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Sample records for directs zebrafish period2

  1. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  2. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: updates and new directions

    PubMed Central

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Eagle, Anne E.; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  3. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  4. Chemokine guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R.M.; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C. Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E.; Sucov, Henry M.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interruption of coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often-fatal consequences for heart disease patients. However the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine-signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  5. Chemokine-guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael R M; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Sucov, Henry M; Siekmann, Arndt F; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-05-26

    Interruption of the coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often fatal consequences for patients. However, the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  6. Directional and color preference in adult zebrafish: Implications in behavioral and learning assays in neurotoxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Bault, Zachary A; Peterson, Samuel M; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a useful vertebrate model organism for neurological studies. While a number of behavior and learning assays are recently reported in the literature for zebrafish, many of these assays are still being refined. The initial purpose of this study was to apply a published T-maze assay for adult zebrafish that measures how quickly an organism can discriminate between different color stimuli after receiving reinforcement to measure learning in a study investigating the later life impacts of developmental Pb exposure. The original results were inconclusive as the control group showed a directional and color preference. To assess directional preference further, a three-chambered testing apparatus was constructed and rotated in several directions. The directional preference observed in males was alleviated by rotating the arms pointing west and east. In addition, color preference was investigated using all combinations of five different colors (orange, yellow, green, blue and purple). With directional preference alleviated results showed that both male and female zebrafish preferred colors of shorter wavelengths. An additional experiment tested changes in color preference due to developmental exposure to Pb in adult male zebrafish. Results revealed that Pb-exposed males gained and lost certain color preferences compared to control males and the preference for short wavelengths was decreased. Overall, these results show that consideration and pretesting should be completed before applying behavioral and learning assays involving adult zebrafish to avoid innate preferences and confounding changes in neurotoxicology studies and that developmental Pb exposure alters color preferences in adult male zebrafish. PMID:25993913

  7. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Elicit Swimming Behaviors Consistent with Direct Vestibular Stimulation in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Zee, David S.; Carey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for ‘high-throughput’ investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  8. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C; Della Santina, Charles C; Zee, David S; Carey, John P

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  9. Effect-directed analysis of Elizabeth River porewater: developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J; Cooper, Ellen M; Clark, Bryan W; Garner, Lindsey V T; Di Giulio, Richard T; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified. PMID:25196082

  10. EFFECT-DIRECTED ANALYSIS OF ELIZABETH RIVER POREWATER: DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY IN ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO)

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J.; Cooper, Ellen M.; Clark, Bryan W.; Garner, Lindsey V.T.; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Ferguson, P. Lee; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified. PMID:25196082

  11. The kinematics of directional control in the fast start of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arjun; Azatian, Grigor; McHenry, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Larval fish use the 'fast start' escape response to rapidly evade the strike of a predator with a three-dimensional (3D) maneuver. Although this behavior is essential for the survival of fishes, it is not clear how its motion is controlled by the motor system of a larval fish. As a basis for understanding this control, we measured the high-speed kinematics of the body of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae when executing the fast start in a variety of directions. We found that the angular excursion in the lateral direction is correlated with the yaw angle in the initial stage of bending (stage 1). In this way, larvae moved in a manner similar to that reported for adult fish. However, larvae also have the ability to control the elevation of a fast start. We found that escapes directed downwards or upwards were achieved by pitching the body throughout the stages of the fast start. Changes in the pitching angle in each stage were significantly correlated with the elevation angle of the trajectory. Therefore, as a larva performs rapid oscillations in yaw that contribute to undulatory motion, the elevation of an escape is generated by more gradual and sustained changes in pitch. These observations are consistent with a model of motor control where elevation is directed through the differential activation of the epaxial and hypaxial musculature. This 3D motion could serve to enhance evasiveness by varying elevation without slowing the escape from a predator. PMID:26519511

  12. Homology Directed Knockin of Point Mutations in the Zebrafish tardbp and fus Genes in ALS Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chen, Brian Edwin; Drapeau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The methodology for site-directed editing of single nucleotides in the vertebrate genome is of considerable interest for research in biology and medicine. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 type II (Cas9) system has emerged as a simple and inexpensive tool for editing genomic loci of interest in a variety of animal models. In zebrafish, error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) has been used as a simple method to disrupt gene function. We sought to develop a method to easily create site-specific SNPs in the zebrafish genome. Here, we report simple methodologies for using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology directed repair using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide donor templates (ssODN) for site-directed single nucleotide editing, for the first time in two disease-related genes, tardbp and fus. PMID:26930076

  13. Cartilage development requires the function of Estrogen-related receptor alpha that directly regulates sox9 expression in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Il; No Lee, Joon; Bhandari, Sushil; Nam, In-Koo; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRa) regulates a number of cellular processes including development of bone and muscles. However, direct evidence regarding its involvement in cartilage development remains elusive. In this report, we establish an in vivo role of Esrra in cartilage development during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Gene expression analysis indicates that esrra is expressed in developing pharyngeal arches where genes necessary for cartilage development are also expressed. Loss of function analysis shows that knockdown of esrra impairs expression of genes including sox9, col2a1, sox5, sox6, runx2 and col10a1 thus induces abnormally formed cartilage in pharyngeal arches. Importantly, we identify putative ESRRa binding elements in upstream regions of sox9 to which ESRRa can directly bind, indicating that Esrra may directly regulate sox9 expression. Accordingly, ectopic expression of sox9 rescues defective formation of cartilage induced by the knockdown of esrra. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that ESRRa is essential for cartilage development by regulating sox9 expression during vertebrate development. PMID:26657540

  14. Rx3 and Shh direct anisotropic growth and specification in the zebrafish tuberal/anterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Victor; Eachus, Helen; Ellis, Pam; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In the developing brain, growth and differentiation are intimately linked. Here, we show that in the zebrafish embryo, the homeodomain transcription factor Rx3 coordinates these processes to build the tuberal/anterior hypothalamus. Analysis of rx3 chk mutant/rx3 morphant fish and EdU pulse-chase studies reveal that rx3 is required to select tuberal/anterior hypothalamic progenitors and to orchestrate their anisotropic growth. In the absence of Rx3 function, progenitors accumulate in the third ventricular wall, die or are inappropriately specified, the shh+ anterior recess does not form, and its resident pomc+, ff1b+ and otpb+ Th1+ cells fail to differentiate. Manipulation of Shh signalling shows that Shh coordinates progenitor cell selection and behaviour by acting as an on-off switch for rx3. Together, our studies show that Shh and Rx3 govern formation of a distinct progenitor domain that elaborates patterning through its anisotropic growth and differentiation. PMID:27317806

  15. Rx3 and Shh direct anisotropic growth and specification in the zebrafish tuberal/anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Victor; Eachus, Helen; Ellis, Pam; Brown, Sarah; Placzek, Marysia

    2016-07-15

    In the developing brain, growth and differentiation are intimately linked. Here, we show that in the zebrafish embryo, the homeodomain transcription factor Rx3 coordinates these processes to build the tuberal/anterior hypothalamus. Analysis of rx3 chk mutant/rx3 morphant fish and EdU pulse-chase studies reveal that rx3 is required to select tuberal/anterior hypothalamic progenitors and to orchestrate their anisotropic growth. In the absence of Rx3 function, progenitors accumulate in the third ventricular wall, die or are inappropriately specified, the shh(+) anterior recess does not form, and its resident pomc(+), ff1b(+) and otpb(+) Th1(+) cells fail to differentiate. Manipulation of Shh signalling shows that Shh coordinates progenitor cell selection and behaviour by acting as an on-off switch for rx3 Together, our studies show that Shh and Rx3 govern formation of a distinct progenitor domain that elaborates patterning through its anisotropic growth and differentiation. PMID:27317806

  16. Combinatorial activity of Flamingo proteins directs convergence and extension within the early zebrafish embryo via the planar cell polarity pathway.

    PubMed

    Formstone, Caroline J; Mason, Ivor

    2005-06-15

    The seven-transmembrane protocadherin, Flamingo, functions in a number of processes during Drosophila development, including planar cell polarity (PCP). To assess the role(s) of Flamingo1/Celsr1 (Fmi1) during vertebrate embryogenesis we have exploited the zebrafish system, identifying two Fmi1 orthologues (zFmi1a and zFmi1b) and employing morpholinos to induce mis-splicing of zebrafish fmi1 mRNAs, to both imitate mutations identified in Drosophila flamingo and generate novel aberrant Flamingo proteins. We demonstrate that in the zebrafish gastrula, Fmi1 proteins function in concert with each other and with the vertebrate PCP proteins, Wnt11 and Strabismus, to mediate convergence and extension during gastrulation, without altering early dorso-ventral patterning. We show that zebrafish Fmi1a promotes extension of the entire antero-posterior axis of the zebrafish gastrula including prechordal plate and ventral diencephalic precursors. However, while we show that control over axial extension is autonomous, we find that Fmi1a is not required within lateral cells undergoing dorsal convergence. PMID:15882862

  17. Microgavage of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Cocchiaro, Jordan L; Rawls, John F

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism for studying intestinal development(1-5), physiology(6-11), disease(12-16), and host-microbe interactions(17-25). Experimental approaches for studying intestinal biology often require the in vivo introduction of selected materials into the lumen of the intestine. In the larval zebrafish model, this is typically accomplished by immersing fish in a solution of the selected material, or by injection through the abdominal wall. Using the immersion method, it is difficult to accurately monitor or control the route or timing of material delivery to the intestine. For this reason, immersion exposure can cause unintended toxicity and other effects on extraintestinal tissues, limiting the potential range of material amounts that can be delivered into the intestine. Also, the amount of material ingested during immersion exposure can vary significantly between individual larvae(26). Although these problems are not encountered during direct injection through the abdominal wall, proper injection is difficult and causes tissue damage which could influence experimental results. We introduce a method for microgavage of zebrafish larvae. The goal of this method is to provide a safe, effective, and consistent way to deliver material directly to the lumen of the anterior intestine in larval zebrafish with controlled timing. Microgavage utilizes standard embryo microinjection and stereomicroscopy equipment common to most laboratories that perform zebrafish research. Once fish are properly positioned in methylcellulose, gavage can be performed quickly at a rate of approximately 7-10 fish/ min, and post-gavage survival approaches 100% depending on the gavaged material. We also show that microgavage can permit loading of the intestinal lumen with high concentrations of materials that are lethal to fish when exposed by immersion. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we present a fluorescent dextran microgavage assay that can be

  18. IL-1β and reactive oxygen species differentially regulate neutrophil directional migration and Basal random motility in a zebrafish injury-induced inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Han, Peidong; Pan, Lifeng; Lu, Wei; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Li; Wen, Zilong

    2014-06-15

    During inflammation, the proper inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils is crucial for the host to fight against infections and remove damaged cells and detrimental substances. IL-1β and NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated to play important roles in this process. However, the cellular and molecular basis underlying the actions of IL-1β and ROS and their relationship during inflammatory response remains undefined. In this study, we use the zebrafish model to investigate these issues. We find that, similar to that of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is required for the recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, to the injury-induced inflammatory site, whereas it is dispensable for bacterial-induced inflammation. Interestingly, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is independent of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling and critical for the directional migration, but not the basal random movement, of neutrophils. In contrast, the NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling is required for both basal random movement and directional migration of neutrophils. We further document that ectopic expression of Il-1β in zebrafish induces an inflammatory disorder, which can be suppressed by anti-inflammatory treatment. Our findings reveal that the Il-1β-Myd88 axis and NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling are two independent pathways that differentially regulate neutrophil migration during sterile inflammation. In addition, Il-1β overexpressing Tg(hsp70:(m)il-1β_eGFP;lyz:DsRed2)hkz10t;nz50 transgenic zebrafish provides a useful animal model for the study of chronic inflammatory disorder and for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. PMID:24835391

  19. Zebrafish Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Michael; Chen, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    In vivo models of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) have proven instrumental in understanding the development and progression of this devastating pediatric sarcoma. Both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems have been developed to study the tumor biology of both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS) RMS subtypes. Zebrafish RMS models have been particularly amenable for high-throughput studies to identify drug targetable pathways because of their short tumor latency, ease of ex vivo manipulation and conserved tumor biology. The transgenic KRASG12D-induced ERMS model allows for molecular and cellular characterization of distinct tumor cell subpopulations including the tumor propagating cells. Comparative genomic approaches have also been utilized in zebrafish ERMS to identify conserved candidate driver genes. Recent advances in zebrafish genome engineering have further enabled the ability to probe the functional significance of potential driver genes. Using the unique strengths of the zebrafish model organisms with the wealth of cellular and molecular tools currently available, zebrafish RMS models provide a powerful in vivo system for which to study RMS tumorigenesis. PMID:27165362

  20. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6) Is Essential for Early Zebrafish Development through the Direct Suppression of gadd45αa Stress Sensor Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Xi; Zhang, Yun-Bin; Ni, Pei-Li; Wu, Zhi-Li; Yan, Yuan-Chang; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation is important in early zebrafish development; however, the role of histone arginine methylation in this process remains unclear. H3R2me2a, generated by protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6), is a repressive mark. To explore the role of Prmt6 and H3R2me2a during zebrafish embryogenesis, we identified the maternal characteristic of prmt6 and designed two prmt6-specific morpholino-oligos (MOs) to study its importance in early development, application of which led to early epiboly defects and significantly reduced the level of H3R2me2a marks. prmt6 mRNA could rescue the epiboly defects and the H3R2me2a reduction in the prmt6 morphants. Functionally, microarray data demonstrated that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible, α, a (gadd45αa) was a significantly up-regulated gene in MO-treated embryos, the activity of which was linked to the activation of the p38/JNK pathway and apoptosis. Importantly, gadd45αa MO and p38/JNK inhibitors could partially rescue the defect of prmt6 morphants, the downstream targets of Prmt6, and the apoptosis ratios of the prmt6 morphants. Moreover, the results of ChIP quantitative real time PCR and luciferase reporter assay indicated that gadd45αa is a repressive target of Prmt6. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal Prmt6 is essential to early zebrafish development by directly repressing gadd45αa. PMID:26487724

  1. Zebrafish Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Charles K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma skin cancer is a potentially deadly disease in humans and has remained extremely difficult to treat once it has metastasized. In just the last 10 years, a number of models of melanoma have been developed in the zebrafish that are biologically faithful to the human disease and have already yielded important insights into the fundamental biology of melanoma and offered new potential avenues for treatment. With the diversity and breadth of the molecular genetic tools available in the zebrafish, these melanoma models will continue to be refined and expanded upon to keep pace with the rapidly evolving field of melanoma biology. PMID:27165365

  2. The Light Responsive Transcriptome of the Zebrafish: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weger, Benjamin D.; Sahinbas, Meltem; Otto, Georg W.; Mracek, Philipp; Armant, Olivier; Dolle, Dirk; Lahiri, Kajori; Vallone, Daniela; Ettwiller, Laurence; Geisler, Robert; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Dickmeis, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms possess circadian clocks that are able to anticipate the day/night cycle and are reset or “entrained” by the ambient light. In the zebrafish, many organs and even cultured cell lines are directly light responsive, allowing for direct entrainment of the clock by light. Here, we have characterized light induced gene transcription in the zebrafish at several organizational levels. Larvae, heart organ cultures and cell cultures were exposed to 1- or 3-hour light pulses, and changes in gene expression were compared with controls kept in the dark. We identified 117 light regulated genes, with the majority being induced and some repressed by light. Cluster analysis groups the genes into five major classes that show regulation at all levels of organization or in different subset combinations. The regulated genes cover a variety of functions, and the analysis of gene ontology categories reveals an enrichment of genes involved in circadian rhythms, stress response and DNA repair, consistent with the exposure to visible wavelengths of light priming cells for UV-induced damage repair. Promoter analysis of the induced genes shows an enrichment of various short sequence motifs, including E- and D-box enhancers that have previously been implicated in light regulation of the zebrafish period2 gene. Heterologous reporter constructs with sequences matching these motifs reveal light regulation of D-box elements in both cells and larvae. Morpholino-mediated knock-down studies of two homologues of the D-box binding factor Tef indicate that these are differentially involved in the cell autonomous light induction in a gene-specific manner. These findings suggest that the mechanisms involved in period2 regulation might represent a more general pathway leading to light induced gene expression. PMID:21390203

  3. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  4. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  5. Turnover of the actomyosin complex in zebrafish embryos directs geometric remodelling and the recruitment of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Asmita; Kumar Sinha, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs), reservoirs of cholesterols and fats, are organelles that hydrolyse lipids in the cell. In zebrafish embryos, the actomyosin complex and filamentous microtubules control the periodic regulation of the LD geometry. Contrary to the existing hypothesis that LD transport involves the kinesin-microtubule system, we find that their recruitment to the blastodisc depends on the actomyosin turnover and is independent of the microtubules. For the first time we report the existence of two distinct states of LDs, an inactive and an active state, that occur periodically, coupled weakly to the cleavage cycles. LDs are bigger, more circular and more stable in the inactive state in which the geometry of the LDs is maintained by actomyosin as well as microtubules. The active state has smaller and irregularly shaped LDs that show shape fluctuations that are linked to actin depolymerization. Because most functions of LDs employ surface interactions, our findings on the LD geometry and its regulation bring new insights to the mechanisms associated with specific functions of LDs, such as their storage capacity for fats or proteins, lipolysis etc. PMID:26355567

  6. Direct regulation of p53 by miR-142a-3p mediates the survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyan; Wei, Yonglong; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells have the capacity to self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell lineages, and thus sustain life-long homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Although intensive studies have focused on the orchestrated genetic network of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell specification and expansion, relatively little is known on the regulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival during embryogenesis. Here, we generated two types of miR-142a-3p genetic mutants in zebrafish and showed that the loss-of-function mutants displayed severe reduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further analysis showed that the diminished proliferation and excessive apoptosis in miR-142a-3p mutants were attributed to the increased p53 signaling. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that miR-142a-3p directly targets p53 during hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development, and the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival defect in miR-142a-3p mutants could be rescued by loss of p53. Therefore, our work reveals the significance of the miR-142a-3p-p53 pathway in controlling hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival, and thus advances our understanding of the role of p53 in vertebrate hematopoiesis.

  7. Zebrafish in hematology: sushi or science?

    PubMed Central

    Carradice, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    After a decade of the “modern era” of zebrafish hematology research, what have been their major contributions to hematology and what challenges does the model face? This review argues that, in hematology, zebrafish have demonstrated their suitability, are proving their utility, have supplied timely and novel discoveries, and are poised for further significant contributions. It presents an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of zebrafish hematopoiesis underpinning their use in hematology research. Whereas reverse genetic techniques enable functional studies of particular genes of interest, forward genetics remains zebrafish's particular strength. Mutants with diverse and interesting hematopoietic defects are emerging from multiple genetic screens. Some mutants model hereditary blood diseases, occasionally leading to disease genes first; others provide insights into developmental hematology. Models of malignant hematologic disorders provide tools for drug-target and pharmaceutics discovery. Numerous transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently marked blood cells enable live-cell imaging of inflammatory responses and host-pathogen interactions previously inaccessible to direct observation in vivo, revealing unexpected aspects of leukocyte behavior. Zebrafish disease models almost uniquely provide a basis for efficient whole animal chemical library screens for new therapeutics. Despite some limitations and challenges, their successes and discovery potential mean that zebrafish are here to stay in hematology research. PMID:18182572

  8. A Zebrafish Thrombosis Model for Assessing Antithrombotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hong-Cui; Guo, Sheng-Ya; Xia, Bo; Song, Ru-Shun; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Xuan, Yao-Xian; Li, Chun-Qi

    2016-08-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death and the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents for thrombotic diseases has been proven challenging. In this study, taking advantage of the transparency of larval zebrafish, we developed a larval zebrafish thrombosis model for drug screening and efficacy assessment. Zebrafish at 2 dpf (days post fertilization) were treated with phenylhydrazine (PHZ) and a testing drug for 24 h. Tested drugs were administered into the zebrafish either by direct soaking or circulation microinjection. Antithrombotic efficacy was quantitatively evaluated based on our previously patented technology characterized as an image analysis of the heart red blood cells stained with O-dianisidine staining. Zebrafish at 2 dpf treated with PHZ at a concentration of 1.5 μM for a time period of 24 h were determined as the optimum conditions for the zebrafish thrombosis model development. Induced thrombosis in zebrafish was visually confirmed under a dissecting stereomicroscope and quantified by the image assay. All 6 human antithrombotic drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, diltiazem hydrochloride injection, xuanshuantong injection, salvianolate injection, and astragalus injection) showed significant preventive and therapeutic effects on zebrafish thrombosis (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, & p < 0.001) in this zebrafish thrombosis model. The larval zebrafish thrombosis model developed and validated in this study could be used for in vivo thrombosis studies and for rapid screening and efficacy assessment of antithrombotic drugs. PMID:27333081

  9. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  10. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A M; Ullmann, J F P; Norton, W H J; Parker, M O; Brennan, C H; Gerlai, R; Kalueff, A V

    2015-02-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern molecular psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  11. Detection of Autofluorescent Mycobacterium Chelonae in Living Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Whipps, Christopher M.; Moss, Larry G.; Sisk, Dana M.; Murray, Katrina N.; Tobin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium chelonae is widespread in aquatic environments and can cause mycobacteriosis with low virulence in zebrafish. The risk of infection in zebrafish is exacerbated in closed-recirculating aquatic systems where rapidly growing mycobacteria can live on biofilms, as well as in zebrafish tissues. We have discovered a method of identifying and visualizing M. chelonae infections in living zebrafish using endogenous autofluorescence. Infected larvae are easily identified and can be excluded from experimental results. Because infection may reduce fertility in zebrafish, the visualization of active infection in contaminated eggs of transparent casper females simplifies screening. Transparent fish are also particularly useful as sentinels that can be examined periodically for the presence of autofluorescence, which can then be tested directly for M. chelonae. PMID:24451037

  12. Zebrafish models for the functional genomics of neurogenetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Brustein, Edna; Champagne, Nathalie; Drapeau, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    In this review, we consider recent work using zebrafish to validate and study the functional consequences of mutations of human genes implicated in a broad range of degenerative and developmental disorders of the brain and spinal cord. Also we present technical considerations for those wishing to study their own genes of interest by taking advantage of this easily manipulated and clinically relevant model organism. Zebrafish permit mutational analyses of genetic function (gain or loss of function) and the rapid validation of human variants as pathological mutations. In particular, neural degeneration can be characterized at genetic, cellular, functional, and behavioral levels. Zebrafish have been used to knock down or express mutations in zebrafish homologs of human genes and to directly express human genes bearing mutations related to neurodegenerative disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy, ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, fronto-temporal dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. More recently, we have been using zebrafish to validate mutations of synaptic genes discovered by large-scale genomic approaches in developmental disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and non-syndromic mental retardation. Advances in zebrafish genetics such as multigenic analyses and chemical genetics now offer a unique potential for disease research. Thus, zebrafish hold much promise for advancing the functional genomics of human diseases, the understanding of the genetics and cell biology of degenerative and developmental disorders, and the discovery of therapeutics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Zebrafish Models of Neurological Diseases. PMID:20887784

  13. Laser capture microdissection of gonads from juvenile zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Investigating gonadal gene expression is important in attempting to elucidate the molecular mechanism of sex determination and differentiation in the model species zebrafish. However, the small size of juvenile zebrafish and correspondingly their gonads complicates this type of investigation. Furthermore, the lack of a genetic sex marker in juvenile zebrafish prevents pooling gonads from several individuals. The aim of this study was to establish a method to isolate the gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish allowing future investigations of gonadal gene expression during sex determination and differentiation. Methods The laser capture microdissection technique enables isolation of specific cells and tissues and thereby removes the noise of gene expression from other cells or tissues in the gene expression profile. A protocol developed for laser microdissection of human gonocytes was adjusted and optimised to isolate juvenile zebrafish gonads. Results The juvenile zebrafish gonad is not morphologically distinguishable when using dehydrated cryosections on membrane slides and a specific staining method is necessary to identify the gonads. The protocol setup in this study allows staining, identification, isolation and subsequent RNA purification and amplification of gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish thereby enabling gonadal gene expression profiling. Conclusion The study presents a protocol for isolation of individual juvenile zebrafish gonads, which will enable future investigations of gonadal gene expression during the critical period of sex differentiation. Furthermore, the presented staining method is applicable to other species as it is directed towards alkaline phosphatase that is expressed in gonocytes and embryonic stem cells, which is conserved among vertebrate species. PMID:19747405

  14. Zebrafish: a new companion for translational research in oncology.

    PubMed

    Barriuso, Jorge; Nagaraju, Raghavendar; Hurlstone, Adam

    2015-03-01

    In an era of high-throughput "omic" technologies, the unprecedented amount of data that can be generated presents a significant opportunity but simultaneously an even greater challenge for oncologists trying to provide personalized treatment. Classically, preclinical testing of new targets and identification of active compounds against those targets have entailed the extensive use of established human cell lines, as well as genetically modified mouse tumor models. Patient-derived xenografts in zebrafish may in the near future provide a platform for selecting an appropriate personalized therapy and together with zebrafish transgenic tumor models represent an alternative vehicle for drug development. The zebrafish is readily genetically modified. The transparency of zebrafish embryos and the recent development of pigment-deficient zebrafish afford researchers the valuable capacity to observe directly cancer formation and progression in a live vertebrate host. The zebrafish is amenable to transplantation assays that test the serial passage of fluorescently labeled tumor cells as well as their capacity to disseminate and/or metastasize. Progress achieved to date in genetic engineering and xenotransplantation will establish the zebrafish as one of the most versatile animal models for cancer research. A model organism that can be used in transgenesis, transplantation assays, single-cell functional assays, and in vivo imaging studies make zebrafish a natural companion for mice in translational oncology research. PMID:25573382

  15. Zebrafish models of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qing; Burton, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies are a group of incurable neurodegenerative diseases, in which loss of neurons is accompanied by intracellular deposition of fibrillar material composed of hyper phosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein Tau. A zebrafish model of Tauopathy could complement existing murine models by providing a platform for genetic and chemical screens, in order to identify novel therapeutic targets and compounds with disease-modifying potential. In addition, Tauopathy zebrafish would be useful for hypothesis-driven experiments, especially those exploiting the potential to deploy in vivo imaging modalities. Several considerations, including conservation of specialized neuronal and other cellular populations, and biochemical pathways implicated in disease pathogenesis, suggest that the zebrafish brain is an appropriate setting in which to model these complex disorders. Novel transgenic zebrafish lines expressing wild-type and mutant forms of human Tau inCNS neurons have recently been reported. These studies show evidence that human Tau undergoes disease-relevant changes in zebrafish neurons, including somato-dendritic relocalization, hyper phosphorylation and aggregation. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that Tau transgene expression can precipitate neuronal dysfunction and death. These initial studies are encouraging that the zebrafish holds considerable promise as a model in which to study Tauopathies. Further studies are necessary to clarify the phenotypes of transgenic lines and to develop assays and models suitable for unbiased high-throughput screening approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Zebrafish Models of Neurological Diseases. PMID:20849952

  16. Conservation and Early Expression of Zebrafish Tyrosine Kinases Support the Utility of Zebrafish as a Model for Tyrosine Kinase Biology

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  17. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  18. Angiogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, Annika; Helker, Christian S M; Herzog, Wiebke

    2014-07-01

    The vasculature consists of an extensively branched network of blood and lymphatic vessels that ensures the efficient circulation and thereby the supply of all tissues with oxygen and nutrients. Research within the last decade has tremendously advanced our understanding of how this complex network is formed, how angiogenic growth is controlled and how differences between individual endothelial cells contribute to achieving this complex pattern. The small size and the optical clarity of the zebrafish embryo in combination with the advancements in imaging technologies cleared the way for the zebrafish as an important in vivo model for elucidating the mechanisms of angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the recent contributions of the analysis of zebrafish vascular development on how vessels establish their characteristic morphology and become patent. We focus on the morphogenetic cellular behaviors as well as the molecular mechanisms that drive these processes in the developing zebrafish embryo. PMID:24813365

  19. Irf6 directly regulates Klf17 in zebrafish periderm and Klf4 in murine oral epithelium, and dominant-negative KLF4 variants are present in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Jia, Zhonglin; Smith, Tiffany; Eshete, Mekonen; Butali, Azeez; Dunnwald, Martine; Murray, Jeffrey; Cornell, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic (NS) cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common disorder with a strong genetic underpinning. Genome-wide association studies have detected common variants associated with this disorder, but a large portion of the genetic risk for NSCL/P is conferred by unidentified rare sequence variants. Mutations in IRF6 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 6) and GRHL3 (Grainyhead-like 3) cause Van der Woude syndrome, which includes CL/P. Both genes encode members of a regulatory network governing periderm differentiation in model organisms. Here, we report that Krüppel-like factor 17 (Klf17), like Grhl3, acts downstream of Irf6 in this network in zebrafish periderm. Although Klf17 expression is absent from mammalian oral epithelium, a close homologue, Klf4, is expressed in this tissue and is required for the differentiation of epidermis. Chromosome configuration capture and reporter assays indicated that IRF6 directly regulates an oral-epithelium enhancer of KLF4. To test whether rare missense variants of KLF4 contribute risk for NSCL/P, we sequenced KLF4 in approximately 1000 NSCL/P cases and 300 controls. By one statistical test, missense variants of KLF4 as a group were enriched in cases versus controls. Moreover, two patient-derived KLF4 variants disrupted periderm differentiation upon forced expression in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that they have dominant-negative effect. These results indicate that rare NSCL/P risk variants can be found in members of the gene regulatory network governing periderm differentiation. PMID:26692521

  20. Dioxin Inhibits Zebrafish Epicardium and Proepicardium Development

    PubMed Central

    Heideman, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to the environmental contaminant and aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin), disrupts cardiac development and function in fish, birds, and mammals. In zebrafish, the temporal window of sensitivity to the cardiotoxic effects of TCDD coincides with epicardium formation. We hypothesized that this TCDD-induced heart failure results from disruption of epicardial development. To determine whether embryonic TCDD exposure inhibits epicardium and proepicardium (PE) development in zebrafish, we used histology and fluorescence immunocytochemistry to examine the epicardium formation in fish exposed to TCDD. TCDD exposure prevented epicardium formation. Using live imaging and in situ hybridization, we found that TCDD exposure blocked the formation of the PE cluster. In situ hybridization experiments showed that TCDD exposure also prevented the expression of the PE marker tcf21 at the site where the PE normally forms. TCDD also inhibited expansion of the epicardial layer across the developing heart: Exposure after PE formation was completed prevented further expansion of the epicardium. However, TCDD exposure did not affect epicardial cells already present. Because TCDD blocks epicardium formation, but is not directly toxic to the epicardium once complete, we propose that inhibition of epicardium formation can account for the window of sensitivity to TCDD cardiotoxicity in developing zebrafish. Epicardium development is crucial to heart development. Loss of this layer during development may account for most if not all of the TCDD-induced cardiotoxicity in zebrafish. PMID:23135548

  1. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Customized Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Pearlberg, Joseph; Joung, J. Keith; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish mutants have traditionally been obtained using random mutagenesis or retroviral insertions, methods that cannot be targeted to a specific gene and require laborious gene mapping and sequencing. Recently, we and others have shown that customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can introduce targeted frame-shift mutations with high efficiency, thereby enabling directed creation of zebrafish gene mutations. Here we describe a detailed protocol for constructing ZFN expression vectors, for generating and introducing ZFN-encoding RNAs into zebrafish embryos, and for identifying ZFN-generated mutations in targeted genomic sites. All of our vectors and methods are compatible with previously described Zinc Finger Consortium reagents for constructing engineered zinc finger arrays. Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within four months. PMID:20010934

  2. Tracking zebrafish larvae in group – Status and perspectives☆

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Pierre R.; Mourrain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Video processing is increasingly becoming a standard procedure in zebrafish behavior investigations as it enables higher research throughput and new or better measures. This trend, fostered by the ever increasing performance-to-price ratio of the required recording and processing equipment, should be expected to continue in the foreseeable future, with video-processing based methods permeating more and more experiments and, as a result, expanding the very role of behavioral studies in zebrafish research. To assess whether the routine video tracking of zebrafish larvae directly in the Petri dish is a capability that can be expected in the near future, the key processing concepts are discussed and illustrated on published zebrafish studies when available or other animals when not. PMID:23707495

  3. Making waves in cancer research: new models in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, Stephane; Jette, Cicely; Langenau, David; Hsu, Karl; Stewart, Rodney; Look, Thomas; Kanki, John P

    2005-08-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has proven to be a powerful vertebrate model system for the genetic analysis of developmental pathways and is only beginning to be exploited as a model for human disease and clinical research. The attributes that have led to the emergence of the zebrafish as a preeminent embryological model, including its capacity for forward and reverse genetic analyses, provides a unique opportunity to uncover novel insights into the molecular genetics of cancer. Some of the advantages of the zebrafish animal model system include fecundity, with each female capable of laying 200-300 eggs per week, external fertilization that permits manipulation of embryos ex utero, and rapid development of optically clear embryos, which allows the direct observation of developing internal organs and tissues in vivo. The zebrafish is amenable to transgenic and both forward and reverse genetic strategies that can be used to identify or generate zebrafish models of different types of cancer and may also present significant advantages for the discovery of tumor suppressor genes that promote tumorigenesis when mutationally inactivated. Importantly, the transparency and accessibility of the zebrafish embryo allows the unprecedented direct analysis of pathologic processes in vivo, including neoplastic cell transformation and tumorigenic progression. Ultimately, high-throughput modifier screens based on zebrafish cancer models can lead to the identification of chemicals or genes involved in the suppression or prevention of the malignant phenotype. The identification of small molecules or gene products through such screens will serve as ideal entry points for novel drug development for the treatment of cancer. This review focuses on the current technology that takes advantage of the zebrafish model system to further our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and its treatment. PMID:16116796

  4. p53 Regulates Period2 Expression and the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic interconnectivity between circadian regulation and the genotoxic stress response remains poorly understood. Here we show that the expression of Period 2 (Per2), a circadian regulator, is directly regulated by p53 binding to a response element in the Per2 promoter. This p53 response element is evolutionarily conserved and overlaps with the E-Box element critical for BMAL1/CLOCK binding and its transcriptional activation of Per2 expression. Our studies reveal that p53 blocks BMAL1/CLOCK binding to the Per2 promoter leading to repression of Per2 expression. In the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), p53 expression and its binding to the Per2 promoter are under circadian control. Per2 expression in the SCN is altered by p53 deficiency or stabilization of p53 by Nutlin-3. Behaviorally, p53−/− mice have a shorter period length that lacks stability and they exhibit impaired photo-entrainment to a light pulse under a free-running state. Our studies demonstrate that p53 modulates mouse circadian behavior. PMID:24051492

  5. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  6. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  7. Zebrafish for modeling skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The experimental advantages of zebrafish make this model system highly amenable to the field of dermatology. Zebrafish skin development is similar to humans and its genome is ~70% orthologous to the human genome. Its external developmental process allows for genetic manipulation and analysis of embryogenesis within a short time frame with all important internal organs and skin compartments formed within 6 days. Zebrafish models of cutaneous human diseases offer insight into pathogenesis and a unique platform for testing of potential therapies. This review details the specific advantages of zebrafish and highlights its use in dermatological research. PMID:27617951

  8. Global analysis of phosphoproteome dynamics in embryonic development of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Kim, Sun Ju; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Young-Hoon; Bae, Young-Seuk; Kim, Jin Young; Peng, Xiaojun; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a popular animal model used for studies on vertebrate development and organogenesis. Recent research has shown a similarity of approximately 70% between the human and zebrafish genomes and about 84% of human disease-causing genes have common ancestry with that of the zebrafish genes. Zebrafish embryos have a number of desirable features, including transparency, a large size, and rapid embryogenesis. Protein phosphorylation is a well-known PTM, which can carry out various biological functions. Recent MS developments have enabled the study of global phosphorylation patterns by using MS-based proteomics coupled with titanium dioxide phosphopeptide enrichment. In the present study, we identified 3500 nonredundant phosphorylation sites on 2166 phosphoproteins and quantified 1564 phosphoproteins in developing embryos of zebrafish. The distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation sites in zebrafish embryos was found to be 88.9, 10.2, and 0.9%, respectively. A potential kinase motif was predicted using Motif-X analysis, for 80% of the identified phosphorylation sites, with the proline-directed motif appearing most frequently, and 35 phosphorylation sites having the pSF motif. In addition, we created six phosphoprotein clusters based on their dynamic pattern during the development of zebrafish embryos. Here, we report the largest dataset of phosphoproteins in zebrafish embryos and our results can be used for further studies on phosphorylation sites or phosphoprotein dynamics in zebrafish embryos. PMID:26449285

  9. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Daniel; Dellenbach, Christian; Saveljic, Igor; Rieger, Michael; Rohr, Stephan; Filipovic, Nenad; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo. Materials and Methods Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations. Results Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001). Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01) and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03). Discussion In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic

  10. Proximal and distal sequences control UV cone pigment gene expression in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Williams, John; Smallwood, Philip M; Touchman, Jeffrey W; Roman, Laura M; Nathans, Jeremy

    2004-04-30

    The molecular basis of cone photoreceptor-specific gene expression is largely unknown. In this study, we define cis-acting DNA sequences that control the cell type-specific expression of the zebrafish UV cone pigment gene by transient expression of green fluorescent protein transgenes following their injection into zebrafish embryos. These experiments show that 4.8 kb of 5'-flanking sequences from the zebrafish UV pigment gene direct expression specifically to UV cones and that this activity requires both distal and proximal sequences. In addition, we demonstrate that a proximal region located between -215 and -110 bp (with respect to the initiator methionine codon) can function in the context of a zebrafish rhodopsin promotor to convert its specificity from rod-only expression to rod and UV cone expression. These experiments demonstrate the power of transient transgenesis in zebrafish to efficiently define cis-acting regulatory sequences in an intact vertebrate. PMID:14966125

  11. Textile dyes induce toxicity on zebrafish early life stages.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gisele Augusto Rodrigues; de Lapuente, Joaquín; Teixidó, Elisabet; Porredón, Constança; Borràs, Miquel; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2016-02-01

    Textile manufacturing is one of the most polluting industrial sectors because of the release of potentially toxic compounds, such as synthetic dyes, into the environment. Depending on the class of the dyes, their loss in wastewaters can range from 2% to 50% of the original dye concentration. Consequently, uncontrolled use of such dyes can negatively affect human health and the ecological balance. The present study assessed the toxicity of the textile dyes Direct Black 38 (DB38), Reactive Blue 15 (RB15), Reactive Orange 16 (RO16), and Vat Green 3 (VG3) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos for 144 h postfertilization (hpf). At the tested conditions, none of the dyes caused significant mortality. The highest RO16 dose significantly delayed or inhibited the ability of zebrafish embryos to hatch from the chorion after 96 hpf. From 120 hpf to 144 hpf, all the dyes impaired the gas bladder inflation of zebrafish larvae, DB38 also induced curved tail, and VG3 led to yolk sac edema in zebrafish larvae. Based on these data, DB38, RB15, RO16, and VG3 can induce malformations during embryonic and larval development of zebrafish. Therefore, it is essential to remove these compounds from wastewater or reduce their concentrations to safe levels before discharging textile industry effluents into the aquatic environment. PMID:26267709

  12. Zebrafish: A Model for the Study of Addiction Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W; Schneider, Henning; Clark, Karl; Cousin, Margot; Ebbert, Jon; Hooten, Michael; Karpyak, Victor; Warner, David; Ekker, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse and dependence are multifaceted disorders with complex genetic underpinnings. Identifying specific genetic correlates is challenging and may be more readily accomplished by defining endophenotypes specific for addictive disorders. Symptoms and syndromes, including acute drug response, consumption, preference, and withdrawal, are potential endophenotypes characterizing addiction that have been investigated using model organisms. We present a review of major genes involved in serotonergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic, and adrenoreceptor signaling that are considered to be directly involved in nicotine, opioid, cannabinoid, and ethanol use and dependence. The zebrafish genome encodes likely homologs of the vast majority of these loci. We also review the known expression patterns of these genes in zebrafish. The information presented in this review provides support for the use of zebrafish as a viable model for studying genetic factors related to drug addiction. Expansion of investigations into drug response using model organisms holds the potential to advance our understanding of drug response and addiction in humans. PMID:22207143

  13. Distinct phenotypes in zebrafish models of human startle disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Lisa R.; Yan, Qing; James, Victoria M.; Kozol, Robert; Topf, Maya; Harvey, Robert J.; Dallman, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Startle disease is an inherited neurological disorder that causes affected individuals to suffer noise- or touch-induced non-epileptic seizures, excessive muscle stiffness and neonatal apnea episodes. Mutations known to cause startle disease have been identified in glycine receptor subunit (GLRA1 and GLRB) and glycine transporter (SLC6A5) genes, which serve essential functions at glycinergic synapses. Despite the significant successes in identifying startle disease mutations, many idiopathic cases remain unresolved. Exome sequencing in these individuals will identify new candidate genes. To validate these candidate disease genes, zebrafish is an ideal choice due to rapid knockdown strategies, accessible embryonic stages, and stereotyped behaviors. The only existing zebrafish model of startle disease, bandoneon (beo), harbors point mutations in glrbb (one of two zebrafish orthologs of human GLRB) that cause compromised glycinergic transmission and touch-induced bilateral muscle contractions. In order to further develop zebrafish as a model for startle disease, we sought to identify common phenotypic outcomes of knocking down zebrafish orthologs of two known startle disease genes, GLRA1 and GLRB, using splice site-targeted morpholinos. Although both morphants were expected to result in phenotypes similar to the zebrafish beo mutant, our direct comparison demonstrated that while both glra1 and glrbb morphants exhibited embryonic spasticity, only glrbb morphants exhibited bilateral contractions characteristic of beo mutants. Likewise, zebrafish over-expressing a dominant startle disease mutation (GlyR α1R271Q) exhibited spasticity but not bilateral contractions. Since GlyR βb can interact with GlyR α subunits 2–4 in addition to GlyR α1, loss of the GlyR βb subunit may produce more severe phenotypes by affecting multiple GlyR subtypes. Indeed, immunohistochemistry of glra1 morphants suggests that in zebrafish, alternate GlyR α subunits can compensate for the

  14. Analysing regenerative potential in zebrafish models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A J; Currie, P D

    2014-11-01

    fish, a model of MDC1A. Secondly high-throughput small molecule screens not only provide effective therapies, but also an alternative strategy for investigating CMD in zebrafish. In this instance insight into disease mechanism is derived in reverse. Zebrafish models are therefore clearly of critical importance in the advancement of regenerative medicine strategies in CMD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: The challenge of translation. PMID:25449259

  15. Chemical screening with zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Functional chemicals are very useful tools for molecular biology studies. Due to its small size, large progeny clutch, and embryonic transparency, zebrafish serves as a superb in vivo animal model for chemical compound screens and characterization. During zebrafish embryogenesis, multiple developmental phenotypes can be easily examined under the microscope, therefore allowing a more comprehensive evaluation for identifying novel functional chemicals than cell-based assays. Ever since the first zebrafish-based chemical screen was conducted in the year 2000, many functional chemicals have been discovered using this strategy. In this chapter, we describe how to perform a typical zebrafish-based chemical screen and discuss the details of the protocol by using the example of the identification and characterization of two new Smo inhibitors with a Gli:GFP transgenic line. PMID:21318908

  16. The Zebrafish Annexin Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Steven A.; De Rose, Robert A.; Olson, Eric S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2003-01-01

    The Annexins (ANXs) are a family of calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins that have been implicated in many cellular processes, including channel formation, membrane fusion, vesicle transport, and regulation of phospholipase A2 activity. As a first step toward understanding in vivo function, we have cloned 11 zebrafish anx genes. Four genes (anx1a, anx2a, anx5,and anx11a) were identified by screening a zebrafish cDNA library with a Xenopus anx2 fragment. For these genes, full-length cDNA sequences were used to cluster 212 EST sequences generated by the Zebrafish Genome Resources Project. The EST analysis revealed seven additional anx genes that were subsequently cloned. The genetic map positions of all 11 genes were determined by using a zebrafish radiation hybrid panel. Sequence and syntenic relationships between zebrafish and human genes indicate that the 11 genes represent orthologs of human anx1,2,4,5,6,11,13,and suggest that several zebrafish anx genes resulted from duplications that arose after divergence of the zebrafish and mammalian genomes. Zebrafish anx genes are expressed in a wide range of tissues during embryonic and larval stages. Analysis of the expression patterns of duplicated genes revealed both redundancy and divergence, with the most similar genes having almost identical tissue-specific patterns of expression and with less similar duplicates showing no overlap. The differences in gene expression of recently duplicated anx genes could explain why highly related paralogs were maintained in the genome and did not rapidly become pseudogenes. PMID:12799347

  17. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  18. Zebrafish: A marvel of high-throughput biology for 21st century toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Bugel, Sean M.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Planchart, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary conservation of genomic, biochemical and developmental features between zebrafish and humans is gradually coming into focus with the end result that the zebrafish embryo model has emerged as a powerful tool for uncovering the effects of environmental exposures on a multitude of biological processes with direct relevance to human health. In this review, we highlight advances in automation, high-throughput (HT) screening, and analysis that leverage the power of the zebrafish embryo model for unparalleled advances in our understanding of how chemicals in our environment affect our health and wellbeing. PMID:25678986

  19. INDUCED AND SPONTANEOUS NEOPLASIA IN ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors, and to compare zebrafish tumors with human tumors. To determine whether the commonly-used germ line mutagen, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induces tumors, we ...

  20. Zebrafish as a cancer model.

    PubMed

    Feitsma, Harma; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-05-01

    The zebrafish has developed into an important model organism for biomedical research over the last decades. Although the main focus of zebrafish research has traditionally been on developmental biology, keeping and observing zebrafish in the lab led to the identification of diseases similar to humans, such as cancer, which subsequently became a subject for study. As a result, about 50 articles have been published since 2000 in which zebrafish were used as a cancer model. Strategies used include carcinogenic treatments, transplantation of mammalian cancer cells, forward genetic screens for proliferation or genomic instability, reverse genetic target-selected mutagenesis to inactivate known tumor suppressor genes, and the generation of transgenics to express human oncogenes. Zebrafish have been found to develop almost any tumor type known from human, with similar morphology and, according to gene expression array studies, comparable signaling pathways. However, tumor incidences are relatively low, albeit highly comparable between different mutants, and tumors develop late in life. In addition, tumor spectra are sometimes different when compared with mice and humans. Nevertheless, the zebrafish model has created its own niche in cancer research, complementing existing models with its specific experimental advantages and characteristics. Examples of these are imaging of tumor progression in living fish by fluorescence, treatment with chemical compounds, and screening possibilities not only for chemical modifiers but also for genetic enhancers and suppressors. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of zebrafish as a model in cancer research. (Mol Cancer Res 2008;6(5):685-94). PMID:18505914

  1. Behavioral effects of bidirectional modulation of brain monoamines by reserpine and d-amphetamine in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kyzar, Evan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Landsman, Samuel; Collins, Christopher; Gebhardt, Michael; Robinson, Kyle; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain monoamines play a key role in the regulation of behavior. Reserpine depletes monoamines, and causes depression and hypoactivity in humans and rodents. In contrast, d-amphetamine increases brain monoamines’ levels, and evokes hyperactivity and anxiety. However, the effects of these agents on behavior and in relation to monoamine levels remain poorly understood, necessitating further experimental studies to understand their psychotropic action. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as a promising model organism for drug screening and translational neuroscience research. Here, we have examined the acute and long-term effects of reserpine and d-amphetamine on zebrafish behavior in the novel tank test. Overall, d-amphetamine (5 and 10 mg/L) evokes anxiogenic-like effects in zebrafish acutely, but not 7 days later. In contrast, reserpine (20 and 40 mg/L) did not evoke overt acute behavioral effects, but markedly reduced activity 7 days later, resembling motor retardation observed in depression and/or Parkinson’s disease. Three-dimensional ‘temporal’ (X, Y, Time) reconstructions of zebrafish locomotion further supports these findings, confirming the utility of 3D-based video-tracking analyses in zebrafish models of drug action. Our results show that zebrafish are highly sensitive to drugs bi-directionally modulating brain monoamines, generally paralleling rodent and clinical findings. Collectively, this emphasizes the potential of zebrafish tests to model complex brain disorders associated with monoamine dysregulation. PMID:23827499

  2. Immunostaining of dissected zebrafish embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingchun; Xu, Xiaolei

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish embryo becomes a popular in vivo vertebrate model for studying cardiac development and human heart diseases due to its advantageous embryology and genetics. About 100-200 embryos are readily available every week from a single pair of adult fish. The transparent embryos that develop ex utero make them ideal for assessing cardiac defects. The expression of any gene can be manipulated via morpholino technology or RNA injection. Moreover, forward genetic screens have already generated a list of mutants that affect different perspectives of cardiogenesis. Whole mount immunostaining is an important technique in this animal model to reveal the expression pattern of the targeted protein to a particular tissue. However, high resolution images that can reveal cellular or subcellular structures have been difficult, mainly due to the physical location of the heart and the poor penetration of the antibodies. Here, we present a method to address these bottlenecks by dissecting heart first and then conducting the staining process on the surface of a microscope slide. To prevent the loss of small heart samples and to facilitate solution handling, we restricted the heart samples within a circle on the surface of the microscope slides drawn by an immEdge pen. After the staining, the fluorescence signals can be directly observed by a compound microscope. Our new method significantly improves the penetration for antibodies, since a heart from an embryonic fish only consists of few cell layers. High quality images from intact hearts can be obtained within a much reduced procession time for zebrafish embryos aged from day 2 to day 6. Our method can be potentially extended to stain other organs dissected from either zebrafish or other small animals. PMID:22258109

  3. Maintenance of Zebrafish Lines at the European Zebrafish Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Nadine; Ferg, Marco; Maier, Jana Viktoria; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have established a European Zebrafish Resource Center (EZRC) at the KIT. This center not only maintains and distributes a large number of existing mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines but also gives zebrafish researchers access to screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing, provided by the Institute of Toxicology and Genetics (ITG). The EZRC maintains and distributes the stock collection of the Nüsslein-Volhard laboratory, comprising over 2000 publicly released mutations, as frozen sperm samples. Within the framework of the ZF-HEALTH EU project, the EZRC distributes over 10,000 knockout mutations from the Sanger Institute (United Kingdom), as well as over 100 mutant and transgenic lines from other sources. In this article, we detail the measures we have taken to ensure the health of our fish, including hygiene, quarantine, and veterinary inspections. PMID:27351617

  4. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  5. New zebrafish models of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Martín-Jiménez, Rebeca; Campanella, Michelangelo; Russell, Claire

    2015-06-01

    In modern biomedicine, the increasing need to develop experimental models to further our understanding of disease conditions and delineate innovative treatments has found in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) an experimental model, and indeed a valuable asset, to close the gap between in vitro and in vivo assays. Translation of ideas at a faster pace is vital in the field of neurodegeneration, with the attempt to slow or prevent the dramatic impact on the society's welfare being an essential priority. Our research group has pioneered the use of zebrafish to contribute to the quest for faster and improved understanding and treatment of neurodegeneration in concert with, and inspired by, many others who have primed the study of the zebrafish to understand and search for a cure for disorders of the nervous system. Aware of the many advantages this vertebrate model holds, here, we present an update on the recent zebrafish models available to study neurodegeneration with the goal of stimulating further interest and increasing the number of diseases and applications for which they can be exploited. We shall do so by citing and commenting on recent breakthroughs made possible via zebrafish, highlighting their benefits for the testing of therapeutics and dissecting of disease mechanisms. PMID:25903297

  6. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  7. Human cardiotoxic drugs delivered by soaking and microinjection induce cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Jing; Xu, Yi-Qiao; He, Jian-Hui; Yu, Hang-Ping; Huang, Chang-Jiang; Gao, Ji-Min; Dong, Qiao-Xiang; Xuan, Yao-Xian; Li, Chun-Qi

    2014-02-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is a major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry and predictive screening models to identify and eliminate pharmaceuticals with the potential to cause cardiovascular toxicity in humans are urgently needed. In this study, taking advantage of the transparency of larval zebrafish, Danio rerio, we assessed cardiovascular toxicity of seven known human cardiotoxic drugs (aspirin, clomipramine hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, nimodipine, quinidine, terfenadine and verapamil hydrochloride) and two non-cardiovascular toxicity drugs (gentamicin sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride) in zebrafish using six specific phenotypic endpoints: heart rate, heart rhythm, pericardial edema, circulation, hemorrhage and thrombosis. All the tested drugs were delivered into zebrafish by direct soaking and yolk sac microinjection, respectively, and cardiovascular toxicity was quantitatively or qualitatively assessed at 4 and 24 h post drug treatment. The results showed that aspirin accelerated the zebrafish heart rate (tachycardia), whereas clomipramine hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, nimodipine, quinidine, terfenadine and verapamil hydrochloride induced bradycardia. Quinidine and terfenadine also caused atrioventricular (AV) block. Nimodipine treatment resulted in atrial arrest with much slower but regular ventricular heart beating. All the tested human cardiotoxic drugs also induced pericardial edema and circulatory disturbance in zebrafish. There was no sign of cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish treated with non-cardiotoxic drugs gentamicin sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride. The overall prediction success rate for cardiotoxic drugs and non-cardiotoxic drugs in zebrafish were 100% (9/9) as compared with human results, suggesting that zebrafish is an excellent animal model for rapid in vivo cardiovascular toxicity screening. The procedures we developed in this report for assessing cardiovascular toxicity in zebrafish were suitable for drugs delivered

  8. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  9. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  10. Developmental toxicity screening in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Catherine W; Ducharme, Nicole A; Bondesson, Maria; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2011-06-01

    Given the ever-increasing toxic exposure ubiquitously present in our environment as well as emerging evidence that these exposures are hazardous to human health, the current rodent-based regulations are proving inadequate. In the process of overhauling risk assessment methodology, a nonrodent test organism, the zebrafish, is emerging as tractable for medium- and high-throughput assessments, which may help to accelerate the restructuring of standards. Zebrafish have high developmental similarity to mammals in most aspects of embryo development, including early embryonic processes, and on cardiovascular, somite, muscular, skeletal, and neuronal systems. Here, we briefly describe the development of these systems and then chronicle the toxic impacts assessed following chemical exposure. We also compare the available data in zebrafish toxicity assays with two databases containing mammalian toxicity data. Finally, we identify gaps in our collective knowledge that are ripe for future studies. PMID:21671351

  11. Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility Overview.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Ryan E; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a premier nonmammalian vertebrate model organism. This small aquatic fish is utilized in multiple disciplines in the Mayo Clinic community and by many laboratories around the world because of its biological similarity to humans, its advanced molecular genetics, the elucidation of its genome sequence, and the ever-expanding and outstanding new biological tools now available to the zebrafish researcher. The Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility (MCZF) houses ∼2,000 tanks annotated using an in-house, Internet cloud-based bar-coding system tied to our established zfishbook.org web infrastructure. Paramecia are the primary food source for larval fish rearing, using a simplified culture protocol described herein. The MCZF supports the specific ongoing research in a variety of laboratories, while also serving as a local hub for new scientists as they learn to tap into the potential of this model system for understanding normal development, disease, and as models of health. PMID:27023741

  12. Measuring thigmotaxis in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schnörr, S J; Steenbergen, P J; Richardson, M K; Champagne, D L

    2012-03-17

    One of the most commonly used behavioral endpoints measured in preclinical studies using rodent models is thigmotaxis (or "wall-hugging"). Thigmotaxis is a well-validated index of anxiety in animals and humans. While assays measuring thigmotaxis in adult zebrafish have been developed, a thigmotaxis assay has not yet been validated in larval zebrafish. Here we present a novel assay for measurement of thigmotaxis in zebrafish larvae that is triggered by a sudden change in illumination (i.e. sudden light-to-darkness transition) and performed in a standard 24-well plate. We show that zebrafish larvae as young as 5 days post fertilization respond to this challenge by engaging in thigmotaxis. Thigmotaxis was significantly attenuated by anxiolytic (diazepam) and significantly enhanced by anxiogenic (caffeine) drugs, thus representing the first validated thigmotaxis assay for larval zebrafish. We also show that exposure to sudden darkness per se may represent an anxiogenic situation for larval zebrafish since less contrasting light-to-darkness transitions (achieved by lowering darkness degrees) significantly decreased thigmotaxis levels in a manner similar to what was achieved with diazepam. These findings suggest that stimuli such as exposure to sudden darkness could be used proficiently to trigger the expression of anxiety-like behaviors in laboratory settings. In sum, this is a versatile protocol allowing testing of both anxiolytic and anxiogenic drugs in a cost-effective manner (only 10 min). This assay is also amenable to medium to high-throughput capacity while constituting a valuable tool for stress and central nervous system research as well as for preclinical drug screening and discovery. PMID:22197677

  13. Object recognition memory in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    May, Zacnicte; Morrill, Adam; Holcombe, Adam; Johnston, Travis; Gallup, Joshua; Fouad, Karim; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor James

    2016-01-01

    The novel object recognition, or novel-object preference (NOP) test is employed to assess recognition memory in a variety of organisms. The subject is exposed to two identical objects, then after a delay, it is placed back in the original environment containing one of the original objects and a novel object. If the subject spends more time exploring one object, this can be interpreted as memory retention. To date, this test has not been fully explored in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish possess recognition memory for simple 2- and 3-dimensional geometrical shapes, yet it is unknown if this translates to complex 3-dimensional objects. In this study we evaluated recognition memory in zebrafish using complex objects of different sizes. Contrary to rodents, zebrafish preferentially explored familiar over novel objects. Familiarity preference disappeared after delays of 5 mins. Leopard danios, another strain of D. rerio, also preferred the familiar object after a 1 min delay. Object preference could be re-established in zebra danios by administration of nicotine tartrate salt (50mg/L) prior to stimuli presentation, suggesting a memory-enhancing effect of nicotine. Additionally, exploration biases were present only when the objects were of intermediate size (2 × 5 cm). Our results demonstrate zebra and leopard danios have recognition memory, and that low nicotine doses can improve this memory type in zebra danios. However, exploration biases, from which memory is inferred, depend on object size. These findings suggest zebrafish ecology might influence object preference, as zebrafish neophobia could reflect natural anti-predatory behaviour. PMID:26376244

  14. Zebrafish as a model to study chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have emerged as a powerful model organism to study embryo morphogenesis. Due to their optical clarity, they are uniquely suited for time-lapse imaging studies, providing insights into the dynamic processes underlying tissue formation and cell migration. These studies have been tremendously facilitated by the availability of transgenic zebrafish lines, labelling distinct embryonic structures, individual cells, or even subcellular structures, such as the nucleus. Zebrafish studies have revealed that the migration of several different cell types in the embryo is controlled by chemokines, small vertebrate-specific proteins. Here, we report methods to analyze the expression pattern of a given chemokine and its receptor in transgenic zebrafish using fluorescent in situ hybridization in combination with an anti-green fluorescent protein (GFP) antibody staining. We furthermore illustrate how to image migrating cell populations using time-lapse microscopy in double-transgenic embryos. We show how to investigate cell number and direction of migration by using a nuclear-localized GFP. The combination of this transgene with a membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein allows for the simultaneous determination of changes in cell shape, such as the formation of filopodial extensions. We exemplify this by describing how a mutation in the chemokine receptor cxcr4a affects endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Finally, we provide a method to perform fluorescent angiography to monitor blood vessel perfusion in chemokine receptor mutants. PMID:23625497

  15. Coupled mutagenesis screens and genetic mapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, John F; Frieda, Matthew R; McAdow, Anthony R; Gross, Jason P; Clayton, Chad M; Heyen, Candy K; Johnson, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is one of the principal advantages of the zebrafish model system. However, managing zebrafish mutant lines derived from mutagenesis screens and mapping the corresponding mutations and integrating them into the larger collection of mutations remain arduous tasks. To simplify and focus these endeavors, we developed an approach that facilitates the rapid mapping of new zebrafish mutations as they are generated through mutagenesis screens. We selected a minimal panel of 149 simple sequence length polymorphism markers for a first-pass genome scan in crosses involving C32 and SJD inbred lines. We also conducted a small chemical mutagenesis screen that identified several new mutations affecting zebrafish embryonic melanocyte development. Using our first-pass marker panel in bulked-segregant analysis, we were able to identify the genetic map positions of these mutations as they were isolated in our screen. Rapid mapping of the mutations facilitated stock management, helped direct allelism tests, and should accelerate identification of the affected genes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of coupling mutagenesis screens with genetic mapping. PMID:12663538

  16. A model 450 million years in the making: zebrafish and vertebrate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Stephen A.; Trede, Nikolaus S.

    2012-01-01

    Since its first splash 30 years ago, the use of the zebrafish model has been extended from a tool for genetic dissection of early vertebrate development to the functional interrogation of organogenesis and disease processes such as infection and cancer. In particular, there is recent and growing attention in the scientific community directed at the immune systems of zebrafish. This development is based on the ability to image cell movements and organogenesis in an entire vertebrate organism, complemented by increasing recognition that zebrafish and vertebrate immunity have many aspects in common. Here, we review zebrafish immunity with a particular focus on recent studies that exploit the unique genetic and in vivo imaging advantages available for this organism. These unique advantages are driving forward our study of vertebrate immunity in general, with important consequences for the understanding of mammalian immune function and its role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22228790

  17. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  18. Budget Period 2 Summary Report Part 2: Hywind Maine Project

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Frederick; Platt, Andrew; Sirnivas, Senu

    2015-08-15

    This project was performed under the Work for Others—Funds in Agreement FIA-14-1793 between Statoil and the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, manager and operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). To support the development of a 6-MW spar-mounted offshore wind turbine, Statoil funded NREL to perform tasks in the following three categories: 1. Design and analysis 2. Wake modeling 3. Concept resource assessment. This study expands upon the work conducted in Budget Period 1 (BP1) to investigate the influence of the wake generated from an upstream turbine on a downstream turbine using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) high-fidelity modeling tool. Simulator fOr Wind Farms Application (SOWFA) [1] is an NREL high fidelity modeling tool that couples OpenFOAM [2] CFD and NREL’s Aero-Elastic code Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence (FAST)[3]. In BP1 the configuration was based on Hywind-3MW at 140 m water depth in the Gulf of Maine; however this study for Budget Period 2 (BP2) the configuration investigated is based on Hywind-6MW at 220 m water depth off the coast of Boston. The objectives were to perform two-turbines One-Way Coupling (OWC), three-turbines Two-Way Coupling (TWC), and to investigate wind power plant optimization.

  19. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and, when PER 2 was co-expressed with the Crytochrome 2 (Cry 2) gene, an even greater growth-inhibitory effect was observed. The inhibitory effect of PER 2 on breast cancer cells was also demonstrated by its suppression of the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as evidenced by the reduced number and size of colonies. A corresponding blockade of MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was also observed in response to the expression of PER 2 alone or in combination with CRY 2. Expression of PER 2 also induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells as demonstrated by an increase in PARP [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage. Finally, our studies demonstrate that PER 2 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is associated with a significant decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and an up-regulation of p53 levels. PMID:18334030

  20. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and, when PER 2 was co-expressed with the Crytochrome 2 (Cry 2) gene, an even greater growth-inhibitory effect was observed. The inhibitory effect of PER 2 on breast cancer cells was also demonstrated by its suppression of the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as evidenced by the reduced number and size of colonies. A corresponding blockade of MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was also observed in response to the expression of PER 2 alone or in combination with CRY 2. Expression of PER 2 also induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells as demonstrated by an increase in PARP [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage. Finally, our studies demonstrate that PER 2 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is associated with a significant decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and an up-regulation of p53 levels. PMID:18334030

  1. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  2. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  3. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model.

  4. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  5. Microsporidiosis in Zebrafish Research Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Justin L.; Watral, Virginia; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia) is the most common pathogen detected in zebrafish (Danio rerio) from research facilities. The parasite infects the central nervous system and muscle and may be associated with emaciation and skeletal deformities. However, many fish exhibit sub-clinical infections. Another microsporidium, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, has recently been detected in a few zebrafish facilities. Here, we review the methods for diagnosis and detection, modes of transmission, and approaches used to control microsporidia in zebrafish, focusing on P. neurophilia. The parasite can be readily transmitted by feeding spores or infected tissues, and we show that cohabitation with infected fish is also an effective means of transmission. Spores are released from live fish in various manners, including through the urine, feces, and sex products during spawning. Indeed, P. neurophilia infects both the eggs and ovarian tissues, where we found concentrations ranging from 12,000 to 88,000 spores per ovary. Hence, various lines of evidence support the conclusion that maternal transmission is a route of infection: spores are numerous in ovaries and developing follicles in infected females, spores are present in spawned eggs and water from spawning tanks based on polymerase chain reaction tests, and larvae are very susceptible to the infection. Furthermore, egg surface disinfectants presently used in zebrafish laboratories are ineffective against microsporidian spores. At this time, the most effective method for prevention of these parasites is avoidance. PMID:23382342

  6. Expression profiles for six zebrafish genes during gonadal sex differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Anne; Morthorst, Jane E; Andersen, Ole; Rasmussen, Lene J; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Background The mechanism of sex determination in zebrafish is largely unknown and neither sex chromosomes nor a sex-determining gene have been identified. This indicates that sex determination in zebrafish is mediated by genetic signals from autosomal genes. The aim of this study was to determine the precise timing of expression of six genes previously suggested to be associated with sex differentiation in zebrafish. The current study investigates the expression of all six genes in the same individual fish with extensive sampling dates during sex determination and -differentiation. Results In the present study, we have used quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the expression of ar, sox9a, dmrt1, fig alpha, cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b during the expected sex determination and gonadal sex differentiation period. The expression of the genes expected to be high in males (ar, sox9a and dmrt1a) and high in females (fig alpha and cyp19a1a) was segregated in two groups with more than 10 times difference in expression levels. All of the investigated genes showed peaks in expression levels during the time of sex determination and gonadal sex differentiation. Expression of all genes was investigated on cDNA from the same fish allowing comparison of the high and low expressers of genes that are expected to be highest expressed in either males or females. There were 78% high or low expressers of all three "male" genes (ar, sox9a and dmrt1) in the investigated period and 81% were high or low expressers of both "female" genes (fig alpha and cyp19a1a). When comparing all five genes with expected sex related expression 56% show expression expected for either male or female. Furthermore, the expression of all genes was investigated in different tissue of adult male and female zebrafish. Conclusion In zebrafish, the first significant peak in gene expression during the investigated period (2–40 dph) was dmrt1 at 10 dph which indicates involvement of this gene in the early gonadal sex

  7. Development of social behavior in young zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dreosti, Elena; Lopes, Gonçalo; Kampff, Adam R.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Adult zebrafish are robustly social animals whereas larva is not. We designed an assay to determine at what stage of development zebrafish begin to interact with and prefer other fish. One week old zebrafish do not show significant social preference whereas most 3 weeks old zebrafish strongly prefer to remain in a compartment where they can view conspecifics. However, for some individuals, the presence of conspecifics drives avoidance instead of attraction. Social preference is dependent on vision and requires viewing fish of a similar age/size. In addition, over the same 1–3 weeks period larval zebrafish increasingly tend to coordinate their movements, a simple form of social interaction. Finally, social preference and coupled interactions are differentially modified by an NMDAR antagonist and acute exposure to ethanol, both of which are known to alter social behavior in adult zebrafish. PMID:26347614

  8. Studying rod photoreceptor development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A.C.; Fadool, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish has rapidly become a favored model vertebrate organism, well suited for studies of developmental processes using large-scale genetic screens. In particular, zebrafish morphological and behavioral genetic screens have led to the identification of genes important for development of the retinal photoreceptors. This may help clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying human photoreceptor development and dysfunction in retinal diseases. In this review, we present the advantages of zebrafish as a vertebrate model organism, summarize retinal and photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish, with emphasis on the rod photoreceptors, and describe zebrafish visual behaviors that can be used for genetic screens. We then describe some of the photoreceptor cell mutants that have been isolated in morphological and behavioral screens and discuss the limitations of current screening methods for uncovering mutations that specifically affect rod function. Finally, we present some alternative strategies to target the rod developmental pathway in zebrafish. PMID:16199068

  9. Multiplicity of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and their connection to the circadian clock in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pelster, Bernd; Egg, Margit

    2015-01-01

    modified life cycle of erythrocytes and an altered patterning of the vascular bed, leading to even higher mortality rates of chronodisrupted animals. Hif protein, in turn, is known to affect the circadian clock pathway in zebrafish. Previously, we demonstrated that Hif-1α directly binds to defined E-boxes of the period 1 gene, leading to a sustained dampening of its oscillation amplitude. Here we show that Hif-1α also binds to the promoter of the period 2 gene, indicating that multiple connections between the Hif signaling pathway and the circadian clock exist. The redundancy of the coupling between both pathways might be evidence for the coevolution of both circuits after the great oxygenation event about 2.5 billion years ago. Coupling the circadian clock and the hypoxic signaling pathway may have conferred selective advantages by facilitating a coordinated response of cells and organisms to alternating day-night cycles and concomitant variable food availabilities in the face of varying oxygen supply. PMID:25730270

  10. Zebrafish: a vertebrate tool for studying basal body biogenesis, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Ryan A; Osborn, Daniel P S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of basal bodies (BBs) during development and disease has been largely overshadowed by research into the function of the cilium. Although these two organelles are closely associated, they have specific roles to complete for successful cellular development. Appropriate development and function of the BB are fundamental for cilia function. Indeed, there are a growing number of human genetic diseases affecting ciliary development, known collectively as the ciliopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that BBs establish cell polarity, direct ciliogenesis, and provide docking sites for proteins required within the ciliary axoneme. Major contributions to our knowledge of BB structure and function have been provided by studies in flagellated or ciliated unicellular eukaryotic organisms, specifically Tetrahymena and Chlamydomonas. Reproducing these and other findings in vertebrates has required animal in vivo models. Zebrafish have fast become one of the primary organisms of choice for modeling vertebrate functional genetics. Rapid ex-utero development, proficient egg laying, ease of genetic manipulation, and affordability make zebrafish an attractive vertebrate research tool. Furthermore, zebrafish share over 80 % of disease causing genes with humans. In this article, we discuss the merits of using zebrafish to study BB functional genetics, review current knowledge of zebrafish BB ultrastructure and mechanisms of function, and consider the outlook for future zebrafish-based BB studies. PMID:27168933

  11. Hooked! Modeling human disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Santoriello, Cristina; Zon, Leonard I

    2012-07-01

    Zebrafish have been widely used as a model system for studying developmental processes, but in the last decade, they have also emerged as a valuable system for modeling human disease. The development and function of zebrafish organs are strikingly similar to those of humans, and the ease of creating mutant or transgenic fish has facilitated the generation of disease models. Here, we highlight the use of zebrafish for defining disease pathways and for discovering new therapies. PMID:22751109

  12. Shuttle box learning in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Pather, Shalini; Gerlai, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish is used in forward genetic and drug screening and is gaining popularity in behavioral brain research but high throughput learning paradigms are lacking. The sight of conspecifics has been shown to be rewarding in zebrafish. Here, in a novel paradigm, subjects learn to respond to alternating presentation of computer animated zebrafish images. The simplicity and computerization of the paradigm will make it useful for high throughput screening. PMID:18926855

  13. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-02-20

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  14. The zebrafish genome editing toolkit.

    PubMed

    Ata, H; Clark, K J; Ekker, S C

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a unique model organism at the functional intersection between a high fecundity and conserved vertebrate physiology while being amenable to a multitude of genome editing techniques. The genome engineering field has experienced an unprecedented rate of growth in the recent years since the introduction of designer endonucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-Cas9 systems. With the ever-evolving toolset available to the scientific community, the important question one should ask is not simply how to make a mutant line, but rather how best to do so. For this purpose, understanding the toolset is just one end of the equation; understanding how DNA is repaired once double-strand breaks are induced by designer endonucleases, as well as understanding proper fish handling and line maintenance techniques, are also essential to rapidly edit the zebrafish genome. This chapter is outlined to provide a bird's-eye view on each of these three components. The goal of this chapter is to facilitate the adoption of the zebrafish as a model to study human genetic disease and to rapidly analyze the function of the vertebrate genome. PMID:27443924

  15. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  16. Stressing Zebrafish for Behavioral Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The stress response is a normal reaction to a real or perceived threat. However, stress response systems that are overwhelmed or out of balance can increase both the incidence and severity of diseases including addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. Using an animal model with both genetic diversity and large family size can help discover the specific genetic and environmental contributions to these behavioral diseases. The stress response has been studied extensively in teleosts because of their importance in food production. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a major model organism with a strong record for use in developmental biology, genetic screening, and genomic studies. More recently, the stress response of larval and adult zebrafish has been documented. High-throughput automated tracking systems make possible behavioral readouts of the stress response in zebrafish. This non-invasive measure of the stress response can be combined with mutagenesis methods to dissect the genes involved in complex stress response behaviors in vertebrates. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic basis for the stress response in vertebrates will help to develop advanced screening and therapies for stress-aggravated diseases like addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:21615261

  17. Zebrafish as a model for human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mohseny, A B; Hogendoorn, P C W

    2014-01-01

    For various reasons involving biological comparativeness, expansive technological possibilities, accelerated experimental speed, and competitive costs, zebrafish has become a comprehensive model for cancer research. Hence, zebrafish embryos and full-grown fish have been instrumental for studies of leukemia, melanoma, pancreatic cancer, bone tumors, and other malignancies. Although because of its similarities to human osteogenesis zebrafish appears to be an appealing model to investigate osteosarcoma, only a few osteosarcoma specific studies have been accomplished yet. Here, we review interesting related and unrelated reports of which the findings might be extrapolated to osteosarcoma. More importantly, rational but yet unexplored applications of zebrafish are debated to expand the window of opportunities for future establishment of osteosarcoma models. Accordingly technological advances of zebrafish based cancer research, such as robotic high-throughput multicolor injection systems and advanced imaging methods are discussed. Furthermore, various use of zebrafish embryos for screening drug regimens by combinations of chemotherapy, novel drug deliverers, and immune system modulators are suggested. Concerning the etiology, the high degree of genetic similarity between zebrafish and human cancers indicates that affected regions are evolutionarily conserved. Therefore, zebrafish as a swift model system that allows for the investigation of multiple candidate gene-defects is presented. PMID:24924177

  18. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  19. The Red Light District and Its Effects on Zebrafish Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Isaac; Krug, Lauren; Zon, Leonard Ira

    2016-06-01

    Light-dark cycles mimicking natural settings in a zebrafish facility are crucial for maintaining fish with an entrained circadian clock making them an ideal vertebrate model to study such rhythms. However, failure to provide optimal conditions to include complete darkness can lead to a disturbed circadian pacemaker affecting physiology and behavior in zebrafish. To meet building code requirements, the aquatics facility in use was outfitted with EXIT signs emitting a constant light. To determine if light radiating from the EXIT sign has an effect on zebrafish embryo production, 100 fish (1:1 m/f ratio) were split and housed at 10 fish/L. Half were housed directly in front of the EXIT sign, whereas the other half (control) were housed under a true 14-h light-10-h dark cycle. Reproductive success was evaluated by recording fecundity and viability from 10 weekly matings under two light colors: red (640 nm) and green (560 nm). On average the control group spawned twice as many embryos compared to those housed in front of a red EXIT sign, whereas green EXIT sign showed no difference. This suggests the importance of providing a complete dark environment within the night cycle and a recommendation toward dim green EXIT signs to avoid a decline in reproductive performance. PMID:26978703

  20. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  1. Developmental effects of simulated microgravity on zebrafish, (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyek, Matthew; Edsall, Sara; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara; Smith, Frank; Croll, Roger

    Zebrafish are widely used model vertebrates in research and recently this species has been used to study the effects of microgravity on fundamental biological processes. In this study we used a NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) to investigate the effects of simulated microgravity (SMG) on zebrafish development up to 14 days post fertilization (dpf). At developmental stages beyond the 3-4 somite stage we found SMG-exposed embryos reached key developmental stag-ing points more rapidly than fish raised within a non-rotating vessel. By the 21 somite stage, both groups were again synchronized in their developmental staging. However, SMG-exposed embryos eventually exhibited a delay in hatching time compared to controls. Otolith and to-tal body size were observed to be greater in larvae raised in SMG. In addition, pigmentation patterns in SMG exposed fish differed, with larger and differentially aggregated melanocytes . Heart development was slowed in SMG exposed fish, but no change in nervous system de-velopment was detected. Ongoing research will focus on differences in heart and respiration rates. Finally, by developing a method to extend the duration of SMG exposure, we found the swimming behaviour of SMG-exposed animals was altered with time in the RWV. Initially SMG-exposed animals swam in the direction of RWV rotation (5-9dpf) but older (9+dpf) fish swam against rotation and demonstrated righting behaviour with each rotation. These results suggest that vestibular reflexes may develop normally and be maintained in animals exposed to SMG. Together, our data provide insights into how zebrafish may develop when flown in space, permitting better formulation of experiments to test mechanisms by which microgravity may affect ontogeny of this model organism. Keywords: microgravity, zebrafish, growth, development

  2. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease. PMID:25655100

  3. VEGF-B-Neuropilin-1 signaling is spatiotemporally indispensable for vascular and neuronal development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lasse D.; Nakamura, Masaki; Bräutigam, Lars; Li, Xuri; Liu, Yizhi; Samani, Nilesh J.; Cao, Yihai

    2015-01-01

    Physiological functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B remain an enigma, and deletion of the Vegfb gene in mice lacks an overt phenotype. Here we show that knockdown of Vegfba, but not Vegfbb, in zebrafish embryos by specific morpholinos produced a lethal phenotype owing to vascular and neuronal defects in the brain. Vegfba morpholinos also markedly prevented development of hyaloid vasculatures in the retina, but had little effects on peripheral vascular development. Consistent with phenotypic defects, Vegfba, but not Vegfaa, mRNA was primarily expressed in the brain of developing zebrafish embryos. Interestingly, in situ detection of Neuropilin1 (Nrp1) mRNA showed an overlapping expression pattern with Vegfba, and knockdown of Nrp1 produced a nearly identically lethal phenotype as Vegfba knockdown. Furthermore, zebrafish VEGF-Ba protein directly bound to NRP1. Importantly, gain-of-function by exogenous delivery of mRNAs coding for NRP1-binding ligands VEGF-B or VEGF-A to the zebrafish embryos rescued the lethal phenotype by normalizing vascular development. Similarly, exposure of zebrafish embryos to hypoxia also rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects in the brain by increasing VEGF-A expression. Independent evidence of VEGF-A gain-of-function was provided by using a functionally defective Vhl-mutant zebrafish strain, which again rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects. These findings show that VEGF-B is spatiotemporally required for vascular development in zebrafish embryos and that NRP1, but not VEGFR1, mediates the essential signaling. PMID:26483474

  4. A zebrafish model of hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B; Tuchman, M; Caldovic, L

    2014-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is the principal consequence of urea cycle defects and liver failure, and the exposure of the brain to elevated ammonia concentrations leads to a wide range of neuro-cognitive deficits, intellectual disabilities, coma and death. Current treatments focus almost exclusively on either reducing ammonia levels through the activation of alternative pathways for ammonia disposal or on liver transplantation. Ammonia is toxic to most fish and its pathophysiology appears to be similar to that in mammals. Since hyperammonemia can be induced in fish simply by immersing them in water with elevated concentration of ammonia, we sought to develop a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of hyperammonemia. When exposed to 3mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac), 50% of 4-day old (dpf) fish died within 3hours and 4mM NH4Ac was 100% lethal. We used 4dpf zebrafish exposed to 4mM NH4Ac to test whether the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and/or NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801, memantine and ketamine, which are known to protect the mammalian brain from hyperammonemia, prolong survival of hyperammonemic fish. MSO, MK-801, memantine and ketamine all prolonged the lives of the ammonia-treated fish. Treatment with the combination of MSO and an NMDA receptor antagonist was more effective than either drug alone. These results suggest that zebrafish can be used to screen for ammonia-neuroprotective agents. If successful, drugs that are discovered in this screen could complement current treatment approaches to improve the outcome of patients with hyperammonemia. PMID:25069822

  5. Zebrafish resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    The use of the zebrafish, Danio (Brachydanio) rerio in research laboratories, teaching curricula, and home aquariums has exploded over the past two decades. They have been used to study embryology, developmental and reproductive biology, behavior, neurobiology, immunology, toxicology, oncology, teratology, stem cell and regenerative biology, and a wide range of human diseases and disorders. This has been paralleled by a corresponding increase in the amount of information and literature about this species on the Internet. This overview of Internet resources is intended to aid both beginning and experienced individuals in the search for such information. PMID:23382352

  6. Disruption of Epithalamic Left–Right Asymmetry Increases Anxiety in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Facchin, Lucilla; Duboué, Erik R.

    2015-01-01

    Differences between the left and right sides of the brain are found throughout the animal kingdom, but the consequences of altered neural asymmetry are not well understood. In the zebrafish epithalamus, the parapineal is located on the left side of the brain where it influences development of the adjacent dorsal habenular (dHb) nucleus, causing the left and right dHb to differ in their organization, gene expression, and connectivity. Left–right (L-R) reversal of parapineal position and dHb asymmetry occurs spontaneously in a small percentage of the population, whereas the dHb develop symmetrically following experimental ablation of the parapineal. The habenular region was previously implicated in modulating fear in both mice and zebrafish, but the relevance of its L-R asymmetry is unclear. We now demonstrate that disrupting directionality of the zebrafish epithalamus causes reduced exploratory behavior and increased cortisol levels, indicative of enhanced anxiety. Accordingly, exposure to buspirone, an anxiolytic agent, significantly suppresses atypical behavior. Axonal projections from the parapineal to the dHb are more variable when it is located on the right side of the brain, revealing that L-R reversals do not necessarily represent a neuroanatomical mirror image. The results highlight the importance of directional asymmetry of the epithalamus in the regulation of stress responses in zebrafish. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The asymmetric epithalamus of zebrafish has emerged as a valuable model to explore the formation and function of left–right differences in the brain. To probe the relationship between brain laterality and behavior, we examined the effects of left–right reversal of epithalamic asymmetry or symmetric development on behavior. In both cases, zebrafish showed increased measures of fear/anxiety, including reduced exploratory behavior and delayed exit from a confined space. Adults with reversed L-R asymmetry also have elevated cortisol levels

  7. The influences of parental diet and vitamin E intake on the embryonic zebrafish transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Galen W.; Truong, Lisa; Barton, Carrie L.; Labut, Edwin M.; Lebold, Katie M.; Traber, Maret G.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the typical commercial diet fed to zebrafish can dramatically vary. By utilizing defined diets we sought to answer two questions: 1) How does the embryonic zebrafish transcriptome change when the parental adults are fed a commercial lab diet compared with a sufficient, defined diet (E+)? 2) Does a vitamin Edeficient parental diet (E−) further change the embryonic transcriptome? We conducted a global gene expression study using embryos from zebrafish fed a commercial (Lab), an E+ or an E− diet. To capture differentially expressed transcripts prior to onset of overt malformations observed in E− embryos at 48 h post-fertilization (hpf), embryos were collected from each group at 36 hpf. Lab embryos differentially expressed (p < 0.01) 946 transcripts compared with the E+ embryos, and 2656 transcripts compared with the E− embryos. The differences in protein, fat and micronutrient intakes in zebrafish fed the Lab compared with the E + diet demonstrate that despite overt morphologic consistency, significant differences in gene expression occurred. Moreover, functional analysis of the significant transcripts in the E−embryos suggested perturbed energy metabolism, leading to overt malformations and mortality. Thus, these findings demonstrate that parental zebrafish diet has a direct impact on the embryonic transcriptome. PMID:24657723

  8. Mesoderm is required for coordinated cell movements within zebrafish neural plate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis of the zebrafish neural tube requires the coordinated movement of many cells in both time and space. A good example of this is the movement of the cells in the zebrafish neural plate as they converge towards the dorsal midline before internalizing to form a neural keel. How these cells are regulated to ensure that they move together as a coherent tissue is unknown. Previous work in other systems has suggested that the underlying mesoderm may play a role in this process but this has not been shown directly in vivo. Results Here we analyze the roles of subjacent mesoderm in the coordination of neural cell movements during convergence of the zebrafish neural plate and neural keel formation. Live imaging demonstrates that the normal highly coordinated movements of neural plate cells are lost in the absence of underlying mesoderm and the movements of internalization and neural tube formation are severely disrupted. Despite this, neuroepithelial polarity develops in the abnormal neural primordium but the resulting tissue architecture is very disorganized. Conclusions We show that the movements of cells in the zebrafish neural plate are highly coordinated during the convergence and internalization movements of neurulation. Our results demonstrate that the underlying mesoderm is required for these coordinated cell movements in the zebrafish neural plate in vivo. PMID:24755297

  9. Association of Early Atherosclerosis with Vascular Wall Shear Stress in Hypercholesterolemic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Joon; Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop

    2015-01-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic information has become more important. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) that changes its direction is associated with the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several in vitro and in vivo models were proposed to reveal the relation between the WSS and the early atherosclerosis. However, these models possess technical limitations in mimicking real physiological conditions and monitoring the developmental course of the early atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model is proposed as a novel experimental model to resolve these limitations. Zebrafish larvae are optically transparent, which enables temporal observation of pathological variations under in vivo condition. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, and spatial distribution of lipid deposition inside the model was quantitatively investigated after feeding high cholesterol diet for 10 days. Lipids were mainly deposited in blood vessel of low WSS. The oscillating WSS was not induced by the blood flows in zebrafish models. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish would be used as a potentially useful model for in vivo study about the effects of low WSS in the early atherosclerosis. PMID:26561854

  10. Generation of Parabiotic Zebrafish Embryos by Surgical Fusion of Developing Blastulae.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Elliott J; Cillis, Jennifer L; Curley, Caitlyn R; Patch, Taylor C; Li, Brian; Blaser, Bradley W; Riquelme, Raquel; Zon, Leonard I; Shah, Dhvanit I

    2016-01-01

    Surgical parabiosis of two animals of different genetic backgrounds creates a unique scenario to study cell-intrinsic versus cell-extrinsic roles for candidate genes of interest, migratory behaviors of cells, and secreted signals in distinct genetic settings. Because parabiotic animals share a common circulation, any blood or blood-borne factor from one animal will be exchanged with its partner and vice versa. Thus, cells and molecular factors derived from one genetic background can be studied in the context of a second genetic background. Parabiosis of adult mice has been  used extensively to research aging, cancer, diabetes, obesity, and brain development. More recently, parabiosis of zebrafish embryos has been used to study the developmental biology of hematopoiesis. In contrast to mice, the transparent nature of zebrafish embryos permits the direct visualization of cells in the parabiotic context, making it a uniquely powerful method for investigating fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms. The utility of this technique, however, is limited by a steep learning curve for generating the parabiotic zebrafish embryos. This protocol provides a step-by-step method on how to surgically fuse the blastulae of two zebrafish embryos of different genetic backgrounds to investigate the role of candidate genes of interest. In addition, the parabiotic zebrafish embryos are tolerant to heat shock, making temporal control of gene expression possible. This method does not require a sophisticated set-up and has broad applications for studying cell migration, fate specification, and differentiation in vivo during embryonic development. PMID:27341538

  11. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  12. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  13. Nonhatching Decapsulated Artemia Cysts As a Replacement to Artemia Nauplii in Juvenile and Adult Zebrafish Culture.

    PubMed

    Tye, Marc; Rider, Dana; Duffy, Elizabeth A; Seubert, Adam; Lothert, Brogen; Schimmenti, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Feeding Artemia nauplii as the main nutrition source for zebrafish is a common practice for many research facilities. Culturing live feed can be time-consuming and requires additional equipment to be purchased, maintained, and cleaned. Nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts (decaps) are a commercially available product that can be fed directly to fish. Several other ornamental fish species have been successfully cultured using decaps. Replacing Artemia nauplii with decaps could reduce the overall time and costs associated with the operation of a zebrafish facility. The objective of this study was to determine if decaps could be a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture. Wild-type zebrafish were fed one of three dietary treatments: decaps only, nauplii only, or a standard consisting of nauplii plus a commercially prepared pellet food. Survival, growth (length and weight), and embryo production were analyzed between the treatments. Fish receiving the decap diet demonstrated a significantly higher growth and embryo production when compared to the fish receiving the nauplii-only diet. When comparing the decap fish to the standard fish, no significant difference was found in mean survival, mean weight at 90 days postfertilization, or mean embryo production. It was determined that nonhatching decapsulated Artemia cysts can be used as a suitable replacement to Artemia nauplii in juvenile and adult zebrafish culture. PMID:25495227

  14. The influences of parental diet and vitamin E intake on the embryonic zebrafish transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Miller, Galen W; Truong, Lisa; Barton, Carrie L; Labut, Edwin M; Lebold, Katie M; Traber, Maret G; Tanguay, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    The composition of the typical commercial diet fed to zebrafish can dramatically vary. By utilizing defined diets we sought to answer two questions: 1) How does the embryonic zebrafish transcriptome change when the parental adults are fed a commercial lab diet compared with a sufficient, defined diet (E+)? 2) Does a vitamin E-deficient parental diet (E-) further change the embryonic transcriptome? We conducted a global gene expression study using embryos from zebrafish fed a commercial (Lab), an E+ or an E- diet. To capture differentially expressed transcripts prior to onset of overt malformations observed in E- embryos at 48h post-fertilization (hpf), embryos were collected from each group at 36hpf. Lab embryos differentially expressed (p<0.01) 946 transcripts compared with the E+ embryos, and 2656 transcripts compared with the E- embryos. The differences in protein, fat and micronutrient intakes in zebrafish fed the Lab compared with the E+ diet demonstrate that despite overt morphologic consistency, significant differences in gene expression occurred. Moreover, functional analysis of the significant transcripts in the E- embryos suggested perturbed energy metabolism, leading to overt malformations and mortality. Thus, these findings demonstrate that parental zebrafish diet has a direct impact on the embryonic transcriptome. PMID:24657723

  15. Learning and memory in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Adam C.; Bill, Brent R.; Glanzman, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Larval zebrafish possess several experimental advantages for investigating the molecular and neural bases of learning and memory. Despite this, neuroscientists have only recently begun to use these animals to study memory. However, in a relatively short period of time a number of forms of learning have been described in zebrafish larvae, and significant progress has been made toward their understanding. Here we provide a comprehensive review of this progress; we also describe several promising new experimental technologies currently being used in larval zebrafish that are likely to contribute major insights into the processes that underlie learning and memory. PMID:23935566

  16. Imaging blood vessels in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Makoto; Isogai, Sumio; Pan, Weijun; Weinstein, Brant M

    2010-01-01

    Understanding on the mechanisms of vascular branching morphogenesis has become a subject of enormous scientific and clinical interest. Zebrafish, which have small, accessible, transparent embryos and larvae, provides a unique living animal model to facilitating high-resolution imaging on ubiquitous and deep localization of vessels within embryo development and also in adult tissues. In this chapter, we have summarized various methods for vessel imaging in zebrafish, including in situ hybridization for vascular-specific genes, resin injection- or dye injection-based vessel visualization, and alkaline phosphatase staining. We also described detail protocols for live imaging of vessels by microangiography or using various transgenic zebrafish lines. PMID:21111213

  17. Genome editing in zebrafish: a practical overview.

    PubMed

    Sertori, Robert; Trengove, Monique; Basheer, Faiza; Ward, Alister C; Liongue, Clifford

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish is a powerful model for the study of vertebrate development, being amenable to a wide range of genetic and other manipulations to probe the molecular basis of development and its perturbation in disease. Over recent years, genome editing approaches have become increasingly used as an efficient and sophisticated approach to precisely engineer the zebrafish genome, which has further enhanced the utility of this organism. This review provides a practical overview of genome editing and its application in zebrafish research, including alternate strategies for introducing and screening for specific genetic changes. PMID:26654901

  18. Waterborne Risperidone Decreases Stress Response in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kalichak, Fabiana; Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; de Oliveira, Tiago Acosta; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Giacomini, Ana Cristina Varrone; Barcellos, Heloísa Helena de Alcântara

    2015-01-01

    The presence of drugs and their metabolites in surface waters and municipal effluents has been reported in several studies, but its impacts on aquatic organisms are not yet well understood. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to the antipsychotic risperidone on the stress and behavioral responses in zebrafish. It became clear that intermediate concentration of risperidone inhibited the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis and displayed anxiolytic-like effects in zebrafish. The data presented here suggest that the presence of this antipsychotic in aquatic environments can alter neuroendocrine and behavior profiles in zebrafish. PMID:26473477

  19. Regulated tissue fluidity steers zebrafish body elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Andrew K.; Nandi, Amitabha; Stulberg, Michael J.; Dray, Nicolas; Sneddon, Michael W.; Pontius, William; Emonet, Thierry; Holley, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The tailbud is the posterior leading edge of the growing vertebrate embryo and consists of motile progenitors of the axial skeleton, musculature and spinal cord. We measure the 3D cell flow field of the zebrafish tailbud and identify changes in tissue fluidity revealed by reductions in the coherence of cell motion without alteration of cell velocities. We find a directed posterior flow wherein the polarization between individual cell motion is high, reflecting ordered collective migration. At the posterior tip of the tailbud, this flow makes sharp bilateral turns facilitated by extensive cell mixing due to increased directional variability of individual cell motions. Inhibition of Wnt or Fgf signaling or cadherin 2 function reduces the coherence of the flow but has different consequences for trunk and tail extension. Modeling and additional data analyses suggest that the balance between the coherence and rate of cell flow determines whether body elongation is linear or whether congestion forms within the flow and the body axis becomes contorted. PMID:23293289

  20. Probiotic modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behaviour in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Menna, Lucia F.; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut–brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels and serotonin metabolism. In the present study, we report for the first time an analysis of the microbiota–gut–brain axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After 28 days of dietary administration with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501, we found differences in shoaling behaviour, brain expression levels of bdnf and of genes involved in serotonin signalling/metabolism between control and treated zebrafish group. In addition, in microbiota we found a significant increase of Firmicutes and a trending reduction of Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that selected microbes can be used to modulate endogenous neuroactive molecules in zebrafish. PMID:27416816

  1. Probiotic modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behaviour in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Menna, Lucia F; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut-brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels and serotonin metabolism. In the present study, we report for the first time an analysis of the microbiota-gut-brain axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After 28 days of dietary administration with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501, we found differences in shoaling behaviour, brain expression levels of bdnf and of genes involved in serotonin signalling/metabolism between control and treated zebrafish group. In addition, in microbiota we found a significant increase of Firmicutes and a trending reduction of Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that selected microbes can be used to modulate endogenous neuroactive molecules in zebrafish. PMID:27416816

  2. Ganzfeld ERG in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Mathias W; Rilk, Albrecht; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2002-01-01

    In developmental biology, zebrafish are widely used to study the impact of mutations. The fast pace of development allows for a definitive morphological evaluation of the phenotype usually 5 days post fertilization (dpf). At that age, a functional analysis is already feasible using electroretinographic (ERG) methods. Corneal Ganzfeld ERGs were recorded with a glass microelectrode in anaesthetized, dark-adapted larvae aged 5 dpf, using a platinum wire beneath a moist paper towel as reference. ERG protocols included flash, flicker, and ON/OFF stimuli, both under scotopic and photopic conditions. Repetitive, isoluminant stimuli were used to assess the dynamic effect of pharmacological agents on the ERG. Single flash, flicker, and ON/OFF responses had adequately matured at this point to be informative. Typical signs of the cone dominance were the small scotopic a-wave and the large OFF responses. The analysis of consecutive single traces was possible because of the lack of EKG, breathing, and blink artefacts. After application of APB, which selectively blocks the ON channel via the mGluR6 receptor, the successive loss of the b-wave could be observed, which was quite different from the deterioration of the ERG after a circulatory arrest. The above techniques allowed to reliably obtain Ganzfeld ERGs in larvae aged 5 dpf. This underlines the important role of the zebrafish as a model for the functional analysis of mutations disrupting the visual system. PMID:11949809

  3. Benzo[a]pyrene decreases global and gene specific DNA methylation during zebrafish development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is important for gene regulation and is vulnerable to early-life exposure to environmental contaminants. We found that direct waterborne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) exposure at 24 'g/L from 2.5 to 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) to zebrafish embryos significantly decreased global cytosine...

  4. “Casting” light on the role of glycosylation during embryonic development: Insights from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather R.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) remains a versatile model organism for the investigation of early development and organogenesis, and has emerged as a valuable platform for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation [1–6]. Harnessing the genetic power and experimental accessibility of this system, three decades of research have identified key genes and pathways that control the development of multiple organ systems and tissues, including the heart, kidney, and craniofacial cartilage, as well as the hematopoietic, vascular, and central and peripheral nervous systems [7–31]. In addition to their application in large mutagenic screens, zebrafish has been used to model a variety of diseases such as diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, muscular dystrophy and cancer [32–36]. As this work continues to intersect with cellular pathways and processes such as lipid metabolism, glycosylation and vesicle trafficking, investigators are often faced with the challenge of determining the degree to which these pathways are functionally conserved in zebrafish. While they share a high degree of genetic homology with mouse and human, the manner in which cellular pathways are regulated in zebrafish during early development, and the differences in the organ physiology, warrant consideration before functional studies can be effectively interpreted and compared with other vertebrate systems. This point is particularly relevant for glycosylation since an understanding of the glycan diversity and the mechanisms that control glycan biosynthesis during zebrafish embryogenesis (as in many organisms) is still developing. Nonetheless, a growing number of studies in zebrafish have begun to cast light on the functional roles of specific classes of glycans during organ and tissue development. While many of the initial efforts involved characterizing identified mutants in a number of glycosylation pathways, the use of reverse genetic approaches to directly model glycosylation-related disorders is now

  5. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  6. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  7. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  8. The MHC class I genes of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dirscherl, Hayley; McConnell, Sean C.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; de Jong, Jill L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the immune response and in the recognition of non-self. Found in all jawed vertebrate species, including zebrafish and other teleosts, MHC genes are considered the most polymorphic of all genes. In this review we focus on the multi-faceted diversity of zebrafish MHC class I genes, which are classified into three sequence lineages: U, Z, and L. We examine the polygenic, polymorphic, and haplotypic diversity of the zebrafish MHC class I genes, discussing known and postulated functional differences between the different class I lineages. In addition, we provide the first comprehensive nomenclature for the L lineage genes in zebrafish, encompassing at least 15 genes, and characterize their sequence properties. Finally, we discuss how recent findings have shed new light on the remarkably diverse MHC loci of this species. PMID:24631581

  9. Visualizing vascular networks in zebrafish: an introduction to microangiography.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Holland, Melinda B; Jin, Suk-Won

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing the circulatory pattern in developing embryos becomes an essential technique for the field of cardiovascular biology. In the zebrafish model system, there are currently several techniques available to visualize the circulatory pattern. Microangiography is a simple technique in which a fluorescent dye is injected directly into the Sinus Venosus and/or the Posterior Cardinal Vein, allowing for the rapid labeling and easy detection of patent vessels. Here, we compare microangiography to other vascular labeling techniques, describe the benefits and potential applications of microangiography, and give step by step instructions for microangiography. PMID:22222521

  10. What is the Thalamus in Zebrafish?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Current research on the thalamus and related structures in the zebrafish diencephalon identifies an increasing number of both neurological structures and ontogenetic processes as evolutionary conserved between teleosts and mammals. The patterning processes, for example, which during the embryonic development of zebrafish form the thalamus proper appear largely conserved. Yet also striking differences between zebrafish and other vertebrates have been observed, particularly when we look at mature and histologically differentiated brains. A case in point is the migrated preglomerular complex of zebrafish which evolved only within the lineage of ray-finned fish and has no counterpart in mammals or tetrapod vertebrates. Based on its function as a sensory relay station with projections to pallial zones, the preglomerular complex has been compared to specific thalamic nuclei in mammals. However, no thalamic projections to the zebrafish dorsal pallium, which corresponds topologically to the mammalian isocortex, have been identified. Merely one teleostean thalamic nucleus proper, the auditory nucleus, projects to a part of the dorsal telencephalon, the pallial amygdala. Studies on patterning mechanisms identify a rostral and caudal domain in the embryonic thalamus proper. In both, teleosts and mammals, the rostral domain gives rise to GABAergic neurons, whereas glutamatergic neurons originate in the caudal domain of the zebrafish thalamus. The distribution of GABAergic derivatives in the adult zebrafish brain, furthermore, revealed previously overlooked thalamic nuclei and redefined already established ones. These findings require some reconsideration regarding the topological origin of these adult structures. In what follows, I discuss how evolutionary conserved and newly acquired features of the developing and adult zebrafish thalamus can be compared to the mammalian situation. PMID:22586363

  11. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further

  12. Conserved synteny and the zebrafish genome.

    PubMed

    Catchen, Julian M; Braasch, Ingo; Postlethwait, John H

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish offers significant opportunities for the investigation of vertebrate development, evolution, physiology, and behavior and provides numerous models of human disease. Connecting zebrafish phenogenetic biology to that of humans and other vertebrates, however, requires the proper assignment of gene orthologies. Orthology assignments by phylogenetic analysis or by reciprocal best sequence similarity searches can lead to errors, especially in cases of gene duplication followed by gene loss or rapid lineage-specific gene evolution. Conserved synteny analysis provides a method that helps overcome such problems. Here we describe conserved synteny analysis for zebrafish genes and discuss the Synteny Database, a website specifically designed to identify conserved syntenies for zebrafish that takes into account the teleost genome duplication (TGD). We utilize the Synteny Database to demonstrate its power to resolve our understanding of the evolution of nerve growth factor receptor related genes, including Ngfr and the enigmatic Nradd. Finally, we compare conserved syntenies between zebrafish, stickleback, spotted gar, and human to understand the timing of chromosome rearrangements in teleost genome evolution. An improved understanding of gene histories that comes from the application of tools provided by the Synteny Database can facilitate the connectivity of zebrafish and human genomes. PMID:21924168

  13. Olfactory conditioning in the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Braubach, Oliver R; Wood, Heather-Dawn; Gadbois, Simon; Fine, Alan; Croll, Roger P

    2009-03-01

    The zebrafish olfactory system is an attractive model for studying neural processing of chemosensory information. Here we characterize zebrafish olfactory behaviors and their modification through learning, using an apparatus consisting of a circular flow-through tank that allows controlled administration of odorants. When exposed to the amino acids l-alanine and l-valine, naive zebrafish responded with appetitive swimming behavior, which we measured as the number of >90 degrees turns made during 30s observation periods. Such appetitive responses were not observed when naive zebrafish were exposed to an unnatural odorant, phenylethyl alcohol (PEA). Repeated pairing of amino acids or PEA (conditioned stimuli, CS) with food flakes (unconditioned stimuli; UCS) increased odorant-evoked appetitive swimming behavior in all fish tested. The zebrafish also learned to restrict this behavior to the vicinity of a feeding ring, through which UCS were administered. When both nares were temporarily occluded, conditioned fish failed to respond to odorants, confirming that these behaviors were mediated by olfaction. These results represent the first demonstration of a classically conditioned appetitive response to a behaviorally neutral odorant in fish. Furthermore, they complement recent demonstrations of conditional place preferences in fish. By virtue of its robustness and simplicity, this method will be a useful tool for future research into the biological basis of olfactory learning in zebrafish. PMID:19056431

  14. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Strand, Nicholas S; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S; Moon, Randall T

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC(+), mpo(+)) and macrophages (mpeg1(+)) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/β-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  15. Generation and analysis of zebrafish melanoma models.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, S; van Rooijen, E; Ceol, C; Patton, E E; White, R M

    2016-01-01

    The rapid emergence of the zebrafish as a cancer model has been aided by advances in genetic, chemical, and imaging technologies. Melanoma in particular highlights both the power and challenges associated with cancer modeling in zebrafish. This chapter focuses on the lessons that have emerged from the melanoma models as paradigmatic of what will apply to nearly all cancer models in the zebrafish system. We specifically focus on methodologies related to germline and mosaic transgenic melanoma generation, and how these can be used to deeply interrogate additional cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressors. These transgenic tumors can in turn be used to generate zebrafish-specific, stable melanoma cell lines which can be fluorescently labeled, modified by cDNA/CRISPR techniques, and used for detailed in vivo imaging of cancer progression in real time. These zebrafish melanoma models are beginning to elucidate both cell intrinsic and microenvironmental factors in melanoma that have broader implications for human disease. We envision that nearly all of the techniques described here can be applied to other zebrafish cancer models, and likely expanded beyond what we describe here. PMID:27312504

  16. Influence of magnetic field on zebrafish activity and orientation in a plus maze.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Elena A; Pavlova, Vera V; Nepomnyashchikh, Valentin A; Krylov, Viacheslav V

    2016-01-01

    We describe an impact of the geomagnetic field (GMF) and its modification on zebrafish's orientation and locomotor activity in a plus maze with four arms oriented to the north, east, south and west. Zebrafish's directional preferences were bimodal in GMF: they visited two arms oriented in opposed directions (east-west) most frequently. This bimodal preference remained stable for same individuals across experiments divided by several days. When the horizontal GMF component was turned 90° clockwise, the preference accordingly shifted by 90° to arms oriented to the north and south. Other modifications of GMF (reversal of both vertical and horizontal GMF components; reversal of vertical component only; and reversal of horizontal component only) did not exert any discernible effect on the orientation of zebrafish. The 90° turn of horizontal component also resulted in a significant increase of fish's locomotor activity in comparison with the natural GMF. This increase became even more pronounced when the horizontal component was repeatedly turned by 90° and back with 1min interval between turns. Our results show that GMF and its variations should be taken into account when interpreting zebrafish's directional preferences and locomotor activity in mazes and other experimental devices. PMID:26589739

  17. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  18. Active microrheology of fluids inside developing zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Mike; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Biological fluids are a source of diverse and interesting behavior for the soft matter physicist. Since their mechanical properties must be tuned to fulfill functional roles important to the development and health of living things, they often display complex behavior on length and time scales spanning many orders of magnitude. For microbes colonizing an animal host, for example, the mechanical properties of the host environment are of great importance, affecting mobility and hence the ability to establish a stable population. Indeed, some species possess the ability to affect the fluidity of their environment, both directly by chemically modifying it, and indirectly by influencing the host cells' secretion of mucus. Driving magnetically doped micron-scale probes which have been orally micro-gavaged into the intestinal bulb of a larval zebrafish allows the rheology of the mucosal layer within the fish to be measured over three decades of frequency, complementing ecological data on microbial colonization with physical information about the gut environment. Here, we describe the technique, provide the first measurement of mucosal viscosity in a developing animal, and explore the technique's applicability to other small-volume or spatially inhomogeneous fluid samples.

  19. Zebrafish neurobehavioral phenomics for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Homechaudhuri, Sumit; Stewart, Adam Michael; Collier, Adam D; Kaluyeva, Aleksandra A; Li, Shaomin; Liu, Yingcong; Chen, Peirong; Wang, JiaJia; Yang, Lei; Mitra, Anisa; Pal, Subharthi; Chaudhuri, Adwitiya; Roy, Anwesha; Biswas, Missidona; Roy, Dola; Podder, Anupam; Poudel, Manoj K; Katare, Deepshikha P; Mani, Ruchi J; Kyzar, Evan J; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Nguyen, Michael; Song, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as an important model organism for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research. The behavioral/phenotypic complexity of zebrafish allows for thorough dissection of complex human brain disorders and drug-evoked pathological states. As numerous zebrafish models become available with a wide spectrum of behavioral, genetic, and environmental methods to test novel drugs, here we discuss recent zebrafish phenomics methods to facilitate drug discovery, particularly in the field of biological psychiatry. Additionally, behavioral, neurological, and endocrine endpoints are becoming increasingly well-characterized in zebrafish, making them an inexpensive, robust and effective model for toxicology research and pharmacological screening. We also discuss zebrafish behavioral phenotypes, experimental considerations, pharmacological candidates and relevance of zebrafish neurophenomics to other 'omics' (e.g., genomic, proteomic) approaches. Finally, we critically evaluate the limitations of utilizing this model organism, and outline future strategies of research in the field of zebrafish phenomics. PMID:26372090

  20. Can Zebrafish be used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Can Zebrafish be Used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. We are exploring behavioral methods using zebrafish by desig...

  1. Intraperitoneal Injection into Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Mary D.; Eames, Stefani C.; Philipson, Louis H.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    A convenient method for chemically treating zebrafish is to introduce the reagent into the tank water, where it will be taken up by the fish. However, this method makes it difficult to know how much reagent is absorbed or taken up per fish. Some experimental questions, particularly those related to metabolic studies, may be better addressed by delivering a defined quantity to each fish, based on weight. Here we present a method for intraperitoneal (IP) injection into adult zebrafish. Injection is into the abdominal cavity, posterior to the pelvic girdle. This procedure is adapted from veterinary methods used for larger fish. It is safe, as we have observed zero mortality. Additionally, we have seen bleeding at the injection site in only 5 out of 127 injections, and in each of those cases the bleeding was brief, lasting several seconds, and the quantity of blood lost was small. Success with this procedure requires gentle handling of the fish through several steps including fasting, weighing, anesthetizing, injection, and recovery. Precautions are required to minimize stress throughout the procedure. Our precautions include using a small injection volume and a 35G needle. We use Cortland salt solution as the vehicle, which is osmotically balanced for freshwater fish. Aeration of the gills is maintained during the injection procedure by first bringing the fish into a surgical plane of anesthesia, which allows slow operculum movements, and second, by holding the fish in a trough within a water-saturated sponge during the injection itself. We demonstrate the utility of IP injection by injecting glucose and monitoring the rise in blood glucose level and its subsequent return to normal. As stress is known to increase blood glucose in teleost fish, we compare blood glucose levels in vehicle-injected and non-injected adults and show that the procedure does not cause a significant rise in blood glucose. PMID:20834219

  2. Intraperitoneal injection into adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kinkel, Mary D; Eames, Stefani C; Philipson, Louis H; Prince, Victoria E

    2010-01-01

    A convenient method for chemically treating zebrafish is to introduce the reagent into the tank water, where it will be taken up by the fish. However, this method makes it difficult to know how much reagent is absorbed or taken up per fish. Some experimental questions, particularly those related to metabolic studies, may be better addressed by delivering a defined quantity to each fish, based on weight. Here we present a method for intraperitoneal (IP) injection into adult zebrafish. Injection is into the abdominal cavity, posterior to the pelvic girdle. This procedure is adapted from veterinary methods used for larger fish. It is safe, as we have observed zero mortality. Additionally, we have seen bleeding at the injection site in only 5 out of 127 injections, and in each of those cases the bleeding was brief, lasting several seconds, and the quantity of blood lost was small. Success with this procedure requires gentle handling of the fish through several steps including fasting, weighing, anesthetizing, injection, and recovery. Precautions are required to minimize stress throughout the procedure. Our precautions include using a small injection volume and a 35G needle. We use Cortland salt solution as the vehicle, which is osmotically balanced for freshwater fish. Aeration of the gills is maintained during the injection procedure by first bringing the fish into a surgical plane of anesthesia, which allows slow operculum movements, and second, by holding the fish in a trough within a water-saturated sponge during the injection itself. We demonstrate the utility of IP injection by injecting glucose and monitoring the rise in blood glucose level and its subsequent return to normal. As stress is known to increase blood glucose in teleost fish, we compare blood glucose levels in vehicle-injected and non-injected adults and show that the procedure does not cause a significant rise in blood glucose. PMID:20834219

  3. Neuroblastoma and Its Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shizhen; Thomas Look, A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, an important developmental tumor arising in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (PSNS), accounts for approximately 10 % of all cancer-related deaths in children. Recent genomic analyses have identified a spectrum of genetic alterations in this tumor. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene is found in 20 % of cases and is often accompanied by mutational activation of the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) gene, suggesting their cooperation in tumor initiation and spread. Understanding how complex genetic changes function together in oncogenesis has been a continuing and daunting task in cancer research. This challenge was addressed in neuroblastoma by generating a transgenic zebrafish model that overexpresses human MYCN and activated ALK in the PSNS, leading to tumors that closely resemble human neuroblastoma and new opportunities to probe the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of this tumor. For example, coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the penetrance of neuroblastoma and markedly accelerates tumor onset, demonstrating the interaction of these modified genes in tumor development. Further, MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. In the context of MYCN overexpression, activated ALK provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response, allowing continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. This application of the zebrafish model illustrates its value in rational assessment of the multigenic changes that define neuroblastoma pathogenesis and points the way to future studies to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27165366

  4. Gaining translational momentum: more zebrafish models for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Stewart, Adam Michael

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly becoming a popular model organism in translational neuroscience and biological psychiatry research. Here we discuss conceptual, practical and other related aspects of using zebrafish in this field ("from tank to bedside"), and critically evaluate both advantages and limitations of zebrafish models of human brain disorders. We emphasize the need to more actively develop zebrafish models for neuroscience research focusing on complex traits. PMID:24593944

  5. The zebrafish as a model system for human disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Lieschke, Graham J

    2002-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been widely utilised for the study of developmental biology, which has lead to the evolution of sophisticated cellular and molecular approaches. More recently, the rapid progress of various zebrafish genomic infrastructure initiatives is facilitating the development of zebrafish models of human disease. This review aims to describe several representative examples of how the zebrafish can be successfully used to identify novel genes and assign gene function, providing invaluable clues to human pathophysiology. PMID:11897571

  6. Mixtures, Metabolites, and Mechanisms: Understanding Toxicology Using Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gamse, Joshua T; Gorelick, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    For more than 60 years, zebrafish have been used in toxicological studies. Due to their transparency, genetic tractability, and compatibility with high-throughput screens, zebrafish embryos are uniquely suited to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental insults on embryonic development, organ formation and function, and reproductive success. This special issue of Zebrafish highlights the ways zebrafish are used to investigate the toxic effects of endocrine disruptors, pesticides, and heavy metals. PMID:27618129

  7. Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  8. Disruption of Epithalamic Left-Right Asymmetry Increases Anxiety in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Lucilla; Duboué, Erik R; Halpern, Marnie E

    2015-12-01

    Differences between the left and right sides of the brain are found throughout the animal kingdom, but the consequences of altered neural asymmetry are not well understood. In the zebrafish epithalamus, the parapineal is located on the left side of the brain where it influences development of the adjacent dorsal habenular (dHb) nucleus, causing the left and right dHb to differ in their organization, gene expression, and connectivity. Left-right (L-R) reversal of parapineal position and dHb asymmetry occurs spontaneously in a small percentage of the population, whereas the dHb develop symmetrically following experimental ablation of the parapineal. The habenular region was previously implicated in modulating fear in both mice and zebrafish, but the relevance of its L-R asymmetry is unclear. We now demonstrate that disrupting directionality of the zebrafish epithalamus causes reduced exploratory behavior and increased cortisol levels, indicative of enhanced anxiety. Accordingly, exposure to buspirone, an anxiolytic agent, significantly suppresses atypical behavior. Axonal projections from the parapineal to the dHb are more variable when it is located on the right side of the brain, revealing that L-R reversals do not necessarily represent a neuroanatomical mirror image. The results highlight the importance of directional asymmetry of the epithalamus in the regulation of stress responses in zebrafish. PMID:26631467

  9. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  10. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  11. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration. PMID:25762592

  12. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development.

    PubMed

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  13. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  14. A bone to pick with zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Eirinn W; Apschner, Alexander; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput sequencing and genome-wide association studies allows us to deduce the genetic factors underlying diseases much more rapidly than possible through classical genetics, but a true understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases still relies on integrated approaches including in vitro and in vivo model systems. One such model that is particularly suitable for studying bone diseases is the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small fresh-water teleost that is highly amenable to genetic manipulation and in vivo imaging. Zebrafish physiology and genome organization are in many aspects similar to those of humans, and the skeleton and mineralizing tissues are no exception. In this review, we highlight some of the contributions that have been made through the study of mutant zebrafish that feature bone and/or mineralization disorders homologous to human diseases, including osteogenesis imperfecta, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva and generalized arterial calcification of infancy. The genomic and phenotypic similarities between the zebrafish and human cases are illustrated. We show that, despite some systemic physiological differences between mammals and teleosts, and a relative lack of a history as a model for bone research, the zebrafish represents a useful complement to mouse and tissue culture systems in the investigation of genetic bone disorders. PMID:24422140

  15. Methods for generating and colonizing gnotobiotic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Linh N.; Kanther, Michelle; Semova, Ivana; Rawls, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrates are colonized at birth by complex and dynamic communities of microorganisms that can contribute significantly to host health and disease. The ability to raise animals in the absence of microorganisms has been a powerful tool for elucidating the relationships between animal hosts and their microbial residents. The optical transparency of the developing zebrafish and relative ease of generating germ-free zebrafish makes it an attractive model organism for gnotobiotic research. Here we provide a protocol for: generating zebrafish embryos; deriving and rearing germ-free zebrafish; and colonizing zebrafish with microorganisms. Using these methods, we typically obtain 80–90% sterility rates in our germ-free derivations with 90% survival in germ-free animals and 50–90% survival in colonized animals through larval stages. Obtaining embryos for derivation requires approximately 1–2 hours with a 3–8 hour incubation period prior to derivation. Derivation of germ-free animals takes 1–1.5 hours, and daily maintenance requires 1–2 hours. PMID:19008873

  16. Toxicity induced by emodin on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuxia; Liu, Kechun; Wang, Sifeng; Hou, Hairong; Yuan, Yanqiang; Wang, Ximin

    2012-04-01

    Emodin, a widely available herbal remedy, has a variety of pharmacological actions and valuable clinical applications. The potential effect of emodin on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos was evaluated. Zebrafish embryos were incubated with 0.1-2 μg/mL of emodin from 7 hours to 6 days postfertilization (dpf). Emodin, at concentrations of 0.25 μg/mL and above, negatively affected embryo survival and hatching success. Emodin induced a large suite of abnormalities on zebrafish embryos, such as edema, crooked trunk, and abnormal morphogenesis. To elucidate the mechanism of action, the transcript levels of drug-metabolism genes (CYP3A) and a multiple drug-resistance gene (MDR1) were detected by reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction. Embryos showed increases in mRNA accumulation of CYP3A and MDR1. The above-described results indicated that emodin impaired zebrafish embryo development and some organ morphogenesis, and CYP3A and MDR1 were involved in the process. These findings suggest that emodin was toxic to zebrafish lavae at relatively low concentrations. PMID:21834668

  17. Zebrafish as an emerging model for studying complex brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kalueff, Allan V.; Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is rapidly becoming a popular model organism in pharmacogenetics and neuropharmacology. Both larval and adult zebrafish are currently used to increase our understanding of brain function, dysfunction, and their genetic and pharmacological modulation. Here we review the developing utility of zebrafish in the analysis of complex brain disorders (including, for example, depression, autism, psychoses, drug abuse and cognitive disorders), also covering zebrafish applications towards the goal of modeling major human neuropsychiatric and drug-induced syndromes. We argue that zebrafish models of complex brain disorders and drug-induced conditions have become a rapidly emerging critical field in translational neuropharmacology research. PMID:24412421

  18. The Toolbox for Conditional Zebrafish Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Mione, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the conditional zebrafish cancer toolbox, which allows for fine control of the expression of oncogenes or downregulation of tumor suppressors at the spatial and temporal level. Methods such as the Gal4/UAS or the Cre/lox systems paved the way to the development of elegant tumor models, which are now being used to study cancer cell biology, clonal evolution, identification of cancer stem cells and anti-cancer drug screening. Combination of these tools, as well as novel developments such as the promising genome editing system through CRISPR/Cas9 and clever application of light reactive proteins will enable the development of even more sophisticated zebrafish cancer models. Here, we introduce this growing toolbox of conditional transgenic approaches, discuss its current application in zebrafish cancer models and provide an outlook on future perspectives. PMID:27165348

  19. 15 years of zebrafish chemical screening.

    PubMed

    Rennekamp, Andrew J; Peterson, Randall T

    2015-02-01

    In 2000, the first chemical screen using living zebrafish in a multi-well plate was reported. Since then, more than 60 additional screens have been published describing whole-organism drug and pathway discovery projects in zebrafish. To investigate the scope of the work reported in the last 14 years and to identify trends in the field, we analyzed the discovery strategies of 64 primary research articles from the literature. We found that zebrafish screens have expanded beyond the use of developmental phenotypes to include behavioral, cardiac, metabolic, proliferative and regenerative endpoints. Additionally, many creative strategies have been used to uncover the mechanisms of action of new small molecules including chemical phenocopy, genetic phenocopy, mutant rescue, and spatial localization strategies. PMID:25461724

  20. Expression Profiling of Developing Zebrafish Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mullally, Madelyn; Albrecht, Caitlin; Horton, Mary; Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Goetz, Jillian J; Chowdhury, Rebecca; Manning, Alicia; Wester, Andrea K; Bose, Quinton; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    During retinal development, a variety of different types of neurons are produced. Understanding how each of these types of retinal nerve cells is generated is important from a developmental biology perspective. It is equally important if one is interested in how to regenerate cells after an injury or a disease. To gain more insight into how retinal neurons develop in the zebrafish, we performed single-cell mRNA profiling and in situ hybridizations (ISHs) on retinal sections and whole-mount zebrafish. Through the series of ISHs, designed and performed solely by undergraduate students in the laboratory, we were able to retrospectively identify our single-cell mRNA profiles as most likely coming from developing amacrine cells. Further analysis of these profiles will reveal genes that can be mutated using genome editing techniques. Together these studies increase our knowledge of the genes driving development of different cell types in the zebrafish retina. PMID:26982811

  1. 15 years of zebrafish chemical screening

    PubMed Central

    Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    In 2000, the first chemical screen using living zebrafish in a multi-well plate was reported. Since then, more than 60 additional screens have been published describing whole-organism drug and pathway discovery projects in zebrafish. To investigate the scope of the work reported in the last 14 years and to identify trends in the field, we analyzed the discovery strategies of 64 primary research articles from the literature. We found that zebrafish screens have expanded beyond the use of developmental phenotypes to include behavioral, cardiac, metabolic, proliferative and regenerative endpoints. Additionally, many creative strategies have been used to uncover the mechanisms of action of new small molecules including chemical phenocopy, genetic phenocopy, mutant rescue, and spatial localization strategies. PMID:25461724

  2. Culturable Gut Microbiota Diversity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sørby, Jan Roger Torp; Aleström, Peter; Sørum, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly used laboratory animal model in basic biology and biomedicine, novel drug development, and toxicology. The wide use has increased the demand for optimized husbandry protocols to ensure animal health care and welfare. The knowledge about the correlation between culturable zebrafish intestinal microbiota and health in relation to environmental factors and management procedures is very limited. A semi-quantitative level of growth of individual types of bacteria was determined and associated with sampling points. A total of 72 TAB line zebrafish from four laboratories (Labs A–D) in the Zebrafish Network Norway were used. Diagnostic was based on traditional bacterial culture methods and biochemical characterization using commercial kits, followed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing from pure subcultures. Also selected Gram-negative isolates were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility to 8 different antibiotics. A total of 13 morphologically different bacterial species were the most prevalent: Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas luteola, Comamonas testosteroni, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis, and Staphylococcus warneri. Only Lab B had significantly higher levels of total bacterial growth (OR=2.03), whereas numbers from Lab C (OR=1.01) and Lab D (OR=1.12) were found to be similar to the baseline Lab A. Sexually immature individuals had a significantly higher level of harvested total bacterial growth than mature fish (OR=0.82), no statistically significant differences were found between male and female fish (OR=1.01), and the posterior intestinal segment demonstrated a higher degree of culturable bacteria than the anterior segment (OR=4.1). Multiple antibiotic (>3) resistance was observed in 17% of the strains. We propose that a rapid

  3. Characterization of zebrafish dysferlin by morpholino knockdown

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Genri; Serafini, Peter R.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Alexander, Matthew S.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb). {yields} The dysferlin expression was detected in skeletal muscle, heart and eye. {yields} Injection of antisense morpholinos to dysferlin caused marked muscle disorganization. {yields} Zebrafish dysferlin expression may be involved in stabilizing muscle structures. -- Abstract: Mutations in the gene encoding dysferlin cause two distinct muscular dystrophy phenotypes: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD-2B) and Miyoshi myopathy (MM). Dysferlin is a large transmembrane protein involved in myoblast fusion and membrane resealing. Zebrafish represent an ideal animal model to use for studying muscle disease including abnormalities of dysferlin. cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb) and the predicted amino acid sequences, showed 68% similarity to predicted amino acid sequences of mammalian dysferlin. The expression of dysferlin was mainly in skeletal muscle, heart and eye, and the expression could be detected as early as 11 h post fertilization (hpf). Three different antisense oligonucleotide morpholinos were targeted to inhibit translation of this dysferlin mRNA and the morpholino-injected fish showed marked muscle disorganization which could be detected by birefringence assay. Western blot analysis using dysferlin antibodies showed that the expression of dysferlin was reduced in each of the three morphants. Dysferlin expression was shown to be reduced at the myosepta of zebrafish muscle using immunohistochemistry, although the expression of other muscle membrane components, dystrophin, laminin, {beta}-dystroglycan were detected normally. Our data suggest that zebrafish dysferlin expression is involved in stabilizing muscle structures and its downregulation causes muscle disorganization.

  4. Glyphosate induces neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nicole M; Carneiro, Bruno; Ochs, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Glyphosate based herbicides (GBH) like Roundup(®) are used extensively in agriculture as well as in urban and rural settings as a broad spectrum herbicide. Its mechanism of action was thought to be specific only to plants and thus considered safe and non-toxic. However, mounting evidence suggests that GBHs may not be as safe as once thought as initial studies in frogs suggest that GBHs may be teratogenic. Here we utilize the zebrafish vertebrate model system to study early effects of glyphosate exposure using technical grade glyphosate and the Roundup(®) Classic formulation. We find morphological abnormalities including cephalic and eye reductions and a loss of delineated brain ventricles. Concomitant with structural changes in the developing brain, using in situ hybridization analysis, we detect decreases in genes expressed in the eye, fore and midbrain regions of the brain including pax2, pax6, otx2 and ephA4. However, we do not detect changes in hindbrain expression domains of ephA4 nor exclusive hindbrain markers krox-20 and hoxb1a. Additionally, using a Retinoic Acid (RA) mediated reporter transgenic, we detect no alterations in the RA expression domains in the hindbrain and spinal cord, but do detect a loss of expression in the retina. We conclude that glyphosate and the Roundup(®) formulation is developmentally toxic to the forebrain and midbrain but does not affect the hindbrain after 24 h exposure. PMID:26773362

  5. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  6. In vivo dynamics of skeletal muscle Dystrophin in zebrafish embryos revealed by improved FRAP analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Gonzalez-Perez, Vinicio; Gillespie, Sean J; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Theveneau, Eric; Sear, Richard P; Hughes, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin forms an essential link between sarcolemma and cytoskeleton, perturbation of which causes muscular dystrophy. We analysed Dystrophin binding dynamics in vivo for the first time. Within maturing fibres of host zebrafish embryos, our analysis reveals a pool of diffusible Dystrophin and complexes bound at the fibre membrane. Combining modelling, an improved FRAP methodology and direct semi-quantitative analysis of bleaching suggests the existence of two membrane-bound Dystrophin populations with widely differing bound lifetimes: a stable, tightly bound pool, and a dynamic bound pool with high turnover rate that exchanges with the cytoplasmic pool. The three populations were found consistently in human and zebrafish Dystrophins overexpressed in wild-type or dmdta222a/ta222a zebrafish embryos, which lack Dystrophin, and in Gt(dmd-Citrine)ct90a that express endogenously-driven tagged zebrafish Dystrophin. These results lead to a new model for Dystrophin membrane association in developing muscle, and highlight our methodology as a valuable strategy for in vivo analysis of complex protein dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06541.001 PMID:26459831

  7. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Intestinal Neoplasia in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Indicates Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Colleen E.; Kent, Michael L.; Peterson, Tracy S.; Wang, Rong; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Löhr, Christiane V.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous neoplasia of the intestinal tract in sentinel and moribund zebrafish (Danio rerio) is common in some zebrafish facilities. We previously classified these tumors as adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, or carcinoma otherwise unspecified based on histomorphologic characteristics. Based on histological presentation, the primary differential diagnosis for the intestinal carcinomas was tumor of neuroendocrine cells (e.g., carcinoids). To further characterize the phenotype of the neoplastic cells, select tissue sections were stained with a panel of antibodies directed toward human epithelial (Cytokeratin Wide Spectrum Screening [WSS], AE1/AE3) or neuroendocrine (S100, chromogranin A) markers. We also investigated antibody specificity by Western blot analysis, using a human cell line and zebrafish tissues. Nine of the intestinal neoplasms (64%) stained for AE1/AE3, seven (50%) also stained for WSS. None of the intestinal neoplastic cells were stained for chromogranin A or S100. Endocrine cells of the pituitary gland and neurons and axons of peripheral nerves and ganglia stained for Chromogranin A, whereas perineural and periaxonal cells of peripheral intestinal ganglia, and glial and ependymal cells of the brain stained for S100. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins confirmed the majority of intestinal neoplasms in this cohort of zebrafish as carcinomas. PMID:26503773

  8. Novel vector systems optimized for injecting in vitro-synthesized mRNA into zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ro, Hyunju; Soun, Kyungchull; Kim, Eun-Jung; Rhee, Myungchull

    2004-04-30

    Microinjection of nucleic acids or proteins is a useful way of studying embryonic development. In particular, injection of in vitro-transcribed capped RNA is commonly employed to achieve ectopic or increased expression of genes. Two vector systems, pCS2+ and pT7Ts, have been used for this purpose in zebrafish. However, they were initially optimized for Xenopus embryos not for zebrafish. Here we describe a vector, pcGlobin2, optimized for zebrafish, and its derivative, pcGlobin2-GST. This new vector system offers several advantages. First, pcGlobin 2 contains three critical elements 15' and 3' zebrafish beta-globin UTRs, and a poly(A) tail] for generating stable mRNAs and greatly improving translation efficiency. Second, subcloning and preparation of template DNA is easier because of the larger number of restriction sites. Third, protein-binding assays can be performed directly on the injected embryos with pcGlobin2-GST. Lastly, this vector system can be transfected into animal cells without additional subcloning. PMID:15179057

  9. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  10. A Primer for Morpholino Use in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Brent R.; Petzold, Andrew M.; Clark, Karl J.; Schimmenti, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Morpholino oligonucleotides are the most common anti-sense “knockdown” technique used in zebrafish (Danio rerio). This review discusses common practices for the design, preparation, and deployment of morpholinos in this vertebrate model system. Off-targeting effects of morpholinos are discussed as well as method to minimize this potentially confounding variable via co-injection of a tP53-targeting morpholino. Finally, new uses of morpholinos are summarized and contextualized with respect to the complementary, DNA-based knockout technologies recently developed for zebrafish. PMID:19374550

  11. Zebrafish Invade Valparaiso: Third Meeting and Symposium of the Latin American Zebrafish Network.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Zebrafish are an excellent model system for research and teaching. Because of their relatively low maintenance costs, beautiful and bountiful embryos, and tool box of molecular genetic technique, zebrafish are ideal for countries with smaller research budgets and less well-developed science infrastructure. For these reasons, zebrafish are growing in popularity as a model system for research in Latin America. In response to this growing need, we held the Third Latin American Zebrafish Network (LAZEN) Course and Symposium in Valparaiso, Chile, in April 4-13, 2014. The course covered a wide variety of topics from fish husbandry to outreach and ended with a symposium hosting excellent scientists from Latin America and beyond. PMID:25372497

  12. Zebrafish invade Valparaiso: third meeting and symposium of the Latin American zebrafish network.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model system for research and teaching. Because of their relatively low maintenance costs, beautiful and bountiful embryos, and tool box of molecular genetic technique, zebrafish are ideal for countries with smaller research budgets and less well-developed science infrastructure. For these reasons, zebrafish are growing in popularity as a model system for research in Latin America. In response to this growing need, we held the Third Latin American Zebrafish Network (LAZEN) Course and Symposium in Valparaiso, Chile, in April 4-13, 2014. The course covered a wide variety of topics from fish husbandry to outreach and ended with a symposium hosting excellent scientists from Latin America and beyond. PMID:25470532

  13. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  14. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  15. Sparc Protein Is Required for Normal Growth of Zebrafish Otoliths

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Jin; Stevenson, Amy K.; Yau, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Otoliths and the homologous otoconia in the inner ear are essential for balance. Their morphogenesis is less understood than that of other biominerals, such as bone, and only a small number of their constituent proteins have been characterized. As a novel approach to identify unknown otolith proteins, we employed shotgun proteomics to analyze crude extracts from trout and catfish otoliths. We found three proteins that had not been associated previously with otolith or otoconia formation: ‘Secreted acidic cysteine rich glycoprotein’ (Sparc), an important bone protein that binds collagen and Ca2+; precerebellin-like protein, which contains a C1q domain and may associate with the collagenous otolin-1 during its assembly into a framework; and neuroserpin, a serine protease inhibitor that may regulate local protease activity during framework assembly. We then used the zebrafish to investigate whether Sparc plays a role in otolith morphogenesis. Immunodetection demonstrated that Sparc is a true constituent of otoliths. Knockdown of Sparc expression in morphant zebrafish resulted in four principal types of defective otoliths: smaller, extra and ectopic, missing and fused, or completely absent. Smaller size was the predominant phenotype and independent of the severity of otic-vesicle defects. These results suggested that Sparc is directly required for normal otolith growth. PMID:18784957

  16. Fast gene transfer into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and electroporation: methods and optogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming; De Koninck, Paul; Neve, Rachael L.; Friedrich, Rainer W.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has various advantages as a model organism to analyze the structure and function of neural circuits but efficient viruses or other tools for fast gene transfer are lacking. We show that transgenes can be introduced directly into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex type I viruses (HSV-1) or electroporation. We developed a new procedure to target electroporation to defined brain areas and identified promoters that produced strong long-term expression. The fast workflow of electroporation was exploited to express multiple channelrhodopsin-2 variants and genetically encoded calcium indicators in telencephalic neurons for measurements of neuronal activity and synaptic connectivity. The results demonstrate that HSV-1 and targeted electroporation are efficient tools for gene delivery into the zebrafish brain, similar to adeno-associated viruses and lentiviruses in other species. These methods fill an important gap in the spectrum of molecular tools for zebrafish and are likely to have a wide range of applications. PMID:24834028

  17. Startle response memory and hippocampal changes in adult zebrafish pharmacologically-induced to exhibit anxiety/depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Julian T; Lott, Chad S

    2014-01-17

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly becoming a popular animal model for neurobehavioral and psychopharmacological research. While startle testing is a well-established assay to investigate anxiety-like behaviors in different species, screening of the startle response and its habituation in zebrafish is a new direction of translational biomedical research. This study focuses on a novel behavioral protocol to assess a tapping-induced startle response and its habituation in adult zebrafish that have been pharmacologically-induced to exhibit anxiety/depression-like behaviors. We demonstrated that zebrafish exhibit robust learning performance in a task adapted from the mammalian literature, a modified plus maze, and showed that ethanol and fluoxetine impair memory performance in this maze when administered after training at a dose that does not impair motor function, however, leads to significant upregulation of hippocampal serotoninergic neurons. These results suggest that the maze associative learning paradigm has face and construct validity and that zebrafish may become a translationally relevant study species for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory changes associated with psychopharmacological treatment of anxiety/depression. PMID:24184510

  18. Hooking the big one: the potential of zebrafish xenotransplantation to reform cancer drug screening in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Veinotte, Chansey J.; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    The current preclinical pipeline for drug discovery can be cumbersome and costly, which limits the number of compounds that can effectively be transitioned to use as therapies. Chemical screens in zebrafish have uncovered new uses for existing drugs and identified promising new compounds from large libraries. Xenotransplantation of human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos builds on this work and enables direct evaluation of patient-derived tumor specimens in vivo in a rapid and cost-effective manner. The short time frame needed for xenotransplantation studies means that the zebrafish can serve as an early preclinical drug screening tool and can also help personalize cancer therapy by providing real-time data on the response of the human cells to treatment. In this Review, we summarize the use of zebrafish embryos in drug screening and highlight the potential for xenotransplantation approaches to be adopted as a preclinical tool to identify and prioritize therapies for further clinical evaluation. We also discuss some of the limitations of using zebrafish xenografts and the benefits of using them in concert with murine xenografts in drug optimization. PMID:24973744

  19. High-Content and Semi-Automated Quantification of Responses to Estrogenic Chemicals Using a Novel Translucent Transgenic Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Green, Jon M; Metz, Jeremy; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; Takesono, Aya; Brown, A Ross; Owen, Stewart F; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    Rapid embryogenesis, together with genetic similarities with mammals, and the desire to reduce mammalian testing, are major incentives for using the zebrafish model in chemical screening and testing. Transgenic zebrafish, engineered for identifying target gene expression through expression of fluorophores, have considerable potential for both high-content and high-throughput testing of chemicals for endocrine activity. Here we generated an estrogen responsive transgenic zebrafish model in a pigment-free "Casper" phenotype, facilitating identification of target tissues and quantification of these responses in whole intact fish. Using the ERE-GFP-Casper model we show chemical type and concentration dependence for green fluorescent protein (GFP) induction and both spatial and temporal responses for different environmental estrogens tested. We also developed a semiautomated (ArrayScan) imaging and image analysis system that we applied to quantify whole body fluorescence responses for a range of different estrogenic chemicals in the new transgenic zebrafish model. The zebrafish model developed provides a sensitive and highly integrative system for identifying estrogenic chemicals, their target tissues and effect concentrations for exposures in real time and across different life stages. It thus has application for chemical screening to better direct health effects analysis of environmental estrogens and for investigating the functional roles of estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:27227508

  20. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones. PMID:19718031

  1. Gelsolin is a dorsalizing factor in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Kozmik, Zbynek; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K.; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2003-01-01

    The gene for gelsolin (an actin-binding, cytoskeletal regulatory protein) was shown earlier to be specialized for high corneal expression in adult zebrafish. We show here that zebrafish gelsolin is required for proper dorsalization during embryogenesis. Inhibition of gelsolin expression by injecting fertilized eggs with a specific morpholino oligonucleotide resulted in a range of concentration-dependent ventralized phenotypes, including those lacking a brain and eyes. These were rescued by coinjection of zebrafish gelsolin or chordin (a known dorsalizing agent) mRNAs, or human gelsolin protein. Moreover, injection of gelsolin mRNA or human gelsolin protein by itself dorsalized the developing embryos, often resulting in axis duplication. Injection of the gelsolin-specific morpholino oligonucleotide enhanced the expression of Vent mRNA, a ventral marker downstream of bone morphogenetic proteins, whereas injection of gelsolin mRNA enhanced the expression of chordin and goosecoid mRNAs, both dorsal markers. Our results indicate that gelsolin also modulates embryonic dorsal/ventral pattern formation in zebrafish. PMID:12629212

  2. Antiangiogenic cancer drug using the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo M

    2014-09-01

    The process of de novo vessel formation, called angiogenesis, is essential for tumor progression and spreading. Targeting of molecular pathways involved in such tumor angiogenetic processes by using specific drugs or inhibitors is important for developing new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery remains to be the main focus for biomedical research and represents the essence of antiangiogenesis cancer research. To pursue these molecular and pharmacological goals, researchers need to use animal models that facilitate the elucidation of tumor angiogenesis mechanisms and the testing of antiangiogenic therapies. The past few years have seen the zebrafish system emerge as a valid model organism to study developmental angiogenesis and, more recently, as an alternative vertebrate model for cancer research. In this review, we will discuss why the zebrafish model system has the advantage of being a vertebrate model equipped with easy and powerful transgenesis as well as imaging tools to investigate not only physiological angiogenesis but also tumor angiogenesis. We will also highlight the potential of zebrafish for identifying antitumor angiogenesis drugs to block tumor development and progression. We foresee the zebrafish model as an important system that can possibly complement well-established mouse models in cancer research to generate novel insights into the molecular mechanism of the tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24903092

  3. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  4. Teaching Stress Physiology Using Zebrafish ("Danio Rerio")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael; Dhawale, Shree; Mustafa, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A straightforward and inexpensive laboratory experiment is presented that investigates the physiological stress response of zebrafish after a 5 degree C increase in water temperature. This experiment is designed for an undergraduate physiology lab and allows students to learn the scientific method and relevant laboratory techniques without causing…

  5. Bioenergetic Profiling of Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stackley, Krista D.; Beeson, Craig C.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Many debilitating conditions are linked to bioenergetic defects. Developing screens to probe the genetic and/or chemical basis for such links has proved intractable. Furthermore, there is a need for a physiologically relevant assay of bioenergetics in whole organisms, especially for early stages in life where perturbations could increase disease susceptibility with aging. Thus, we asked whether we could screen bioenergetics and mitochondrial function in the developing zebrafish embryo. We present a multiplexed method to assay bioenergetics in zebrafish embryos from the blastula period (3 hours post-fertilization, hpf) through to hatching (48 hpf). In proof of principle experiments, we measured respiration and acid extrusion of developing zebrafish embryos. We quantified respiratory coupling to various bioenergetic functions by using specific pharmacological inhibitors of bioenergetic pathways. We demonstrate that changes in the coupling to ATP turnover and proton leak are correlated with developmental stage. The multiwell format of this assay enables the user to screen for the effects of drugs and environmental agents on bioenergetics in the zebrafish embryo with high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:21980518

  6. Thyroid development in zebrafish lacking Taz.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Porreca, Immacolata; Caputi, Luigi; De Felice, Elena; Schulte-Merker, Stephan; Zannini, Mariastella; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Taz is a signal-responsive transcriptional coregulator implicated in several biological functions, from chondrogenesis to regulation of organ size. Less well studied, however, is its role in thyroid formation. Here, we explored the in vivo effects on thyroid development of morpholino (MO)-mediated knockdown of wwtr1, the gene encoding zebrafish Taz. The wwtr1 gene is expressed in the thyroid primordium and pharyngeal tissue of developing zebrafish. Compared to mammalian cells, in which Taz promotes expression of thyroid transcription factors and thyroid differentiation genes, wwtr1 MO injection in zebrafish had little or no effect on the expression of thyroid transcription factors, and differentially altered the expression of thyroid differentiation genes. Analysis of wwtr1 morphants at later stages of development revealed that the number and the lumen of thyroid follicles, and the number of thyroid follicle cells, were significantly smaller. In addition, Taz-depleted larvae displayed patterning defects in ventral cranial vessels that correlate with lateral displacement of thyroid follicles. These findings indicate that the zebrafish Taz protein is needed for the normal differentiation of the thyroid and are the first to suggest that Taz confers growth advantage to the endocrine gland. PMID:26478012

  7. Illuminating Phagocyte Biology: The View from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-07-25

    Many phagocyte behaviors, including vascular rolling and adhesion, migration, and oxidative bursting, are better measured in seconds or minutes than hours or days. Zebrafish is ideally suited for imaging such rapid biology within the intact animal. We discuss how this model has revealed unique insights into various aspects of phagocyte physiology. PMID:27459065

  8. Neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging model for integrative physiological research. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances in the neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in this species, and identify current knowledge gaps and issues that would benefit from further investigation. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-ionic environment and therefore are challenged by a continual loss of ions to the water. To maintain ionic homeostasis, they must actively take up ions from the water and reduce passive ion loss. The adult gill or the skin of larvae are the primary sites of ionic regulation. Current models for the uptake of major ions in zebrafish incorporate at least three types of ion transporting cells (also called ionocytes); H(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Na(+) uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Ca(2+) uptake, and Na(+)/Cl(-)-cotransporter expressing cells for both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. The precise molecular mechanisms regulating the paracellular loss of ions remain largely unknown. However, epithelial tight junction proteins, including claudins, are thought to play a critical role in reducing ion losses to the surrounding water. Using the zebrafish model, several key neuroendocrine factors were identified as regulators of epithelial ion movement, including the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline), cortisol, the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone and prolactin. Increasing evidence also suggests that gasotransmitters, such as H2S, are involved in regulating ion uptake. PMID:27179885

  9. Nicotine response genetics in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Andrew M.; Balciunas, Darius; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Clark, Karl J.; Bedell, Victoria M.; Westcot, Stephanie E.; Myers, Shelly R.; Moulder, Gary L.; Thomas, Mark J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is predicted to result in over 1 billion deaths worldwide by the end of the 21st century. How genetic variation contributes to the observed differential predisposition in the human population to drug dependence is unknown. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging vertebrate model system for understanding the genetics of behavior. We developed a nicotine behavioral assay in zebrafish and applied it in a forward genetic screen using gene-breaking transposon mutagenesis. We used this method to molecularly characterize bdav/cct8 and hbog/gabbr1.2 as mutations with altered nicotine response. Each have a single human ortholog, identifying two points for potential scientific, diagnostic, and drug development for nicotine biology and cessation therapeutics. We show this insertional method generates mutant alleles that are reversible through Cre-mediated recombination, representing a conditional mutation system for the zebrafish. The combination of this reporter-tagged insertional mutagen approach and zebrafish provides a powerful platform for a rich array of questions amenable to genetic-based scientific inquiry, including the basis of behavior, epigenetics, plasticity, stress, memory, and learning. PMID:19858493

  10. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  11. Detecting Developmental Neurotoxicants Using Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of EPA’s program on the screening and prioritization of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity, a rapid, cost-effective in vivo vertebrate screen is being developed using an alternative species approach. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish with external f...

  12. Behavorial assessments of larval zebrafish neurotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishes have long been a popular organism in ecotoxicology research, and are increasingly used in human health research as an alternative animal model for chemical screening. Our laboratory incorporates a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo/larval assay to screen chemicals for developm...

  13. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  14. Zebrafish Embryo Model of Bartonella henselae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J.; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis. PMID:25026365

  15. An outbreak of Plesimonus Shigelloides in Zebrafish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a flagellated, gram-negative rod that is an emergent pathogen associated with human gastroenteritis. Recently, we experienced a disease outbreak in zebrafish that were obtained from a commercial source. Fourteen days after being held at 27°C in our flow-through quarantine...

  16. Reactive gliosis in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Ranski, Alexandra H; Morgan, Gregory W; Thummel, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish posses the remarkable ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Damage to the zebrafish retina induces Müller glia to act as stem cells, generating retinal progenitors for regeneration. In contrast, injury in the mammalian retina results in Müller glial reactive gliosis, a characteristic gliotic response that is normally detrimental to vision. Understanding the signaling pathways that determine how Müller glia respond to injury is a critical step toward promoting regeneration in the mammalian retina. Here we report that zebrafish Müller glia exhibit signs of reactive gliosis even under normal regenerative conditions and that cell cycle inhibition increases this response. Persistently reactive Müller glia increase their neuroprotective functions, temporarily saving photoreceptors from a cytotoxic light lesion. However, the absence of a sustained proliferation response results in a significant inhibition of retinal regeneration. Interestingly, when cell cycle inhibition is released, a partial recovery of regeneration is observed. Together, these data demonstrate that zebrafish Müller glia possess both gliotic and regenerative potential. PMID:26492821

  17. Identification and developmental expression of the full complement of Cytochrome P450 genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing use of zebrafish in drug discovery and mechanistic toxicology demands knowledge of cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene regulation and function. CYP enzymes catalyze oxidative transformation leading to activation or inactivation of many endogenous and exogenous chemicals, with consequences for normal physiology and disease processes. Many CYPs potentially have roles in developmental specification, and many chemicals that cause developmental abnormalities are substrates for CYPs. Here we identify and annotate the full suite of CYP genes in zebrafish, compare these to the human CYP gene complement, and determine the expression of CYP genes during normal development. Results Zebrafish have a total of 94 CYP genes, distributed among 18 gene families found also in mammals. There are 32 genes in CYP families 5 to 51, most of which are direct orthologs of human CYPs that are involved in endogenous functions including synthesis or inactivation of regulatory molecules. The high degree of sequence similarity suggests conservation of enzyme activities for these CYPs, confirmed in reports for some steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP19, aromatase; CYP11A, P450scc; CYP17, steroid 17a-hydroxylase), and the CYP26 retinoic acid hydroxylases. Complexity is much greater in gene families 1, 2, and 3, which include CYPs prominent in metabolism of drugs and pollutants, as well as of endogenous substrates. There are orthologous relationships for some CYP1 s and some CYP3 s between zebrafish and human. In contrast, zebrafish have 47 CYP2 genes, compared to 16 in human, with only two (CYP2R1 and CYP2U1) recognized as orthologous based on sequence. Analysis of shared synteny identified CYP2 gene clusters evolutionarily related to mammalian CYP2 s, as well as unique clusters. Conclusions Transcript profiling by microarray and quantitative PCR revealed that the majority of zebrafish CYP genes are expressed in embryos, with waves of expression of different sets of genes over the course

  18. Expression pattern and biochemical properties of zebrafish N-acetylglutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Haskins, Nantaporn; Mumo, Amy; Majumdar, Himani; Pinter, Mary; Tuchman, Mendel; Krufka, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase 1, and two membrane transporters, ornithine transporter and aralar, comprise the urea cycle. The genes for all six enzymes and both transporters are present in the zebrafish genome. NAGS (EC 2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate from glutamate and acetyl coenzyme A and in zebrafish is partially inhibited by L-arginine. NAGS and other urea cycle genes are highly expressed during the first four days of zebrafish development. Sequence alignment of NAGS proteins from six fish species revealed three regions of sequence conservation: the mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) at the N-terminus, followed by the variable and conserved segments. Removal of the MTS yields mature zebrafish NAGS (zfNAGS-M) while removal of the variable segment from zfNAGS-M results in conserved NAGS (zfNAGS-C). Both zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C are tetramers in the absence of L-arginine; addition of L-arginine decreased partition coefficients of both proteins. The zfNAGS-C unfolds over a broader temperature range and has higher specific activity than zfNAGS-M. In the presence of L-arginine the apparent Vmax of zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C decreased, their Km(app) for acetyl coenzyme A increased while the Km(app) for glutamate remained unchanged. The expression pattern of NAGS and other urea cycle genes in developing zebrafish suggests that they may have a role in citrulline and/or arginine biosynthesis during the first day of development and in ammonia detoxification thereafter. Biophysical and biochemical properties of zebrafish NAGS suggest that the variable segment may stabilize a tetrameric state of zfNAGS-M and that under physiological

  19. Expression Pattern and Biochemical Properties of Zebrafish N-Acetylglutamate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Haskins, Nantaporn; Mumo, Amy; Majumdar, Himani; Pinter, Mary; Tuchman, Mendel; Krufka, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase 1, and two membrane transporters, ornithine transporter and aralar, comprise the urea cycle. The genes for all six enzymes and both transporters are present in the zebrafish genome. NAGS (EC 2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate from glutamate and acetyl coenzyme A and in zebrafish is partially inhibited by L-arginine. NAGS and other urea cycle genes are highly expressed during the first four days of zebrafish development. Sequence alignment of NAGS proteins from six fish species revealed three regions of sequence conservation: the mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) at the N-terminus, followed by the variable and conserved segments. Removal of the MTS yields mature zebrafish NAGS (zfNAGS-M) while removal of the variable segment from zfNAGS-M results in conserved NAGS (zfNAGS-C). Both zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C are tetramers in the absence of L-arginine; addition of L-arginine decreased partition coefficients of both proteins. The zfNAGS-C unfolds over a broader temperature range and has higher specific activity than zfNAGS-M. In the presence of L-arginine the apparent Vmax of zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C decreased, their Kmapp for acetyl coenzyme A increased while the Kmapp for glutamate remained unchanged. The expression pattern of NAGS and other urea cycle genes in developing zebrafish suggests that they may have a role in citrulline and/or arginine biosynthesis during the first day of development and in ammonia detoxification thereafter. Biophysical and biochemical properties of zebrafish NAGS suggest that the variable segment may stabilize a tetrameric state of zfNAGS-M and that under physiological

  20. Developmental exposure to acetaminophen does not induce hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Isabel; Knaup, Sabine; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Drepper, Carsten; Lillesaar, Christina

    2016-08-01

    First line pain relief medication during pregnancy relies nearly entirely on the over-the-counter analgesic acetaminophen, which is generally considered safe to use during gestation. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest a risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in children if mothers use acetaminophen during pregnancy. Currently, there are no experimental proofs that prenatal acetaminophen exposure causes developmental brain alterations of progeny. Exposure to high acetaminophen concentrations causes liver toxicity, which is well investigated in different model organisms. However, sub-liver-toxic concentrations have not been experimentally investigated with respect to ADHD endophenotypes such as hyperactivity. We used zebrafish to investigate the potential impact of acetaminophen exposure on locomotor activity levels, and compared it to the established zebrafish Latrophilin 3 (Lphn3) ADHD-model. We determined the sub-liver-toxic concentration of acetaminophen in zebrafish larvae and treated wild-type and lphn3.1 knockdown larvae with increasing concentrations of acetaminophen. We were able to confirm that lphn3.1 knockdown alone causes hyperactivity, strengthening the implication of Lphn3 dysfunction as an ADHD risk factor. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to acetaminophen at sub-liver-toxic concentrations in wild-type or lphn3.1 knock-downs increases locomotor activity levels. Together our findings show that embryonic to larval exposure to acetaminophen does not cause hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae. Furthermore, there are no additive and/or synergistic effects of acetaminophen exposure in a susceptible background induced by knock-down of lphn3.1. Our experimental study suggests that there is, at least in zebrafish larvae, no direct link between embryonic acetaminophen exposure and hyperactivity. Further work is necessary to clarify this issue in humans. PMID:27116683

  1. Human melanoma cells transplanted into zebrafish proliferate, migrate, produce melanin, form masses and stimulate angiogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haldi, Maryann; Ton, Christopher; Seng, Wen Lin; McGrath, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    In this research, we optimized parameters for xenotransplanting WM-266-4, a metastatic melanoma cell line, including zebrafish site and stage for transplantation, number of cells, injection method, and zebrafish incubation temperature. Melanoma cells proliferated, migrated and formed masses in vivo. We transplanted two additional cancer cell lines, SW620, a colorectal cancer cell line, and FG CAS/Crk, a pancreatic cancer cell line and these human cancers also formed masses in zebrafish. We also transplanted CCD-1092Sk, a human fibroblast cell line established from normal foreskin and this cell line migrated, but did not proliferate or form masses. We quantified the number of proliferating melanoma and normal skin fibroblasts by dissociating xenotransplant zebrafish, dispensing an aliquot of CM-DiI labeled human cells from each zebrafish onto a hemocytometer slide and then visually counting the number of fluorescently labeled cancer cells. Since zebrafish are transparent until approximately 30 dpf, the interaction of labeled melanoma cells and zebrafish endothelial cells (EC) can be visualized by whole-mount immunochemical staining. After staining with Phy-V, a mouse anti-zebrafish monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically labels activated EC and angioblasts, using immunohistology and 2-photon microscopy, we observed activated zebrafish EC embedded in human melanoma cell masses. The zebrafish model offers a rapid efficient approach for assessing human cancer cells at various stages of tumorigenesis. PMID:17051341

  2. Anxiogenic effects of cocaine withdrawal in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    López-Patiño, Marcos A; Yu, Lili; Cabral, Howard; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2008-01-28

    Continued usage of cocaine is determined by genetic, conditioned and homeostatic factors, while it is reinforced by drug-induced reward and the emotionally negative state of drug withdrawal, which includes anxiety. The molecular mechanisms of these long-term behavioral and physiological alterations have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate that in zebrafish, a wide range of non-anesthetic cocaine doses, 0.015-15 muM, does not result in acute alterations in locomotor activity, in spite of the high brain cocaine levels induced (7-120 pg/microg protein). Conversely, cocaine withdrawal causes hyperactivity associated with stereotypy. The behavioral hyperactivity is progressively increased during the initial period of withdrawal (24-72 h) and is maintained for at least 5 days. Such effect of cocaine withdrawal is aggravated by environmental stimulation and attenuated in the home environment. Administration of cocaine (1.5 microM) or a non-sedative dose of diazepam (5 microM, immersion) acutely counteracts withdrawal-associated hyperactivity and stereotypy in zebrafish, with the magnitude of these effects positively correlating with the degree of prior increase in basal activity. Administration of an anxiogenic benzodiazepine inverse agonist, FG-7142, results in zebrafish behavior similar to that observed during cocaine withdrawal. Together, the results suggest that cocaine withdrawal produces long-lasting behavioral effects in zebrafish which are consistent with an anxiety-like state. Thus, zebrafish, a powerful model for the study of vertebrate genetics, could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of drug withdrawal. PMID:17889042

  3. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nociceptive processing. The importance of the glycinergic synapse is conserved across vertebrate species. A teleost fish, the zebrafish, offers several advantages as a vertebrate model for research of glycinergic synapse. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish have isolated two motor defective mutants that have pathogenic mutations in glycinergic synaptic transmission: bandoneon (beo) and shocked (sho). Beo mutants have a loss-of-function mutation of glycine receptor (GlyR) β-subunit b, alternatively, sho mutant is a glycinergic transporter 1 (GlyT1) defective mutant. These mutants are useful animal models for understanding of glycinergic synaptic transmission and for identification of novel therapeutic agents for human diseases arising from defect in glycinergic transmission, such as hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy. Recent advances in techniques for genome editing and for imaging and manipulating of a molecule or a physiological process make zebrafish more attractive model. In this review, we describe the glycinergic defective zebrafish mutants and the technical advances in both forward and reverse genetic approaches as well as in vivo visualization and manipulation approaches for the study of the glycinergic synapse in zebrafish. PMID:27445686

  4. Behavioral analysis of zebrafish larvae swimming in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Behavioral biologists have a strong interest in studying the behavior of larval zebrafish because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with the rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their movements. Most research also only considers the 2D movements of zebrafish, leaving out the vertical component of their locomotion. Our lab has developed a method to reduce the dimensionality of the locomotion of zebrafish and determine the behavioral space of 2D swimming. We are extending this work to capture 3D locomotion of zebrafish larvae. Here we present our preliminary analysis of the 3D locomotion of zebrafish.

  5. 75 FR 4004 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Spiny Dogfish Fishery; Commercial Period 2 Quota...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... (5,443.11 mt) (74 FR 20230, May 1, 2009). The commercial quota is allocated into two periods (May 1... United States; Spiny Dogfish Fishery; Commercial Period 2 Quota Harvested AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; Closure of spiny dogfish fishery. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the spiny dogfish...

  6. 77 FR 2022 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Spiny Dogfish Fishery; Commercial Period 2 Quota...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... dogfish for the 2011 fishing year is 20 million lb (9,071.85 mt) (76 FR 32874, June 7, 2011). The... Northeastern United States; Spiny Dogfish Fishery; Commercial Period 2 Quota Harvested AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; closure of spiny dogfish fishery. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the spiny dogfish...

  7. Dithiocarbamates are teratogenic to developing zebrafish through inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boxtel, Antonius L. van; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Legler, Juliette

    2010-04-15

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are a class of compounds that are extensively used in agriculture as pesticides. As such, humans and wildlife are undoubtedly exposed to these chemicals. Although DTCs are thought to be relatively safe due to their short half lives, it is well established that they are teratogenic to vertebrates, especially to fish. In zebrafish, these teratogenic effects are characterized by distorted notochord development and shortened anterior to posterior axis. DTCs are known copper (Cu) chelators but this does not fully explain the observed teratogenic effects. We show here that DTCs cause malformations in zebrafish that highly resemble teratogenic effects observed by direct inhibition of a group of cuproenzymes termed lysyl oxidases (LOX). Additionally, we demonstrate that partial knockdown of three LOX genes, lox, loxl1 and loxl5b, sensitizes the developing embryo to DTC exposure. Finally, we show that DTCs directly inhibit zebrafish LOX activity in an ex vivo amine oxidase assay. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that DTC induced teratogenic effects are, at least in part, caused by direct inhibition of LOX activity.

  8. Swimming Against the Current: Zebrafish Help Address Educational Challenges.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Michael A; Liang, Jennifer; Hutson, Lara; Pierret, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish can be important tools for learning and authentic student research. The broad zebrafish community is rich with examples to improve education for learners of all ages and geographical locales. This special collection of articles is presented with the hope of encouraging readers to reflect on the educational outcomes reported here and to consider new ways zebrafish may engage others to learn and grow. PMID:27333079

  9. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  10. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  11. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology.

  12. A dedicated visual pathway for prey detection in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Semmelhack, Julia L; Donovan, Joseph C; Thiele, Tod R; Kuehn, Enrico; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae show characteristic prey capture behavior in response to small moving objects. The neural mechanism used to recognize objects as prey remains largely unknown. We devised a machine learning behavior classification system to quantify hunting kinematics in semi-restrained animals exposed to a range of virtual stimuli. Two-photon calcium imaging revealed a small visual area, AF7, that was activated specifically by the optimal prey stimulus. This pretectal region is innervated by two types of retinal ganglion cells, which also send collaterals to the optic tectum. Laser ablation of AF7 markedly reduced prey capture behavior. We identified neurons with arbors in AF7 and found that they projected to multiple sensory and premotor areas: the optic tectum, the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) and the hindbrain. These findings indicate that computations in the retina give rise to a visual stream which transforms sensory information into a directed prey capture response. PMID:25490154

  13. Methods for studying the zebrafish brain: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Cameron; Bartoszek, Ewelina M; Yaksi, Emre

    2015-07-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the most promising new model organisms. The increasing popularity of this amazing small vertebrate is evident from the exponentially growing numbers of research articles, funded projects and new discoveries associated with the use of zebrafish for studying development, brain function, human diseases and screening for new drugs. Thanks to the development of novel technologies, the range of zebrafish research is constantly expanding with new tools synergistically enhancing traditional techniques. In this review we will highlight the past and present techniques which have made, and continue to make, zebrafish an attractive model organism for various fields of biology, with a specific focus on neuroscience. PMID:25900095

  14. Hearing Assessment in Zebrafish During the First Week Postfertilization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qi; DeSmidt, Alexandra A; Tekin, Mustafa; Liu, Xuezhong; Lu, Zhongmin

    2016-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a valuable vertebrate model for human hearing disorders because of many advantages in genetics, embryology, and in vivo visualization. In this study, we investigated auditory function of zebrafish during the first week postfertilization using microphonic potential recording. Extracellular microphonic potentials were recorded from hair cells in the inner ear of wild-type AB and transgenic Et(krt4:GFP)(sqet4) zebrafish at 3, 5, and 7 days postfertilization in response to 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400-Hz acoustic stimulation. We found that microphonic threshold significantly decreased with age in zebrafish. However, there was no significant difference of microphonic responses between wild-type and transgenic zebrafish, indicating that the transgenic zebrafish have normal hearing like wild-type zebrafish. In addition, we observed that microphonic threshold did not change with the recording electrode location. Furthermore, microphonic threshold increased significantly at all tested stimulus frequencies after displacement of the saccular otolith but only increased at low frequencies after displacement of the utricular otolith, showing that the saccule rather than the utricle plays the major role in larval zebrafish hearing. These results enhance our knowledge of early development of auditory function in zebrafish and the factors affecting hearing assessment with microphonic potential recording. PMID:26982161

  15. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  16. Endocrine-active compound evaluation: qualitative and quantitative histomorphological assessment of zebrafish gonads after bisphenol-A exposure.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ana M; Lora, Antonio J; Blanco, Alfonso; Monterde, José G; Ayala, Nahum; Moyano, Rosario

    2013-02-01

    There is great social concern about the risk involved from exposure to BPA as an endocrine disrupter in humans, as well as the possible repercussion of this chemical on the environment. In this study, the short-term effects of BPA at a gonadal level were assessed by means of different biomarkers in a model animal organism in vogue, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). For this purpose, 60 female zebrafish aged 16 weeks were used. These were exposed for 14 days in aquariums (following OECD Directive no.204) to BPA concentrations of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 μg/L, in addition to a control batch. After the exposure period, the zebrafish were sacrificed and samples taken for a histopathological study by light and electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. During the fourteen days of exposure, water samples were taken from the aquariums to analyze the BPA levels. The BPA concentration in the fish and the water was determined by LC-MS/MS. The gonads of the zebrafish exposed to the BPA had a normal external appearance and there were no variations in their size or body weight. An accumulation of BPA was produced in the zebrafish tissues, and this increased as the BPA concentration to which the fish were exposed did. In the histopathological and morphometric studies, multiple alterations were observed in the zebrafish ovaries, particularly highlighting the vacuolization of the follicular cytoplasm, a great degeneration of all the cell components, and an important increase in the percentage of atretic follicles as from concentrations of 100 and 1000 μg/L of BPA, verified by morphometry. These data indicate that morphological endpoints are sufficiently sensitive to individuate early effects of environmental concentration of BPA on gonads after two weeks of exposure. PMID:23219663

  17. Annual Zebrafish Husbandry Workshop USA: A Resource for All Zebrafish Users.

    PubMed

    Baur, Bobbi M

    2016-07-01

    Understandably, in the early years of the growth of the zebrafish model, husbandry parameters varied widely from laboratory to laboratory. But with the explosion in the number of investigators opting to utilize zebrafish in their research, the standardization of husbandry parameters is not only practical but also absolutely critical to ensure the reliability and reproducibility of experimental results. For more than 13 years, technicians, veterinarians, laboratory managers, regulatory officers, and investigators have joined together for an annual workshop on zebrafish husbandry. The meeting is held in conjunction with the World Aquaculture Society's annual conference, a congeries of fish experts and aquatic species enthusiasts. From a lineup of five speakers and perhaps 25 attendees, the workshop has grown to a one and a half day event with more than 20 speakers and ∼90 attendees. PMID:27267407

  18. DeltaA mRNA and protein distribution in the zebrafish nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Trepman, Alissa; Eisen, Judith S

    2009-12-01

    Physical interaction between the transmembrane proteins Delta and Notch allows only a subset of neural precursors to become neurons, as well as regulating other aspects of neural development. To examine the localization of Delta protein during neural development, we generated an antibody specific to zebrafish Delta A (Dla). Here, we describe for the first time the subcellular localization of Dla protein in distinct puncta at cell cortex and/or membrane, supporting the function of Dla in direct cell-cell communication. In situ RNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed dynamic, coordinated expression patterns of dla mRNA and Dla protein in the developing and adult zebrafish nervous system. Dla expression is mostly excluded from differentiated neurons and is maintained in putative precursor cells at least until larval stages. In the adult brain, dla mRNA and Dla protein are expressed in proliferative zones normally associated with stem cells. PMID:19924821

  19. Structure-dependent activities of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hydroxylated metabolites on zebrafish retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Xiangwei; Xu, Ting; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a group of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been shown to disrupt retinoid homeostasis in different species in both laboratory and field studies. However, the molecular mechanisms of interactions with the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) are not fully understood. Zebrafish have proven useful for investigating mechanisms of chemical toxicity. In the present study, a reporter gene assay was used to investigate the activities of 11 PBDEs and six OH-PBDEs with different degrees of bromination on zebrafish RAR. All tested OH-PBDEs induced RAR transcriptional activity; however, of the 11 PBDEs examined, only BDE28 and BDE154 affected the RAR transcriptional activity. Homology modeling and molecular docking were employed to simulate the interactions of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs with zebrafish RARs and to identify binding affinities to analyze the specialization of the interaction between RARs and PBDEs/OH-PBDEs. The results showed that although these compounds could bind with RARs, the effects of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs on RAR transcriptional activity did not depend on their RAR-binding abilities. The present study is the first attempt to demonstrate that OH-PBDEs could induce RAR transcriptional activity by binding directly with RAR; these effects are possibly related to the structure of the compounds, especially their hydroxylation and bromination. Most of the PBDEs could not directly interact with the RAR. PMID:25077655

  20. Understanding Cardiac Sarcomere Assembly With Zebrafish Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingchun; Shih, Yu-huan; Xu, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in sarcomere genes have been found in many inheritable human diseases, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of sarcomere assembly shall facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of sarcomere-based cardiac disease. Recently, biochemical and genomic studies have identified many new genes encoding proteins that localize to the sarcomere. However, their precise functions in sarcomere assembly and sarcomere-based cardiac disease are unknown. Here, we review zebrafish as an emerging vertebrate model for these studies. We summarize the techniques offered by this animal model to manipulate genes of interest, annotate gene expression, and describe the resulting phenotypes. We survey the sarcomere genes that have been investigated in zebrafish and discuss the potential of applying this in vivo model for larger-scale genetic studies. PMID:25125181

  1. Detection of Smad Signaling in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingfeng; Wang, Qiang; Meng, Anming

    2016-01-01

    Nodal and BMPs play critical roles in germ layer induction and patterning in early zebrafish embryos. Smad2/3 and Smad1/5/8 are intracellular effectors of Nodal and BMPs, respectively. These Smads regulate, in cooperation with other factors, transcription of hundreds of target genes in the nucleus. The activity and stability of Smads are regulated by phosphorylation modifications. To better understand the regulatory network of Smads-mediated signaling and its biological implications, it is necessary to monitor the signaling activity in an in vivo model system. In this chapter, we describe the methods used in zebrafish embryos for dissecting Smads signaling, including TGF-β/Nodal- and BMP-responsive luciferase reporter assays, Western blotting for Smads, co-immunoprecipitation for Smads and their interacting proteins, chromatin-immunoprecipitation for identification of Smad2-binding sites, and immunostaining for detection of active Smad1/5/8. PMID:26520131

  2. Parallel Mechanisms for Visual Search in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Michael J.; Parker, Matthew O.; Tahir, Yasser; Brennan, Caroline H.

    2014-01-01

    Parallel visual search mechanisms have been reported previously only in mammals and birds, and not animals lacking an expanded telencephalon such as bees. Here we report the first evidence for parallel visual search in fish using a choice task where the fish had to find a target amongst an increasing number of distractors. Following two-choice discrimination training, zebrafish were presented with the original stimulus within an increasing array of distractor stimuli. We found that zebrafish exhibit no significant change in accuracy and approach latency as the number of distractors increased, providing evidence of parallel processing. This evidence challenges theories of vertebrate neural architecture and the importance of an expanded telencephalon for the evolution of executive function. PMID:25353168

  3. Zebrafish Hsp70 is required for embryonic lens formation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tyler G.; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Jeffery, William R.; Krone, Patrick H.

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were originally identified as proteins expressed after exposure of cells to environmental stress. Several Hsps were subsequently shown to play roles as molecular chaperones in normal intracellular protein folding and targeting events and to be expressed during discrete periods in the development of several embryonic tissues. However, only recently have studies begun to address the specific developmental consequences of inhibiting Hsp expression to determine whether these molecular chaperones are required for specific developmental events. We have previously shown that the heat-inducible zebrafish hsp70 gene is expressed during a distinct temporal window of embryonic lens formation at normal growth temperatures. In addition, a 1.5-kb fragment of the zebrafish hsp70 gene promoter is sufficient to direct expression of a gfp reporter gene to the lens, suggesting that the hsp70 gene is expressed as part of the normal lens development program. Here, we used microinjection of morpholino-modified antisense oligonucleotides (MOs) to reduce Hsp70 levels during zebrafish development and to show that Hsp70 is required for normal lens formation. Hsp70-MO–injected embryos exhibited a small-eye phenotype relative to wild-type and control-injected animals, with the phenotype discernable during the second day of development. Histological and immunological analysis revealed a small, underdeveloped lens. Numerous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP-fluoroscein nick-end labeling (TUNEL)–positive nuclei appeared in the lens of small-eye embryos after 48 hours postfertilization (hpf), whereas they were no longer apparent in untreated embryos by this age. Lenses transplanted from hsp70-MO–injected embryos into wild-type hosts failed to recover and retained the immature morphology characteristic of the small-eye phenotype, indicating that the lens phenotype is lens autonomous. Our data suggest that the lens defect in hsp70-MO

  4. Regionalized calcium signaling in zebrafish fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H

    2008-01-01

    Fertilization involves an initial, highly localized signal delivered by the sperm, which becomes amplified by a signal transduction cascade to impact the entire oocyte cytoplasm. The zebrafish oocyte presents a unique opportunity to study this process since fertilization always occurs at the micropyle, allowing the investigator to image the earliest steps in the oocyte activation process. The objective of the present study was to characterize the amplification of the sperm-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and test the role of Fyn kinase in this process. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the sperm-induced calcium transient was composed of two elements, one of which was unique to the oocyte cortex and a second, slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. The cortical transient was initiated immediately deep to the micropyle, became amplified at the animal pole, and progressed peripherally through the oocyte cortex. This was followed by a slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. Several lines of evidence indicate that calcium release in these two compartments may be regulated differently. The calcium transient in the oocyte cortex is highly sensitive to inhibition by Fyn-SH2 domain containing fusion proteins, while the central cytoplasmic transient is relatively resistant to this treatment. Oocytes stimulated by injection of a soluble extract prepared from zebrafish sperm respond only with a cortical calcium transient initiated at the micropyle, while oocytes stimulated parthenogenetically by hypotonic shock exhibit a defective cortical transient but a normal transient in the central cytoplasm. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Fyn kinase and the IP3 receptor reveal that these important signaling components are highly enriched in the oocyte cortex, a factor which may facilitate a faster propagation of the calcium transient in this compartment. In summary, analysis of

  5. Cadmium potentiates toxicity of cypermethrin in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Ye, Xiaoqing; He, Buyuan; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Co-occurrence of pesticides such as synthetic pyrethroids and metals in aquatic ecosystems raises concerns over their combined ecological effects. Cypermethrin, 1 of the top 5 synthetic pyrethroids in use, has been extensively detected in surface water. Cadmium (Cd) has been recognized as 1 of the most toxic metals and is a common contaminant in the aquatic system. However, little information is available regarding their joint toxicity. In the present study, combined toxicity of cypermethrin and Cd and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Zebrafish embryos and adults were exposed to the individual contaminant or binary mixtures. Co-exposure to cypermethrin and Cd produced synergistic effects on the occurrence of crooked body, pericardial edema, and noninflation of swim bladder. The addition of Cd significantly potentiated cypermethrin-induced spasms and caused more oxidative stress in zebrafish larvae. Cypermethrin-mediated induction of transcription levels and catalytic activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme were significantly down-regulated by Cd in both zebrafish larvae and adults. Chemical analytical data showed that in vitro elimination of cypermethrin by CYP1A1 was inhibited by Cd. The addition of Cd caused an elevation of in vivo cypermethrin residue levels in the mixture-exposed adult zebrafish. These results suggest that the enhanced toxicity of cypermethrin in the presence of Cd results from the inhibitory effects of Cd on CYP-mediated biotransformation of this pesticide. The authors' findings provide a deeper understanding of the mechanistic basis accounting for the joint toxicity of cypermethrin and Cd. PMID:26267556

  6. Efficacy of UV-C photolysis of bisphenol A on transcriptome alterations of genes in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Asma; Hashmi, Imran; Zare, Ava; Mehrabani-Zeinabad, Mitra; Achari, Gopal; Habibi, Hamid R

    2016-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of UV-C direct photolysis of bisphenol A (BPA) as a remediation method of BPA contamination. We used zebrafish embryos as a model organism to test the toxicity and residual biological activity by measuring cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A), aromatase B (Aro B) and heat shock proteins (HSP-70) transcript levels. The mRNA levels of CYP1A gene increased about two fold while exposure of zebrafish embryos at 72 hpf resulted in significant induction (P = 0.048) of Aro B at 100 µg/L of BPA. Exposure of zebrafish embryos at 72 hpf to increasing concentrations of BPA resulted in significant induction (P = 0.0031) of HSP-70 transcript level. UV treatment of BPA resulted in a significant reduction in toxicity by reducing mortality of zebrafish embryos. The results suggest that UV-C direct photolysis may be an effective method for remediation of BPA contamination. Further studies will be necessary for better understanding of the identity and relative activity of the UV degradation by-products. PMID:27314163

  7. Manipulating Galectin Expression in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chiguang; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; González-Montalbán, Nuria; Wang, Jingyu; Mancini, Justin; Ravindran, Chinnarajan; Ahmed, Hafiz; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for disrupting gene expression are invaluable tools for the analysis of the biological role of a gene product. Because of its genetic tractability and multiple advantages over conventional mammalian models, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is recognized as a powerful system for gaining new insight into diverse aspects of human health and disease. Among the multiple mammalian gene families for which the zebrafish has shown promise as an invaluable model for functional studies, the galectins have attracted great interest due to their participation in early development, regulation of immune hoemostasis, and recognition of microbial pahtogens. Galectins are β-galactosyl-binding lectins with a characteristic sequence motif in their carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs), that constitute an evolutionary conserved family ubiquitous in eukaryotic taxa. Galectins are emerging as key players in the modulation of many important pathological processes, which include acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmunity and cancer, thus making them potential molecular targets for innovative drug discovery. Here, we provide a review of the current methods available for the manipulation of gene expression in the zebrafish, with a focus on gene knockdown [morpholino (MO)-derived antisense oligonucleotides] and knockout (CRISPR-Cas) technologies. PMID:25253151

  8. Single stimulus learning in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    O'Neale, Ashley; Ellis, Joseph; Creton, Robbert; Colwill, Ruth M

    2014-02-01

    Learning about a moving visual stimulus was examined in zebrafish larvae using an automated imaging system and a t1-t2 design. In three experiments, zebrafish larvae were exposed to one of two inputs at t1 (either a gray bouncing disk or an identical but stationary disk) followed by a common test at t2 (the gray bouncing disk). Using 7days post-fertilization (dpf) larvae and 12 stimulus exposures, Experiment 1 established that these different treatments produced differential responding to the moving disk during testing. Larvae familiar with the moving test stimulus were significantly less likely to be still in its presence than larvae that had been exposed to the identical but stationary stimulus. Experiment 2 confirmed this result in 7dpf larvae and extended the finding to 5 and 6dpf larvae. Experiment 3 found differential responding to the moving test stimulus with 4 or 8 stimulus exposures but not with just one exposure in 7dpf larvae. These results provide evidence for learning in very young zebrafish larvae. The merits and challenges of the t1-t2 framework to study learning are discussed. PMID:24012906

  9. CERKL Knockdown Causes Retinal Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Burguera, Demian; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration. PMID:23671706

  10. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Cid, Natasha Del; Bermudez, Andres; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an encapsulated, Gram-positive bacterium that is a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, and an emerging aquaculture pathogen. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a genetically tractable model vertebrate that has been used to analyze the pathogenesis of both aquatic and human bacterial pathogens. We have developed a larval zebrafish model of GBS infection to study bacterial and host factors that contribute to disease progression. GBS infection resulted in dose dependent larval death, and GBS serotype III, ST-17 strain was observed as the most virulent. Virulence was dependent on the presence of the GBS capsule, surface anchored lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and toxin production, as infection with GBS mutants lacking these factors resulted in little to no mortality. Additionally, interleukin-1β il1b and CXCL-8 (cxcl8a) were significantly induced following GBS infection compared to controls. We also visualized GBS outside the brain vasculature, suggesting GBS penetration into the brain during the course of infection. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a valuable model organism to study GBS pathogenesis. PMID:25617657

  11. Standardized Welfare Terms for the Zebrafish Community

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Natasha A.; Blackledge, Samuel; Clark, Bradley; Keeble, Rosemary; Kovacs, Ceri; Murray, Katrina N.; Price, Michael; Thompson, Peter; Bussell, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Managing the welfare of laboratory animals is critical to animal health, vital in the understanding of phenotypes created by treatment or genetic alteration and ensures compliance of regulations. Part of an animal welfare assessment is the requirement to record observations, ensuring all those responsible for the animals are aware of their health status and can act accordingly. Although the use of zebrafish in research continues to increase, guidelines for conducting welfare assessments and the reporting of observations are considered unclear compared to mammalian species. To support the movement of zebrafish between facilities, significant improvement would be achieved through the use of standardized terms to ensure clarity and consistency between facilities. Improving the clarity of terminology around welfare not only addresses our ethical obligation but also supports the research goals and provides a searchable description of the phenotypes. A Collaboration between the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Cambridge University (Department of Medicine-Laboratory of Molecular Biology) has led to the creation of the zebrafish welfare terms from which standardization of terminology can be achieved. PMID:27096380

  12. In vivo imaging of zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Philipp J.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio has emerged as a powerful vertebrate model system that lends itself particularly well to quantitative investigations with live imaging approaches, owing to its exceptionally high optical clarity in embryonic and larval stages. Recent advances in light microscopy technology enable comprehensive analyses of cellular dynamics during zebrafish embryonic development, systematic mapping of gene expression dynamics, quantitative reconstruction of mutant phenotypes and the system-level biophysical study of morphogenesis. Despite these technical breakthroughs, it remains challenging to design and implement experiments for in vivo long-term imaging at high spatio-temporal resolution. This article discusses the fundamental challenges in zebrafish long-term live imaging, provides experimental protocols and highlights key prop1erties and capabilities of advanced fluorescence microscopes. The article focuses in particular on experimental assays based on light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy, an emerging imaging technology that achieves exceptionally high imaging speeds and excellent signal-to-noise ratios, while minimizing light-induced damage to the specimen. This unique combination of capabilities makes light sheet microscopy an indispensable tool for the in vivo long-term imaging of large developing organisms. PMID:23523701

  13. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27085002

  14. Automated analysis of behavior in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Creton, Robbert

    2009-10-12

    Zebrafish larvae have become a popular model system to examine genetic and environmental factors that affect behavior. However, studying complex behavior in large numbers of fish larvae can be challenging. The present study describes a novel high-resolution imaging system that is unique in its ability to automatically analyze the location and orientation of zebrafish larvae in multiwell plates. The system revealed behaviors in zebrafish larvae that would have been missed by more manual approaches, including a preference to face a threatening stimulus from a distance and a clockwise orientation in a two-fish assay. The clockwise orientation of the larvae correlates with a clockwise orientation of molecular structures during early development. Larvae with reversed embryonic asymmetries display a counter-clockwise orientation in the two-fish assay, suggesting that embryonic asymmetry and chiral behavior are regulated by the same developmental mechanisms. The developed imaging techniques may be used in large-scale screens to identify genes, pharmaceuticals, and environmental toxicants that influence complex behaviors. PMID:19409932

  15. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148. PMID:21176202

  16. Zebrafish melanopsin: isolation, tissue localisation and phylogenetic position.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, James; Whitmore, David; Philp, Alisdair R; Wells, Dominic J; Foster, Russell G

    2002-11-15

    Photoreception is best understood in retinal rods and cones, but it is not confined to these cells. In non-mammals, intrinsically photosensitive cells have been identified within several structures including the pineal, hypothalamus and skin. More recently novel light sensitive cells have been identified in the inner/basal retina of both teleosts and rodents. Melanopsin has been proposed as the photopigment mediating many of these non-rod, non-cone responses to light. However, much about the melanopsin gene family remains to be clarified including their potential role as photopigments, and taxonomic distribution. We have isolated the first orthologue of melanopsin from a teleost fish and show expression of this gene in a sub-set of retinal horizontal cells (type B). Zebrafish melanopsin, and orthologues of this gene, differ markedly from the vertebrate photopigment opsins. The putative counterion is not a glutamate but a tyrosine, the putative G-protein binding domain in the third cytoplasmic loop is not conserved, and they show low levels of amino acid identity (approximately 27%) to both the known photopigment opsins and to other members of the melanopsin family. Mouse melanopsin is only 58% identical to Xenopus, and 68% identical to zebrafish. By contrast, the photosensory opsin families show approximately 75% conservation. On the basis of their structure, genomic organisation, discrete evolutionary lineage, and their co-expression with other opsins, the melanopins are not obvious photosensory opsins. They might represent a separate branch of photopigment evolution in the vertebrates or they may have a non-direct photosensory function, perhaps as a photoisomerase, in non-rod, non-cone light detection. PMID:12487121

  17. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders) indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Results Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Conclusions Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms. PMID:22369050

  18. Modular, Easy-to-Assemble, Low-Cost Zebrafish Facility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongcheol; Carlson, Ryan; Zafreen, Lala; Rajpurohit, Surendra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have constructed a standalone, modular, low-cost water recirculation zebrafish facility in our laboratory. This is easy to maintain and will take only approximately $500 and a half a day to build an 80-tank module. The system described here will be useful to even investigators who are new to zebrafish aquaculture. PMID:19694524

  19. A bioenergetic model for zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Sharma, Bibek; Pope, K.L.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed from observed consumption, respiration and growth rates for zebrafish Danio rerio across a range (18-32?? C) of water temperatures, and evaluated with a 50 day laboratory trial at 28?? C. No significant bias in variable estimates was found during the validation trial; namely, predicted zebrafish mass generally agreed with observed mass. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  20. Survival Study of Zebrafish Embryos Under Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Pamela; Allende, Miguel; Morales, José Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Zebrafish embryos have interesting biological properties for the study of human diseases. The present work uses zebrafish embryos in a particular development state, to study biological effects due to gamma radiation, arising from a calibrated 60Co source. Initially, the lethal dose for fish embryos was determined and subsequent irradiations were performed at sub-lethal doses, in order to study more subtle effects.

  1. Host-Pathogen Interactions Made Transparent with the Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish holds much promise as a high-throughput drug screening model for immune-related diseases, including inflammatory and infectious diseases and cancer. This is due to the excellent possibilities for in vivo imaging in combination with advanced tools for genomic and large scale mutant analysis. The context of the embryo’s developing immune system makes it possible to study the contribution of different immune cell types to disease progression. Furthermore, due to the temporal separation of innate immunity from adaptive responses, zebrafish embryos and larvae are particularly useful for dissecting the innate host factors involved in pathology. Recent studies have underscored the remarkable similarity of the zebrafish and human immune systems, which is important for biomedical applications. This review is focused on the use of zebrafish as a model for infectious diseases, with emphasis on bacterial pathogens. Following a brief overview of the zebrafish immune system and the tools and methods used to study host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish, we discuss the current knowledge on receptors and downstream signaling components that are involved in the zebrafish embryo’s innate immune response. We summarize recent insights gained from the use of bacterial infection models, particularly the Mycobacterium marinum model, that illustrate the potential of the zebrafish model for high-throughput antimicrobial drug screening. PMID:21366518

  2. Identifying Structural Alerts Based on Zebrafish Developmental Morphological Toxicity (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish constitute a powerful alternative animal model for chemical hazard evaluation. To provide an in vivo complement to high-throughput screening data from the ToxCast program, zebrafish developmental toxicity screens were conducted on the ToxCast Phase I (Padilla et al., 20...

  3. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  4. Zebrafish as an appealing model for optogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Simmich, Joshua; Staykov, Eric; Scott, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Optogenetics, the use of light-based protein tools, has begun to revolutionize biological research. The approach has proven especially useful in the nervous system, where light has been used both to detect and to manipulate activity in targeted neurons. Optogenetic tools have been deployed in systems ranging from cultured cells to primates, with each offering a particular combination of advantages and drawbacks. In this chapter, we provide an overview of optogenetics in zebrafish. Two of the greatest attributes of the zebrafish model system are external fertilization and transparency in early life stages. Combined, these allow researchers to observe the internal structures of developing zebrafish embryos and larvae without dissections or other interference. This transparency, combined with the animals' small size, simple husbandry, and similarity to mammals in many structures and processes, has made zebrafish a particularly popular model system in developmental biology. The easy optical access also dovetails with optogenetic tools, allowing their use in intact, developing, and behaving animals. This means that optogenetic studies in embryonic and larval zebrafish can be carried out in a high-throughput fashion with relatively simple equipment. As a consequence, zebrafish have been an important proving ground for optogenetic tools and approaches and have already yielded important new knowledge about the neural circuits underlying behavior. Here, we provide a general introduction to zebrafish as a model system for optogenetics. Through descriptions and analyses of important optogenetic studies that have been done in zebrafish, we highlight the advantages and liabilities that the system brings to optogenetic experiments. PMID:22341325

  5. A virtual tour of the Guide for zebrafish users.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Monte; Trevarrow, Bill; Matthews, Jennifer

    2002-03-01

    PHS-funded and AAALAC-accredited facilities are required to use the Guide as the basis for setting up a zebrafish care and use program. The authors describe how they accomplished this task at the University of Oregon Zebrafish Facility. PMID:11923859

  6. Zebrafish models for translational neuroscience research: from tank to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Braubach, Oliver; Spitsbergen, Jan; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is emerging as a new important species for studying mechanisms of brain function and dysfunction. Focusing on selected central nervous system (CNS) disorders (brain cancer, epilepsy, and anxiety) and using them as examples, we discuss the value of zebrafish models in translational neuroscience. We further evaluate the contribution of zebrafish to neuroimaging, circuit level, and drug discovery research. Outlining the role of zebrafish in modeling a wide range of human brain disorders, we also summarize recent applications and existing challenges in this field. Finally, we emphasize the potential of zebrafish models in behavioral phenomics and high-throughput genetic/small molecule screening, which is critical for CNS drug discovery and identifying novel candidate genes. PMID:24726051

  7. Intravenous microinjections of zebrafish larvae to study acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo Cosentino, Chiara; Roman, Beth L; Drummond, Iain A; Hukriede, Neil A

    2010-01-01

    In this video article we describe a zebrafish model of AKI using gentamicin as the nephrotoxicant. The technique consists of intravenous microinjections on 2 dpf zebrafish. This technique represents an efficient and rapid method to deliver soluble substances into the bloodstream of zebrafish larvae, allowing for the injection of 15-20 fish per hour. In addition to AKI studies, this microinjection technique can also be used for other types of experimental studies such as angiography. We provide a detailed protocol of the technique from equipment required to visual measures of decreased kidney function. In addition, we also demonstrate the process of fixation, whole mount immunohistochemistry with a kidney tubule marker, plastic embedding and sectioning of the larval zebrafish. We demonstrate that zebrafish larvae injected with gentamicin show morphological features consistent with AKI: edema, loss of cell polarity in proximal tubular epithelial cells, and morphological disruption of the tubule. PMID:20729805

  8. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish. PMID:24718256

  9. Host-microbe interactions in the developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kanther, Michelle; Rawls, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of recent advances The amenability of the zebrafish to in vivo imaging and genetic analysis has fueled expanded use of this vertebrate model to investigate the molecular and cellular foundations of host-microbe relationships. Study of microbial encounters in zebrafish hosts has concentrated on developing embryonic and larval stages, when the advantages of the zebrafish model are maximized. A comprehensive understanding of these host-microbe interactions requires appreciation of the developmental context into which a microbe is introduced, as well as the effects of that microbial challenge on host ontogeny. In this review, we discuss how in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish has advanced our knowledge of host-microbe interactions in the context of a developing vertebrate host. We focus on recent insights into immune cell ontogeny and function, commensal microbial relationships in the intestine, and microbial pathogenesis in zebrafish hosts. PMID:20153622

  10. Using the zebrafish model for Alzheimer’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Morgan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models have been extensively used to investigate the cause and mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease. Despite many years of intensive research using these models we still lack a detailed understanding of the molecular events that lead to neurodegeneration. Although zebrafish lack the complexity of advanced cognitive behaviors evident in rodent models they have proven to be a very informative model for the study of human diseases. In this review we give an overview of how the zebrafish has been used to study Alzheimer’s disease. Zebrafish possess genes orthologous to those mutated in familial Alzheimer’s disease and research using zebrafish has revealed unique characteristics of these genes that have been difficult to observe in rodent models. The zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model for the investigation of Alzheimer’s disease and will complement studies using other models to help complete our understanding of this disease. PMID:25071820