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Sample records for disc instability dependency

  1. Hydrodynamic instability in eccentric astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2014-12-01

    Eccentric Keplerian discs are believed to be unstable to three-dimensional hydrodynamical instabilities driven by the time-dependence of fluid properties around an orbit. These instabilities could lead to small-scale turbulence, and ultimately modify the global disc properties. We use a local model of an eccentric disc, derived in a companion paper, to compute the non-linear vertical (`breathing mode') oscillations of the disc. We then analyse their linear stability to locally axisymmetric disturbances for any disc eccentricity and eccentricity gradient using a numerical Floquet method. In the limit of small departures from a circular reference orbit, the instability of an isothermal disc is explained analytically. We also study analytically the small-scale instability of an eccentric neutrally stratified polytropic disc with any polytropic index using a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We find that eccentric discs are generically unstable to the parametric excitation of small-scale inertial waves. The non-linear evolution of these instabilities should be studied in numerical simulations, where we expect them to lead to a decay of the disc eccentricity and eccentricity gradient as well as to induce additional transport and mixing. Our results highlight that it is essential to consider the three-dimensional structure of eccentric discs, and their resulting vertical oscillatory flows, in order to correctly capture their evolution.

  2. Hydrodynamic instability in warped astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.; Latter, Henrik N.

    2013-08-01

    Warped astrophysical discs are usually treated as laminar viscous flows, which have anomalous properties when the disc is nearly Keplerian and the viscosity is small: fast horizontal shearing motions and large torques are generated, which cause the warp to evolve rapidly, in some cases at a rate that is inversely proportional to the viscosity. However, these flows are often subject to a linear hydrodynamic instability, which may produce small-scale turbulence and modify the large-scale dynamics of the disc. We use a warped shearing sheet to compute the oscillatory laminar flows in a warped disc and to analyse their linear stability by the Floquet method. We find widespread hydrodynamic instability deriving from the parametric resonance of inertial waves. Even very small, unobservable warps in nearly Keplerian discs of low viscosity can be expected to generate hydrodynamic turbulence, or at least wave activity, by this mechanism.

  3. Characterizing gravitational instability in turbulent multicomponent galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Grisdale, Kearn

    2015-05-01

    Gravitational instabilities play an important role in galaxy evolution and in shaping the interstellar medium (ISM). The ISM is observed to be highly turbulent, meaning that observables like the gas surface density and velocity dispersion depend on the size of the region over which they are measured. In this work, we investigate, using simulations of Milky Way-like disc galaxies with a resolution of ˜ 9 pc, the nature of turbulence in the ISM and how this affects the gravitational stability of galaxies. By accounting for the measured average turbulent scalings of the density and velocity fields in the stability analysis, we can more robustly characterize the average level of stability of the galaxies as a function of scale, and in a straightforward manner identify scales prone to fragmentation. Furthermore, we find that the stability of a disc with feedback-driven turbulence can be well described by a `Toomre-like' Q stability criterion on all scales, whereas the classical Q can formally lose its meaning on small scales if violent disc instabilities occur in models lacking pressure support from stellar feedback.

  4. Bulge Growth Through Disc Instabilities in High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric

    The role of disc instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disc galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges (Chap. 14 10.1007/978-3-319-19378-6_14"). This secular growth of bulges in modern disc galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudobulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disc instabilities at high redshift (z > 1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (1010 to a few 1011 M⊙ of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift discs are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 108-9 M⊙ of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disc evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms on short timescales. The giant clumps can migrate inward and coalesce into the bulge in a few 108 years. The instability in the very turbulent media drives intense gas inflows toward the bulge and nuclear region. Thick discs and supermassive black holes can grow concurrently as a result of the violent instability. This chapter reviews the properties of high-redshift disc instabilities, the evolution of giant clumps and other features associated to the instability, and the resulting growth of bulges and associated sub-galactic components.

  5. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  6. An accretion disc instability induced by a temperature sensitive α parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Balbus, Steven A.

    2014-06-01

    In the standard thin-disc formalism, the dimensionless α parameter is usually assumed to be constant. However, there are good theoretical reasons for believing, as well as evidence from simulations, that α is dependent on intrinsic disc properties. In this paper, we analyse the conditions for the stability of a thin accretion disc in which α is a function of the magnetic Prandtl number, the ratio of collisional viscosity to resistivity. In the inner disc, where the free electron opacity and radiation viscosity dominate, the disc is unstable if α is proportional to the magnetic Prandtl number with an exponent >0.5. This is within the range of values for the power-law index found in magnetohydrodynamic simulations with simple energetics. We calculate the evolution of the unstable disc within the α-formalism and show that the physically accessible solutions form a limit cycle, analogous to the behaviour seen in recurrent dwarf novae. It is noteworthy that the time-dependent global behaviour of the instability results in cyclic heating of the inner section of the disc, when parameters appropriate for an X-ray binary system are used. We calculate a model spectrum of the disc in the flaring and quiescent states and show that the behaviour is compatible with X-ray observations of the thermal accretion disc in flaring X-ray binary systems.

  7. Vortex formation in protoplanetary discs induced by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Nelson, Richard P.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations of idealized protoplanetary discs that examine the formation and evolution of vortices by the vertical shear instability (VSI). In agreement with recent work, we find that discs with radially decreasing temperature profiles and short thermal relaxation time-scales, are subject to the axisymmetric VSI. In three dimensions, the resulting velocity perturbations give rise to quasi-axisymmetric potential vorticity perturbations that break up into discrete vortices, in a manner that is reminiscent of the Rossby wave instability. Discs with very short thermal evolution time-scales (i.e. τ ≤ 0.1 local orbit periods) develop strong vorticity perturbations that roll up into vortices that have small aspect ratios (χ ≤ 2) and short lifetimes (˜ a few orbits). Longer thermal time-scales give rise to vortices with larger aspect ratios (6 ≤ χ ≤ 10), and lifetimes that depend on the entropy gradient. A steeply decreasing entropy profile leads to vortex lifetimes that exceed the simulation run times of hundreds of orbital periods. Vortex lifetimes in discs with positive or weakly decreasing entropy profiles are much shorter, being 10s of orbits at most, suggesting that the subcritical baroclinic instability plays an important role in sustaining vortices against destruction through the elliptical instability. Applied to the outer regions of protoplanetary discs, where the VSI is most likely to occur, our results suggest that vortices formed by the VSI are likely to be short-lived structures.

  8. An Analysis of Burst Disc Pressure Instability

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Robinson; B. C. Odegard, Jr.; N. r. Moody; S. H. Goods

    2000-06-01

    During the development stage of the 1X Acorn burst disc, burst pressure test results exhibited an unexpected increase of 8 to 14% over times of 90--100 days from initial fabrication. This increase is a concern where design constraints require stability. The disc material, 316L stainless steel sheet, is formed to a dome-like geometry and scored to produce a thin-walled, high-strength ligament. The fracture events controlling burst occur in that ligament. Thus it has been characterized both for tensile properties and microstructure through nanoindentation, magnetic measurements, optical and transmission electron microscopy. These results compare favorably with finite element simulation of the properties of the ligament. The ligament exhibits a highly heterogeneous microstructure; its small volume and microstructural heterogeneity make it difficult to identify which microstructural feature controls fracture and hence burst pressure. Bulk mechanical test specimens were fabricated to emulate mid-ligament properties, and aged at both room and elevated temperatures to characterize and accelerate the temporal behavior of the burst disc. Property changes included yield and ultimate tensile strength increases, and fracture strain decreases with aging. Specimens were subjected to a reversion anneal identical to that given the burst disc to eliminate the martensite phase formed during rolling. Reversion-annealed samples exhibited no change in properties in room temperature or accelerated aging, showing that the reversion-anneal eliminated the aging phenomenon. Aging was analyzed in terms of diffusion controlled precipitate growth kinetics, showing that carbon migration to dislocations is consistent with the strength increases. A vacancy-assisted diffusion mechanism for carbon transport is proposed, giving rise to rapid aging, which replaces interstitial carbon diffusion until excess vacancies from deformation are consumed. Mechanical activation parameters in stress relaxation

  9. The magnetorotational instability in debris-disc gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Quentin; Latter, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Debris discs are commonly swathed in gas, which can be observed in UV, in fine structure lines in FIR, and in resolved maps of CO emission. Carbon and oxygen are overabundant in such gas, but it is severely depleted in hydrogen. As a consequence, its ionization fraction is remarkably high, suggesting that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes could be important. In particular, the gas may be subject to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and indeed, recent modelling of β Pictoris requires an anomalous viscosity to explain the gas's observed radial structure. In this paper, we explore the possibility that the MRI is active in debris-disc gas and responsible for the observed mass transport. We find that non-ideal MHD and dust-gas interactions play a subdominant role, and that linear instability is viable at certain radii. However, owing to low gas densities, the outer parts of the disc could be stabilized by a weak ambient magnetic field, though it is difficult to constrain such a field. Even if the MRI is stabilized by too strong a field, a magnetocentrifugal wind may be launched in its place, and this could lead to equivalent (non-turbulent) transport. Numerical simulations of the vertically stratified MRI in conditions appropriate to the debris-disc gas should be able to determine the nature of the characteristic behaviour at different radii, and decide on the importance of the MRI (and MHD more generally) on the evolution of these discs.

  10. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in discs with imposed zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanon, R.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    We conduct a linear stability calculation of an ideal Keplerian flow on which a sinusoidal zonal flow is imposed. The analysis uses the shearing sheet model and is carried out both in isothermal and adiabatic conditions, with and without self-gravity (SG). In the non-SG regime a structure in the potential vorticity (PV) leads to a non-axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability; in the short-wavelength limit its growth rate agrees with the incompressible calculation by Lithwick (2007), which only considers perturbations elongated in the streamwise direction. The instability's strength is analysed as a function of the structure's properties, and zonal flows are found to be stable if their wavelength is ≳ 8H, where H is the disc's scale height, regardless of the value of the adiabatic index γ. The non-axisymmetric KH instability can operate in Rayleigh-stable conditions, and it therefore represents the limiting factor to the structure's properties. Introducing SG triggers a second non-axisymmetric instability, which is found to be located around a PV maximum, while the KH instability is linked to a PV minimum, as expected. In the adiabatic regime, the same gravitational instability is detected even when the structure is present only in the entropy (not in the PV) and the instability spreads to weaker SG conditions as the entropy structure's amplitude is increased. This eventually yields a non-axisymmetric instability in the non-SG regime, albeit of weak strength, localised around an entropy maximum.

  11. Compressive vs Solenoidal Turbulence and Violent Disc Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Inoue, Shigeki; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel

    2015-08-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) exhibit star-formation rates (SFR) 20-100 times higher than local SFGs. This increased SFR is due to much higher gas fractions and surface densities prevalent in high redshift SFG. Such high gas fractions cause the disc to become violently unstable and undergo a phase of violent disc instability (VDI). During the VDI phase, there is rapid inflow of gas towards the galactic centre with inflow times comparable to the disc orbital time, which can lead to a compact "blue nugget". In addition, giant ~kpc scale star-forming clumps are formed, the most massive of which survive dtellar feedback and migrate towards the centre, where they coalesce in the growing bulge. While the existence of giant clumps is commonly associated with Toomre instability, high resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation show that active clump formation occurs even in regions where the Toomre Q parameter is well above the threshold for stability. The simulations suggest instead a non-linear instability, where frequent minor mergers and intense inflow by cold streams increase the compressive mode of turbulence relative to the solenoidal mode. We find this can induce clump formation even in regions that should be stable according to linear Toomre theory. Thus we show that mergers, smooth accretion from the cosmic web and VDI all go hand in hand in driving galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  12. Stellar motion induced by gravitational instabilities in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, R. H.

    2010-07-01

    We test the effect of assumptions about stellar motion on the behaviour of gravitational instabilities (GIs) in protoplanetary discs around solar-type stars by performing two simulations that are identical in all respects except the treatment of the star. In one simulation, the star is assumed to remain fixed at the centre of the inertial reference frame. In the other, stellar motion is handled properly by including an indirect potential in the hydrodynamic equations to model the star's reference frame as one which is accelerated by star/disc interactions. The discs in both simulations orbit a solar mass star, initially extend from 2.3 to 40 au with a ϖ-1/2 surface density profile, and have a total mass of 0.14 Msolar. The γ = 5/3 ideal gas is assumed to cool everywhere with a constant cooling time of two outer rotation periods. The overall behaviour of the disc evolution is similar, except for weakening in various measures of GI activity by about at most tens of per cent for the indirect potential case. Overall conclusions about disc evolution in earlier papers by our group, where the star was always assumed to be fixed in an inertial frame, remain valid. There is no evidence for independent one-armed instabilities, like the Stimulation by the Long-range Interaction of Newtonian Gravity (SLING), in either simulation. On the other hand, the stellar motion about the system centre of mass (COM) in the simulation with the indirect potential is substantial, up to 0.25 au during the burst phase, as GIs initiate, and averaging about 0.9 au during the asymptotic phase, when the GIs reach an overall balance of heating and cooling. These motions appear to be a stellar response to non-linear interactions between discrete global spiral modes in both the burst and asymptotic phases of the evolution, and the star's orbital motion about the COM reflects the orbit periods of disc material near the corotation radii of the dominant spiral waves. This motion is, in principle

  13. Disc instability models for X-ray transients: evidence for evaporation and low α-viscosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen; Hameury, Jean-Marie; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Narayan, Ramesh

    2000-05-01

    We construct time-dependent models of accretion discs around black holes and neutron stars. We investigate the effect that evaporation of the inner disc regions during quiescence has upon the predictions of the disc instability model (DIM) for these systems. We do not include irradiation of the disc in the models. Removing the inner, most unstable, parts of the accretion disc increases the predicted recurrence times. However, DIMs with values of the viscosity parameter αhot~0.1 and αcold~0.02 (values typically used in applications of the DIM to standard dwarf nova outbursts) fail to reproduce the long recurrence times of soft X-ray transients (unless we resort to fine-tuning the parameters), independent of the evaporation strength. We show that models in which evaporation is included and a smaller value of αcold (~0.005) used do reproduce the long recurrence times and the accretion rates at the level of the Eddington rate observed in outburst. The large difference between the values of αhot and αcold, if confirmed once disc irradiation is included, suggests that several viscosity mechanisms operate in these accretion discs. For some parameter sets our models predict re-flares during the decline from outburst. The re-flares are a physical property of the model and result from the formation of a heating front in the wake of an initial cooling front, and subsequent multiple front reflections. The re-flares disappear in low-α models where front reflection cannot occur.

  14. A new inclination instability reshapes Keplerian discs into cones: application to the outer Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie; McCourt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Discs of bodies orbiting a much more massive central object are extremely common in astrophysics. When the orbits comprising such discs are eccentric, we show they are susceptible to a new dynamical instability. Gravitational forces between bodies in the disc drive exponential growth of their orbital inclinations and clustering in their angles of pericentre, expanding an initially thin disc into a conical shape by giving each orbit an identical `tilt' with respect to the disc plane. This new instability dynamically produces the unusual distribution of orbits observed for minor planets beyond Neptune, suggesting that the instability has shaped the outer Solar system. It also implies a large disc mass (˜ 1-10 Earth masses) of scattered bodies at hundreds of AU; we predict increasing numbers of detections of minor planets clustered in their angles of pericentre with high inclinations.

  15. Dependence of optic disc parameters on disc area according to Heidelberg Retina Tomograph: Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhin, V.; Manaenkova, G.; Bondarenko, O.

    2007-05-01

    With the help of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT-II) optic disc parameters in 211 eyes of 115 healthy patients with refraction Em +/- 3,0 D and 96 eyes of 72 patients with myopia 3,5-14,0 D without any signs of glaucoma were studied. Analysis of optic disc parameters were carried out in 5 groups of patients according to disc area: less than 1,5 mm2, 1,5- 2,5 mm2, 2,5-3,0 mm2, 3,0-3,5 mm2 and more than 3,5 mm2. An accurate depending on disc area was revealed for all optic disc parameters in all sectors, which was manifested by increasing cup disc and rim disc (area and volume) and other parameters. We consider it is necessary to use the proper tables for right interpretation of received data for early diagnosis of glaucoma.

  16. Non-linear violent disc instability with high Toomre's Q in high-redshift clumpy disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; Bournaud, Frédéric; Primack, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We utilize zoom-in cosmological simulations to study the nature of violent disc instability in clumpy galaxies at high redshift, z = 1-5. Our simulated galaxies are not in the ideal state assumed in Toomre instability, of linear fluctuations in an isolated, uniform, rotating disc. There, instability is characterized by a Q parameter below unity, and lower when the disc is thick. Instead, the high-redshift discs are highly perturbed. Over long periods they consist of non-linear perturbations, compact massive clumps and extended structures, with new clumps forming in interclump regions. This is while the galaxy is subject to frequent external perturbances. We compute the local, two-component Q parameter for gas and stars, smoothed on a ˜1 kpc scale to capture clumps of 108-9 M⊙. The Q < 1 regions are confined to collapsed clumps due to the high surface density there, while the interclump regions show Q significantly higher than unity. Tracing the clumps back to their relatively smooth Lagrangian patches, we find that Q prior to clump formation typically ranges from unity to a few. This is unlike the expectations from standard Toomre instability. We discuss possible mechanisms for high-Q clump formation, e.g. rapid turbulence decay leading to small clumps that grow by mergers, non-axisymmetric instability, or clump formation induced by non-linear perturbations in the disc. Alternatively, the high-Q non-linear VDI may be stimulated by the external perturbations such as mergers and counter-rotating streams. The high Q may represent excessive compressive modes of turbulence, possibly induced by tidal interactions.

  17. Gravitational instabilities in a protosolar-like disc - I. Dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. G.; Ilee, J. D.; Boley, A. C.; Caselli, P.; Durisen, R. H.; Hartquist, T. W.; Rawlings, J. M. C.

    2015-10-01

    To date, most simulations of the chemistry in protoplanetary discs have used 1 + 1D or 2D axisymmetric α-disc models to determine chemical compositions within young systems. This assumption is inappropriate for non-axisymmetric, gravitationally unstable discs, which may be a significant stage in early protoplanetary disc evolution. Using 3D radiative hydrodynamics, we have modelled the physical and chemical evolution of a 0.17 M⊙ self-gravitating disc over a period of 2000 yr. The 0.8 M⊙ central protostar is likely to evolve into a solar-like star, and hence this Class 0 or early Class I young stellar object may be analogous to our early Solar system. Shocks driven by gravitational instabilities enhance the desorption rates, which dominate the changes in gas-phase fractional abundances for most species. We find that at the end of the simulation, a number of species distinctly trace the spiral structure of our relatively low-mass disc, particularly CN. We compare our simulation to that of a more massive disc, and conclude that mass differences between gravitationally unstable discs may not have a strong impact on the chemical composition. We find that over the duration of our simulation, successive shock heating has a permanent effect on the abundances of HNO, CN and NH3, which may have significant implications for both simulations and observations. We also find that HCO+ may be a useful tracer of disc mass. We conclude that gravitational instabilities induced in lower mass discs can significantly, and permanently, affect the chemical evolution, and that observations with high-resolution instruments such as Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) offer a promising means of characterizing gravitational instabilities in protosolar discs.

  18. Supermassive star formation via episodic accretion: protostellar disc instability and radiative feedback efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Hosokawa, T.; Yoshida, N.; Omukai, K.; Yorke, H. W.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of supermassive stars (SMSs) is a potential pathway to seed supermassive black holes in the early universe. A critical issue for forming SMSs is stellar UV feedback, which may limit the stellar mass growth via accretion. In this paper, we study the evolution of an accreting SMS and its UV emissivity with realistic variable accretion from a circumstellar disc. First we conduct a 2D hydrodynamical simulation to follow the protostellar accretion until the stellar mass exceeds 104 M⊙. The disc fragments by gravitational instability, creating many clumps that migrate inward to fall on to the star. The resulting accretion history is highly time-dependent: short episodic accretion bursts are followed by longer quiescent phases. We show that the disc for the direct collapse model is more unstable and generates greater variability than normal Pop III cases. Next, we conduct a stellar evolution calculation using the obtained accretion history. Our results show that, regardless of the variable accretion, the stellar radius monotonically increases with almost constant effective temperature at Teff ≃ 5000 K as the stellar mass increases. The resulting UV feedback is too weak to hinder accretion due to the low flux of stellar UV photons. The insensitivity of stellar evolution to variable accretion is attributed to the fact that time-scales of variability, ≲103 yr, are too short to affect the stellar structure. We argue that this evolution will continue until the SMS collapses to produce a black hole by the general relativistic instability after the mass reaches ≳105 M⊙.

  19. On the effect of cosmological inflow on turbulence and instability in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genel, Shy; Dekel, Avishai; Cacciato, Marcello

    2012-09-01

    We analyse the evolution of turbulence and gravitational instability of a galactic disc in a quasi-steady state governed by cosmological inflow. We focus on the possibility that the coupling between the in-streaming gas and the disc is maximal, e.g. via dense clumps, and ask whether the streams could be the driver of turbulence in an unstable disc with a Toomre parameter Q ˜ 1. Our fiducial model assumes an efficiency of ˜0.5 per dynamical time for the decay of turbulence energy, and ˜0.02 for each of the processes that depletes the disc gas, i.e. star formation, outflow and inflow within the disc into a central bulge. In this case, the in-streaming drives a ratio of turbulent to rotation velocity σ/V ˜ 0.2-0.3, which at z ˜ 2 induces an instability with Q ˜ 1, both as observed. However, in conflict with observations, this model predicts that σ/V remains constant with time, independent of the cosmological accretion rate, because mass and turbulence have the same external source. Such strongly coupled cosmological inflow tends to stabilize the disc at low z, with Q ˜ a few, which may be consistent with observations. The instability could instead be maintained for longer, with a properly declining σ/V, if it is self-regulated to oscillations about Q ≈ 1 by a duty cycle for disc depletion. However, the 'off' phases of this duty cycle become long at low z, which may be hard to reconcile with observations. Alternatively, the coupling between the in-streaming gas and the disc may weaken in time, reflecting an evolving nature of the accretion. If, instead, that coupling is weak at all times, the likely energy source for self-regulated stirring up of the turbulence is the inflow within the disc down the potential gradient (studied in a companion paper).

  20. Two-dimensional models of layered protoplanetary discs - I. The ring instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, R.; Klahr, H.; Różyczka, M.

    2005-09-01

    In this work we use the radiation-hydrodynamic code TRAMP to perform a two-dimensional axially symmetric model of the layered disc. Using this model we follow the accumulation of mass in the dead zone due to the radially varying accretion rate. We find a new type of instability which causes the dead zone to split into rings. This `ring instability' works due to the positive feedback between the thickness of the dead zone and the mass accumulation rate. We give an analytical description of this instability, taking into account the non-zero thickness of the dead zone and deviations from the Keplerian rotational velocity. The analytical model agrees reasonably well with the results of numerical simulations. Finally, we speculate concerning the possible role of the ring instability in protoplanetary discs and in the formation of planets.

  1. Material property discontinuities in intervertebral disc porohyperelastic finite element models generate numerical instabilities due to volumetric strain variations.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Noailly, J; Lacroix, D

    2013-10-01

    Numerical studies of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are important to better understand the load transfer and the mechanobiological processes within the disc. Among the relevant calculations, fluid-related outputs are critical to describe and explore accurately the tissue properties. Porohyperelastic finite element models of IVD can describe accurately the disc behaviour at the organ level and allow the inclusion of fluid effects. However, results may be affected by numerical instabilities when fast load rates are applied. We hypothesized that such instabilities would appear preferentially at material discontinuities such as the annulus-nucleus boundary and should be considered when testing mesh convergence. A L4-L5 IVD model including the nucleus, annulus and cartilage endplates were tested under pure rotational loads, with different levels of mesh refinement. The effect of load relaxation and swelling were also studied. Simulations indicated that fluid velocity oscillations appeared due to numerical instability of the pore pressure spatial derivative at material discontinuities. Applying local refinement only was not enough to eliminate these oscillations. In fact, mesh refinements had to be local, material-dependent, and supplemented by the creation of a material transition zone, including interpolated material properties. Results also indicated that oscillations vanished along load relaxation, and faster attenuation occurred with the incorporation of the osmotic pressure. We concluded that material discontinuities are a major cause of instability for poromechanical calculations in multi-tissue models when load velocities are simulated. A strategy was presented to address these instabilities and recommendations on the use of IVD porohyperelastic models were given. PMID:23796430

  2. Fingering instability in the flow of a power-law fluid on a rotating disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Akash; Doshi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    A computational study of the flow of a non-Newtonian power law fluid on a spinning disc is considered here. The main goal of this work is to examine the effect of non-Newtonian nature of the fluid on the flow development and associated contact line instability. The governing mass and momentum balance equations are simplified using the lubrication theory. The resulting model equation is a fourth order non-linear PDE which describes the spatial and temporal evolutions of film thickness. The movement of the contact line is modeled using a constant angle slip model. To solve this moving boundary problem, a numerical method is developed using a Galerkin/finite element method based approach. The numerical results show that the spreading rate of the fluid strongly depends on power law exponent n. It increases with the increase in the shear thinning character of the fluid (n < 1) and decreases with the increase in shear thickening nature of the fluid (n > 1). It is also observed that the capillary ridge becomes sharper with the value of n. In order to examine the stability of these ridges, a linear stability theory is also developed for these power law fluids. The dispersion relationship depicting the growth rate for a given wave number has been reported and compared for different power-law fluids. It is found that the growth rate of the instability decreases as the fluid becomes more shear thinning in nature, whereas it increases for more shear thickening fluids.

  3. Linear and non-linear theory of a parametric instability of hydrodynamic warps in Keplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Goodman, Jeremy; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2000-11-01

    We consider the stability of warping modes in Keplerian discs. We find them to be parametrically unstable using two lines of attack, one based on three-mode couplings and the other on Floquet theory. We confirm the existence of the instability and investigate its non-linear development in three dimensions, via numerical experiment. The most rapidly growing non-axisymmetric disturbances are the most nearly axisymmetric (low-m) ones. Finally, we offer a simple, somewhat speculative model for the interaction of the parametric instability with the warp. We apply this model to the masing disc in NGC 4258 and show that, provided the warp is not forced too strongly, parametric instability can fix the amplitude of the warp.

  4. Drag-driven instability of a dust layer in a magnetized protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Oudi, Razieh; Rastegarzade, Gohar

    2016-09-01

    We study drag-driven instability in a protoplanetary disc consisting of a layer of single-sized dust particles which are coupled to the magnetized gas aerodynamically and the particle-to-gas feedback is included. We find a dispersion relation for axisymmetric linear disturbances and growth rate of the unstable modes are calculated numerically. While the secular gravitational instability in the absence of particle-togas feedback predicts the dust layer is unstable, magnetic fields significantly amplify the instability if the Toomre parameter for the gas component is fixed. We also show that even a weak magnetic field is able to amplify the instability more or less irrespective of the dust-gas coupling.

  5. Rossby wave instability and long-term evolution of dead zones in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Ryan; Lai, Dong; Méheut, Héloïse

    2016-04-01

    The physical mechanism of angular momentum transport in poorly ionized regions of protoplanetary discs, the dead zones (DZs), is not understood. The presence of a DZ naturally leads to conditions susceptible to the Rossby wave instability (RWI), which produces vortices and spiral density waves that may revive the DZ and be responsible for observed large-scale disc structures. We present a series of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the role of the RWI in DZs, including its impact on the long-term evolution of the disc and its morphology. The non-linear RWI can generate Reynolds stresses (effective α parameter) as large as 0.01-0.05 in the DZ, helping to sustain quasi-steady accretion throughout the disc. It also produces novel disc morphologies, including azimuthal asymmetries with m = 1, 2, and atypical vortex shapes. The angular momentum transport strength and morphology are most sensitive to two parameters: the radial extent of the DZ and the disc viscosity. The largest Reynolds stresses are produced when the radial extent of the DZ is less than its distance to the central star. Such narrow DZs lead to a single vortex or two coherent antipodal vortices in the quasi-steady state. The edges of wider DZs evolve separately, resulting in two independent vortices and reduced angular momentum transport efficiency. In either case, we find that, because of the Reynolds stresses generated by the non-linear RWI, gravitational instability is unlikely to play a role in angular momentum transport across the DZ, unless the accretion rate is sufficiently high.

  6. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete on to Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, `SPHS'. We find that the `cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments break up into bound, physically motivated clumps that form stars. The filaments are overdense by a factor of 10-100 compared to the surrounding gas, suggesting that the fragmentation results from a physical non-linear instability driven by the overdensity. This `fragmenting filament' mode of disc growth has important implications for galaxy formation, in particular the role of star formation in bringing cold gas into disc galaxies.

  7. The effect of self-gravity on vortex instabilities in disc-planet interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of disc self-gravity on instabilities associated with gaps opened by a giant Saturn mass planet in a protoplanetary disc that lead to the formation of vortices. We also study the non-linear evolution of the vortices when this kind of instability occurs in a self-gravitating disc as well as the potential effect on type III planetary migration due to angular momentum exchange via co-orbital flows. It is shown analytically and is confirmed through linear calculations that vortex-forming modes with low azimuthal mode number, m, are stabilized by the effect of self-gravity if the background structure is assumed fixed. However, the disc’s self-gravity also affects the background gap surface density profile in a way that destabilizes modes with high m. Linear calculations show that the combined effect of self-gravity through its effect on the background structure and its direct effect on the linear modes shifts the most rapidly growing vortex mode to higher m. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaps opened by a Saturn mass planet show more vortices develop with increasing disc mass and therefore importance of self-gravity. For sufficiently large disc mass the vortex instability is suppressed, consistent with analytical expectations. In this case a new global instability develops instead. In the non-linear regime, we found that vortex merging is in general increasingly delayed as the disc mass increases and in some cases multiple vortices persist until the end of simulations. For massive discs in which the vortices merge, the post-merger vortex is localized in azimuth and has similar structure to a Kida-like vortex. This is unlike the case without self-gravity where vortices merge to form a larger vortex extended in azimuth. In order to study the properties of the vortex systems without the influence of the planet, we also performed a series of supplementary simulations of co-orbital Kida-like vortices. We found that self-gravity enables Kida-like vortices

  8. Turbulence in Accretion Discs. The Global Baroclinic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Bodenheimer, Peter

    The transport of angular momentum away from the central object is a sufficient condition for a protoplanetary disk to accrete matter onto the star and spin it down. Magnetic fields cannot be of importance for this process in a large part of the cold and dusty disk where the planets supposedly form. Our new hypothesis on the angular momentum transport based on radiation hydro simulations is as follows: We present the global baroclinic instability as a source for vigorous turbulence leading to angular momentum transport in Keplerian accretion disks. We show by analytical considerations and three-dimensional radiation hydro simulations that, in particular, protoplanetary disks have a negative radial entropy gradient, which makes them baroclinic. Two-dimensional numerical simulations show that this baroclinic flow is unstable and produces turbulence. These findings are currently tested for numerical effects by performing barotropic simulations which show that imposed turbulence rapidly decays. The turbulence in baroclinic disks draws energy from the background shear, transports angular momentum outward and creates a radially inward bound accretion of matter, thus forming a self consistent process. Gravitational energy is transformed into turbulent kinetic energy, which is then dissipated, as in the classical accretion paradigm. We measure accretion rates in 2D and 3D simulations of dot M= - 10-9 to -10-7 Msolar yr-1 and viscosity parameters of α = 10-4 - 10-2, which fit perfectly together and agree reasonably with observations. The turbulence creates pressure waves, Rossby waves, and vortices in the (r-φ) plane of the disk. We demonstrate in a global simulation that these vortices tend to form out of little background noise and to be long-lasting features, which have already been suggested to lead to the formation of planets.

  9. Long-term quasi-periodicity of 4U 1636-536 resulting from accretion disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewicz, Mateusz; Zdziarski, Andrzej; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Rosinska, Dorota; Slowikowska, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of a study of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-536. We have performed temporal analysis of all available RXTE/ASM, RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT and MAXI data. We have confirmed the previously discovered quasi-periodicity of ˜45 d present during ˜2004, however we found it continued to 2006. At other epochs, the quasi-periodicity is only transient, and the quasi-period, if present, drifts. We have then applied a time-dependent accretion disc model to the interval with the significant X-ray quasi-periodicity. For our best model, the period and the amplitude of the theoretical light curve agree well with that observed. The modelled quasi-periodicity is due to the hydrogen thermal-ionization instability occurring in outer regions of the accretion disc. The model parameters are the average mass accretion rate (estimated from the light curves), and the accretion disc viscosity parameters, α_{cold} and α_{hot}, for the hot and cold phases, respectively. Our best model gives relatively low values of α_{cold} and α_{hot}.

  10. Early formation of massive, compact, spheroidal galaxies with classical profiles by violent disc instability or mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Tweed, Dylan; Primack, Joel

    2015-03-01

    We address the formation of massive stellar spheroids between redshifts z = 4 and 1 using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement hydrocosmological simulations. The spheroids form as bulges, and the spheroid mass growth is partly driven by violent disc instability (VDI) and partly by mergers. A kinematic decomposition to disc and spheroid yields that the mass fraction in the spheroid is between 50 and 90 per cent and is roughly constant in time, consistent with a cosmological steady state of VDI discs that are continuously fed from the cosmic web. The density profile of the spheroid is typically `classical', with a Sérsic index n = 4.5 ± 1, independent of whether it grew by mergers or VDI and independent of the feedback strength. The disc is characterized by n = 1.5 ± 0.5, and the whole galaxy by n = 3 ± 1. The high-redshift spheroids are compact due to the dissipative inflow of gas and the high universal density. The stellar surface density within the effective radius of each galaxy as it evolves remains roughly constant in time after its first growth. For galaxies of a fixed stellar mass, the surface density is higher at higher redshifts.

  11. Predicted influence of materials' thermal properties on disc brake roughness due to thermoelastic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, R.L.; Hartsock, D.L.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.

    1999-07-01

    Passenger car disc brakes occasionally exhibit objectionable vibration during operation. Low frequency vibration (< 100 Hz) that occurs when the brakes are applied is called brake roughness or judder and is caused by a variation in torque at the friction interface. Brale torque variation can result from disc thickness variation and/or thermal distortions. Thermal distortions or hot spots may occur during a long brake drag such as a mountain descent due to the onset of a phenomenon known as frictionally excited thermoelastic instability (TEI). Models of TEI can be used to predict the propensity of a brake system to generate torque variation or roughness during long brake drags. TEI modeling requires accurate materials properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, density and thermal expansion of both the disc and the brake pad materials. The authors have measured the thermal transport properties of a series of disc materials, gray cast irons and aluminum metal matrix composites, and commercially available brake pad friction materials. For example, room temperature thermal diffusivity measured by the laser flash technique was found to vary from 0.002--0.009 cm{sup 2}/sec for friction materials, 0.15--0.21 cm{sup 2}/sec for gray cast irons, and 0.43--0.89 cm{sup 2}/sec for aluminum metal matrix composites (Al MMCs). This paper will consider the behavior of Al MMC rotors versus traditional gray cast iron rotors coupled with a non-asbestos organic brake pad. The relevant materials properties were used in a TEI analytical model of a mid-sized passenger car disc brake. The analysis shows that Al MMC rotors have a lower critical speed at which TEI is predicted to occur than gray cast iron rotors.

  12. On different types of instabilities in black hole accretion discs: implications for X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Czerny, Bożena

    2011-07-01

    We discuss two important instability mechanisms that may lead to the limit-cycle oscillations of the luminosity of the accretion discs around compact objects: ionization instability and radiation pressure instability. Ionization instability is well established as a mechanism of X-ray novae eruptions in black hole binary systems, but its applicability to active galactic nuclei (AGN) is still problematic. Radiation pressure theory has still a very weak observational background in any of these sources. In this paper, we attempt to confront the parameter space of these instabilities with the observational data. At the basis of this simple survey of sources properties, we argue that the radiation pressure instability is likely to be present in several Galactic sources with the Eddington ratios being above 0.15 and in AGN with the Eddington ratio above 0.025. Our results favour the parametrization of the viscosity through the geometrical mean of the radiation and gas pressure in both Galactic sources and AGN. More examples of the quasi-regular outbursts in the time-scales of 100 s in Galactic sources and hundreds of years in AGN are needed to formulate firm conclusions. We also show that the disc sizes in the X-ray novae are consistent with the ionization instability. This instability may also considerably influence the lifetime cycle and overall complexity in the supermassive black hole environment.

  13. Counter-rotating stellar discs around a massive black hole: self-consistent, time-dependent dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, J. R.; Sridhar, S.

    2012-07-01

    We formulate the collisionless Boltzmann equation for dense star clusters that lie within the radius of influence of a massive black hole in galactic nuclei. Our approach to these nearly Keplerian systems follows that of Sridhar & Touma: Delaunay canonical variables are used to describe stellar orbits and we average over the fast Keplerian orbital phases. The stellar distribution function (DF) evolves on the longer time-scale of precessional motions, whose dynamics is governed by a Hamiltonian, given by the orbit-averaged self-gravitational potential of the cluster. We specialize to razor-thin, planar discs and consider two counter-rotating ('±') populations of stars. To describe discs of small eccentricities, we expand the ± Hamiltonian to fourth order in the eccentricities, with coefficients that depend self-consistently on the ± DFs. We construct approximate ± dynamical invariants and use Jeans' theorem to construct time-dependent ± DFs, which are completely described by their centroid coordinates and shape matrices. When the centroid eccentricities are larger than the dispersion in eccentricities, the ± centroids obey a set of four autonomous equations ordinary differential equations. We show that these can be cast as a two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system which is non-linear, yet integrable. We study the linear instability of initially circular discs and derive a criterion for the counter-rotating instability. We then explore the rich non-linear dynamics of counter-rotating discs, with focus on the variety of steadily precessing eccentric configurations that are allowed. The stability and properties of these configurations are studied as functions of parameters such as the disc mass ratios and angular momentum.

  14. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-15

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  15. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  16. Effects of eccentric phase difference between two discs on oil-film instability in a rotor-bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhao, Xueyan; Niu, Heqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2013-12-01

    The operating speed of the rotating machinery often exceeds the second order or even higher order critical speeds to pursue higher efficiency. Thus, the second mode whirl/whip can appear when the operating speeds approach or exceed twice the second order critical speed according to the reference A. Muszynska (2005) [1]. In this study, we investigate how the eccentric phase difference between two discs influence the oil-film instability (the first/second mode whirl/whip) in a rotor-bearing system. Firstly, a lumped mass model with 20 degrees of freedom (DOFs) of a rotor system with two discs considering the gyroscopic effect is developed. The graphite bearing and sliding bearing are simulated by a spring-damping model and a nonlinear oil-film force model based on the assumption of short bearings, respectively. The research focuses on the effect of eccentric phase differences of two discs on the onset of instability and nonlinear responses of the rotor-bearing system by using the bifurcation diagrams, spectrum cascades, vibration waveforms, orbits and Poincaré maps. The results show that the instability speed increases when the eccentric phase difference becomes larger and it increases almost linearly when the eccentric phase difference is greater than 20°. Moreover, complicated combination frequency components related to the first and second mode whirl/whip frequencies are also excited and the transfer of the self-excited vibration energy between the first and second mode whips can be observed under a larger eccentric phase difference. The study may contribute to a further understanding of the oil-film instability of such a rotor-bearing system.

  17. Exact time-dependent solutions for the thin accretion disc equation: boundary conditions at finite radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu

    2011-01-01

    We discuss Green's function solutions of the equation for a geometrically thin, axisymmetric Keplerian accretion disc with a viscosity prescription ν∝Rn. The mathematical problem was solved by Lynden-Bell & Pringle for the special cases with boundary conditions of zero-viscous torque and zero mass flow at the disc centre. While it has been widely established that the observational appearance of astrophysical discs depends on the physical size of the central object(s), exact time-dependent solutions with boundary conditions imposed at finite radius have not been published for a general value of the power-law index n. We derive exact Green's function solutions that satisfy either a zero-torque or a zero-flux condition at a non-zero inner boundary Rin > 0, for an arbitrary initial surface density profile. Whereas the viscously dissipated power diverges at the disc centre for the previously known solutions with Rin= 0, the new solutions with Rin > 0 have finite expressions for the disc luminosity that agree, in the limit t→∞, with standard expressions for steady-state disc luminosities. The new solutions are applicable to the evolution of the innermost regions of thin accretion discs.

  18. Dynamical instabilities in density-dependent hadronic relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. M.; Brito, L.; Providencia, C.

    2008-04-15

    Unstable modes in asymmetric nuclear matter (ANM) at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field density-dependent hadron models. The size of the instabilities that drive the system are calculated and a comparison with results obtained within the nonlinear Walecka model is presented. The distillation and antidistillation effects are discussed.

  19. Dose-Dependent Response of Tissue-Engineered Intervertebral Discs to Dynamic Unconfined Compressive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Katherine D.; Mozia, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the limitations of current surgical methods in the treatment of degenerative disc disease, tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (TE-IVDs) have become an important target. This study investigated the biochemical and mechanical responses of composite TE-IVDs to dynamic unconfined compression. TE-IVDs were manufactured by floating an injection molded alginate nucleus pulposus (NP) in a type I collagen annulus fibrosus (AF) that was allowed to contract for 2 weeks before loading. The discs were mechanically stimulated at a range of strain amplitude (1–10%) for 2 weeks with a duty cycle of 1 h on–1 h off–1 h on before being evaluated for their biochemical and mechanical properties. Mechanical loading increased all properties in a dose-dependent manner. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) increased between 2.8 and 2.2 fold in the AF and NP regions, respectively, whereas the hydroxyproline content increased between 1.2 and 1.8 fold. The discs also experienced a 2-fold increase in the equilibrium modulus and a 4.3-fold increase in the instantaneous modulus. Full effects for all properties were seen by 5% strain amplitude. These data suggest that dynamic loading increases the functionality of our TE-IVDs with region-dependent responses using a method that may be scaled up to larger disc models to expedite maturation for implantation. PMID:25277703

  20. Dependence of mechanical behavior of the murine tail disc on regional material properties: a parametric finite element study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Adam H; Wagner, Diane R; Cheng, Louis Y; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2005-12-01

    In vivo rodent tail models are becoming more widely used for exploring the role of mechanical loading on the initiation and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. Historically, finite element models (FEMs) have been useful for predicting disc mechanics in humans. However, differences in geometry and tissue properties may limit the predictive utility of these models for rodent discs. Clearly, models that are specific for rodent tail discs and accurately simulate the disc's transient mechanical behavior would serve as important tools for clarifying disc mechanics in these animal models. An FEM was developed based on the structure, geometry, and scale of the mouse tail disc. Importantly, two sources of time-dependent mechanical behavior were incorporated: viscoelasticity of the matrix, and fluid permeation. In addition, a novel strain-dependent swelling pressure was implemented through the introduction of a dilatational stress in nuclear elements. The model was then validated against data from quasi-static tension-compression and compressive creep experiments performed previously using mouse tail discs. Finally, sensitivity analyses were performed in which material parameters of each disc subregion were individually varied. During disc compression, matrix consolidation was observed to occur preferentially at the periphery of the nucleus pulposus. Sensitivity analyses revealed that disc mechanics was greatly influenced by changes in nucleus pulposus material properties, but rather insensitive to variations in any of the endplate properties. Moreover, three key features of the model-nuclear swelling pressure, lamellar collagen viscoelasticity, and interstitial fluid permeation-were found to be critical for accurate simulation of disc mechanics. In particular, collagen viscoelasticity dominated the transient behavior of the disc during the initial 2200 s of creep loading, while fluid permeation governed disc deformation thereafter. The FEM developed in this

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behaviour of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as {N}, likewise for effective radius we use {R}. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of {N}. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of {R} (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  2. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-05-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behavior of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as N, likewise for effective radius we use R. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of N. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of R (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  3. Cognitive control moderates the association between emotional instability and alcohol dependence symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Brittany L; Dvorak, Robert D; Kuvaas, Nicholas J; Williams, Thomas J; Spaeth, Destini T

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has linked emotional instability with problematic alcohol use. This may be a function of increased "hot" information processing (which is relatively automatic in nature and highly influenced by emotional states) for individuals with more emotional instability. According to dual-process models, cognitive control may attenuate the impact of emotional instability by preventing an overreliance on hot information processing. It was hypothesized that emotional instability would be positively associated with alcohol-related consequences, but that cognitive control would moderate this association. Participants were undergraduate students (n = 80) who endorsed drinking at moderate levels. Participants completed laboratory assessments of emotional instability, alcohol use and its consequences, and cognitive control. An observed variable path model examined the association between emotional instability and alcohol problems. Consistent with hypotheses, emotional instability was positively associated with alcohol consequences, and this relationship was moderated by cognitive control, at least for dependence symptoms. At low levels of cognitive control, there was a positive association between emotional instability and dependence symptoms (β = 0.514, p < .001), however, this association was attenuated and no longer significant at high levels of cognitive control (β = 0.095, p = .302). Emotional instability may promote alcohol dependence via an overreliance on hot information processing. Consistent with dual-process theory, this relationship is diminished among individuals with more cognitive control. Interventions focusing on increasing cognitive control may be effective in reducing alcohol pathology associated with emotional instability. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25621417

  4. Data dependent systems approach to modal analysis, Part II: Application to structural modification of a disc-brake rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, S. M.; Jacobson, E. N.

    1988-05-01

    The Data Dependent Systems (DDS) methodology is used to determine the modal parameters of a disc-brake rotor. The rotor, due to its symmetry, causes the vibration induced disc-brake squeal phenomenon. This paper presents results from an experimental investigation to show how structural modification can be used to change the modal parameters of the rotor. The modal parameters from both the DDS method and from a Fourier analyzer based modal analysis package are presented. Each rotor was modelled with 60 points on three equally spaced diameters. For an unmodified free-free rotor (resting on packing foam) the DDS results indicate that a 60th order model was required, whereas a structurally modified disc-brake rotor required a 76th order model. The results indicate how the disc-brake rotor can be modified to reduce the squeal propensity in selected frequency ranges.

  5. Godzilla-dependent transcytosis promotes Wingless signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Palmer, Lucy; Alexandre, Cyrille; Kakugawa, Satoshi; Beckett, Karen; Gaugue, Isabelle; Palmer, Ruth H; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    The apical and basolateral membranes of epithelia are insulated from each other, preventing the transfer of extracellular proteins from one side to the other. Thus, a signalling protein produced apically is not expected to reach basolateral receptors. Evidence suggests that Wingless, the main Drosophila Wnt, is secreted apically in the embryonic epidermis. However, in the wing imaginal disc epithelium, Wingless is mostly seen on the basolateral membrane where it spreads from secreting to receiving cells. Here we examine the apico-basal movement of Wingless in Wingless-producing cells of wing imaginal discs. We find that it is presented first on the apical surface before making its way to the basolateral surface, where it is released and allowed to interact with signalling receptors. We show that Wingless transcytosis involves dynamin-dependent endocytosis from the apical surface. Subsequent trafficking from early apical endosomes to the basolateral surface requires Godzilla, a member of the RNF family of membrane-anchored E3 ubiquitin ligases. Without such transport, Wingless signalling is strongly reduced in this tissue. PMID:26974662

  6. On the evolution of the protolunar disc.

    PubMed

    Ward, William R

    2014-09-13

    The structure and viscous evolution of a post-impact, protolunar disc is examined. The equations for a silicate disc in two-phase (vapour-liquid) equilibrium are employed to derive an analytical solution to vertical structure. Both a vertically mixed phase disc and a stratified disc, where a magma layer exists in the mid-plane surrounded by a vapour reservoir, are considered. The former largely reproduces the low gas mass fraction, x≪1, profiles of the disc described in earlier literature that proposed that the disc would hover on the brink of gravitational instability. In the latter, the vapour layer has x∼1 and is generally gravitationally stable, while the magma layer is vigorously unstable. The viscous evolution of the stratified model is then explored. Initially, the disc quickly settles to a quasi-steady state with a vapour reservoir containing the majority of the disc mass. The magma layer viscously spreads on a time scale of approximately 3-4 years, during which vapour continuously condenses into droplets that settle to the mid-plane, maintaining the magma surface density in spite of disc spreading. Material flowing inwards is accreted by the Earth; material flowing outwards past the Roche boundary can become incorporated into accreting moonlets. This evolution persists until the vapour reservoir is depleted in approximately 50-100 years, depending on its initial mass. PMID:25114314

  7. Was the soft X-ray flare in NGC 3599 due to an AGN disc instability or a delayed tidal disruption event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, R. D.; Motta, S. E.; Komossa, S.; Read, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present unpublished data from a tidal disruption candidate in NGC 3599 which show that the galaxy was already X-ray bright 18 months before the measurement which led to its classification. This removes the possibility that the flare was caused by a classical, fast-rising, short-peaked, tidal disruption event. Recent relativistic simulations indicate that the majority of disruptions will actually take months or years to rise to a peak, which will then be maintained for longer than previously thought. NGC 3599 could be one of the first identified examples of such an event. The optical spectra of NGC 3599 indicate that it is a low-luminosity Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) with Lbol ˜ 1040 erg s-1. The flare may alternatively be explained by a thermal instability in the accretion disc, which propagates through the inner region at the sound speed, causing an increase of the disc scaleheight and local accretion rate. This can explain the ≤9 yr rise time of the flare. If this mechanism is correct then the flare may repeat on a time-scale of several decades as the inner disc is emptied and refilled.

  8. Myc-Dependent Genome Instability and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Christina; Lee, Moonsook; Westerhof, Maaike; Milholland, Brandon; Spokony, Rebecca; Vijg, Jan; Secombe, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability. PMID:24040302

  9. DISC1-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls the Morphogenesis of Complex Neuronal Dendrites*

    PubMed Central

    Norkett, Rosalind; Modi, Souvik; Birsa, Nicol; Atkin, Talia A.; Ivankovic, Davor; Pathania, Manav; Trossbach, Svenja V.; Korth, Carsten; Hirst, Warren D.; Kittler, Josef T.

    2016-01-01

    The DISC1 protein is implicated in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism. Aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are also associated with major mental illness. DISC1 plays a role in mitochondrial transport in neuronal axons, but its effects in dendrites have yet to be studied. Further, the mechanisms of this regulation and its role in neuronal development and brain function are poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated that DISC1 couples to the mitochondrial transport and fusion machinery via interaction with the outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase proteins Miro1 and Miro2, the TRAK1 and TRAK2 mitochondrial trafficking adaptors, and the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins). Using live cell imaging, we show that disruption of the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex inhibits mitochondrial transport in neurons. We also show that the fusion protein generated from the originally described DISC1 translocation (DISC1-Boymaw) localizes to the mitochondria, where it similarly disrupts mitochondrial dynamics. We also show by super resolution microscopy that DISC1 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum contact sites and that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein decreases the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact area. Moreover, disruption of mitochondrial dynamics by targeting the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex or upon expression of the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein impairs the correct development of neuronal dendrites. Thus, DISC1 acts as an important regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in both axons and dendrites to mediate the transport, fusion, and cross-talk of these organelles, and pathological DISC1 isoforms disrupt this critical function leading to abnormal neuronal development. PMID:26553875

  10. DISC1-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls the Morphogenesis of Complex Neuronal Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Norkett, Rosalind; Modi, Souvik; Birsa, Nicol; Atkin, Talia A; Ivankovic, Davor; Pathania, Manav; Trossbach, Svenja V; Korth, Carsten; Hirst, Warren D; Kittler, Josef T

    2016-01-01

    The DISC1 protein is implicated in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism. Aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are also associated with major mental illness. DISC1 plays a role in mitochondrial transport in neuronal axons, but its effects in dendrites have yet to be studied. Further, the mechanisms of this regulation and its role in neuronal development and brain function are poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated that DISC1 couples to the mitochondrial transport and fusion machinery via interaction with the outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase proteins Miro1 and Miro2, the TRAK1 and TRAK2 mitochondrial trafficking adaptors, and the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins). Using live cell imaging, we show that disruption of the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex inhibits mitochondrial transport in neurons. We also show that the fusion protein generated from the originally described DISC1 translocation (DISC1-Boymaw) localizes to the mitochondria, where it similarly disrupts mitochondrial dynamics. We also show by super resolution microscopy that DISC1 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum contact sites and that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein decreases the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact area. Moreover, disruption of mitochondrial dynamics by targeting the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex or upon expression of the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein impairs the correct development of neuronal dendrites. Thus, DISC1 acts as an important regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in both axons and dendrites to mediate the transport, fusion, and cross-talk of these organelles, and pathological DISC1 isoforms disrupt this critical function leading to abnormal neuronal development. PMID:26553875

  11. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  12. Proto-planetary disc evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Planets form from gas and dust discs in orbit around young stars. The timescale for planet formation is constrained by the lifetime of these discs. The properties of the formed planetary systems depend thus on the evolution and final dispersal of the discs, which is the main topic of this thesis. Observations reveal the existence of a class of discs called "transitional", which lack dust in their inner regions. They are thought to be the last stage before the complete disc dispersal, and hence they may provide the key to understanding the mechanisms behind disc evolution. X-ray photoevaporation and planet formation have been studied as possible physical mechanisms responsible for the final dispersal of discs. However up to now, these two phenomena have been studied separately, neglecting any possible feedback or interaction. In this thesis we have investigated what is the interplay between these two processes. We show that the presence of a giant planet in a photo-evaporating disc can significantly shorten its lifetime, by cutting the inner regions from the mass reservoir in the exterior of the disc. This mechanism produces transition discs that for a given mass accretion rate have larger holes than in models considering only X-ray photo-evaporation, constituting a possible route to the formation of accreting transition discs with large holes. These discs are found in observations and still constitute a puzzle for the theory. Inclusion of the phenomenon called "thermal sweeping", a violent instability that can destroy a whole disc in as little as 10 4 years, shows that the outer disc left can be very short-lived (depending on the X-ray luminosity of the star), possibly explaining why very few non accreting transition discs are observed. However the mechanism does not seem to be efficient enough to reconcile with observations. In this thesis we also show that X-ray photo-evaporation naturally explains the observed correlation between stellar masses and accretion

  13. Long-term nonlinear behaviour of the magnetorotational instability in a localized model of an accretion disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvers, L. J.

    2008-04-01

    For more than a decade, the so-called shearing-box model has been used to study the fundamental local dynamics of accretion discs. This approach has proved to be very useful because it allows high-resolution and long-term studies to be carried out, studies that would not be possible for a global disc. Localized disc studies have largely focused on examining the rate of enhanced transport of angular momentum, essentially a sum of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. The dominant radial-azimuthal component of this stress tensor is, in the classic Shakura-Sunyaev model, expressed as a constant α times the pressure. Previous studies have estimated α based on a modest number of orbital times. Here we use much longer baselines, and perform a cumulative average for α. Great care must be exercised when trying to extract numerical α values from simulations: dissipation scales, computational box aspect ratio, and even numerical algorithms can all affect the result. This study suggests that estimating α becomes more, not less, difficult as computational power increases.

  14. MicroRNA-146a reduces IL-1 dependent inflammatory responses in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Su-Xi; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L.; Chee, Ana; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; An, Howard S.; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Chun-do; Ma, Yuan-Zheng; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Because miR-146a expression in articular chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed whether miR-146a is linked to cartilage degeneration in the spine. Monolayer cultures of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from the intervertebral discs (IVD) of bovine tails were transfected with a miR-146a mimic. To provoke inflammatory responses and catabolic extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, cells were co-treated with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Transfection of miR-146a decreases IL-1 induced mRNA levels of inflammatory genes and catabolic proteases in NP cells based on quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Similarly, miR146a suppresses IL-1 induced protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and aggrecanases as revealed by immunoblotting. Disc segments from wild type (WT) and miR-146a knockout (KO) mice were cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of IL-1 for 3 days. Histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of disc organ cultures revealed that IL-1 mediates changes in proteoglycan (PG) content and in-situ levels of catabolic proteins (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) in the nucleus pulposus of the disc. However, these IL-1 effects are more pronounced in miR-146a KO discs compared to WT discs. For example, absence of miR-146a increases the percentage of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive cells after treatment with IL-1. Thus, miR-146a appears to protect against IL-1 induced IVD degeneration and inflammation. Stimulation of endogenous miR-146a expression or exogenous delivery of miRNA-146a are viable therapeutic strategies that may decelerate disc degeneration and regain a normal homeostatic balance in extracellular matrix production and turn-over. PMID:25311550

  15. MicroRNA-146a reduces IL-1 dependent inflammatory responses in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Gu, Su-Xi; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Chee, Ana; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; An, Howard S; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Chun-do; Ma, Yuan-Zheng; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-25

    Because miR-146a expression in articular chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed whether miR-146a is linked to cartilage degeneration in the spine. Monolayer cultures of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from the intervertebral discs (IVD) of bovine tails were transfected with a miR-146a mimic. To provoke inflammatory responses and catabolic extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, cells were co-treated with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Transfection of miR-146a decreases IL-1 induced mRNA levels of inflammatory genes and catabolic proteases in NP cells based on quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Similarly, miR146a suppresses IL-1 induced protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and aggrecanases as revealed by immunoblotting. Disc segments from wild type (WT) and miR-146a knockout (KO) mice were cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of IL-1 for 3days. Histological and immuno-histochemical (IHC) analyses of disc organ cultures revealed that IL-1 mediates changes in proteoglycan (PG) content and in-situ levels of catabolic proteins (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) in the nucleus pulposus of the disc. However, these IL-1 effects are more pronounced in miR-146a KO discs compared to WT discs. For example, absence of miR-146a increases the percentage of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive cells after treatment with IL-1. Thus, miR-146a appears to protect against IL-1 induced IVD degeneration and inflammation. Stimulation of endogenous miR-146a expression or exogenous delivery of miRNA-146a are viable therapeutic strategies that may decelerate disc degeneration and regain a normal homeostatic balance in extracellular matrix production and turn-over. PMID:25311550

  16. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 signal pathway in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chuqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Le; Tang, Long; Li, Shuangqing; Yang, Yixi; Yang, Fuguo; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is a common and remitting problem. One of the primary causes of LBP is thought to be degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway in the mechanism of IVD degeneration. IVD nucleus pulposus cells isolated and cultured from the lumbar vertebrae of Wistar rats were stimulated by various doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml) to simulate IVD degeneration. Cells were rinsed and cultured in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h of incubation. Additionally, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses were used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα, and IL-1β protein expression after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. The levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β mRNA all increased in the cells stimulated by 10 µg/ml LPS at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P<0.001). Furthermore, the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β protein all increased at 24, 48 and 72 h (all P<0.001). Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β increased significantly in the cells stimulated by 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml LPS compared with the control group, and reached a peak in the 10 µg/ml LPS group (all P<0.001). These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR4 signal pathway is a target pathway in IVD degeneration. This pathway is time phase- and dose-dependent, and when activated can lead to the release of inflammatory factors that participate in IVD degeneration. PMID:27446251

  17. Composition and substrate-dependent strength of the silken attachment discs in spiders

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Ingo; Wolff, Jonas O.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    Araneomorph spiders have evolved different silks with dissimilar material properties, serving different purposes. The two-compound pyriform secretion is used to glue silk threads to substrates or to other threads. It is applied in distinct patterns, called attachment discs. Although ubiquitously found in spider silk applications and hypothesized to be strong and versatile at low material consumption, the performance of attachment discs on different substrates remains unknown. Here, we analyse the detachment forces and fracture mechanics of the attachment discs spun by five different species on three different substrates, by pulling on the upstream part of the attached thread. Results show that although the adhesion of the pyriform glue is heavily affected by the substrate, even on Teflon it is frequently strong enough to hold the spider's weight. As plant surfaces are often difficult to wet, they are hypothesized to be the major driving force for evolution of the pyriform secretion. PMID:25030386

  18. Concentration-dependent diffusion instability in reactive miscible fluids.

    PubMed

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Kostarev, Konstantin; Mizev, Aleksey; Mosheva, Elena

    2015-07-01

    We report on chemoconvective pattern formation phenomena observed in a two-layer system of miscible fluids filling a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the concentration-dependent diffusion coupled with frontal acid-base neutralization can give rise to the formation of a local unstable zone low in density, resulting in a perfectly regular cell-type convective pattern. The described effect gives an example of yet another powerful mechanism which allows the reaction-diffusion processes to govern the flow of reacting fluids under gravity conditions. PMID:26274115

  19. A variational principle for the extraction of time-dependent modes associated with transient instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapsis, Themistoklis; Babaee, Hessam

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a variational formulation for the determination of a finite-dimensional, time-dependent, orthonormal basis that captures directions of phase space associated with finite-time instabilities. While these instabilities have finite lifetime they can play a crucial role either by altering the system dynamics through the activation of other instabilities, or by creating sudden nonlinear energy transfers that lead extreme responses. However, their essentially transient character makes their description a particularly challenging task. Here we develop a variational framework that focus on the optimal approximation of the system dynamics over finite-time intervals under the orthonormal basis constraint. This variational formulation results in differential equations that evolve a time-dependent basis so that it optimally approximates the most unstable directions over finite times. Supported by ARO Award # 66710-EG-YIP.

  20. Intervertebral disc cell response to dynamic compression is age and frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Korecki, Casey L; Kuo, Catherine K; Tuan, Rocky S; Iatridis, James C

    2009-06-01

    The maintenance of the intervertebral disc extracellular matrix is regulated by mechanical loading, nutrition, and the accumulation of matrix proteins and cytokines that are affected by both aging and degeneration. Evidence suggests that cellular aging may lead to alterations in the quantity and quality of extracellular matrix produced. The aims of this study were to examine the role of loading and maturation (a subset of aging), and the interaction between these two factors in intervertebral disc cell gene expression and biosynthesis in a controlled 3D culture environment. Cells were isolated from young (4-6 months) and mature (18-24 months) bovine caudal annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus tissue. Isolated cells were seeded into alginate and dynamically compressed for 7 days at either 0.1, 1, or 3 Hz or maintained as a free-swelling control. After 7 days, DNA and sulfated glycosaminoglycan contents were analyzed along with real time, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for collagen types I and II, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene expression. Results suggest that maturation plays an important role in intervertebral disc homeostasis and influences the cell response to mechanical loading. While isolated intervertebral disc cells responded to mechanical compression in 3D culture, the effect of loading frequency was minimal. Altered cellular phenotype and biosynthesis rates appear to be an attribute of the cell maturation process, potentially independent of changes in cellular microenvironment associated with lost nutrition and disc degeneration. Mature cells may have a decreased capacity to create or retain extracellular matrix components in response to mechanical loading compared to young cells. PMID:19058142

  1. Structural instabilities involving time dependent materials : theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahen, Timothy M.

    The creep buckling of viscoelastic structures is studied analytically and experimentally to investigate structural stability in the presence of time dependent materials. The theory of linear viscoelasticity is used to model polymeric column specimens subjected to constant compressive end loads. A strength of materials approach (Euler-Bernoulli beam theory) is employed to model the moment-curvature relation for the column. The growth of initial imperfections is calculated using the hereditary integral formulation. Solution techniques are developed for small displacements and then generalized to include the effects of large displacements and rotations. A failure criterion based on maximum deformation allows the column life to be estimated directly from the material relaxation modulus. A discussion generalizing the results to include plates and shells is presented.Rectangular cross-section polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens with hinged boundary conditions are used to study viscoelastic buckling experimentally. Constant compressive end loads are applied using a servo-controlled load frame while the specimens are kept in a temperature cabinet at elevated temperatures (accelerating the creep behavior). Specimen shortening and out-of-plane deflections are monitored during the tests. The relaxation modulus of PMMA is approximated by a Prony-Dirichlet series and the model is used to simulate the laboratory experiments. Model and experimental results show good agreement during the "glassy" and slow growth phases of the column response. As the growth rate increases some deviations between theory and experiment are seen. It is shown that the deviations are not a result of geometric nonlinearities, but may, in part, be explained by material nonlinearities not accounted for in the model.

  2. Disc-planet interactions in subkeplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: One class of protoplanetary disc models, the X-wind model, predicts strongly subkeplerian orbital gas velocities, a configuration that can be sustained by magnetic tension. Aims: We investigate disc-planet interactions in these subkeplerian discs, focusing on orbital migration for low-mass planets and gap formation for high-mass planets. Methods: We use linear calculations and nonlinear hydrodynamical simulations to measure the torque and look at gap formation. In both cases, the subkeplerian nature of the disc is treated as a fixed external constraint. Results: We show that, depending on the degree to which the disc is subkeplerian, the torque on low-mass planets varies between the usual type I torque and the one-sided outer Lindblad torque, which is also negative but an order of magnitude stronger. In strongly subkeplerian discs, corotation effects can be ignored, making migration fast and inward. Gap formation near the planet's orbit is more difficult in such discs, since there are no resonances close to the planet accommodating angular momentum transport. The location of the gap is shifted inwards with respect to the planet, leaving the planet on the outside of a surface density depression. Conclusions: Depending on the degree to which a protoplanetary disc is subkeplerian, disc-planet interactions can be very different from the usual Keplerian picture, making these discs in general more hazardous for young planets.

  3. c-Myc dependent initiation of genomic instability during neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C; Jalava, A; Mai, S

    1997-01-01

    The dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene is a target of c-Myc in genomic instability. The induced overexpression of c-Myc in cell lines is followed by the amplification and rearrangement of the DHFR gene. Furthermore, the constitutive upregulation of c-Myc protein coincides with genomic instability of the DHFR gene in lymphoid, non-lymphoid and in tumor lines. The amplification of the DHFR gene is locus-specific and independent of species origins. We have now addressed the question whether inducible deregulation of c-Myc is followed by DHFR gene amplification in vivo. We show that the DHFR gene is a target of c-Myc-dependent neoplasia in vivo and propose a role for genomic instability during the initiation of neoplastic transformation. PMID:9308243

  4. Time-dependent modes associated with finite time instabilities in unstable fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaee, Hessam; Sapsis, Themistoklis

    2015-11-01

    We apply a recently developed variational formulation for the determination of a finite-dimensional, time-dependent, orthonormal basis that captures the directions associated with finite-time instabilities. We demonstrate the capability of the method for two problems: the Orr-Sommerfeld/Squire operator and the vertical jet in crossflow. In the first problem we demonstrate that the time-dependent subspace captures the strongly transient non-normal energy growth (in the short time regime), while for longer times the modes capture the expected asymptotic behavior of the dynamics. We also consider the vertical jet in crossflow at the jet Reynolds number of Rej = 900 . We demonstrate that the subspace instantaneously captures the most unstable directions of the time-dependent flow. We explore the connection between the shear flow, non-normal growth and persistent instabilities. Supported by ARO Award # 66710-EG-YIP.

  5. Local and global dynamics of warped astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.; Latter, Henrik N.

    2013-08-01

    Astrophysical discs are warped whenever a misalignment is present in the system, or when a flat disc is made unstable by external forces. The evolution of the shape and mass distribution of a warped disc is driven not only by external influences but also by an internal torque, which transports angular momentum through the disc. This torque depends on internal flows driven by the oscillating pressure gradient associated with the warp, and on physical processes operating on smaller scales, which may include instability and turbulence. We introduce a local model for the detailed study of warped discs. Starting from the shearing sheet of Goldreich and Lynden-Bell, we impose the oscillating geometry of the orbital plane by means of a coordinate transformation. This warped shearing sheet (or box) is suitable for analytical and computational treatments of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, etc., and it can be used to compute the internal torque that drives the large-scale evolution of the disc. The simplest hydrodynamic states in the local model are horizontally uniform laminar flows that oscillate at the orbital frequency. These correspond to the non-linear solutions for warped discs found in previous work by Ogilvie, and we present an alternative derivation and generalization of that theory. In a companion paper, we show that these laminar flows are often linearly unstable, especially if the disc is nearly Keplerian and of low viscosity. The local model can be used in future work to determine the non-linear outcome of the hydrodynamic instability of warped discs, and its interaction with others such as the magnetorotational instability.

  6. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Peloquin, John M; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress-strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model's nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc's nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc's full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios. PMID:24998992

  7. Time-dependent models of accretion discs with nuclear burning following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf by a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    We construct time-dependent one-dimensional (vertically averaged) models of accretion discs produced by the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a binary neutron star (NS) companion. Nuclear reactions in the disc mid-plane burn the WD matter to increasingly heavier elements at sequentially smaller radii, releasing substantial energy which can impact the disc dynamics. A model for disc outflows is employed, by which cooling from the outflow balances other sources of heating (viscous, nuclear) in regulating the Bernoulli parameter of the mid-plane to a fixed value ≲0. We perform a comprehensive parameter study of the compositional yields and velocity distributions of the disc outflows for WDs of different initial compositions. For C/O WDs, the radial composition profile of the disc evolves self-similarly in a quasi-steady-state manner, and is remarkably robust to model parameters. The nucleosynthesis in helium WD discs does not exhibit this behaviour, which instead depends sensitively on factors controlling the disc mid-plane density (e.g. the strength of the viscosity, α). By the end of the simulation, a substantial fraction of the WD mass is unbound in outflows at characteristic velocities of ˜109 cm s-1. The outflows from WD-NS merger discs contain 10-4-3 × 10-3 M⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, resulting in fast (˜ week long) dim (˜1040 erg s-1) optical transients; shock heating of the ejecta by late-time outflows may increase the peak luminosity to ˜1043 erg s-1. The accreted mass on to the NS is probably not sufficient to induce gravitational collapse, but may be capable of spinning up the NS to periods of ˜10 ms, illustrating the feasibility of this channel in forming isolated millisecond pulsars.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  9. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Nathan T.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Peloquin, John M.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress–strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model’s nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc’s nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc’s full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios. PMID:24998992

  10. Women's sexual interests across the ovulatory cycle depend on primary partner developmental instability

    PubMed Central

    Gangestad, Steven W; Thornhill, Randy; Garver-Apgar, Christine E

    2005-01-01

    Normally ovulating women have been found to report greater sexual attraction to men other than their own partners when near ovulation relative to the luteal phase. One interpretation is that women possess adaptations to be attracted to men possessing (ancestral) markers of genetic fitness when near ovulation, which implies that women's interests should depend on qualities of her partner. In a sample of 54 couples, we found that women whose partners had high developmental instability (high fluctuating asymmetry) had greater attraction to men other than their partners, and less attraction to their own partners, when fertile. PMID:16191612

  11. Instability in the dense supernova neutrino gas with flavor-dependent angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2012-06-01

    The usual description of self-induced flavor conversions for neutrinos (ν's) in supernovae is based on the simplified assumption that all the ν's of the different species are emitted "half-isotropically" by a common neutrinosphere, in analogy to a blackbody emission. However, realistic supernova simulations show that ν angular distributions at decoupling are far from being half-isotropic and, above all, are flavor dependent. We show that flavor-dependent angular distributions may lead to crossing points in the angular spectra of different ν species (where F(ν(e))=F(ν(x)) and F(ν(e))=F(ν(x))) around which a new multiangle instability can develop. To characterize this effect, we carry out a linearized flavor stability analysis for different supernova neutrino angular distributions. We find that this instability can shift the onset of the flavor conversions toward low radii and produce a smearing of the splitting features found with trivial ν emission models. As a result the spectral differences among ν's of different flavors could be strongly reduced. PMID:23003940

  12. Have protoplanetary discs formed planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, J. S.; Rice, W. K. M.

    2010-09-01

    It has recently been noted that many discs around T Tauri stars appear to comprise only a few Jupiter masses of gas and dust. Using millimetre surveys of discs within six local star formation regions, we confirm this result, and find that only a few per cent of young stars have enough circumstellar material to build gas giant planets, in standard core accretion models. Since the frequency of observed exoplanets is greater than this, there is a `missing-mass' problem. As alternatives to simply adjusting the conversion of dust flux to disc mass, we investigate three other classes of solution. Migration of planets could hypothetically sweep up the disc mass reservoir more efficiently, but trends in multiplanet systems do not support such a model, and theoretical models suggest that the gas accretion time-scale is too short for migration to sweep the disc. Enhanced inner-disc mass reservoirs are possible, agreeing with predictions of disc evolution through self-gravity, but not adding to millimetre dust flux as the inner disc is optically thick. Finally, the incidence of massive discs is shown to be higher at the protostellar stages, Classes 0 and I, where discs substantial enough to form planets via core accretion are abundant enough to match the frequency of exoplanets. Gravitational instability may also operate in the Class 0 epoch, where half the objects have potentially unstable discs of >~30 per cent of the stellar mass. However, recent calculations indicate that forming gas giants inside 50 au by instability is unlikely, even in such massive discs. Overall, the results presented suggest that the canonically `protoplanetary' discs of Class II T Tauri stars have globally low masses in dust observable at millimetre wavelengths, and conversion to larger bodies (anywhere from small rocks up to planetary cores) must already have occurred.

  13. Sub-parsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disc exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namekata, Daisuke; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disc of radius ≈1 pc around a supermassive black hole of mass 107 M⊙ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disc, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons re-emitted by dust, (4) frequency dependence of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio ≈0.77, a nearly neutral, dense ({≈ } 10^{6-8}cm^{-3}), geometrically thin (h/r < 0.06) disc forms with a high-velocity (≈200 ˜ 3000 km s-1) dusty outflow launched from the disc surface. The disc temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disc is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to Krolik (2007), the radiation pressure by IR photons is not effective to thicken the disc, but rather compresses it. Thus, it seems difficult for a radiation-supported, geometrically thick, obscuring torus to form near the dust sublimation radius as far as the Eddington ratio is high (˜1). The mass outflow rate is 0.05-0.1M_{⊙} yr^{-1} and the column density of the outflow is NH ≲ 1021 cm-2. To explain observed type-II AGN fraction, it is required that outflow gas is extended to larger radii (r ≳ 10 pc) or that a denser dusty wind is launched from smaller radii (r ˜ 104 Rg).

  14. Size-dependent nonlinear vibration and instability of embedded fluid-conveying SWBNNTs in thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Norouzzadeh, A.; Gholami, R.; Faghih Shojaei, M.; Hosseinzadeh, M.

    2014-07-01

    The size-dependent nonlinear free vibration and instability of fluid-conveying single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) embedded in thermal environment are studied in this paper. The fluid-conveying SWBNNT is modeled as a Timoshenko beam by which the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia is taken into consideration. The modified strain gradient theory is used to capture the size effect. To consider the nonlinear effect, the geometric nonlinearity, based on von Kármán's assumption is introduced to develop the nonlinear governing equations of motion. By employing Hamilton's principle, the governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived. Thereafter, a numerical solution procedure based on the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) is introduced, according to which the nonlinear governing equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are discretized via the operational matrix of differentiation. The discretized equations are then solved analytically through the harmonic balance approach. Effects of different parameters including material length scale parameter, spring and damping constants of surrounding viscoelastic medium, and flow velocity on the nonlinear free vibration and instability of SWBNNTs are examined.

  15. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  16. Method to predict length dependency of negative bias temperature instability degradation in p-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Gang-Jun; Son, Donghee; Lee, Nam-Hyun; Kang, Yongha; Kang, Bongkoo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to predict the length dependency of the magnitude of degradation caused by negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) stress applied to a p-MOSFET. Threshold voltage degradation ΔV th varied according to the drain bias V d, during the measurement of drain current I d. The depletion length L dep into the channel was calculated based on a particular V d value and the channel doping concentration. L dep was used to extract the channel edge region length L edge, then the center channel region length L cen was obtained by subtracting L edge from the gate length L gate. We proposed an equation that uses L dep, L cen, L edge and degree of ΔV th variation to calculate ΔV th according to L gate while the p-MOSFET is under NBTI stress. Equation estimates of ΔV th at different L gate were similar to measurements.

  17. Growth Factor Dependent Regulation of Centrosome Function and Genomic Instability by HuR

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Yang, Xiuhua; Nabors, Louis Burt

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA binding protein HuR is over expressed in cancer cells and contributes to disease progression through post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA. The regulation of HuR and how this relates to glioma is the focus of this report. SRC and c-Abl kinases regulate HuR sub-cellular trafficking and influence accumulation in the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) via a growth factor dependent signaling mechanism. Growth factor stimulation of glioma cell lines results in the associate of HuR with the PCM and amplification of centrosome number. This process is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of HuR and is abolished by mutating tyrosine residues. HuR is overexpressed in tumor samples from patients with glioblastoma and associated with a reduced survival. These findings suggest HuR plays a significant role in centrosome amplification and genomic instability, which contributes to a worse disease outcome. PMID:25803745

  18. The Gaia-ESO Survey: New constraints on the Galactic disc velocity dispersion and its chemical dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiglion, G.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Kordopatis, G.; Hill, V.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Minchev, I.; Chiappini, C.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Pancino, E.; Bayo, A.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Ruchti, G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Understanding the history and the evolution of the Milky Way is one of the main goals of modern astrophysics. In particular, the formation of the Galactic disc is a key problem of Galactic archaeology. Aims: We study the velocity dispersion behaviour of Galactic disc stars as a function of the [Mg/Fe] ratio, which for small metallicity bins can be used as a proxy of relative age. This key relation is essential to constrain the formation mechanisms of the disc stellar populations as well as the cooling and settling processes. Methods: We used the recommended parameters and chemical abundances of 7800 FGK Milky Way field stars from the second internal data release of the Gaia-ESO spectroscopic Survey. These stars were observed with the GIRAFFE spectrograph (HR10 and HR21 setups), and cover a large spatial volume in the intervals 6 disc sequence in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane. Results: From analysing the Galactocentric velocity of the stars for the thin disc, we find a weak positive correlation between Vφ and [Fe/H] that is due to a slowly rotating [Fe/H]-poor tail. For the thick disc stars, a strong correlation with [Fe/H] and [Mg/Fe] is established. In addition, we have detected an inversion of the velocity dispersion trends with [Mg/Fe] for thick-disc stars with [Fe/H] < -0.10 dex and [Mg/Fe] > +0.20 dex for the radial component. First, the velocity dispersion increases with [Mg/Fe] at all [Fe/H] ratios for the thin-disc stars, and then it decreases for the thick-disc population at the highest [Mg/Fe] abundances. Similar trends are observed for several bins of [Mg/Fe] within the errors for the azimuthal velocity dispersion, while a continuous increase with [Mg/Fe] is observed for the vertical velocity dispersion. The velocity dispersion decrease agrees with previous measurements of the RAVE survey, although it is observed here for a greater metallicity

  19. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  20. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  1. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease. PMID:23350123

  2. Fluid-flow dependent response of intervertebral discs under cyclic loading: On the role of specimen preparation and preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Schilling, Christoph; Reyna, Ana Laura Puente; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-04-11

    In vivo during the day, intervertebral discs are loaded mainly in compression causing fluid and height losses that are subsequently fully recovered overnight due to fluid inflow under smaller compression. However, in vitro, fluid flow through the endplates, in particular fluid imbibition, is hampered possibly by blood clots formed post mortem. Despite earlier in vitro studies, it remains yet unclear if and how fluid flow conditions in vitro could properly emulate those in vivo. Effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa) and disc-bone preparation conditions (e.g., w/o bony endplates) on disc height and nucleus pressure were investigated using 54 bovine specimens. Changes in specimen height and pressure at different nucleus locations were used as surrogate measures to assess the fluid content and flow within the discs. Under all investigated preparation conditions and preload magnitudes, no significant pressure recovery could be obtained during low loading phases, even without bony endplates. On the contrary, partial to full displacement recovery were reached in particular under 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude in disc height recovery during low loading periods. Attention should hence be given in future studies to the proper selection of preload magnitude and duration as well as the animal models used if in vivo response is intended to be replicated. Findings also indicate that flushing the endplates or injection of bone cement respectively neither facilitates nor impedes fluid flow into or out of the disc to a noticeable degree in this bovine disc model. PMID:26549766

  3. Magnetically driven accretion in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-11-01

    We characterize magnetically driven accretion at radii between 1 and 100 au in protoplanetary discs, using a series of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The simulations assume a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disc that is threaded by a net vertical magnetic field of specified strength. Confirming previous results, we find that the Hall effect has only a modest impact on accretion at 30 au, and essentially none at 100 au. At 1-10 au the Hall effect introduces a pronounced bimodality in the accretion process, with vertical magnetic fields aligned to the disc rotation supporting a strong laminar Maxwell stress that is absent if the field is anti-aligned. In the anti-aligned case, we instead find evidence for bursts of turbulent stress at 5-10 au, which we tentatively identify with the non-axisymmetric Hall-shear instability. The presence or absence of these bursts depends upon the details of the adopted chemical model, which suggests that appreciable regions of actual protoplanetary discs might lie close to the borderline between laminar and turbulent behaviour. Given the number of important control parameters that have already been identified in MHD models, quantitative predictions for disc structure in terms of only radius and accretion rate appear to be difficult. Instead, we identify robust qualitative tests of magnetically driven accretion. These include the presence of turbulence in the outer disc, independent of the orientation of the vertical magnetic fields, and a Hall-mediated bimodality in turbulent properties extending from the region of thermal ionization to 10 au.

  4. The dependence of the AV prior for SN Ia on host mass and disc inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Keel, W. C.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Mack, K. J.

    2015-08-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are used as `standard candles' for cosmological distance scales. To fit their light-curve shape-absolute luminosity relation, one needs to assume an intrinsic colour and a likelihood of host galaxy extinction or a convolution of these, a colour distribution prior. The host galaxy extinction prior is typically assumed to be an exponential drop-off for the current supernova programmes (P(A_V) ∝ e^{-A_V/τ_0}). We explore the validity of this prior using the distribution of extinction values inferred when two galaxies accidentally overlap (an occulting galaxy pair). We correct the supernova luminosity distances from the SDSS-III supernova projects (SDSS-SN) by matching the host galaxies to one of three templates from occulting galaxy pairs based on the host galaxy mass and the AV-bias-prior-scale (τ0) relation from Jha et al. We find that introducing an AV prior that depends on host mass results in lowered luminosity distances for the SDSS-SN on average but it does not reduce the scatter in individual measurements. This points, in our view, to the need for many more occulting galaxy templates to match to SN Ia host galaxies to rule out this possible source of scatter in the SN Ia distance measurements. We match occulting galaxy templates based on both mass and projected radius and we find that one should match by stellar mass first with radius as a secondary consideration. We discuss the caveats of the current approach: the lack of enough radial coverage, the small sample of priors (occulting pairs with HST data), the effect of gravitationally interacting as well as occulting pairs, and whether an exponential distribution is appropriate. Our aim is to convince the reader that a library of occulting galaxy pairs observed with HST will provide sufficient priors to improve (optical) SN Ia measurements to the next required accuracy in cosmology.

  5. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected. PMID:26854966

  6. Quantization and instability of the damped harmonic oscillator subject to a time-dependent force

    SciTech Connect

    Majima, H. Suzuki, A.

    2011-12-15

    We consider the one-dimensional motion of a particle immersed in a potential field U(x) under the influence of a frictional (dissipative) force linear in velocity (-{gamma}x) and a time-dependent external force (K(t)). The dissipative system subject to these forces is discussed by introducing the extended Bateman's system, which is described by the Lagrangian: L=mxy-U(x+1/2 y)+U(x-1/2 y)+({gamma})/2 (xy-yx)-xK(t)+yK(t), which leads to the familiar classical equations of motion for the dissipative (open) system. The equation for a variable y is the time-reversed of the x motion. We discuss the extended Bateman dual Lagrangian and Hamiltonian by setting U(x{+-}y/2)=1/2 k(x{+-}y/2){sup 2} specifically for a dual extended damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the time-dependent external force. We show the method of quantizing such dissipative systems, namely the canonical quantization of the extended Bateman's Hamiltonian H. The Heisenberg equations of motion utilizing the quantized Hamiltonian H surely lead to the equations of motion for the dissipative dynamical quantum systems, which are the quantum analog of the corresponding classical systems. To discuss the stability of the quantum dissipative system due to the influence of an external force K(t) and the dissipative force, we derived a formula for transition amplitudes of the dissipative system with the help of the perturbation analysis. The formula is specifically applied for a damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the impulsive force. This formula is used to study the influence of dissipation such as the instability due to the dissipative force and/or the applied impulsive force. - Highlights: > A method of quantizing dissipative systems is presented. > In order to obtain the method, we apply Bateman's dual system approach. > A formula for a transition amplitude is derived. > We use the formula to study the instability of the dissipative systems.

  7. Universal framework for temperature dependence prediction of the negative bias temperature instability based on microscope pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chenyue; Zhang, Lining; Lin, Xinnan; Chan, Mansun

    2016-04-01

    A universal framework for describing the temperature enhanced negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) is developed in this paper. Analytical time evolution models of the NBTI mechanisms, as Pb center generation and hole-transport in the oxygen vacancies, are proposed based on careful investigation of atom-level microscopic pictures. A logarithmic time function is derived to describe the interface state (Pb center) generation and recovery evolution by revealing a fact that the activation energy is significantly modified by the accumulation of generated defects. Corresponding coefficients, including the generation amplitudes and time constant, are identified depending on temperature linearly and exponentially. Moreover, the unrecoverable oxide hole-trapping is proposed resulted from the hole-transport among deep-level oxygen vacancies driven by electrical field within the gate oxide. A power-law time function is derived to describing this evolution, with time exponent linear to temperature. Parameters calculated by the proposed analytical models reveal good consistent with the parameters directly extracted from the measured data, indicating the validation and universality of the physical based framework in reproducing the parametric shift of the NBTI degradation under various temperature conditions and process technologies.

  8. Laboratory experiment of liquefaction under vertical vibration: parameter dependence of the resulting instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, N.; Sumita, I.

    2013-12-01

    (Transition) whose amplitude grows and a flame structure forms (Flame). We find that the critical acceleration for the formation of a flame structure is of the order of (Δρ/ρ)g, where Δρ is the particle-water density difference, ρ is the particle density, and g is the gravitational acceleration. We apply the results of linear stability analysis for superimposed viscous fluids to our experiments. We find that the growth rate and the wavelength of the instability can be explained if the effective layer thickness of the lower layer is of the order of 1 mm. This suggests that only the uppermost part of the lower layer is mobile. Further detailed parameter dependence and their analyses will be presented in the poster.

  9. Shear-rate-dependent viscosities of nematic and disc-like particles perfectly aligned in arbitrary relative directions to the shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyearn-Maw

    2016-07-01

    The shear-rate-dependent viscosity coefficients of hard ellipsoids are derived for arbitrary relative orientations to the shear flow geometry. Each of the nine components of the coefficients scaled by the Newtonian shear viscosity agrees with the previous result for the viscosity in the zero-shear-rate limit. Among the components, the shear viscosity is graphically displayed for nematic ellipsoids with an axis ratio greater than 1 and for disc-like ellipsoids with an axis ratio less than 1 over the whole range of relative orientations of the axis of ellipsoid to the plane shear layer. As the primary axis of the ellipsoid rotates from the x-axis to the y-axis in the x-y plane, the shear viscosity increases or decreases for nematic or disc-like ellipsolids, respectively.

  10. Floquet analysis in accretion disc dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Bianchini, A.

    2002-01-01

    Floquet analysis is proposed to analyze the evolution of exponentially growing modes of the local instabilities in accretion discs of CVs induced by perturbations in the velocity field. Both the stability of the disc and the deviation of the Reynolds number are described by the Floquet exponents μj of the perturbations, which represent Landau's modes of the fluid.

  11. Nonlinear hydrodynamical evolution of eccentric Keplerian discs in two dimensions: validation of secular theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-06-01

    We perform global two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Keplerian discs with free eccentricity over thousands of orbital periods. Our aim is to determine the validity of secular theory in describing the evolution of eccentric discs, and to explore their nonlinear evolution for moderate eccentricities. Linear secular theory is found to correctly predict the structure and precession rates of discs with small eccentricities. However, discs with larger eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients) are observed to precess faster (retrograde relative to the orbital motion), at a rate that depends on their eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients). We derive analytically a nonlinear secular theory for eccentric gas discs, which explains this result as a modification of the pressure forces whenever eccentric orbits in a disc nearly intersect. This effect could be particularly important for highly eccentric discs produced in tidal disruption events, or for narrow gaseous rings; it might also play a role in causing some of the variability in superhump binary systems. In two dimensions, the eccentricity of a moderately eccentric disc is long-lived and persists throughout the duration of our simulations. Eccentric modes are however weakly damped by their interaction with non-axisymmetric spiral density waves (driven by the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, which occurs in our idealized setup with solid walls), as well as numerical diffusion.

  12. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M; Cohn, Daniel H; Merrill, Amy E; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb-/-mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb-/-mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb-/-mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  13. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  14. Hysteretic Dependence of Magnetic Flux Density on Primary AC Current in Flat-Type Inductive Fault Current Limiter with YBCO Thin Film Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masayuki; Yokomizu, Yasunobu; Matsumura, Toshiro

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on a flat-type inductive superconducting FCL (FIS-FCL) consisting of a pancake coil and a YBCO thin layer disc. AC current injection experiments and magnetic field analysis were carried out for two kinds of FIS-FCL, single-disc model and double-discs model. In the former, the pancake coil was putted on the YBCO disc. In the latter, the pancake coil was sandwiched with two YBCO discs. The double-discs model cancels out the magnetic flux density more effectively than the single-disc model. In the double-discs model, the superconducting state period is longer than in the single-disc model. Thus, it may be concluded that the double-discs model is considered to be suitable for FIS-FCL.

  15. Counter-rotating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud on to the surface of an existing corotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inwards to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc centre. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of viscous counter-rotating discs for the cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic α-viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components, a shear layer forms between them and the middle part of this layer free-falls to the disc centre. The accretion rates are increased by factors of ˜102-104 over that for a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dependent on the viscosity and the mass fraction of the counter-rotating gas. In the case of radially separated components where the inner disc corotates and the outer disc rotates in the opposite direction, a gap between the two components opens and closes quasi-periodically. The accretion rates are ≳25 times larger than those for a disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity.

  16. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  17. Sputter roughening instability on the Ge(001) surface: Energy and flux dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Mayer, T.M.; Kellerman, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    We have measured surface roughening kinetics during low energy Xe ion sputtering of Ge (001) surfaces. Results are interpreted in terms of an instability theory developed by Bradley and Harper. Although the calculated magnitude of the roughening rate does not agree with the measured value, the variation of the rate with ion flux and energy is on agreement with the theory.

  18. Experimental study of cold plume instability in large Prandtl number Czochralski melt: Parametric dependences and scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, E.; Kit, E.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A parametric experimental study of the cold plume instability that appears in the large-Prandtl-number Czochralski melt flows is reported. The critical temperature difference (the critical Grashof number) and the frequency of appearing oscillations were measured for varying Prandtl numbers, aspect ratios of the melt, and crystal/crucible radii ratio. The measurements were carried out by two independent and fully non-intrusive experimental techniques. The results are reported as dimensional and dimensionless parametric dependences, and then are joined into relatively simple empirical relations showing how the critical Grashof number and the frequency of emerging oscillations depend on other parameters.

  19. Region-dependent aggrecan degradation patterns in the rat intervertebral disc are affected by mechanical loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Godburn, Karolyn; Wuertz, Karin; Alini, Mauro; Roughley, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Design Immunoblotting study to evaluate aggrecan degradation patterns in rat intervertebral discs(IVDs) subjected to mechanical overload. Objective To evaluate the effects of in vivo dynamic compression overloading on aggrecan degradation products associated with matrix metalloproteinase(MMP) and aggrecanase activity in different regions of the IVD. Summary of Background Data Aggrecan cleavage at the MMP and aggrecanase sites are important events in human IVD aging, with distinct cleavage patterns in the annulus and nucleus regions. No such information is available on regional variations in rat IVDs, nor on how such cleavage is affected by mechanical loading. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with an Ilizarov-type device and subjected to dynamic compression (1 MPa and 1 Hz for 8 hours per day for 8 weeks). Control, sham, and overloaded IVDs were separated by disc region and analyzed for aggrecan degradation products using immunoblotting techniques with antibodies specific for the aggrecanase and MMP cleavage sites in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. Results Control IVDs exhibited strong regional variation in aggrecan degradation patterns with minimal degradation products being present in the nucleus pulposus(NP), degradation products associated with aggrecanase cleavage predominating in the inner annulus fibrosus(AF), and degradation products associated with MMP cleavage predominating in the outer annulus fibrosus. Dynamic compression overloading increased the amount of aggrecan degradation products associated with MMP cleavage particularly in the AF but also in the NP. Degradation profiles of sham IVDs were similar to control. Conclusions Aggrecan G1 regions resulting from proteolysis were found to have a strong regionally-specific pattern in the rat IVD, which was altered under excessive loading. The shift from aggrecanase to MMP-induced degradation products with dynamic compression overloading suggests that protein

  20. Chromosome instability in human hepatocellular carcinoma depends on p53 status and aflatoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Pascal; Marchio, Agnès; Battiston, Carlo; Cordina, Emilie; Russo, Alessandro; Terris, Benoît; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Turlin, Bruno; Tang, Zhao-You; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Dejean, Anne

    2008-05-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous disease triggered by various risk factors and frequently characterized by chromosome instability. This instability is considered to be caused primarily by Hepatitis B virus (HBV), although aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent fungal mutagen is also suspected to influence chromosomal repair. We studied 90 HCCs from Italy, the country with the highest incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in Europe, 81 samples from France and 52 specimens from Shanghai, in a region where intake of AFB1 via the diet is known to be high. All 223 tumours were characterized for 15 different genomic targets, including allelic loss at 13 chromosome arms and mutations of beta-catenin and p53 genes. Despite disparity in risk-factor distribution, Italian and French cases did not significantly differ for 14 of the 15 targets tested. beta-Catenin and p53 displayed moderate and similar mutation rates (18-29% of cases) in European series. By contrast, tumours from Shanghai were significantly different, with a lower mutation rate for beta-catenin (4% vs. 26%, p<0.0003) and a higher mutation rate for p53 (48% vs. 22%, p<0.0001) when compared with tumours of European origin. The Arg249Ser mutation, hallmark of exposure to AFB1, represented half of the changes in p53 in Shanghai. Furthermore, when stratified for the presence of HBV or p53 mutations, chromosome instability was always higher in Chinese than in European patients. This difference was particularly strong in p53-wildtype tumours (fractional allelic loss, 29.4% vs. 16.7%, p<0.0001). We suggest that AFB1-associated mutagenesis represents a plausible cause for the higher chromosome instability observed in Chinese HCCs, when compared with European primary liver carcinomas. PMID:18467159

  1. Bandwidth Dependence of Laser Plasma Instabilities Driven by the Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Phillips, L.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.; Feldman, U.

    2011-10-01

    The Nike krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory operates in the deep UV (248 nm) and employs beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In the first ISI studies at longer wavelengths (1054 nm and 527 nm) [Obenschain, PRL 62, 768(1989);Mostovych, PRL, 59, 1193(1987); Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1479(1991)], stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν / ν ~ 0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (1014-1015W/cm2) . Recent Nike work showed that the threshold for quarter critical instabilities increased with the expected wavelength scaling, without accounting for the large bandwidth (δν ~ 1-3 THz). New experiments will compare laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by narrower bandwidth pulses to those observed with the standard operation. The bandwidth of KrF lasers can be reduced by adding narrow filters (etalons or gratings) in the initial stages of the laser. This talk will discuss the method used to narrow the output spectrum of Nike, the laser performance for this new operating mode, and target observations of LPI in planar CH targets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  2. Simulations of the Galactic Centre Stellar Discs In a Warped Disc Origin Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulubay-Siddiki, A.; Bartko, H.

    2012-07-01

    The Galactic Center (GC) hosts a population of young stars some of which seem to form a system of mutually inclined warped discs. While the presence of young stars in the close vicinity of the massive black hole is already problematic, their orbital configuration makes the situation even more puzzling. We present a possible warped disc origin scenario for these stars, which assumes an initially flat accretion disc which develops a warp through Pringle instability, or Bardeen-Petterson Effect. By working out the critical radii and the time scales involved, we argue that disc warping is plausible for GC parameters. We construct time evolution models for such discs considering the discs' self-gravity, and the torques exerted by the surrounding old star cluster. Our simulations suggest that the best agreement for a purely self-gravitating model is obtained for a disc-to-black hole mass ratio of Md/Mbh ~ 0.001.

  3. Effects of chemical reactions on density-dependent fluid flow: On the numerical formulation and the development of instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2002-04-01

    A three-dimensional, reactive numerical flow model is developed that couples chemical reactions with density-dependent mass transport and fluid flow. The model includes equilibrium reactions for the aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid and aqueous phases, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes that result from precipitation and dissolution reactions in the porous media. The coupled effects of the processes driving flow and the chemical reactions occurring during solute transport is studied using a carbonate system in fully saturated porous media. Results demonstrate that instability development is sensitive to the initial perturbation caused by density differences between the solute plume and the ambient ground water. If the initial perturbation is large, then it acts as a''trigger'' in the flow system that causes instabilities to develop in a planar reaction front. When permeability changes occur due to dissolution reactions occurring in the porous media, a reactive feedback loop is created by calcite dissolution and the mixed convective transport of the system. Although the feedback loop does not have a significant impact on plume shape, complex concentration distributions develop as a result of the instabilities generated in the flow system.

  4. The temperature dependence of the thermopower of the InSb Corbino disc in a quantizing magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gadjialiev, M. M. Pirmagomedov, Z. Sh.

    2009-08-15

    Thermopower of the Corbino disc made of InSb with n{sub 77} = 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} in a transverse magnetic field as high as 30 kOe at temperatures of 60, 67, and 80 K is studied. It is established that the diffusion fraction of thermopower in a quantizing magnetic field rises according to the power law H{sup 2.2} at all mentioned temperatures. By the magnitude of saturation thermopower {alpha}{sub xx}({infinity}) in a high field, the scattering mechanism of charge carriers is determined. It is established that in a temperature region of 60-80 K, the electrons are scattered by acoustic phonons.

  5. Disk instability and the time-dependent X-ray emission from the intermediate polar GK Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Kim, Soon-Wook; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The correlation between the disk instability model for the 1981-1989 optical outbursts of the intermediate polar GK Per and the accompanying X-ray emission is examined, and the self-consistency of the combined optical-X-ray model is investigated. Special attention is given to the nature of the transition in the X-ray emission due to the time-dependent accretion rates in the simple column accretion model. The large variation in the efficiency of hard X-ray production is explained.

  6. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Zischler, Luciana; Etringer, Aurélie; Bergeret, Marion; Morlé, Aymeric; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Morizot, Alexandre; Shirley, Sarah; Lalaoui, Najoua; Elifio-Esposito, Selene L.; Fais, Stefano; Garrido, Carmen; Solary, Eric; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells. PMID:26010871

  7. Dependence of Ablative Rayleigh—Taylor Instability on High-Z Dopant Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2016-03-01

    We conducted two-dimensional simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets to evaluate effects of high-Z doping on implosion hydrodynamics. It was found that an ablation structure drastically changes with concentration of dopant material. We also confirmed that even a lightly-doped target can suppress Rayleigh-Taylor instability on short wavelength, while a long-wavelength perturbation is difficult to be suppressed with any dopant concentration. The high-Z doping is thus only effective for a spherical implosion with high-mode perturbations.

  8. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  9. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν/ν˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (δν˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (δν˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  10. The evolution of earthquake-nucleating slip instabilities under spatially variable steady-state rate dependence of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S.; Viesca, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Following laboratory rock friction experiments, fault strength under sub-seismic slip speeds is thought to depend on a slip rate- and state-dependent friction. Laboratory-measured temperature dependence of the frictional properties and their implied variation with depth form the basis for current models of the seismic cycle. However, scant attention has been paid to the role such heterogeneity has on determining the location and manner in which an earthquake nucleating slip instability develops. Recent work demonstrates that a slip instability on a fault with rate-and-state friction (in which state evolution follows the aging law) occurs as the attraction of a dynamical system towards a fixed point (Viesca, this meeting). Based on this development, we find that the location of that fixed point may be determined if a heterogeneous distribution of the relative rate-weakening parameter a/b is known. (Rate-weakening occurs for 01). That this arises can be deduced considering that (i) the problem that determines the fixed points is equivalent to finding the equilibrium solution for a linearly slip-weakening crack, and (ii) heterogeneities in the parameter a/b have analogy in the equivalent problem to heterogeneities in the background stress. Physically, instability develops where rate-weakening is strongest. We examined the influence such a heterogeneity has on the fixed point attractor (and hence on the instability development) by considering the scenario of a rate-weakening patch embedded within a rate-strengthening region with in-plane or anti-plane slip conditions. Specifically, we solve for fixed points under a rate-weakening heterogeneity within |x|1) outside. Additionally, a linear stability analysis reveals the effect of heterogeneity on the stability of the fixed points of the dynamical system. The heterogeneity parameters (a

  11. Sound velocities in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite shocked to 18 GPa: Orientational order dependence and elastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Marcel; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports of rapid phase transformation above 18 GPa [Erskine and Nellis, Nature 349, 317 (1991)] and large elastic waves below 18 GPa [Lucas et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 093515 (2013)] for shock-compressed ZYB-grade highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), but not for less oriented ZYH-grade HOPG, indicated a link between the orientational order dependence of the HOPG response above and below the phase transformation stress. To gain insight into this link and into the mechanical response of HOPG shocked to peak stresses approaching the phase transformation onset, the compressibility of ZYB- and ZYH-grade HOPG in the shocked state was examined using front surface impact experiments. Particle velocity histories and sound velocities were measured for peak stresses reaching 18 GPa. Although the locus of the measured peak stress-particle velocity states is indistinguishable for the two grades of HOPG, the measured sound velocities in the peak state reveal significant differences between the two grades. Specifically (1) the measured sound velocities are somewhat higher for ZYH-grade HOPG compared with ZYB-grade HOPG; (2) the measured sound velocities for ZYH-grade HOPG increase smoothly with compression, whereas those for ZYB-grade HOPG exhibit a significant reduction in the compression dependence from 12 GPa to 17 GPa and an abrupt increase from 17 GPa to 18 GPa; and (3) the longitudinal moduli, determined from the measured sound velocities, are smaller than the calculated bulk moduli for ZYB-grade HOPG shocked to peak stresses above 15 GPa, indicating the onset of an elastic instability. The present findings demonstrate that the softening of the longitudinal modulus (or elastic instability) presented here is linked to the large elastic waves and the rapid phase transformation reported previously—all observed only for shocked ZYB-grade HOPG. The elastic instability in shocked ZYB-grade HOPG is likely a precursor to the rapid phase transformation observed

  12. Debris disc formation induced by planetary growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Löhne, T.

    2014-08-01

    Several hundred stars older than 10 million years have been observed to have infrared excesses. These observations are explained by dust grains formed by the collisional fragmentation of hidden planetesimals. Such dusty planetesimal discs are known as debris discs. In a dynamically cold planetesimal disc, collisional coagulation of planetesimals produces planetary embryos which then stir the surrounding leftover planetesimals. Thus, the collisional fragmentation of planetesimals that results from planet formation forms a debris disc. We aim to determine the properties of the underlying planetesimals in debris discs by numerically modelling the coagulation and fragmentation of planetesimal populations. The brightness and temporal evolution of debris discs depend on the radial distribution of planetesimal discs, the location of their inner and outer edges, their total mass, and the size of planetesimals in the disc. We find that a radially narrow planetesimal disc is most likely to result in a debris disc that can explain the trend of observed infrared excesses of debris discsvvv around G-type stars, for which planet formation occurs only before 100 million years. Early debris disc formation is induced by planet formation, while the later evolution is explained by the collisional decay of leftover planetesimals around planets that have already formed. Planetesimal discs with underlying planetesimals of radii ˜100 km at ≈30 au most readily explain the Spitzer Space Telescope 24 and 70 μm fluxes from debris discs around G-type stars.

  13. Janus discs.

    PubMed

    Walther, Andreas; André, Xavier; Drechsler, Markus; Abetz, Volker; Müller, Axel H E

    2007-05-16

    We describe the synthesis and the solution properties of sheet- and disclike Janus particles, containing an inner crosslinked polybutadiene (PB) layer and two different outer sides of polystyrene (PS) and poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) (PtBMA). The structures formed upon adsorption of the flat Janus particles onto solid substrates as well as in THF solution are investigated. The Janus discs are obtained in a template-assisted synthetic pathway followed by sonication. Selectively crosslinking the lamellar PB domains in a well-ordered lamellar microphase-separated bulk morphology of PS-block-PB-block-PtBMA (SBT) block terpolymers leads to the conservation of the compartmentalization of the two outer blocks. Sonication of the crosslinked block terpolymer templates renders soluble sheet- and disclike Janus particles, the size of which can be tuned from the micrometer range down to the nanometer scale. Small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the template-assisted synthetic process and the solution properties. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy in THF and TEM of particles, embedded into a photo-crosslinkable silicon oil, indicate a supramolecular aggregation behavior of the Janus discs in concentrated solutions. Pendant drop tensiometry demonstrates that Janus sheets and discs can be used to stabilize liquid-liquid interfaces, rendering these materials interesting for future applications. PMID:17441717

  14. Instabilities of bellows: Dependence on internal pressure, end supports, and interactions in accelerator magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    For superconducting magnets, one needs many bellows for connection of various helium cooling transfer lines in addition to beam tube bellows. There could be approximately 10,000 magnet interconnection bellows in the SSC exposed to an internal pressure. When axially compressed or internally pressurized, bellows can become unstable, leading to gross distortion or complete failure. If several bellows are contained in an assembly, failure modes might interact. If designed properly, large bellows can be a very feasible possibility for connecting the large tubular shells that support the magnet iron yokes and superconducting coils and contain supercritical helium for magnet cooling. We present here (1) a spring-supported bellows model, in order to develop necessary design features for bellows and end supports so that instabilities will not occur in the bellows pressure operating region, including some margin, (2) a model of three superconducting accelerator magnets connected by two large bellows, in order to ascertain that support requirements are satisfied and in order to study interaction effects between the two bellows. Reliability of bellows for our application will be stressed. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Experimental study of initial condition dependence on mixing in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Prestridge, Katherine P; Orlicz, Gregory C; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar J

    2010-11-18

    Recent work has shown that buoyancy-driven turbulence can be affected at late time by initial conditions, thus presenting an opportunity to predict and design late-time turbulent mixing, with transformative impact on our understanding and prediction of Inertial Confinement Fusion and general fluid mixing processes. In this communication, we report results on the initial condition parameters, amplitude ({delta}) and wavelength ({lambda}) of perturbation, that impact the material mixing and transition to turbulence in shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Experiments were conducted using a stable, membrane-free, heavy gas varicose curtain (air-SF{sub 6}-air) at shock Mach number, Ma = 1.2. The velocity and density field of our initial conditions was quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar-Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively. Quantitative measurements on the temporal and spatial evolution of developing structures after first shock and subsequent re-shock at different times obtained using PLlF aid us in understating the importance of the initial conditions on transition to turbulence and mixing.

  16. Amplification of Reynolds number dependent processes by wave distortion. [acoustic instability of liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventrice, M. B.; Fang, J. C.; Purdy, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A system using a hot-wire transducer as an analog of a liquid droplet of propellant was employed to investigate the ingredients of the acoustic instability of liquid-propellant rocket engines. It was assumed that the combustion process was vaporization-limited and that the combustion chamber was acoustically similar to a closed-closed right-circular cylinder. Before studying the hot-wire closed-loop system (the analog system), a microphone closed-loop system, which used the response of a microphone as the source of a linear feedback exciting signal, was investigated to establish the characteristics of self-sustenance of acoustic fields. Self-sustained acoustic fields were found to occur only at resonant frequencies of the chamber. In the hot-wire closed-loop system, the response of hot-wire anemometer was used as the source of the feedback exciting signal. The self-sustained acoustic fields which developed in the system were always found to be harmonically distorted and to have as their fundamental frquency a resonant frequency for which there also existed a second resonant frequency which was approximately twice the fundamental frequency.

  17. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  18. Investigation of negative bias temperature instability dependence on fin width of silicon-on-insulator-fin-based field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Chadwin D. Wang, Zhe; Neugroschel, Arnost; Majumdar, Kausik; Matthews, Ken; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-01-21

    The fin width dependence of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) of double-gate, fin-based p-type Field Effect Transistors (FinFETs) fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers was investigated. The NBTI degradation increased as the fin width narrowed. To investigate this phenomenon, simulations of pre-stress conditions were employed to determine any differences in gate oxide field, fin band bending, and electric field profile as a function of the fin width. The simulation results were similar at a given gate stress bias, regardless of the fin width, although the threshold voltage was found to increase with decreasing fin width. Thus, the NBTI fin width dependence could not be explained from the pre-stress conditions. Different physics-based degradation models were evaluated using specific fin-based device structures with different biasing schemes to ascertain an appropriate model that best explains the measured NBTI dependence. A plausible cause is an accumulation of electrons that tunnel from the gate during stress into the floating SOI fin body. As the fin narrows, the sidewall device channel moves in closer proximity to the stored electrons, thereby inducing more band bending at the fin/dielectric interface, resulting in a higher electric field and hole concentration in this region during stress, which leads to more degradation. The data obtained in this work provide direct experimental proof of the effect of electron accumulation on the threshold voltage stability in FinFETs.

  19. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  20. Impact of Temperature-dependent Resistivity and Thermal Conduction on Plasmoid Instabilities in Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Lei; Roussev, Ilia I.; Lin, Jun; Ziegler, Udo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate, by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the impact of temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conduction on the development of plasmoid instabilities in reconnecting current sheets in the solar corona. We find that the plasma temperature in the current-sheet region increases with time and it becomes greater than that in the inflow region. As secondary magnetic islands appear, the highest temperature is not always found at the reconnection X-points, but also inside the secondary islands. One of the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction is to decrease the temperature of the reconnecting X-points and transfer the heat into the O-points, the plasmoids, where it gets trapped. In the cases with temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, η ~ T -3/2, the decrease in plasma temperature at the X-points leads to (1) an increase in the magnetic diffusivity until the characteristic time for magnetic diffusion becomes comparable to that of thermal conduction, (2) an increase in the reconnection rate, and (3) more efficient conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy and kinetic energy of bulk motions. These results provide further explanation of the rapid release of magnetic energy into heat and kinetic energy seen during flares and coronal mass ejections. In this work, we demonstrate that the consideration of anisotropic thermal conduction and Spitzer-type, temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, as in the real solar corona, are crucially important for explaining the occurrence of fast reconnection during solar eruptions.

  1. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  2. Experimental study of initial condition dependence on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the presence of reshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Orlicz, G. C.; Prestridge, K. P.; Balakumar, B. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present an experimental study on the dependence of initial condition parameters, namely, the amplitude δ and wavenumber κ (κ = 2π/λ, where λ is the wavelength) of perturbations, on turbulence and mixing in shock-accelerated Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) unstable fluid layers. A single mode, membrane-free varicose heavy gas curtain (air-SF6-air) at a shock Mach number M = 1.2 was used in our experiments. The density (concentration) and velocity fields for this initial configuration were measured using planar laser -induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). In order to understand the effects of multi-mode initial conditions on shock-accelerated mixing, the evolving fluid interface formed during the incident shock (M = 1.2) was shocked again by a reflected shock wave at various times using a movable wall, thus enabling us to change both δ and κ simultaneously. A dimensionless length-scale defined as η = κδ is proposed to parametrically link the initial condition dependence to late-time mixing. It was observed experimentally that high wavenumber (short wavelength) modes enhance the mixing and transition to turbulence in these flows. Statistics such as power spectral density, density self-correlation, turbulent kinetic energy, and the rms of velocity fluctuations were measured using simultaneous PLIF-PIV to quantify the amount of mixing for varying values of η. The results indicate a dependence of initial condition parameters on mixing at late times. The results of this study present an opportunity to predict and "design" late-time turbulent mixing that has applications in inertial confinement fusion and general fluid mixing processes.

  3. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  4. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  5. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  6. SMC3 knockdown triggers genomic instability and p53-dependent apoptosis in human and zebrafish cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    Background The structural maintenance of chromosome 3 (SMC3) protein is a constituent of a number of nuclear multimeric protein complexes that are involved in DNA recombination and repair in addition to chromosomal segregation. Overexpression of SMC3 activates a tumorigenic cascade through which mammalian cells acquire a transformed phenotype. This has led us to examine in depth how SMC3 level affects cell growth and genomic stability. In this paper the effect of SMC3 knockdown has been investigated. Results Mammalian cells that are SMC3 deficient fail to expand in a clonal population. In order to shed light on the underlying mechanism, experiments were conducted in zebrafish embryos in which cell competence to undergo apoptosis is acquired at specific stages of development and affects tissue morphogenesis. Zebrafish Smc3 is 95% identical to the human protein, is maternally contributed, and is expressed ubiquitously at all developmental stages. Antisense-mediated loss of Smc3 function leads to increased apoptosis in Smc3 expressing cells of the developing tail and notocord causing morphological malformations. The apoptosis and the ensuing phenotype can be suppressed by injection of a p53-specific MO that blocks the generation of endogenous p53 protein. Results in human cells constitutively lacking p53 or BAX, confirmed that a p53-dependent pathway mediates apoptosis in SMC3-deficient cells. A population of aneuploid cells accumulated in zebrafish embryos following Smc3-knockdown whereas in human cells the transient downregulation of SMC3 level lead to the generation of cells with amplified centrosome number. Conclusion Smc3 is required for normal embryonic development. Its deficiency affects the morphogenesis of tissues with high mitotic index by triggering an apoptotic cascade involving p53 and the downstream p53 target gene bax. Cells with low SMC3 level display centrosome abnormalities that can lead to or are the consequence of dysfunctional mitosis and

  7. Coupled Marangoni-Benard/Rayleigh-Benard Instability with Temperature Dependent Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Mccaughan, Frances E.

    1994-01-01

    The onset of convection induced by coupled surface tension gradient and buoyancy forces is investigated with temperature dependent viscosity. Both surface tension and viscosity are assumed to vary linearly with temperature. The limiting case, Ma=0, is the buoyancy driven convection problem typically referred to as the Rayleigh-Benard stability problem. The other limiting case, Ra=0, is the surface tension (gradient) driven flow problem referred to as the Marangoni-Benard problem. The equations and boundary conditions obtained from the linear analysis are solved numerically as a generalized eigenvalue problem. Neutral stability curves for different viscosity slopes have been generated for the Marangoni-Benard and Rayleigh-Benard problems. It is shown that the curves can be collapsed to a single curve by appropriately scaling the results for each of the limiting cases. The critical Marangoni number is determined as a function of the slope of the viscosity temperature variation, epsilon, for different values of the Rayleigh number. When the viscosity decreases linearly with temperature, the coupled buoyancy-surface tension problem, including the limiting cases of Ra=0 and Ma=0, is found to be more stable than the constant viscosity case.

  8. 5-Fluorouracil-induced RNA stress engages a TRAIL-DISC-dependent apoptosis axis facilitated by p53

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Birce; Bracht, Ethiene V.; Reijnders, Dorin; Safarikova, Barbora; Jelinkova, Iva; Grandien, Alf; Vaculova, Alena Hyrslova; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Olsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in targeted therapeutics, administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) remains a common clinical strategy for post-surgical treatment of solid tumors. Although it has been proposed that RNA metabolism is disturbed by 5-FU treatment, the key cytotoxic response is believed to be enzymatic inhibition of thymidylate synthase resulting in nucleotide pool disproportions. An operating p53 tumor suppressor signaling network is in many cases essential for the efficiency of chemotherapy, and malfunctions within this system remain a clinical obstacle. Since the fate of chemotherapy-insensitive tumor cells is rarely described, we performed a comparative analysis of 5-FU toxicity in p53-deficient cells and conclude that p53 acts as a facilitator rather than a gatekeeper of cell death. Although p53 can act as a regulator of several cellular stress responses, no rerouting of cell death mode was observed in absence of the tumor suppressor. Thus, the final death outcome of 5-FU-treated p53−/− cells is demonstrated to be caspase-dependent, but due to a slow pace, accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species contributes to necrotic characteristics. The oligomerization status of the p53 target gene DR5 is determined as a significant limiting factor for the initiation of caspase activity in an intracellular TRAIL-dependent manner. Using several experimental approaches, we further conclude that RNA- rather than DNA-related stress follows by caspase activation irrespectively of p53 status. A distinct 5-FU-induced stress mechanism is thereby functionally connected to a successive and discrete cell death signaling pathway. Finally, we provide evidence that silencing of PARP-1 function may be an approach to specifically target p53-deficient cells in 5-FU combinatorial treatment strategies. Together, our results disclose details of impaired cell death signaling engaged as a consequence of 5-FU chemotherapy. Obtained data will contribute to the comprehension of

  9. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R. John; Baillie, George S.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal ‘head’ domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1’s C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1D453G mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1D453G mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1D453G mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans. PMID:26728762

  10. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R John; Baillie, George S; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal 'head' domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1's C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1(D453G) mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1(D453G) mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1(D453G) mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans. PMID:26728762

  11. A viscosity prescription for a self-gravitating accretion disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    A model for treating the transfer of angular momentum within a gaseous differentially rotating disc subject to gravitational instability is discussed in terms of an effective kinematic viscosity. It is assumed that even when matter in the disc is subject to self-gravitation, the instability does not necessarily lead directly to condensation of parts of the disc into self-gravitating bodies. Conditions under which the present model permits a similarity solution are discussed, and it is shown that the general solution tends to the similarity solution at large times.

  12. IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT RESISTIVITY AND THERMAL CONDUCTION ON PLASMOID INSTABILITIES IN CURRENT SHEETS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Lei; Roussev, Ilia I.; Lin Jun; Ziegler, Udo E-mail: iroussev@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-10-10

    In this paper, we investigate, by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the impact of temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conduction on the development of plasmoid instabilities in reconnecting current sheets in the solar corona. We find that the plasma temperature in the current-sheet region increases with time and it becomes greater than that in the inflow region. As secondary magnetic islands appear, the highest temperature is not always found at the reconnection X-points, but also inside the secondary islands. One of the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction is to decrease the temperature of the reconnecting X-points and transfer the heat into the O-points, the plasmoids, where it gets trapped. In the cases with temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, {eta} {approx} T {sup -3/2}, the decrease in plasma temperature at the X-points leads to (1) an increase in the magnetic diffusivity until the characteristic time for magnetic diffusion becomes comparable to that of thermal conduction, (2) an increase in the reconnection rate, and (3) more efficient conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy and kinetic energy of bulk motions. These results provide further explanation of the rapid release of magnetic energy into heat and kinetic energy seen during flares and coronal mass ejections. In this work, we demonstrate that the consideration of anisotropic thermal conduction and Spitzer-type, temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, as in the real solar corona, are crucially important for explaining the occurrence of fast reconnection during solar eruptions.

  13. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  14. Intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, S T

    1992-07-01

    This article describes the functional anatomy of intervertebral discs and their relationship to the vertebrae and spinal cord. The pathologic events and clinical complications of intervertebral disc disease are described. A discussion of proper staging of disc disease and appropriate conservative management of degenerative disc disease is included. PMID:1641922

  15. The Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Banerjee, Rahul; Varshochi, Hilda; Khan, Manoranjan; Lawrie, Andrew; Variable g RT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    From detailed numerical simulations of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories, we report on several findings of relevance to the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules. The incompressible, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) were performed in two- and three-dimensions, and over a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We have investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles g(t) of the general form tn, with n > -2. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations are compared with a potential flow model developed and reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with an extension to the drag buoyancy model with modifications for time-dependent acceleration histories. We have come up with simple analytic solutions to the Drag Buoyancy model for variable g flows, and compared the solution with the 2D and 3D DNS results. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  16. Broken discs: warp propagation in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Christopher J.; King, Andrew R.

    2012-04-01

    We simulate the viscous evolution of an accretion disc around a spinning black hole. In general, any such disc is misaligned, and warped by the Lense-Thirring effect. Unlike previous studies, we use effective viscosities constrained to be consistent with the internal fluid dynamics of the disc. We find that non-linear fluid effects, which reduce the effective viscosities in warped regions, can promote breaking of the disc into two distinct planes. This occurs when the Shakura & Sunyaev dimensionless viscosity parameter α is ≲0.3 and the initial angle of misalignment between the disc and hole is ≳45°. The break can be a long-lived feature, propagating outwards in the disc on the usual alignment time-scale, after which the disc is fully co-aligned or counter-aligned with the hole. Such a break in the disc may be significant in systems where we know the inclination of the outer accretion disc to the line of sight, such as some X-ray binaries: the inner disc, and so any jets, may be noticeably misaligned with respect to the orbital plane.

  17. Dancing Discs: Bending and Twisting of Soft Materials by Anisotropic Swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Roché, Matthieu; Sinha, Tarun; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Soft materials, e.g. biological tissues and gels, undergo morphological changes, motion, and instabilities when subjected to external stimuli. Tissues can exhibit residual internal stresses induced by growth, and generate elastic deformations to move in response to light or touch, curl articular cartilage, aid in seed dispersal, and actuate hygromorphs, such as pine cones. Understanding the dynamics of such osmotically driven movements, in the influence of geometry and boundary conditions, is crucial to the controlled deformation of soft materials. We examine how thin elastic plates undergo rapid bending and buckling instabilities after anisotropic exposure to a favorable solvent that swells the network. An unconstrained beam bends along its length, while a circular disc bends and buckles with multiple curvatures. In the case of a disc, a large-amplitude transverse travelling wave rotates azimuthally around the disc. Theoretical interpretations inspired by the complementary thermal expansion problem of transient shape changes triggered by time-dependent heating are presented and allow collapse of time-dependent data on universal curves. Understanding the dynamics of strain-driven shape changes provides new insight into natural systems and control of advanced functional materials.

  18. On the convective overstability in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the driving of low-level hydrodynamical activity in protoplanetary-disc dead zones. A small adverse radial entropy gradient, ordinarily stabilized by rotation, excites oscillatory convection (`convective overstability') when thermal diffusion, or cooling, is neither too strong nor too weak. I revisit the linear theory of the instability, discuss its prevalence in protoplanetary discs, and show that unstable modes are exact non-linear solutions in the local Boussinesq limit. Overstable modes cannot grow indefinitely, however, as they are subject to a secondary parametric instability that limits their amplitudes to relatively low levels. If parasites set the saturation level of the ensuing turbulence then the convective overstability is probably too weak to drive significant angular momentum transport or to generate vortices. But I also discuss an alternative, and far more vigorous, saturation route that generates radial `layers' or `zonal flows' (witnessed in semiconvection). Numerical simulations are required to determine which outcome is favoured in realistic discs, and consequently how important the instability is for disc dynamics.

  19. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, P.; Karkhanis, V.; Banerjee, R.; Varshochi, H.; Khan, M.; Lawrie, A. G. W.

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g (t ) ˜tn , with n ≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g (t ) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s2, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids—at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s2 and Z , while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models.

  20. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations.

    PubMed

    Ramaprabhu, P; Karkhanis, V; Banerjee, R; Varshochi, H; Khan, M; Lawrie, A G W

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g(t)∼t^{n}, with n≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009)10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g(t) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s^{2}, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids-at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s^{2} and Z, while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models. PMID:26871165

  1. Accretion disc viscosity: a limit on the anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Observations of warped discs can give insight into the nature of angular momentum transport in accretion discs. Only a few objects are known to show strong periodicity on long time-scales, but when such periodicity is present it is often attributed to precession of the accretion disc. The X-ray binary Hercules X-1/HZ Herculis (Her X-1) is one of the best examples of such periodicity and has been linked to disc precession since it was first observed. By using the current best-fitting models to Her X-1, which invoke precession driven by radiation warping, I place a constraint on the effective viscosities that act in a warped disc. These effective viscosities almost certainly arise due to turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability. The constraints derived here are in agreement with analytical and numerical investigations into the nature of magnetohydrodynamic disc turbulence, but at odds with some recent global simulations.

  2. Structure of evolving Accretion Discs and their Implications to the Formation of Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Lega, E.

    2013-10-01

    Two features in a protoplanetary disc can have profound effects on planet formation. The first feature is "pressure bumps", i.e. local maxima in the gas surface density distribution that can arise e.g. at the inner edge of the dead zone. Pressure bumps stop the inward migration of small bodies undergoing gas drag (Brauer et al., 2008), promote the onset of the streaming instability (Johansen and Youdin, 2007), help the accretion of planetary embryos by the pebble-accretion process (Lambrechts and Johansen, 2012) and stop inward type-I migration by the planet-trap mechanism (Masset et al., 2006). The second feature is "scale height bumps", that originate from opacity transitions. The regions of the disc that are shadowed, where H/r decreases with r, allow planetary cores to migrate outwards due to entropy gradient effects (Paardekooper and Mellema (2006), Baruteau and Masset (2008)), until they reach the local minimum of the H/r profile (Bitsch et al. 2013). Thus, it is important to model the existence and the location of these structures in realistic protoplanetary discs. The structure of the disc is dependent on the mass-flux (accretion rate) through the disc, which determines the evolution of the density profile. This mass-flux changes in time, as the whole disc gets accreted onto the central star. We will show using 2D hydrodynamical models how the change of the accretion rate affects the disc structure and how this will change the sweet-spots for saving planetary cores from too rapid inward migration. We will focus here on "scale height bumps" in the disc that will change the alpha-viscosity and consequently the gas surface density (as the mass-flux is constant through the disc). Therefore the formation of pressure bumps is possible, whose prominence and effects on migration will be investigated in detail. This will give important indications of where and when in the disc the cores of giant planets and thus giant planets can form.

  3. TP53-dependent chromosome instability is associated with transient reductions in telomere length in immortal telomerase-positive cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Jordan, R.; Liber, H.; Murnane, J. P.; Evans, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    Telomere shortening in telomerase-negative somatic cells leads to the activation of the TP53 protein and the elimination of potentially unstable cells. We examined the effect of TP53 gene expression on both telomere metabolism and chromosome stability in immortal, telomerase-positive cell lines. Telomere length, telomerase activity, and chromosome instability were measured in multiple clones isolated from three related human B-lymphoblast cell lines that vary in TP53 expression; TK6 cells express wild-type TP53, WTK1 cells overexpress a mutant form of TP53, and NH32 cells express no TP53 protein. Clonal variations in both telomere length and chromosome stability were observed, and shorter telomeres were associated with higher levels of chromosome instability. The shortest telomeres were found in WTK1- and NH32-derived cells, and these cells had 5- to 10-fold higher levels of chromosome instability. The primary marker of instability was the presence of dicentric chromosomes. Aneuploidy and other stable chromosome alterations were also found in clones showing high levels of dicentrics. Polyploidy was found only in WTK1-derived cells. Both telomere length and chromosome instability fluctuated in the different cell populations with time in culture, presumably as unstable cells and cells with short telomeres were eliminated from the growing population. Our results suggest that transient reductions in telomere lengths may be common in immortal cell lines and that these alterations in telomere metabolism can have a profound effect on chromosome stability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) L100P mutants have impaired activity-dependent plasticity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tropea, D; Molinos, I; Petit, E; Bellini, S; Nagakura, I; O'Tuathaigh, C; Schorova, L; Mitchell, K J; Waddington, J; Sur, M; Gill, M; Corvin, A P

    2016-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are genetically complex but share overlapping etiology. Mice mutant for rare, highly penetrant risk variants can be useful in dissecting the molecular mechanisms involved. The gene disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) has been associated with increased risk for neuropsychiatric conditions. Mice mutant for Disc1 display morphological, functional and behavioral deficits that are consistent with impairments observed across these disorders. Here we report that Disc1 L100P mutants are less able to reorganize cortical circuitry in response to stimulation in vivo. Molecular analysis reveals that the mutants have a reduced expression of PSD95 and pCREB in visual cortex and fail to adjust expression of such markers in response to altered stimulation. In vitro analysis shows that mutants have impaired functional reorganization of cortical neurons in response to selected forms of neuronal stimulation, but there is no altered basal expression of synaptic markers. These findings suggest that DISC1 has a critical role in the reorganization of cortical plasticity and that this phenotype becomes evident only under challenge, even at early postnatal stages. This result may represent an important etiological mechanism in the emergence of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26756905

  5. On the dynamics of planetesimals embedded in turbulent protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard P.; Gressel, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Angular momentum transport and accretion in protoplanetary discs are generally believed to be driven by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The dynamics of solid bodies embedded in such discs (dust grains, boulders, planetesimals and planets) may be strongly affected by the turbulence, such that the formation pathways for planetary systems are determined in part by the strength and spatial distribution of the turbulent flow. We examine the dynamics of planetesimals, with radii between 1m and 10km, embedded in turbulent protoplanetary discs, using 3D MHD simulations. The planetesimals experience gas drag and stochastic gravitational forces due to the turbulent disc. We use, and compare the results from, local shearing box simulations and global models in this study. The main aims of this work are to examine: the growth, and possible saturation, of the velocity dispersion of embedded planetesimals as a function of their size and disc parameters; the rate of radial migration and diffusion of planetesimals; the conditions under which the results from shearing box and global simulations agree. We find good agreement between local and global simulations when shearing boxes of dimension 4H × 16H × 2H are used (H being the local scaleheight). The magnitude of the density fluctuations obtained is sensitive to the box size, due to the excitation and propagation of spiral density waves. This affects the stochastic forcing experienced by planetesimals. The correlation time associated with the stochastic forcing is also found to be a function of the box size and aspect ratio. The equilibrium radial velocity dispersion, σ(vr), obtained depends on the radii, Rp, of the planetesimals. Bodies with Rp = 50m achieve the smallest value with σ(vr) ~= 20ms-1. Smaller bodies are tightly coupled to the gas, and boulders with Rp = 1m attain a value of σ(vr) similar to the turbulent velocity of the gas (~100ms-1). Equilibrium values of

  6. Video Discs in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1986-01-01

    This discussion of the use of images in learning processes focuses on recent developments in optical storage disc technology, particularly compact disc read-only (CD-ROM) and optical video discs. Interactive video systems and user interfaces are described, and applications in education and industry in the United Kingdom are reviewed. (Author/LRW)

  7. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  8. Dust dynamics in 2D gravito-turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of solid bodies in protoplanetary discs are subject to the properties of any underlying gas turbulence. Turbulence driven by disc self-gravity shows features distinct from those driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the dynamics of solids in gravito-turbulent discs with two-dimensional (in the disc plane), hybrid (particle and gas) simulations. Gravito-turbulent discs can exhibit stronger gravitational stirring than MRI-active discs, resulting in greater radial diffusion and larger eccentricities and relative speeds for large particles (those with dimensionless stopping times tstopΩ > 1, where Ω is the orbital frequency). The agglomeration of large particles into planetesimals by pairwise collisions is therefore disfavoured in gravito-turbulent discs. However, the relative speeds of intermediate-size particles (tstopΩ ˜ 1) are significantly reduced as such particles are collected by gas drag and gas gravity into coherent filament-like structures with densities high enough to trigger gravitational collapse. First-generation planetesimals may form via gravitational instability of dust in marginally gravitationally unstable gas discs.

  9. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds have been performed. The results show a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The qualitative features of the model agree well with the reqirements of displaced narrow absorption components in UV lines.

  10. Disc structure and variability in dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, Emilios Theofanus

    An introduction is given to dwarf novae reviewing the current research status in the field. We present IUE observations of Z Cha which support the mass transfer instability as the cause of the superoutbursts observed in SU UMa type dwarf novae. Comparison between the superoutburst and a normal outburst of Z Cha shows that the disc is flatter and has significantly less azimuthal structure than during superoutburst. Z Cha exhibits a soft x-ray deficit during superoutburst compared to OY Car. We find that the secondary star of Z Cha contributes approximately 30 percent of the infrared flux at peak of outburst. The second part of the thesis presents results from the 1988 International Time Project at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos. Investigation of the behavior of SU UMa and YZ Cnc is carried out through the outburst cycle. The secular changes of the equivalent widths of both systems shows an increasing trend even during quiescence and are caused by the continuum decrease. Both systems show a low-velocity emission component which contaminates the wings of the H(alpha) profile. In addition to doppler broadening, the Stark effect is found to cause significant broadening to the line profile. The radial dependence of the emission lines is discussed in relation to other cataclysmic variables. H(alpha) emission from the secondary star of YZ Cnc is found during superoutburst, during outburst and during quiescence after outburst. Photometry during late decline of outburst shows a sinusoidal, weak variation peaking at 0.5 orbital phase and which is related to heating of the red star or to a transient disc event. During quiescence, the flickering is found to be caused by the bright spot. This modulation increases with time and is maximum before the outburst. Doppler tomography of IP Peg during quiescence reveals an emission line distribution not consistent to the standard model. We find Balmer emission from the secondary star, at a level of only 2.5 percent of the

  11. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  12. Tracing Planets in Circumstellar Discs. Observability of Large-scale Disc Structures with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, Jan Philipp; Wolf, Sebastian; Uribe, Ana L.; Klahr, Hubert H.

    2013-04-01

    ]. We also find, that zonal flows resulting from magneto-rotational instability (MRI) create gap-like structures in the disc re-emission radiation which are observable with ALMA. Through the unprecedented resolution and sensitivity of ALMA in the (sub)mm wavelength range the expected detailed observations of planet-disc interaction and global disc structures will deepen our understanding of the planet formation and disc evolution process. This article presents a summary of the study published by [2].

  13. Termination of the MRI via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae: influence of numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembiasz, T.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. Á.; Müller, E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of numerical methods and grid resolution on the termination of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of parasitic instabilities in threedimensional shearing-disc simulations reproducing typical conditions found in core-collapse supernovae. Whether or not the MRI is able to amplify weak magnetic fields in this context strongly depends, among other factors, on the amplitude at which its growth terminates. The qualitative results of our study do not depend on the numerical scheme. In all our models, MRI termination is caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, consistent with theoretical predictions. Quantitatively, however, there are differences, but numerical convergence can be achieved even at relatively low grid resolutions if high-order reconstruction methods are used.

  14. Time-dependent Marangoni-Bénard instability of an evaporating binary-liquid layer including gas transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dauby, P. C.

    2013-08-01

    We are here concerned with Bénard instabilities in a horizontal layer of a binary liquid, considering as a working example the case of an aqueous solution of ethanol with a mass fraction of 0.1. Both the solvent and the solute evaporate into air (the latter being insoluble in the liquid). The system is externally constrained by imposing fixed "ambient" pressure, humidity, and temperature values at a certain effective transfer distance above the liquid-gas interface, while the ambient temperature is also imposed at the impermeable rigid bottom of the liquid layer. Fully transient and horizontally homogeneous solutions for the reference state, resulting from an instantaneous exposure of the liquid layer to ambient air, are first calculated. Then, the linear stability of these solutions is studied using the frozen-time approach, leading to critical (monotonic marginal stability) curves in the parameter plane spanned by the liquid layer thickness and the elapsed time after initial contact. This is achieved for different ratios of the liquid and gas thicknesses, and in particular yields critical times after which instability sets in (for given thicknesses of both phases). Conversely, the analysis also predicts a critical thickness of the liquid layer below which no instability ever occurs. The nature of such critical thickness is explained in detail in terms of mass fraction profiles in both phases, as it indeed appears that the most important mechanism for instability onset is the solutal Marangoni one. Importantly, as compared to the result obtained previously under the quasi-steady assumption in the gas phase [H. Machrafi, A. Rednikov, P. Colinet, and P. C. Dauby, Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 192, 71 (2011)], 10.1140/epjst/e2011-01361-y, it is shown that relaxing this assumption may yield essentially lower values of the critical liquid thickness, especially for large gas-to-liquid thickness ratios. A good-working analytical model is developed for the description of such

  15. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  16. [The number of aberrations in aberrant cells as a parameter of chromosomal instability. 1. Characterization of dose dependency].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Bezrukov, V F; Lazarenko, L M; Rashydov, N M; Hrodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome instability (CI) is of great importance in view of pollution of the environment by genotoxic factors. Frequency of aberrant cells, spectrum of chromosome aberrations, damages of aberrant cell and distribution of aberrations in the cells are the most conventional parameters of CI. We have carried out the comparative analysis of the frequency of aberrant cells and the dynamics of aberrant cell damages induced by different mutagenic factors (alpha-irradiation from 241Am, gamma-irradiation from 60Co and tioTEPA) in Allium-test. This comparative analysis denotes that the studied parameters have different dynamics characterizing different mechanisms of CI in Allium cepa L. PMID:14569619

  17. [Revision surgery after implantation of a vertebral disc prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Hopf, C

    2008-04-01

    Assessment of the revisability of surgery after the endoprosthetic replacement of vertebral discs shows that the surgical approach depends on the time of revision surgery and the reason why it is carried out. Our experience is based on nine revision operations out of 152 cervical vertebra prostheses of the Bryan and Prodisc C types implanted from 2003 to 2007 and 312 endoprostheses of the Charité and Prodisc types implanted from 1999 to 2007. Our own results show differing approaches in perioperative or late postoperative revision operations. Operations to exchange implants were not possible, whereas a change of surgical procedure is the rule. The same access route can usually be selected in the cervical spine, but in the lumbar spine this can only be done perioperatively; if revision surgery is carried out at a later date, an alternative access route must be used. Using strict indications for the primary implant is the only way to prevent postoperative revision surgery that is due to an inaccurate primary assessment and not to the vertebral endoprosthesis (e.g. post-discotomy syndrome, facet joint arthropathy, rotation instability, vertebral slip). The next generation of vertebral disc endoprostheses must incorporate reduced load of the zygapophyseal joints and improved revisability. PMID:18340432

  18. Intermediate mass black holes in AGN discs - I. Production and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, B.; Ford, K. E. S.; Lyra, W.; Perets, H. B.

    2012-09-01

    Here we propose a mechanism for efficiently growing intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in discs around supermassive black holes. Stellar mass objects can efficiently agglomerate when facilitated by the gas disc. Stars, compact objects and binaries can migrate, accrete and merge within discs around supermassive black holes. While dynamical heating by cusp stars excites the velocity dispersion of nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) in the disc, gas in the disc damps NCO orbits. If gas damping dominates, NCOs remain in the disc with circularized orbits and large collision cross-sections. IMBH seeds can grow extremely rapidly by collisions with disc NCOs at low relative velocities, allowing for super-Eddington growth rates. Once an IMBH seed has cleared out its feeding zone of disc NCOs, growth of IMBH seeds can become dominated by gas accretion from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) disc. However, the IMBH can migrate in the disc and expand its feeding zone, permitting a super-Eddington accretion rate to continue. Growth of IMBH seeds via NCO collisions is enhanced by a pile-up of migrators. We highlight the remarkable parallel between the growth of IMBH in AGN discs with models of giant planet growth in protoplanetary discs. If an IMBH becomes massive enough it can open a gap in the AGN disc. IMBH migration in AGN discs may stall, allowing them to survive the end of the AGN phase and remain in galactic nuclei. Our proposed mechanisms should be more efficient at growing IMBH in AGN discs than the standard model of IMBH growth in stellar clusters. Dynamical heating of disc NCOs by cusp stars is transferred to the gas in an AGN disc helping to maintain the outer disc against gravitational instability. Model predictions, observational constraints and implications are discussed in a companion paper (Paper II).

  19. Shoulder Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors Is shoulder instability the same as shoulder dislocation? No. The signs of dislocation and instability might ... the same to you--weakness and pain. However, dislocation occurs when your shoulder goes completely out of place. The shoulder ligaments ...

  20. On the evolution of the Snow Line in Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We examine the evolution of the snow line in a protoplanetary disc. If the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) drives turbulence throughout the disc, there is a unique snow line outside of which the disc is icy. The snow line moves closer to the star as the infall accretion rate drops. Because the snow line moves inside the radius of the Earth's orbit, the formation of our water-devoid planet is difficult with this model. However, protoplanetary discs are not likely to be sufficiently ionised to be fully turbulent. A dead zone at the mid-plane slows the flow of material through the disc and a global steady state cannot be achieved. We model the evolution of the snow line also in a disc with a dead zone. As the mass is accumulating, the outer parts of the dead zone become self gravitating, heat the massive disc and thus the outer snow line does not come inside the radius of the Earth's orbit. With this model there is sufficient time and mass in the disc for the Earth to form from water-devoid planetesimals at a radius of 1AU. Furthermore, the additional inner icy region within the dead zone predicted by this model may allow for the formation of giant planets close to their host star without the need for much migration.

  1. Perturbations of the Black Hole-Torus System: Instabilities and QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    2016-07-01

    The existence of the black hole (BH)-torus system has been given a considerable attention to explain the variability of X-ray and Gamma-ray (γ-ray) data. The perturbation of the black hole-torus system creates instabilities and some of these instabilities are responsible for a quasi-periodic oscillation. In this talk, we present the results from numerical simulation of the dynamical instability of a pressure-supported relativistic torus, rotating around the black hole with a constant specific angular momentum on a fixed space-time background, in case of perturbation. The types of instabilities and their amplitudes strongly depend on what kind of perturbation is applied. The types of perturbations can be a blob of hot gas, Bondi-Hoyle accretion from a finite distance, radial and angular velocity perturbations of the stable accreted torus, and non-spherical accretion as a consequence of isotropic fall of the spherical-shell which has finite thickness. We study the effects of perturbations onto the torus-black hole system by solving the hydrodynamical equations and we have found that the torus around the black hole would have an instability, which is called the Papaloizou-Pringle, and a quasi-periodic oscillation only if we choose a suitable perturbations and initial data. It is noted that, while the perturbations, which are called blob of hot gas, radial velocity perturbations and Bondi-Hoyle accretion, create the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, the Papaloizou-Pringle instability is softly developed and removed in a short time scale for spherical shell accretion. Our studies also indicate that QPOs are common phenomena on the disc around the black holes. If the accretion disc or torus has a quasi-periodic behavior, it emits continuous radiation during the oscillation.

  2. Modelling and observations of molecules in discs around young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilee, John David

    2013-04-01

    This thesis contains a study of molecules within circumstellar discs around young stars. Firstly, the chemistry of a disc around a young, Class 0 protostar is modelled. Such discs are thought to be massive, and thus experience gravitational instabilities, which produce spiral density waves. These affect the chemistry in three ways; by desorbing molecules from dust grains, by providing extra energy for new reactions to take place, and by mixing the internal structure of the disc to provide a rich chemistry near the midplane. Secondly, high resolution near-infrared spectra of 20 massive young stellar objects are presented. The objects display CO first overtone bandhead emission, which is excited in the conditions expected within circumstellar discs. The emission is modelled using a simple analytic model of a Keplerian disc, and good fits are found to all spectra. On average, the discs correspond to being geometrically thin, spread across a wide range of inclinations. The discs are located within the dust sublimation radius, providing strong evidence that the CO emission originates in small gaseous discs, supporting the scenario in which massive stars form via disc accretion. Finally, medium resolution near-infrared spectra of 5 Herbig Ae/Be stars are presented. The spectra cover both CO bandhead and Br gamma emission. Accretion rates are derived from the measuring the Br gamma emission and through modelling the CO emission, however these accretion rates are found to be inconsistent. High resolution archival data of one of the targets is presented, and it is shown that this CO disc model is unable to fit the high resolution data. Therefore, it is concluded that to properly fit CO spectra, high resolution data are needed, and that previously published information determined from low resolution spectra should be treated with caution.

  3. Modeling Jupiter's current disc: Pioneer 10 outbound

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.E.; Melville, J.G. II; Blake, M.L.

    1980-07-01

    The magnetic field of the Jovian current disc has been modeled by using Euler functions and the Biot-Savart law applied to a series of concentric, but not necessarily coplanar, current rings. We find that a best fit to the Pioneer 10 outbound perturbation magnetic field data (B/sub total/-B/sub dipole/) is obtained if the current disc is twisted (outer edges increasingly lag behind inner edges with radial distance) and also bent so as to tend toward parallelism with the Jovigraphic equator. The inner and outer radii of the disc appear to be about 7 R/sub J/ and 150 R/sub J/, respectively, although some indication of a changing magnetopause location is apparent in the data. Because of the observed current disc penetrations, the bent disc also requires a deformation in the form of a bump or wrinkle whose axis tends also to exhibit spiraling. The radial dependence of the azimuthal current in the disc is not described by a simple power law, the outer region showing a smaller power law dependence. Modeling of the azimuthal field shows it to be due to a thin radial current sheet, but there is some evidence that this may, in fact, be due in large part to penetration of a tail current sheet as suggested by the Voyager observations.

  4. On the possibility of a warped disc origin of the inclined stellar discs at the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulubay-Siddiki, A.; Bartko, H.; Gerhard, O.

    2013-01-01

    The central parsec of our Galaxy hosts a population of young stars. At distances of r ˜ 0.03-0.5 pc, most of these stars seem to form a system of mutually inclined discs of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating stars. We present a possible warped disc origin scenario for these stars assuming that an initially flat accretion disc becomes warped due to a central radiation source via the Pringle instability or due to a spinning black hole via the Bardeen-Petterson effect before it cools, fragments and forms stars. From simple arguments, we show that this is plausible if the star formation efficiency is high, ɛSF ≲ 1, and the viscosity parameter α ˜ 0.1. After fragmentation, we model the disc as a collection of concentric, circular rings tilted with respect to each other, and construct time evolution models of warped discs for mass ratios and other parameters relevant to the Galactic Centre environment, but also for more massive discs. We take into account the disc's self-gravity in the non-linear regime and the torques exerted by a slightly flattened surrounding star cluster. Our simulations show that a self-gravitating low-mass disc (Md/Mbh ˜ 0.001) precesses with its integrity maintained in the lifetime of the stars, but precesses essentially freely when the torques from a non-spherical cluster are included. An intermediate-mass disc (Md/Mbh ˜ 0.01) breaks into pieces, which precess as independent discs in the self-gravity-only case, and become disrupted in the presence of the star cluster torques. Finally, for a high-mass disc (Md/Mbh ˜ 0.1), the evolution is dominated by self-gravity and the disc is broken but not dissolved. The time-scale after which the disc breaks into pieces scales almost linearly with Md/Mbh for self-gravitating models. Typical values are longer than the age of the stars for Md/Mbh ˜ 0.001, and are in the range ˜8 × 104-105 yr for Md/Mbh ˜ 0.1-0.01, respectively. None of these discs explains the two Galactic Centre discs with

  5. A Framework for Quantifying and Understanding the Type of Topographic Dependence and Degree of Time-Instability in Catchment-Scale Soil Moisture Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, J. D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable in hydrology. It affects the partitioning of available energy between sensible and latent heat fluxes and the partitioning of rainfall between infiltration and overland flow. Spatial variability of soil moisture within a region or catchment is also important to the hydrologic behavior of that region or catchment. For example, the magnitude of spatial variability has been shown to affect regional rates of evapotranspiration, and the spatial structure of soil moisture patterns is known to affect the runoff production of a catchment. Topography has been shown to be a dominant control on soil moisture patterns at the catchment scale, but its influence often varies between catchments. Some soil moisture patterns depend most strongly on the hillslope orientation with wetter areas occurring on hillslopes that are more protected from the sun (e.g., the Cache la Poudre dataset). Other soil moisture patterns depend on the valley configuration with wetter areas occurring in the valley bottoms (e.g., the Satellite Station dataset). Still other patterns exhibit time-instability with the type of topographic dependence changing in time (e.g., the Tarrawarra dataset). This research aims to identify the local climatic and catchment characteristics that determine the type of topographic dependence and the strength of time instability in soil moisture patterns. A conceptual model is developed that estimates soil moisture patterns by assuming that the processes that affect soil moisture at any given point are in equilibrium. This assumption allows the spatial pattern of soil moisture to be estimated as a function of the spatial-average soil moisture. The model includes infiltration, lateral unsaturated flow, groundwater recharge, and evapotranspiration. The spatial variations in soil moisture that are produced by these processes are then described as functions of various topographic attributes. The model is tested through application to three

  6. Importance of wave-number dependence of Biot numbers in one-sided models of evaporative Marangoni instability: Horizontal layer and spherical droplet.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2015-05-01

    A one-sided model of the thermal Marangoni instability owing to evaporation into an inert gas is developed. Two configurations are studied in parallel: a horizontal liquid layer and a spherical droplet. With the dynamic gas properties being admittedly negligible, one-sided approaches typically hinge upon quantifying heat and mass transfer through the gas phase by means of transfer coefficients (like in the Newton's cooling law), which in dimensionless terms eventually corresponds to using Biot numbers. Quite a typical arrangement encountered in the literature is a constant Biot number, the same for perturbations of different wavelengths and maybe even the same as for the reference state. In the present work, we underscore the relevance of accounting for its wave-number dependence, which is especially the case in the evaporative context with relatively large values of the resulting effective Biot number. We illustrate the effect in the framework of the Marangoni instability thresholds. As a concrete example, we consider HFE-7100 (a standard refrigerant) for the liquid and air for the inert gas. PMID:26066259

  7. Effect of Size-Dependent Thermal Instability on Synthesis of Zn2 SiO4-SiOx Core–Shell Nanotube Arrays and Their Cathodoluminescence Properties

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Vertically aligned Zn2SiO4-SiOx(x < 2) core–shell nanotube arrays consisting of Zn2SiO4-nanoparticle chains encapsulated into SiOx nanotubes and SiOx-coated Zn2SiO4 coaxial nanotubes were synthesized via one-step thermal annealing process using ZnO nanowire (ZNW) arrays as templates. The appearance of different nanotube morphologies was due to size-dependent thermal instability and specific melting of ZNWs. With an increase in ZNW diameter, the formation mechanism changed from decomposition of “etching” to Rayleigh instability and then to Kirkendall effect, consequently resulting in polycrystalline Zn2SiO4-SiOx coaxial nanotubes, single-crystalline Zn2SiO4-nanoparticle-chain-embedded SiOx nanotubes, and single-crystalline Zn2SiO4-SiOx coaxial nanotubes. The difference in spatially resolved optical properties related to a particular morphology was efficiently documented by means of cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy using a middle-ultraviolet emission at 310 nm from the Zn2SiO4 phase. PMID:20672064

  8. Excess of Yra1 RNA-Binding Factor Causes Transcription-Dependent Genome Instability, Replication Impairment and Telomere Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldá, Sandra; Santos-Pereira, José M.; García-Rubio, María L.; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Yra1 is an essential nuclear factor of the evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like export factors that when overexpressed impairs mRNA export and cell growth. To investigate further the relevance of proper Yra1 stoichiometry in the cell, we overexpressed Yra1 by transforming yeast cells with YRA1 intron-less constructs and analyzed its effect on gene expression and genome integrity. We found that YRA1 overexpression induces DNA damage and leads to a transcription-associated hyperrecombination phenotype that is mediated by RNA:DNA hybrids. In addition, it confers a genome-wide replication retardation as seen by reduced BrdU incorporation and accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. In addition, YRA1 overexpression causes a cell senescence-like phenotype and telomere shortening. ChIP-chip analysis shows that overexpressed Yra1 is loaded to transcribed chromatin along the genome and to Y’ telomeric regions, where Rrm3 is also accumulated, suggesting an impairment of telomere replication. Our work not only demonstrates that a proper stoichiometry of the Yra1 mRNA binding and export factor is required to maintain genome integrity and telomere homeostasis, but suggests that the cellular imbalance between transcribed RNA and specific RNA-binding factors may become a major cause of genome instability mediated by co-transcriptional replication impairment. PMID:27035147

  9. Precision diagnostic disc injections.

    PubMed

    Fortin, J D

    2000-07-01

    Spinal pain is an important public health problem affecting the population indiscriminately. The structures responsible for pain in the spine include the vertebrae, intervertebral discs, spinal cord, nerve roots, facet joints, ligaments, muscles, atlanto-occipital joints, atlanto-axial joints, and sacroiliac joints. Even though disc herniation, facet joints, strained muscles, and torn ligaments have been attributed to be the cause of most spinal pain, either in the neck and upper extremities, upper and mid back, or low back and lower extremities, disorders of the disc other than disc herniation have been implicated more frequently than any other disorders. Once stifled by misinformation, discography now has applications in a number of clinical settings. While cervical and lumbar discography is well studied and well known, thoracic discography is in its nascent stages of clinical application. The value of discography lies in its ability to produce pain and thereby identify a "pain generator." This allows treatment to be based on the specific cause of pain. The three primary components of diagnostic disc injection are: provocation/analgesia, discometry, and nucleography. Despite the recent exponential growth of noninvasive spinal technology, diagnostic disc injection remains the sole direct method for definitively determining whether a disc is a physiological pain generator. It is clear that discography is a safe and powerful complement to the overall clinical context. PMID:16906185

  10. Percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1995-06-01

    Herniated disc disease has an incidence of 1.7% in the U.S. Heretofore, open operative procedures were the rule for this condition when conservative measures were ineffective. Choy and Ascher introduced this new technique in February 1986 using a Nd:YAG laser introduced into the disc through an optical fiber in a needle. Percutaneous laser disc decompression is based on the principle that in an enclosed hydraulic space, such as an intact disc, a small reduction in volume is associated with a disproportionate fall in pressure. In the disc, this partial vacuum causes the herniated portion to move away from the nerve root back toward the center of the disc. This technique has been taught worldwide and is being performed in most of Europe, Japan, the United States, and Korea. In this special issue devoted to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), we will set forth the basic science of PLDD, patient selection, use of the holmium:YAG, and the Nd:YAG lasers, operative technique, and results. PMID:10150634

  11. Accretion disc dynamo activity in local simulations spanning weak-to-strong net vertical magnetic flux regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-03-01

    Strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes have attractive features that may explain enigmatic aspects of X-ray binary behaviour. The structure and evolution of these discs are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels part of the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) into an ordered toroidal magnetic field. To study dynamo activity, we performed three-dimensional, stratified, isothermal, ideal magnetohydrodynamic shearing box simulations. The strength of the self-sustained toroidal magnetic field depends on the net vertical magnetic flux, which we vary across almost the entire range over which the MRI is linearly unstable. We quantify disc structure and dynamo properties as a function of the initial ratio of mid-plane gas pressure to vertical magnetic field pressure, β _0^mid = p_gas / p_B. For 10^5 ≥ β _0^mid ≥ 10 the effective α-viscosity parameter scales as a power law. Dynamo activity persists up to and including β _0^mid = 10^2, at which point the entire vertical column of the disc is magnetic pressure dominated. Still stronger fields result in a highly inhomogeneous disc structure, with large density fluctuations. We show that the turbulent steady state βmid in our simulations is well matched by the analytic model of Begelman et al. describing the creation and buoyant escape of toroidal field, while the vertical structure of the disc can be broadly reproduced using this model. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for observed properties of X-ray binaries.

  12. Structure formation in gas-rich galactic discs with finite thickness: from discs to rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, M.; Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.

    2015-03-01

    Gravitational instabilities play an important role in structure formation of gas-rich high-redshift disc galaxies. In this paper, we revisit the axisymmetric perturbation theory and the resulting growth of structure by taking the realistic thickness of the disc into account. In the unstable regime, which corresponds for thick discs to a Toomre parameter below the critical value Q0, crit = 0.696, we find a fastest growing perturbation wavelength that is always a factor 1.93 times larger than in the classical razor-thin disc approximation. This result is independent of the adopted disc scaleheight and by this independent of temperature and surface density. In order to test the analytical theory, we compare it with a high-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of an isothermal gravitationally unstable gas disc with the typical vertical sech2 density profile and study its break up into rings that subsequently fragment into dense clumps. In the first phase, rings form, that organize themselves discretely, with distances corresponding to the local fastest growing perturbation wavelength. We find that the disc scaleheight has to be resolved initially with five or more grid cells in order to guarantee proper growth of the ring structures, which follow the analytical prediction. These rings later on contract to a thin and dense line, while at the same time accreting more gas from the inter-ring region. It is these dense, circular filaments, that subsequently fragment into a large number of clumps. Contrary to what is typically assumed, the clump sizes are therefore not directly determined by the fastest growing wavelength.

  13. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power. PMID:25004532

  14. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  15. Be discs in binary systems - I. Coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, Despina; Carciofi, Alex C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Cyr, Isabelle H.; Jones, Carol E.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio and eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar binaries. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. We find two limiting cases with respect to the effects of eccentricity: in circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc structure appears smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for small viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. In highly eccentric orbits, the effects are more complex, with the disc structure strongly dependent on the orbital phase. We also studied the effects of binarity in the disc continuum emission. Since the infrared and radio SED are sensitive to the disc size and density slope, the truncation and matter accumulation result in considerable modifications in the emergent spectrum. We conclude that binarity can serve as an explanation for the variability exhibited in observations of Be stars, and that our model can be used to detect invisible companions.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of biological aging in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nam V; Hartman, Robert A; Patil, Prashanti R; Risbud, Makarand V; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C; Hoyland, Judith A; Le Maitre, Christine L; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D

    2016-08-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1289-1306, 2016. PMID:26890203

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging in Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Patil, Prashanti R.; Risbud, Makarand V.; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. PMID:26890203

  18. The structure of protoplanetary discs around evolving young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The formation of planets with gaseous envelopes takes place in protoplanetary accretion discs on time scales of several million years. Small dust particles stick to each other to form pebbles, pebbles concentrate in the turbulent flow to form planetesimals and planetary embryos and grow to planets, which undergo substantial radial migration. All these processes are influenced by the underlying structure of the protoplanetary disc, specifically the profiles of temperature, gas scale height, and density. The commonly used disc structure of the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) is a simple power law in all these quantities. However, protoplanetary disc models with both viscous and stellar heating show several bumps and dips in temperature, scale height, and density caused by transitions in opacity, which are missing in the MMSN model. These play an important role in the formation of planets, since they can act as sweet spots for forming planetesimals via the streaming instability and affect the direction and magnitude of type-I migration. We present 2D simulations of accretion discs that feature radiative cooling and viscous and stellar heating, and they are linked to the observed evolutionary stages of protoplanetary discs and their host stars. These models allow us to identify preferred planetesimal and planet formation regions in the protoplanetary disc as a function of the disc's metallicity, accretion rate, and lifetime. We derive simple fitting formulae that feature all structural characteristics of protoplanetary discs during the evolution of several Myr. These fits are straightforward for applying to modelling any growth stage of planets where detailed knowledge of the underlying disc structure is required. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  20. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  1. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: The DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-06-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find the discs naturally build a pseduobulge-like component. Our main results are focussed on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  2. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  3. Planetesimal formation in self-gravitating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, P. G.; Rice, W. K. M.; Mamatsashvili, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    We study particle dynamics in local two-dimensional simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs with a simple cooling law. It is well known that the structure which arises in the gaseous component of the disc due to a gravitational instability can have a significant effect on the evolution of dust particles. Previous results using global simulations indicate that spiral density waves are highly efficient at collecting dust particles, creating significant local overdensities which may be able to undergo gravitational collapse. We expand on these findings using a range of cooling times to mimic the conditions at a large range of radii within the disc. Here we use the PENCIL code to solve the 2D local shearing sheet equations for gas on a fixed grid together with the equations of motion for solids coupled to the gas solely through aerodynamic drag force. We find that spiral density waves can create significant enhancements in the surface density of solids, equivalent to 1-10 cm sized particles in a disc following the profiles of Clarke around an ˜1 M⊙ star, causing it to reach concentrations several orders of magnitude larger than the particles mean surface density. We also study the velocity dispersion of the particles, finding that the spiral structure can result in the particle velocities becoming highly ordered, having a narrow velocity dispersion. This implies low relative velocities between particles, which in turn suggest that collisions are typically low energy, lessening the likelihood of grain destruction. Both these findings suggest that the density waves that arise due to gravitational instabilities in the early stages of star formation provide excellent sites for the formation of large, planetesimal-sized objects.

  4. Growth of eccentric modes in disc-planet interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssandier, Jean; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-05-01

    We formulate a set of linear equations that describe the behaviour of small eccentricities in a protoplanetary system consisting of a gaseous disc and a planet. Eccentricity propagates through the disc by means of pressure and self-gravity, and is exchanged with the planet via secular interactions. Excitation and damping of eccentricity can occur through Lindblad and corotation resonances, as well as viscosity. We compute normal modes of the coupled disc-planet system in the case of short-period giant planets orbiting inside an inner cavity, possibly carved by the stellar magnetosphere. Three-dimensional effects allow for a mode to be trapped in the inner parts of the disc. This mode can easily grow within the disc's lifetime. An eccentric mode dominated by the planet can also grow, although less rapidly. We compute the structure and growth rates of these modes and their dependence on the assumed properties of the disc.

  5. Herniated lumbar disc

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgery for herniated lumbar disc? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 37 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdiscectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction. PMID:21711958

  6. Tuning directional dependent metal–insulator transitions in quasi-1D quantum wires with spin–orbit density wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    We study directional dependent band gap evolutions and metal–insulator transitions (MITs) in model quantum wire systems within the spin–orbit density wave (SODW) model. The evolution of MIT is studied as a function of varying anisotropy between the intra-wire hopping ({{t}\\parallel} ) and inter-wire hopping ({{t}\\bot} ) with Rashba spin–orbit coupling. We find that as long as the anisotropy ratio (β ={{t}\\bot}/{{t}\\parallel} ) remains below 0.5, and the Fermi surface nesting is tuned to {{\\mathbf{Q}}1}=≤ft(π,0\\right) , an exotic SODW induced MIT easily develops, with its critical interaction strength increasing with increasing anisotropy. As β \\to 1 (2D system), the nesting vector switches to {{\\mathbf{Q}}2}=≤ft(π,π \\right) , making this state again suitable for an isotropic MIT. Finally, we discuss various physical consequences and possible applications of the directional dependent MIT.

  7. Tuning directional dependent metal-insulator transitions in quasi-1D quantum wires with spin-orbit density wave instability.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanmoy

    2016-07-27

    We study directional dependent band gap evolutions and metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in model quantum wire systems within the spin-orbit density wave (SODW) model. The evolution of MIT is studied as a function of varying anisotropy between the intra-wire hopping ([Formula: see text]) and inter-wire hopping ([Formula: see text]) with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We find that as long as the anisotropy ratio ([Formula: see text]) remains below 0.5, and the Fermi surface nesting is tuned to [Formula: see text], an exotic SODW induced MIT easily develops, with its critical interaction strength increasing with increasing anisotropy. As [Formula: see text] (2D system), the nesting vector switches to [Formula: see text], making this state again suitable for an isotropic MIT. Finally, we discuss various physical consequences and possible applications of the directional dependent MIT. PMID:27248294

  8. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  9. The role of toroidal magnetic field on the Rossby wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholipour, Mahmoud; Nejad-Asghar, Mohsen

    2015-05-01

    In the accretion discs, the toroidal magnetic fields and viscous stresses are directly connected to each other, because generation of the large-scale toroidal magnetic fields are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Gholipour & Nejad-Asghar have recently shown that the effect of high turbulent viscosity on the Rossby wave instability (RWI) is important, while the effect of low turbulent viscosity can be ignored. In this paper, in addition of turbulent viscosity, we investigate the role of toroidal magnetic field on the non-axisymmetric RWI in the self-gravitating accretion discs. We use a numerical method to investigate stable and unstable modes. The results show that the perturbations of Rossby waves will be damped by both the viscosity and toroidal magnetic field, while the magnetic diffusivity acts vice versa. Also, occurrence of RWI depends on the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number (i.e. ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity).

  10. Interlaced dynamics of density waves and vortices in self-gravitating Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatsashvili, G. R.

    2013-04-01

    Latest developments in the dynamics of density waves and vortices in selfgravitating protoplanetary discs is reviewed. It is well established by now that in discs, vortices are dynamically coupled with density waves due to the disc's differential rotation, or shear. On the other hand, density waves play a central role in the theory of self-gravitating discs and recently revealed their coupling with vortices implies that the latter can also be subject to self-gravity effects, thus taking active part in defining overall dynamics of self-gravitating discs. We describe the specific features of vortex dynamics and evolution in self-gravitating discs with and without driving by baroclinic or Rossby wave instabilities and point out differences between these two case.

  11. Evolution of gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Quentin; Wyatt, Mark; Pringle, Jim

    2015-12-01

    A non negligible quantity of gas has been discovered in an increasing number of debris disc systems. ALMA high sensitivity and high resolution is changing our perception of the gaseous component of debris discs as CO is discovered in systems where it should be rapidly photodissociated. It implies that there is a replenishment mechanism and that the observed gas is secondary. Past missions such as Herschel probed the atomic part of the gas through O I and C II emission lines. Gas science in debris discs is still in its infancy, and these new observations raise a handful of questions concerning the mechanisms to create the gas and about its evolution in the planetary system when it is released. The latter question will be addressed in this talk as a self-consistent gas evolution scenario is proposed and is compared to observations for the peculiar case of β Pictoris.Our model proposes that carbon and oxygen within debris discs are created due to photodissociation of CO which is itself created from the debris disc dust (due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption). The evolution of the carbon atoms is modelled as viscous spreading, with viscosity parameterised using an α model. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon are followed with a PDR model called Cloudy, which is coupled to the dynamical viscous α model. Only carbon gets ionised due to its lower ionisation potential than oxygen. The carbon gas disc can end up with a high ionisation fraction due to strong FUV radiation field. A high ionisation fraction means that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is very active, so that α is very high. Gas density profiles can be worked out for different input parameters such as the α value, the CO input rate, the location of the input and the incoming radiation field. Observability predictions can be made for future observations, and our model is tested on β Pictoris observations. This new gas evolution model fits the carbon and CO

  12. The ProDisc artificial disc: insertion technique.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Henry E; Acosta, Frank L; Ames, Christopher P

    2005-10-01

    The ProDisc artificial lumbar disc was designed for use in treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. The disc is implanted using an anterior approach to the lumbar spine with the assistance of intraoperative fluoroscopy. A variety of insertion instruments guide the surgeon through this process. The disc is implanted via an anterior approach, generally retroperitoneally but on occasion transperitoneally. The different approaches and insertion technique are described in this article. PMID:16326288

  13. Nonlinear transient and chaotic interactions in disc brake squeal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2015-04-01

    In automotive disc-brake squeal, most numerical studies have been focussed on the prediction of unstable vibration modes in the frequency domain using the complex eigenvalue analysis. However, the magnitude of the positive real part of a complex eigenvalue is an unreliable indicator of squeal occurrence. Although nonlinearities have been shown to play a significant role in brake squeal, transient nonlinear time domain analyses have rarely been applied owing to high computational costs. Here the complex eigenvalue analysis, the direct steady-state analysis and the transient nonlinear time domain analysis are applied to an isotropic pad-on-disc finite element model representing a simple model of a brake system. While in this investigation, in-plane pad-mode instabilities are not detected by the complex eigenvalue analysis, the dissipated energy obtained by the direct steady-state analysis of the model subjected to harmonic contact pressure excitation is negative at frequencies of pad modes, indicating a potential for instabilities. Transient nonlinear time domain analysis of the pad and disc dynamics reveal that in-plane pad vibrations excite a dominant out-of-plane disc mode. For intermittently chaotic pad motion, the disc dynamics is quasi-periodic; and for chaotic motion of the pad, a toroidal attractor is found for the disc's out-of-plane motion. Nonlinear interactions between the pad and the disc highlight that different parts in a brake system display different dynamic behaviour and need to be analysed separately. The type II intermittency route to chaos could be the cause for the experimentally observed instantaneous mode squeal.

  14. mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus and MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 promote chromosomal instability and cell type-dependent phenotype changes of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Andreieva, S V; Korets, K V; Mykytenko, D O; Baklaushev, V P; Chekhonin, V P; Dmitrenko, V V

    2016-03-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the RAF/mitogen-activated and extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways are frequently deregulated in cancer. Temsirolimus (TEM) and its primary active metabolite rapamycin allosterically block mTOR complex 1 substrate recruitment. The context-/experimental setup-dependent opposite effects of rapamycin on the multiple centrosome formation, aneuploidy, DNA damage/repair, proliferation, and invasion were reported. Similarly, the context-dependent either tumor-promoting or suppressing effects of RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and its inhibitors were demonstrated. Drug treatment-mediated stress may promote chromosomal instability (CIN), accelerating changes in the genomic landscape and phenotype diversity. Here, we characterized the genomic and phenotypic changes of U251 and T98G glioblastoma cell lines long-term treated with TEM or U0126, an inhibitor of MEK1/2. TEM significantly increased clonal and non-clonal chromosome aberrations. Both TEM and U0126 affected copy number alterations (CNAs) pattern. A proliferation rate of U251TEM and U251U0126 cells was lower and higher, respectively, than control cells. Colony formation efficiency of U251TEM significantly decreased, whereas U251U0126 did not change. U251TEM and U251U0126 cells decreased migration. In contrast, T98GTEM and T98GU0126 cells did not change proliferation, colony formation efficiency, and migration. Changes in the sensitivity of inhibitor-treated cells to the reduction of the glucose concentration were observed. Our results suggest that CIN and adaptive reprogramming of signal transduction pathways may be responsible for the cell type-dependent phenotype changes of long-term TEM- or U0126-treated tumor cells. PMID:26748241

  15. Vertical oscillations of fluid and stellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Bonner, Gage

    2015-06-01

    A satellite galaxy or dark matter subhalo that passes through a stellar disc may excite coherent oscillations in the disc perpendicular to its plane. We determine the properties of these modes for various self-gravitating plane symmetric systems (Spitzer sheets) using the matrix method of Kalnajs. In particular, we find an infinite series of modes for the case of a barotropic fluid. In general, for a collisionless system, there is a double series of modes, which include normal modes and/or Landau-damped oscillations depending on the phase space distribution function of the stars. Even Landau-damped oscillations may decay slowly enough to persist for several hundred Myr. We discuss the implications of these results for the recently discovered vertical perturbations in the kinematics of solar neighbourhood stars and for broader questions surrounding secular phenomena such as spiral structure in disc galaxies.

  16. Scattered light images of spiral arms in marginally gravitationally unstable discs with an embedded planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, A.; Pinilla, P.; Benisty, M.; Ataiee, S.; Juhász, A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Van Boekel, R.; Henning, T.

    2015-10-01

    Scattered light images of transition discs in the near-infrared often show non-axisymmetric structures in the form of wide-open spiral arms in addition to their characteristic low-opacity inner gap region. We study self-gravitating discs and investigate the influence of gravitational instability on the shape and contrast of spiral arms induced by planet-disc interactions. Two-dimensional non-isothermal hydrodynamical simulations including viscous heating and a cooling prescription are combined with three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer models for direct comparison to observations. We find that the resulting contrast between the spirals and the surrounding disc in scattered light is by far higher for pressure scaleheight variations, i.e. thermal perturbations, than for pure surface density variations. Self-gravity effects suppress any vortex modes and tend to reduce the opening angle of planet-induced spirals, making them more tightly wound. If the disc is only marginally gravitationally stable with a Toomre parameter around unity, an embedded massive planet (planet-to-star mass ratio of 10-2) can trigger gravitational instability in the outer disc. The spirals created by this instability and the density waves launched by the planet can overlap resulting in large-scale, more open spiral arms in the outer disc. The contrast of these spirals is well above the detection limit of current telescopes.

  17. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  18. Bending and breathing modes of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Barber, Jarrett; Chequers, Matthew H.; Cheng, Edward

    2014-05-01

    We explore the hypothesis that a passing satellite or dark matter subhalo has excited coherent oscillations of the Milky Way's stellar disc in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic mid-plane. This work is motivated by recent observations of spatially dependent bulk vertical motions within ˜2 kpc of the Sun. A satellite can transfer a fraction of its orbital energy to the disc stars as it plunges through the Galactic mid-plane, thereby heating and thickening the disc. Bulk motions arise during the early stages of such an event when the disc is still in an unrelaxed state. We present simple toy-model calculations and simulations of disc-satellite interactions, which show that the response of the disc depends on the relative velocity of the satellite. When the component of the satellite's velocity perpendicular to the disc is small compared with that of the stars, the perturbation is pre-dominantly a bending mode. Conversely, breathing and higher order modes are excited when the vertical velocity of the satellite is larger than that of the stars. We argue that the compression and rarefaction motions seen in three different surveys are in fact breathing-mode perturbations of the Galactic disc.

  19. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan

    2010-11-01

    We study optical phenomena related to the appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable us to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with the growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with the descending spin. This behaviour differs substantially from the appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and cause self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin a ~ 1.

  20. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

  1. Inhomogeneous accretion discs and the soft states of black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-10-01

    Observations of black hole binaries (BHBs) have established a rich phenomenology of X-ray states. The soft states range from the low variability, accretion disc dominated thermal (TD) state to the higher variability, non-thermal steep power law (SPL) state. The disc component in all states is typically modelled with standard thin disc accretion theory. However, this theory is inconsistent with optical/UV spectral, variability and gravitational microlensing observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the supermassive analogues of BHBs. An inhomogeneous disc (ID) model with large (≃0.4 dex) temperature fluctuations in each radial annulus can qualitatively explain all of these AGN observations. The inhomogeneity may be a consequence of instabilities in radiation-dominated discs, and therefore may be present in BHBs as well. We show that ID models can explain many features of the TD and SPL states of BHBs. The observed relationships between spectral hardness, disc fraction and rms variability amplitude in BHBs are reproduced with temperature fluctuations similar to those inferred in AGNs, suggesting a unified picture of luminous accretion discs across orders of magnitude in black hole mass. This picture can be tested with spectral fitting of ID models, X-ray polarization observations and radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. If BHB accretion discs are indeed inhomogeneous, only the most disc-dominated states (disc fraction ≳0.95) can be used to robustly infer black hole spin using current continuum fitting methods.

  2. Self-organisation in protoplanetary discs. Global, non-stratified Hall-MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Context. Recent observations have revealed organised structures in protoplanetary discs, such as axisymmetric rings or horseshoe concentrations, evocative of large-scale vortices. These structures are often interpreted as the result of planet-disc interactions. However, these discs are also known to be unstable to the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) which is believed to be one of the dominant angular momentum transport mechanism in these objects. It is therefore natural to ask whether the MRI itself could produce these structures without invoking planets. Aims: The nonlinear evolution of the MRI is strongly affected by the low ionisation fraction in protoplanetary discs. The Hall effect in particular, which is dominant in dense and weakly ionised parts of these objects, has been shown to spontaneously drive self-organising flows in local, shearing box simulations. Here, we investigate the behaviour of global MRI-unstable disc models dominated by the Hall effect and characterise their dynamics. Methods: We validated our implementation of the Hall effect into the PLUTO code with predictions from a spectral method in cylindrical geometry. We then performed 3D unstratified Hall-MHD simulations of Keplerian discs for a broad range of Hall, Ohmic, and ambipolar Elsasser numbers. Results: We confirm the transition from a turbulent to an organised state as the intensity of the Hall effect is increased. We observe the formation of zonal flows, their number depending on the available magnetic flux and on the intensity of the Hall effect. For intermediate Hall intensity, the flow self-organises into long-lived magnetised vortices. Neither the addition of a toroidal field nor Ohmic or ambipolar diffusion change this picture drastically in the range of parameters we have explored. Conclusions: Self-organisation by the Hall effect is a robust phenomenon in global non-stratified simulations. It is able to quench turbulent transport and spontaneously produce axisymmetric

  3. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  4. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  5. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  6. Learning Language on Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmarais, Norman

    1995-01-01

    Presents a comparison of two types of compact disc (CD-ROM) foreign language tutorials: (1) those made by publishers who favor an immersion approach; and (2) those made by publishers who use grammar-based approaches. Both types of CD-ROMs address various age groups, skill levels, and learning styles. (JMV)

  7. The DISC Quotient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John R.; Baxter, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    D.I.S.C: Decipherment Impact of a Signal's Content. The authors present a numerical method to characterise the significance of the receipt of a complex and potentially decipherable signal from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). The purpose of the scale is to facilitate the public communication of work on any such claimed signal, as such work proceeds, and to assist in its discussion and interpretation. Building on a "position" paper rationale, this paper looks at the DISC quotient proposed and develops the algorithmic steps and comprising measures that form this post detection strategy for information dissemination, based on prior work on message detection, decipherment. As argued, we require a robust and incremental strategy, to disseminate timely, accurate and meaningful information, to the scientific community and the general public, in the event we receive an "alien" signal that displays decipherable information. This post-detection strategy is to serve as a stepwise algorithm for a logical approach to information extraction and a vehicle for sequential information dissemination, to manage societal impact. The "DISC Quotient", which is based on signal analysis processing stages, includes factors based on the signal's data quantity, structure, affinity to known human languages, and likely decipherment times. Comparisons with human and other phenomena are included as a guide to assessing likely societal impact. It is submitted that the development, refinement and implementation of DISC as an integral strategy, during the complex processes involved in post detection and decipherment, is essential if we wish to minimize disruption and optimize dissemination.

  8. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  9. Dynamic Compression Effects on Intervertebral Disc Mechanics and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, Casey L.; MacLean, Jeffrey J.; Iatridis, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design A bovine intervertebral disc organ culture model was used to study the effect of dynamic compression magnitude on mechanical behavior and measurement of biosynthesis rate, cell viability, and mRNA expression. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effect of loading magnitude on intervertebral disc mechanics and biology in an organ culture model. Summary of Background Data The in vivo and cell culture response of intervertebral disc cells to dynamic mechanical loading provides evidence the disc responds in a magnitude dependant manner. However, the ability to link mechanical behavior of the disc with biologic phenomena has been limited. A large animal organ culture system facilitates measurements of tissue mechanics and biologic response parameters on the same sample allowing a broader understanding of disc mechanobiology. Methods Bovine caudal intervertebral discs were placed in organ culture for 6 days and assigned to a static control or 1 of 2 dynamic compression loading protocols (0.2–1 MPa or 0.2–2.5 MPa) at 1 Hz for 1 hour for 5 days. Disc structure was assessed with measurements of dynamic modulus, creep, height loss, water content, and proteoglycan loss to the culture medium. Cellular responses were assessed through changes in cell viability, metabolism, and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Increasing magnitudes of compression increased disc modulus and creep; however, all mechanical parameters recovered each day. In the anulus, significant increases in gene expression for collagen I and a trend of increasing sulfate incorporation were observed. In the nucleus, increasing gene expression for collagen I and MMP3 was observed between magnitudes and between static controls and the lowest magnitude of loading. Conclusion Results support the hypothesis that biologic remodeling precedes damage to the intervertebral disc structure, that compression is a healthy loading condition for the disc, and further support the link between applied

  10. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  11. An accurate geometric distance to the compact binary SS Cygni vindicates accretion disc theory.

    PubMed

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Sivakoff, G R; Knigge, C; Körding, E G; Templeton, M; Waagen, E O

    2013-05-24

    Dwarf novae are white dwarfs accreting matter from a nearby red dwarf companion. Their regular outbursts are explained by a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disc, described by the disc instability model that has since been successfully extended to other accreting systems. However, the prototypical dwarf nova, SS Cygni, presents a major challenge to our understanding of accretion disc theory. At the distance of 159 ± 12 parsecs measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it is too luminous to be undergoing the observed regular outbursts. Using very long baseline interferometric radio observations, we report an accurate, model-independent distance to SS Cygni that places the source substantially closer at 114 ± 2 parsecs. This reconciles the source behavior with our understanding of accretion disc theory in accreting compact objects. PMID:23704566

  12. Thin accretion discs are stabilized by a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, Aleksander

    2016-07-01

    By studying three-dimensional, radiative, global simulations of sub-Eddington, geometrically thin (H/R ≈ 0.15) black hole accretion flows we show that thin discs which are dominated by magnetic pressure are stable against thermal instability. Such discs are thicker than predicted by the standard model and show significant amount of dissipation inside the marginally stable orbit. Radiation released in this region, however, does not escape to infinity but is advected into the black hole. We find that the resulting accretion efficiency (5.5 ± 0.5 per cent for the simulated 0.8dot{M}_Edd disc) is very close to the predicted by the standard model (5.7 per cent).

  13. Evidence from stellar rotation of enhanced disc dispersal. I. The case of the triple visual system BD-21 1074 in the β Pictoris association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Monard, B.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C. H. F.; Frasca, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The early stage of stellar evolution is characterized by a magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disc, known as a star-disc locking mechanism. The disc-locking prevents the star to spin its rotation up, and its timescale depends on the disc lifetime, which should not be longer than about 10 Myr. Some mechanisms can significantly shorten this lifetime, allowing a few stars to start spinning up much earlier than other stars and increasing the observed rotation period dispersion among coeval stars. Aims: In the present study, we aim to investigate how the properties of the circumstellar environment can shorten the disc lifetime, more specifically the presence of a close stellar companion. Methods: We have identified a few multiple stellar systems, composed of stars with similar masses, which belong to associations with a known age. Since all parameters that are responsible for the rotational evolution, with the exception of environment properties and initial stellar rotation, are similar for all components, we expect that significant differences among the rotation periods can only arise from differences in the disc lifetimes. A photometric timeseries allowed us to measure the rotation periods of each component, while high-resolution spectra provided us with the fundamental parameters, v sin i and chromospheric line fluxes. Results: In the present study, we have collected timeseries photometry of BD-21 1074, a member of the 21 Myr old β Pictoris association, and measured the rotation periods of its brightest components A and B. They differ significantly, and the component B, which has a closer companion C, rotates faster than the more distant and isolated component A. It also displays a slightly higher chromospheric activity level. Conclusions: Since components A and B have similar mass, age, and initial chemical composition, we can ascribe the rotation period difference to either different initial rotation periods or different disc

  14. Electrokinetic instability in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Ganchenko, Georgy

    2012-05-01

    The effect of geometric confinement on electroconvective instability due to nonequilibrium electro-osmotic slip at the interface of an electrolytic fluid and charge-selective solid is studied. It is shown that the topology of the marginal stability curves and the behavior of the critical parameters depend strongly on both channel geometry and dimensionless Debye length at low voltages for sufficiently deep channels, corresponding to the Rubinstein-Zaltzman instability mechanism, but that stability is governed almost entirely by channel depth for narrow channels at higher voltages. For shallow channels, it is shown that above a transition threshold, determined by both channel depth and Debye length, the low-voltage instability is completely suppressed.

  15. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  16. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  17. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  18. Factors to be Considered for Selection and Design of Rupture Disc

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, D.V.R.; Bhaskar Rao, Y.; Chennakeshava Reddy, A.

    2006-07-01

    All over the world numerous fatalities and large property losses have taken place because of Industrial Explosions. In order to mitigate the losses of life and property due to overpressure rupture discs are used. Successful implementation would depend on many factors and one of the important factors is the selection and design of rupture discs. There are several factors that affect the disc performance. The present paper discusses the factors that effect the disc performance so that the right type of disc can be selected. (authors)

  19. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. PMID:24412045

  20. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Sandell, G.; Vacca, W. D.; Menard, F.; Mendigutia, I.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  1. Disc edge veins of Kraupa associated with optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Andrea; Almela, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Disc edge veins of Kraupa are a rare anomaly of the retinal venous system in which the main trunk of the retinal vein disappeared into the margin of the optic disc instead of its centre. Methods: A 40-year-old woman was detected to have an anomaly in her left optic disc in a routine eye examination. The eyes had an anomaly of the retinal venous system in which all branches of the retinal vein joined in a common trunk that entered the disc margin inferonasally. The central retinal artery issued from the centre of the disc separately of the venous system. B-scan ultrasonografhy revealed the presence of hyperechoic imaging at the optic nerve head in both eyes. Results: We describe the association of disc edge veins of Kraupa with optic disc drusen. Conclusion: Vascular complications of optic disc drusen hav been described. We don’t know the implication of disc edge veins in the pathogenesis of these complications.

  2. Inner disc obscuration in GRS 1915+105 based on relativistic slim disc model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierdayanti, K.; Sadowski, A.; Mineshige, S.; Bursa, M.

    2013-11-01

    We study the observational signatures of the relativistic slim disc of 10 M⊙ black hole, in a wide range of mass accretion rate, dot{m}, dimensionless spin parameter, a*, and viewing angle, i. In general, the innermost temperature, Tin, increases with the increase of i for a fixed value of dot{m} and a*, due to the Doppler effect. However, for i > 50° and dot{m}>dot{m}_turn, Tin starts to decrease with the increase of dot{m}. This is a result of self-obscuration - the radiation from the innermost hot part of the disc is blocked by the surrounding cooler part. The value of dot{m}_turn and the corresponding luminosities depend on a* and i. Such obscuration effects cause an interesting behaviour on the disc luminosity (Ldisc)-Tin plane for high inclinations. In addition to the standard disc branch which appears below dot{m}_turn and which obeys L_disc ∝ T_in4 relation, another branch above dot{m}_turn, which is nearly horizontal, may be observed at luminosities close to the Eddington luminosity. We show that these features are likely observed in a Galactic X-ray source, GRS 1915+105. We support a high spin parameter (a* > 0.9) for GRS 1915+105 since otherwise the high value of Tin and small size of the emitting region (rin < 1rS) cannot be explained.

  3. Structural Raman enhancement in graphite nano-discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, J. F.; Chakarov, D.; Kasemo, B.

    2016-04-01

    Raman scattering in disc-shaped graphite nanostructures, etched out of bulk HOPG, are investigated using an excitation wavelength of 532 nm at different laser power. The G-band is fitted using two Lorentzian functions, GL and GH. The difference of Raman shift between the two Lorentzian functions increase with laser power as a consequence of selective absorption and heating of the discs. Further, the G-band from the nanostructured HOPG reveal a Raman enhancement (RE) of ~2.2 and ~1.5 for the components associated with the discs (GL) and the supporting substrate (GH), respectively. The quantitative agreement between the experimental results and performed finite difference time domain calculations make possible to conclude that electromagnetic energy penetrates considerably into the discs from the circular periphery probably due to multiple scattering. In addition, the dependence of RE of the GL component on the laser power is attributed to a temperature dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  4. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  5. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  6. Planetary migration in protoplanetary discs and outer Solar System architecture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Tsiganis, K.

    2007-08-01

    Planets form around stars in gaseous protoplanetary discs. Due to tidal effects, they perturb the gas distribution, which in turn affects their motion. If the planet is massive enough (see for instance Crida et al. 2006 for a criterion), it repels the gas efficiently and opens a gap around its orbit ; then, locked into its gap, the planet follows the disc viscous evolution, which generally consists in accretion onto the central star. This process is called type II migration and leads to the orbital decay of the planet on a timescale shorter than the disc lifetime. After a review of these processes, we will focus on the Solar System giant planets. Strong constraints suggest that they did not migrate significantly. Masset and Snellgrove (2001) have shown that the evolution of 2 giants planets in mean motion resonance in a common gap differs from the evolution of a single planet. For what concerns Jupiter and Saturn, we found that in some conditions on the disc parameter, they can avoid significant migration (Morbidelli and Crida 2007). Adding Uranus and Neptune to the system, six stable fully resonant configurations for the four giants in the gas disc appear. Of course, none of them correspond to the present configuration. However, after the gas disc phase, the system was surrounded by a planetesimal disk. Interactions with this debris disk make the planets slowly evolve, until an instability in reached. This destabilises the planetesimal disc and triggers the Late Heavy Bombardment, while the planets reach their actual position, like in the model by Tsiganis et al (2005) and Gomes et al (2005). Our simulations show a very satisfying case, opening the possibility for a dynamically consistent scenario of the outer Solar System evolution, starting from the gas phase.

  7. Diffusion instability in a bimodal disc. [planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, W. R.; Harris, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified model of radial diffusion in a planetary disk with a bimodal size distribution is presented. The large particle component excites the small particles' dispersion velocity via gravitational scattering. The resulting small particle viscous stress goes through a maximum near optical depth = sq root 3. Such a stress profile promotes the development of high and low optical depth zones. The resulting ringlet appearance is due primarily to the distribution of small particles, which produce most of the optical depth but may constitute only a minor portion of system mass.

  8. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  9. Whistler modulational instability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of the modulational instability characteristics of whistlers in cold and hot plasmas. The cold-plasma analysis considers both ion motion and relativistic effects; the unstable band, with a growth rate proportional to (B/B sub zero)squared, is contiguous to Omega sub e/4 and, depending on the plasma density, lies above or below that frequency (Omega sub e is the electron cyclotron frequency of the static magnetic field; B and B sub zero are the whistler and static magnetic fields). In hot plasmas, stability occurs between Omega sub e/4 and Omega prime (less than Omega sub e), with Omega prime depending mainly on the mean energy and anisotropy of the energetic electron population; the complementary unstable band has a growth rate proportional to (B/B sub zero) to the 1/2 power. The relevance of the instability to whistlers in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  10. Materietransport in Akkretionsscheiben %t Transport of matter in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Christof Martin

    2003-07-01

    Time-scales that need to be considered in time-dependent computations of accretion discs are many orders of magnitude larger than stable time-step sizes of common numerical codes. Therefore, theoretical investigation of these objects is severely limited by present-day computational resources, unless more efficient algorithms are found. Due to large differences in the underlying physics of cosmic accretion discs, algorithms need to be adjusted to the particular problem. During the course of this thesis, several algorithms have been implemented and tested. One of the implemented splitting-methods could efficiently be employed to 1D-simulations of supersonic accretion flows onto black holes. Another splitting method and a pressure correction scheme were applied to simulate two-dimensional protostellar accretion flows, which have been investigated more elaborately in this thesis. With these methods, performance in simulating protostellar discs could be improved in at least some cases. Numerical simulations of flow-structures in protostellar discs could thus be conducted and compared to higher order analytical approximations. Disc models using an α-description of the viscosity produced meridional flow-structures that have already been observed by several authors. Unlike flow-structures resulting from stationary one-zone-approximations, meridional flows exhibit outward directed velocities in the midplane of the disc. Test cases showed, that meridional flows can play an important role in the mixing processes of protostellar disc material that is reflected in the composition of cometary and meteorite material.

  11. Preparation of ormetoprim sulfadimethoxine medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Romet (a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a typeA medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine discs were prepared at...

  12. Grain size segregation in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebault, P.; Kral, Q.; Augereau, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Context. In most debris discs, dust grain dynamics is strongly affected by stellar radiation pressure. Because this mechanism is size-dependent, we expect dust grains to be spatially segregated according to their sizes. However, because of the complex interplay between radiation pressure, grain processing by collisions, and dynamical perturbations, this spatial segregation of the particle size distribution (PSD) has proven difficult to investigate and quantify with numerical models. Aims: We propose to thoroughly investigate this problem by using a new-generation code that can handle some of the complex coupling between dynamical and collisional effects. We intend to explore how PSDs behave in both unperturbed discs at rest and in discs pertubed by planetary objects. Methods: We used the DyCoSS code to investigate the coupled effect of collisions, radiation pressure, and dynamical perturbations in systems that have reached a steady-state. We considered two setups: a narrow ring perturbed by an exterior planet, and an extended disc into which a planet is embedded. For both setups we considered an additional unperturbed case without a planet. We also investigated the effect of possible spatial size segregation on disc images at different wavelengths. Results: We find that PSDs are always spatially segregated. The only case for which the PSD follows a standard dn ∝ s-3.5ds law is for an unperturbed narrow ring, but only within the parent-body ring itself. For all other configurations, the size distributions can strongly depart from such power laws and have steep spatial gradients. As an example, the geometrical cross-section of the disc is very rarely dominated by the smallest grains on bound orbits, as it is expected to be in standard PSDs in sq with q ≤ -3. Although the exact profiles and spatial variations of PSDs are a complex function of the set-up that is considered, we are still able to derive some reliable results that will be useful for image or SED

  13. The growth of discs and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation - I. Fast evolution versus secular processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Croton, D. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy discs and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code, Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disc instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model mostly reproduces the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar discs, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disc fraction. Bulge type also affects the star formation rate and colour at a given luminosity. The model predicts a population of merger-driven red ellipticals that dominate both the low-mass and high-mass ends of the galaxy population, and span all dynamical ages; merger-driven bulges in disc galaxies are dynamically old and do not interfere with subsequent evolution of the star-forming component. Instability-driven bulges dominate the population at intermediate galaxy masses, especially thriving in massive discs. The model green valley is exclusively populated by instability-driven bulge hosts. Through the present implementation, the mass accretion history is perceivable in the galaxy structure, morphology and colours.

  14. A revised condition for self-gravitational fragmentation of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S. Z.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Inutsuka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Fragmentation of protoplanetary discs due to gravitational instabilities is a candidate of a formation mechanism of binary stars, brown dwarfs, and gaseous giant planets. The condition for the fragmentation has been thought that the disc cooling time-scale is comparable to its dynamical time-scale. However, some numerical simulations suggest that the fragmentation does not occur even if the cooling time is small enough, or the fragmentation can occur even when the cooling is inefficient. To reveal a realistic condition for fragmentation of self-gravitating discs, we perform two-dimensional numerical simulations that take into account the effect of the irradiation of the central star and radiation cooling of the disc, and precisely investigate the structure of the spiral arms formed in the protoplanetary discs. We show that the Toomre Q parameter in the spiral arms is an essential parameter for fragmentation. The spiral arms fragment only when Q < 0.6 in the spiral arms. We have further confirmed that this fragmentation condition observed in the numerical simulations can be obtained from the linear stability analysis for the self-gravitating spiral arms. These results indicate that the process of fragmentation of protoplanetary discs is divided into two stages: formation of the spiral arms in the discs; and fragmentation of the spiral arm. Our work reduces the condition for the fragmentation of the protoplanetary discs to the condition of the formation of the spiral arm that satisfies Q < 0.6.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  16. A truly Newtonian softening length for disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Trova, A.

    2015-02-01

    The softened point mass model is commonly used in simulations of gaseous discs including self-gravity while the value of associated length λ remains, to some degree, controversial. This `parameter' is however fully constrained when, in a discretized disc, all fluid cells are demanded to obey Newton's law. We examine the topology of solutions in this context, focusing on cylindrical cells more or less vertically elongated. We find that not only the nominal length depends critically on the cell's shape (curvature, radial extension, height), but it is either a real or an imaginary number. Setting λ as a fraction of the local disc thickness - as usually done - is indeed not the optimal choice. We then propose a novel prescription valid irrespective of the disc properties and grid spacings. The benefit, which amounts to 2-3 more digits typically, is illustrated in a few concrete cases. A detailed mathematical analysis is in progress.

  17. Stellar and gaseous disc structures in cosmological galaxy equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathaus, Ben; Sternberg, Amiel

    2016-05-01

    We present `radially resolved equilibrium models' for the growth of stellar and gaseous discs in cosmologically accreting massive haloes. Our focus is on objects that evolve to redshifts z ˜ 2. We solve the time-dependent equations that govern the radially dependent star formation rates, inflows and outflows from and to the inter- and circumgalactic medium, and inward radial gas flows within the discs. The stellar and gaseous discs reach equilibrium configurations on dynamical time-scales much shorter than variations in the cosmological dark matter halo growth and baryonic accretions rates. We show analytically that mass and global angular momentum conservation naturally give rise to exponential gas and stellar discs over many radial length-scales. As expected, the gaseous discs are more extended as set by the condition Toomre Q < 1 for star formation. The discs rapidly become baryon dominated. For massive, 5 × 1012 M⊙ haloes at redshift z = 2, we reproduced the typical observed star formation rates of ˜100 M⊙ yr-1, stellar masses ˜9 × 1010 M⊙, gas contents ˜1011 M⊙, half-mass sizes of 4.5 and 5.8 kpc for the stars and gas, and characteristic surface densities of 500 and 400 M⊙ pc-2 for the stars and gas.

  18. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease. PMID:27103967

  19. TGV disc brake squeal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorang, X.; Foy-Margiocchi, F.; Nguyen, Q. S.; Gautier, P. E.

    2006-06-01

    The discomfort generated by the noise emission of braking systems in trains has aroused recently many studies on the mechanical modelling of brake noise in France. A theoretical and numerical discussion on the phenomenon of brake squeal is given in this paper in relation with some experimental data. This study is based upon a flutter instability analysis giving unstable modes of the brake system under the contact and Coulomb friction.

  20. Size-dependent snap-through and pull-in instabilities of initially curved pre-stressed electrostatic nano-bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeian, Milad; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Ataei, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the electromechanical instabilities of micro/nanobeams with initial curved shape and subjected to electrostatic field and Casimir intermolecular force. Using modified couple stress theory and the principle of minimum potential energy and variational approach, the nonlinear equations associated with boundary conditions are derived. The generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method is used to discretize the equations and boundary conditions, and then the discretized form of equations are solved numerically. In the end, the impacts of fringing field effect, beam imperfection and size effect on microbeam are investigated and the results are compared with experimental results. Besides, in the end the effect of Casimir intermolecular force in initially curved nanobeams and its symmetric and asymmetric effects on snap-through and pull-in instabilities are discussed.

  1. Stokes drag on a disc with a Navier slip condition near a plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    The Stokes drag and couple acting on a disc moving through incompressible Newtonian fluid are investigated for the case when the fluid obeys a Navier slip condition, with slip length b, on the surface of the disc. The fluid is bounded by an infinite plane wall on which there is no slip. The disc, of zero thickness and radius a, is parallel to the wall and distance h from it. Analyses are presented for the limits h ≫ a and h ≪ a results for intermediate values of the separation h are obtained numerically by means of Tranter's method. The resistance coefficients for translation normal to the disc surface, and for rotation about a diameter, are unaffected by slip when the disc lies in unbounded fluid, but all resistance coefficients depend upon the slip length b when the disc is close to the wall. Their dependence on h becomes weak when b ≫ a.

  2. Superresolution technology applied to optical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Luo, Hongxin

    2005-09-01

    Smaller focal points are essential for the development of the next-generation optical disc. The size of focal point depends on the diffraction effect that is dependant on the numerical aperture of a lens and the wavelength of light. However, increase of the numerical aperture and decrease of the light wavelength will be ultimately limited due to the technical difficulty of fabricating a too-high NA lens and the too-short wavelength laser. In this paper, we report another approach of using the superresolution technology to compress the size of the so-called Airy spot for the next-generation optical disc, which is independent on the wavelength of laser. The superresolution phase plates are designed and fabricated with a microoptics technique. When such a phase plate is inserted into the optical system, the central spot at the focal plane of a lens is decreased to be 0.8 times of the Airy pattern, implying the possibility of reading higher storage density of optical discs. The most attractive feature is that the phase plate can be mass-produced at a very low cost, compared with the high cost of the high-numerical lens and/or the short wavelength laser. The disadvantages are that the inserted phase plate will induce the slight circular sidelobes around the central sport, so that it consumes a little more laser energy. The shortcoming could be overcome with suitable amendment. We have fabricated the phase plates with the surface-relief profile on a normal glass for phase modulation. Experimental results of superresolution effect with a low numerical aperture (NA=0.1) and a high-numerical lens (NA=0.8) are reported, which are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Superresolution technique should be highly interesting as a novel technique of the next-generation pickup head for reading the high storage of the optical discs.

  3. Rossby Wave Instability in Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Richard; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    A brief review is given of the Rossby wave instability in astrophysical disks. In non-self-gravitating discs, around for example a newly forming stars, the instability can be triggered by an axisymmetric bump at some radius r0 in the disk surface mass-density. It gives rise to exponentially growing non-axisymmetric perturbation (proportional to Exp[im ϕ], m = 1,2,...) in the vicinity of r0 consisting of anticyclonic vortices. These vortices are regions of high pressure and consequently act to trap dust particles which in turn can facilitate planetesimal growth in protoplanetary disks. The Rossby vortices in the disks around stars and black holes may cause the observed quasi-periodic modulations of the disk's thermal emission. Stirling Colgate's long standing interest in all types of vortices - particularly tornados - had an important part in stimulating the research on the Rossby wave instability.

  4. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  5. Investigating the Magnetorotational Instability with Dedalus, and Open-Souce Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Keaton J; /UC, Berkeley, aff SLAC

    2012-08-31

    The magnetorotational instability is a fluid instability that causes the onset of turbulence in discs with poloidal magnetic fields. It is believed to be an important mechanism in the physics of accretion discs, namely in its ability to transport angular momentum outward. A similar instability arising in systems with a helical magnetic field may be easier to produce in laboratory experiments using liquid sodium, but the applicability of this phenomenon to astrophysical discs is unclear. To explore and compare the properties of these standard and helical magnetorotational instabilities (MRI and HRMI, respectively), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities were added to Dedalus, an open-source hydrodynamics simulator. Dedalus is a Python-based pseudospectral code that uses external libraries and parallelization with the goal of achieving speeds competitive with codes implemented in lower-level languages. This paper will outline the MHD equations as implemented in Dedalus, the steps taken to improve the performance of the code, and the status of MRI investigations using Dedalus.

  6. Preload substantially influences the intervertebral disc stiffness in loading-unloading cycles of compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Schilling, Christoph; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-06-14

    Disc hydration is controlled by fluid imbibition and exudation and hence by applied load magnitude and history, internal osmotic pressure and disc conditions. It affects both the internal load distribution and external load-bearing of a disc while variations therein give rise to the disc time-dependent characteristics. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of changes in compression preload magnitude on the disc axial cyclic compression stiffness under physiological loading. After 20h of free hydration, effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa, applied for eight hours) and disc-bone preparation conditions on disc height and axial stiffness were investigated using 36 disc-bone and 24 isolated disc (without bony endplates) bovine specimens. After preloading, specimens were subjected to ten loading/unloading cycles each of 7.5min compression at 0.5MPa followed by 7.5min at 0.06MPa. Under 0.06MPa preload, the specimen height losses during high loading periods of cyclic loading were greater than corresponding height recoveries during low loading phases. This resulted in a progressive reduction in the specimen height and increase in its stiffness. Differences between disc height losses in high cyclic loads and between stiffness in both load increase and release phases were significant for 0 and 0.06MPa vs. 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude/history and hence disc height and hydration on disc stiffness in loading/unloading and disc height loss in loading periods. Proper preconditioning and hence hydration level should be achieved if recovery in height loss similar to in vivo conditions is expected. PMID:27209550

  7. On the interaction of stationary crossflow vortices and Tollmien-Schlichting waves in the boundary layer on a rotating disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassom, Andrew P.; Hall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    There are many fluid flows where the onset of transition can be caused by different instability mechanisms which compete among themselves. The interaction is considered of two types of instability mode (at an asymptotically large Reynolds number) which can occur in the flow above a rotating disc. In particular, the interaction is examined between lower branch Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and the upper branch, stationary, inviscid crossflow vortex whose asymptotic structure has been described by Hall (1986). This problem is studied in the context of investigating the effect of the vortex on the stability characteristics of a small TS wave. Essentially, it is found that the primary effect is felt through the modification to the mean flow induced by the presence of the vortex. Initially, the TS wave is taken to be linear in character and it is shown (for the cases of both a linear and a nonlinear stationary vortex) that the vortex can exhibit both stabilizing and destabilizing effects on the TS wave and the nature of this influence is wholly dependent upon the orientation of this latter instability. Further, the problem is examined with a larger TS wave, whose size is chosen so as to ensure that this mode is nonlinear in its own right. An amplitude equation for the evolution of the TS wave is derived which admits solutions corresponding to finite amplitude, stable, traveling waves.

  8. On the interaction of stationary crossflow vortices and Tollmien-Schlichting waves in the boundary layer on a rotating disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassom, Andrew P.; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    There are many fluid flows where the onset of transition can be caused by different instability mechanisms which compete among themselves. The interaction is considered of two types of instability mode (at an asymptotically large Reynolds number) which can occur in the flow above a rotating disc. In particular, the interaction is examined between lower branch Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and the upper branch, stationary, inviscid crossflow vortex whose asymptotic structure has been described by Hall (1986). This problem is studied in the context of investigating the effect of the vortex on the stability characteristics of a small TS wave. Essentially, it is found that the primary effect is felt through the modification to the mean flow induced by the presence of the vortex. Initially, the TS wave is taken to be linear in character and it is shown (for the cases of both a linear and a nonlinear stationary vortex) that the vortex can exhibit both stabilizing and destabilizing effects on the TS wave and the nature of this influence is wholly dependent upon the orientation of this latter instability. Further, the problem is examined with a larger TS wave, whose size is chosen so as to ensure that this mode is nonlinear in its own right. An amplitude equation for the evolution of the TS wave is derived which admits solutions corresponding to finite amplitude, stable, traveling waves.

  9. Biomechanical comparison between lumbar disc arthroplasty and fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Jer; Hung, Chinghua

    2009-03-01

    The artificial disc is a mobile implant for degenerative disc replacement that attempts to lessen the degeneration of the adjacent elements. However, inconsistent biomechanical results for the neighboring elements have been reported in a number of studies. The present study used finite element (FE) analysis to explore the biomechanical differences at the surgical and both adjacent levels following artificial disc replacement and interbody fusion procedures. First, a three-dimensional FE model of a five-level lumbar spine was established by the commercially available medical imaging software Amira 3.1.1, and FE software ANSYS 9.0. After validating the five-level intact (INT) model with previous in vitro studies, the L3/L4 level of the INT model was modified to either insert an artificial disc (ProDisc II; ADR) or incorporate bilateral posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) cages with a pedicle screw fixation system. All models were constrained at the bottom of the L5 vertebra and subjected to 150N preload and 10Nm moments under four physiological motions. The ADR model demonstrated higher range of motion (ROM), annulus stress, and facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the non-modified INT model. At both adjacent levels, ROM and annulus stress were similar to that of the INT model and varied less than 7%. In addition, the greatest displacement of posterior annulus occurred at the superior-lateral region. Conversely, the PLIF model showed less ROM, less annulus stress, and no facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the INT model. The adjacent levels had obviously high ROM, annulus stress, and facet contact pressure, especially at the adjacent L2/3 level. In conclusion, the artificial disc replacement revealed no adjacent-level instability. However, instability was found at the surgical level, which might accelerate degeneration at the highly stressed annulus and facet joint. In contrast to disc replacement results, the posterior

  10. Yet another instability in glasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Shoichiro; Iida, Hideaki; Kunihiro, Teiji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2014-09-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions (HIC), hydrodynamic models can describe many experimental data and suggest that the quark-gluon plasma formed at RHIC and LHC is almost perfect fluid. We need very short thermalization time and far-from-equilibrium dynamics may be important in thermalization processes of HIC. In the earliest stages of HIC, classical gluon dynamics is dominant and many types of instabilities emerge there. These instabilities may strongly affect the later stages of dynamics; realization of chaoticity and field-particle conversions. We investigate instabilities of classical gluon fields under the homogeneous, but time dependent background color magnetic fields. The background field become periodic function of time and we can analyze the stability of fluctuations based on the Floquet theory which consists the basis of the Bloch theory. As a result, we get the complete structure of instability bands for physical degrees of freedom appearing from parametric resonance. We also find that the parametric instabilities considered here have different natures from the several known instabilities; Weibel and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities. We also discuss some implications of parametric resonance to the particle productions in HIC.

  11. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  12. Discs in misaligned binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawiraswattana, Krisada; Hubber, David A.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We perform SPH simulations to study precession and changes in alignment between the circumprimary disc and the binary orbit in misaligned binary systems. We find that the precession process can be described by the rigid-disc approximation, where the disc is considered as a rigid body interacting with the binary companion only gravitationally. Precession also causes change in alignment between the rotational axis of the disc and the spin axis of the primary star. This type of alignment is of great important for explaining the origin of spin-orbit misaligned planetary systems. However, we find that the rigid-disc approximation fails to describe changes in alignment between the disc and the binary orbit. This is because the alignment process is a consequence of interactions that involve the fluidity of the disc, such as the tidal interaction and the encounter interaction. Furthermore, simulation results show that there are not only alignment processes, which bring the components towards alignment, but also anti-alignment processes, which tend to misalign the components. The alignment process dominates in systems with misalignment angle near 90°, while the anti-alignment process dominates in systems with the misalignment angle near 0° or 180°. This means that highly misaligned systems will become more aligned but slightly misaligned systems will become more misaligned.

  13. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  14. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability.

    PubMed

    Perego, A M; Tarasov, N; Churkin, D V; Turitsyn, S K; Staliunas, K

    2016-01-15

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems. PMID:26824573

  15. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals. PMID:17767079

  16. Depth-dependent critical-current density of melt-processed Y-Ba-Cu-O discs determined by the third-harmonic technique: Surface barrier and intrinsic pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; He, T.-F.; Zhang, M.-J.; Wang, S.-S.; Shi, Y.-H.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The critical-current density Jc of three Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) discs, each cut from the upper section of a melt-processed single grain, has been determined as a function of the depth from the top (seeded) and bottom surfaces of the sample by a modified version of the inductive third-harmonic technique proposed originally by Mawatari et al. It is shown that local Jc in the vicinity of the bottom surface of the sample is lower than that in the vicinity of the top surface for thicker discs and there are reduced effect of surface barrier and intrinsic pinning and important surface damage. The technique employed is recommended as a tool for detecting the imperfection within superconducting structure in bulk YBCO.

  17. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  18. Stability of galactic discs: finite arm-inclination and finite-thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Gedalin, Michael

    2012-05-01

    A modified theory of the Lin-Shu density waves, studied in connection with the problem of spiral pattern of rapidly and differentially rotating disc galaxies, is presented for both the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric structures in highly flattened galaxies resulted from the classical Jeans instability of small gravity perturbations (e.g. those produced by a spontaneous disturbance). A new method is provided for the analytical solution of the self-consistent system of the gas-dynamic equations and the Poisson equation describing the stability of a three-dimensional galactic disc composed of stars or gaseous clouds. In order to apply the method, the modifications introduced for the properties of the gravitationally unstable, that is to say, amplitude-growing density waves are considered by removing the often used assumptions that the gravity perturbations are axisymmetric and the disc is infinitesimally thin. In contrast to previous studies, in this paper these two effects - the non-axial symmetry effect and the finite thickness effect - are simultaneously taken into account. We show that non-axisymmetric perturbations developing in a differentially rotating disc are more unstable than the axisymmetric ones. We also show that destabilizing self-gravity is far more 'dangerous' in thin discs than in thick discs. The primary effect of small but finite thickness is a reduction of the growth rate of the gravitational Jeans instability and a shift in the threshold of instability towards a longer wavelength (and larger wavelength will include more mass). The results of this paper are in qualitative agreement with previous analytical and numerical estimations of the effects. The extent to which our results on the disc's stability can have a bearing on observable spiral galaxies, including the Milky Way, is also discussed.

  19. On total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Berg, Svante

    2011-02-01

    Low back pain consumes a large part of the community's resources dedicated to health care and sick leave. Back disorders also negatively affect the individual leading to pain suffering, decreased quality-of-life and disability. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) due to degenerative disc disease (DDD) is today often treated with fusion when conservative treatment has failed and symptoms are severe. This treatment is as successful as arthroplasty is for hip arthritis in restoring the patient's quality of life and reducing disability. Even so, there are some problems with this treatment, one of these being recurrent CLBP from an adjacent segment (ASD) after primarily successful surgery. This has led to the development of alternative surgical treatments and devices that maintain or restore mobility, in order to reduce the risk for ASD. Of these new devices, the most frequently used are the disc prostheses used in Total Disc Replacement (TDR). This thesis is based on four studies comparing total disc replacement with posterior fusion. The studies are all based on a material of 152 patients with DDD in one or two segments, aged 20-55 years that were randomly treated with either posterior fusion or TDR. The first study concerned clinical outcome and complications. Follow-up was 100% at both one and two years. It revealed that both treatment groups had a clear benefit from treatment and that patients with TDR were better in almost all outcome scores at one-year follow-up. Fusion patients continued to improve during the second year. At two-year follow-up there was a remaining difference in favour of TDR for back pain. 73% in the TDR group and 63% in the fusion group were much better or totally pain-free (n.s.), while twice as many patients in the TDR group were totally pain free (30%) compared to the fusion group (15%). Time of surgery and total time in hospital were shorter in the TDR group. There was no difference in complications and reoperations, except that seventeen of the

  20. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  1. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  2. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  3. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  4. Magnetothermal instability with generalized Ohm's law

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M.P.; Talwar, S.P. )

    1993-03-01

    The problem of thermal instability, having bearing on the formation of astrophysical condensations, is investigated for a hydromagnetic fluid obeying generalized Ohm's law, both for self-gravitating and nongravitating configurations. Effects of finite Larmor frequency, resistivity, and finite plasma frequency on the stability of the system are studied and the condition of instabilities are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function. It is found that the condition of instability for propagation parallel to the ambient magnetic field is independent of finite resistivity, Hall current, and electron inertia effects and also of the magnetic field strength. For transverse propagation, however, the instability criterion involves the field strength, resistivity, and electron inertia terms. The Hall current is found to modify the growth rates for generally inclined propagation only. Both monotonically unstable and overstable modes of instability arise in the system depending on the dependence of the heat-loss function on the local density and temperature.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of the human lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Marini, Giacomo; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Systems with a quasi-static response similar to the axial response of the intervertebral disc (i.e. progressive stiffening) often present complex dynamics, characterized by peculiar nonlinearities in the frequency response. However, such characteristics have not been reported for the dynamic response of the disc. The accurate understanding of disc dynamics is essential to investigate the unclear correlation between whole body vibration and low back pain. The present study investigated the dynamic response of the disc, including its potential nonlinear response, over a range of loading conditions. Human lumbar discs were tested by applying a static preload to the top and a sinusoidal displacement at the bottom of the disc. The frequency of the stimuli was set to increase linearly from a low frequency to a high frequency limit and back down. In general, the response showed nonlinear and asymmetric characteristics. For each test, the disc had different response in the frequency-increasing compared to the frequency-decreasing sweep. In particular, the system presented abrupt changes of the oscillation amplitude at specific frequencies, which differed between the two sweeps. This behaviour indicates that the system oscillation has a different equilibrium condition depending on the path followed by the stimuli. Preload and amplitude of the oscillation directly influenced the disc response by changing the nonlinear dynamics and frequency of the jump-phenomenon. These results show that the characterization of the dynamic response of physiological systems should be readdressed to determine potential nonlinearities. Their direct effect on the system function should be further investigated. PMID:25573099

  6. Simulation of biological therapies for degenerated intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gao, Xin; Temple, H Thomas; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Weiyong

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of biological therapies on intervertebral disc repair was quantitatively studied using a three-dimensional finite element model based on a cell-activity coupled multiphasic mixture theory. In this model, cell metabolism and matrix synthesis and degradation were considered. Three types of biological therapies-increasing the cell density (Case I), increasing the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis rate (Case II), and decreasing the GAG degradation rate (Case III)-to the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each of two degenerated discs [one mildly degenerated (e.g., 80% viable cells in the NP) and one severely degenerated (e.g., 30% viable cells in the NP)] were simulated. Degenerated discs without treatment were also simulated as a control. The cell number needed, nutrition level demanded, time required for the repair, and the long-term outcomes of these therapies were analyzed. For Case I, the repair process was predicted to be dependent on the cell density implanted and the nutrition level at disc boundaries. With sufficient nutrition supply, this method was predicted to be effective for treating both mildly and severely degenerated discs. For Case II, the therapy was predicted to be effective for repairing the mildly degenerated disc, but not for the severely degenerated disc. Similar results were predicted for Case III. No change in cell density for Cases II and III were predicted under normal nutrition level. This study provides a quantitative guide for choosing proper strategies of biological therapies for different degenerated discs. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:699-708, 2016. PMID:26425965

  7. Origin of structures in disc galaxies: internal or external processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2015-03-01

    Disc galaxies have a number of structures, such as bars, spirals, rings, discy bulges, m = 1 asymmetries, thick discs, warps etc. I will summarise what is known about their origin and in particular whether it is due to an external or an internal process. The former include interactions, major or minor mergers etc, while the latter include instabilities, or driving by another component of the same galaxy, as e.g. the bar or the halo. In cases where more than one process is eligible, I will analyse whether it is possible to distinguish between different origins, and what it would take to do so. This discussion will show that, at least in some cases, it is difficult to distinguish between an internal and an external origin.

  8. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jílková, Lucie; Hamers, Adrian S.; Hammer, Michael; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distribution in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new host star. The population of the transferred particles can be used to constrain the encounter through which it was delivered. We expect that many stars experienced transfer among their debris discs and planetary systems in their birth environment. This mechanism presents a formation channel for objects on wide orbits of arbitrary inclinations, typically having high eccentricity but possibly also close to circular (eccentricities of about 0.1). Depending on the geometry, such orbital elements can be distinct from those of the objects formed around the star.

  9. Tissue engineering: A live disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukins, David W. L.

    2005-12-01

    A material-cell hybrid device that mimics the anatomic shape of the intervertebral disc has been made and successfully implanted into mice to show that tissue engineering may, in the future, benefit sufferers from back pain.

  10. Disc Golf, a Growing Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a rapid pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues

  11. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors’ clinic and treated by PCN. The patients’ gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 ± 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3–4, 30 cases at C4–5, 40 cases at C5–6, and 35 cases at C6–7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) ≥11° or horizontal displacement (HD) ≥3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  12. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  13. Hydromagnetic stability of a slim disc in a stationary geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya-Góchez, Rafael Angel

    2002-12-01

    The magnetorotational instability originates from the elastic coupling of fluid elements in orbit around a gravitational well. Since inertial accelerations play a fundamental dynamical role in the process, one may expect substantial modifications by strong gravity in the case of accretion on to a black hole. In this paper, we develop a fully covariant, Lagrangian displacement vector field formalism with the aim of addressing these issues for a disc embedded in a stationary geometry with negligible radial flow. This construction enables a transparent connection between particle dynamics and the ensuing dispersion relation for magnetohydrodynamic wave modes. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) - in its incompressible variant - is found to operate virtually unabated down to the marginally stable orbit; the putative inner boundary of standard accretion disc theory. To obtain a qualitative feel for the dynamical evolution of the flow below rms, we assume a mildly advective accretion flow such that the angular velocity profile departs slowly from circular geodesic flow. This exercise suggests that turbulent eddies will occur at spatial scales approaching the radial distance while tracking the surfaces of null angular velocity gradients. The implied field topology, namely large-scale horizontal field domains, should yield strong mass segregation at the displacement nodes of the non-linear modes when radiation stress dominates the local disc structure (an expectation supported by quasi-linear arguments and by the non-linear behaviour of the MRI in a non-relativistic setting). Under this circumstance, baryon-poor flux in horizontal field domains will be subject to radial buoyancy and to the Parker instability, thereby promoting the growth of poloidal field.

  14. High Glucose Accelerates Autophagy in Adult Rat Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Study Design In vitro cell culture. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult rat intervertebral disc cells. Overview of Literature Diabetes mellitus is considered to be an important etiologic factor for intervertebral disc degeneration, resulting in degenerative disc diseases. A glucose-mediated increase of autophagy is a major causative factor for the development of diseases associated with diabetes mellitus. However, no information is available for the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells. Methods Nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from 24-week-old adult rats, cultured and placed in either 10% fetal bovine serum (normal control) or 10% fetal bovine serum plus two different high glucose concentrations (0.1 M and 0.2 M) (experimental conditions) for one and three days, respectively. The expressions of autophagy markers, such as beclin-1, light chain 3-I (LC3-I) and LC3-II, autophagy-related gene (Atg) 3, 5, 7 and 12, were identified and quantified. Results Two high glucoses significantly increased the expressions of beclin-1, LC3-II, Atg3, 5, 7, and 12 in adult rat nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I expression was also increased in a dose-respectively time-dependent manner. Conclusions The results suggest that autophagy of adult nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells might be a potential mechanism for the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. Thus, the prevention of autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells might be considered as a novel therapeutic target to prevent or to delay the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25346805

  15. The Effect of Sustained Compression on Oxygen Metabolic Transport in the Intervertebral Disc Decreases with Degenerative Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  16. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  17. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  18. On the stability of elliptical vortices in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, G.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2009-04-01

    Context: The existence of large-scale and long-lived 2D vortices in accretion discs has been debated for more than a decade. They appear spontaneously in several 2D disc simulations and they are known to accelerate planetesimal formation through a dust trapping process. In some cases, these vortices may even lead to an efficient way to transport angular momentum in protoplanetary discs when MHD instabilities are inoperative. However, the issue of the stability of these structures to the imposition of 3D disturbances is still not fully understood, and it casts doubts on their long term survival Aims: We present new results on the 3D stability of elliptical vortices embedded in accretion discs, based on a linear analysis and several non-linear simulations. Methods: We introduce a simple steady 2D vortex model which is a non-linear solution of the equations of motion, and we show that its core is made of elliptical streamlines. We then derive the linearised equations governing the 3D perturbations in the core of this vortex, and we show that they can be reduced to a Floquet problem. We solve this problem numerically in the astrophysical regime, including a simplified model to take into account vertical stratification effects. We present several analytical limits for which the mechanism responsible for instability can be explained. Finally, we compare the results of the linear analysis to some high resolution numerical simulations obtained with spectral and finite difference methods. A discussion is provided, emphasising the astrophysical consequences of our findings for the dynamics of vortices. Results: We show that most anticyclonic vortices are unstable due to a resonance between the turnover time and the local epicyclic oscillation period. A small linearly stable domain is found for vortex cores with an aspect-ratio of around 5. However, our simulations show that it is only the vortex core that is stable, with the instability still appearing on the vortex boundary

  19. On the dynamic instability of nanowire-fabricated electromechanical actuators in the Casimir regime: Coupled effects of surface energy and size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Mardaneh, Mohamadreza; Koochi, Ali; Rezaei, Morteza; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the dynamic pull-in instability of cantilever nanoactuator fabricated from conductive cylindrical nanowire with circular cross-section is studied under the presence of Casimir force. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in combination with the couple stress theory is employed to incorporate the coupled effects of surface energy and size phenomenon. Using Green-Lagrange strain, the higher order surface stress components are incorporated in the governing equation. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on the path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of the Casimir attraction. Furthermore, the influence of structural damping is considered in the model. The nonlinear governing equation is solved using analytical reduced order method (ROM). The effects of various parameters on the dynamic pull-in parameters, phase planes and stability threshold of the actuator are demonstrated.

  20. Stellar explosions, instabilities, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Muthsam, H. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-04-15

    It has become very clear that the evolution of structure during supernovae is centrally dependent on the pre-existing structure in the star. Modeling of the pre-existing structure has advanced significantly, leading to improved understanding and to a physically based assessment of the structure that will be present when a star explodes. It remains an open question whether low-mode asymmetries in the explosion process can produce the observed effects or whether the explosion mechanism somehow produces jets of material. In any event, the workhorse processes that produce structure in an exploding star are blast-wave driven instabilities. Laboratory experiments have explored these blast-wave-driven instabilities and specifically their dependence on initial conditions. Theoretical work has shown that the relative importance of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities varies with the initial conditions and does so in ways that can make sense of a range of astrophysical observations.

  1. Activation of peripheral delta opioid receptors eliminates cardiac electrical instability in a rat model of post-infarction cardiosclerosis via mitochondrial ATP-dependent K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Yu B; Solenkova, N V; Gross, G J; Stefano, G B; Tam, S W

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the selective delta-1 (delta(1)) opioid receptor agonist, DPDPE, and the selective delta(2) opioid receptor agonist, DSLET, have been studied on the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) in rats with an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis (CS). It has been found that CS induced a significant decrease in VFT. This CS-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of DPDPE (0.1 mg/kg) 10 min before VFT measurement. On the contrary, intravenous injection of DSLET (0.5 mg/kg) exacerbated the CS-induced cardiac electrical instability. Pretreatment with the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, ICI 174,864 (0.5 mg/kg), completely abolished the changes in VFT produced by both DPDPE and DSLET. Previous administration of a nonselective peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg) also completely reversed the antifibrillatory action of DPDPE. Naloxone methiodide and ICI 174,864 alone had no effect on VFT. Pretreatment with the nonselective K(ATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (0.3 mg/kg), or with the mitochondrial selective K(ATP) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD, 5 mg/kg), completely abolished the DPDPE-induced increase in cardiac electrical stability. Glibenclamide and 5-HD alone had no effect on VFT. These results demonstrate that the delta opioid receptor plays an important role in the regulation of electrical stability in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. We propose that peripheral delta(1) opioid receptor stimulation reverses CS-induced electrical instability via mitochondrial K(ATP) channels. On the contrary, delta(2) opioid receptor stimulation may exacerbate the CS-induced decrease in VFT. Further studies are necessary to determine the delta opioid receptor subtype which mediates the antifibrillatory effect of DPDPE and pro-fibrillatory effect of DSLET. PMID:12798419

  2. Black hole mergers: do gas discs lead to spin alignment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodato, Giuseppe; Gerosa, Davide

    2013-02-01

    In this Letter, we revisit arguments suggesting that the Bardeen-Petterson effect can coalign the spins of a central supermassive black hole binary accreting from a circumbinary (or circumnuclear) gas disc. We improve on previous estimates by adding the dependence on system parameters and noting that the non-linear nature of warp propagation in a thin viscous disc affects alignment. This reduces the disc's ability to communicate the warp, and can severely reduce the effectiveness of disc-assisted spin alignment. We test our predictions with a Monte Carlo realization of random misalignments and accretion rates, and we find that the outcome depends strongly on the spin magnitude. We estimate a generous upper limit to the probability of alignment by making assumptions which favour it throughout. Even with these assumptions, about 40 per cent of black holes with a ≳ 0.5 do not have time to align with the disc. If the residual misalignment is not small and it is maintained down to the final coalescence phase, this can give a powerful recoil velocity to the merged hole. Highly spinning black holes are thus more likely being subject to strong recoils, the occurrence of which is currently debated.

  3. Nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    A new analytical technique for the solution of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability problems in rocket combustors is developed. Using relatively little computation time, this technique is capable of predicting the transient and limit cycle behavior of the combustion instability oscillations as well as the disturbance amplitude required to trigger an instability in a linearly stable motor. The limit cycle waveforms are found to exhibit shock wave characteristics for most unstable engine operating conditions. It is shown that the characteristics of the resulting instability are independent of the nature of the initial disturbance and they depend solely upon the engine operating conditions and the characteristics of the unsteady combustion process.

  4. Curveballs in protoplanetary discs - the effect of the Magnus force on planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Spinning planetesimals in a gaseous protoplanetary disc may experience a hydrodynamical force perpendicular to their relative velocities. We examine the effect this force has on the dynamics of these objects using analytical arguments based on a simple laminar disc model and numerical integrations of the equations of motion for individual grains. We focus in particular on metre-sized boulders traditionally expected to spiral in to the central star in as little as 100 years from 1 au We find that there are plausible scenarios in which this force extends the lifetime of these solids in the disc by a factor of several. More importantly the velocities induced by the Magnus force can prevent the formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability in the inner disc if the size of the dust particles is larger than of the order of 10 cm. We find that the fastest growing linear modes of the streaming instability may still grow despite the diffusive effect of the Magnus force, but it remains to be seen how the Magnus force will alter the non-linear evolution of these instabilities.

  5. Prosthetic lumbar disc replacement for degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Arvind G; Diwan, Ashish D

    2005-12-01

    Mechanical articulated device to replace intervertebral disc as a treatment for low back pain secondary to disc degeneration has emerged as a promising tool for selected patients. The potential advantages are prevention of adjacent segment degeneration, maintenance of mobility as well as avoidance of all the complications associated with fusion. The short-term results have been comparable to that of fusion, a few mid-term results have shown mixed outcome, but information on long-term results and performance are not available at present. The rationale for lumbar disc arthroplasty, indications, contraindications, the various artificial devices in the market and the concepts intrinsic to each of them, basic technique of insertion, complications are discussed and a brief summary of our experience with one of the devices is presented. PMID:16565543

  6. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  7. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  8. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  9. Chondrule transport in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Aaron Z.; Owen, James E.; Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Chondrule formation remains one of the most elusive early Solar system events. Here, we take the novel approach of employing numerical simulations to investigate chondrule origin beyond purely cosmochemical methods. We model the transport of generically produced chondrules and dust in a 1D viscous protoplanetary disc model in order to constrain the chondrule formation events. For a single formation event we are able to match analytical predictions of the memory they retain of each other (complementarity), finding that a large mass accretion rate (≳10-7 M⊙ yr-1) allows for delays on the order of the disc's viscous time-scale between chondrule formation and chondrite accretion. Further, we find older discs to be severely diminished of chondrules, with accretion rates ≲10-9 M⊙ yr-1 for nominal parameters. We then characterize the distribution of chondrule origins in both space and time, as functions of disc parameters and chondrule formation rates, in runs with continuous chondrule formation and both static and evolving discs. Our data suggest that these can account for the observed diversity between distinct chondrite classes, if some diversity in accretion time is allowed for.

  10. Evolution of accretion discs around a kerr black hole using extended magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F.; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-02-01

    Black holes accreting well below the Eddington rate are believed to have geometrically thick, optically thin, rotationally supported accretion discs in which the Coulomb mean free path is large compared to GM/c2. In such an environment, the disc evolution may differ significantly from ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predictions. We present non-ideal global axisymmetric simulations of geometrically thick discs around a rotating black hole. The simulations are carried out using a new code GRIM, which evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal MHD. Non-ideal effects are modelled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines, and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. We find that the pressure anisotropy grows to match the magnetic pressure, at which point it saturates due to the mirror instability. The pressure anisotropy produces outward angular momentum transport with a magnitude comparable to that of MHD turbulence in the disc, and a significant increase in the temperature in the wall of the jet. We also find that, at least in our axisymmetric simulations, conduction has a small effect on the disc evolution because (1) the heat flux is constrained to be parallel to the field and the field is close to perpendicular to temperature gradients, and (2) the heat flux is choked by an increase in effective collisionality associated with the mirror instability.

  11. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  12. The long-term evolution of photoevaporating transition discs with giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Ercolano, Barbara; Owen, James E.

    2015-12-01

    Photoevaporation and planet formation have both been proposed as mechanisms responsible for the creation of a transition disc. We have studied their combined effect through a suite of 2D simulations of protoplanetary discs undergoing X-ray photoevaporation with an embedded giant planet. In a previous work, we explored how the formation of a giant planet triggers the dispersal of the inner disc by photoevaporation at earlier times than what would have happened otherwise. This is particularly relevant for the observed transition discs with large holes and high mass accretion rates that cannot be explained by photoevaporation alone. In this work, we significantly expand the parameter space investigated by previous simulations. In addition, the updated model includes thermal sweeping, needed for studying the complete dispersal of the disc. After the removal of the inner disc, the disc is a non-accreting transition disc, an object that is rarely seen in observations. We assess the relative length of this phase, to understand if it is long lived enough to be found observationally. Depending on the parameters, especially on the X-ray luminosity of the star, we find that the fraction of time spent as a non-accretor greatly varies. We build a population synthesis model to compare with observations and find that in general thermal sweeping is not effective enough to destroy the outer disc, leaving many transition discs in a relatively long lived phase with a gas-free hole, at odds with observations. We discuss the implications for transition disc evolution. In particular, we highlight the current lack of explanation for the missing non-accreting transition discs with large holes, which is a serious issue in the planet hypothesis.

  13. Formation of discs around super-massive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, Felipe G.; Cuadra, Jorge; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    We model numerically the evolution of 104 M ⊙ turbulent molecular clouds in near-radial infall onto 106 M ⊙, equal-mass supermassive black hole binaries, using a modified version of the SPH code gadget-3. We investigate the different gas structures formed depending on the relative inclination between the binary and the cloud orbits. Our first results indicate that an aligned orbit produces mini-discs around each black hole, almost aligned with the binary; a perpendicular orbit produces misaligned mini-discs; and a counter-aligned orbit produces a circumbinary, counter-rotating ring.

  14. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  15. Laser engineering of spine discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, E.; Zakharkina, O.; Baskov, A.; Shekhter, A.; Borschenko, I.; Guller, A.; Baskov, V.; Omelchenko, A.; Sviridov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The laser engineering of intervertebral discs is one of the branch of medical physics aimed at the development of minimally invasive laser medical techniques based on the effect of the controlled (time- and space-modulated) laser radiation on the structure and the field of mechanical stress of biological tissues. A new method for the laser engineering of the intervertebral discs and the differences of this approach from the existing physical methods of medical treatment are considered. The newly formed tissues of animals and humans are hystologically studied. Possible regeneration processes are discussed. A control system that provides for the treatment efficiency and safety is developed. The new laser medical equipment that is designed for the laser engineering of intervertebral discs is described, and the corresponding results of the clinical application are presented.

  16. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  17. On the local stability of vortices in differentially rotating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Railton, A. D.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2014-12-01

    In order to circumvent the loss of solid material through radial drift towards the central star, the trapping of dust inside persistent vortices in protoplanetary discs has often been suggested as a process that can eventually lead to planetesimal formation. Although a few special cases have been discussed, exhaustive studies of possible quasi-steady configurations available for dust-laden vortices and their stability are yet to be undertaken, thus their viability or otherwise as locations for the gravitational instability to take hold and seed planet formation is unclear. In this paper we generalize and extend the well-known Kida solution to obtain a series of steady-state solutions with varying vorticity and dust density distributions in their cores, in the limit of perfectly coupled dust and gas. We then present a local stability analysis of these configurations, considering perturbations localized on streamlines. Typical parametric instabilities found have growth rates of 0.05ΩP, where ΩP is the angular velocity at the centre of the vortex. Models with density excess can exhibit many narrow parametric instability bands while those with a concentrated vorticity source display internal shear which significantly affects their stability. However, the existence of these parametric instabilities may not necessarily prevent the possibility of dust accumulation in vortices.

  18. NIHAO III: the constant disc gas mass conspiracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, G. S.; Dutton, A. A.; Wang, L.; Macciò, A. V.; Herpich, J.; Bradford, J. D.; Quinn, T. R.; Wadsley, J.; Keller, B.

    2015-11-01

    We show that the cool gas masses of galactic discs reach a steady state that lasts many Gyr after their last major merger in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The mass of disc gas, Mgas, depends mostly upon a galaxy virial mass and halo's spin, and less upon stellar feedback. Haloes with low spin have high star formation efficiency and lower disc gas mass. Similarly, lower stellar feedback leads to more star formation so the gas mass ends up being nearly the same regardless of stellar feedback strength. Rather than regulating cool gas mass, stellar feedback regulates the mass of stars that forms. Even considering spin, the Mgas relation with halo mass, M200 only shows a factor of 3 scatter. The simulated Mgas-M200 relation shows a break at M200 = 2 × 1011 M⊙ that corresponds to an observed break in the Mgas-M⋆ relation. The galaxies that maintain constant disc masses share a common halo gas density profile shape in all the simulated galaxies. In their outer regions, the profiles are isothermal. Where the profile rises above n = 10-3 cm-3, the gas readily cools and the profile steepens. Inside the disc, rotation supports gas with a flatter density profile. Energy injection from stellar feedback provides pressure support to the halo gas to prevent runaway cooling flows. The constant gas mass makes simpler models for galaxy formation possible, either using a `bathtub' model for star formation rates or when modelling chemical evolution.

  19. The convective stability of fully stratified baroclinic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volponi, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We examine the convective stability of hydrodynamic discs with full stratification in the local approximation and in the presence of thermal diffusion (or relaxation). Various branches of the relevant axisymmetric dispersion relation derived by Urpin (2003) are discussed. We find that when the vertical Richardson number is larger than or equal to the radial one (i.e. |Riz| ≥ |Rix|) and wavenumbers are comparable (i.e. |kx| ˜ |kz|) the disc becomes unstable, even in the presence of radial and vertical stratifications with Rix > 0 and Riz > 0. The origin of this resides in an hybrid radial-vertical Richardson number. We propose an equilibrium profile with temperature depending on the radial and vertical coordinates and with Riz > 0 for which this destabilization mechanism occurs. We notice as well that the dispersion relation of the "convective overstability" is the branch of the one here discussed in the limit |kz| ≫ |kx| (i. e. two-dimensional disc).

  20. The convective stability of fully stratified baroclinic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volponi, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We examine the convective stability of hydrodynamic discs with full stratification in the local approximation and in the presence of thermal diffusion (or relaxation). Various branches of the relevant axisymmetric dispersion relation derived by Urpin are discussed. We find that when the vertical Richardson number is larger than or equal to the radial one (i.e. |Riz| ≥ |Rix|) and wavenumbers are comparable (i.e. |kx| ˜ |kz|) the disc becomes unstable, even in the presence of radial and vertical stratifications with Rix > 0 and Riz > 0. The origin of this resides in a hybrid radial-vertical Richardson number. We propose an equilibrium profile with temperature depending on the radial and vertical coordinates and with Riz > 0 for which this destabilization mechanism occurs. We notice as well that the dispersion relation of the `convective overstability' is the branch of the one here discussed in the limit |kz| ≫ |kx| (i.e. two-dimensional disc).

  1. Arrangement of discs in 2d binary assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervois, A.; Annic, C.; Lemaitre, J.; Ammi, M.; Oger, L.; Troadec, J.-P.

    1995-02-01

    We study arrangements of the two species of discs in binary assemblies at an intermediate scale. Small discs rearrange along large ones in clusters whose mass and compactness are analyzed with the tools of percolation. The assemblies are generated analogically on an air table or numerically from RSA or Powell algorithms. At a given packing fraction, an infinite cluster of small discs exists above a critical composition; a phenomenological expression for this threshold is proposed. Like in usual percolation problems, the number of inner links in a cluster is a linear function of its mass, with a slope depending both on the packing fraction, the composition of the mixture and the building procedure. An approximate expression is derived for it.

  2. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-09-01

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  3. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-09-15

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  4. DISC1 Protein Regulates γ-Aminobutyric Acid, Type A (GABAA) Receptor Trafficking and Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Graziane, Nicholas M; Gu, Zhenglin; Yan, Zhen

    2015-11-13

    Association studies have suggested that Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) confers a genetic risk at the level of endophenotypes that underlies many major mental disorders. Despite the progress in understanding the significance of DISC1 at neural development, the mechanisms underlying DISC1 regulation of synaptic functions remain elusive. Because alterations in the cortical GABA system have been strongly linked to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, one potential target of DISC1 that is critically involved in the regulation of cognition and emotion is the GABAA receptor (GABAAR). We found that cellular knockdown of DISC1 significantly reduced GABAAR-mediated synaptic and whole-cell current, whereas overexpression of wild-type DISC1, but not the C-terminal-truncated DISC1 (a schizophrenia-related mutant), significantly increased GABAAR currents in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex. These effects were accompanied by DISC1-induced changes in surface GABAAR expression. Moreover, the regulation of GABAARs by DISC1 knockdown or overexpression depends on the microtubule motor protein kinesin 1 (KIF5). Our results suggest that DISC1 exerts an important effect on GABAergic inhibitory transmission by regulating KIF5/microtubule-based GABAAR trafficking in the cortex. The knowledge gained from this study would shed light on how DISC1 and the GABA system are linked mechanistically and how their interactions are critical for maintaining a normal mental state. PMID:26424793

  5. The aging mouse partially models the aging human spine: lumbar and coccygeal disc height, composition, mechanical properties, and Wnt signaling in young and old mice

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Rhiannon; Harland, Robin A.; Bomar, Bradley A.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Murine lumbar and coccygeal (tail) regions of spines are commonly used to study cellular signaling of age-related disc diseases, but the tissue-level changes of aging intervertebral discs and vertebrae of each spinal region remain unclear. Furthermore, the impact of aging lumbar and coccygeal discs on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which is putatively involved in the catabolism of intervertebral discs, is also unclear. We compared disc/vertebrae morphology and mechanics and biochemical composition of intervertebral discs from lumbar and coccygeal regions between young (4–5 mo) and old (20–22 mo) female C57BL/6 mice. Center intervertebral disc height from both regions was greater in old discs than young discs. Compared with young, old lumbar discs had a lower early viscous coefficient (a measure of stiffness) by 40%, while conversely old coccygeal discs were stiffer by 53%. Biochemically, old mice had double the collagen content in lumbar and coccygeal discs of young discs, greater glycosaminoglycan in lumbar discs by 37%, but less glycosaminoglycan in coccygeal discs by 32%. Next, we compared Wnt activity of lumbar and coccygeal discs of 4- to 5-mo and 12- to 14-mo TOPGAL mice. Despite the disc-specific changes, aging decreased Wnt signaling in the nucleus pulposus from both spinal regions by ≥64%. Compared with young, trabecular bone volume/tissue volume and ultimate force were less in old lumbar vertebrae, but greater in old coccygeal vertebrae. Thus intervertebral discs and vertebrae age in a spinal region-dependent manner, but these differential age-related changes may be uncoupled from Wnt signaling. Overall, lumbar and coccygeal regions are not interchangeable in modeling human aging. PMID:24790018

  6. Magnetorotationally driven wind cycles in local disc models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Latter, H.; Ross, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    Jets, from the protostellar to the AGN context, have been extensively studied but their connection to the turbulent dynamics of the underlying accretion disc is poorly understood. Following a similar approach to Lesur et al. (2013), we examine the role of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the production and acceleration of outflows from discs. Via a suite of one-dimensional shearing-box simulations of stratified discs we show that magneto-centrifugal winds exhibit cyclic activity with a period of 10 - 20 Ω-1, a few times the orbital period. The cycle seems to be more vigorous for strong vertical field; it is robust to the variation of relevant parameters and independent of numerical details. The convergence of these solutions (in particular the mass loss rate) with vertical box size is also studied. By considering a sequence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria and their stability, the periodic activity may be understood as the succession of the following phases: (a) a dominant MRI channel mode, (b) strong magnetic field generation, (c) consequent wind launching, and ultimately (d) vertical expulsion of the excess magnetic field by the expanding and accelerating gas associated with the wind. We discuss potential connections between this behaviour and observed time-variability in disk-jet systems.

  7. Free motion around black holes with discs or rings: between integrability and chaos - IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzany, V.; Semerák, O.; Suková, P.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamical system studied in previous papers of this series, namely a bound time-like geodesic motion in the exact static and axially symmetric space-time of an (originally) Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a thin disc or ring, is considered to test whether the often employed `pseudo-Newtonian' approach (resorting to Newtonian dynamics in gravitational potentials modified to mimic the black hole field) can reproduce phase-space properties observed in the relativistic treatment. By plotting Poincaré surfaces of section and using two recurrence methods for similar situations as in the relativistic case, we find similar tendencies in the evolution of the phase portrait with parameters (mainly with mass of the disc/ring and with energy of the orbiters), namely those characteristic to weakly non-integrable systems. More specifically, this is true for the Paczyński-Wiita and a newly suggested logarithmic potential, whereas the Nowak-Wagoner potential leads to a different picture. The potentials and the exact relativistic system clearly differ in delimitation of the phase-space domain accessible to a given set of particles, though this mainly affects the chaotic sea whereas not so much the occurrence and succession of discrete dynamical features (resonances). In the pseudo-Newtonian systems, the particular dynamical features generally occur for slightly smaller values of the perturbation parameters than in the relativistic system, so one may say that the pseudo-Newtonian systems are slightly more prone to instability. We also add remarks on numerics (a different code is used than in previous papers), on the resemblance of dependence of the dynamics on perturbing mass and on orbital energy, on the difference between the Newtonian and relativistic Bach-Weyl rings, and on the relation between Poincaré sections and orbital shapes within the meridional plane.

  8. Infrared accretion disc mapping of the dwarf nova V2051 Ophiuchi in outburst and in quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcikiewicz, E.; Baptista, R.

    2014-10-01

    Dwarf novae are compact binaries where a late-type star (the secondary) fills its Roche lobe and transfers matter to a companion white dwarf (the primary) via an accretion disc. They show outbursts which recur on timescales of weeks to years, where the accretion disc brightens by factors 20 to 100 either due to a thermal-viscous instability in the disc (DI model) or to a burst of enhanced mass-transfer from the secondary (MTI model). We report time-series of fast photometry of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph in the J and H bands, obtained with the CAMIV at the 1.6 m telescope of Observatório Pico dos Dias/Brazil, during the decline of an outburst in 2005 June, and in 2008 when the object was in quiescence. We modeled the ellipsoidal variations caused by the secondary to infer its contribution to the J and H fluxes, and fitted stellar atmosphere models to find a photometric parallatic distance of d = (111± 14)pc. Front-back brightness asymmetries in J and H-band eclipse maps along the decline from the 2005 outburst suggest that the accretion disc had a non-negligible opening angle which decreased as the disc cooled down. The time evolution of the disc radial temperature distribution along the outburst decline shows a cooling wave which accelerates as is travels inwards - in contradiction to a basic prediction from the DI model.

  9. Shear instabilities in a fully compressible polytropic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2015-05-01

    Shear flows have a significant impact on the dynamics in an assortment of different astrophysical objects, including accretion discs and stellar interiors. Investigating shear flow instabilities in a polytropic atmosphere provides a fundamental understanding of the motion in stellar interiors where turbulent motions, mixing processes, and magnetic field generation take place. Here, a linear stability analysis for a fully compressible fluid in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry is carried out. Our study focuses on determining the critical Richardson number for different Mach numbers and the destabilising effects of high thermal diffusion. We find that there is a deviation in the predicted stability threshold for moderate Mach number flows, along with a significant effect on the growth rate of the linear instability for small Péclet numbers. We show that in addition to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, a Holmboe instability can appear, and we discuss the implication of this in stellar interiors.

  10. Optical Discs: New Storage Media for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgerson, Linda W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses three new advances in the use of optical disc technology in education. Describes the storage formats and capabilities of the videodisc, the compact disc, and the optical write-once disc. Contrasts the three technologies in terms of their production requirements, the hardware involved, and some projected applications in education. (TW)

  11. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  12. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  13. Rotational support of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Bournaud, Frederic; Burkert, Andreas; Genzel, Reinhard; Primack, Joel

    2012-03-01

    We address the internal support against total free-fall collapse of the giant clumps that form by violent gravitational instability in high-z disc galaxies. Guidance is provided by an analytic model, where the protoclumps are cut from a rotating disc and collapse to equilibrium while preserving angular momentum. This model predicts prograde clump rotation, which dominates the support if the clump has contracted to a surface density contrast ≳10. This is confirmed in hydro adaptive mesh refinement zoom-in simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context. In most high-z clumps, the centrifugal force dominates the support, ?, where Vrot is the rotation velocity and the circular velocity Vcirc measures the potential well. The clump spin indeed tends to be in the sense of the global disc angular momentum, but substantial tilts are frequent, reflecting the highly warped nature of the high-z discs. Most clumps are in Jeans equilibrium, with the rest of the support provided by turbulence, partly driven by the gravitational instability itself. The general agreement between model and simulations indicates that angular momentum loss or gain in most clumps is limited to a factor of 2. Simulations of isolated gas-rich discs that resolve the clump substructure reveal that the cosmological simulations may overestimate ? by ˜30 per cent, but the dominance of rotational support at high z is not a resolution artefact. In turn, isolated gas-poor disc simulations produce at z= 0 smaller gaseous non-rotating transient clouds, indicating that the difference in rotational support is associated with the fraction of cold baryons in the disc. In our current cosmological simulations, the clump rotation velocity is typically more than twice the disc dispersion, Vrot˜ 100 km s-1, but when beam smearing of ≥0.1 arcsec is imposed, the rotation signal is reduced to a small gradient of ≤30 km s-1 kpc-1 across the clump. The velocity dispersion in the simulated clumps is comparable to the

  14. TRANSVERSE INSTABILITIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Dawson, C; Degen, C; Drees, K; Fischer, W; Koropsak, E; Michnoff, R; Montag, C; Roser, T

    2003-05-12

    The beam quality in RHIC can be significantly impacted by a transverse instability which can occur just after transition [1]. Data characterizing the instability are presented and analyzed. Techniques for ameliorating the situation are considered.

  15. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  16. On the migration of two planets in a disc and the formation of mean motion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migaszewski, Cezary

    2015-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a system of two super-Earths embedded in a protoplanetary disc. We build a simple model of an irradiated viscous disc and use analytical prescriptions for the planet-disc interactions which lead to migration. We show that depending on the disc parameters, planets' masses and their positions in the disc, the migration of each planet can be inwards or outwards and the migration of a two-planet system can be convergent (which may lead to formation of a first-order mean motion resonance, MMR) or divergent (a system moves away from MMR). We performed 3500 simulations of the migration of two-planet systems with various masses and initial orbits. Almost all of them end up as resonant configurations, although the period ratios may be very distant from the nominal values of a given MMR. We found that almost all the systems resulting from the migration are periodic configurations.

  17. Carbon, nitrogen and α-element abundances determine the formation sequence of the Galactic thick and thin discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, T.; Gilmore, G.

    2015-10-01

    Using the DR12 public release of APOGEE data, we show that the thin and thick discs separate very well in the space defined by [α/Fe], [Fe/H] and [C/N]. Thick disc giants have both higher [C/N] and higher [α/Fe] than do thin disc stars with similar [Fe/H]. We deduce that the thick disc is composed of lower mass stars than the thin disc. Considering the fact that at a given metallicity there is a one-to-one relation between stellar mass and age, we are then able to infer the chronology of disc formation. Both the thick and the thin discs - defined by [α/Fe] - converge in their dependence on [C/N] and [C+N/Fe] at [Fe/H]≈-0.7. We conclude that (1) the majority of thick disc stars formed earlier than did the thin disc stars, (2) the formation histories of the thin and thick discs diverged early on, even when the [Fe/H] abundances are similar and (3) that the star formation rate in the thin disc has been lower than in the thick disc, at all metallicities. Although these general conclusions remain robust, we also show that current stellar evolution models cannot reproduce the observed C/N ratios for thick disc stars. Unexpectedly, reduced or inhibited canonical extra mixing is very common in field stars. While subject to abundance calibration zero-point uncertainties, this implies a strong dependence of non-canonical extra mixing along the red giant branch on the initial composition of the star and in particular on the α-elemental abundance.

  18. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  19. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  20. Sealing arrangement with annular flexible disc

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Honigsberg, Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    Fluid sealing arrangements including an annular shaped flexible disc having enlarged edges disposed within channel-shaped annular receptacles which are spaced from one another. The receptacles form an annular region for contacting and containing the enlarged edges of the disc, and the disc is preloaded to a conical configuration. The disc is flexibly and movably supported within the receptacles so that unevenly distributed relative motion between the components containing the receptacles is accommodated without loss of sealing contact between the edges of the disc and the walls of the receptacles.

  1. Genomic instability establishes dependencies on acquired gene regulatory networks: A novel role of p62 in myeloid malignancies with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2015-01-01

    MiR-146a deletion is a driving molecular event in del(5q) myeloid malignancies, which acquire dependency on a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) regulatory network. p62, a neighboring haploid 5q gene, is induced by NF-κB and required to sustain TRAF6-mediated NF-κB activation. Interfering with p62/TRAF6 binding may have a therapeutic benefit in miR-146a–deficient leukemic cells. PMID:27308507

  2. In vitro biomechanics of cervical disc arthroplasty with the ProDisc-C total disc implant.

    PubMed

    DiAngelo, Denis J; Foley, Kevin T; Morrow, Brian R; Schwab, John S; Song, Jung; German, John W; Blair, Eve

    2004-09-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study was conducted to compare the effects of disc arthroplasty and anterior cervical fusion on cervical spine biomechanics in a multilevel human cadaveric model. Three spine conditions were studied: harvested, single-level cervical disc arthroplasty, and single-level fusion. A programmable testing apparatus was used that replicated physiological flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Measurements included vertebral motion, applied load, and bending moments. Relative rotations at the superior, treated, and inferior motion segment units (MSUs) were normalized with respect to the overall rotation of those three MSUs and compared using a one-way analysis of variance with Student-Newman-Keuls test (p < 0.05). Simulated fusion decreased motion across the treated site relative to the harvested and disc arthroplasty conditions. The reduced motion at the treated site was compensated at the adjacent segments by an increase in motion. For all modes of testing, use of an artificial disc prosthesis did not alter the motion patterns at either the instrumented level or adjacent segments compared with the harvested condition, except in extension. PMID:15636563

  3. Plateau Rayleigh instability simulation.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; King, Andrew J C; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-05-01

    The well-known phenomena of Plateau-Rayleigh instability has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The breakup of a liquid film into an array of droplets on a cylindrical element was simulated using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) solver and compared to experimental observations and existing theory. It is demonstrated that the VOF method can correctly predict the breakup of thins films into an array of either axisymmetric droplets or clam-shell droplets, depending on the surface energy. The existence of unrealistically large films is precluded. Droplet spacing was found to show reasonable agreement with theory. Droplet motion and displacement under fluid flow was also examined and compared to that in previous studies. It was found that the presence of air flow around the droplet does not influence the stable film thickness; however, it reduces the time required for droplet formation. Novel relationships for droplet displacement were derived from the results. PMID:22512475

  4. From the Solar Neighbourhood to the Galactic Disc(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, L.

    2012-08-01

    We present a re-analysis of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS), based on improved effective temperature and metallicity scales, which also provide a better match to theoretical isochrones. The latter are used for a Bayesian investigation on stellar ages. With respect to previous analyses, our stars are on average 100 K hotter and 0.1 dex more metal rich, which shifts the peak of the metallicity distribution function (MDF) around the solar value. From Strömgren photometry we are able to derive for the first time a proxy for alpha elements, which enables us to perform a tentative dissection of the chemical thin and thick disc. We find evidence for the latter being composed of an old, mildly but systematically alpha-enhanced population that extends to super solar metallicities. These findings help to constrain different processes potentially relevant in the build-up of the Milky Way disc.

  5. The poro-elastic behaviour of the intervertebral disc: A new perspective on diurnal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; van der Veen, Albert J; Emanuel, Kaj S; van Dieën, Jaap H; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-04-11

    Diurnal disc height changes, due to fluid in- and outflow, are in equilibrium while daytime spinal loading is twice as long as night time rest. A direction-dependent permeability of the endplates, favouring inflow over outflow, reportedly explains this; however, fluid flow through the annulus fibrosus should be considered. This study investigates the fluid flow of entire intervertebral discs. Caprine discs were preloaded in saline for 24h under four levels of static load. Under sustained load, we modulated the disc׳s swelling pressure by exchanging saline for demineralised water (inflow) and back to saline (outflow), both for 24h. We measured disc height creep and used stretched exponential models to determine time-constants. During inflow disc height increased in relation to applied load, and during outflow disc height decreased to preload levels. When comparing in- and outflow phases, there was no difference in creep, and time-constants were similar indicating no direction-dependent resistance to fluid flow in the entire intervertebral disc. Results provoked a new hypothesis for diurnal fluid flow: in vitro time-constants for loading are shorter than for unloading and in vivo daytime loading is twice as long as night time unloading, i.e. in diurnal loading the intervertebral disc is closer to loading equilibrium than to unloading equilibrium. Per definition, fluid flow is slower close to equilibrium than far from equilibrium; therefore, as diurnal loading occurs closer to loading equilibrium, fluid inflow during night time unloading can balance fluid outflow during daytime loading, despite a longer time-constant. PMID:26684430

  6. Influence of the water content in protoplanetary discs on planet migration and formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The temperature and density profiles of protoplanetary discs depend crucially on the mass fraction of micrometre-sized dust grains and on their chemical composition. A larger abundance of micrometre-sized grains leads to an overall heating of the disc, so that the water ice line moves further away from the star. An increase in the water fraction inside the disc, maintaining a fixed dust abundance, increases the temperature in the icy regions of the disc and lowers the temperature in the inner regions. Discs with a larger silicate fraction have the opposite effect. Here we explore the consequence of the dust composition and abundance for the formation and migration of planets. We find that discs with low water content can only sustain outwards migration for planets up to 4 Earth masses, while outwards migration in discs with a larger water content persists up to 8 Earth masses in the late stages of the disc evolution. Icy planetary cores that do not reach run-away gas accretion can thus migrate to orbits close to the host star if the water abundance is low. Our results imply that hot and warm super-Earths found in exoplanet surveys could have formed beyond the ice line and thus contain a significant fraction in water. These water-rich super-Earths should orbit primarily around stars with a low oxygen abundance, where a low oxygen abundance is caused by either a low water-to-silicate ratio or by overall low metallicity.

  7. Effect of microgravity on the biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal intervertebral discs in mice.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeannie F; Hargens, Alan R; Cheng, Kevin K; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2014-09-22

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity has shown to have deleterious effects on the human spine, indicated by low back pain during spaceflight and increased incidence of post-spaceflight herniated nucleus pulposus. We examined the effect of microgravity on biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal discs from mice having been on 15-day shuttle mission STS-131. Sixteen C57BL/C mice (spaceflight group, n=8; ground-based control group, n=8) were sacrificed immediately after spaceflight. Physiological disc height (PDH) was measured in situ, and compressive creep tests were performed to parameterize biomechanical properties into endplate permeability (k), nuclear swelling pressure strain dependence (D), and annular viscoelasticity (G). For caudal discs, the spaceflight group exhibited 32% lower PDH, 70% lower D and crept more compared to the control mice (p=0.03). For lumbar discs, neither PDH nor D was significantly different between murine groups. Initial modulus, osmotic pressure, k and G for lumbar and caudal discs did not appear influenced by microgravity (p>0.05). Decreases in both PDH and D suggest prolonged microgravity effectively diminished biomechanical properties of caudal discs. By contrast, differences were not noted for lumbar discs. This potentially deleterious interaction between prolonged weightlessness and differential ranges of motion along the spine may underlie the increased cervical versus lumbar disc herniation rates observed among astronauts. PMID:25085756

  8. Intradural herniation of lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C J; Binet, E F; Kieffer, S A

    1978-12-01

    A case of intradural rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disc is reported, and the literature is reviewed. The majority of intradural disc herniations occur at the L4--5 level. These patients usually have neurologic deficits more severe than those found in the much more common extradural disc herniations. The myelographic picture varies from an irregularly marginated intradural lesion overlying the disc space to a complete block. The common factor allowing intradural disc herniation is probably dense adhesions between the dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament, preventing the more common lateral extradural disc herniation. Intradural disc herniation should be included in the differential diagnosis of lumbar intradural lesions causing nerve root or cauda equina compression. PMID:741242

  9. Parametric instabilities in the LCGT arm cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Miyoki, S.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Numata, K.

    2008-07-01

    We evaluated the parametric instabilities of LCGT (Japanese interferometric gravitational wave detector project) arm cavity. The number of unstable modes of LCGT is 10-times smaller than that of Advanced LIGO (USA). Since the strength of the instabilities of LCGT depends on the mirror curvature more weakly than that of Advanced LIGO, the requirement of the mirror curvature accuracy is easier to be achieved. The difference in the parametric instabilities between LCGT and Advanced LIGO is because of the thermal noise reduction methods (LCGT, cooling sapphire mirrors; Advanced LIGO, fused silica mirrors with larger laser beams), which are the main strategies of the projects. Elastic Q reduction by the barrel surface (0.2 mm thickness Ta2O5) coating is effective to suppress instabilities in the LCGT arm cavity. Therefore, the cryogenic interferometer is a smart solution for the parametric instabilities in addition to thermal noise and thermal lensing.

  10. Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, François; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Chin, Jennie; Lotz, Jeffrey C.; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Barbet, Jacques Patrick; Chevrot, Alain; Shyy, John Y.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disk (IVD) is a major pathological process implicated in low back pain and is a prerequisite to disk herniation. Although mechanical stress is an important modulator of the degeneration, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The association of human IVD degeneration, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, with annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis and anti-cytochrome c staining revealed that the activation of the mitochondria-dependent apoptosome was a major event in the degeneration process. Mouse models of IVD degeneration were used to investigate the role of the mechanical stress in this process. The application of mechanical overload (1.3 MPa) for 24 hours induced annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis and led to severe degeneration of the mouse disks. Immunostaining revealed cytochrome c release but not Fas-L generation. The role of the caspase-9-dependent mitochondrial pathway in annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis induced by overload was investigated further with the use of cultured rabbit IVD cells in a stretch device. Mechanical overload (15% area change) induced apoptosis with increased caspase-9 activity and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, Z-LEHD-FMK, a caspase-9 inhibitor, but not Z-IETD-FMK, a caspase-8 inhibitor, attenuated the overload-induced apoptosis. Our results from human samples, mouse models, and annulus fibrosus culture experiments demonstrate that the mechanical overload-induced IVD degeneration is mediated through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in IVD cells. PMID:14982845

  11. The Transition between the Inner Disc and the Innermost Galactic Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Genovali, K.; Lemasle, B.; Romaniello, M.; Nonino, M.; Bergemann, M.; Buonanno, R.; Fabrizio, M.; François, P.; Inno, L.; Laney, C.; Matsunaga, N.; Pedicelli, S.; Primas, F.; Thévenin, F.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the iron and the α-element gradients in the Galactic disc and in the innermost Galactic regions (bulge, bar, nuclear bulge). Accurate spectroscopic measurements of young stellar tracers show a well defined iron gradient between the inner and the outer disc. The same outcome applies to light, α, and heavy elements. Moreover, the [α/Fe] ratio attains solar values over a significant fraction of the disc, in the bar and in the nuclear bulge. Thus suggesting that the slopes of iron and α-elements attain quite similar values. There is evidence of a mild enhancement in the outer disc, but this is the consequence of the steady decrease in iron abundance. Current findings do not allow us to constrain whether the chemical enrichment in the nuclear bulge and in the bar is currently driven by bar instabilities. The recent results by the ARGOS spectroscopic survey of intermediate-age stellar tracers (red clump) suggest that the metal-rich stellar components associated with the boxy/peanut bulge show evidence of a mild iron gradient, while the metal-poor component associated with the thick disc/halo shows a flat iron distribution across the bulge. The [α/Fe] ratio of the metal-rich components is slightly enhanced in the bulge, but attains a solar value in the disc. On the other hand, the metal-poor component is α-enhanced both in the bulge and at larger Galactocentric distances. The chemical enrichment history of the bulge supports N-body simulations suggesting that the bulge formed via a bar-forming and bar-buckling instabilities (Ness et al. 2013a,b).

  12. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  13. [Innervation of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    García-Cosamalón, José; Fernández-Fernández, Javier; González-Martínez, Emilio; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Javier; Robla Costales, Javier; Martínez-Madrigal, Milton; López Muñíz, Alfonso; del Valle, Miguel Enrique; Vega, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, intervertebral disc innervation was a subject of considerable debate. Nowadays, the introduction of inmunohistochemical techniques associated to specific antibodies and studies with retrograde tracers in nerves have allowed greater understanding of disc innervation in physiological and pathological conditions and also endings characteristics and their patterns of distribution in both situations. The existing controversies regarding structural basis of discogenic pain, have raised the interest of knowing the influence of innervation in back pain from discal origin and its characteristics. Today, we know that pathologic neoinnervation accompanying radial fissures is an important factor in the genesis of discogenic pain; within a complex mechanism in which other neurobiomechemical, inflammatory and biomechanical factors are involved. PMID:23582224

  14. What powers the starburst activity of NGC 1068? Star-driven gravitational instabilities caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Alessandro B.; Fathi, Kambiz

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role that gravitational instability plays in NGC 1068, a nearby Seyfert galaxy that exhibits unusually vigorous starburst activity. For this purpose, we use the Romeo-Falstad disc instability diagnostics and data from BIMA SONG, SDSS and SAURON. Our analysis illustrates that NGC 1068 is a gravitationally unstable "monster". Its starburst disc is subject to unusually powerful instabilities. Several processes, including AGN/stellar feedback, try to quench such instabilities from inside out by depressing the surface density of molecular gas across the central kpc, but they do not succeed. Gravitational instability "wins" because it is driven by the stars via their much higher surface density. In this process, stars and molecular gas are strongly coupled, and it is such a coupling that ultimately triggers local gravitational collapse/fragmentation in the molecular gas.

  15. What powers the starburst activity of NGC 1068? Star-driven gravitational instabilities caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Alessandro B.; Fathi, Kambiz

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role that gravitational instability plays in NGC 1068, a nearby Seyfert galaxy that exhibits unusually vigorous starburst activity. For this purpose, we use the Romeo-Falstad disc instability diagnostics and data from the BIMA Survey of Nearby Galaxies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. Our analysis illustrates that NGC 1068 is a gravitationally unstable `monster'. Its starburst disc is subject to unusually powerful instabilities. Several processes, including feedback from the active galactic nucleus and starburst activity, try to quench such instabilities from inside out by depressing the surface density of molecular gas across the central kpc, but they do not succeed. Gravitational instability `wins' because it is driven by the stars via their much higher surface density. In this process, stars and molecular gas are strongly coupled, and it is such a coupling that ultimately triggers local gravitational collapse/fragmentation in the molecular gas.

  16. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Wyatt, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Pringle, J. E.; Matrà, L.; Juhász, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for the evolution of gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris. Our model proposes that atomic carbon and oxygen are created from the photodissociation of CO, which is itself released from volatile-rich bodies in the debris disc due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption. While the CO lasts less than one orbit, the atomic gas evolves by viscous spreading resulting in an accretion disc inside the parent belt and a decretion disc outside. The temperature, ionization fraction and population levels of carbon and oxygen are followed with the photodissociation region model CLOUDY, which is coupled to a dynamical viscous α model. We present new gas observations of β Pic, of C I observed with Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment and O I observed with Herschel, and show that these along with published C II and CO observations can all be explained with this new model. Our model requires a viscosity α > 0.1, similar to that found in sufficiently ionized discs of other astronomical objects; we propose that the magnetorotational instability is at play in this highly ionized and dilute medium. This new model can be tested from its predictions for high-resolution ALMA observations of C I. We also constrain the water content of the planetesimals in β Pic. The scenario proposed here might be at play in all debris discs and this model could be used more generally on all discs with C, O or CO detections.

  17. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Wyatt, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Pringle, J. E.; Matrà, L.; Juhász, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for the evolution of gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris. Our model proposes that atomic carbon and oxygen are created from the photodissociation of CO, which is itself released from volatile-rich bodies in the debris disc due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption. While the CO lasts less than one orbit, the atomic gas evolves by viscous spreading resulting in an accretion disc inside the parent belt and a decretion disc outside. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon and oxygen are followed with the photodissociation region model Cloudy, which is coupled to a dynamical viscous α model. We present new gas observations of β Pic, of C I observed with APEX and O I observed with Herschel, and show that these along with published C II and CO observations can all be explained with this new model. Our model requires a viscosity α > 0.1, similar to that found in sufficiently ionised discs of other astronomical objects; we propose that the magnetorotational instability is at play in this highly ionised and dilute medium. This new model can be tested from its predictions for high resolution ALMA observations of C I. We also constrain the water content of the planetesimals in β Pic. The scenario proposed here might be at play in all debris discs and this model could be used more generally on all discs with C, O or CO detections.

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  19. Variant mapping of the Apo(B) AT rich minisatellite. Dependence on nucleotide sequence of the copy number variations. Instability of the non-canonical alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, E; Vigneron, S; Buresi, C; Cambien, F; Cambou, J P; Roizes, G

    1993-01-01

    Because of its variations in length, the AT rich Hyper-Variable Region (HVR) of the 3' end of the Apolipoprotein B gene is used as a polymorphic maker in genetic studies. It contains a SspI site in its repeated motif and we used this feature to precisely analyse the internal structure of the different alleles found at this locus in a Caucasian population. We performed total digestion on 194 alleles as well as Minisatellite Variant Repeat mapping (MVR mapping: partial digestion) on 54. The results show that the level of length variability (in copy number) of the 5' end of this locus is at least two times higher than that of the 3' end. This could be correlated with the difference in nucleotide sequence between the two parts of the HVR and suggests the dependence on the primary structure of the mechanism that produces length variability. A molecular model is proposed to explain this result. Moreover, the sharp analysis of the minisatellite structure by the distribution of SspI sites reveals differences between long and short alleles, indicating that in most cases, no recombination occurs between alleles of different sizes. Finally the rare alleles exhibit a non-canonical structure. These important points could explain the bimodal distribution of the frequencies of the alleles in the population. Images PMID:8502559

  20. Nature of the empty states and signature of the charge density wave instability and upper Peierls transition of TTF-TCNQ by temperature-dependent NEXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenkaya, Alisa; Medjanik, Katerina; Nagel, Peter; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan; Canadell, Enric; Pouget, Jean-Paul; Schönhense, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of TTF-TCNQ was studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in order to detect a spectroscopic signature of the phase transitions, especially that occurring at 54 K, which is related to a Peierls gap opening on the TCNQ stacks. All unoccupied TCNQ orbitals predicted by first-principles calculations and, in particular the pair σ ∗( π( a g , b 3 u )), located in the cyano groups, are clearly resolved in our experimental data. The latter orbital was observed for the first time in our NEXAFS spectra. The temperature dependence of NEXAFS peak intensities gives evidence of a subtle modification of the electronic structure when the charge density wave (CDW) fluctuations develop as the Peierls transition of the TCNQ stacks is approached from higher temperatures. These changes are explained on the basis of the charge transfer, the shape of the lower empty TCNQ molecular orbitals and the deformation of TCNQ during the pre-transitional CDW fluctuations. Finally the data suggest that the internal stack deformation consisting in a substantial out of plane displacement of the central ring with respect to the cyano-groups allows to gain C α -C α bonding energy which helps the stabilization of the Peierls transition on the TCNQ stack.

  1. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  2. Conditional Activation of β-Catenin Signaling Leads to Severe Defects in Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meina; Tang, Dezhi; Shu, Bing; Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Hao, Suyang; Dresser, Karen A.; Shen, Jie; Im, Hee-Jeong; Sampson, Erik R.; Rubery, Paul T.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Wang, Yongjun; Chen, Di

    2013-01-01

    Objective The incidence of low back pain is extremely high and is often linked to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The mechanism of this disease is currently unknown. In this study, we have investigated the role of β-catenin signaling in IVD tissue function. Methods β-catenin protein levels were measured in disc samples derived from patients with disc degeneration and normal subjects by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To generate β-catenin conditional activation (cAct) mice, Col2a1-CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with β-cateninfx(Ex3)/fx(Ex3) mice. Changes in disc tissue morphology and function were analyzed by micro-CT, histology and real-time PCR assays. Results We found that β-catenin protein was up-regulated in disc tissues from patients with disc degeneration. To assess the effects of increased β-catenin on disc tissue we generated β-catenin cAct mice. Overexpression of β-catenin in disc cells led to extensive osteophyte formation in 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin cAct mice which were associated with significant changes in the cells and extracellular matrix of disc tissues and growth plate. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that activation of β-catenin could enhance Runx2-dependent Mmp13 and Adamts5 expression. Moreover, genetic ablation of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 under β-catenin cAct background, or treatment of β-catenin cAct mice with a specific MMP13 inhibitor, ameliorated the mutant phenotype. Conclusions β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in disc tissue function. PMID:22422036

  3. Factors regulating viable cell density in the intervertebral disc: blood supply in relation to disc height

    PubMed Central

    Boubriak, Olga A; Watson, Natasha; Sivan, Sarit S; Stubbens, Naomi; Urban, Jill P G

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an avascular tissue, maintained by a small population of cells that obtain nutrients mainly by diffusion from capillaries at the disc–vertebral body interface. Loss of this nutrient supply is thought to lead to disc degeneration, but how nutrient supply influences viable cell density is unclear. We investigated two factors that influence nutrient delivery to disc cells and hence cell viability: disc height and blood supply. We used bovine caudal discs as our model as these show a gradation in disc height. We found that although disc height varied twofold from the largest to the smallest disc studied, it had no significant effect on cell density, unlike the situation found in articular cartilage. The density of blood vessels supplying the discs was markedly greater for the largest disc than the smallest disc, as was the density of pores allowing capillary penetration through the bony endplate. Results indicate that changes in blood vessels in the vertebral bodies supplying the disc, as well as changes in endplate architecture appear to influence density of cells in intervertebral discs. PMID:23311982

  4. Uncovertebral Anatomic Midline Targeting for Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Objective To document the accuracy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting in positioning cervical disc arthroplasty. Summary of Background Data Disc arthroplasty implants depend on midline placement for optimum mechanical function. Fluoroscopy is used to delineate the midline. Anatomic targeting from the uncovertebral joints in the neck may be adequate. We have investigated the efficacy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting for cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Anatomic uncovertebral midline targeting for disc arthroplasty insertion was performed in 18 male (mean age 51 years, range 27 to 67) and 22 female (mean age 50, range 35 to 70) patients receiving a total of 59 implants over a 5-year period. Device insertion was under only lateral imaging control. Postinsertion operative fluoroscopy with optimized centering was used to record implant position in the anteroposterior plane, and centerline analysis was performed using cursor measurement technology from the GE PACS™ imaging system (GE Medical Systems, Mt. Prospect, IL). Results Analysis found a mean deviation from the ideal midline placement of only 0.7 mm (range, 0 to 2.9 mm). Only three devices were more than 2 mm off the anatomic midline. Conclusion This anatomic technique is effective, safely minimizing imaging resource needs and X-ray exposure to the patient and operating team. PMID:24353946

  5. Liquid Crystal Phase Behaviour of Attractive Disc-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a generalized van der Waals-Onsager perturbation theory to construct a free energy functional capable of describing the thermodynamic properties and orientational order of the isotropic and nematic phases of attractive disc particles. The model mesogen is a hard (purely repulsive) cylindrical disc particle decorated with an anisotropic square-well attractive potential placed at the centre of mass. Even for isotropic attractive interactions, the resulting overall inter-particle potential is anisotropic, due to the orientation-dependent excluded volume of the underlying hard core. An algebraic equation of state for attractive disc particles is developed by adopting the Onsager trial function to characterize the orientational order in the nematic phase. The theory is then used to represent the fluid-phase behaviour (vapour-liquid, isotropic-nematic, and nematic-nematic) of the oblate attractive particles for varying values of the molecular aspect ratio and parameters of the attractive potential. When compared to the phase diagram of their athermal analogues, it is seen that the addition of an attractive interaction facilitates the formation of orientationally-ordered phases. Most interestingly, for certain aspect ratios, a coexistence between two anisotropic nematic phases is exhibited by the attractive disc-like fluids. PMID:23965962

  6. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  7. Jeans instability in a quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.

    2009-01-15

    Jeans instability in a homogeneous cold quantum dusty plasma in the presence of the ambient magnetic field and the quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential has been examined using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is found that the Jeans instability is significantly reduced by the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave and the ion quantum effect. The minimum wavenumber for Jeans stability depends clearly on ion quantum effect and the dust-lower-hybrid frequency also.

  8. On the evolution of the snow line in protoplanetary discs - II. Analytic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario

    2013-09-01

    We examine the evolution of the snow line in a protoplanetary disc that contains a dead zone (a region of zero or low turbulence). The snow line is within a self-gravitating part of the dead zone, and we obtain a fully analytic solution for its radius. Our formula could prove useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics of planets outside the snow line. External sources such as cosmic rays or X-rays from the central star can ionize the disc surface layers and allow the magnetorotational instability to drive turbulence there. We show that provided that the surface density in this layer is less than about 50 g cm-2, the dead zone solution exists, after an initial outbursting phase, until the disc is dispersed by photoevaporation. We demonstrate that the snow line radius is significantly larger than that predicted by a fully turbulent disc model, and that in our own Solar system it remains outside of the orbital radius of the Earth. Thus, the inclusion of a dead zone into a protoplanetary disc model explains how our Earth formed with very little water.

  9. Wet disc contraction to galactic blue nuggets and quenching to red nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Burkert, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the origin of high-redshift, compact, quenched spheroids (red nuggets) through the dissipative shrinkage of gaseous discs into compact star-forming systems (blue nuggets). The discs, fed by cold streams, undergo violent disc instability that drives gas into the centre (along with mergers). The inflow is dissipative when its time-scale is shorter than the star formation time-scale. This implies a threshold of ˜0.28 in the cold-to-total mass ratio within the disc radius. For the typical gas fraction ˜0.5 at z ˜ 2, this threshold is traced back to a maximum spin parameter of ˜0.05, implying that ˜half the star-forming galaxies contract to blue nuggets, while the rest form extended stellar discs. Thus, the surface density of blue galaxies is expected to be bimodal about ˜109 M⊙ kpc-2, slightly increasing with mass. The blue nuggets are expected to be rare at low z when the gas fraction is low. The blue nuggets quench to red nuggets by complementary internal and external mechanisms. Internal quenching by a compact bulge, in a fast mode and especially at high z, may involve starbursts, stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, or Q-quenching. Quenching due to hot-medium haloes above 1012 M⊙ provides maintenance and a slower mode at low redshift. These predictions are confirmed in simulations and are consistent with observations at z = 0-3.

  10. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  11. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  12. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  13. Intervertebral disc extrusion in six cats.

    PubMed

    Knipe, M F; Vernau, K M; Hornof, W J; LeCouteur, R A

    2001-09-01

    Existing reports concerning intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) have focused almost exclusively on dogs, although a small number of individual case reports of IVDD of cats has been published. The medical records of six cats with IVDD were reviewed. Radiographic studies confirmed narrowed intervertebral disc spaces, mineralised intervertebral discs, and one or more extradural compressive lesions of the spinal cord in each cat. All disc extrusions were located in the thoracolumbar region. Surgical decompression of the spinal cord was achieved in all cats by means of hemilaminectomy and removal of compressive extradural material confirmed to be degenerative disc material. Good to excellent neurological recovery was noted in five of the six cats included in this report. Based on this review, it appears that IVDD of cats has many similarities to IVDD of dogs, and that healthy cats with acute intervertebral disc extrusion(s) respond favourably to surgical decompression of the spinal cord. PMID:11876633

  14. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Shim, Chan Shik; Ahn, Yong; Choi, Young-Geun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation. Methods Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Results Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation. PMID:20062565

  15. Thanatology in protoplanetary discs. The combined influence of Ohmic, Hall, and ambipolar diffusion on dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Fromang, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Protoplanetary discs are poorly ionised due to their low temperatures and high column densities and are therefore subject to three "non-ideal" magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects: Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. The existence of magnetically driven turbulence in these discs has been a central question since the discovery of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Early models considered Ohmic diffusion only and led to a scenario of layered accretion, in which a magnetically "dead" zone in the disc midplane is embedded within magnetically "active" surface layers at distances of about 1-10 au from the central protostellar object. Recent work has suggested that a combination of Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion can render both the midplane and surface layers of the disc inactive and that torques due to magnetically driven outflows are required to explain the observed accretion rates. We reassess this picture by performing three-dimensional numerical simulations that include all three non-ideal MHD effects for the first time. We find that the Hall effect can generically "revive" dead zones by producing a dominant azimuthal magnetic field and a large-scale Maxwell stress throughout the midplane, provided that the angular velocity and magnetic field satisfy Ω·B > 0. The attendant large magnetic pressure modifies the vertical density profile and substantially increases the disc scale height beyond its hydrostatic value. Outflows are produced but are not necessary to explain accretion rates ≲ 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The flow in the disc midplane is essentially laminar, suggesting that dust sedimentation may be efficient. These results demonstrate that if the MRI is relevant for driving mass accretion in protoplanetary discs, one must include the Hall effect to obtain even qualitatively correct results. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Evolution of genetic instability in heterogeneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Ani D; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-05-01

    Genetic instability is an important characteristic of cancer. While most cancers develop genetic instability at some stage of their progression, sometimes a temporary rise of instability is followed by the return to a relatively stable genome. Neither the reasons for these dynamics, nor, more generally, the role of instability in tumor progression, are well understood. In this paper we develop a class of mathematical models to study the evolutionary competition dynamics among different sub-populations in a heterogeneous tumor. We observe that despite the complexity of this multi-component and multi-process system, there is only a small number of scenarios expected in the context of the evolution of instability. If the penalty incurred by unstable cells (the decrease in the growth due to deleterious mutations) is high compared with the gain (the production rate of advantageous mutations), then instability does not evolve. In the opposite case, instability evolves and comes to dominate the system. In the intermediate parameter regime, instability is generated but later gives way to stable clones. Moreover, the model also informs us of the patterns of instability for cancer lineages corresponding to different stages of progression. It is predicted that mutations causing instability are merely "passengers" in tumors that have undergone only a small number of malignant mutations. Further down the path of carcinogenesis, however, unstable cells are more likely to give rise to the winning clonal wave that takes over the tumor and carries the evolution forward, thus conferring a causal role of the instability in such cases. Further, each individual clonal wave (i.e. cells harboring a fixed number of malignant driver mutations) experiences its own evolutionary history. It can fall under one of three types of temporal behavior: stable throughout, unstable to stable, or unstable throughout. Which scenario is realized depends on the subtle (but predictable) interplay among

  17. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  18. Disc repositioning: does it really work?

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Rezende, Luciano; Wolford, Larry M

    2015-02-01

    Although limited, there is evidence to support the assumption that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular disc repositioning indeed works; to date, there is no evidence that TMJ articular disc repositioning does not work. Despite the controversy among professionals in private practice and academia, TMJ articular disc repositioning is a procedure based on (still limited) evidence; the opposition is based solely on clinical preference and influenced by the ability to perform it or not. PMID:25483446

  19. Nonlocal magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Erokhin, N. N.; Lominadze, J. G.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Churikov, A. P.; Kharshiladze, O. A.; Amador, C. H. S.

    2008-05-15

    An analytical theory of the nonlocal magnetorotational instability (MRI) is developed for the simplest astrophysical plasma model. It is assumed that the rotation frequency profile has a steplike character, so that there are two regions in which it has constant different values, separated by a narrow transition layer. The surface wave approach is employed to investigate the MRI in this configuration. It is shown that the main regularities of the nonlocal MRI are similar to those of the local instability and that driving the nonaxisymmetric MRI is less effective than the axisymmetric one, also for the case of the nonlocal instability. The existence of nonlocal instabilities in nonmagnetized plasma is predicted.

  20. Accretion Discs Show Their True Colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Quasars are the brilliant cores of remote galaxies, at the hearts of which lie supermassive black holes that can generate enough power to outshine the Sun a trillion times. These mighty power sources are fuelled by interstellar gas, thought to be sucked into the hole from a surrounding 'accretion disc'. A paper in this week's issue of the journal Nature, partly based on observations collected with ESO's Very Large Telescope, verifies a long-standing prediction about the intensely luminous radiation emitted by these accretion discs. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 21/08 Uncovering the inner disc "Astronomers were puzzled by the fact that the best models of these discs couldn't quite be reconciled with some of the observations, in particular, with the fact that these discs did not appear as blue as they should be," explains lead-author Makoto Kishimoto. Such a discrepancy could be the signal that there was something very wrong with the models. With his colleagues, he investigated this discrepancy by studying the polarised light from six quasars. This enabled them to demonstrate that the disc spectrum is as blue as predicted. "The crucial observational difficulty here has been that the disc is surrounded by a much larger torus containing hot dust, whose light partly outshines that of the disc," says Kishimoto. "Because the light coming from the disc is scattered in the disc vicinity and thus polarised, by observing only polarised light from the quasars, one can uncover the buried light from the disc." In a similar way that a fisherman would wear polarised sunglasses to help get rid of the glare from the water surface and allow him to see more clearly under the water, the filter on the telescope allowed the astronomers to see beyond surrounding clouds of dust and gas to the blue colour of the disc in infrared light. The observations were done with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on one of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in the Atacama

  1. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  2. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age velocity dispersion relation of the Solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models the outward migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  3. Laboratory studies of baroclinic instability at small Richardson number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L.; Fowlis, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the support program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment, laboratory studies of baroclinic and other convective instabilities were performed for a thin layer of fluid between thermally conducting horizontal discs. There were three types of modes identified. The first has a spiral-arm appearance, and exists for large enough horizontal thermal forcing, weak enough static stability, and large enough rotation. The source of this wave is shown to be the Eady mode of instability. The second mode is due to convective instability in the thermal boundary layers which exist due to the thermally conducting horizontal boundaries. Finally, for strong enough negative static stability, thermal convection of the Benard type appears. The most significant result is that the symmetric (Solberg) mode was not found, even though the infinite-plane theory predicts this mode under certain experimental conditions.

  4. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  5. Termination of the magnetorotational instability via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembiasz, T.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Müller, E.; Aloy, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be a powerful mechanism amplifying the magnetic field in core-collapse supernovae. Whether initially weak magnetic fields can be amplified by this instability to dynamically relevant strengths is still a matter of debate. One of the main uncertainties concerns the process that terminates the growth of the instability. Parasitic instabilities of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing-mode type have been suggested to play a crucial role in this process, disrupting MRI channel flows and quenching magnetic field amplification. We perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional sheering-disc simulations of a differentially rotating protoneutron star layer in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics with unprecedented high numerical accuracy, finding that Kelvin-Helmholtz parasitic modes dominate tearing modes in the regime of large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, as encountered close to the surface of protoneutron stars. They also determine the maximum magnetic field stress achievable during the exponential growth of the MRI. Our results are consistent with the theory of parasitic instabilities based on a local stability analysis. To simulate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities properly, a very high numerical resolution is necessary. Using ninth-order spatial reconstruction schemes, we find that at least eight grid zones per MRI channel are necessary to simulate the growth phase of the MRI and reach an accuracy of ˜10 per cent in the growth rate, while more than ˜60 zones per channel are required to achieve convergent results for the value of the magnetic stress at MRI termination.

  6. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  7. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  8. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  9. Substructuring and poroelastic modelling of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Swider, P; Pédrono, A; Ambard, D; Accadbled, F; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2010-05-01

    We proposed a substructure technique to predict the time-dependant response of biological tissue within the framework of a finite element resolution. Theoretical considerations in poroelasticity preceded the calculation of the sub-structured poroelastic matrix. The transient response was obtained using an exponential fitting method. We computed the creep response of an MRI 3D reconstructed L(5)-S(1) intervertebral disc of a scoliotic spine. The FE model was reduced from 10,000 degrees of freedom for the full 3D disc to only 40 degrees of freedom for the sub-structured model defined by 10 nodes attached to junction nodes located on both lower and upper surfaces of the disc. Comparisons of displacement fields were made between the full poroelastic FE model and the sub-structured model in three different loading conditions: compression, offset compression and torsion. Discrepancies in displacement were lower than 10% for the first time steps when time-dependant events were significant. The substructuring technique provided an exact solution in quasi-static behavior after pressure relaxation. Couplings between vertical and transversal displacements predicted by the reference FE model were well stored by the sub-structured model despite the drastic reduction of degrees of freedom. Finally, we demonstrated that substructuring was very efficient to reduce the size of numerical models while respecting the time-dependant behavior of the structure. This result highlighted the potential interest of substructure techniques in large-scale models of musculoskeletal structures. PMID:20170917

  10. The shape of `dark matter' haloes of disc galaxies according to MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2001-10-01

    Analyses of halo shapes for disc galaxies are said to give conflicting results. I point out that the modified dynamics (MOND) predicts for disc galaxies a distribution of fictitious dark matter that comprises two components: a pure disc and a rounder halo. The former dominates the true disc in regions of small accelerations, where it controls the z-dynamics in the disc (disc flaring etc.); it has a finite total mass. It also dominates the round component near the centre where the geometry is nearly planar. The second component controls motions far from the plane, has a total enclosed mass that diverges linearly with radius, and determines the rotation curve at large radii. Its ellipticity may be appreciable at small radii but vanishes asymptotically. This prediction of MOND differs from what one expects from galaxy formation scenarios with dark matter. Analyses to date, which, as they do, assume one component - usually with a constant ellipticity - perforce give conflicting results for the best value of ellipticity, depending on whether they probe the disc or the sphere, small radii or large ones.

  11. Genomic DISC1 disruption in hiPSCs alters Wnt signaling and neural cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Priya; Han, Karam; Callahan, Dana G.; Makovkina, Eugenia; Muratore, Christina R.; Lalli, Matthew A.; Zhou, Honglin; Boyd, Justin D.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic and clinical association studies have identified disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) as a candidate risk gene for major mental illness. DISC1 is interrupted by a balanced chr(1;11) translocation in a Scottish family, in which the translocation predisposes to psychiatric disorders. We investigate the consequences of DISC1 interruption in human neural cells using TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 to target the DISC1 locus. We show that disruption of DISC1 near the site of the translocation results in decreased DISC1 protein levels due to nonsense-mediated decay of long splice variants. This results in an increased level of canonical Wnt signaling in neural progenitor cells and altered expression of fate markers such as Foxg1 and Tbr2. These gene expression changes are rescued by antagonizing Wnt signaling in a critical developmental window, supporting the hypothesis that DISC1-dependent suppression of basal Wnt signaling influences the distribution of cell types generated during cortical development. PMID:26299970

  12. Genomic DISC1 Disruption in hiPSCs Alters Wnt Signaling and Neural Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Priya; Han, Karam; Callahan, Dana G; Makovkina, Eugenia; Muratore, Christina R; Lalli, Matthew A; Zhou, Honglin; Boyd, Justin D; Kosik, Kenneth S; Selkoe, Dennis J; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    Genetic and clinical association studies have identified disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) as a candidate risk gene for major mental illness. DISC1 is interrupted by a balanced chr(1;11) translocation in a Scottish family in which the translocation predisposes to psychiatric disorders. We investigate the consequences of DISC1 interruption in human neural cells using TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 to target the DISC1 locus. We show that disruption of DISC1 near the site of the translocation results in decreased DISC1 protein levels because of nonsense-mediated decay of long splice variants. This results in an increased level of canonical Wnt signaling in neural progenitor cells and altered expression of fate markers such as Foxg1 and Tbr2. These gene expression changes are rescued by antagonizing Wnt signaling in a critical developmental window, supporting the hypothesis that DISC1-dependent suppression of basal Wnt signaling influences the distribution of cell types generated during cortical development. PMID:26299970

  13. Pharmacological mydriasis and optic disc examination

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, J.; Gouws, P.; Linnell, A.; Crowston, J.; Bunce, C.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether pharmacological mydriasis leads to a significant difference in interobserver agreement of optic disc measurement compared with examination without mydriasis.
METHOD—A cross sectional study was performed with a pair of observers examining the optic disc of two randomised groups of patients, one group before diagnostic mydriasis, and the other afterwards. Horizontal and vertical disc diameters and cup/disc ratios were measured with a 78 dioptre lens. The study was repeated with another observer pair and two further groups of patients.
RESULTS—In study A 86 subjects were examined in total (52 without and 34 with mydriasis). In study B 87 subjects were examined (45 without and 42 with mydriasis). The 95% limits of agreement of the cup/disc ratio measurement differences were significantly larger without mydriasis (p<0.001 for all studies (F test)). For both studies examination after mydriasis gave significantly greater agreement for vertical and horizontal cup/disc ratios. The cases with good agreement (0.1 difference or better) for vertical cup/disc ratios were 37/52 (72%) and 34 /45 (76%) without mydriasis and 33/34 (97%) and 40/42 (95%) respectively with mydriasis. Similar differences were recorded for horizontal cup/disc ratios. Disc diameter measurement results showed similar differences in study A but were not affected by mydriasis in study B.
CONCLUSIONS—Examination of the optic disc without pharmacological mydriasis gives significantly poorer interobserver agreement. In this study, the mean 95% limits of agreement values for all cup/disc ratio values were 0.27 for examination without mydriasis and 0.13 for examination with mydriasis. A measure outside these limits would suggest a real difference. This study indicates that mydriasis is important for reproducible clinical examination in glaucoma.

 PMID:10906099

  14. Quantitative Pfirrmann Disc Degeneration Grading System to Overcome the Limitation of Pfirrmann Disc Degeneration Grade

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade is one of morphologic disc degeneration grading system and it was reliable on routine T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade, and check the alternative technique of disc degeneration grading system. Methods Fifteen volunteers (4 medical doctors related to spinal disease, 2 medical doctors not related to spinal disease, 6 nurses in spinal hospital, and 3 para-medicines) were included in this study. Three different digitalized MR images were provided all volunteers, and they checked Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade of each disc levels after careful listening to explanation. Indeed, all volunteers checked the signal intensity of disc degeneration at the points of nucleus pulposus (NP), disc membrane, ligaments, fat, and air to modify the quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade. Results Total 225 grade results of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade and 405 signal intensity results of quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade were analyzed. Average interobserver agreement was "moderate (mean±standard deviation, 0.575±0.251)" from poor to excellent. Completely agreed levels of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade were only 4 levels (26.67%), and the disagreement levels were observed in 11 levels; two different grades in 8 levels (53.33%) and three different grades in 3 levels (20%). Quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration showed relatively cluster distribution with the interobserver deviations of 0.41-1.56 at the ratio of NP and disc membrane, and it showed relatively good cluster and distribution indicating that the proposed grading system has good discrimination ability. Conclusion Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade showed the limitation of different interobserver results, but this limitation could be overcome by using quantitative techniques of MR signal intensity. Further evaluation is needed to access its advantage

  15. Pattern imaging of primary and secondary electrohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Reyes, Francisco; García, Francisco J.

    A little known electrohydrodynamic instability, which we call a rose window, is observed in air/liquid interfaces in electric fields with unipolar space charge distributions. Depending on the liquid properties, the rose window may appear from an initial rest state (primary instability) or on top of another instability, the classical unipolar-injection-induced instability, destroying its pattern (secondary instability). After imaging of the rose window, we use an edge-detection filter to find the instability threshold and study the characteristic pattern as a function of the liquid properties. Results show that the specific properties of the electric field, due to charge injection, are the cause of the rose-window and that the primary and secondary rose windows are essentially different instabilities.

  16. Minimally invasive redo discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Kogias, Evangelos; Franco Jimenez, Pamela; Klingler, Jan-Helge; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate which minimally invasive techniques have been used for discectomy in recurrent lumbar disc herniation (LDH), to present the success and complication rates and to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each technique. Discectomy for recurrent LDH is accompanied by a higher morbidity rate compared with primary LDH. Because of the limited operating field, the majority of surgeons have been discouraged from utilising a minimally invasive approach for revision surgery. Minimally invasive techniques have gained ground in the treatment of primary LDH and an increasing number of patients are expressing interest in such techniques for the treatment of recurrent LDH. Microendoscopic discectomy (MED), endoscopic transforaminal and interlaminar discectomy (ETD and EID) have been used for treatment of recurrent LDH. The reported success rate is 60-95%. Full endoscopic techniques, especially ETD, showed favourable results concerning dural tear rates but have a demanding learning curve. The limitations of ETD include dislocated disc fragments or concomitant lateral recess stenosis, and MED is more effective in these instances. All three techniques have a low delayed instability rate. MED, ETD and EID are safe and efficient treatment options for surgical management of recurrent LDH with good success and low complication rates. At the same time, they offer the advantages of minimally invasive access. PMID:26122379

  17. The collimation of magnetic jets by disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, N.; Levinson, A.

    2016-09-01

    The collimation of a Poynting-flux dominated jet by a wind emanating from the surface of an accretion flow is computed using a semi-analytic model. The injection of the disc wind is treated as a boundary condition in the equatorial plane, and its evolution is followed by invoking a prescribed geometry of streamlines. Solutions are obtained for a wide range of disc wind parameters. It is found that jet collimation generally occurs when the total wind power exceeds about 10 percents of the jet power. For moderate wind powers, we find gradual collimation. For strong winds, we find rapid collimation followed by focusing of the jet, after which it remains narrow over many Alfvén crossing times before becoming conical. We estimate that in the later case, the jet's magnetic field may be dissipated by the current-driven kink instability over a distance of a few hundreds gravitational radii. We apply the model to M87 and show that the observed parabolic shape of the radio jet within the Bondi radius can be reproduced provided that the wind injection zone extends to several hundreds gravitational radii, and that its total power is about one-third of the jet power. The radio spectrum can be produced by synchrotron radiation of relativistically hot, thermal electrons in the sheath flow surrounding the inner jet.

  18. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  19. Wave-like warp propagation in circumbinary discs - I. Analytic theory and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Stefano; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we analyse the propagation of warps in protostellar circumbinary discs. We use these systems as a test environment in which to study warp propagation in the bending-wave regime, with the addition of an external torque due to the binary gravitational potential. In particular, we want to test the linear regime, for which an analytic theory has been developed. In order to do so, we first compute analytically the steady-state shape of an inviscid disc subject to the binary torques. The steady-state tilt is a monotonically increasing function of radius, but misalignment is found at the disc inner edge. In the absence of viscosity, the disc does not present any twist. Then, we compare the time-dependent evolution of the warped disc calculated via the known linearized equations both with the analytic solutions and with full 3D numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code using two million particles. We find a good agreement both in the tilt and in the phase evolution for small inclinations, even at very low viscosities. Moreover, we have verified that the linearized equations are able to reproduce the diffusive behaviour when α > H/R, where α is the disc viscosity parameter. Finally, we have used the 3D simulations to explore the non-linear regime. We observe a strongly non-linear behaviour, which leads to the breaking of the disc. Then, the inner disc starts precessing with its own precessional frequency. This behaviour has already been observed with numerical simulations in accretion discs around spinning black holes. The evolution of circumstellar accretion discs strongly depends on the warp evolution. Therefore, the issue explored in this paper could be of fundamental importance in order to understand the evolution of accretion discs in crowded environments, when the gravitational interaction with other stars is highly likely, and in multiple systems. Moreover, the evolution of

  20. On the chiral imbalance and Weibel instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the chiral-imbalance and the Weibel instabilities in presence of the quantum anomaly using the Berry-curvature modified kinetic equation. We argue that in many realistic situations, e.g. relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both the instabilities can occur simultaneously. The Weibel instability depends on the momentum anisotropy parameter ξ and the angle (θn) between the propagation vector and the anisotropy direction. It has maximum growth rate at θn = 0 while θn = π / 2 corresponds to a damping. On the other hand the pure chiral-imbalance instability occurs in an isotropic plasma and depends on difference between the chiral chemical potentials of right and left-handed particles. It is shown that when θn = 0, only for a very small values of the anisotropic parameter ξ ∼ξc, growth rates of the both instabilities are comparable. For the cases ξc < ξ ≪ 1 or ξ ≳ 1 at θn = 0, the Weibel modes dominate over the chiral-imbalance instability if μ5 / T ≤ 1. However, when μ5 / T ≥ 1, it is possible to have dominance of the chiral-imbalance modes at certain values of θn for an arbitrary ξ.

  1. Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

    2004-09-01

    The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

  2. Cervical arthroplasty using ProDisc-C case report.

    PubMed

    Nica, D A; Copaciu, R

    2013-03-15

    Cervical disc replacement is an emerging motion-preserving technology in the surgical treatment of the cervical degenerative disc disorders used as an alternative to the classic interbody fusion. We present a case report of a patient diagnosed with C6-7 right disc herniation who underwent anterior discectomy and received a total disc replacement using ProDisc C artificial disc prosthesis. PMID:23599830

  3. D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental Rupture Disc

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-03

    The common relief and rupture disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel rupture disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum rupture value for the second disc must be less than the minimum rupture value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.

  4. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  5. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  6. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  7. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  8. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  9. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  10. About detection of precessing circumpulsar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-08-01

    Detections of circumpulsar discs and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disc penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disc self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disc precession may be detected by the proposed second-generation space interferometers DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing discs are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar system. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  11. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  12. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  16. The Causal Connection Between Disc and Power-Law Variability in Hard State Black Hole X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttley, P.; Wilkinson, T.; Cassatella, P.; Wilms, J.; Pottschimdt, K.; Hanke, M.; Boeck, M.

    2010-01-01

    We use the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn instrument in timing mode to extend spectral time-lag studies of hard state black hole X-ray binaries into the soft X-ray band. \\Ve show that variations of the disc blackbody emission substantially lead variations in the power-law emission, by tenths of a second on variability time-scales of seconds or longer. The large lags cannot be explained by Compton scattering but are consistent with time-delays due to viscous propagation of mass accretion fluctuations in the disc. However, on time-scales less than a second the disc lags the power-law variations by a few ms, consistent with the disc variations being dominated by X-ray heating by the power-law, with the short lag corresponding to the light-travel time between the power-law emitting region and the disc. Our results indicate that instabilities in the accretion disc are responsible for continuum variability on time-scales of seconds or longer and probably also on shorter time-scales.

  17. Delivery systems for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Blanquer, S B G; Grijpma, D W; Poot, A A

    2015-04-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is the most avascular and acellular tissue in the body and therefore prone to degeneration. During IVD degeneration, the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes in the disc is deregulated, amongst others leading to alteration of extracellular matrix production, abnormal enzyme activities and production of pro-inflammatory substances like cytokines. The established treatment strategy for IVD degeneration consists of physiotherapy, pain medication by drug therapy and if necessary surgery. This approach, however, has shown limited success. Alternative strategies to increase and prolong the effects of bioactive agents and to reverse the process of IVD degeneration include the use of delivery systems for drugs, proteins, cells and genes. In view of the specific anatomy and physiology of the IVD and depending on the strategy of the therapy, different delivery systems have been developed which are reviewed in this article. PMID:25451138

  18. Growth of Gas-giant Cores in Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Michiel

    2011-09-01

    The core accretion scenario is the most successful theoretical model for gas-giant formation. However, the initial growth of the core depends on arbitrary assumptions on planetesimal sizes. Growing the solid core before gas dissipation is problematic due to the long time-scale for run-away accretion, especially in the outer distant regions of a protoplanetary disc. We have studied the dynamics of gas-coupled cm-sized pebbles, gravitationally interacting with larger than km-sized cores. The Pencil Code is used to correctly model the gas drag hydrodynamics. Interestingly, the presence of pebbles in the gaseous disc influences both the dynamics (through dynamical friction) and growth rate of the gas-giant core. Under favourable conditions, i.e. unity mid-plane dust-to-gas ratio and particle growth to mm and cm sizes, pebble accretion turns out to be significantly faster than run-away accretion of planetesimals.

  19. Structure and evolutionary history of DISC1.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ponting, Chris P

    2011-10-15

    Evolutionary and protein structural analyses can provide functional insights into genes implicated in human psychiatric diseases. Even eukaryotic organisms lacking nervous systems contain homologues of many key signalling molecules of animal neurons implying that human cognition derives, in part, from modifications of ancestral molecules and complexes. One protein whose evolutionary origin is obscure is DISC1 (disrupted in schizophrenia 1) whose gene locus has been associated with many psychiatric conditions including schizophrenia, clinical depression and bipolar disorder. This protein's rapid evolution and its unusual amino acid and α-helix composition have hindered searches for DISC1 homologues in species other than vertebrates. Here, we review the evolution and structure of the DISC1 protein in the light of in-depth sequence analyses. These predict DISC1 orthologues in diverse eukaryotic organisms, including early-branching animals such as amphioxus, sea anemone, amoebas and Trichoplax, and in plants and algae. DISC1 thus is widespread among eukaryotes, although it remains absent from fungi, nematodes and Diptera, including fruit flies. These observations now permit studies of DISC1 function in simple non-vertebrate model organisms. Surprisingly, these analyses also identify between two and four sequence repeats in DISC1 orthologues. The first two of these repeats show significant sequence similarity to the UVR family of globular domains. These UVR-like repeats are predicted to contain, not coiled coil structures, but rather two closely associated antiparallel α-helices. One common missense variant in DISC1 (L607F) lies within the second DISC1 UVR-like domain. These observations should assist in delineating the functional regions of the DISC1 protein. PMID:21852244

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2014-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

  1. Simple Model of Splitting Instability in Swollen Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2014-02-01

    A simple one-dimensional mechanical model is proposed for splitting instability in swollen membranes. The splitting instability occurs by ring constriction. The bifurcation can be both subcritical and supercritical, depending on the slenderness of spheroidal membranes. The lower critical point is estimated theoretically for the simplest circular system. Necking instability occurs in a spheroidal membrane when the twist angle in the boundary conditions is increased.

  2. The formation and evolution of wind-capture discs in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Nordhaus, J.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.

    2013-07-01

    We study the formation, evolution and physical properties of accretion discs formed via wind capture in binary systems. Using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code AstroBEAR, we have carried out high-resolution 3D simulations that follow a stellar mass secondary in the corotating frame as it orbits a wind producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) primary. We first derive a resolution criteria, based on considerations of Bondi-Hoyle flows, that must be met in order to properly resolve the formation of accretion discs around the secondary. We then compare simulations of binaries with three different orbital radii (Ro = 10, 15, 20 au). Discs are formed in all three cases, however, the size of the disc and, most importantly, its accretion rate decreases with orbital radii. In addition, the shape of the orbital motions of material within the disc becomes increasingly elliptical with increasing binary separation. The flow is mildly unsteady with `fluttering' around the bow shock observed. The discs are generally well aligned with the orbital plane after a few binary orbits. We do not observe the presence of any large-scale, violent instabilities (such as the flip-flop mode). For the first time, moreover, it is observed that the wind component that is accreted towards the secondary has a vortex tube-like structure, rather than a column-like one as it was previously thought. In the context of AGB binary systems that might be precursors to pre-planetary nebula (PPN) and planetary nebula (PN), we find that the wind accretion rates at the chosen orbital separations are generally too small to produce the most powerful outflows observed in these systems if the companions are main-sequence stars but marginally capable if the companions are white dwarfs. It is likely that many of the more powerful PPN and PN involve closer binaries than the ones considered here. The results also demonstrate principles of broad relevance to all wind-capture binary systems.

  3. Stress Analysis of Anterior-Disc-Displaced Temporomandibular Joint Using Individual Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masao; Tanaka, Eiji; Todoh, Masahiro; Asai, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yukiko

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder relates to the biomechanical irregularity of the structual joint components, and the behavior of soft tissue components is considered as a key to understand the biomechanical condition in the TMJ. The configuration of joint components, however, closely depends on individual patients. In this study, attention has been focused on the stress and displacement of irregular TMJs with anterior disc displacement. Using biplane magnetic resonance (MR) images, typical anterior-disc-displaced (ADD) TMJ of a patient with temporomandibular disorder has been modeled individually. The stress distribution in ADD TMJs has been compared with that in normal TMJs. Parameter studies with the elastic modulus have been carried out and it revealed that the stress distribution in the TMJ is highly dependent on the connective tissue modulus as well as disc modulus in the case of ADD TMJ, and that the disc displacement due to mouth opening movement depends on disc modulus in normal TMJ but depends on retrodiscal connective tissue in ADD TMJ.

  4. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    PubMed

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  5. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  6. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  7. The mass donor star and the accretion disc of the dwarf nova V2051 Ophiuchi in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcikiewicz, Eduardo; Baptista, Raymundo; Ribeiro, Tiago

    2016-07-01

    We report the analysis of infrared JHK_s high speed photometry of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph in quiescence. We model the ellipsoidal variations in the light curve to measure the fluxes of the mass donor star. Its colors are consistent with an M8 ± 1 spectral type with an equivalent blackbody temperature of T_{bb}= (2700± 300) K, in agreement with spectroscopic measurements and with theoretical expectation for donor stars at the same orbital period. We use the mass donor star fluxes and the Barnes & Evans relation to find a photometric parallax distance of (102 ± 16) pc to the binary. At this distance the outbursts of V2051 Oph occur at disc temperatures everywhere lower than the minimum/critical temperature predicted by the disc instability model, underscoring previous suggestions that they are powered by mass transfer bursts. We subtract the contribution of the mass donor star and apply eclipse mapping techniques to the remaining light curve in order to investigate the structure and emission of its accretion disc. The infrared accretion disc is bright and 'blue' in the inner regions and becomes progressively fainter and redder with increasing radii, indicating that the disc temperature decreases with radius. Bulges in the eclipse shape, more prominent in the H and K_s bands, lead to asymmetric arcs in the eclipse maps reminiscent of the spiral arms found in disc maps of outbursting dwarf novae. The arcs show an azimuthal extent of ˜90^o, extend from the intermediate to the outer disc regions (0.3-0.4 R_{L1}, where R_{L1} is the distance from disc center to the inner lagrangian point), and account for ≃ 30 per cent of the total flux in the H and K_s bands.

  8. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  9. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  10. Shear Mechanics of the TMJ Disc

    PubMed Central

    Juran, C.M.; Dolwick, M.F.; McFetridge, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex hinge and gliding joint that induces significant shear loads onto the fibrocartilage TMJ disc during jaw motion. The purpose of this study was to assess regional variation in the disc’s shear loading characteristics under physiologically relevant loads and to associate those mechanical findings with common clinical observations of disc fatigue and damage. Porcine TMJ discs were compressed between an axially translating bottom platen and a 2.5-cm-diameter indenter within a hydrated testing chamber. Discs were cyclically sheared at 0.5, 1, or 5 Hz to 1, 3, or 5% shear strain. Within the anterior and intermediate regions of the disc when sheared in the anteroposterior direction, both shear and compressive moduli experienced a significant decrease from instantaneous to steady state, while the posterior region’s compressive modulus decreased approximately 5%, and no significant loss of shear modulus was noted. All regions retained their shear modulus within 0.5% of instantaneous values when shear was applied in the mediolateral direction. The results of the disc’s regional shear mechanics suggest an observable and predictable link with the common clinical observation that the posterior region of the disc is most often the zone in which fatigue occurs, which may lead to disc damage and perforation. PMID:23166043

  11. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  12. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    PubMed Central

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  13. Studies of eRHIC coherent instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    2012-05-20

    In the presence of an effective coherent electron cooling, the rms ion bunch length in eRHIC will be kept at 8.3 cm for 250 GeV protons, which is much shorter than the current RHIC 45 cm rms bunch length. Together with the increased bunch intensity and total bunch number, coherent instabilities could be a potential limitation for achieving desired machine performance. In this study, we use the tracking code TRANFT to find thresholds and growth rates for single bunch and coupled bunch instabilities with linear chromaticity and amplitude dependent tune shift taken into account. Based on the simulation results, requirements of machine parameters such as rf voltage, linear chromaticity, and tune dependence of betatron amplitude are specified to suppress these instabilities.

  14. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-08-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory.

  15. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks.

    PubMed

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  16. Chiral plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-08-01

    We study the collective modes in relativistic electromagnetic or quark-gluon plasmas with an asymmetry between left- and right-handed chiral fermions, based on the recently formulated kinetic theory with Berry curvature corrections. We find that there exists an unstable mode, signaling the presence of a plasma instability. We argue the fate of this "chiral plasma instability" including the effect of collisions, and briefly discuss its relevance in heavy ion collisions and compact stars. PMID:23952387

  17. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  18. The effects of a magnetic field on planetary migration in laminar and turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comins, Megan L.; Romanova, Marina M.; Koldoba, Alexander V.; Ustyugova, Galina V.; Blinova, Alisa A.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the migration of low-mass planets (1M⊕, 5M⊕ and 20M⊕) in accretion discs threaded with a magnetic field using 2D MHD code in polar coordinates. We observed that, in the case of a strong azimuthal magnetic field where the plasma parameter is β ˜ 2 - 4, density waves at the magnetic resonances exert a positive torque on the planet and may slow down or reverse its migration. However, when the magnetic field is weaker (i.e., the plasma parameter β is relatively large), then non-axisymmetric density waves excited by the planet lead to growth of the radial component of the field and, subsequently, to development of the magneto-rotational instability, such that the disc becomes turbulent. Migration in a turbulent disc is stochastic, and the migration direction may change as such. To understand migration in a turbulent disc, both the interaction between a planet and individual turbulent cells, as well as the interaction between a planet and ordered density waves, have been investigated.

  19. The effects of a magnetic field on planetary migration in laminar and turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comins, Megan L.; Romanova, Marina M.; Koldoba, Alexander V.; Ustyugova, Galina V.; Blinova, Alisa A.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the migration of low-mass planets (1, 5 and 20 M⊕) in accretion discs threaded with a magnetic field using 2D magnetohydrodynamic code in polar coordinates. We observed that, in the case of a strong azimuthal magnetic field where the plasma parameter is β ˜ 2-4, density waves at the magnetic resonances exert a positive torque on the planet and may slow down or reverse its migration. However, when the magnetic field is weaker (i.e. the plasma parameter β is relatively large), then non-axisymmetric density waves excited by the planet lead to growth of the radial component of the field and, subsequently, to development of the magnetorotational instability, such that the disc becomes turbulent. Migration in a turbulent disc is stochastic, and the migration direction may change as such. To understand migration in a turbulent disc, both the interaction between a planet and individual turbulent cells, as well as the interaction between a planet and ordered density waves, have been investigated.

  20. Does disc fragmentation prevent the formation of supermassive stars in protogalaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán

    2014-12-01

    Supermassive stars (SMSs; ≳ 105 M⊙) formed in the first protogalaxies with virial temperature Tvir ≳ 104 K are expected to collapse into seeds of supermassive black hole in the high-redshift Universe (z ≳ 7). Fragmentation of the primordial gas is, however, a possible obstacle to SMS formation. We discuss the expected properties of a compact, metal-free, marginally unstable nuclear protogalactic disc, and the fate of the clumps formed in the disc by gravitational instability. Interior to a characteristic radius Rf = few × 10-2 pc, the disc fragments into massive clumps with Mc ˜ 30 M⊙. The clumps grow via accretion and migrate inward rapidly on a time-scale of ˜104 yr, which is comparable or shorter than the Kelvin-Helmholtz time >104 yr. Some clumps may evolve to zero-age main-sequence stars and halt gas accretion by radiative feedback, but most of the clumps can migrate inward and merge with the central protostar before forming massive stars. Moreover, we found that dust-induced fragmentation in metal-enriched gas does not modify these conclusions unless Z ≳ 3 × 10- 4 Z⊙, because clump migration below this metallicity remains as rapid as in the primordial case. Our results suggest that fragmentation of a compact, metal-poor disc cannot prevent the formation of a SMS.

  1. Electron beam recording of optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Giles; Reynolds, Gerald; Baylis, Chris; Pearce, Adrian; Dix, Colin; Ogilvie, Nick

    2002-09-01

    The Nimbus Technology & Engineering e -Beam Mastering System was developed to gain a large improvement in optical disc and structured hard disc recording capacity, significantly more than is possible from deep UV and SIL mastering. The current electron beam recorder is essentially a production machine capable of making full-length exposures at capacities of up to 50 GB with a simple low-cost upgrade path to disc capacities of several hundred gigabytes and beyond and hard disk drives (HDD) with capacities of up to 1 tera bit per square inch.

  2. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  3. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  4. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  5. Planetary rings and astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    Disks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and participate in some of its most important processes. Of special interest is their role in star, planet and moon formation, the growth of supermassive black holes, and the launching of jets. Although astrophysical disks can be up to ten orders of magnitude larger than planetary rings and differ hugely in composition, all disks share to some extent the same basic dynamics and many physical phenomena. This review explores these areas of overlap. Topics covered include disk formation, accretion, collisions, instabilities, and satellite-disk interactions.

  6. Can MRI Observations Predict Treatment Outcome of Lavage in Patients with Painful TMJ Disc Displacement without Reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Ekberg, EwaCarin; Hansson, Lars-Göran; List, Thomas; Eriksson, Lars; Sahlström, Lotta Englesson

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with painful disc displacement without reduction of the temporomandibular joint to determine whether the findings were able to predict treatment outcome of lavage and a control group treated with local anaesthesia without lavage in a short-term: 3-month perspective. Material and Methods Bilateral magnetic resonance images were taken of 37 patients with the clinical diagnosis of painful disc displacement without reduction. Twenty-three patients received unilateral extra-articular local anaesthetics and 14 unilateral lavage and extra-articular local anaesthetics. The primary treatment outcome defining success was reduction in pain intensity of at least 30% during jaw movement at the 3-month follow-up. Results Bilateral disc displacement was found in 30 patients. In 31 patients the disc on the treated side was deformed, and bilaterally in 19 patients. Osteoarthritis was observed in 28 patients, and 13 patients had bilateral changes. Thirty patients responded to treatment and 7 did not, with no difference between the two treated groups. In neither the treated nor the contralateral temporomandibular joint did treatment outcome depend on disc diagnosis, disc shape, joint effusion, or osseous diagnoses. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of disc position, disc shape, joint effusion or osseous diagnosis on the treated or contralateral side did not give information of treatment outcome. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging findings could not predict treatment outcome in patients treated with either local anaesthetics or local anaesthetics and lavage. PMID:25937876

  7. Best paper NASS 2013: link-N can stimulate proteoglycan synthesis in the degenerated human intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Gawri, Rahul; Antoniou, John; Ouellet, Jean; Awwad, Waleed; Steffen, Thomas; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet; Mwale, Fackson

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is the most common cause of back pain. Presently there is no medical treatment, leaving surgery as the only offered option. Here we evaluate the potential of Link-N to promote extracellular matrix regeneration in human IVDs. Human disc cells cultured in alginate and intact human discs were exposed to a combination of Link-N and ³⁵SO₄ in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-1, and the effect on proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated. In addition, message levels of aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, MMP-13, a Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS)-4 and ADAMTS-5 were evaluated in alginate cultures. Human disc cells responded in a dose dependent manner with maximal proteoglycan synthesis at 1 µg/mL Link-N. Link-N treatment also induced proteoglycan synthesis in intact human discs, and a prolonged effect was found up to one week after Link-N treatment. Message levels of proteinases were decreased by Link-N in the presence of IL-1. Thus, Link-N can promote proteoglycan synthesis and deplete proteinase expression in adult human discs. Link-N could therefore be a promising candidate for biologically-induced disc repair, and could provide an alternative to surgical intervention for early stage disc degeneration. PMID:24027023

  8. Analysis of intensity instability threshold at transition in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Cameron, P.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2008-06-23

    The beam intensity of ion beams in RHIC is limited by a fast transverse instability at transition, driven by the machine impedance and electron clouds. For gold and deuteron beams we analyze the dependence of the instability threshold on beam and machine parameters from recent operational data and dedicated experiments. We fit the machine impedance to the experimental data.

  9. Mitigating the hosing instability in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceurvorst, L.; Ratan, N.; Levy, M. C.; Kasim, M. F.; Sadler, J.; Scott, R. H. H.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Huang, T. W.; Skramic, M.; Vranic, M.; Silva, L. O.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    A new physical model of the hosing instability that includes relativistic laser pulses and moderate densities is presented and derives the density dependence of the hosing equation. This is tested against two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. These simulations further examine the feasibility of using multiple pulses to mitigate the hosing instability in a Nd:glass-type parameter space. An examination of the effects of planar versus cylindrical exponential density gradients on the hosing instability is also presented. The results show that strongly relativistic pulses and more planar geometries are capable of mitigating the hosing instability which is in line with the predictions of the physical model.

  10. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  11. Neurexin-Neuroligin Synaptic Complex Regulates Schizophrenia-Related DISC1/Kal-7/Rac1 "Signalosome".

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Bang, Marie Louise; Berezin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Neurexins (NXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are cell adhesion molecules that are localized at opposite sites of synaptic membranes. They interact with each other to promote the assembly, maintenance, and function of synapses in the central nervous system. Both NX and NL are cleaved from a membrane-attached intracellular domain in an activity-dependent manner, generating the soluble ectodomain of NX or NL. Expression of the NX1 and NX3 genes in the brain appears to be regulated by a schizophrenia-related protein, DISC1. Here, we show that soluble ecto-NX1β can regulate the expression of DISC1 and induce signaling downstream of DISC1. We also show that NL1 binds to a well-characterized DISC1 interaction partner, Kal-7, and this interaction can be compromised by DISC1. Our results indicate that the NX/NL synaptic complex is intrinsically involved in the regulation of DISC1 function, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:26078884

  12. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  13. Annulo-nucleoplasty using Disc-FX in the management of lumbar disc pathology: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aravind; Siddharth M, Shah; Sambhav P, Shah; Tan, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Background Back pain due to Lumbar Disc Disease is a major clinical problem. The treatment options range from physiotherapy to fusion surgery. A number of minimally invasive procedures have also been developed in the recent past for its management. Disc-FX is a new minimally invasive technique that combines percutaneous discectomy, nuclear ablation and annular modification. Literature on its role in the management of lumbar disc pathology is scarce. Methods We included 24 consecutive patients who underwent the Disc-FX for back pain due to lumbar disc pathology non-responsive to non-operative treatment for a period of at least 6 months. Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) these patients fell into 2 groups – those with degenerative disc disease (DDD) (n = 12) and those with a contained lumbar disc herniation (CLDH)(n = 12). They were evaluated using the Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores preoperatively and postoperatively. Results The mean age was 37.9 years (21-53 years). There were 17 males and 7 females. One patient in each subgroup was excluded from the final evaluation. Significant improvement was seen in all outcome measures. The overall rate of reintervention for persistent symptoms was 18.18% (4/22); in the CLDH subgroup, it was 36.36% (4/11). Conclusions and level of evidence Early results after the Disc-FX procedure suggest that it s a reasonable treatment option for patients with back pain due to lumbar disc disease, especially for those with DDD who fail conservative treatment. It could be an alternative to procedures like fusion or disc replacement. This study presents Level IV evidence. Clinical relevance We feel that our study establishes Disc-FX as a modality of treating symptomatic lumbar disc disease due to DDD. However, longer term prospective studies are needed to prove this and to evaluate its role in the treatment of patients with CLDH. PMID:25694914

  14. The growth of planets by pebble accretion in evolving protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Lambrechts, Michiel; Johansen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The formation of planets depends on the underlying protoplanetary disc structure, which in turn influences both the accretion and migration rates of embedded planets. The disc itself evolves on time scales of several Myr, during which both temperature and density profiles change as matter accretes onto the central star. Here we used a detailed model of an evolving disc to determine the growth of planets by pebble accretion and their migration through the disc. Cores that reach their pebble isolation mass accrete gas to finally form giant planets with extensive gas envelopes, while planets that do not reach pebble isolation mass are stranded as ice giants and ice planets containing only minor amounts of gas in their envelopes. Unlike earlier population synthesis models, our model works without any artificial reductions in migration speed and for protoplanetary discs with gas and dust column densities similar to those inferred from observations. We find that in our nominal disc model, the emergence of planetary embryos preferably should occur after approximately 2 Myr in order to not exclusively form gas giants, but also ice giants and smaller planets. The high pebble accretion rates ensure that critical core masses for gas accretion can be reached at all orbital distances. Gas giant planets nevertheless experience significant reduction in semi-major axes by migration. Considering instead planetesimal accretion for planetary growth, we show that formation time scales are too long to compete with the migration time scales and the dissipation time of the protoplanetary disc. All in all, we find that pebble accretion overcomes many of the challenges in the formation of ice and gas giants in evolving protoplanetary discs. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  16. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression. PMID:18817014

  17. Archival-grade optical disc design and international standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toru; Kojyo, Shinichi; Endo, Akihisa; Kodaira, Takuo; Mori, Fumi; Shimizu, Atsuo

    2015-09-01

    Optical discs currently on the market exhibit large variations in life span among discs, making them unsuitable for certain business applications. To assess and potentially mitigate this problem, we performed accelerated degradation testing under standard ISO conditions, determined the probable disc failure mechanisms, and identified the essential criteria necessary for a stable disc composition. With these criteria as necessary conditions, we analyzed the physical and chemical changes that occur in the disc components, on the basis of which we determined technological measures to reduce these degradation processes. By applying these measures to disc fabrication, we were able to develop highly stable optical discs.

  18. Gravitational Instability of a Nonrotating Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    Gravitational instability of the distribution of stars in a galaxy is a well-known phenomenon in astrophysics. This work is a preliminary attempt to analyze this phenomenon using the standard tools developed in accelerator physics. By applying this analysis, it is found that a stable nonrotating galaxy would become unstable if its size exceeds a certain limit that depends on its mass density.

  19. Gravitational Instability of a Nonrotating Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2009-06-23

    Gravitational instability of the distribution of stars in a galaxy is a well-known phenomenon in astrophysics. This report is an attempt to analyze this phenomenon by applying standard tools developed in accelerator physics. It is found that a nonrotating galaxy would become unstable if its size exceeds a certain limit that depends on its mass density and its velocity spread.

  20. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  1. Action of fibroblast growth factor-2 on the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; An, Howard S; Ellman, Michael; Phillips, Frank; Thonar, Eugene J; Park, Daniel K; Udayakumar, Ranjith K; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a growth factor that is immediately released after cartilage injury and plays a pivotal role in cartilage homeostasis. In human adult articular cartilage, FGF2 mediates anti-anabolic and potentially catabolic effects via the suppression of proteoglycan (PG) production along with the upregulation of matrix-degrading enzyme activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the biological effects of FGF2 in spine disc cells and to elucidate the complex biochemical pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine intervertebral disc (IVD) cells in an attempt to further understand the pathophysiologic processes involved in disc degeneration. Methods We studied the effect of FGF2 on IVD tissue homeostasis by assessing MMP-13 expression (potent matrix-degrading enzyme), PG accumulation, and PG synthesis in the bovine spine IVD, as well as evaluating whether FGF2 counteracts known anabolic factors such as BMP7. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF2 antagonizes BMP7 activity, we also investigated the signaling pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine disc tissue. Results The primary receptor expressed in bovine nucleus pulposus cartilage is FGFR1, and this receptor is upregulated in degenerative human IVD tissue compared with normal IVD tissue. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in monolayer with FGF2 augmented the production of MMP-13 at the transcriptional and translational level in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in alginate beads for 21 days with FGF2 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in PG accumulation, due at least in part to the inhibition of PG synthesis. Further studies demonstrate that FGF2 (10 ng/ml) antagonizes BMP7-mediated acceleration of PG production in bovine nucleus pulposus cells via the upregulation of noggin, an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway. Chemical inhibitor studies

  2. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  3. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, John E.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.; Chandler, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    A four-port disc valve for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of .alpha. silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions.

  4. Activ C cervical disc replacement for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    McGonagle, L.; Cadman, S.; Chitgopkar, S. D.; Canavan, L.; O’Malley, M.; Shackleford, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc replacement is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for cervical myelopathy. It retains motion at the affected segment, unlike anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The aim of this study is to assess the outcomes of a series of patients who underwent Activ C disc replacement for cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: A series of patients at the above Trust with clinical and radiological evidence of cervical myelopathy who were suitable for cervical disc replacement from 2007 to 2009 were included. Implants were inserted by one of two consultant surgeons {IMS, MO’M}. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at six, 12 and 24 months, postoperatively, with a visual analogue score (VAS) for neck and arm pain severity and frequency, the Neck Disability Index questionnaire (NDI) and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression questionnaire (CES-D). Results: Ten patients underwent surgery between May 2007 and July 2009, 6 women, and 4 men. Average age was 54 years (40-64). Disc levels replaced were: four at C4-5; eight at C5-6; seven at C6-7. Three patients had one disc replaced, five patients had two discs replaced, and two patients had three discs replaced. The VAS for neck pain improved from 5.9 pre-operatively to 1.4-24 months postoperatively and the VAS arm pain improved from 5.4 to 2.6. The NDI improved from 51% preoperatively to 26.8% at 24 months postoperatively. The CES-D showed a slight increase from 19.5 preoperatively to 21.7 at 24 months, postoperatively. Conclusion: Cervical decompression and disc replacement improves pain and function in patients with cervical myelopathy. This benefit is maintained at 24 months post op, with no cases requiring revision. PMID:23125494

  5. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  6. Mach disc formation in cylindrical recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; McQueen, R.G.; Marsh, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Cylindrical recovery systems have been used to shock-load polymers to pressures exceeding 50 GPa. In order to determine the pressures generated in these recovery systems the formation of the Mach disc on axis and its approach to steady state was monitored. The relation of the Mach disc diameter to the lateral dimension of the high explosive used to compress the polymer samples was also investigated.

  7. Tangling clustering instability for small particles in temperature stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2013-08-01

    We study tangling clustering instability of inertial particles in a temperature stratified turbulence with small finite correlation time. It is shown that the tangling mechanism in the temperature stratified turbulence strongly increases the degree of compressibility of particle velocity field. This results in the strong decrease of the threshold for the excitation of the tangling clustering instability even for small particles. The tangling clustering instability in the temperature stratified turbulence is essentially different from the inertial clustering instability that occurs in non-stratified isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. While the inertial clustering instability is caused by the centrifugal effect of the turbulent eddies, the mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is related to the temperature fluctuations generated by the tangling of the mean temperature gradient by the velocity fluctuations. Temperature fluctuations produce pressure fluctuations and cause particle accumulations in regions with increased instantaneous pressure. It is shown that the growth rate of the tangling clustering instability is by sqrtRe (ell _0 / L_T)^2 / (3 Ma)^4 times larger than that of the inertial clustering instability, where Re is the Reynolds number, Ma is the Mach number, ℓ0 is the integral turbulence scale, and LT is the characteristic scale of the mean temperature variations. It is found that depending on the parameters of the turbulence and the mean temperature gradient there is a preferential particle size at which the particle clustering due to the tangling clustering instability is more effective. The particle number density inside the cluster after the saturation of this instability can be by several orders of magnitude larger than the mean particle number density. It is also demonstrated that the evaporation of droplets drastically changes the tangling clustering instability, e.g., it increases the instability threshold in the droplet radius. The

  8. Discovery of the Fomalhaut C debris disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Kalas, P.; Duchêne, G.; Sibthorpe, B.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Matthews, B. C.; Greaves, J.

    2014-02-01

    Fomalhaut is one of the most interesting and well-studied nearby stars, hosting at least one planet, a spectacular debris ring and two distant low-mass stellar companions (TW PsA and LP 876-10, a.k.a. Fomalhaut B and C). We observed both companions with Herschel, and while no disc was detected around the secondary, TW PsA, we have discovered the second debris disc in the Fomalhaut system, around LP 876-10. This detection is only the second case of two debris discs seen in a multiple system, both of which are relatively wide (≳3000 au for HD 223352/40 and 158 kau [0.77 pc] for Fomalhaut/LP 876-10). The disc is cool (24 K) and relatively bright, with a fractional luminosity Ldisc/L⋆ = 1.2 × 10-4, and represents the rare observation of a debris disc around an M dwarf. Further work should attempt to find if the presence of two discs in the Fomalhaut system is coincidental, perhaps simply due to the relatively young system age of 440 Myr, or if the stellar components have dynamically interacted and the system is even more complex than it currently appears.

  9. Proteomic Signature of the Murine Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Patel, Priya; Frimpong, Agya; Xiao, Yizhi; Siqueira, Walter L.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal problem and the single most common cause of disability, often attributed to degeneration of the intervertebral disc. Lack of effective treatment is directly related to our limited understanding of the pathways responsible for maintaining disc health. While transcriptional analysis has permitted initial insights into the biology of the intervertebral disc, complete proteomic characterization is required. We therefore employed liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) protein/peptide separation and mass spectrometric analyses to characterize the protein content of intervertebral discs from skeletally mature wild-type mice. A total of 1360 proteins were identified and categorized using PANTHER. Identified proteins were primarily intracellular/plasma membrane (35%), organelle (30%), macromolecular complex (10%), extracellular region (9%). Molecular function categorization resulted in three distinct categories: catalytic activity (33%), binding (molecule interactions) (29%), and structural activity (13%). To validate our list, we confirmed the presence of 14 of 20 previously identified IVD-associated markers, including matrix proteins, transcriptional regulators, and secreted proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed distinct localization patterns of select protein with the intervertebral disc. Characterization of the protein composition of healthy intervertebral disc tissue is an important first step in identifying cellular processes and pathways disrupted during aging or disease progression. PMID:25689066

  10. Optic disc anomalies and frontonasal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, P; Lees, M; Lawson, J; Reardon, W; Leitch, J; Thorogood, P; Winter, R; Taylor, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To document the optic disc abnormalities in patients with frontonasal dysplasia in association with basal encephalocele.
METHODS—Names and hospital numbers of patients with midline clefts were obtained from the ophthalmology and genetics database. Six patients were identified who had the following common findings: midline facial cleft with midline cleft lip and palate; hypertelorism; absent corpus callosum; basal (sphenoethmoidal) encephalocele; and pituitary deficiency (five out of six cases). Ophthalmic examination was performed with fundal photography where possible.
RESULTS—Two patients had unilateral and one a bilateral peripapillary staphyloma. Two patients had bilateral optic disc hypoplasia and one appeared to have a peripapillary staphyloma in one eye and a morning glory disc in the other.
CONCLUSION—Optic disc abnormalities were found in all patients with this constellation of clinical findings. This association appears to represent a distinct subgroup within the spectrum of frontonasal dysplasia. The presence of midline facial anomalies and any dysplastic disc should alert the physician as to the presence of an encephalocele.

 Keywords: frontonasal dysplasia; optic disc; encephalocele PMID:9602627

  11. The diversity of thick galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Anastasia V.; Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Silchenko, Olga K.; Moiseev, Alexey V.; Borisov, Svyatoslav B.

    2016-07-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on S0-a disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC 4111 in a dense group, NGC 4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC 5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4-5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ˜- 0.2…0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC 4111 and NGC 4710. On the other hand, NGC 5422 does not harbour young stars, its disc is thick and old (10 Gyr), without evidence for a second component, and its α-element abundance suggests a 1.5-2 Gyr long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results suggest the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  12. Interplay of instabilities in mounded surface growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2005-02-01

    We numerically study a one-dimensional conserved growth equation with competing linear (Ehrlich-Schwoebel) and nonlinear instabilities. As a control parameter is varied, this model exhibits a nonequilibrium phase transition between two mounded states, one of which exhibits slope selection and the other does not. The coarsening behavior of the mounds in these two phases is studied in detail. In the absence of noise, the steady-state configuration depends crucially on which of the two instabilities dominates the early time behavior.

  13. Adolescent cannabis exposure interacts with mutant DISC1 to produce impaired adult emotional memory.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Michael D; Saito, Atsushi; Abazyan, Bagrat; Taniguchi, Yu; Huang, Ching-Hsun; Ito, Koki; Zhu, Xiaolei; Segal, Hadar; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira; Mackie, Ken; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Kamiya, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis is an increasingly popular and controversial drug used worldwide. Cannabis use often begins during adolescence, a highly susceptible period for environmental stimuli to alter functional and structural organization of the developing brain. Given that adolescence is a critical time for the emergence of mental illnesses before full-onset in early adulthood, it is particularly important to investigate how genetic insults and adolescent cannabis exposure interact to affect brain development and function. Here we show for the first time that a perturbation in disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) exacerbates the response to adolescent exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, consistent with the concept that gene-environment interaction may contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions. We found that chronic adolescent treatment with Δ(9)-THC exacerbates deficits in fear-associated memory in adult mice that express a putative dominant-negative mutant of DISC1 (DN-DISC1). Synaptic expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is down-regulated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala, critical brain regions for fear-associated memory, by either expression of DN-DISC1 or adolescent Δ(9)-THC treatment. Notably, elevation of c-Fos expression evoked by context-dependent fear memory retrieval is impaired in these brain regions in DN-DISC1 mice. We also found a synergistic reduction of c-Fos expression induced by cue-dependent fear memory retrieval in DN-DISC1 with adolescent Δ(9)-THC exposure. These results suggest that alteration of CB1R-mediated signaling in DN-DISC1 mice may underlie susceptibility to detrimental effects of adolescent cannabis exposure on adult behaviors. PMID:26093170

  14. Viscoelastic properties of the pig temporomandibular joint articular soft tissues of the condyle and disc.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Shinoda, M; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained loading condition such as clenching could compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular soft tissues. However, there is still no clear understanding of how the TM joint articular tissues respond under compression. To answer this question, we performed in vitro indentation tests on fresh articular discs and cartilage-bone systems of the condyles of 10 Yorkshire pigs (aged 7 months) using a self-developed indentation tester. The indenter was 5 mm in diameter and was controlled by means of a computer-aided feedback mechanism. Bilateral condyles from the same mandible were uniformly prepared; one was used for measurements under sustained compression (SC) and the other for measurements under intermittent compression (IC). The displacements of the indenter induced by a SC of 10, 20, and 30 Newtons (N, units of force) for 10 min and by an IC, also of 10, 20, and 30 N, with one-second duration and two-second intervals for 10 min were measured by means of a displacement sensor with a resolution of 0.001 mm. From these data, the indentation curves of the articular discs and the cartilage-bone systems were calculated. Both the disc and the articular cartilage showed characteristic displacement vs. time curves-namely, an instantaneous deformation upon load application, followed by a time-dependent creep phase of asymptotically increasing deformation under constant load. However, the indentation curves of the two tissues were not identical: The deformation of the articular cartilage was dose-dependent, but that of the disc was not. Moreover, the articular cartilage deformed significantly less under IC than under SC. This difference was not found in the disc. It can be concluded that both the disc and the articular cartilage of the pig temporomandibular joint have viscoelastic properties against compression; however, the disc is stiffer than the articular cartilage. PMID:9372793

  15. Adolescent cannabis exposure interacts with mutant DISC1 to produce impaired adult emotional memory

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Michael D.; Saito, Atsushi; Abazyan, Bagrat; Taniguchi, Yu; Huang, Ching-Hsun; Ito, Koki; Zhu, Xiaolei; Segal, Hadar; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira; Mackie, Ken; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.; Kamiya, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis is an increasingly popular and controversial drug used worldwide. Cannabis use often begins during adolescence, a highly susceptible period for environmental stimuli to alter functional and structural organization of the developing brain. Given that adolescence is a critical time for the emergence of mental illnesses before full-onset in early adulthood, it is particularly important to investigate how genetic insults and adolescent cannabis exposure interact to affect brain development and function. Here we show for the first time that a perturbation in Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) exacerbates the response to adolescent exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), a major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, consistent with the concept that gene-environment interactions may contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions. We found that chronic adolescent treatment with Δ9-THC exacerbates deficits in fear-associated memory in adult mice that express a putative dominant-negative mutant of DISC1 (DN-DISC1). Synaptic expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is down-regulated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala, critical brain regions for fear-associated memory, by either expression of DN-DISC1 or adolescent Δ9-THC treatment. Notably, elevation of c-Fos expression evoked by context-dependent fear memory retrieval is impaired in these brain regions in DN-DISC1 mice. We also found a synergistic reduction of c-Fos expression induced by cue-dependent fear memory retrieval in DN-DISC1 with adolescent Δ9-THC exposure. These results suggest that alteration of CB1R-mediated signaling in DN-DISC1 mice may underlie susceptibility to detrimental effects of adolescent cannabis exposure on adult behaviors. PMID:26093170

  16. A study and classification of non-linear high frequency ionospheric instabilities by coupled mode theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two basic high-frequency ionospheric instabilities are discussed - i.e., the three-wave parametric interaction, and the oscillating two-stream instability. In the parametric instability, the ion-acoustic wave has a complex frequency, whereas in the oscillating two-stream instability the ion-acoustic frequency is purely imaginary. The parametric instability is shown to be the only one whose threshold depends on the ion collision frequency. A coupled-mode theory is proposed which permits study and classification of high-frequency instabilities on a unified basis.

  17. Variational approach to the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Rapti, Z; Kevrekidis, P G; Smerzi, A; Bishop, A R

    2004-01-01

    We study the modulational stability of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using a time-dependent variational approach. Within this framework, we derive ordinary differential equations (ODE's) for the time evolution of the amplitude and phase of modulational perturbations. Analyzing the ensuing ODE's, we rederive the classical modulational instability criterion. The case (relevant to applications in optics and Bose-Einstein condensation) where the coefficients of the equation are time dependent, is also examined. PMID:14995759

  18. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability. PMID:25661070

  19. Plasma instabilities in electronegative inductive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakhtanov, Alexei Mikhail

    Plasma instabilities have been observed in low-pressure inductive discharges, in the transition between low density capacitive mode and high density inductive mode of the discharge when attaching gases such as SF6 and Ar/SF 6 mixtures are used. Oscillations of charged particles, plasma potential and light emitted from the plasma with the frequencies from a few hertz to tens of kilohertz are seen for gas pressures between 1 and 100 mTorr and the discharge power in the range of 75--1200 W. The region of instability increases as the plasma becomes more electronegative and the frequency of plasma oscillations increases as the power, pressure, and gas flow rate increase. The instability frequencies may also depend on the settings of a matching network. A volume-averaged (global) model of the instability has been developed, for a discharge containing time varying densities of electrons, positive ions, and negative ions, and time invariant excited states and neutral densities. The particle and energy balance equations are integrated to produce the dynamical behavior. As pressure or power is varied to cross a threshold, the instability goes through a series of oscillatory states to large scale relaxation oscillations between higher and lower density states. The model qualitatively agrees with experimental observations, and also shows a significant influence of the matching network. A stability analysis of an electronegative discharge has been performed, using a Hurwitz criterion, for a system of linearized particle and power balance differential equations. Capacitive coupling plays a crucial role in the instability process. A variable electrostatic (Faraday) shield has been used to control the capacitive coupling from the excitation coil to the plasma. The plasma instability disappears when the shielded area exceeds 65% of the total area of the coil. The global model of instability gives a slightly higher value of 85% for instability suppression with the same discharge

  20. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  1. Turbulent thermal diffusion: a way to concentrate dust in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence acting on mixes of gas and particles generally diffuses the latter evenly through the former. However, in the presence of background gas temperature gradients, a phenomenon known as turbulent thermal diffusion appears as a particle drift velocity (rather than a diffusive term). This process moves particles from hot regions to cold ones. We re-derive turbulent thermal diffusion using astrophysical language and demonstrate that it could play a major role in protoplanetary discs by concentrating particles by factors of tens. Such a concentration would set the stage for collective behaviour such as the streaming instability and hence planetesimal formation.

  2. MaGICC-WDM: the effects of warm dark matter in hydrodynamical simulations of disc galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpich, Jakob; Stinson, Gregory S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Brook, Chris; Wadsley, James; Couchman, Hugh M. P.; Quinn, Tom

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of warm dark matter (WDM) on hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation as part of the Making Galaxies in a Cosmological Context (MaGICC) project. We simulate three different galaxies using three WDM candidates of 1, 2 and 5 keV and compare results with pure cold dark matter simulations. WDM slightly reduces star formation and produces less centrally concentrated stellar profiles. These effects are most evident for the 1 keV candidate but almost disappear for m_{wdm} >2 keV. All simulations form similar stellar discs independent of WDM particle mass. In particular, the disc scalelength does not change when WDM is considered. The reduced amount of star formation in the case of 1 keV particles is due to the effects of WDM on merging satellites which are on average less concentrated and less gas rich. The altered satellites cause a reduced starburst during mergers because they trigger weaker disc instabilities in the main galaxy. Nevertheless we show that disc galaxy evolution is much more sensitive to stellar feedback than it is to WDM candidate mass. Overall, we find that WDM, especially when restricted to current observational constraints (m_{wdm} >2 keV), has a minor impact on disc galaxy formation.

  3. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  4. Varus Posteromedial Instability.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Miguel A; Stein, Jason A; Murthi, Anand M

    2015-11-01

    Varus posteromedial instability of the elbow is a result of traumatic injury to the medial facet of the coronoid and usually the lateral collateral ligament. Treatment of these fractures is usually surgical; poor outcomes have been described with nonoperative treatment. Surgical management consists of coronoid fracture fixation with plates, screws, or sutures and radial collateral ligament repair. Outcomes of these injuries are mixed, but most series report fair to good objective scores. The purpose of this article is to describe the pathophysiology of varus posteromedial instability, discuss the management of this injury, and report the outcomes of treatment. PMID:26498545

  5. Suppression of the accretion rate in thin discs around binary black holes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Enrico; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-05-01

    We present three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations investigating the dependence of the accretion rate on the disc thickness around an equal-mass, circular black hole binary system. We find that for thick/hot discs, with H/R ≳ 0.1, the binary torque does not prevent the gas from penetrating the cavity formed in the disc by the binary (in line with previous investigations). The situation drastically changes for thinner discs, in this case the mass accretion rate is suppressed, such that only a fraction (linearly dependent on H/R) of the available gas is able to flow within the cavity and accrete on to the binary. Extrapolating this result to the cold and thin accretion discs expected around supermassive black hole binary systems implies that this kind of systems accretes less material than predicted so far, with consequences not only for the electromagnetic and gravitational waves emissions during the late inspiral phase but also for the recoil speed of the black hole formed after binary coalescence, thus influencing also the evolutionary path both of the binary and of the host galaxy. Our results, being scale-free, are also applicable to equal mass, circular binaries of stellar mass black holes, such as the progenitor of the recently discovered gravitational wave source GW150914.

  6. Suppression of the accretion rate in thin discs around binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Enrico; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations investigating the dependence of the accretion rate on the disc thickness around an equal-mass, circular black hole binary system. We find that for thick/hot discs, with H/R ≳ 0.1, the binary torque does not prevent the gas from penetrating the cavity formed in the disc by the binary (in line with previous investigations). The situation drastically changes for thinner discs; in this case the mass accretion rate is suppressed, such that only a fraction (linearly dependent on H/R) of the available gas is able to flow within the cavity and accrete on to the binary. Extrapolating this result to the cold and thin accretion discs expected around supermassive black hole binary systems implies that this kind of system accretes less material than predicted so far, with consequences not only for the electromagnetic and gravitational waves emissions during the late inspiral phase but also for the recoil speed of the black hole formed after binary coalescence, thus influencing also the evolutionary path both of the binary and of the host galaxy. Our results, being scale-free, are also applicable to equal-mass, circular binaries of stellar mass black holes, such as the progenitor of the recently discovered gravitational wave source GW150914.

  7. The value of accurate clinical assessment in the surgical management of the lumbar disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R S; Cadoux-Hudson, T A; Adams, C B

    1988-02-01

    One hundred patients with lumbar disc protrusions were studied. Thirty six "control" patients were admitted in the same time period with low back pain and sciatica but with subsequently "normal" myelograms and no surgery. The aim of this paper was to relate history and clinical signs to the myelograms and surgical findings. Ninety nine per cent of our patients presented with sciatica (controls 94%). The most frequently found sign in patients with a disc protrusion was reduction of ipsilateral straight leg raising (98%). However, 55% of controls also showed this sign. There were three signs that, when present, particularly indicated a disc protrusion; "crossed straight leg raising" (pain on contralateral straight leg raising), measured calf wasting and impaired ankle reflex: the latter being especially indicative of an L5-S1 disc protrusion. There were two further important signs, weakness of dorsiflexion of the foot and scoliosis of the lumbar spine. However, such signs occurred in about half the patients and so clinical diagnosis in the remaining half depended on obtaining a good history of sciatica, and paying due regard to severity of the pain, the mobility of the patient, the ability and desire to work and the overall personality. Satisfactory results of surgery simply depend on finding and removing a definite disc protrusion. Using these methods of selection, 98% have returned to their original employment, 86% within 3 months of the operation. For a patient with no abnormal signs and a normal myelogram, surgical treatment should not be advised. PMID:3346682

  8. Wetting induced instabilities in miscible polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Nigel; Thomas, Katherine; Steiner, Ullrich; Poetes, Rosa; Morariu, Mihai

    2011-03-01

    The behaviour of miscible blends of polystyrene (PS)/poly(vinyl methyl ether)(PVME) of varying compositions has been investigated at temperatures where PS and PVME are miscible. The PVME is seen to enrich the polymer-air surface, forming a layer with a width that is comparable to the correlation length. Further heating close to the demixing temperature results in the formation of a capillary instabilities at the polymer surface exhibiting a spinodal-like pattern with a characteristic wavelength that depends on the blend composition. Formation of these instabilities is seen for all blend compositions. We propose that these wetting induced instabilities result from coupled height and composition fluctuations in the PVME enriched surface layer, driving the build-up of long wavelength fluctuations.

  9. Radiative instabilities in sheared magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure and growth rate of the radiative instability in a sheared magnetic field B have been calculated analytically using the Braginskii fluid equations. In a shear layer, temperature and density perturbations are linked by the propagation of sound waves parallel to the local magnetic field. As a consequence, density clumping or condensation plays an important role in driving the instability. Parallel thermal conduction localizes the mode to a narrow layer where K(parallel) is small and stabilizes short wavelengths k larger-than(c) where k(c) depends on the local radiation and conduction rates. Thermal coupling to ions also limits the width of the unstable spectrum. It is shown that a broad spectrum of modes is typically unstable in tokamak edge plasmas and it is argued that this instability is sufficiently robust to drive the large-amplitude density fluctuations often measured there.

  10. Weibel instability with semirelativistic Maxwellian distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, S.; Murtaza, G.

    2007-07-15

    A macroscopic description of the linear Weibel instability, based on semirelativistic distribution in an unmagnetized plasma is presented. In particular, analytical expressions are derived for the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant for the Maxwellian and semirelativistic Maxwellian distribution functions under the conditions of {xi}=({omega}/k{sub parallel}{theta}{sub parallel})>>1 and <<1. The real frequency and the growth rate of the instability for the semirelativistic case now depends upon the factor {chi} generated from the relativistic term in the distribution function. The presence of {chi} which is always greater than unity favors the Weibel instability to occur even for the small anisotropy of temperature. As we increase the value of {chi} large enough that it dominates over other terms, the damping changes into growth. In the limiting case, i.e., {chi}=1, the results approach the Maxwellian situation.

  11. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  12. Preparation of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine-medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Romet ( a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a type A medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine discs were prepare...

  13. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  14. Feedback in simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, T. J.; Jonsson, Patrik; Primack, Joel R.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2006-12-01

    Using hydrodynamic simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers, we investigate the star formation history and remnant properties when various parametrizations of a simple stellar feedback model are implemented. The simulations include radiative cooling, a density-dependent star formation recipe and a model for feedback from massive stars. The feedback model stores supernova feedback energy within individual gas particles and dissipates this energy on a time-scale specified by two free parameters; τfb, which sets the dissipative time-scale, and n, which sets the effective equation of state in star-forming regions. Via this model, feedback energy can provide pressure support to regions of gas that are thermally cold. Using a self-consistent disc galaxy, modelled after a local Sbc spiral, in both isolated and major-merger simulations, we investigate parametrizations of the feedback model that are selected with respect to the quiescent disc stability. These models produce a range of star formation histories for discs evolved in isolation, or during a major merger, yet all are consistent with the star formation relation found by Kennicutt. We suggest that this result is produced by the adopted recipe for star formation and is not a byproduct of the feedback model. All major mergers produce a population of new stars that is highly centrally concentrated, demonstrating a distinct break in the r1/4 surface density profile, consistent with previous findings. The half-mass radius and one-dimensional velocity dispersion are affected by the feedback model used. In tests with up to an order of magnitude higher resolution, the star formation history is nearly identical, suggesting that we have achieved a numerically converged star formation history. Finally, we compare our results to those of previous simulations of star formation in disc-galaxy major mergers, addressing the effects of star formation normalization, the version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) employed and

  15. Structures induced by companions in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyziropoulos, P. E.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Gravvanis, G. A.; Patsis, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Using N-body simulations we study the structures induced on a galactic disc by repeated flybys of a companion in decaying eccentric orbit around the disc. Our system is composed by a stellar disc, bulge and live dark matter halo, and we study the system's dynamical response to a sequence of a companion's flybys, when we vary i) the disc's temperature (parameterized by Toomre's Q-parameter) and ii) the companion's mass and initial orbit. We use a new 3D Cartesian grid code: MAIN (Mesh-adaptive Approximate Inverse N-body solver). The main features of MAIN are reviewed, with emphasis on the use of a new Symmetric Factored Approximate Sparse Inverse (SFASI) matrix in conjunction with the multigrid method that allows the efficient solution of Poisson's equation in three space variables. We find that: i) companions need to be assigned initial masses in a rather narrow window of values in order to produce significant and more long-standing non-axisymmetric structures (bars and spirals) in the main galaxy's disc by the repeated flyby mechanism. ii) a crucial phenomenon is the antagonism between companion-excited and self-excited modes on the disc. Values of Q > 1.5 are needed in order to allow for the growth of the companion-excited modes to prevail over the the growth of the disc's self-excited modes. iii) We give evidence that the companion-induced spiral structure is best represented by a density wave with pattern speed nearly constant in a region extending from the ILR to a radius close to, but inside, corotation.

  16. Reconstructing the star formation history of the Milky Way disc(s) from chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snaith, O.; Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Combes, F.; Katz, D.; Gómez, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a chemical evolution model to study the star formation history of the Milky Way. Our model assumes that the Milky Way has formed from a closed-box-like system in the inner regions, while the outer parts of the disc have experienced some accretion. Unlike the usual procedure, we do not fix the star formation prescription (e.g. Kennicutt law) to reproduce the chemical abundance trends. Instead, we fit the abundance trends with age to recover the star formation history of the Galaxy. Our method enables us to recover the star formation history of the Milky Way in the first Gyrs with unprecedented accuracy in the inner (R < 7-8 kpc) and outer (R > 9-10 kpc) discs, as sampled in the solar vicinity. We show that half the stellar mass formed during the thick-disc phase in the inner galaxy during the first 4-5 Gyr. This phase was followed by a significant dip in star formation activity (at 8-9 Gyr) and a period of roughly constant lower-level star formation for the remaining 8 Gyr. The thick-disc phase has produced as many metals in 4 Gyr as the thin-disc phase in the remaining 8 Gyr. Our results suggest that a closed-box model is able to fit all the available constraints in the inner disc. A closed-box system is qualitatively equivalent to a regime where the accretion rate maintains a high gas fraction in the inner disc at high redshift. In these conditions the SFR is mainly governed by the high turbulence of the interstellar medium. By z ~ 1 it is possible that most of the accretion takes place in the outer disc, while the star formation activity in the inner disc is mostly sustained by the gas that is not consumed during the thick-disc phase and the continuous ejecta from earlier generations of stars. The outer disc follows a star formation history very similar to that of the inner disc, although initiated at z ~ 2, about 2 Gyr before the onset of the thin-disc formation in the inner disc.

  17. Tearing up the disc: misaligned accretion on to a binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew; Price, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    In a recent paper, we have shown that the evolution of a misaligned disc around a spinning black hole can result in tearing the disc into many distinct planes. Tearing discs with random orientations produce direct dynamical accretion on to the hole in ≈70 per cent of all cases. Here, we examine the evolution of a misaligned disc around a binary system. We show that these discs are susceptible to tearing for almost all inclinations. We also show that tearing of the disc can result in a significant acceleration of the disc evolution and subsequent accretion on to the binary - by factors up to 104 times that of a coplanar prograde disc with otherwise identical parameters. This provides a promising mechanism for driving mergers of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries on time-scales much shorter than a Hubble time. Disc tearing also suggests new observational signatures of accreting SMBH binaries and other systems such as protostellar binaries.

  18. Disc-shaped colloids interacting in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, Alena; Denniston, Colin

    2014-11-01

    We studied the behavior of pairs of disc-shaped colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal using Lattice Boltzmann algorithm. Without any external forces the position of the disc with respect to the liquid crystal director minimizes the free energy of the system and no distortion of the director field is observed. When the rotating magnetic field is present, the torque on the disc with homeotropic surface anchoring should change with analogy to electrostatic energy, which implies the disc continues turning following the field. However, when the disc reaches some critical position and the director field around it is highly distorted, the disc suddenly flips to minimize the free energy. Position and motion of pairs of such discs under similar conditions can be controlled by the angular velocity of magnetic field, it's magnitude and initial configuration of the system. As a result of analysis of discs' dynamics, a new way to control self-organization of disc particles was produced.

  19. Effects of incoming wind condition and wind turbine aerodynamics on the hub vortex instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, R.; Viola, F.; Gallaire, F.; Iungo, G. V.

    2015-06-01

    Dynamics and instabilities occurring in the near-wake of wind turbines have a crucial role for the wake downstream evolution, and for the onset of far-wake instabilities. Furthermore, wake dynamics significantly affect the intra-wind farm wake flow, wake interactions and potential power losses. Therefore, the physical understanding and predictability of wind turbine wake instabilities become a nodal point for prediction of wind power harvesting and optimization of wind farm layout. This study is focused on the prediction of the hub vortex instability encountered within wind turbine wakes under different operational conditions of the wind turbine. Linear stability analysis of the wake flow is performed by means of a novel approach that enables to take effects of turbulence on wake instabilities into account. Stability analysis is performed by using as base flow the time-averaged wake velocity field at a specific downstream location. The latter is modeled through Carton-McWilliams velocity profiles by mimicking the presence of the hub vortex and helicoidal tip vortices, and matching the wind turbine thrust coefficient predicted through the actuator disc model. The results show that hub vortex instability is promoted by increasing the turbine thrust coefficient. Indeed, a larger aerodynamic load produces an enhanced wake velocity deficit and axial shear, which are considered the main sources for the wake instability. Nonetheless, wake swirl also promotes hub vortex instability, and it can also affect the azimuthal wavenumber of the most unstable mode.

  20. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  1. Adjacent segment disc pressures following two-level cervical disc replacement versus simulated anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Eric B; Darden, Bruce V; Murrey, Daniel B; Milam, R Alden; Rhyne, Alfred L; Claytor, Brian; Nussman, Donna S; Powers, Timothy W; Davies, Matthew A; Bryant, S Chad; Larsen, Scott P; Bhatt, Meghal; Brodziak, John; Polic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) has been shown to alter the biomechanics of adjacent segments of the cervical spine. The goal of total disc replacement is to address pathology at a given disc with minimal disruption of the operated or adjacent segments. This study compares the pressure within discs adjacent to either a two-level simulated ACDF or a two-level total disc replacement with the ProDisc-C. A special automated motion testing apparatus was constructed. Four fresh cadaveric cervical spine specimens were affixed to the test stand and tested in flexion and extension under specific loads. Intradiscal, miniature strain-gauge-based transducers were placed in the discs above and below the "treated" levels. The specimens were then tested in flexion and extension. Pressure and overall angular displacement were measured. In the most extreme and highest quality specimen the difference at C3/C4 registered 800 kPa and the difference at C6/C7 registered 50 kPa. This same quality specimen treated with the ProDisc reached a flexion angle at much lower moments, 24.3 degrees at 5 N-m, when compared to the the SACF 12.2 degrees at 8.6 N-m. Therefore, the moment needed to achieve 15 degrees of flexion with the SACF treatment was 5.5 N-m and the ProDisc treatment was only 2.9 N-m. This initial data would indicate that adjacent level discs experience substantially lower pressure after two-level disc replacement when compared to two-level SACF. Additional testing to further support these observations is ongoing. PMID:17108473

  2. INSTABILITIES IN THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.

    1999-03-29

    The 2MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will have a D.C. beam current of 40 A at extraction, making it one of the worlds most intense accelerators. Coherent instabilities are a major concern and efforts to predict beam behavior are described.

  3. Two-fluid instability

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of interpenetrating flow models to represent multidimensional instabilities is probed by numerical experiments with an L-shaped two-fluid jet. Periodic and nonperiodic oscillations of various types are observed, and a partial phase portrait is constructed. The numerical experiments suggest new approaches to verifying transient interpenetrating flow models. 18 references.

  4. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  5. Global Linear Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews linear instability analysis of flows over or through complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D geometries. In the three decades since it first appeared in the literature, global instability analysis, based on the solution of the multidimensional eigenvalue and/or initial value problem, is continuously broadening both in scope and in depth. To date it has dealt successfully with a wide range of applications arising in aerospace engineering, physiological flows, food processing, and nuclear-reactor safety. In recent years, nonmodal analysis has complemented the more traditional modal approach and increased knowledge of flow instability physics. Recent highlights delivered by the application of either modal or nonmodal global analysis are briefly discussed. A conscious effort is made to demystify both the tools currently utilized and the jargon employed to describe them, demonstrating the simplicity of the analysis. Hopefully this will provide new impulses for the creation of next-generation algorithms capable of coping with the main open research areas in which step-change progress can be expected by the application of the theory: instability analysis of fully inhomogeneous, 3D flows and control thereof.

  6. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-07-01

    Compared to most other alcoholic beverages, beer is unique because it is unstable when in the final package. This instability can be divided into biological and nonbiological instability. Nonbiological stability of beer involves a wide range of chemical processes and can be considered in a number of categories: physical, flavor, light, foam, and gushing. It is the balance between flavanoid polyphenols (tannoids) and sensitive proteins that specifically combine with polyphenols to form haze that largely dictates physical stability. The flavor stability of beer primarily depends on the oxygen concentration of packaged beer but is influenced by all stages of the brewing process. Foam stability in a glass of beer reflects the quality of the beverage. The backbone of foam is hydrophobic polypeptides. Novel brewing processes such as high-gravity brewing result in a disproportionate loss of these polypeptides and have a negative effect on the foam stability of the resulting beer. Beer is light sensitive, especially in the 350 500 nm range. Beer exposed to this wavelength range in clear or green glass containers quickly develop nauseous skunky-like off-flavors resulting from the formation of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Methods of enhancing all of these types of beer stability are discussed.

  7. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability.

  8. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  9. Crystallization of Self-Propelled Hard Discs.

    PubMed

    Briand, G; Dauchot, O

    2016-08-26

    We experimentally study the crystallization of a monolayer of vibrated discs with a built-in polar asymmetry, a model system of active liquids, and contrast it with that of vibrated isotropic discs. Increasing the packing fraction ϕ, the quasicontinuous crystallization reported for isotropic discs is replaced by a transition, or a crossover, towards a "self-melting" crystal. Starting from the liquid phase and increasing the packing fraction, clusters of dense hexagonal-ordered packed discs spontaneously form, melt, split, and merge, leading to a highly intermittent and heterogeneous dynamics. For a packing fraction larger than ϕ^{*}, a few large clusters span the system size. The cluster size distribution is monotonically decreasing for ϕ<ϕ^{*}, nonmonotonic for ϕ>ϕ^{*}, and is a power law at the transition. The system is, however, never dynamically arrested. The clusters permanently melt from place to place, forming droplets of an active liquid which rapidly propagate across the system. This self-melting crystalline state subsists up to the highest possible packing fraction, questioning the stability of the crystal for active discs unless it is at ordered close packing. PMID:27610889

  10. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  11. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  12. Parametric instabilities of rotor-support systems with application to industrial ventilators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parszewski, Z.; Krodkiemski, T.; Marynowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rotor support systems interaction with parametric excitation is considered for both unequal principal shaft stiffness (generators) and offset disc rotors (ventilators). Instability regions and types of instability are computed in the first case, and parametric resonances in the second case. Computed and experimental results are compared for laboratory machine models. A field case study of parametric vibrations in industrial ventilators is reported. Computed parametric resonances are confirmed in field measurements, and some industrial failures are explained. Also the dynamic influence and gyroscopic effect of supporting structures are shown and computed.

  13. Mechanobiological Assessment of TMJ Disc Surfaces: Nanoindentation and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Cassandra M.; Dolwick, M. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Temporomandibular disc is a mechanically robust fibrocartilage tissue exhibiting highly elastic compressive, shear, and tensile moduli with structurally dense extracellular matrix that supports functional loading of the joint. The aim of this study was to illustrate structural complexities of the superior and inferior disc surfaces, to demonstrate the robust mechanical ability of the disc as a whole may be due to depth-dependent regional/layered variation, and also to provide characterization data imperative for future tissue engineering efforts focused on restoring function to the joint. Material and Methods Nanoindentation was used to assess tissue zones in conjunction with detailed Transmission Electron Microscopy to define structural attributes that influence the temporomandibular disc function. Results The disc architecture adjacent to the superior surface was shown to have three distinct regional segments within the interface layer: 1-a surface peripheral layer; 2-subsurface region; and 3-a layer of helical matrix bundles. The inferior surface displayed an interface layer (20 µm) that showed limited cell populations with little depth-dependent structural variation, a stiffer elastic modulus and reduced energy dissipation compared to the superior surface. These data indicate that the primary function of the inferior surface is resistance to compression rather than load distribution during joint motion. Conclusions These are the first works that demonstrate that the superior central surface of the he temporomandibular disc is structured in depth-dependent isometric layers, each of which provides different mechanical function supporting the bulk tissue’s properties. From a clinical perspective these data have potential to define regions susceptible to fatigue that may translate to diagnostic criteria to better define the stages of dysfunction. PMID:26904180

  14. From the channel model of an InSb-based superresolution optical disc system to impulse response and resolution limits.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Dietmar

    2011-06-10

    The signal model of a superresolution optical channel can be an efficient tool for developing components of an associated high-density optical disc system. While the behavior of the laser diode, aperture, lens, and detector are properly described, a general mathematical model of the superresolution disc itself has not yet been available until recently. Different approaches have been made to describe the properties of a mask layer, mainly based on temperature- or power-dependent nonlinear effects. A complete signal-based or phenomenological optical channel model--from non-return-to-zero inverted input to disc readout signal--has recently been developed including the reflectivity of a superresolution disc with InSb used for the mask layer. In this contribution, the model is now extended and applied to a moving disc including a land-and-pit structure, and results are compared with data read from real superresolution discs. Both impulse response and resolution limits are derived and discussed. Thus the model provides a bridge from physical to readout signal properties, which count after all. The presented approach allows judging of the suitability of a mask layer material for storage density enhancement already based on static experiments, i.e., even before developing an associated disc drive. PMID:21673750

  15. Notochordal Cells in the Adult Intervertebral Disc: New Perspective on an Old Question

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a soft tissue, positioned between each of the vertebrae, that accommodates applied biomechanical forces to the spine. The central compartment of the disc contains the nucleus pulposus (NP), which is enclosed by the annulus fibrosus and the endplate cartilage. The NP is derived from the notochord, a rodlike structure of mesodermal origin. Development of the notochord is tightly regulated by interactive transcription factors and target genes. Since a number of these molecules are unique, they have been used for cell lineage and fate mapping studies of tissues of the intervertebral disc. These studies have shown that in a number of species including human, NP tissue retains notochordal cells throughout life. In the adult NP, there are present both large and small notochordal cells, as well as a progenitor cell population which can differentiate along the mesengenic pathway. Since tissue renewal in the intervertebral disc is dependent on the ability of these cells to commit to the NP lineage and undergo terminal differentiation, studies have been performed to assess which signaling pathways may regulate these activities. The notch signaling pathway is active in the intervertebral disc and is responsive to hypoxia, probably through HIF-1α. From a disease viewpoint, it is hypothesized that an oxemic shift, possibly mediated by alterations in the vascular supply to the tissues of the disc, would be expected to lead to a failure in notochordal progenitor cell activation and a decrease in the number of differentiated cells. In turn, this would lead to decrements in function and enhancement of the effect of agents that are known to promote disc degeneration. PMID:21967331

  16. NoSOCS in SDSS - V. Red disc and blue bulge galaxies across different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. A. A.; Rembold, S. B.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Nascimento, R. S.; Vajgel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of `red discs' and `blue bulges', comparing those to the `normal' objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at z ≤ 0.1, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where `blue discs' are transformed into `red discs' as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time-scale of ˜2-3 Gyr. We also find from the sSFR-M* plane that `red discs' gradually change as they move into clusters. The `blue bulges' have many similar properties than `blue discs', but some of the former show strong signs of asymmetry. The high asymmetry `blue bulges' display enhanced recent star formation compared to their regular counterparts. That indicates some of these systems may have increased their star formation due to mergers. None the less, there may not be a single evolutionary path for these blue early-type objects.

  17. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches—RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse—we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca2+ transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+, hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  18. General approach to spatiotemporal modulational instability processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjot, P.; Kibler, B.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we derive the general exact solution of the modulation instability gain. The solution described here is valid for 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D cases considering any temporal response function of the medium and with possible higher order Kerr nonlinearities. In particular, we show that the gain induced by modulation instability is initial condition dependent, while the usual calculations do not lead to such a dependence. Applications for current and high-interest nonlinear propagation problems, such as 1-D optical fiber propagation with delayed Raman response and 2-D filamentation in gases, are investigated in detail. More specifically, we demonstrate that the 2-D model of filamentation based on the balance between higher order Kerr terms leads to a modulation instability window. The impact of both self-steepening and space-time defocusing effects is also highlighted. Finally, we discuss the influence of the finite-time response of the different order electronic Kerr effects on the growth of the expected modulation instability bands.

  19. Perception and self-organized instability

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl; Breakspear, Michael; Deco, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers state-dependent dynamics that mediate perception in the brain. In particular, it considers the formal basis of self-organized instabilities that enable perceptual transitions during Bayes-optimal perception. The basic phenomena we consider are perceptual transitions that lead to conscious ignition (Dehaene and Changeux, 2011) and how they depend on dynamical instabilities that underlie chaotic itinerancy (Breakspear, 2001; Tsuda, 2001) and self-organized criticality (Beggs and Plenz, 2003; Plenz and Thiagarajan, 2007; Shew et al., 2011). Our approach is based on a dynamical formulation of perception as approximate Bayesian inference, in terms of variational free energy minimization. This formulation suggests that perception has an inherent tendency to induce dynamical instabilities (critical slowing) that enable the brain to respond sensitively to sensory perturbations. We briefly review the dynamics of perception, in terms of generalized Bayesian filtering and free energy minimization, present a formal conjecture about self-organized instability and then test this conjecture, using neuronal (numerical) simulations of perceptual categorization. PMID:22783185

  20. Evolution of binary black holes in self gravitating discs. Dissecting the torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, C.; Sesana, A.; Dotti, M.; Cuadra, J.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Haardt, F.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Massive black hole binaries, formed in galaxy mergers, are expected to evolve in dense circumbinary discs. Understanding of the disc-binary coupled dynamics is vital to assess both the final fate of the system and its potentially observable features. Aims: Aimed at understanding the physical roots of the secular evolution of the binary, we study the interplay between gas accretion and gravity torques in changing the binary elements (semi-major axis and eccentricity) and its total angular momentum budget. We pay special attention to the gravity torques, by analysing their physical origin and location within the disc. Methods: We analysed three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the evolution of initially quasi-circular massive black hole binaries (BHBs) residing in the central hollow (cavity) of massive self-gravitating circumbinary discs. We performed a set of simulations adopting different thermodynamics for the gas within the cavity and for the "numerical size" of the black holes. Results: We show that (i) the BHB eccentricity growth found in our previous work is a general result, independent of the accretion and the adopted thermodynamics; (ii) the semi-major axis decay depends not only on the gravity torques but also on their subtle interplay with the disc-binary angular momentum transfer due to accretion; (iii) the spectral structure of the gravity torques is predominately caused by disc edge overdensities and spiral arms developing in the body of the disc and, in general, does not reflect directly the period of the binary; (iv) the net gravity torque changes sign across the BHB corotation radius (positive inside vs negative outside) We quantify the relative importance of the two, which appear to depend on the thermodynamical properties of the instreaming gas, and which is crucial in assessing the disc-binary angular momentum transfer; (v) the net torque manifests as a purely kinematic (non-resonant) effect as it stems from the