibers, and in their 'ghost' preparations (after selective myosin extraction). Up to 3 microm free calcium, in the presence of ATP, induced strong contraction of permeabilized cardiomyocytes with intact sarcomeres, accompanied by alterations in mitochondrial arrangement and a significant decrease in the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP and ATP in the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration. The V(max) of respiration showed a moderate (50%) increase, with an optimum at 0.4 microm free calcium and a decrease at higher calcium concentrations. At high free-calcium concentrations, the direct flux of ADP from ATPases to mitochondria was diminished compared to that at low calcium levels. All of these effects were unrelated either to mitochondrial calcium overload or to mitochondrial permeability transition and were not observed in 'ghost' preparations after the selective extraction of myosin. Our results suggest that the structural changes transmitted from contractile apparatus to mitochondria modify localized restrictions of the diffusion of adenine nucleotides and thus may actively participate in the regulation of mitochondrial function, in addition to the metabolic signalling via the creatine kinase system. PMID:15955072

  1. Mitochondrial oxidative stress mediates induction of autophagy and hypertrophy in angiotensin-II treated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Rabinovitch, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Autophagy is characterized by recycling of cellular organelles and can be induced by several stimuli, including nutrient deprivation and oxidative stress. As a major site of free radical production during oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondria are believed to be primary targets of oxidative damage during stress. Our recent study demonstrated that angiotensin II increases cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causes a decline of mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes and increases cardiac mitochondrial protein oxidative damage and mitochondrial DNA deletions. The deleterious effects of angiotensin II on mitochondria are associated with an increase in autophagosomes and increased signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis, interpreted as an attempt to replenish the damaged mitochondria and restore energy production. Direct evidence for the central role of mitochondrial ROS was investigated by comparing the effect on mice overexpressing catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT) and mice overexpressing peroxisomal targeted catalase (pCAT, the natural site of catalase) challenged by angiotensin II or Gαq overexpression. The mCAT, but not pCAT, mice are resistant to cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and mitochondrial damage, biogenesis and autophagy induced by angiotensin II, as well as heart failure induced by overexpression of Gαq. PMID:21505274

  2. Decrease of mitochondrial p53 during late apoptosis is linked to its dephosphorylation on serine 20

    PubMed Central

    Castrogiovanni, Cédric; Vandaudenard, Marie; Waterschoot, Béranger; De Backer, Olivier; Dumont, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Following a genotoxic stress, the tumor suppressor p53 translocates to mitochondria to take part in direct induction of apoptosis, via interaction with BCL-2 family members such as BAK and BAX. We determined the kinetics of the mitochondrial translocation of p53 in HCT-116 and PA-1 cells exposed to different genotoxic stresses (doxorubicin, camptothecin, UVB). This analysis revealed an early escalation in the amount of mitochondrial p53, followed by a peak amount and a decrease of mitochondrial p53 at later time points. We show that the serine 20 phosphorylated form of p53 is present at the mitochondria and that the decrease of p53 mitochondrial level during late apoptosis correlates with a decrease of Ser-20 phosphorylation. Moreover, the S20A p53 mutant translocates well to mitochondria after a genotoxic stress but its mitochondrial localization is very low during late apoptosis when compared to wt p53. The S20A mutant also appears to be compromised for interaction with BAK. We propose here that the level of serine 20 phosphorylation is influential on p53 mitochondrial localization during late apoptosis. Additionally, we report the presence of a new ≃45 kDa caspase-cleaved fragment of p53 in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of apoptotic cells. PMID:26252178

  3. Mitochondrial stress induces cellular senescence in an mTORC1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nacarelli, Timothy; Azar, Ashley; Sell, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although mitochondrial stress is a key determinant of cellular homeostasis, the intracellular mechanisms by which this stress is communicated to the nucleus and its impact on cell fate decisions are not well defined. In this study, we report that activation of mTORC1 signaling triggered by mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) results in activation of the senescence program. We show that exposure of human fibroblasts to nucleoside analogs commonly used in antiretroviral therapies, and known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, increases mitochondrial ROS and leads to a rise in intracellular ROS concomitant with activation of mTORC1. In this setting, it appears that mTORC1 activates senescence through HDM2 phosphorylation, facilitating a p53-mediated response. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin decreases HDM2 phosphorylation and blocks activation of the senescence program in human cells. In addition, decreasing mitochondrial ROS directly blocks mTORC1 signaling and prevents the onset of senescence. Consistent with these results, both total and mitochondrial-specific ROS increased in cells undergoing replicative senescence along with ribosomal p70 phosphorylation. The results reveal a novel link between mitochondrial dysfunction, mTORC1 signaling, and the senescence program. PMID:27016071

  4. 4-hydroxynonenal regulates mitochondrial function in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Galam, Lakshmi; Failla, Athena; Soundararajan, Ramani; Lockey, Richard F; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-12-01

    Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress causes Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and significantly impairs pulmonary function. Previously we have demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction is a key pathological factor in hyperoxic ALI. While it is known that hyperoxia induces the production of stable, but toxic 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) molecule, it is unknown how the reactive aldehyde disrupts mitochondrial function. Our previous in vivo study indicated that exposure to hyperoxia significantly increases 4-HNE-Protein adducts, as well as levels of MDA in total lung homogenates. Based on the in vivo studies, we explored the effects of 4-HNE in human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). Human SAECs treated with 25 μM of 4-HNE showed a significant decrease in cellular viability and increased caspase-3 activity. Moreover, 4-HNE treated SAECs showed impaired mitochondrial function and energy production indicated by reduced ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, and aconitase activity. This was followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption and depletion of the reserve capacity. The direct effect of 4-HNE on the mitochondrial respiratory chain was confirmed using Rotenone. Furthermore, SAECs treated with 25 μM 4-HNE showed a time-dependent depletion of total Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins and Trx activity. Taken together, our results indicate that 4-HNE induces cellular and mitochondrial dysfunction in human SAECs, leading to an impaired endogenous antioxidant response. PMID:26484418

  5. Mitochondrial Structure, Function and Dynamics Are Temporally Controlled by c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Graves, J. Anthony; Wang, Yudong; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Cherok, Edward; Rothermund, Kristi; Branca, Maria F.; Elster, Jennifer; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Van Houten, Bennett; Vockley, Jerry; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    Although the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc−/− fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC) are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell. PMID:22629444

  6. Biased introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes: a comparison of diploid and haplodiploid systems.

    PubMed

    Patten, Manus M; Carioscia, Sara A; Linnen, Catherine R

    2015-10-01

    Hybridization between recently diverged species, even if infrequent, can lead to the introgression of genes from one species into another. The rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression often differ, with some taxa showing biases for mitochondrial introgression and others for nuclear introgression. Several hypotheses exist to explain such biases, including adaptive introgression, sex differences in dispersal rates, sex-specific prezygotic isolation and sex-specific fitness of hybrids (e.g. Haldane's rule). We derive a simple population genetic model that permits an analysis of sex-specific demographic and fitness parameters and measures the relative rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression between hybridizing pairs. We do this separately for diploid and haplodiploid species. For diploid taxa, we recover results consistent with previous hypotheses: an excess of one sex among the hybridizing migrants or sex-specific prezygotic isolation causes a bias for one type of marker or the other; when Haldane's rule is obeyed, we find a mitochondrial bias in XY systems and a nuclear bias in ZW systems. For haplodiploid taxa, the model reveals that owing to their unique transmission genetics, they are seemingly assured of strong mitochondrial biases in introgression rates, unlike diploid taxa, where the relative fitness of male and female hybrids can tip the bias in either direction. This heretofore overlooked aspect of hybridization in haplodiploids provides what is perhaps the most likely explanation for differential introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear markers and raises concerns about the use of mitochondrial DNA barcodes for species delimitation in these taxa. PMID:26173469

  7. Exercise Increases Mitochondrial PGC-1α Content and Promotes Nuclear-Mitochondrial Cross-talk to Coordinate Mitochondrial Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Adeel; Little, Jonathan P.; Stokl, Andrew J.; Hettinga, Bart P.; Akhtar, Mahmood; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Endurance exercise is known to induce metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle via activation of the transcriptional co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α). PGC-1α regulates mitochondrial biogenesis via regulating transcription of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Recently, PGC-1α has been shown to reside in mitochondria; however, the physiological consequences of mitochondrial PGC-1α remain unknown. We sought to delineate if an acute bout of endurance exercise can mediate an increase in mitochondrial PGC-1α content where it may co-activate mitochondrial transcription factor A to promote mtDNA transcription. C57Bl/6J mice (n = 12/group; ♀ = ♂) were randomly assigned to sedentary (SED), forced-endurance (END) exercise (15 m/min for 90 min), or forced endurance +3 h of recovery (END+3h) group. The END group was sacrificed immediately after exercise, whereas the SED and END+3h groups were euthanized 3 h after acute exercise. Acute exercise coordinately increased the mRNA expression of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcripts. Nuclear and mitochondrial abundance of PGC-1α in END and END+3h groups was significantly higher versus SED mice. In mitochondria, PGC-1α is in a complex with mitochondrial transcription factor A at mtDNA D-loop, and this interaction was positively modulated by exercise, similar to the increased binding of PGC-1α at the NRF-1 promoter. We conclude that in response to acute altered energy demands, PGC-1α re-localizes into nuclear and mitochondrial compartments where it functions as a transcriptional co-a