Science.gov

Sample records for discharge powder river

  1. Effects of coal-bed methane discharge waters on the vegetation and soil ecosystem in Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, M.; Tindall, J.A.; Cronin, G.; Friedel, M.J.; Bergquist, E.

    2005-01-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) co-produced discharge waters in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, resulting from extraction of methane from coal seams, have become a priority for chemical, hydrological and biological research during the last few years. Soil and vegetation samples were taken from affected and reference sites (upland elevations and wetted gully) in Juniper Draw to investigate the effects of CBM discharge waters on soil physical and chemical properties and on native and introduced vegetation density and diversity. Results indicate an increase of salinity and sodicity within local soil ecosystems at sites directly exposed to CBM discharge waters. Elevated concentrations of sodium in the soil are correlated with consistent exposure to CBM waters. Clay-loam soils in the study area have a much larger specific surface area than the sandy soils and facilitate a greater sodium adsorption. However, there was no significant relation between increasing water sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values and increasing sediment SAR values downstream; however, soils exposed to the CBM water ranged from the moderate to severe SAR hazard index. Native vegetation species density was highest at the reference (upland and gully) and CBM affected upland sites. The affected gully had the greatest percent composition of introduced vegetation species. Salt-tolerant species had the greatest richness at the affected gully, implying a potential threat of invasion and competition to established native vegetation. These findings suggest that CBM waters could affect agricultural production operations and long-term water quality. ?? Springer 2005.

  2. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Steelman, Ryan; Clark, Billy; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  3. Flood discharge measurement of mountain rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.

    2012-11-01

    An efficient method that accounts for personal safety, accuracy and reliability for measuring flood discharge of mountain rivers is proposed. It is composed of new measurement method, tools, and techniques. Measuring flood discharge from mountain rivers by using conventional method is costly, time-consuming, and dangerous. Thus previous discharge measurements for mountainous areas were typically based on estimated precipitation, which alone cannot generate accurate measurements. This study applies a novel flood discharge measurement system composed of an Acoustic Doppler Profiler and crane system to accurately and quickly measure velocity distributions and water depths. Moreover a novel and efficient method for measuring discharge, which is based on the relationship between mean and maximum velocities and the relationship between cross-sectional area and gauge height is applied to estimate flood discharge. Flood discharge from mountain rivers can be estimated easily and rapidly by measuring maximum velocity in the river crosssection and the gauge height. The measured flood discharges can be utilized to create a reliable stage-discharge relationship for continuous estimations of discharge using records of water stage. The proposed method was applied to the Nanshih River, Taiwan. Results of measured discharges and estimated discharges only slightly differed from each other, demonstrating the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. Increasing river discharge to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Bruce J; Holmes, Robert M; McClelland, James W; Vörösmarty, Charles J; Lammers, Richard B; Shiklomanov, Alexander I; Shiklomanov, Igor A; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2002-12-13

    Synthesis of river-monitoring data reveals that the average annual discharge of fresh water from the six largest Eurasian rivers to the Arctic Ocean increased by 7% from 1936 to 1999. The average annual rate of increase was 2.0 +/- 0.7 cubic kilometers per year. Consequently, average annual discharge from the six rivers is now about 128 cubic kilometers per year greater than it was when routine measurements of discharge began. Discharge was correlated with changes in both the North Atlantic Oscillation and global mean surface air temperature. The observed large-scale change in freshwater flux has potentially important implications for ocean circulation and climate. PMID:12481132

  5. High resolution aerial monitoring of aquatic and riparian habitat in selected reaches of Wyoming's Powder River

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coalbed Methane (CBM) development produces saline and sodic discharge water at 5-15 gallons/minute/well. Current permits allow 51,000 wells in the Powder River Basin by 2010, giving a potential discharge of 1.1 billion gallons/day. To monitor the effect of the increasing CBM outflow on the aquatic a...

  6. Relating river discharges to salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    New river discharge data are brought together with spacebased sea surface salinity measurements by Aquarius and SMOS to demonstrate the role of river discharge in salinity changes near three river mouths: the Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Amazon. The characteristics of the seasonal cycle and the year-to-year changes of the river runoff are described. Various versions of the satellite salinity data are compared. The relative roles of river discharge, surface water flux, and horizontal advection in changing surface salinity in regions near the river mouths are examined. Satellite measurements of SSS clearly track movements of the fresh water from river discharges. Besides the river discharge, E-P plays an important role in the seasonal salinity variation near the Ganges and Irrawaddy River mouths. For the Mississippi and Amazon river mouths, central and eastern ITCZ, E-P contributes very little to the salinity seasonal change. In the central and eastern ITCZ, contribution of advection to the salinity tendency is clearly identified. Both salinity and salinity tendency are dominated by semi-annual cycle in the Atlantic ITCZ between 5ºN to 9ºN, whereas annual cycle dominates at other latitudes.

  7. In situ measurements of microbially-catalyzed nitrification and nitrate reduction rates in an ephemeral drainage channel receiving water from coalbed natural gas discharge, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification and nitrate reduction were examined in an ephemeral drainage channel receiving discharge from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. CBNG co-produced water typically contains dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), primarily as ammonium. In this study, a substantial portion of discharged ammonium was oxidized within 50??m of downstream transport, but speciation was markedly influenced by diel fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (> 300????M). After 300??m of transport, 60% of the initial DIN load had been removed. The effect of benthic nitrogen-cycling processes on stream water chemistry was assessed at 2 locations within the stream channel using acrylic chambers to conduct short-term (2-6??h), in-stream incubations. The highest ambient DIN removal rates (2103????mol N m- 2 h- 1) were found at a location where ammonium concentrations > 350????M. This occurred during light incubations when oxygen concentrations were highest. Nitrification was occurring at the site, however, net accumulation of nitrate and nitrite accounted for < 12% of the ammonium consumed, indicating that other ammonium-consuming processes were also occurring. In dark incubations, nitrite and nitrate consumption were dominant processes, while ammonium was produced rather than consumed. At a downstream location nitrification was not a factor and changes in DIN removal rates were controlled by nitrate reduction, diel fluctuations in oxygen concentration, and availability of electron donor. This study indicates that short-term adaptation of stream channel processes can be effective for removing CBNG DIN loads given sufficient travel distances, but the long-term potential for nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen saturation remain to be determined.

  8. Accuracy of the river discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han

    2013-04-01

    Discharge values recorded for water conservancy and hydrological analysis is a very important work. Flood control projects, watershed remediation and river environmental planning projects quite need the discharge measurement data. In Taiwan, we have 129 rivers, in accordance with the watershed situation, economic development and other factors, divided into 24 major rivers, 29 minor rivers and 79 ordinary rivers. If each river needs to measure and record these discharge values, it will be enormous work. In addition, the characteristics of Taiwan's rivers contain steep slope, flow rapidly and sediment concentration higher, so it really encounters some difficulties in high flow measurement. When the flood hazards come, to seek a solution for reducing the time, manpower and material resources in river discharge measurement is very important. In this study, the river discharge measurement accuracy is used to determine the tolerance percentage to reduce the number of vertical velocity measurements, thereby reducing the time, manpower and material resources in the river discharge measurement. The velocity data sources used in this study form Yang (1998). Yang (1998) used the Fiber-optic Laser Doppler Velocimetery (FLDV) to obtain different velocity data under different experimental conditions. In this study, we use these data to calculate the mean velocity of each vertical line by three different velocity profile formula (that is, the law of the wall, Chiu's theory, Hu's theory), and then multiplied by each sub-area to obtain the discharge measurement values and compared with the true values (obtained by the direct integration mode) to obtain the accuracy of discharge. The research results show that the discharge measurement values obtained by Chiu's theory are closer to the true value, while the maximum error is the law of the wall. The main reason is that the law of the wall can't describe the maximum velocity occurred in underwater. In addition, the results also show

  9. Smartphone for measuring river discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Haro, Salvador; Lüthi, Beat; Philippe, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Smartphones have become powerful and have extended their capacities including different types of sensors. These capabilities make them very interesting for its applications in water management. We have developed a new mobile device application for open-channel flow measurements. This app can be used to determine the flow in e.g. rivers, artificial channels, irrigation ditches, furrows, etc. The smartphone app computes the runoff by analysing a few seconds of a movie that is recorded using the smartphone camera. The runoff is calculated from the estimated water level, surface velocity and from prior knowledge on the channel geometry. The water level is determined by the separation line of image segments with and without optical flow. Via calibration of the smartphone camera position this separation line is mapped to a water level. The surface velocity is calculated using a modified method of the standard Particle Image Velocimetry method. Among the key characteristics of the method is the fact that no tracer particles are needed. There are two flavours of the app. In the first one, all the measurements are taken using the available sensors in the mobile device and all the calculations are made making only use of the device. Three results are given back: the water level, the average surface velocity and discharge. This information can be sent via SMS. In the second one, the movie is send to a central computer where more detailed calculations are made, like fine camera calibration, camera stabilization tuning, definition of the region of interest, the sub-windows for the velocity analysis can be changed, different algorithms can be chosen, etc. It also generates more detailed results. Using smartphones, measurements can be made at much lower cost, since there is no need of permanent installations, which also makes it possible to take measurements in any place.

  10. Interoperability challenges in river discharge modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Schlummer, Manuela; Andres, Volker; Jirka, Simon; Looser, Ulrich; Mladek, Richard; Pappenberger, Florian; Strauch, Adrian; Utech, Michael; Zsoter, Ervin

    2014-05-01

    River discharge is a critical water cycle variable, as it integrates all the processes (e.g. runoff and evapotranspiration) occurring within a river basin and provides a hydrological output variable that can be readily measured. Its prediction is of invaluable help for many water-related areas such as water resources assessment and management, as well as flood protection and disaster mitigation. Observations of river discharge are very important for the calibration and validation of hydrological or coupled land, atmosphere and ocean models . This requires the use of data from different scientific domains (Water, Weather, etc.). Typically, such data are provided using different technological solutions and formats. This complicates the integration of new hydrological data sources into application systems. Therefore, a considerable effort is often spent on data access issues instead of the actual scientific question. In the context of the FP7 funded project GEOWOW (GEOSS Interoperability for Weather, Ocean and Water), the "River Discharge" use scenario was developed in order to combine river discharge observations data from the Global Runoff Data Center (GRDC) database and model outputs produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) predicting river discharge based on weather forecast information. In this presentation we describe interoperability solutions which were adopted in order to address the technological challenges of the "River Discharge" use scenario: 1) Development of a Hydrology Profile for the OGC SOS 2.0 standard; 2) Enhancement of the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) to support the use scenario: 2.1) Develop new interoperability arrangements for GRDC and ECMWF capacities; 2.2) Select multiple time series for comparison. The development of the above functionalities and tools aims to respond to the need of Water and Weather scientists to assess river discharge forecasting models.

  11. Pulsed microwave discharges in powder mixtures: Status, problems, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanov, G. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Results of experiments on the excitation of pulsed microwave discharges by gyrotron radiation (λ = 4 mm, P 0 = 100-500 kW, τ = 1-10 ms) in the volumes and on the surfaces of metal-dielectric powder mixtures are presented. It is shown that there are two phases of discharge development: the spark phase, accompanied by a partial evaporation of the powder material, and the phase of a developed discharge, characterized by a plasma density of ˜1017 cm-3, high absorption, and high temperatures (˜5-10 kK) in a thin layer (˜0.1-0.2 mm) of plasma and vapor. It is demonstrated that the conductivity induced in the targets by UV radiation play an important role in the microwave absorption by powder grains. It is found that, in the course of the discharge, a conductive metal mesh forms in the powder volume as a result of metal evaporation. Reactions of high-temperature synthesis were initiated in various powder mixtures (Ti + B, Al + Fe2O3, Mo + B, etc.). It is shown that the reactions of high-temperature synthesis last for up to 0.1 s and are accompanied by the evaporation of powder grains and the formation of an aerosol cloud due to free expansion of reactants from the sample surface. The possibility of experimentally studying the kinetics of reactions of high-temperature synthesis is demonstrated. It is noticed that microwave discharges can be used to initiate plasmachemical reactions on the surfaces of radioparent materials in active gaseous media.

  12. Pulsed microwave discharges in powder mixtures: Status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M. Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-10-15

    Results of experiments on the excitation of pulsed microwave discharges by gyrotron radiation (λ = 4 mm, P{sub 0} = 100–500 kW, τ = 1–10 ms) in the volumes and on the surfaces of metal-dielectric powder mixtures are presented. It is shown that there are two phases of discharge development: the spark phase, accompanied by a partial evaporation of the powder material, and the phase of a developed discharge, characterized by a plasma density of ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup –3}, high absorption, and high temperatures (∼5–10 kK) in a thin layer (∼0.1–0.2 mm) of plasma and vapor. It is demonstrated that the conductivity induced in the targets by UV radiation play an important role in the microwave absorption by powder grains. It is found that, in the course of the discharge, a conductive metal mesh forms in the powder volume as a result of metal evaporation. Reactions of high-temperature synthesis were initiated in various powder mixtures (Ti + B, Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mo + B, etc.). It is shown that the reactions of high-temperature synthesis last for up to 0.1 s and are accompanied by the evaporation of powder grains and the formation of an aerosol cloud due to free expansion of reactants from the sample surface. The possibility of experimentally studying the kinetics of reactions of high-temperature synthesis is demonstrated. It is noticed that microwave discharges can be used to initiate plasmachemical reactions on the surfaces of radioparent materials in active gaseous media.

  13. Powder River Basin: new energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.

    1981-02-01

    The Powder River Basin in Wyoming represents a new energy frontier, where traditional ranch styles are giving way to boomtown development around new coal mines. Plans for extensive strip mining, coal trains and pipelines, and synthetic fuels plants will transform a 12,000 square mile area. The environmental and social impacts of trailer villages and the influx of new mores and life styles are already following traditional patterns for newcomers and long-time residents alike. Some local residents, however, are optimistic about the opportunities energy development will have. (DCK)

  14. Powder evolution at low powers in silane-argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, P.; Gupta, N. Dutta; Bhaduri, A.; Longeaud, C.; Vignoli, S.; Marty, O.

    2005-08-15

    Powder formation in a 13.56-MHz radio frequency (rf) capacitive glow discharge plasma of silane-argon mixture has been studied by in situ laser light-scattering measurements. The rf power density (P{sub rf}) was varied from 18 to 53 mW/cm{sup 2}. At high P{sub rf} the light scattering occurs all along the discharge and extends even beyond the exit end of the electrodes toward the pumping system. With decreasing P{sub rf} the maximum intensity of the light scattering decreases and the scattering zone shrinks and moves toward the exit end. With P{sub rf}{approx_equal}20 mW/cm{sup 2} a very bright scattering zone only a few centimeters wide appears located at the electrodes outlet. The powders studied by transmission electron microscopy did not show a drastic decrease of their sizes with P{sub rf} though clear coagulation of small particles is observed at high P{sub rf}. In this paper we have tried to link the laser light-scattering evolution with P{sub rf} to various parameters such as the microstructure factor, the deposition rate, the electron mobilityxlifetime product, the density of states, and the minority-carriers diffusion length of the films in an attempt to link the effect the evolution of powder formation to the films properties.

  15. Coalbed Methane Extraction and Soil Suitability Concerns in the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is located in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. It is an area of approximately 55,000 square kilometers. Extraction of methane gas from the coal seams that underlie the Powder River Basin began in Wyoming in the late 1980s and in Montana in the late 1990s. About 100-200 barrels of co-produced water per day are being extracted from each active well in the Powder River Basin, which comes to over 1.5 million barrels of water per day for all the active coalbed methane wells in the Basin. Lab testing indicates that Powder River Basin co-produced water is potable but is high in sodium and other salts, especially in the western and northern parts of the Powder River Basin. Common water management strategies include discharge of co-produced water into drainages, stock ponds, evaporation ponds, or infiltration ponds; treatment to remove sodium; or application of the water directly on the land surface via irrigation equipment or atomizers. Problems may arise because much of the Powder River Basin contains soils with high amounts of swelling clays. As part of the USGS Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center's hyperspectral research program, researchers are investigating whether hyperspectral remote sensing data can be beneficial in locating areas of swelling clays. Using detailed hyperspectral data collected over parts of the Powder River Basin and applying our knowledge of how the clays of interest reflect energy, we will attempt to identify and map areas of swelling clays. If successful, such information will be useful to resource and land managers.

  16. 78 FR 1936 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-In Custer, Powder River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Counties, MT AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of... Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Cntys., Mont. (Tongue River I), FD 30186 (ICC served Sept. 4, 1985... III. \\4\\ See Tongue River R.R.--Rail Constr. and Operation--In Custer, Powder River and Rosebud...

  17. 77 FR 64592 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-in Custer, Powder River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...--in Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Counties, MT AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION.... \\1\\ Tongue River R.R.--Rail Construction and Operation--In Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Cntys...\\ Tongue River R.R.--Rail Constr. & Operation--In Custer, Powder River & Rosebud Cntys., Mont., FD 30186...

  18. Flood discharges in the upper Mississippi River basin, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Melcher, Nick B.; James, Robert W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Flood-peak discharges that equaled or exceeded the 10-year recurrence interval were recorded at 154 streamflow-gaging stations in the upper Mississippi River Basin. At 41 streamflowgaging stations, the peak discharge was greater than the previous maximumknown discharge. At 15 additional gaging stations, peak discharges exceeded the previous maximum regulated peak discharge. At 45 gaging stations, peak discharges exceeded 100-year recurrence intervals.

  19. Flood peaks and discharge summaries in the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vickers, A.A.; Farsett, Harry A.; Green, J. Wayne

    1981-01-01

    This report contains streamflow data from 299 continuous and partial-record gaging stations in the Delaware River basin. The location, drainage area, period of record, type of gage, and average flow (discharge) is given for each continuous station. Also included, are annual flood peak discharges and discharges above a selected base, annual and monthly mean discharges, and annual and monthly runoff. (USGS)

  20. 9. BLACK RIVER CANAL CANAL (RIGHT), DISCHARGE GATE (BACKGROUND), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BLACK RIVER CANAL - CANAL (RIGHT), DISCHARGE GATE (BACKGROUND), FARMER'S TURNOUT (LEFT), AND LATERAL NO. 14 (FOREGROUND). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Black River Canal, 15 miles Southeast of Carlsbad near Malaga, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  1. 61. VIEW OF SALT RIVER PROJECT WELL DISCHARGING WATER INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. VIEW OF SALT RIVER PROJECT WELL DISCHARGING WATER INTO THE ARIZONA CANAL NEAR 47TH AVENUE, LOOKING SOUTH Photographer: James Eastwood, July 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  3. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Oxide Powders Using Transformer-Coupled Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Ulanov, I.; V. Isupov, M.; Yu Litvinsev, A.; A. Mischenko, P.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation of transformer-coupled discharge in an Ar-O2 mixture with the addition of SiCl4, TiCl4 and ZrCl4 has been carried out under the atmospheric pressure of plasma-forming gases. Discharge power and discharge heat losses have been determined, and the dispersion and phase composition of reaction products (oxide powders) has been analyzed with SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. Investigations reveal the formation of ultrafine oxide powders in the case of vaporized chloride (SiCl4 and TiCl4) injecting into the transformer coupled discharge. In the case of fine powder (ZrCl4) injection, full oxidation was not observed and reaction products consisted of a mixture of ZrO2 and ZrOCl2. A conclusion has been made regarding the perspectives of using transformer-coupled discharge to produce ultrafine oxide powders.

  4. Channeling in Paleocene coals, northern Powder River basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Interpretation of 1,200 geophysical logs in the northern Powder River basin, Montana, reveals the paleodrainages influencing coal deposition during the deposition of the Tongue River member (Paleocene, Fort Union Formation). Four channels with associated crevasse splay deposits are recognized: (1) an east-west rosebud drainage near Colstrip, (2) a north-south wall channel near Birney, (3) a north-south Dietz drainage near Tongue River Reservoir, and (4) a north-south Anderson channel in the vicinity of Moorhead. These channels support the concept of a major northeast-flowing drainage system during deposition of the Tongue River Member. Identification of these channels serves as a guide to future coal exploration.

  5. Possible implications of terrestrial river discharge with Arctic coastal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, H.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Oshima, K.

    2015-12-01

    @font-face { "MS 明朝"; }@font-face { "Cambria Math"; }@font-face { "@MS 明朝"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0mm 0mm 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; ""; }.MsoChpDefault { ; }div.WordSection1 { page: WordSection1; } One of the recent characteristic Arctic changes is the increase in river discharge flowing to the Arctic Ocean. The discharge simultaneously transports heat energy to the ocean. Under Arctic warming, the increased river discharge likely results in more heat flux to the Arctic Ocean. Interestingly, river discharge shows the peak in the spring season when Arctic sea ice begins to melt. At that time, the discharging heat flux may further contribute to sea ice retreat. A land surface model (CHANGE), coupled a river routing discharge model that combines river ice and water temperature models, simulated positive trends of pan-Arctic river discharge and water temperature, consequently enhanced heat flux to the Arctic Ocean. The increases were significant in Eurasian rivers and especially in the spring season. The model estimated cumulative heat flux to July was compared with the loss rate of sea ice concentration in Arctic coastal areas, revealing significantly higher correlation at Laptev and East Siberian seas where sea depth is shallower and the sea slope is not steep. Heat flux provided by river discharge had an ability that can melt approximately 10% or more of sea ice extent in Laptev and East Siberian seas, under the assumption that ice thickness is 1 m. This analysis provides an insight about influence of the terrestrial freshwater on the declining Arctic coastal sea ice.

  6. River discharge measurements by using helicopter-mounted radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, N.B.; Costa, J.E.; Haeni, F.P.; Cheng, R.T.; Thurman, E.M.; Buursink, M.; Spicer, K.R.; Hayes, E.; Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey and the University of Washington collaborated on a series of initial experiments on the Lewis, Toutle, and Cowlitz Rivers during September 2000 and a detailed experiment on the Cowlitz River during May 2001 to determine the feasibility of using helicopter-mounted radar to measure river discharge. Surface velocities were measured using a pulsed Doppler radar, and river depth was measured using ground-penetrating radar. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities, and horizontal registration of both velocity and depth measurements enabled the calculation of river discharge. The magnitude of the uncertainty in velocity and depth indicate that the method error is in the range of 5 percent. The results of this experiment indicate that helicopter-mounted radar can make the rapid, accurate discharge measurements that are needed in remote locations and during regional floods.

  7. Future Concepts for River Discharge Measurements with Microwave Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, G.; Plant, W. J.; Chickadel, C.; Jessup, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    River discharge has traditionally been estimated by combining in situ measurements of stage with in situ measurements of velocity and channel cross-section to derive stage-discharge rating curves. These measurements are time consuming and resource intensive, and only represent the state of the river at a single location. Thus, various researchers have studied non-contact stream gauging techniques using remote sensing instrumentation to estimate discharge. For example, airborne or space-borne radar has been used to measure surface velocity, and altimetry has been used to measure surface elevation. Other approaches have included coupling remote sensing measurements of water surface elevation and river channel width with a hydrodynamic model to estimate discharge. However, in all of these studies, prior knowledge of either the topology of the river bed or the channel roughness was assumed. This paper examines the potential of microwave radar to measure river discharge. Ultimately, our goal is to relate surface features to subsurface topology, thereby allowing non water-penetrating remote sensing measurements to estimate discharge. Our approach is to use interferometric Doppler radar to measure water elevation and surface velocity over a stretch of the river. If the channel topology is known, then discharge estimates can be computed from these measurements. To monitor changes in the channel, we draw on results from laboratory measurements and numerical simulations that demonstrate that variations in the mean water elevation along the river are related to the subsurface topography of the river bed. If the channel topology is not known, we propose to use a simple hydrodynamic model to estimate the depth. To do this, we compute the slope of the river using the water elevation measurements, and then estimate the pressure gradient in the river from the slope. In the case of steady, unstratified, open channel flow, the pressure gradient is balanced by the bottom stress

  8. Effective Discharge and Annual Sediment Yield on Brazos River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, M.; Salehi, M.; Keyvani, A.; Ma, F.; Strom, K. B.; Raphelt, N.

    2012-12-01

    Geometry of an alluvial river alters dynamically over the time due to the sediment mobilization on the banks and bottom of the river channel in various flow rates. Many researchers tried to define a single representative discharge for these morphological processes such as "bank-full discharge", "effective discharge" and "channel forming discharge". Effective discharge is the flow rate in which, the most sediment load is being carried by water, in a long term period. This project is aimed to develop effective discharge estimates for six gaging stations along the Brazos River from Waco, TX to Rosharon, TX. The project was performed with cooperation of the In-stream Flow Team of the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB). Project objectives are listed as: 1) developing "Flow Duration Curves" for six stations based on mean-daily discharge by downloading the required, additional data from U.S Geological Survey website, 2) developing "Rating Curves" for six gaging stations after sampling and field measurements in three different flow conditions, 3) developing a smooth shaped "Sediment Yield Histogram" with a well distinguished peak as effective discharge. The effective discharge was calculated using two methods of manually and automatic bin selection. The automatic method is based on kernel density approximation. Cross-sectional geometry measurements, particle size distributions and water field samples were processed in the laboratory to obtain the suspended sediment concentration associated with flow rate. Rating curves showed acceptable trends, as the greater flow rate we experienced, the more sediment were carried by water.

  9. An approach to estimating river discharge from space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjerklie, D.M.; Dingman, S.L.; Vorosmarty, C.J.; Bolster, C.H.; Congalton, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple-regression analyses of hydraulic data from more than 1,000 discharge measurements, ranging in magnitude from over 200,000 to less than 1 m3/s, were used to develop generally applicable equations that use potentially observable variables to estimate river discharge using remote sensing techniques. Measurement uncertainty analysis indicates that existing satellite-based sensors can measure water-surface width (or surface area), water-surface elevation, and potentially the surface velocity of rivers with accuracies sufficient to provide estimates of discharge with average uncertainty on the order of 20 percent.

  10. Exploring SWOT discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Yoon, Y.; Rodriguez, E.; Minear, J. T.; Andreadis, K.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Smith, L. C.; Bales, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2019, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will utilize a Ka-band radar interferometer to measure river heights, widths, and slopes, globally, as well as characterize storage change in lakes and ocean surface dynamics with a spatial resolution ranging from 10 - 70 m, with temporal revisits on the order of a week. A discharge algorithm has been formulated to solve the inverse problem of characterizing river bathymetry and the roughness coefficient from SWOT observations. The algorithm uses a Bayesian Markov Chain estimation approach, treats rivers as sets of interconnected reaches (typically 5 km - 10 km in length), and produces best estimates of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge, given SWOT observables. AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) consists of a radar interferometer similar to SWOT, but mounted aboard an aircraft. AirSWOT spatial resolution will range from 1 - 35 m. In early 2013, AirSWOT will perform several flights over the Sacramento River, capturing river height, width, and slope at several different flow conditions. The Sacramento River presents an excellent target given that the river includes some stretches heavily affected by management (diversions, bypasses, etc.). AirSWOT measurements will be used to validate SWOT observation performance, but are also a unique opportunity for testing and demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the discharge algorithm. This study uses HEC-RAS simulations of the Sacramento River to first, characterize expected discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River, and second to explore the required AirSWOT measurements needed to perform a successful inverse with the discharge algorithm. We focus on several specific research questions affecting algorithm performance: 1) To what extent do lateral inflows confound algorithm performance? We examine the ~100 km stretch of river from Colusa, CA to the Yolo Bypass, and investigate how the

  11. Estimating discharge in rivers using remotely sensed hydraulic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjerklie, D.M.; Moller, D.; Smith, L.C.; Dingman, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology to estimate in-bank river discharge exclusively from remotely sensed hydraulic data is developed. Water-surface width and maximum channel width measured from 26 aerial and digital orthophotos of 17 single channel rivers and 41 SAR images of three braided rivers were coupled with channel slope data obtained from topographic maps to estimate the discharge. The standard error of the discharge estimates were within a factor of 1.5-2 (50-100%) of the observed, with the mean estimate accuracy within 10%. This level of accuracy was achieved using calibration functions developed from observed discharge. The calibration functions use reach specific geomorphic variables, the maximum channel width and the channel slope, to predict a correction factor. The calibration functions are related to channel type. Surface velocity and width information, obtained from a single C-band image obtained by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) AirSAR was also used to estimate discharge for a reach of the Missouri River. Without using a calibration function, the estimate accuracy was +72% of the observed discharge, which is within the expected range of uncertainty for the method. However, using the observed velocity to calibrate the initial estimate improved the estimate accuracy to within +10% of the observed. Remotely sensed discharge estimates with accuracies reported in this paper could be useful for regional or continental scale hydrologic studies, or in regions where ground-based data is lacking. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 76 FR 58533 - Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Powder... management activities in the Powder River Coal Production Region. DATES: The RCT meeting will begin at 9...

  13. 78 FR 23951 - Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities: Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities: Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Powder... management activities in the Powder River Coal Production Region. DATES: The RCT meeting will begin at 9...

  14. Arctic River Discharge and Sediment Loads --- an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Overeem, I.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Hudson, B.; Cohen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence suggests that river discharge has been increasing (+10%) over the last 30 years (1977-2007) for most arctic rivers. The peak melt month occurs earlier in the season in 66% of the studied rivers. Cold season flow is also increasing. Satellite discharge estimates, daily, based on microwave radiometry, are now possible from 1998 onwards. Daily river discharge hindcasts over the last 60 years using the water balance model WBMsed at a 10km spatial resolution are now available. The WBMsed model can be used in forecast mode assuming valid input climatology. The challenge here has been the accuracy of sub-polar precipitation grids. While each of these three methods (gauging, orbital sensing, modeling) has temporal and spatial coverage limitations, the combination of all three methods provides for a realistic way forward for estimating local discharge across the pan arctic. Flood inundation products are routinely produced for the pan-arctic using automated mapping algorithms developed by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The determination of artic river sediment loads is less than ideal. Some rivers have only been monitored for a short number of years, and many have not been monitored at all. The WBMsed model is perhaps the best method of estimating the daily sediment flux to the Arctic Ocean, at least for rivers where the mean discharge is greater than 30 m3/s. Additionally there is limited-duration field monitoring by national surveys. New methods are being explored, including back calculating the delivery of sediment to the coastal ocean by plume dimensions observed from space (MODIS, LandSat). These methods have had moderate success when applied to plumes extending in the Greenland fjords. Canada maintains an active circa 7-y satellite program (ArcticNet) to track the Mackenzie discharge during the spring-summer runoff period when turbid river water is apt to flow under and over marginal sea ice in the Beaufort Sea.

  15. Estimating river discharges using multiple remote sensing data sets: an initial attempt for continental river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Sichangi; Wang, Lei; Yang, Kun; Chen, Deliang

    2016-04-01

    Rivers act as a source of fresh water for terrestrial life, yet the discharges are poorly known since the existing direct observations are inadequate and some of them were interrupted or discontinued. Discharge estimates using remote sensing thus has a great potential to supplement the ground observations. There are remote sensing methods established to estimate discharge based on single parameter derived relationship; however, they are limited to specific sections due to its empirical nature. In this study, we propose an innovative method to estimate daily discharges for continental rivers (with at least river channel widths greater than 800m) using two satellite derived parameters. Envisat satellite altimetry and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer (MODIS) data have been used to provide a time series of river stage and effective river width. The derived MODIS and altimetry data are then used to optimize unknown parameters in a modified manning's equation. The in situ measurements are used to derive rating curves and to provide assessments of the estimated results. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values for the estimates are between 0.55 and 0.99, indicating the power of the method and accuracy of the estimations. A comparison with a previously developed empirical multi-variate equation for estimating river discharge shows that this method performs better, especially for large rivers. Further, it is found that discharge estimates using both river effective river width and stage information consistently outperform those using only stage data.

  16. Using MODIS data to estimate river discharge in ungauged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, A.; Brocca, L.; Lacava, T.; Faruolo, M.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2012-04-01

    The discharge prediction at a river site is fundamental for water resources management and flood risk prevention. An accurate discharge estimation depends on local hydraulic conditions which are usually detected by recording water level and carrying out flow measurements, which are costly and sometimes impractical for high flows. Over the last decade, the possibility to obtain river discharge estimates from satellite sensors data has become of considerable interest. For large river basins, the use of satellite data derived by altimeter and microwave sensors, characterized by a daily temporal resolution, has proven to be a useful tool to integrate or even increase the discharge monitoring. For smaller basins, Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) have been usually employed for the indirect estimation of water elevation but their low temporal resolution (from a few days up to 30 days) might be considered not suitable for discharge prediction. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard of Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites, can provide a proper tradeoff between temporal and spatial resolution useful for discharge estimation. It assures, in fact, at least a daily temporal resolution and a spatial resolution up to 250 m in the first two channels. In this study, the capability of MODIS data for discharge prediction is investigated. Specifically, the different spectral behavior of water and land in the Near Infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (MODIS channel 2) is exploited by computing the ratio of the MODIS channel 2 reflectance values between two pixels located within and outside the river. Values of such a ratio should increase when more water and, hence, discharge, is present. Time series of daily water level, velocity and discharge between 2002 and 2010 measured at different gauging stations located along the Upper Tiber River (central Italy) and the Po River (North Italy), as well as MODIS channel 2 data for

  17. Channel changes of Powder River between Moorhead and Broadus, Montana, 1939-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    Bank erosion and changes in channel width, length, and pattern were determined for the Powder River between Moorhead and Broadus, Montana using maps of the bankfull channel made from aerial photographs taken during 1939, 1954, 1967, 1973, and 1978. Contemporaneous daily mean and peak discharge records from Moorhead provide the hydrologic data used to interpret the measurements. Magnitudes and frequency of flows were determined for each interval of time delimited by photographs. Bank erosion is related to the number of days that mean discharge was equal to or greater than bankfull (1.5-year flood). Mean channel width ranged between 264 ft (1973) and 415 ft (1967). The channel was wider after periods of higher annual peak flows. The channel lengthened between 1939 and 1978, although at least 12 meanders cut off between Moorhead and Broadus. Variable rates of lengthening in the reach reflect the degree of bedrock control in the valley and local variations in valley slope. Data from the Powder River verify the concept of thresholds of channel pattern stability that were demonstrated experimentally. (USGS)

  18. Railroading Powder River style: bigger investments and bigger trains

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-07-15

    The Joint Line, co-owned and operated by Union Pacific and Burlington Norfolk Santa Fe (BNSF) railroads, carried a record 354 million tons of coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin, on 15,000 to 17,000 ton trains. The average haul is almost 1,000 miles. Torrential rainfall and coal dust caused derailment and buckling problems in 2005. The article reports progress in repairing the track and expanding railroad capacity since then. Many are anxious about the railroad's ability to move ever increasing amounts of coal. 3 photos.

  19. River Discharge Estimation Using Imaged Critical Flow Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Grant, G.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of river science applications require remote estimation of discharge. Flow in steep rivers often approach critical flow (Froude number equal to one), as evidenced by trains of standing waves either perpendicular or at a high angle relative to the flow direction. Previous work has demonstrated that where such waves are present, water depth can be estimated without the need for a roughness coefficient such as Manning's n. We extend this prior work to remotely calculate river discharge. The wavelength of standing waves can be measured using high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Velocity can then be calculated from wavelength using the Kennedy wave equation. Assuming critical flow allows depth to be calculated using the modified Froude number equation, and with an additional measurement of imaged river width, river discharge can be computed directly as the product of these three values. We test this approach using high-resolution Google Earth imagery of rivers with standing waves near existing stream gages. We also demonstrate the utility of this approach by extracting a drainage area-to-discharge relationship for a large watershed. There are certain challenges with this approach, the greatest being the need for high resolution (meter-scale or better) imagery to see and measure standing waves. Such waves are also easily confused with wind waves, turbulence or other surface effects. Nevertheless, this approach offers promise for both estimating discharge in places without extensive gage networks, and also estimating discharge in archival imagery. Repeat imaging of the same areas might also be used to construct at-a-station and downstream hydraulic geometry relationships.

  20. Computations of total sediment discharge, Niobrara River near Cody, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, Bruce R.; Hembree, C.H.

    1955-01-01

    A natural chute in the Niobrara River near Cody, Nebr., constricts the flow of the river except at high stages to a narrow channel in which the turbulence is sufficient to suspend nearly the total sediment discharge. Because much of the flow originates in the sandhills area of Nebraska, the water discharge and sediment discharge are relatively uniform. Sediment discharges based on depth-integrated samples at a contracted section in the chute and on streamflow records at a recording gage about 1,900 feet upstream are available for the period from April 1948 to September 1953 but are not given directly as continuous records in this report. Sediment measurements have been made periodically near the gage and at other nearby relatively unconfined sections of the stream for comparison with measurements at the contracted section. Sediment discharge at these relatively unconfined sections was computed from formulas for comparison with measured sediment discharges at the contracted section. A form of the Du Boys formula gave computed tonnages of sediment that were unsatisfactory. Sediment discharges as computed from the Schoklitsch formula agreed well with measured sediment discharges that were low, but they were much too low at measured sediment discharges that were higher. The Straub formula gave computed discharges, presumably of bed material, that were several times larger than measured discharges of sediment coarser than 0.125 millimeter. All three of these formulas gave computed sediment discharges that increased with water discharges much less rapidly than the measured discharges of sediment coarser than 0.125 millimeter. The Einstein procedure when applied to a reach that included 10 defined cross sections gave much better agreement between computed sediment discharge and measured sediment discharge than did anyone of the three other formulas that were used. This procedure does not compute the discharge of sediment that is too small to be found in the stream bed in

  1. Assessing the potential global extent of SWOT river discharge observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Durand, Michael T.; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Beighley, R. Edward; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Allen, George H.; Miller, Zachary F.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its importance as a major element of the global hydrologic cycle, runoff remains poorly constrained except at the largest spatial scales due to limitations of the global stream gauge network and inadequate data sharing. Efforts using remote sensing to infer runoff from discharge estimates are limited by characteristics of present-day sensors. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, a joint project between the United States and France, aims to substantially improve space-based estimates of river discharge. However, the extent of rivers observable by SWOT, likely limited to those wider than 50-100 m, remains unknown. Here, we estimate the extent of SWOT river observability globally using a downstream hydraulic geometry (DHG) approach combining basin areas from the Hydro1k and Hydrosheds elevation products, discharge from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC), and width estimates from a global width-discharge relationship. We do not explicitly consider SWOT-specific errors associated with layover and other phenomena in this analysis, although they have been considered in formulation of the 50-100 m width thresholds. We compare the extent of SWOT-observable rivers with GRDC and USGS gauge datasets, the most complete datasets freely available to the global scientific community. In the continental US, SWOT would match USGS river basin coverage only at large scales (>25,000 km2). Globally, SWOT would substantially improve on GRDC observation extent: SWOT observation of 100 m (50 m) rivers will allow discharge estimation in >60% of 50,000 km2 (10,000 km2) river basins. In contrast, the GRDC observes fewer than 30% (15%) of these basins. SWOT could improve characterization of global runoff processes, especially with a 50 m observability threshold, but in situ gauge data remains essential and must be shared more freely with the international scientific community.

  2. A new river discharge and river temperature climatology data set for the pan-Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitefield, Jonathan; Winsor, Peter; McClelland, James; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Most regional ocean models that use discharge as part of the forcing use relatively coarse river discharge data sets (1°, or ∼110 km) compared to the model resolution (typically 1/4° or less), and do not account for seasonal changes in river water temperature. We introduce a new climatological data set of river discharge and river water temperature with 1/6° grid spacing over the Arctic region (Arctic River Discharge and Temperature; ARDAT), incorporating observations from 30 Arctic rivers. The annual mean discharge for all rivers in ARDAT is 2817 ± 330 km3 yr-1. River water temperatures range between 0 °C in winter to 14.0-17.6 °C in July, leading to a long-term mean monthly heat flux from all rivers of 3.2 ± 0.6 TW, of which 31% is supplied by Alaskan rivers and 69% is supplied by Eurasian rivers. This riverine heat flux is equivalent to 44% of the estimated ocean heat flux associated with the Bering Strait throughflow, but during the spring freshet can be ∼10 times as large, suggesting that heat flux associated with Arctic rivers is an important component of the Arctic heat budget on seasonal time scales. We apply the ARDAT data set to a high-resolution regional ocean-ice model, and compare results to a model integration using a 1° resolution discharge data set. Integrated freshwater content on the Arctic shelves (<200 m) increases by ∼3600 km3 in the ARDAT forced model run compared to the coarser forcing, suggesting that river discharge is contained on the Arctic shelves when forced with the ARDAT data set. Modelled summer heat fluxes over the shelves increase by 8 TW when river water temperature is included, which subsequently reduces basin-wide September sea ice extent by ∼10%. Regional differences are larger, where e.g., sea ice extent on the Beaufort shelf is reduced by ∼36%. Using a non-linear free surface parameterization along with the ARDAT data set, we find an increase in the sea surface height gradient around river mouths

  3. Effects of waste discharges on Mississippi River sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Evans, R. )

    1987-11-01

    Bottom sediments in the Mississippi River at East St. Louis, Illinois, were studied to determine the effect of discharging water treatment wastes into the river. Average quantities of water treated were 30 mgd by the conventional process and 13.5 mgd by hydrotreators. In this plant the principle sources of waste were flocculators, settling basins, clarifiers, and filters. The nature of the wastes was characterized as the suspended solids content of the raw water and the aluminum or iron hydroxide generated by coagulation. Average daily solids released from all filters was 4,180 lb. Waste discharges increased the iron, aluminum, moisture, and organics content of the sediments and changed the particle size distribution of the sediments. Changes were observed at three of the 35 sampling stations. The area of influence was about 100 ft offshore and 3,300 ft downstream of the outfall. Within this affected zone iron and aluminum concentrations increased 3.4- and 8-fold above the background concentrations of 2,490 and 760 mg/liter, respectively. During a waste discharge at normal river flow, sediments consisted of 92% sand, 8% gravel, and no silt and clay. However, at low flow silt and clay were found at two protected stations. This derived from the reintroduction of river silt and clay captured during treatment. No unnatural sludge deposit was found within the area of waste discharge influence. No measurable effects from the discharge were found one week after cleaning of the basins.

  4. Assessment of potential effects of water produced from coalbed natural gas development on macroinvertebrate and algal communities in the Powder River and Tongue River, Wyoming and Montana, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David A.; Hargett, Eric G.; Feldman, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing development of coalbed natural gas in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and Montana led to formation of an interagency aquatic task group to address concerns about the effects of the resulting production water on biological communities in streams of the area. Ecological assessments, made from 2005–08 under the direction of the task group, indicated biological condition of the macroinvertebrate and algal communities in the middle reaches of the Powder was lower than in the upper or lower reaches. On the basis of the 2005–08 results, sampling of the macroinvertebrate and algae communities was conducted at 18 sites on the mainstem Powder River and 6 sites on the mainstem Tongue River in 2010. Sampling-site locations were selected on a paired approach, with sites located upstream and downstream of discharge points and tributaries associated with coalbed natural gas development. Differences in biological condition among site pairs were evaluated graphically and statistically using multiple lines of evidence that included macroinvertebrate and algal community metrics (such as taxa richness, relative abundance, functional feeding groups, and tolerance) and output from observed/expected (O/E) macroinvertebrate models from Wyoming and Montana. Multiple lines of evidence indicated a decline in biological condition in the middle reaches of the Powder River, potentially indicating cumulative effects from coalbed natural gas discharges within one or more reaches between Flying E Creek and Wild Horse Creek in Wyoming. The maximum concentrations of alkalinity in the Powder River also occurred in the middle reaches. Biological condition in the upper and lower reaches of the Powder River was variable, with declines between some site pairs, such as upstream and downstream of Dry Fork and Willow Creek, and increases at others, such as upstream and downstream of Beaver Creek. Biological condition at site pairs on the Tongue River showed an increase in one case

  5. A game theoretic approach for trading discharge permits in rivers.

    PubMed

    Niksokhan, Mohammad Hossein; Kerachian, Reza; Karamouz, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new Cooperative Trading Discharge Permit (CTDP) methodology is designed for estimating equitable and efficient treatment cost allocation among dischargers in a river system considering their conflicting interests. The methodology consists of two main steps: (1) initial treatment cost allocation and (2) equitable treatment cost reallocation. In the first step, a Pareto front among objectives is developed using a powerful and recently developed multi-objective genetic algorithm known as Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II). The objectives of the optimization model are considered to be the average treatment level of dischargers and a fuzzy risk of violating the water quality standards. The fuzzy risk is evaluated using the Monte Carlo analysis. The best non-dominated solution on the Pareto front, which provides the initial cost allocation to dischargers, is selected using the Young Bargaining Theory (YBT). In the second step, some cooperative game theoretic approaches are utilized to investigate how the maximum saving cost of participating dischargers in a coalition can be fairly allocated to them. The final treatment cost allocation provides the optimal trading discharge permit policies. The practical utility of the proposed methodology for river water quality management is illustrated through a realistic case study of the Zarjub river in the northern part of Iran. PMID:19657175

  6. Linking the river to the estuary: influence of river discharge on tidal damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Toffolon, M.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of river discharge on tidal damping in estuaries is explored within one consistent theoretical framework where analytical solutions are obtained by solving four implicit equations, i.e., the phase lag, the scaling, the damping and the celerity equation. In this approach the damping equation is obtained by subtracting the envelope curves of high water and low water occurrence, taking into account that the flow velocity consists of a tidal and river discharge component. Different approximations of the friction term are considered in deriving the damping equation, resulting in as many analytical solutions. In this framework it is possible to show that river discharge affects tidal damping primarily through the friction term. The application to the Modaomen and Yangtze estuaries demonstrates that the influence of river discharge on tidal damping can be significant in the upstream part of an estuary where the ratio of river flow to tidal flow amplitude is substantial. The analytical model is able to describe the main tidal dynamics with realistic roughness values in the upper part of the estuary, while a model with negligible river discharge can be made to fit observations only with unrealistically high roughness values. Moreover, the damping equation can be used to estimate river discharge on the basis of observed tidal damping, which makes the proposed analytical model a tool to obtain indirect information about quantities that are difficult to measure in the tidal region.

  7. Flood discharge measurement of a mountain river - Nanshih River in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.

    2013-05-01

    This study proposes a more efficient method of flood discharge measurement in mountain rivers that accounts for personal safety, accuracy, and reliability. Because it is based on the relationships between mean and maximum velocities and between cross-sectional area and gauge height, the proposed method utilizes a flood discharge measurement system composed of an acoustic Doppler profiler and crane system to measure velocity distributions, cross-sectional area, and water depths. The flood discharge measurement system can be used to accurately and quickly measure flood data that is difficult to be collected by the conventional instruments. The measured data is then used to calibrate the parameters of the proposed method for estimating mean velocity and cross-sectional area. Then these observed discharge and gauge height can be used to establish the water stage-discharge rating curve. Therefor continuous and real-time estimations of flood discharge of a mountain river can become possible. The measurement method and system is applied to the Nanshih River at the Lansheng Bridge. Once the method is established, flood discharge of the Nanshih River could be efficiently estimated using maximum velocity and the water stage. Results of measured and estimated discharges of the Nanshih River at the Lansheng Bridge differed only slightly from each other, demonstrating the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  8. Landscape co-evolution and river discharge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Ype; Temme, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    Fresh water is crucial for society and ecosystems. However, our ability to secure fresh water resources under climatic and anthropogenic change is impaired by the complexity of interactions between human society, ecosystems, soils, and topography. These interactions cause landscape properties to co-evolve, continuously changing the flow paths of water through the landscape. These co-evolution driven flow path changes and their effect on river runoff are, to-date, poorly understood. In this presentation we introduce a spatially distributed landscape evolution model that incorporates growing vegetation and its effect on evapotranspiration, interception, infiltration, soil permeability, groundwater-surface water exchange and erosion. This landscape scale (10km2) model is calibrated to evolve towards well known empirical organising principles such as the Budyko curve and Hacks law under different climate conditions. To understand how positive and negative feedbacks within the model structure form complex landscape patterns of forests and peat bogs that resemble observed landscapes under humid and boreal climates, we analysed the effects of individual processes on the spatial distribution of vegetation and river peak and mean flows. Our results show that especially river peak flows and droughts decrease with increasing evolution of the landscape, which is a result that has direct implications for flood management.

  9. Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger

    2008-09-07

    Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting.In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  10. Constructing river stage-discharge rating curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feifei; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing from satellites and airborne platforms provides valuable data for monitoring and gauging river discharge. One effective approach first estimates river stage from satellite-measured inundation area based on the inundation area-river stage relationship (IARSR), and then the estimated river stage is used to compute river discharge based on the stage-discharge rating (SDR) curve. However, this approach is difficult to implement because of a lack of data for constructing the SDR curves. This study proposes a new method to construct the SDR curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry. The proposed method was tested over a river reach between two USGS gauging stations, i.e., Kingston Mines (KM) and Copperas Creek (CC) along the Illinois River. First a polygon over each of two cross sections was defined. A complete IARSR curve was constructed inside each polygon using digital elevation model (DEM) and river bathymetric data. The constructed IARSR curves were then used to estimate 47 river water surface elevations at each cross section based on 47 river inundation areas estimated from Landsat TM images collected during 1994-2002. The estimated water surface elevations were substituted into an objective function formed by the Bernoulli equation of gradually varied open channel flow. A nonlinear global optimization scheme was applied to solve the Manning's coefficient through minimizing the objective function value. Finally the SDR curve was constructed at the KM site using the solved Manning's coefficient, channel cross sectional geometry and the Manning's equation, and employed to estimate river discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE) in the estimated river discharges against the USGS measured river discharges is 112.4 m3/s. To consider the variation of the Manning's coefficient in the vertical direction, this study also suggested a power-law function to describe the vertical decline of the Manning

  11. Benchmarking wide swath altimetry-based river discharge estimation algorithms for the Ganges river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnema, Matthew G.; Sikder, Safat; Hossain, Faisal; Durand, Michael; Gleason, Colin J.; Bjerklie, David M.

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of three algorithms that estimate discharge from remotely sensed observables (river width, water surface height, and water surface slope) in anticipation of the forthcoming NASA/CNES Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. SWOT promises to provide these measurements simultaneously, and the river discharge algorithms included here are designed to work with these data. Two algorithms were built around Manning's equation, the Metropolis Manning (MetroMan) method, and the Mean Flow and Geomorphology (MFG) method, and one approach uses hydraulic geometry to estimate discharge, the at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG) method. A well-calibrated and ground-truthed hydrodynamic model of the Ganges river system (HEC-RAS) was used as reference for three rivers from the Ganges River Delta: the main stem of Ganges, the Arial-Khan, and the Mohananda Rivers. The high seasonal variability of these rivers due to the Monsoon presented a unique opportunity to thoroughly assess the discharge algorithms in light of typical monsoon regime rivers. It was found that the MFG method provides the most accurate discharge estimations in most cases, with an average relative root-mean-squared error (RRMSE) across all three reaches of 35.5%. It is followed closely by the Metropolis Manning algorithm, with an average RRMSE of 51.5%. However, the MFG method's reliance on knowledge of prior river discharge limits its application on ungauged rivers. In terms of input data requirement at ungauged regions with no prior records, the Metropolis Manning algorithm provides a more practical alternative over a region that is lacking in historical observations as the algorithm requires less ancillary data. The AMHG algorithm, while requiring the least prior river data, provided the least accurate discharge measurements with an average wet and dry season RRMSE of 79.8% and 119.1%, respectively, across all rivers studied. This poor

  12. Linking the river to the estuary: influence of river discharge on tidal damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Toffolon, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of river discharge on tidal damping in estuaries is explored within one consistent theoretical framework where analytical solutions are obtained by solving four implicit equations, i.e. the phase lag, the scaling, the damping and the celerity equation. In this approach the damping equation is obtained by subtracting the envelope curves of high water and low water occurrence, taking into account that the flow velocity consists of a tidal and river discharge component. Different approximations of the friction term are considered in deriving the damping equation, resulting in as many analytical solutions. In this framework it is possible to show that river discharge affects tidal damping primarily through the friction term. It appears that the residual slope, due to nonlinear friction, can have a substantial influence on tidal wave propagation when including the effect of river discharge. An iterative analytical method is proposed to include this effect, which significantly improved model performance in the upper reaches of an estuary. The application to the Modaomen and Yangtze estuaries demonstrates that the proposed analytical model is able to describe the main tidal dynamics with realistic roughness values in the upper part of the estuary where the ratio of river flow to tidal flow amplitude is substantial, while a model with negligible river discharge can be made to fit observations only with unrealistically high roughness values.

  13. Incorporating safety into surface haulage in the Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, W.; Jennings, C.

    1996-12-31

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) coal deposit extends from southeast Montana to northeast Wyoming. This paper describes a number of haulage practices and tools in use at several mines of the southern PRB and the way in which safety has been designed into and implemented for surface haulage of coal and overburden. Experiences described herein focus on the northeastern corner of Wyoming. All the mines in this area rely on safe and efficient movement of enormous volumes of material, and the results achieved in safety underscore the planning and attention to detail present in the PRB. There are currently 12 large surface mines (those greater than 10.0MM tons/year) operating in this area. In 1995, these mines produced over 230.0MM tons of coal.

  14. Interplay between river discharge and tides in a delta distributary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Kolker, Alexander S.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    The hydrodynamics of distributary channels has tremendous impact on nutrient and dissolved oxygen circulation, transport of sediments, and delta formation and evolution; yet many processes acting at the river-marine interface of a delta are poorly understood. This paper investigates the combined effect of river hydrograph and micro-tides on the hydrodynamics of a delta distributary. As the ratio between river flow to tidal flow increases, tidal flood duration at the distributary mouth decreases, up to the point when flow reversal is absent. Field measurements in a distributary of the Apalachicola Delta, Florida, USA, reveal that, once the flow becomes unidirectional, high-discharge events magnify tidal velocity amplitudes. On the contrary, while the flow is bidirectional, increasing fluvial discharge decreases tidal velocity amplitudes down to a minimum value, reached at the limit between bidirectional and unidirectional flow. Due to the different response of the system to tides, the transition from a bidirectional to a unidirectional flow triggers a change in phase lag between high water and high water slack. In the presence of high riverine flow, tidal dynamics also promote seaward directed Eulerian residual currents. During discharge peaks, these residual currents almost double mean velocity values. Our results show that, even in micro-tidal environments, tides strongly impact distributary hydrodynamics during both high and low fluvial discharge regimes.

  15. Study of Ground-Water Recharge Rates in the Northern Powder River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. W.; Bartos, T. T.

    2003-12-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) production in the Powder River Basin is growing rapidly. The Bureau of Land Management estimates that by the year 2010 there may be as many as 50,000 producing wells in the Wyoming part of the Basin alone. Development of CBM requires the pumping of water from coal seams. As water pressure in the seam is lowered, methane is released from storage. The pumped water is usually discharged into streams, channels, or impoundments. With a typical well producing about 48 cubic meters of water per day, the rate of discharge for the Basin could exceed 2.4 million cubic meters per day by 2010. The fate of that water and its impact on the environment are topics of some concern. Relevant issues include the rate at which water infiltrates and percolates to the water table, the eventual discharge of infiltrated water to surface water, and chemical changes that occur as water moves through the system. An adequate understanding of these issues requires knowledge of local and regional hydrology. This study is investigating rates of ground-water recharge under natural conditions and as impacted be CBM development. Natural recharge within the Powder River Basin occurs by both diffuse mechanisms (infiltration of precipitation and subsequent travel of water through the unsaturated zone to the water table) and focused mechanisms (infiltration from line and point sources, such as streams and ponds). Under natural conditions, the relative importance of each is difficult to assess. Discharged CBM water should substantially enhance the rate of focused recharge, with less effect expected on diffuse recharge. Objectives of this study are to estimate rates of diffuse recharge, naturally occurring focused recharge, and enhanced focused recharge due to the discharge of CBM water. Multiple approaches are being employed: chloride mass balance; tracer methods based on tritium, stable isotopes, and other compounds; Darcy/unit hydraulic gradient; water budget; water

  16. Invasive species and coal bed methane development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergquist, E.; Evangelista, P.; Stohlgren, T.J.; Alley, N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the fastest growing areas of natural gas production is coal bed methane (CBM) due to the large monetary returns and increased demand for energy from consumers. The Powder River Basin, Wyoming is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of CBM development with projections of the establishment of up to 50,000 wells. CBM disturbances may make the native ecosystem more susceptible to invasion by non-native species, but there are few studies that have been conducted on the environmental impacts of this type of resource extraction. To evaluate the potential effects of CBM development on native plant species distribution and patterns of non-native plant invasion, 36 modified Forest Inventory and Analysis plots (each comprised of four 168-m2 subplots) were established in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. There were 73 168-m2 subplots on control sites; 42 subplots on secondary disturbances; 14 on major surface disturbances; eight on well pads; and seven on sites downslope of CBM wells water discharge points. Native plant species cover ranged from 39.5 ?? 2.7% (mean ?? 1 SE) in the secondary disturbance subplots to 17.7 ?? 7.5% in the pad subplots. Non-native plant species cover ranged from 31.0 ?? 8.4% in the discharge areas to 14.7 ?? 8.9% in the pad subplots. The control subplots had significantly less non-native species richness than the combined disturbance types. The combined disturbance subplots had significantly greater soil salinity than the control sites. These results suggest that CBM development and associated disturbances may facilitate the establishment of non-native plants. Future research and management decisions should consider the accumulative landscape-scale effects of CBM development on preserving native plant diversity. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  17. Impact of Precipitation Organization on River Discharge Across North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenbach, T. M.; Zarzar, C. M.; Nieto Ferreira, R.

    2014-12-01

    This study builds from an existing four-year NEXRAD radar-based precipitation climatology over the southeastern U.S. to examine the hydrological response of river systems in North Carolina to different modes of precipitation organization in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) framework. The climatology uses a simple two-category framework of precipitation organization based on instantaneous precipitating feature size: mesoscale precipitation features (MPF) and isolated precipitation. Specifically, the following questions are addressed: First, what are the discharge response characteristics to seasonal changes in precipitation in different watersheds across North Carolina, from the mountains to the coastal plain? Second, how does precipitation organization, whether long-lasting mesoscale systems or short duration isolated convection, affect these watershed characteristics? This analysis defines five watersheds in North Carolina based on five North Carolina river basins using GIS watershed delineation techniques. It was found that lag time between maximum precipitation and maximum discharge increased from 1-2 days in the western mountainous watersheds to 7-8 days in the eastern coastal plain watersheds. The steeper and more impervious western watersheds promoted more rapid discharge of precipitation, while the flat and swampy eastern watersheds drained more slowly. Precipitation originating from MPF events produced stronger precipitation-discharge correlations in the winter and fall than in the summer and spring, while most isolated precipitation-discharge correlations were relatively weak. Overall, it was found that MPF precipitation is the main mode of precipitation organization that drives daily watershed discharge, and differences in watershed precipitation-discharge lag times can be best explained by the watershed characteristics rather than differences in precipitation organization.

  18. Estimating the bankfull velocity and discharge for rivers using remotely sensed river morphology information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjerklie, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    A method to estimate the bankfull velocity and discharge in rivers that uses the morphological variables of the river channel, including bankfull width, channel slope, and meander length was developed and tested. Because these variables can be measured remotely from topographic and river alignment information derived from aerial photos and satellite imagery, it is possible that the bankfull state of flow can be estimated for rivers entirely from remotely-sensed information. Defining the bankfull hydraulics of rivers would also provide a reference condition for remote tracking of dynamic variables including width, stage, and slope, and for quantifying relative change in flow conditions of rivers over large regions. This could provide a more efficient method to inventory and quantify river hydraulic attributes and dynamics.

  19. Dissemination of satellite-based river discharge and flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, A. J.; Brakenridge, G. R.; van Praag, E.; de Groeve, T.; Slayback, D. A.; Cohen, S.

    2014-12-01

    In collaboration with NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) daily measures and distributes: 1) river discharges, and 2) near real-time flood extents with a global coverage. Satellite-based passive microwave sensors and hydrological modeling are utilized to establish 'remote-sensing based discharge stations', and observed time series cover 1998 to the present. The advantages over in-situ gauged discharges are: a) easy access to remote or due to political reasons isolated locations, b) relatively low maintenance costs to maintain a continuous observational record, and c) the capability to obtain measurements during floods, hazardous conditions that often impair or destroy in-situ stations. Two MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites provide global flood extent coverage at a spatial resolution of 250m. Cloud cover hampers flood extent detection; therefore we ingest 6 images (the Terra and Aqua images of each day, for three days), in combination with a cloud shadow filter, to provide daily global flood extent updates. The Flood Observatory has always made it a high priority to visualize and share its data and products through its website. Recent collaborative efforts with e.g. GeoSUR have enhanced accessibility of DFO data. A web map service has been implemented to automatically disseminate geo-referenced flood extent products into client-side GIS software. For example, for Latin America and the Caribbean region, the GeoSUR portal now displays current flood extent maps, which can be integrated and visualized with other relevant geographical data. Furthermore, the flood state of satellite-observed river discharge sites are displayed through the portal as well. Additional efforts include implementing Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to incorporate Water Markup Language (WaterML) data exchange mechanisms to further facilitate the distribution of the satellite

  20. Improving discharge estimates from routine river flow monitoring in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Rene; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) maintains a permanent river gauging network for national hydrological monitoring which includes 263 gauging stations in Sweden. At all these stations, water levels are measured continuously, and discharges are computed through rating curves. The network represents a wide range of environmental settings, different gauging measurement types and gauging frequencies. Gauging frequencies are typically low compared with river gauges in more research-oriented settings, and thus uncertainties in discharges, particularly extremes, can be large. On the other hand, the gauging stations have often been in use for very long, with the oldest measurements dating back to 1900, and at least partly exhibit very stable conditions. Here, we show the variation in gauging stability in the SMHI's gauging network in order to try to identify more error-prone conditions. We investigate how the current, largely subjective, way of updating rating curves influences discharge estimates, and discuss ways forward towards a more objective evaluation of both discharge uncertainty and rating curve updating procedures.

  1. Guidebook to the coal geology of the Powder River coal basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    This survey of Wyoming's Powder River Coal Basin was done in June 1980, with emphasis on coal geology and specifically environments of coal deposition. A geologic map explanation was included. The survey included: (1) the regional depositional framework of the uranium- and coal-bearing Wasatch (Eocene) and Fort Union (Paleocene) Formations, Powder River Basin; (2) the Lake De Smet Coal Seam: the product of active basin-margin sedimentation and tectonics in the Lake De Smet Area, Johnson County, Wyoming, during Eocene Wasatch time; (3) fluvial coal settings of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Clear Creek Area; (4) coal resources of the Powder River Coal basin; (5) survey of chemical and petrographic characteristics of Powder River Basin coals; and (6) the Rawhide Coal Mine, Campbell County, Wyoming. The depositional framework of the Fort Union and Wasach formations is characterized by a northward-flowing intermountain basinal fluvial system. The paleogeographic reconstruction of the fluvial settings of the Tongue River Member deposits in the Powder River-Clear Creek area sugges two important subenvironments of coal accumulation. The thickest and most important coals are found in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and the Eocene Wasatch Formation. Each section was discussed in detail. (DP)

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nucleation and aerosol processing in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: powders production, coatings and filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Jean-Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the production of nano-particles and the processing of particles injected in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges (APED). The mechanisms of formation and the evolution of particles suspended in gases are first presented, with numerical and experimental facilities. Different APED and related properties are then introduced for dc corona, streamer and spark filamentary discharges (FD), as well as for ac filamentary and homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges (DBD). Two mechanisms of particle production are depicted in APED: when FD interact with the surface of electrodes or dielectrics and when filamentary and homogeneous DBD induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The evolution of the so-formed nano-particles, i.e. the growth by coagulation/condensation, the charging and the collection are detailed for each APED, with respect to fine powders production and thin films deposition. Finally, when particles are injected in APED, they undergo interfacial processes. Non-thermal plasmas charge particles for electro-collection and trigger heterogeneous chemical reactions for organic and inorganic films deposition. Heat exchanges in thermal plasmas enable powder purification, shaping, melting for hard coatings and fine powders production by reactive evaporation.

  3. Status report: USGS coal assessment of the Powder River, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luppens, James A.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.; Haacke, Jon E.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: This publication reports on the status of the current coal assessment of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This slide program was presented at the Energy Information Agency's 2006 EIA Energy Outlook and Modeling Conference in Washington, DC, on March 27, 2006. The PRB coal assessment will be the first USGS coal assessment to include estimates of both regional coal resources and reserves for an entire coal basin. Extensive CBM and additional oil and gas development, especially in the Gillette coal field, have provided an unprecedented amount of down-hole geological data. Approximately 10,000 new data points have been added to the PRB database since the last assessment (2002) which will provide a more robust evaluation of the single most productive U.S. coal basin. The Gillette coal field assessment, including the mining economic evaluation, is planned for completion by the end of 2006. The geologic portion of the coal assessment work will shift to the northern and northwestern portions of the PRB before the end of 2006 while the Gillette engineering studies are finalized.

  4. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Brian A.; Sams, James I.; Smith, Bruce D.; Harbert, William

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  5. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D.; Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  6. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D.; Harbert, W.

    2008-01-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated towater salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin. ?? 2008 2008 Society of ExplorationGeophysicists. All rights reserved.

  7. Relief Creation on Molybdenum Plates in Discharges Initiated by Gyrotron Radiation in Metal-Dielectric Powder Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Malakhov, D. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Letunov, A. A.; Petrov, A. E.; Ryabikina, I. G.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Sokolov, A. S.; Smirnov, V. A.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2016-02-01

    We show the possibility of creating a metal microcrystalline relief (micro- and nanosized) on molybdenum plates in a plasma gas-phase discharge initiated by gyrotron radiation in molybdenum-dielectric powder mixtures.

  8. River Discharge Estimation Solely from Satellite Imagery and at-Many-Stations Hydraulic Geometry (AMHG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of river discharge is critically important for water resource management, climate modeling, and improved understanding of the global water cycle, yet discharge is poorly known in much of the world. Remote sensing holds promise to mitigate this gap, yet many current approaches for quantitative retrievals of river discharge require in situ calibration or a priori knowledge of river hydraulics, limiting their utility in unmonitored regions. This talk demonstrates a novel remotely sensed discharge retrieval method that requires no prior knowledge and no ancillary data whatsoever. The approach is enabled by a newly discovered river-specific geomorphic scaling phenomenon, termed at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG), which holds that a river's paired at-a-station hydraulic geometry (AHG) parameters (a and b, c and f, k and m) are log-linearly related along a river. An associated AMHG discharge retrieval method uses only remotely sensed cross sectional river top width as an input to an unconstrained optimization of width-AHG via a genetic algorithm. Using the AMHG approach, we demonstrate successful retrieval of river discharge to within 20-30% of in situ gauge observations for the Mississippi, Athabasca, and Yangtze rivers. Expanding the method to 34 rivers globally, we find that the AMHG discharge retrieval method is sensitive to river morphology, cross sectional geometry, the quality of input widths, and genetic algorithm optimization parameters. These results suggest that the AMHG discharge retrieval method can meaningfully address global discharge knowledge gaps solely from repeat satellite imagery.

  9. 77 FR 71872 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-in Custer, Powder River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.--Rail Construction and Operation--in Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Counties, MT; Extension of Comment Period for the Draft Scope of...

  10. 77 FR 66663 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-in Custer, Powder River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.--Rail Construction and Operation--in Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Counties, MT.; Correction to the Notice of Intent To Prepare...

  11. 77 FR 67863 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-in Custer, Powder River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.--Rail Construction and Operation--in Custer, Powder River and Rosebud Counties, Montana: Update to the Notice of Intent to Prepare...

  12. Effects of river discharge and tidal asymmetry on residual sediment transport and long-term morphodynamics in the river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, J.; He, Q.

    2013-12-01

    The morphodynamics are of ubiquitous importance to the estuarine function with respect to navigation and ecology. This study examines the hydrodynamics, residual sediment transport processes and long-term morphodynamics in the river estuary forced by river discharge and marine tides. We systematically investigated the generation of tidal asymmetry and its modulation by varying river discharges, the interactions between the river discharge and the tides, and the induced residual sediment transport and associated morphodynamic adjustment and then the feedback mechanisms by deploying the Delft3D model in 1D mode. The model shows that the internally generated tidal asymmetry behaves nonlinearly with increasing river discharge. The internal tidal asymmetry is flood dominated in the absence of river discharge and tidal flat. Introduction of a river discharge promotes the overtide generation which reinforces the tidal asymmetry. An increasing river discharge dissipates the tidal energy and damps the tides that the overtide generation is confined in the downstream. A river discharge threshed can be figured out at which the energy transformation from the principle tide (M2) to the overtide (M4) reaches maximum. The tidal averaged residual sediment transport is decomposed into components according to a bed load transport mode. The tidal asymmetry induces a residual sediment transport whose direction is determined by the nature of the tidal asymmetry. The river discharge induces a net seaward residual transport due to enhanced seaward residual current. Moreover, the interaction between the river discharge and tides generates a river-induced asymmetry. The river-induced asymmetry enhances the seaward residual sediment transport to a large degree that it plays a significant role in flushing sediment seaward. The estuarine morphodynamics reach a (quasi-) equilibrium in a time scale of millennia. The morphodynamic equilibrium is characterized by a reducing longitudinal residual

  13. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  14. Moving to the Powder River Basin in search of the American dream

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-03-15

    As the Big Three American automakers cut jobs in Michigan, Wyoming's booming but isolated coal mining industry in the Powder River Basin is trying to lure some of these dissatisfied workers. DRM has attracted workers to the benefaction plant and P & H MinePro Services working on surface mining equipment has been successful, as have Peabody's Powder River coal subsidiary and Kiewitt's Buckshin mine. 2 photos.

  15. Warming Oceans, Phytoplankton, and River Discharge: Implications for Cholera Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Jutla, Antarpreet S.; Akanda, Ali S.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.; Colwell, Rita; Islam, Shafiqul

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton abundance is inversely related to sea surface temperature (SST). However, a positive relationship is observed between SST and phytoplankton abundance in coastal waters of Bay of Bengal. This has led to an assertion that in a warming climate, rise in SST may increase phytoplankton blooms and, therefore, cholera outbreaks. Here, we explain why a positive SST-phytoplankton relationship exists in the Bay of Bengal and the implications of such a relationship on cholera dynamics. We found clear evidence of two independent physical drivers for phytoplankton abundance. The first one is the widely accepted phytoplankton blooming produced by the upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich deep ocean waters. The second, which explains the Bay of Bengal findings, is coastal phytoplankton blooming during high river discharges with terrestrial nutrients. Causal mechanisms should be understood when associating SST with phytoplankton and subsequent cholera outbreaks in regions where freshwater discharge are a predominant mechanism for phytoplankton production. PMID:21813852

  16. Long Term Discharge Estimation for Ogoué River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, F.; Linguet, L.; Calmant, S.

    2014-12-01

    Ogoué river basin is one the last preserved tropical rain forest basin in the world. The river basin covers about 75% of Gabon. Results of a study conducted on wall-to wall forest cover map using Landsat images (Fichet et al., 2014) gave a net forest loss of 0,38% from 1990 and 2000 and sensibly the same loss rate between 2000 and 2010. However, the country launched recently an ambitious development plan, with communication infrastructure, agriculture and forestry as well as mining projects. Hydrological cycle response to changes may be expected, in both quantitative and qualitative aspects. Unfortunately monitoring gauging stations have stopped functioning in the seventies, and Gabon will then be unable to evaluate, mitigate and adapt adequately to these environmental challenges. Historical data were registered during 42 years at Lambaréné (from 1929 to 1974) and during 10 to 20 years at 17 other ground stations. The quantile function approach (Tourian et al., 2013) has been tested to estimate discharge from J2 and ERS/Envisat/AltiKa virtual stations. This is an opportunity to assess long term discharge patterns in order to monitor land use change effects and eventual disturbance in runoff. Figure 1: Ogoué River basin: J2 (red) and ERS/ENVISAT/ALTIKa (purple) virtual stations Fichet, L. V., Sannier, C., Massard Makaga, E. K., Seyler, F. (2013) Assessing the accuracy of forest cover map for 1990, 2000 and 2010 at national scale in Gabon. In press IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote SensingTourian, M. J., Sneeuw, N., & Bárdossy, A. (2013). A quantile function approach to discharge estimation from satellite altimetry (ENVISAT). Water Resources Research, 49(7), 4174-4186. doi:10.1002/wrcr.20348

  17. River discharge reduces reef coral diversity in Palau.

    PubMed

    Golbuu, Yimnang; van Woesik, Robert; Richmond, Robert H; Harrison, Peter; Fabricius, Katharina E

    2011-04-01

    Coral community structure is often governed by a suite of processes that are becoming increasingly influenced by land-use changes and related terrestrial discharges. We studied sites along a watershed gradient to examine both the physical environment and the associated biological communities. Transplanted corals showed no differences in growth rates and mortality along the watershed gradient. However, coral cover, coral richness, and coral colony density increased with increasing distance from the mouth of the bay. There was a negative relationship between coral cover and mean suspended solids concentration. Negative relationships were also found between terrigenous sedimentation rates and the richness of adult and juvenile corals. These results have major implications not only for Pacific islands but for all countries with reef systems downstream of rivers. Land development very often leads to increases in river runoff and suspended solids concentrations that reduce coral cover and coral diversity on adjacent reefs. PMID:21251680

  18. Environmental fate of mercury discharged into the upper Wisconsin River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rada, R.G.; Findley, J.E.; Wiener, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors studied the distribution of Hg in sediments, fish, and crayfish in a 60 km reach of the Upper Wisconsin River that formerly received Hg in discharges from pulp and paper mills. The most heavily contaminated strata of sediments were deposited during the 1950s and early 1960s and buried under subsequent deposits; however, surficial sediments remained substantially enriched at certain sites in 1981. Median concentrations of Hg in surficial sediments, adjusted for grain size, were at least 10-fold greater at the main study area than at an upstream reference site. Total concentrations exceeded 1.0 mu g g super(-1) wet weight in axial muscle tissue in only 2 of 173 fish analyzed from the study area; however, historical comparisons revealed that Hg contamination of fish (common carp Cyprinus carpio and walleye Stizostedion vitreum vitreum ) and crayfish (Orconectes ) in the river had not decreased since the early 1970s.

  19. Retrieving river discharge from SWOT-like data time-series : a sample of rivers types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garambois, Pierre-André; Roux, Hélène; Monnier, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would provide new cartographic measurements of ocean surface and inland water surfaces dynamics, and especially river height, width and slope. The highlight of SWOT will be its almost global coverage and temporal revisits on the order of 1 to 4 times per 22 - days repeat cycle [1]. The estimation of hydraulic parameters from water surface observations is still an open question. Several methods have recently been proposed for retrieving river discharge from SWOT data ([2, 3, 4]). The method introduced by [2] and used in the present study is based on Manning equation. The first step consists in retrieving an equivalent bathymetry profile for a river given one in situ depth measurement and SWOT like data of the water surface, that is to say water elevation, free surface slope and width. From this equivalent bathymetry, the second step consists in solving mass and Manning equation in the least square sense. Nevertheless, for cases where no in situ measurement of water depth is available, it is still possible to solve a system formed by mass and Manning equations in the least square sense (or with other methods such as Bayesian ones, see e.g. [3]). The approach is tested with synthetic data generated from hydraulic models for several river reaches around the world (cf. [5]). We show that a good a priori knowledge of bathymetry and roughness is required for such methods. The identifiability of the roughness geometry couple is also investigated for different space time sampling and hydraulic regimes. Indeed, the knowledge of effective hydraulic representation and limitations might be a cornerstone in identifications of hydraulic or hydrologic variables through data assimilation chains. References [1] E. Rodriguez, "SWOT science requirements document," JPL document, JPL, 2012. [2] P. A. Garambois and J. Monnier, "Inference of river properties from remotly sensed observations of water surface," (minor revisions

  20. Mathematical model for simulating discharges on the Sabine River between Tatum and Ruliff, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neely, Braxtel L.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model for simulating discharges on the Sabine River between Tatum and Ruliff, TX., was developed to evaluate the effects of release schedules on discharges from the Toledo Bend Reservoir compared to discharges under natural conditions. Using the discharge at Tatum, TX., the rainfall over the basin, and the discharge release schedule for the reservoir, discharge hydrographs for the natural and reservoir-controlled conditions can be computed. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Using Cottonwood Dendrochronology to Reconstruct River Discharge and Floodplain Dynamics, Yellowstone River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schook, D. M.; Friedman, J. M.; Rathburn, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Ecosystems and societies worldwide have evolved to depend upon the timing and magnitude of river discharge, and understanding past flows can help guide modern water management. We used tree rings of riparian plains cottonwoods (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) to reconstruct the history of flow variation and channel migration of a 20 km reach of the Yellowstone River in eastern Montana. Dendrochronological flow reconstructions commonly use upland trees, but our study highlights the improved resolution when floodplain trees are integrated into the data set . Our sample of 240 cottonwoods dating back to 1751 permits flow reconstruction of the Yellowstone to before the voyage of Lewis and Clark. Our tree ring series intercorrelation coefficient is 0.58, and the ring width index correlates to annual discharge at R = 0.67. Flow reconstruction indicates that the decades of highest (1820s, 1850s) and lowest (1830s, 1900s) flows all occurred prior to the instrumental record, revealing the value of an extended perspective. Cottonwood age distribution indicates that, like other western rivers, the rate of channel migration on the Yellowstone declined in the 20th century. However, the Yellowstone uniquely lacks mainstem dams and substantial water extractions, revealing the occurrence of hydrological and ecological change on a relatively natural river. Our study reach is the most geomorphically active of the entire 1100 km river between Yellowstone National Park and the Missouri River, but cottonwood age distribution reveals that trees that have established since the 1960s are underrepresented. The lack of younger cottonwood trees is likely caused by a decline in river migration rates, which may be attributed to i) climate change directly leading to a decline in fluvial processes driving river migration, ii) a decoupling in the timing of the snowmelt runoff receding limb and cottonwood seed release, or iii) both. Even on this relatively unmodified river, it appears that

  2. Preliminary analysis for trends in selected water-quality characteristics, Powder River, Montana and Wyoming, water years 1952-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cary, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Selected water-quality data from two streamflow-gaging stations on the Powder River, Montana and Wyoming, were statistically analyzed for trends using the seasonal Kendall test. Data for water years 1952-63 and 1975-85 from the Powder River near Locate, Montana, and water years 1967-68 and 1976-85 from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming, were analyzed. Data for the earlier period near Locate were discharge-weighted monthly mean values, whereas data for the late period near Locate and at Sussex were from periodic samples. For data from water years 1952-63 near Locate, increasing trends were detected in sodium and sodium-adsorption ratio; no trends were detected in specific conductance, hardness, non-carbonate hardness, alkalinity, dissolved solids, or sulfate. For data from water years 1975-85 near Locate, increasing trends were detected in specific conductance, sodium, sodium-adsorption ratio, and chloride; no trends were detected in hardness, noncarbonate hardness, alkalinity, dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, potassium, or sulfate. At Sussex (water years 1967-68 and 1976-85), increasing trends were detected in sodium, sodium-adsorption ratio, and chloride, and a decreasing trend was detected in sulfate. No trends were detected in specific conductance, alkalinity, or dissolved solids. When the 1967-68 data were deleted and the analysis repeated for the 1976-85 data, only sodium-adsorption ratio displayed a significant (increasing) trend. Because the study was exploratory, causes and effects were not considered. The results might have been affected by sample size, number of seasons, heterogeneity, significance level, serial correlation, and data adjustment for changes in discharge. (USGS)

  3. River discharge influences on particulate organic carbon age structure in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, Brad E.; Roe, Kimberly M.; Roberts, Brian J.; Kolker, Alexander S.; Allison, Mead A.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2013-01-01

    Applying ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis to suspended river sediments, we generate radiocarbon (14C) age spectra for particulate organic carbon (POC) from the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system (MARS) to better understand a major river system's role in carbon transport. Ramped pyrolysis 14C analysis generates age distributions of bulk carbon based on thermochemical stability of different organic components. Our results indicate higher proportions of older material in the POC during higher discharge. Ages increase throughout the high-discharge age spectra, indicating that no single component of the POC is responsible for the overall age increases observed. Instead, older material is contributed across the POC age spectrum and unrelated to increased bedload suspension. In this comparison of 2 spring discharges, less than half of the POC transported during higher discharge is less than 1000 14C years in age, constraining of the role of the MARS as a flux of atmospheric CO2 toward longer-term sedimentary sinks in the Mississippi delta and the Gulf of Mexico. The results suggest that delta-building processes benefit disproportionately from high discharge events carrying larger amounts of sediment because these events involve both a higher proportion of millennially-aged carbon from floodplain exchange of POC and a potentially higher proportion of petrogenic carbon (30-530% increase). Overall, an internally consistent picture of PO14C age distributions from a major river system emerges, as differences in space and time are small compared to the range of ages of POC sources in such a large basin.

  4. A new method of quantifying discharge of small rivers into lakes and inland seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchiev, Alexander; Zavialov, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Continental discharge is an important component of the global hydrological cycle, providing the majority of the input part of the ocean water balance. Buoyant inflow usually causes surface density stratification at the large shelf areas, and plays a significant role in physical, chemical, and biological processes there that is especially important for the lakes and inland seas. Although there is a lack of discharge data for most of rivers in a global scale. Regular direct measurements of discharge are performed only for a relatively small number of rivers, generally the biggest ones or ones that flow through densely populated areas. Within this problem an indirect method of assuming a volume of river discharge was developed. The general idea of the method is the following. Firstly, the spatial surface spread of the plume generated by the considered river discharge is identified using high resolution satellite imagery of the coastal zone adjacent to the river estuary. Secondly, a series of numerical simulations of the river runoff spread is performed under various prescribed external forcing conditions which include the discharge rate. Varying forcing conditions we iteratively improve the accordance between simulated and observed river plumes therefore consequentially specifying the value of river discharge. The developed method was applied and validated against in situ date for several rivers feeding the Black Sea. Practical importance of this work consists in the fact, that the suggested method is an alternative for the expensive and laborious direct measurements of the river discharge, which are used nowadays.

  5. Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, T

    2006-10-20

    I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the

  6. Miocene Coral Skeleton Rare Earth Element Patterns Reflect River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Brachert, T. C.; Jochum, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns of modern coral skeletons usually reflect the REE composition of ambient seawater which is characterized by heavy REE enriched relative to light REE with NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized La/Lu ratios of typically <0.4. The REE concentration in coral aragonite is enriched by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude compared to ambient seawater. Here we report trace element data including REE of coral skeletons of Late Miocene age (~9 Ma, Tortonian) from Crete (Eastern Mediterranean). Analyses were done using a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser coupled to an Element2 ICP-MS along the growth axis of the coral skeletons. The profiles show that Ba/Ca ratios have a seasonally induced pattern with high values around the winter months which are identified by δ18O analyses. REE/Ca ratios co-vary with Ba/Ca ratios. Since the Ba/Ca ratio is a proxy used to monitor river discharge, the co-variation suggests the REE/Ca ratio to be a proxy of comparable quality. NASC-normalized REE patterns of the Tortonian corals have negative Ce anomalies like modern corals. However, the Tortonian corals have REE patterns highly enriched in LREE with (La/Lu)N ratios of 4 to 30 which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to modern corals. Al concentrations are low (<10 ppm) and do not correlate with REE concentrations indicating an insignificant fraction of terrigenous material included in the skeleton. Applying distribution coefficients typical for modern corals, the REE composition of the Tortonian ambient water yields (La/Lu)N of about 2 to 16. This range can be explained by binary mixing of modern Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water ((La/Lu)N=0.35, sea surface salinity (SSS) ~38 ‰) with highly LREE-enriched river water ((La/Lu)N >3, salinity ~0.5 ‰) transporting suspended and colloid phases, also highly enriched, especially in LREE, at a ratio of ~9 (seawater):1 (river water). The river water component is considered because paleoenvironmental

  7. Estimating reach-averaged discharge for the River Severn from measurements of river water surface elevation and slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Michael; Neal, Jeffrey; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Smith, Laurence C.; Yoon, Yeosang

    2014-04-01

    An algorithm is presented that calculates a best estimate of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge based on input measurements of river water surface elevation (h) and slope (S) using the Metropolis algorithm in a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme, providing an inverse solution to the diffusive approximation to the shallow water equations. This algorithm has potential application to river h and S measurements from the forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. The algorithm was tested using in situ data as a proxy for satellite measurements along a 22.4 km reach of the River Severn, UK. First, the algorithm was run with gage measurements of h and S during a small, in-bank event in June 2007. Second, the algorithm was run with measurements of h and S estimated from four remote sensing images during a major out-of-bank flood event in July 2007. River width was assumed to be known for both events. Algorithm-derived estimates of river bathymetry were validated using in situ measurements, and estimates of roughness coefficient were compared to those used in an operational hydraulic model. Algorithm-derived estimates of river discharge were evaluated using gaged discharge. For the in-bank event, when lateral inflows from smaller tributaries were assumed to be known, the method provided an accurate discharge estimate (10% RMSE). When lateral inflows were assumed unknown, discharge RMSE increased to 36%. Finally, if just one of the three river reaches was assumed to be have known bathymetry, solutions for bathymetry, roughness and discharge for all three reaches were accurately retrieved, with a corresponding discharge RMSE of 15.6%. For the out-of-bank flood event, the lateral inflows were unknown, and the final discharge RMSE was 19%. These results suggest that it should be possible to estimate river discharge via SWOT observations of river water surface elevation, slope and width.

  8. On the value of satellite-based river discharge and river flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, A. J.; Brakenridge, R.; van Praag, E.; Borrero, S.; Slayback, D. A.; Young, C.; Cohen, S.; Prades, L.; de Groeve, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding is the most common natural hazard worldwide. According to the World Resources Institute, floods impact 21 million people every year and affect the global GDP by $96 billion. Providing accurate flood maps in near-real time (NRT) is critical to their utility to first responders. Also, in times of flooding, river gauging stations on location, if any, are of less use to monitor stage height as an approximation for water surface area, as often the stations themselves get washed out or peak water levels reach much beyond their design measuring capacity. In a joint effort with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the European Commission Joint Research Centre and the University of Alabama, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) measures NRT: 1) river discharges, and 2) water inundation extents, both with a global coverage on a daily basis. Satellite-based passive microwave sensors and hydrological modeling are utilized to establish 'remote-sensing based discharge stations'. Once calibrated, daily discharge time series span from 1998 to the present. Also, the two MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites provide daily floodplain inundation extent with global coverage at a spatial resolution of 250m. DFO's mission is to provide easy access to NRT river and flood data products. Apart from the DFO web portal, several water extent products can be ingested by utilizing a Web Map Service (WMS), such as is established with for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region through the GeoSUR program portal. This effort includes implementing over 100 satellite discharge stations showing in NRT if a river is flooding, normal, or in low flow. New collaborative efforts have resulted in flood hazard maps which display flood extent as well as exceedance probabilities. The record length of our sensors allows mapping the 1.5 year, 5 year and 25 year flood extent. These can provide key information to water management and disaster response entities.

  9. Modelling the fate of the Tijuana River discharge plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ormondt, M.; Terrill, E.; Hibler, L. F.; van Dongeren, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    After rainfall events, the Tijuana River discharges excess runoff into the ocean in a highly turbid plume. The runoff waters contain large suspended solids concentrations, as well as high levels of toxic contaminants, bacteria, and hepatitis and enteroviruses. Public health hazards posed by the effluent often result in beach closures for several kilometers northward along the U.S. shoreline. A Delft3D model has been set up to predict the fate of the Tijuana River plume. The model takes into account the effects of tides, wind, waves, salinity, and temperature stratification. Heat exchange with the atmosphere is also included. The model consists of a relatively coarse outer domain and a high-resolution surf zone domain that are coupled with Domain Decomposition. The offshore boundary conditions are obtained from the larger NCOM SoCal model (operated by the US Navy) that spans the entire Southern California Bight. A number of discharge events are investigated, in which model results are validated against a wide range of field measurements in the San Diego Bight. These include HF Radar surface currents, REMUS tracks, drifter deployments, satellite imagery, as well as current and temperature profile measurements at a number of locations. The model is able to reproduce the observed current and temperature patterns reasonably well. Under calm conditions, the model results suggest that the hydrodynamics in the San Diego Bight are largely governed by internal waves. During rainfall events, which are typically accompanied by strong winds and high waves, wind and wave driven currents become dominant. An analysis will be made of what conditions determine the trapping and mixing of the plume inside the surfzone and/or the propagation of the plume through the breakers and onto the coastal shelf. The model is now also running in operational mode. Three day forecasts are made every 24 hours. This study was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  10. Modelling the impact of wind stress and river discharge on Danshuei River plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, W.-C.; Chen, W.-B.; Cheng, R.T.; Hsu, M.-H.

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent, baroclinic, hydrodynamic and salinity model, UnTRIM, was performed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal sea in northern Taiwan. The model forcing functions consist of tidal elevations along the open boundaries and freshwater inflows from the main stream and major tributaries in the Danshuei River estuarine system. The bottom friction coefficient was adjusted to achieve model calibration and verification in model simulations of barotropic and baroclinic flows. The turbulent diffusivities were ascertained through comparison of simulated salinity time series with observations. The model simulation results are in qualitative agreement with the available field data. The validated model was then used to investigate the influence of wind stress and freshwater discharge on Dasnhuei River plume. As the absence of wind stress, the anticyclonic circulation is prevailed along the north to west coast. The model results reveal when winds are downwelling-favorable, the surface low-salinity waters are flushed out and move to southwest coast. Conversely, large amounts of low-salinity water flushed out the Danshuei River mouth during upwelling-favorable winds, as the buoyancy-driven circulation is reversed. Wind stress and freshwater discharge are shown to control the plume structure. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evapotranspiration rates at selected sites in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenfest, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve sites were chosen for a study of evapotranspiration in the Powder River basin based on variations in topography and plant communities, geographic location, and the availability of groundwater data at the sites. Evapotranspiration rates were estimated from groundwater, meteorological, and vegetation data using the Blaney-Criddle method. Five of the sites were equipped with digital recorders that provided continuous groundwater level data at the sites for the 1978 growing season. Evapotranspiration was estimated monthly during the growing season and ranged from 0 to 3.7 inches per month. Total evapotranspiration rates for the growing season ranged from 8.3 to 14.9 inches. Discharge per mile of stream reach was estimated for three of the sites and ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 cubic foot per second. The well records for the remaining seven sites consisted of monthly, or less frequent, water-level measurements. Evapotranspiration rates estimated for those months for which water-level data were available ranged from 0 to 3.8 inches per month. Only one of these sites had monthly water-level measurements for the entire growing season; a total of 9.7 inches of evapotranspiration was estimated for the growing season at this site. (USGS)

  12. Ecological Assessment of Streams in the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming and Montana, 2005-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.; Wright, P.R.; Edwards, G.P., Jr.; Hargett, E.G.; Feldman, D.L.; Zumberge, J.R.; Dey, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Energy and mineral development, particularly coalbed natural gas development, is proceeding at a rapid pace in the Powder River Structural Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming. Concerns about the potential effects of development led to formation of an interagency working group of primarily Federal and State agencies to address these issues in the PRB in Wyoming and in Montana where similar types of resources exist but are largely undeveloped. Under the direction of the interagency working group, an ecological assessment of streams in the PRB was initiated to determine the current status (2005-06) and to establish a baseline for future monitoring. The ecological assessment components include assessment of stream habitat and riparian zones as well as assessments of macroinvertebrate, algal, and fish communities. All of the components were sampled at 47 sites in the PRB during 2005. A reduced set of components, consisting primarily of macroinvertebrate and fish community assessments, was sampled in 2006. Related ecological data, such as habitat and fish community data collected from selected sites in 2004, also are included in this report. The stream habitat assessment included measurement of channel features, substrate size and embeddedness, riparian vegetation, and reachwide characteristics. The width-to-depth ratio (bankfull width/bankfull depth) tended to be higher at sites on the main-stem Powder River than at sites on the main-stem Tongue River and at sites on tributary streams. The streambed substrate particle size was largest at sites on the main-stem Tongue River and smallest at sites on small tributary streams such as Squirrel Creek and Otter Creek. Total vegetative cover at the ground level, understory, and canopy layers ranged from less than 40 percent at a few sites to more than 90 percent at many of the sites. A bank-stability index indicated that sites in the Tongue River drainage were less at risk of bank failure than sites on the main-stem Powder River

  13. Upstream Satellite Remote Sensing for River Discharge Forecasting: Application to Major Rivers in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopson, Thomas; Hirpa, Feyera; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Webster, Peter J.; De Groeve, Tom; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Restrepo, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    In this work we demonstrate the utility of satellite remote sensing for river discharge nowcasting and forecasting for two major rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra, in southern Asia. Passive microwave sensing of the river and floodplain at more than twenty locations upstream of Hardinge Bridge (Ganges) and Bahadurabad (Brahmaputra) gauging stations are used to: 1) evaluate their use in producing stand-alone river flow nowcasts, and forecasts at 1-15 days lead time; and 2) how they can be combined to improve the skill of an ongoing ensemble weather forecast-based flood forecasting system. The pattern of correlation between upstream satellite data and in situ observations of downstream discharge is used to estimate wave propagation time. This pattern of correlation is combined with a cross-validation method to select the satellite sites that produce the most accurate river discharge estimates in a lagged regression model. The results show that the well-correlated satellite-derived flow (SDF) signals were able to detect the propagation of a river flow wave along both river channels. The daily river discharge (contemporaneous) nowcast produced from the upstream SDFs could be used to provide missing data estimates given its Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of 0.8 for both rivers; and forecasts have considerably better skill than autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model beyond 3-day lead time for Brahmaputra. Due to the expected better accuracy of the SDF for detecting large flows, the forecast error is found to be lower for high flows compared to low flows. Overall, we conclude that satellite-based flow estimates are a useful source of dynamical surface water information in data-scarce regions and that they could be used for model calibration and data assimilation purposes in near-time hydrologic forecast applications. The paper concludes by explore the utility of the SDF's in improving the skill of the existing Climate Forecasting Applications for Bangladesh (CFAB

  14. Water-quality characteristics, including sodium-adsorption ratios, for four sites in the Powder River drainage basin, Wyoming and Montana, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Mason, Jon P.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, monitors streams throughout the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and parts of Montana for potential effects of coalbed natural gas development. Specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios may be larger in coalbed waters than in stream waters that may receive the discharge waters. Therefore, continuous water-quality instruments for specific conductance were installed and discrete water-quality samples were collected to characterize water quality during water years 2001-2004 at four sites in the Powder River drainage basin: Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming; Crazy Woman Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; Clear Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; and Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. During water years 2001-2004, the median specific conductance of 2,270 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius (?S/cm) in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming, was larger than the median specific conductance of 1,930 ?S/cm in discrete samples collected downstream from the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The median specific conductance was smallest in discrete samples from Clear Creek (1,180 ?S/cm), which has a dilution effect on the specific conductance for the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The daily mean specific conductance from continuous water-quality instruments during the irrigation season showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance values for the discrete samples. Dissolved sodium, sodium-adsorption ratios, and dissolved solids generally showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance. The largest median sodium concentration (274 milligrams per liter) and the largest range of sodium-adsorption ratios (3.7 to 21) were measured in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming. Median concentrations of sodium and sodium-adsorption ratios were substantially smaller in Crazy Woman Creek and Clear Creek, which tend to

  15. Terrace aggradation during the 1978 flood on Powder River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Meade, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Flood processes no longer actively increase the planform area of terraces. Instead, lateral erosion decreases the area. However, infrequent extreme floods continue episodic aggradation of terraces surfaces. We quantify this type of evolution of terraces by an extreme flood in May 1978 on Powder River in southeastern Montana. Within an 89-km study reach of the river, we (1) determine a sediment budget for each geomorphic feature, (2) interpret the stratigraphy of the newly deposited sediment, and (3) discuss the essential role of vegetation in the depositional processes. Peak flood discharge was about 930??m3 s- 1, which lasted about eight??days. During this time, the flood transported 8.2??million tons of sediment into and 4.5??million tons out of the study reach. The masses of sediment transferred between features or eroded from one feature and redeposited on the same feature exceeded the mass transported out of the reach. The flood inundated the floodplain and some of the remnants of two terraces along the river. Lateral erosion decreased the planform area of the lower of the two terraces (~ 2.7??m above the riverbed) by 3.2% and that of the higher terrace (~ 3.5??m above the riverbed) by 4.1%. However, overbank aggradation, on average, raised the lower terrace by 0.16??m and the higher terrace by 0.063??m. Vegetation controlled the type, thickness, and stratigraphy of the aggradation on terrace surfaces. Two characteristic overbank deposits were common: coarsening-upward sequences and lee dunes. Grass caused the deposition of the coarsening-upward sequences, which had 0.02 to 0.07??m of mud at the base, and in some cases, the deposits coarsened upwards to coarse sand on the top. Lee dunes, composed of fine and very fine sand, were deposited in the wake zone downstream from the trees. The characteristic morphology of the dunes can be used to estimate some flood variables such as suspended-sediment particle size, minimum depth, and critical shear velocity

  16. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined

  17. Geology and resource appraisal of the Felix coal deposit, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, B.H.; Weaver, J.N.; Boberts, S.B. ); Ming, T.; Shu, L.; Bangzhuo, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Powder River basin in Wyoming and Montana and the Ordos Basin in the Shaanxi Province of China were selected for study as part of Project 6, a joint program for coal basin exploration and analysis between the United States and the People's Republic of China. Some of the largest coal deposits in the world occur in Paleocene and Eocene rocks on the eastern flank of the Powder River basin. The authors report that the Felix coal is small compared to underlying deposits such as the Wyodak coal in upper Paleocene rocks.

  18. Climatic and anthropogenic factors affecting river discharge to the global ocean, 1951-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milliman, John D.; Farnsworth, K.L.; Jones, P.D.; Xu, K.H.; Smith, L.C.

    2008-01-01

    During the last half of the 20th century, cumulative annual discharge from 137 representative rivers (watershed areas ranging from 0.3 to 6300 ?? 103??km2) to the global ocean remained constant, although annual discharge from about one-third of these rivers changed by more than 30%. Discharge trends for many rivers reflected mostly changes in precipitation, primarily in response to short- and longer-term atmospheric-oceanic signals; with the notable exception of the Parana, Mississippi, Niger and Cunene rivers, few of these "normal" rivers experienced significant changes in either discharge or precipitation. Cumulative discharge from many mid-latitude rivers, in contrast, decreased by 60%, reflecting in large part impacts due to damming, irrigation and interbasin water transfers. A number of high-latitude and high-altitude rivers experienced increased discharge despite generally declining precipitation. Poorly constrained meteorological and hydrological data do not seem to explain fully these "excess" rivers; changed seasonality in discharge, decreased storage and/or decreased evapotranspiration also may play important roles. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of beaver ponds on river discharge and sediment deposition along the Chevral River, Ardennes, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyssen, Jan; Frankl, Amaury; Pontzeele, Jolien; De Visscher, Maarten; Billi, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    With the recovery of the European beaver (Castor fiber) and their capacity to engineer fluvial landscapes, questions arise as to how they influence river discharge and sediment transport. The Chevral river (Ardennes, Belgium) contains two beaver dam sequences which appeared in 2004 and count now about 30 dams. Flow discharges and sediment fluxes were measured at the in- and outflow of each dam sequence. Volumes of sediment deposited behind the dams were measured. Between 2004 and 2011, peak flows were topped off, and the magnitude of extreme events decreased. 1710 m³ of sediment were deposited behind the beaver dams, with an average sediment thickness of 25 cm. The thickness of the sediment layer is related to the area of the beaver ponds. Along the stream, beaver pond sediment thickness displayed a sinusoidal deposition pattern, in which ponds with thick sediment layers were preceded by a series of ponds with thinner sediment layers. A downstream textural coarsening in the dam sequences was also observed, probably due to dam failures subsequent to surges. Differences in sediment flux between the in- and outflow at the beaver pond sequence were related to the river hydrograph, with deposition taking place during the rising limbs and slight erosion during the falling limbs. The seven-year-old sequences have filtered 190 tons of sediment out of the Chevral river, which is of the same order of magnitude as the 374 tons measured in pond deposits, with the difference between the values corresponding to beaver excavations (60 tons), inflow from small tributaries, and runoff from the valley flanks. Hydrogeomorphic effects of C. fiber and C. canadensis activity are similar in magnitude. The detailed analysis of changes to hydrology in beaver pond sequences confirms the potential of beavers to contribute to river and wetland restoration and catchment management.

  20. Effect of glow discharge sintering in the properties of a composite material fabricated by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, A.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento Santos, A.; Vera, E.

    2016-02-01

    Composite samples of 316 stainless steel and SiC were produced by powder metallurgy. Starting materials were mixed in different proportions and compacted to 700MPa. Sintering stage was performed by abnormal glow discharge plasma with direct current in an inert atmosphere of argon. The process was conducted at a temperature of 1200°C±5°C with a heating rate of 100°C/min. This work shows, the effectiveness of plasma sintering process to generate the first contacts between particles and to reduce vacancies. This fact is confirmed by comparing green and sintered density of the material. The results of porosity show a decrease after plasma sintering. Wear tests showed the wear mechanisms, noting that at higher SiC contents, the wear resistance decreases due to poor matrix-reinforcement interaction and by the porosity presence which causes matrix-reinforcement sliding.

  1. Sediment and water discharge rates of Turkish Black Sea rivers before and after hydropower dam construction

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.J. )

    1994-06-01

    Presently, the water discharge rate to the Black Sea by Turkish rivers is approximately 41 km[sup 3]/yr. The sediment discharge rate of Turkish rivers to the Black Sea is 28 x 10[sup 6] t/yr. Before construction of the hydroelectric dams, the sediment discharge rate was approximately 70 x 10[sup 6] t/yr. The sharp reduction in sediment load is largely a result of the dams near the mouths of the Yesil Irmak and Kizil Irmak rivers. Before the construction of dams, Turkish rivers contributed approximately one third of the total amount of sediment received by the Black Sea from all surrounding rivers. The life-span of the major reservoirs varies from approximately only one century (Yesil Irmak river reservoirs) to several thousand years (Sakarya river reservoirs). Life-span for the large Altinkaya Dam reservoir is estimated with approximately 500 yr.

  2. Land cover controls on river discharge in Sweden. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Velde, Y.; Vercauteren, N.; Jaramillo, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Destouni, G.; Lyon, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    As humans alter landscape, vegetation, climate and atmospheric composition, changes in the terrestrial water balance and fresh water resources are likely to occur. Understanding how climate, vegetation, humans and hydrology interact is key for accurate projections of future fresh water resources. In this study we focus on forest dominated Sweden where significant changes in climate and increasing human activity have co-occurred during the past 50 years. For 280 catchments in Sweden, we related runoff coefficients and change trends thereof to land-surface characteristics. With these relationships we created average and change trend maps for runoff and evapotranspiration across Sweden. All this information is summarized by plotting water use efficiency (actual evapotranspiration (ET)/precipitation) against energy use efficiency (actual ET/potential ET ) in a Budyko-type framework for areas with unique land cover across Sweden. This plot clearly shows that wetlands tend to have lower water and energy use efficiencies compared to 'open waters', forests and agriculture, and that agriculture and forests have comparable water and energy use efficiencies closest to those of 'open waters'. These results demonstrate how a change in land cover driven by climate change or by humans is likely to alter land-cover-atmosphere interactions, thereby changing both the water and energy balance of catchments. Looking at runoff coefficient change trends during the last 50 years we see that forests tended to become more efficient in using water and energy (i.e. the fractions of water and energy converted into river runoff and heat decreased). As this behavior coincides with an increase in precipitation it signals an acceleration of the hydrological cycle of Swedish forests. In this presentation we will discuss these findings focusing on the impact of forests on river discharges and the implications for future water cycles.

  3. Improved error estimates of a discharge algorithm for remotely sensed river measurements: Test cases on Sacramento and Garonne Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeosang; Garambois, Pierre-André; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Durand, Michael; Roux, Hélène; Beighley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We present an improvement to a previously presented algorithm that used a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for estimating river discharge from remotely sensed observations of river height, width, and slope. We also present an error budget for discharge calculations from the algorithm. The algorithm may be utilized by the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. We present a detailed evaluation of the method using synthetic SWOT-like observations (i.e., SWOT and AirSWOT, an airborne version of SWOT). The algorithm is evaluated using simulated AirSWOT observations over the Sacramento and Garonne Rivers that have differing hydraulic characteristics. The algorithm is also explored using SWOT observations over the Sacramento River. SWOT and AirSWOT height, width, and slope observations are simulated by corrupting the "true" hydraulic modeling results with instrument error. Algorithm discharge root mean square error (RMSE) was 9% for the Sacramento River and 15% for the Garonne River for the AirSWOT case using expected observation error. The discharge uncertainty calculated from Manning's equation was 16.2% and 17.1%, respectively. For the SWOT scenario, the RMSE and uncertainty of the discharge estimate for the Sacramento River were 15% and 16.2%, respectively. A method based on the Kalman filter to correct errors of discharge estimates was shown to improve algorithm performance. From the error budget, the primary source of uncertainty was the a priori uncertainty of bathymetry and roughness parameters. Sensitivity to measurement errors was found to be a function of river characteristics. For example, Steeper Garonne River is less sensitive to slope errors than the flatter Sacramento River.

  4. Spatial patterns of the evolution of the chemical composition and discharge of river water in the Ob River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichev, O. G.; Mazurov, A. K.; Pipko, I. I.; Sergienko, V. I.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of major cations and dissolved organic carbon (Corg) with water of the Ob River and its tributaries along the natural zones within the Ob River basin was calculated, and the contribution of the underground component to the volumes of total discharge of the Ob River basin was estimated. It was demonstrated that the total chemical composition of river water and the geochemical discharge in the Ob River basin were consistent with the zoned hydroclimatic conditions controlling the character and duration of interaction in the water-rock system. It was established that the average ionic discharge of the Ob River increased from 6-7 × 106 t/year near Barnaul to 46-47 × 106 t/year near Salekhard; the discharge of dissolved Corg increased from 0.1 × 106 to 3.8 × 106 t/year. Multiple enrichment of underground waters of the Ob River in dissolved organic matter from the upper to the lower reaches was revealed.

  5. Seasonal forecasting of discharge for the Raccoon River, Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Louise; Villarini, Gabriele; Bradley, Allen; Vecchi, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The state of Iowa (central United States) is regularly afflicted by severe natural hazards such as the 2008/2013 floods and the 2012 drought. To improve preparedness for these catastrophic events and allow Iowans to make more informed decisions about the most suitable water management strategies, we have developed a framework for medium to long range probabilistic seasonal streamflow forecasting for the Raccoon River at Van Meter, a 8900-km2 catchment located in central-western Iowa. Our flow forecasts use statistical models to predict seasonal discharge for low to high flows, with lead forecasting times ranging from one to ten months. Historical measurements of daily discharge are obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Van Meter stream gage, and used to compute quantile time series from minimum to maximum seasonal flow. The model is forced with basin-averaged total seasonal precipitation records from the PRISM Climate Group and annual row crop production acreage from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Services database. For the forecasts, we use corn and soybean production from the previous year (persistence forecast) as a proxy for the impacts of agricultural practices on streamflow. The monthly precipitation forecasts are provided by eight Global Climate Models (GCMs) from the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME), with lead times ranging from 0.5 to 11.5 months, and a resolution of 1 decimal degree. Additionally, precipitation from the month preceding each season is used to characterize antecedent soil moisture conditions. The accuracy of our modelled (1927-2015) and forecasted (2001-2015) discharge values is assessed by comparison with the observed USGS data. We explore the sensitivity of forecast skill over the full range of lead times, flow quantiles, forecast seasons, and with each GCM. Forecast skill is also examined using different formulations of the statistical models, as well as NMME forecast

  6. Modeling Peak Discharge within the Marengo River Watershed: Lessons for Restoration in the Saint Louis River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    To more fully understand the hydrologic condition of the Marengo River Watershed, and to map specific locations most likely to have increased discharge and flow velocity (leading to more erosion and higher sediment loads) we modeled peak discharge for 35 different sub-watersheds ...

  7. Comparison of different automatic adaptive threshold selection techniques for estimating discharge from river width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi, Omid; Javad Tourian, Mohammad; Sneeuw, Nico

    2015-04-01

    The importance of river discharge monitoring is critical for e.g., water resource planning, climate change, hazard monitoring. River discharge has been measured at in situ gauges for more than a century. Despite various attempts, some basins are still ungauged. Moreover, a reduction in the number of worldwide gauging stations increases the interest to employ remote sensing data for river discharge monitoring. Finding an empirical relationship between simultaneous in situ measurements of discharge and river widths derived from satellite imagery has been introduced as a straightforward remote sensing alternative. Classifying water and land in an image is the primary task for defining the river width. Water appears dark in the near infrared and infrared bands in satellite images. As a result low values in the histogram usually represent the water content. In this way, applying a threshold on the image histogram and separating into two different classes is one of the most efficient techniques to build a water mask. Beside its simple definition, finding the appropriate threshold value in each image is the most critical issue. The threshold is variable due to changes in the water level, river extent, atmosphere, sunlight radiation, onboard calibration of the satellite over time. These complexities in water body classification are the main source of error in river width estimation. In this study, we are looking for the most efficient adaptive threshold algorithm to estimate the river discharge. To do this, all cloud free MODIS images coincident with the in situ measurement are collected. Next a number of automatic threshold selection techniques are employed to generate different dynamic water masks. Then, for each of them a separate empirical relationship between river widths and discharge measurements are determined. Through these empirical relationships, we estimate river discharge at the gauge and then validate our results against in situ measurements and also

  8. Structural control on paleovalley development, muddy sandstone, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gustason, E.R.; Wheeler, D.A.; Ryer, T.A.

    1988-07-01

    A subaerial unconformity within the Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone in the Powder River basin developed during a late Albian sea level lowstand and resulted in a markedly rectangular drainage pattern. Numerous right-angle bends and perpendicular confluences of Muddy paleovalleys are believed to reflect syndepositional movement on basement faults and dissolution of salts in the Goose Egg Formation. A detailed subsurface analysis of geophysical logs from closely spaced wells reveals that up to 30 ft of vertical displacement occurred along northwest- and northeast-trending faults prior to and during the development of the subaerial unconformity. An analysis of a high-resolution magnetic survey (NewMag) of the Powder River basin reveals that numerous paleovalleys parallel the boundaries, or basement shear zones, between basement blocks. Small, irregularly shaped, thin intervals of the Permian Goose Egg Formation, which resemble karst topography, also occur along these northwest- and northeast-trending basement faults beneath Muddy paleovalleys. An arcuate Muddy paleovalley located in the northern Powder River basin parallels contours of isopach and trend surface maps of the Goose Egg Formation. These relationships suggest that the location and orientation of Muddy paleovalleys were controlled by a combination of movement along northwest- and northeast-trending faults and syntectonic dissolution of salt within the Goose Egg Formation. Simultaneous dissolution of Goose Egg salts and headward erosion of Muddy paleovalleys along this conjugate fault pattern also indicate that the Powder River basin was influenced by wrench fault tectonics during the late Albian.

  9. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserve base in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, David C.; Luppens, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated in-place resources of 1.07 trillion short tons of coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. Of that total, with a maximum stripping ratio of 10:1, recoverable coal was 162 billion tons. The estimate of economically recoverable resources was 25 billion tons.

  10. Geospatial data for coal beds in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, Scott A.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide geospatial data for various layers and themes in a Geographic Information System (GIS) format for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. In 2015, as part of the U.S. Coal Resources and Reserves Assessment Project, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of coal resources and reserves within the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. This report is supplemental to USGS Professional Paper 1809 and contains GIS data that can be used to view digital layers or themes, including the Tertiary limit of the Powder River Basin boundary, locations of drill holes, clinker, mined coal, land use and technical restrictions, geology, mineral estate ownership, coal thickness, depth to the top of the coal bed (overburden), and coal reliability categories. Larger scale maps may be viewed using the GIS data provided in this report supplemental to the page-size maps provided in USGS Professional Paper 1809. Additionally, these GIS data can be exported to other digital applications as needed by the user. The database used for this report contains a total of 29,928 drill holes, of which 21,393 are in the public domain. The public domain database is linked to the geodatabase in this report so that the user can access the drill-hole data through GIS applications. Results of this report are available at the USGS Energy Resources Program Web site,http://energy.usgs.gov/RegionalStudies/PowderRiverBasin.aspx.

  11. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The proportional and linear relationship between absolute and relative thermal inertia was theoretically evaluated, and a more accurate expression for thermal inertia was proposed. Radiometric and meteorological data from three stations in the Powder River Basin were acquired, as well as 400 miles of low altitude scanner data between July 25-28.

  12. Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2009-01-01

    Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  13. Increasing summer river discharge in southern California, USA, linked to urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Pataki, Diane E.; Liu, Hongxing; Li, Zhaofu; Wu, Qiusheng; Thomas, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    southern California relies heavily on imported water for domestic use. A synthesis of river discharge data in this region reveals that summer (June, July, and August) river discharge in watersheds that have at least 50% urban, suburban, and/or commercial land cover has increased by 250% or more over the past half-century, without any substantial precipitation during these months. Total annual discharge in the Los Angeles River has also increased at levels up to several hundred percent. Three factors likely contribute to our observations: (1) increased groundwater recharge rates from leaking water pipelines, (2) inputs of treated wastewater into streams and rivers, and (3) increased runoff or recharge due to over-irrigation of ornamental landscaping. In the southwestern United States, water importation consumes large amounts of energy and contributes to decline of river flows in source regions. Here we show that water importation also increases river flows in urban areas.

  14. Sensitivity of global river discharges under Holocene and future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Renssen, H.; Ward, P. J.; de Moel, H.; Odada, E.; Bouwer, L. M.; Goosse, H.

    2006-10-01

    A comparative analysis of global river basins shows that some river discharges are more sensitive to future climate change for the coming century than to natural climate variability over the last 9000 years. In these basins (Ganges, Mekong, Volta, Congo, Amazon, Murray-Darling, Rhine, Oder, Yukon) future discharges increase by 6-61%. These changes are of similar magnitude to changes over the last 9000 years. Some rivers (Nile, Syr Darya) experienced strong reductions in discharge over the last 9000 years (17-56%), but show much smaller responses to future warming. The simulation results for the last 9000 years are validated with independent proxy data.

  15. River discharge estimation by using remote sensing data in absence of bathymetry: the Po River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, Angelica; Barbetta, Silvia; Brocca, Luca; Lacava, Teodosio; Faruolo, Mariapia; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    River discharge is an important quantity of the hydrologic cycle and it is essential for both scientific and operational applications related to water resources management and flood risk prevention. The absence of flow measurements along the natural channels and, sometimes, their poor accessibility, contribute to make difficult the discharge estimation. In recent years, also thanks to the increased availability of remote sensing data, the great potential of satellite sensors for discharge estimation has been already demonstrated. In particular, recent advances in radar altimetry technology have improved the accuracy in the water levels monitoring of both large rivers and lakes located in ungauged or poorly gauged inland regions. However, the remote sensing based technologies cannot observe river channel bathymetry below the water surface, limiting their value for estimating river depth and/or discharge. This study focuses on the estimation of discharge by coupling information coming from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and radar altimetry and by using the entropy theory for simulating the river channel bathymetry. Specifically, the MODIS-derived velocity is obtained by exploiting the different behavior of water and land in the Near Infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (MODIS channel 2). The ratio of reflectance values between two pixels located within and outside the river increases with the presence of the water and, hence, with flow velocity. The flow area is then assessed considering the dataset of water surface elevation derived by radar altimetry and the maximum flow velocity derived by MODIS images. Based on the dataset, an optimization method for estimating the lowest river bottom level is applied and the cross-section flow area is assessed considering the bathymetry simulated by maximization of entropy. The procedure is tested by comparing in-situ and satellite-derived discharge data for a gauged river site along the

  16. Verification of 1921 peak discharge at Skagit River near Concrete, Washington, using 2003 peak-discharge data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, M.C.; Kresch, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    The 1921 peak discharge at Skagit River near Concrete, Washington (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station 12194000), was verified using peak-discharge data from the flood of October 21, 2003, the largest flood since 1921. This peak discharge is critical to determining other high discharges at the gaging station and to reliably estimating the 100-year flood, the primary design flood being used in a current flood study of the Skagit River basin. The four largest annual peak discharges of record (1897, 1909, 1917, and 1921) were used to determine the 100-year flood discharge at Skagit River near Concrete. The peak discharge on December 13, 1921, was determined by James E. Stewart of the U.S. Geological Survey using a slope-area measurement and a contracted-opening measurement. An extended stage-discharge rating curve based on the 1921 peak discharge was used to determine the peak discharges of the three other large floods. Any inaccuracy in the 1921 peak discharge also would affect the accuracies of the three other largest peak discharges. The peak discharge of the 1921 flood was recalculated using the cross sections and high-water marks surveyed after the 1921 flood in conjunction with a new estimate of the channel roughness coefficient (n value) based on an n-verification analysis of the peak discharge of the October 21, 2003, flood. The n value used by Stewart for his slope-area measurement of the 1921 flood was 0.033, and the corresponding calculated peak discharge was 240,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Determination of a single definitive water-surface profile for use in the n-verification analysis was precluded because of considerable variation in elevations of surveyed high-water marks from the flood on October 21, 2003. Therefore, n values were determined for two separate water-surface profiles thought to bracket a plausible range of water-surface slopes defined by high-water marks. The n value determined using the flattest plausible slope was 0

  17. Geochemistry of inorganic nitrogen in waters released from coal-bed natural gas production wells in the powder river basin, wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Repert, D.A.; Hart, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    Water originating from coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) production wells typically contains ammonium and is often disposed via discharge to ephemeral channels. A. study conducted in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, documented downstream changes in CBNG water composition, emphasizing nitrogen-cycling processes and the fate of ammonium. Dissolved ammonium concentrations from 19 CBNG discharge points ranged from 95 to 527 ??M. Within specific channels, ammonium concentrations decreased with transport distance, with subsequent increases in nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Removal efficiency, or uptake, of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) varied between channel types. DIN uptake was greater in the gentle-sloped, vegetated channel as compared to the incised, steep, and sparsely vegetated channel and was highly correlated with diel patterns of incident light and dissolved oxygen concentration. In a larger main channel with multiple discharge inputs (n = 13), DIN concentrations were >300 ??M, with pH > 8.5, after 5 km of transport. Ammonium represented 25-30% of the large-channel DIN, and ammonium concentrations remained relatively constant with time, with only a weak diel pattern evident. In July 2003, the average daily large-channel DIN load was 23 kg N day-1 entering the Powder River, an amount which substantially increased the total Powder River DIN load after the channel confluence. These results suggest that CBNG discharge may be an important source of DIN to western watersheds, at least at certain times of the year, and that net oxidation and/or removal is dependent upon the extent of contact with sediment and biomass, type of drainage channel, and time of day. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  18. Geochemistry of Inorganic Nitrogen in Waters Released from Coal-Bed Natural Gas Production Wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Hart, Charles P.

    2009-01-01

    Water originating from coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) production wells typically contains ammonium and is often disposed via discharge to ephemeral channels. A study conducted in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, documented downstream changes in CBNG water composition, emphasizing nitrogen-cycling processes and the fate of ammonium. Dissolved ammonium concentrations from 19 CBNG discharge points ranged from 95 to 527 µM. Within specific channels, ammonium concentrations decreased with transport distance, with subsequent increases in nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Removal efficiency, or uptake, of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) varied between channel types. DIN uptake was greater in the gentle-sloped, vegetated channel as compared to the incised, steep, and sparsely vegetated channel and was highly correlated with diel patterns of incident light and dissolved oxygen concentration. In a larger main channel with multiple discharge inputs (n = 13), DIN concentrations were >300 µM, with pH > 8.5, after 5 km of transport. Ammonium represented 25-30% of the large-channel DIN, and ammonium concentrations remained relatively constant with time, with only a weak diel pattern evident. In July 2003, the average daily large-channel DIN load was 23 kg N day-1 entering the Powder River, an amount which substantially increased the total Powder River DIN load after the channel confluence. These results suggest that CBNG discharge may be an important source of DIN to western watersheds, at least at certain times of the year, and that net oxidation and/or removal is dependent upon the extent of contact with sediment and biomass, type of drainage channel, and time of day.

  19. Effective discharge for sediment transport: the sorting role of river flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Stefano; Sprocati, Riccardo; Frascati, Alessandro; Marani, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The effective discharge is a key concept in geomorphology, river engineering and restoration. It is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Previous empirical, theoretical and numerical studies found the effective discharge to be affected by climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and by streamflow variability. However, the heterogeneity of values observed for the effective discharge challenges a clear understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different catchments and geographic areas is still lacking. This work relates the observed diversity of effective discharge values to the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes. The effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is derived as a function of the empirical exponent of the sediment rating curve and the streamflow variability, resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. The proposed analytic expression helps to disentangle hydrologic and landscape controls on the effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. The framework captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States, and may allow for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different climatic regions.

  20. Air toxics in coal: Distribution and abundance of selected trace elements in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Stanton, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments identified 12 potentially toxic elements, called ``air toxics,`` that may be released during the combustion of coal. The elements identified in the amendments are As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and U (radionuclides). In this study, the distribution and concentration of these elements were examined, on a whole-coal basis, in samples from two cores of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene, Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation), in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The distribution of these elements in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed is also compared to the distribution of the same elements in a correlative coal bed, the Anderson-Dietz 1 coal bed in the Powder River Basin of Montana.

  1. An intercomparison of remote sensing river discharge estimation algorithms from measurements of river height, width, and slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M.; Gleason, C. J.; Garambois, P. A.; Bjerklie, D.; Smith, L. C.; Roux, H.; Rodriguez, E.; Bates, P. D.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Monnier, J.; Chen, X.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Fiset, J.-M.; Flipo, N.; Frasson, R. P. d. M.; Fulton, J.; Goutal, N.; Hossain, F.; Humphries, E.; Minear, J. T.; Mukolwe, M. M.; Neal, J. C.; Ricci, S.; Sanders, B. F.; Schumann, G.; Schubert, J. E.; Vilmin, L.

    2016-06-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission planned for launch in 2020 will map river elevations and inundated area globally for rivers >100 m wide. In advance of this launch, we here evaluated the possibility of estimating discharge in ungauged rivers using synthetic, daily "remote sensing" measurements derived from hydraulic models corrupted with minimal observational errors. Five discharge algorithms were evaluated, as well as the median of the five, for 19 rivers spanning a range of hydraulic and geomorphic conditions. Reliance upon a priori information, and thus applicability to truly ungauged reaches, varied among algorithms: one algorithm employed only global limits on velocity and depth, while the other algorithms relied on globally available prior estimates of discharge. We found at least one algorithm able to estimate instantaneous discharge to within 35% relative root-mean-squared error (RRMSE) on 14/16 nonbraided rivers despite out-of-bank flows, multichannel planforms, and backwater effects. Moreover, we found RRMSE was often dominated by bias; the median standard deviation of relative residuals across the 16 nonbraided rivers was only 12.5%. SWOT discharge algorithm progress is therefore encouraging, yet future efforts should consider incorporating ancillary data or multialgorithm synergy to improve results.

  2. Annual variation in recruitment of freshwater mussels and its relationship with river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Patricia R.; Newton, Teresa; Haro, Roger J.; Zigler, Steven J.; Davis, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Understanding variation in recruitment dynamics of native mussels and its relationship to river discharge will be useful in designing effective management strategies to enhance conservation of this imperilled fauna.

  3. Operational river discharge forecasting in poorly gauged basins: the Kavango River Basin case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, P.; Jensen, I. H.; Guzinski, R.; Bredtoft, G. K. T.; Hansen, S.; Michailovsky, C. I.

    2014-10-01

    Operational probabilistic forecasts of river discharge are essential for effective water resources management. Many studies have addressed this topic using different approaches ranging from purely statistical black-box approaches to physically-based and distributed modelling schemes employing data assimilation techniques. However, few studies have attempted to develop operational probabilistic forecasting approaches for large and poorly gauged river basins. This study is funded by the European Space Agency under the TIGER-NET project. The objective of TIGER-NET is to develop open-source software tools to support integrated water resources management in Africa and to facilitate the use of satellite earth observation data in water management. We present an operational probabilistic forecasting approach which uses public-domain climate forcing data and a hydrologic-hydrodynamic model which is entirely based on open-source software. Data assimilation techniques are used to inform the forecasts with the latest available observations. Forecasts are produced in real time for lead times of 0 to 7 days. The operational probabilistic forecasts are evaluated using a selection of performance statistics and indicators. The forecasting system delivers competitive forecasts for the Kavango River, which are reliable and sharp. Results indicate that the value of the forecasts is greatest for intermediate lead times between 4 and 7 days.

  4. Remote Sensing and River Discharge Forecasting for Major Rivers in South Asia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Hopson, T. M.; Hirpa, F. A.; Brakenridge, G. R.; De-Groeve, T.; Shrestha, K.; Gebremichael, M.; Restrepo, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The South Asia is a flashpoint for natural disasters particularly flooding of the Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra has profound societal impacts for the region and globally. The 2007 Brahmaputra floods affecting India and Bangladesh, the 2008 avulsion of the Kosi River in India, the 2010 flooding of the Indus River in Pakistan and the 2013 Uttarakhand exemplify disasters on scales almost inconceivable elsewhere. Their frequent occurrence of floods combined with large and rapidly growing populations, high levels of poverty and low resilience, exacerbate the impact of the hazards. Mitigation of these devastating hazards are compounded by limited flood forecast capability, lack of rain/gauge measuring stations and forecast use within and outside the country, and transboundary data sharing on natural hazards. Here, we demonstrate the utility of remotely-derived hydrologic and weather products in producing skillful flood forecasting information without reliance on vulnerable in situ data sources. Over the last decade a forecast system has been providing operational probabilistic forecasts of severe flooding of the Brahmaputra and Ganges Rivers in Bangldesh was developed (Hopson and Webster 2010). The system utilizes ECMWF weather forecast uncertainty information and ensemble weather forecasts, rain gauge and satellite-derived precipitation estimates, together with the limited near-real-time river stage observations from Bangladesh. This system has been expanded to Pakistan and has successfully forecast the 2010-2012 flooding (Shrestha and Webster 2013). To overcome the in situ hydrological data problem, recent efforts in parallel with the numerical modeling have utilized microwave satellite remote sensing of river widths to generate operational discharge advective-based forecasts for the Ganges and Brahmaputra. More than twenty remotely locations upstream of Bangldesh were used to produce stand-alone river flow nowcasts and forecasts at 1-15 days lead time. showing that

  5. Instream biological assessment of NPDES point source discharges at the Savannah River Site, 1997-1998

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-28

    The Savannah River Site currently has 33 permitted NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health an Environmental Control to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams.

  6. Tidal impact on the division of river discharge over distributary channels in the Mahakam Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Maximiliano G.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; de Brye, Benjamin; Vermeulen, Bart; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Bifurcations in tidally influenced deltas distribute river discharge over downstream channels, asserting a strong control over terrestrial runoff to the coastal ocean. Whereas the mechanics of river bifurcations is well-understood, junctions in tidal channels have received comparatively little attention in the literature. This paper aims to quantify the tidal impact on subtidal discharge distribution at the bifurcations in the Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The Mahakam Delta is a regular fan-shaped delta, composed of a quasi-symmetric network of rectilinear distributaries and sinuous tidal channels. A depth-averaged version of the unstructured-mesh, finite-element model second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model has been used to simulate the hydrodynamics driven by river discharge and tides in the delta channel network. The model was forced with tides at open sea boundaries and with measured and modeled river discharge at upstream locations. Calibration was performed with water level time series and flow measurements, both spanning a simulation period. Validation was performed by comparing the model results with discharge measurements at the two principal bifurcations in the delta. Results indicate that within 10 to 15 km from the delta apex, the tides alter the river discharge division by about 10% in all bifurcations. The tidal impact increases seaward, with a maximum value of the order of 30%. In general, the effect of tides is to hamper the discharge division that would occur in the case without tides.

  7. Surface Preparation of Powder Metallurgical Tool Steels by Means of Wire Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, Sepehr; Shahabi-Navid, Mehrdad; Nyborg, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The surface of two types of powder metallurgical (PM) tool steels ( i.e., with and without nitrogen) was prepared using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM). From each grade of tool steel, seven surfaces corresponding to one to seven passes of WEDM were prepared. The WEDM process was carried out using a brass wire as electrode and deionized water as dielectric. After each WEDM pass the surface of the tool steels was thoroughly examined. Surface residual stresses were measured by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The measured stresses were found to be of tensile nature. The surface roughness of the WEDM specimens was measured using interference microscopy. The surface roughness as well as the residual stress measurements indicated an insignificant improvement of these parameters after four passes of WEDM. In addition, the formed recast layer was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characterization investigation clearly shows diffusion of copper and zinc from the wire electrode into the work material, even after the final WEDM step. Finally, the importance of eliminating excessive WEDM steps is thoroughly discussed.

  8. IDENTIFYING DISCHARGE ZONES OF ARSENIC IN THE GOOSE RIVER BASIN, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater discharge areas are simulated from water balance modeling and kriging of oxygen isotopes in groundwater within the Goose River basin. Groundwater fluxes of discharge range from -10 cm yr-1 to < -25 cm yr-1 and are associated with areas of elevated arsenic in wells. De...

  9. The effect on river discharge estimation by considering an interaction between land surface process and river routing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorozu, K.; Tachikawa, Y.

    2015-06-01

    There is much research assessing the impact of climate change on the hydrologic cycle. However, it has often focused on a specific hydrologic process, without considering the interaction among hydrologic processes. In this study, a distributed hydrologic model considering the interaction between flow routing and land surface processes was developed, and its effect on river discharge estimation was investigated. The model enables consideration of flow routing, irrigation withdrawal from rivers at paddy fields, crop growth depending on water and energy status, and evapotranspiration based on meteorological, soil water and vegetation status. To examine the effects of hydrologic process interaction on river discharge estimation, a developed model was applied to the Chao Phraya river basin using near surface meteorological data collected by the Japanese Meteorological Research Institute's Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-AGCM3.2S) with TL959 spatial resolution as forcing data. Also, a flow routing model, which was part of the developed model, was applied independently, using surface and subsurface runoff data from the same GCM. In the results, the developed model tended to estimate a smaller river discharge than was estimated by the river routing model, because of the irrigation effect. In contrast, the annual maximum daily discharge calculated by the developed model was 24% greater than that by the flow routing model. It is assumed that surface runoff in the developed model was greater than that in the flow routing model because the soil water content was maintained at a high level through irrigation withdrawal. As for drought discharge, which is defined as the 355th largest daily discharge, the developed model gave a discharge 2.7-fold greater than the flow routing model. It seems that subsurface runoff in the developed model was greater than that in the flow routing model. The results of this study suggest that considering hydrologic interaction in a

  10. Effects of reservoirs on flood discharges in the Kansas and the Missouri River basins, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    The floods of 1993 were of historic magnitude as water in the Missouri and the Mississippi Rivers reached levels that exceeded many of the previous observed maximums. Although large parts of the flood plains of both rivers upstream from St. Louis, Missouri, were inundated, water levels would have been even higher had it not been for the large volume of runoff retained in flood-control reservoirs. Most of the total flood-control storage available upstream from St. Louis is located along the main stem and tributaries of the Missouri River; the largest concentration of reservoirs is located within the Kansas River Basin. The Kansas River Basin accounts for about l0 percent (60,000 square miles) of the drainage area of the Missouri River Basin, and reservoirs control streamflow from 85 percent (50,840 square miles) of the drainage area of the Kansas River Basin. Analyses of flood discharges in the Kansas River indicate that reservoirs reduced flooding along the Kansas and the lower Missouri Rivers. Results of analyses of the 1993 flooding, which include total basin rainfall, peak discharge, and total flood volume on the Kansas River, are compared with analyses of the 1951 flood, which had a similar total volume but a substantially larger peak discharge.

  11. Powder River: data for cross-channel profiles at 22 sites in southeastern Montana from 1975 through 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.; Meade, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Powder River rises in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming and flows northward through a semi-arid landscape in Wyoming and Montana to the Yellowstone River. The river drains an area of 34,700 km2 and has an average discharge of about 500 million m3 y-1 or 16 m3 s-1. This view of the river looking northward, and hence downstream, was taken in October 2012 (see study reach map), about 20 km north of the Wyoming-Montana state line, about 4 km downstream from an operating gaging station at Moorhead, Montana (USGS station number 06324500), and about 80 river km upstream from a discontinued gaging station at Broadus, Montana (USGS station number 06324710). The river is emerging from a narrowly-confined reach, and the valley widens northward, bordered by hills of the coal-bearing Fort Union Formation. The river in this photo is at about bed-full flow (12 m3 s-1, Moody and others, 1999), and several riffles with disturbed water can be seen downstream between smooth glassy reaches of the river. A narrow band (~2-4 m wide) of reddish sedge (Scirpus spp.) grows just above the bed-full level along the edge of water with a wider band of mixed grasses (Agropyron repens, A. pauciflorum, Bromus inermis, Elymus canadenis, Spartina pectinata, and S. cynosoroids), willow (Salix exigua), tamarisk (Tamirix ramosissima) and small cottonwood seedlings and trees (Populus sargentii) on the flood plain. Three terrace levels have been identified along the river (Leopold and Miller, 1954; Moody and Meade, 2008). The first is the Lightning terrace with small cottonwood trees (seen here without leaves) adjacent to the floodplain in the right-center of the photo. The second is the Moorcroft terrace seen best forming the left bank and extending as a flat surface to the left (west) with a few large cottonwood trees still retaining their green leaves. The third is the colluvial Kaycee terrace that grades slowly upwards and meets the hills of the Fort Union Formation. It can be seen on the right side

  12. Modeling the influence of river discharge on salt intrusion and residual circulation in Danshuei River estuary, Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, W.-C.; Chen, W.-B.; Cheng, R.T.; Hsu, M.-H.; Kuo, A.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A 3-D, time-dependent, baroclinic, hydrodynamic and salinity model was implemented and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system and the adjacent coastal sea in Taiwan. The model forcing functions consist of tidal elevations along the open boundaries and freshwater inflows from the main stream and major tributaries in the Danshuei River estuarine system. The bottom friction coefficient was adjusted to achieve model calibration and verification in model simulations of barotropic and baroclinic flows. The turbulent diffusivities were ascertained through comparison of simulated salinity time series with observations. The model simulation results are in qualitative agreement with the available field data. The validated model was then used to investigate the influence of freshwater discharge on residual current and salinity intrusion under different freshwater inflow condition in the Danshuei River estuarine system. The model results reveal that the characteristic two-layered estuarine circulation prevails most of the time at Kuan-Du station near the river mouth. Comparing the estuarine circulation under low- and mean flow conditions, the circulation strengthens during low-flow period and its strength decreases at moderate river discharge. The river discharge is a dominating factor affecting the salinity intrusion in the estuarine system. A correlation between the distance of salt intrusion and freshwater discharge has been established allowing prediction of salt intrusion for different inflow conditions. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SEASONAL VARIATIONS IN RIVER DISCHARGE AND NUTRIENT EXPORT TO A NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variations in dissolved nitrogen and silica loadings were related to seasonal variability in river discharge. Dissolved nutrient concentrations measured weekly at three stations in the Yaquina River, Oregon from 1999 through 2001, and then monthly in 2002 were used as th...

  14. Toward global mapping of river discharge using satellite images and at-many-stations hydraulic geometry.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Colin J; Smith, Laurence C

    2014-04-01

    Rivers provide critical water supply for many human societies and ecosystems, yet global knowledge of their flow rates is poor. We show that useful estimates of absolute river discharge (in cubic meters per second) may be derived solely from satellite images, with no ground-based or a priori information whatsoever. The approach works owing to discovery of a characteristic scaling law uniquely fundamental to natural rivers, here termed a river's at-many-stations hydraulic geometry. A first demonstration using Landsat Thematic Mapper images over three rivers in the United States, Canada, and China yields absolute discharges agreeing to within 20-30% of traditional in situ gauging station measurements and good tracking of flow changes over time. Within such accuracies, the door appears open for quantifying river resources globally with repeat imaging, both retroactively and henceforth into the future, with strong implications for water resource management, food security, ecosystem studies, flood forecasting, and geopolitics. PMID:24639551

  15. Discharge and other hydraulic measurements for characterizing the hydraulics of Lower Congo River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin; Shelton, John M.; Gardiner, Ned; Jackson, P. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The first direct measurements of discharge of the Lower Congo River below Malebo Pool and upstream from Kinganga, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were made in July 2008 using acoustic Doppler current profilers, differential GPS, and echo sounders. These measurements were made in support of research that is attempting to understand the distribution of fish species in the Lower Congo River and reasons for separation of species within this large river. Analyses of these measurements show that the maximum depth in the Lower Congo River was in excess of 200 m and maximum water velocities were greater than 4 m/s. The discharge measured near Luozi, DRC was 35,800 m3/s, and decreased slightly beginning midway through the study. Local bedrock controls seem to have a large effect on the flow in the river, even in reaches without waterfalls and rapids. Dramatic changes in bed topography are evident in transects across the river.

  16. Shovelnose sturgeon spawning in relation to varying discharge treatments in a Missouri River tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodman, B.J.; Guy, C.S.; Camp, S.L.; Gardner, W.M.; Kappenman, K.M.; Webb, M.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Many lotic fish species use natural patterns of variation in discharge and temperature as spawning cues, and these natural patterns are often altered by river regulation. The effects of spring discharge and water temperature variation on the spawning of shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus have not been well documented. From 2006 through 2009, we had the opportunity to study the effects of experimental discharge levels on shovelnose sturgeon spawning in the lower Marias River, a regulated tributary to the Missouri River in Montana. In 2006, shovelnose sturgeon spawned in the Marias River in conjunction with the ascending, peak (134 m3/s) and descending portions of the spring hydrograph and water temperatures from 16°C to 19°C. In 2008, shovelnose sturgeon spawned in conjunction with the peak (118 m3/s) and descending portions of the spring hydrograph and during a prolonged period of increased discharge (28–39 m3/s), coupled with water temperatures from 11°C to 23°C in the lower Marias River. No evidence of shovelnose sturgeon spawning was documented in the lower Marias River in 2007 or 2009 when discharge remained low (14 and 20 m3/s) despite water temperatures suitable and optimal (12°C-24°C) for shovelnose sturgeon embryo development. A similar relationship between shovelnose sturgeon spawning and discharge was observed in the Teton River. These data suggest that discharge must reach a threshold level (28 m3/s) and should be coupled with water temperatures suitable (12°C-24°C) or optimal (16°C-20°C) for shovelnose sturgeon embryo development to provide a spawning cue for shovelnose sturgeon in the lower Marias River.

  17. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy

    2007-09-15

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Simulation of stream discharge and transport of nitrate and selected herbicides in the Mississippi River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Clark, G.M.; Jobson, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Stream discharge and the transport of nitrate, atrazine, and metolachlor in the Mississippi River Basin were simulated using the DAFLOW/BLTM hydrologic model. The simulated domain for stream discharge included river reaches downstream from the following stations in the National Stream Quality Accounting Network: Mississippi River at Clinton, IA; Missouri River at Hermann, MO: Ohio River at Grand Chain, IL: And Arkansas River at Little Rock, AR. Coefficients of hydraulic geometry were calibrated using data from water year 1996; the model was validated by favourable simulation of observed discharges in water years 1992-1994. The transport of nitrate, atrazine, and metolachlor was simulated downstream from the Mississippi River at Thebes, IL, and the Ohio River at Grand Chain. Simulated concentrations compared favourably with observed concentrations at Baton Rouge, LA. Development of this model is a preliminary step in gaining a more quantitative understanding of the sources and fate of nutrients and pesticides delivered from the Mississippi River Basin to the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Simulation of stream discharge and transport of nitrate and selected herbicides in the Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broshears, Robert E.; Clark, Gregory M.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    2001-05-01

    Stream discharge and the transport of nitrate, atrazine, and metolachlor in the Mississippi River Basin were simulated using the DAFLOW/BLTM hydrologic model. The simulated domain for stream discharge included river reaches downstream from the following stations in the National Stream Quality Accounting Network: Mississippi River at Clinton, IA; Missouri River at Hermann, MO; Ohio River at Grand Chain, IL; and Arkansas River at Little Rock, AR. Coefficients of hydraulic geometry were calibrated using data from water year 1996; the model was validated by favourable simulation of observed discharges in water years 1992-1994. The transport of nitrate, atrazine, and metolachlor was simulated downstream from the Mississippi River at Thebes, IL, and the Ohio River at Grand Chain. Simulated concentrations compared favourably with observed concentrations at Baton Rouge, LA. Development of this model is a preliminary step in gaining a more quantitative understanding of the sources and fate of nutrients and pesticides delivered from the Mississippi River Basin to the Gulf of Mexico. Published in 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Southwestern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osmonson, Lee M.; Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 37 coal beds were identified during this assessment, 23 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. The total original coal resource in the Southwestern Powder River Basin assessment area for these 23 coal beds, with no restrictions applied was calculated to be 369 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 341 billion short tons (92.4 percent of the total original resource). Approximately 61 percent are at depths between 1,000 and 2,000 ft, with a modeled price of about $30 per short ton. Therefore, the majority of coal resources in the South-western Powder River Basin assessment area are considered sub-economic.

  1. Parameterization of SURFEX-TOPMODEL river velocity based on instant discharge dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedkov, Nikolay; Artinyan, Eram; Tsarev, Petko

    2016-04-01

    SURFEX-TOPMODEL distributed physical model is used to analyze and forecast stream flow discharges including flash floods occurring in a Mediterranean river basin in Bulgaria. River velocity is one of the parameters that need to be calibrated in order to achieve acceptable representation of peak floods but in the same time to produce a smooth hydrograph during the low flow periods. The coupled model showed great sensibility to the parameter but when focusing to reproduce high peaks low discharge hydrograph presented unrealistic small peaks too. The dependency between the measured instant discharge and mean section velocity was established for the Bulgarian hydrometric stations on rivers using 20 years of direct discharge-velocity measures of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology of Bulgaria. The relationship is used to avoid the calibration of the velocity parameter for the measured cross-sections. It was coded within the model thus permitting dynamical adjustment of the velocity with respect to the computed instant discharge in the river section. We present the results of river flow simulations with the modified parameterization compared to those with the original model for the hydrological year 2014-2015. Keywords: SURFEX-TOP, river speed parameter

  2. High resolution synoptic salinity mapping to identify groundwater--surface water discharges in lowland rivers.

    PubMed

    Pai, Henry; Villamizar, Sandra R; Harmon, Thomas C

    2015-04-21

    Quantifying distributed lateral groundwater contributions to surface water (GW-SW discharges) is a key aspect of tracking nonpoint-source pollution (NPSP) within a watershed. In this study, we characterized distributed GW-SW discharges and associated salt loading using elevated GW specific conductance (SC) as a tracer along a 38 km reach of the Lower Merced River in Central California. High resolution longitudinal surveys for multiple flows (1.3-150 m(3) s(-1)) revealed river SC gradients that mainly decreased with increasing flow, suggesting a dilution effect and/or reduced GW-SW discharges due to hydraulic gradient reductions. However, exceptions occurred (gradients increasing with increasing flow), pointing to complex spatiotemporal influences on GW-SW dynamics. The surveys revealed detailed variability in salinity gradients, from which we estimated distributed GW-SW discharge and salt loading using a simple mixing model. Modeled cumulative GW discharges for two surveys unaffected by ungauged SW discharges were comparable in magnitude to differential gauging-based discharge estimates and prior GW-SW studies along the same river reach. Ungauged lateral inlets and sparse GW data limited the study, and argue for enhancing monitoring efforts. Our approach provides a rapid and economical method for characterizing NPSP for gaining rivers in the context of integrated watershed modeling and management. PMID:25837571

  3. Regional thermal-inertia mapping from an experimental satellite ( Powder River basin, Wyoming).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1982-01-01

    A new experimental satellite has provided, for the first time, thermal data that should be useful in reconnaissance geologic exploration. Thermal inertia, a property of geologic materials, can be mapped from these data by applying an algorithm that has been developed using a new thermal model. A simple registration procedure was used on a pair of day and night images of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, to illustrate the method.-from Author

  4. Spatiotemporal interpolation of discharge across a river network by using synthetic SWOT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Durand, Michael T.; Hossain, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts have sought to estimate river discharge and other surface water-related quantities using spaceborne sensors, with better spatial coverage but worse temporal sampling as compared with in situ measurements. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission will provide river discharge estimates globally from space. However, questions on how to optimally use the spatially distributed but asynchronous satellite observations to generate continuous fields still exist. This paper presents a statistical model (River Kriging-RK), for estimating discharge time series in a river network in the context of the SWOT mission. RK uses discharge estimates at different locations and times to produce a continuous field using spatiotemporal kriging. A key component of RK is the space-time river discharge covariance, which was derived analytically from the diffusive wave approximation of Saint Venant's equations. The RK covariance also accounts for the loss of correlation at confluences. The model performed well in a case study on Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) River system in Bangladesh using synthetic SWOT observations. The correlation model reproduced empirically derived values. RK (R2=0.83) outperformed other kriging-based methods (R2=0.80), as well as a simple time series linear interpolation (R2=0.72). RK was used to combine discharge from SWOT and in situ observations, improving estimates when the latter is included (R2=0.91). The proposed statistical concepts may eventually provide a feasible framework to estimate continuous discharge time series across a river network based on SWOT data, other altimetry missions, and/or in situ data.

  5. Employing Ti nano-powder dielectric to enhance surface characteristics in electrical discharge machining of AISI D2 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashi, Houriyeh; Sarhan, Ahmed A. D.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    Manufacturing components with superior surface characteristics is challenging when electrical discharge machining (EDM) is employed for mass production. The aim of this research is to enhance the characteristics of AISI D2 steel surface machined with EDM through adding Ti nano-powder to dielectric under various machining parameters, including discharge duration (Ton) and peak current (I). Surface roughness profilometer, FESEM and AFM analysis were utilized to reveal the machined surface characteristics in terms of surface roughness, surface morphology and surface micro-defects. Moreover, EDX analysis was performed in order to evaluate the atomic deposition of Ti nano-powder on the surface. The concentration of Ti nano-powder in dielectric was also examined using ESEM and EDX. According to the results, the addition of Ti nano-powder to dielectric notably enhanced the surface morphology and surface roughness at all machining parameters except Ton = 340 μs. Of these parameters, maximum enhancement was observed at Ton = 210 μs, where the material removal rate and average surface roughness improved by ∼69 and ∼35% for peak current of 6 and 12 A, respectively. Elemental analysis signified negligible Ti deposition on the machined surface while the atomic concentration of Ti was increased around the crack areas.

  6. Convective heat discharge of Wood River group of springs in the vicinity of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Mariner, Robert H.; Thompson, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Data sets for spring and stream chemistry are combined to estimate convective heat discharge and discharge anomalous amounts of sodium and chloride for the Wood River group of springs south of Crater Lake. The best estimate of heat discharge is 87 MWt based on chloride inventory; this value is 3-5 times the heat input to Crater Lake itself. Anomalous discharges of sodium and chloride are also larger that into Crater Lake. Difference between the chemical and thermal characteristics of the discharge into Crater Lake and those from the Wood River group of springs suggest that the heat sources for the two systems may be different, although both ultimately related to the volcanic system.

  7. Discharge Estimation Using Satellite Gravity During Flood Seasons at the Óbidos Gauge Station, Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable measurement of river discharge is important for management of water resource and understanding of hydrological cycles particularly associated with global and regional climate changes. Practically, to obtain continuous time series of river discharge, regression analysis of an empirical relationship between accumulated water level and discharge data is used. During wet season, however, the relationship includes more uncertainty due to the difficulty of accurate discharge measurement. This is particularly true for the Amazon River because significant amount of water flows outside river channel during flooding. For an alternative way to estimate river discharge, we use GRACE time-varying gravity measurement from January 2003 to December 2012. We first apply Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) for GRACE time-varying gravity fields in Amazon and successfully isolate gravity signal in the main stream. The EOF time series represents relative river discharge variations without larger uncertainty during flooding season compared to conventional in-situ discharge estimate. Estimates of Amazon River discharge based on GRACE data are very close to those from observed at gauge stations during dry seasons. However, our estimates are larger than in-situ data in high water seasons, and the difference is the maximum at the 2009 flooding. This is probably because in-situ observation underestimates river discharge during wet season due possibly to detoured water in river pathway developed during flooding while GRACE observes integrated water mass variations in river channels.

  8. Hyporheic discharge of river water into fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. )

    1999-12-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawned predominantly in areas of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River where hyporheic water discharged into the river channel. This upwelling water had a dissolved solids content (i.e., specific conductance) indicative of river water and was presumed to have entered highly permeable riverbed substrate at locations upstream of the spawning areas. Hyporheic discharge zones composed of undiluted ground water or areas with little or no upwelling were not used by spawning salmon. Rates of upwelling into spawning areas averaged 1,200 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 784 to 1,665 L?m-2?day-1) as compared to approximately 500 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 303 to 1,159 L?m-2?day-1) in non-spawning areas. Dissolved oxygen content of the hyporheic discharge near salmon spawning areas was about 9 mg?L-1 (+ 0.4 mg?L-1) whereas in non-spawning areas dissolved oxygen values were 7 mg?L-1 (+ 0.9 mg?L-1) or lower. In both cases dissolved oxygen of the river water was higher (11.3+ 0.3 mg?L-1). Physical and chemical gradients between the hyporheic zone and the river may provide cues for adult salmon to locate suitable spawning areas. This information will help fisheries managers to describe the suitability of salmon spawning habitat in large rivers.

  9. Estimated monthly percentile discharges at ungaged sites in the Upper Yellowstone River Basin in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Hull, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Once-monthly streamflow measurements were used to estimate selected percentile discharges on flow-duration curves of monthly mean discharge for 40 ungaged stream sites in the upper Yellowstone River basin in Montana. The estimation technique was a modification of the concurrent-discharge method previously described and used by H.C. Riggs to estimate annual mean discharge. The modified technique is based on the relationship of various mean seasonal discharges to the required discharges on the flow-duration curves. The mean seasonal discharges are estimated from the monthly streamflow measurements, and the percentile discharges are calculated from regression equations. The regression equations, developed from streamflow record at nine gaging stations, indicated a significant log-linear relationship between mean seasonal discharge and various percentile discharges. The technique was tested at two discontinued streamflow-gaging stations; the differences between estimated monthly discharges and those determined from the discharge record ranged from -31 to +27 percent at one site and from -14 to +85 percent at the other. The estimates at one site were unbiased, and the estimates at the other site were consistently larger than the recorded values. Based on the test results, the probable average error of the technique was + or - 30 percent for the 21 sites measured during the first year of the program and + or - 50 percent for the 19 sites measured during the second year. (USGS)

  10. Toward global mapping of river discharge using satellite images and at-many-stations hydraulic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Colin J.; Smith, Laurence C.

    2014-01-01

    Rivers provide critical water supply for many human societies and ecosystems, yet global knowledge of their flow rates is poor. We show that useful estimates of absolute river discharge (in cubic meters per second) may be derived solely from satellite images, with no ground-based or a priori information whatsoever. The approach works owing to discovery of a characteristic scaling law uniquely fundamental to natural rivers, here termed a river’s at-many-stations hydraulic geometry. A first demonstration using Landsat Thematic Mapper images over three rivers in the United States, Canada, and China yields absolute discharges agreeing to within 20–30% of traditional in situ gauging station measurements and good tracking of flow changes over time. Within such accuracies, the door appears open for quantifying river resources globally with repeat imaging, both retroactively and henceforth into the future, with strong implications for water resource management, food security, ecosystem studies, flood forecasting, and geopolitics. PMID:24639551

  11. Sediment discharge into a subsiding Louisiana deltaic estuary through a Mississippi River diversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Swarzenski, C.; Swenson, E.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands of the Mississippi River deltaic plain in southeast Louisiana have been hydrologically isolated from the Mississippi River by containment levees for nearly a century. The ensuing lack of fluvial sediment inputs, combined with natural submergence processes, has contributed to high coastal land loss rates. Controlled river diversions have since been constructed to reconnect the marshes of the deltaic plain with the river. This study examines the impact of a pulsed diversion management plan on sediment discharge into the Breton Sound estuary, in which duplicate 185 m3 s-1-diversions lasting two weeks each were conducted in the spring of 2002 and 2003. Sediment delivery during each pulse was highly variable (11,300-43,800 metric tons), and was greatest during rising limbs of Mississippi River flood events. Overland flow, a necessary transport mechanism for river sediments to reach the subsiding backmarsh regions, was induced only when diversion discharge exceeded 100 m3 s-1. These results indicate that timing and magnitude of diversion events are both important factors governing marsh sediment deposition in the receiving basins of river diversions. Though the diversion serves as the primary source of river sediments to the estuary, the inputs observed here were several orders of magnitude less than historical sediment discharge through crevasses and uncontrolled diversions in the region, and are insufficient to offset present rates of relative sea level rise. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01

    Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can

  13. SANITARY SEWER SYSTEMS - DISCHARGES, NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center (NCREDC) in conjunction with Hobbs, Upchurch & Associates developed the digital Sewer system discharges as mapped by individual system owners as required by contract. The data collected will facilitate planning, siting and impa...

  14. The impact of climate change on river discharges in Eastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Minea, Ionut

    2014-05-01

    Climate changes imply many changes in different socioeconomic and environmental fields. Among the most important impacts are changes in water resources. Long- and mid-term river discharge flow analysis is essential for the effective management of water resources. In this work, the changes in two climatic parameters (temperature and precipitation) and river discharges and the connections between precipitation and river discharges were investigated. Seasonal and annual climatic and hydrological data collected at six weather stations and 17 hydrological stations were employed. The data sets cover 57 years (1950-2006). The modified Mann-Kendall test was used to calculate trends, and the Bravais-Pearson correlation index was chosen to detect the connections between precipitation and river discharge data series. The main findings are as follows: A general increase was identified in all the three parameters. The air temperature data series showed the highest frequency of statistically significant slopes, mainly in annual and spring series. All data series, except the series for winter, showed an increase in precipitation; in winter, a significant decrease in precipitation was observed at most of the stations. The increase in precipitation is reflected in the upward trends of the river discharge flows, as verified by the good Bravais-Pearson correlations, mainly for annual, summer, and autumn series

  15. The impact of climate changes on rivers discharge in Eastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Minea, Ionus

    2015-05-01

    Climate changes imply many changes in different socioeconomic and environmental fields. Among the most important impacts are changes in water resources. Long- and mid-term river discharge flow analysis is essential for the effective management of water resources. In this work, the changes in temperature, precipitation, and river discharges as well as the connections between precipitation and river discharges were investigated. Seasonal and annual climatic and hydrological data collected at 6 weather stations and 17 hydrological stations were employed. The data sets cover 57 years (1950-2006). The modified Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope were used to calculate trends and their slopes, whereas the Bravais-Pearson correlation index was chosen to detect the connections between precipitation and river discharge data series. The main findings are as follows: a general increase was identified in all the three variables; the air temperature data series showed the highest frequency of statistically significant slopes, mainly in annual and spring series; all data series, except the series for winter, showed an increase in precipitation, and in winter, a significant decrease in precipitation was observed at most of the stations. The increase in precipitation is reflected in the upward trends of the river discharge flows, as verified by the good Bravais-Pearson correlations, mainly for annual, summer, and autumn series.

  16. Effect of discharge on the chlorophyll a distribution in the tidally-influenced Potomac River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Woodward, J.W.; Shultz, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    In the tidal Potomac River, high river discharges during the spring are associated with high chlorophyll a concentrations in the following in the following summer, assuming that summertime light and temperature conditions are favorable. Spring floods deliver large loads of particulate N and P to the tidal river. This particulate N and P could be mineralized by bacteria to inorganic N and P and released to the water column where it is available for phytoplankton use during summertime. However, during the study period relatively low concentrations of chlorophyll a (less than 50 ??g l-1 occurred in the tidal river if average monthly discharge during July or August exceeded 200 m3s-1. Discharge and other conditions combined to produce conditions favorable for nuisance levels of chlorophyll a (greater than 100 ??g l-1 approximately one year out of four. Chlorophyll a maxima occurred in the Potomac River transition zone and estuary during late winter (dinoflagellates) and spring (diatoms). Typical seasonal peak concentrations were achieved at discharges as high as 970 m3 s-1, but sustained discharges greater than 1,100 m3 s-1 retarded development. Optimum growth conditions occurred following runoff events of 10 to 15 d duration which produced transit times to the transition zone of 7 to 10 d. Wet years with numerous moderate-sized runoff events, such as 1980, tend to produce greater biomass in the transition zone and estuary than do dry years such as 1981. ?? 1986 Estuarine Research Federation.

  17. Effects of river discharge on hyporheic exchange flows in salmon spawning areas of a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    The flow magnitude and timing from hydroelectric dams in the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States is managed in part for the benefit of salmon. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of current Hells Canyon Dam discharge operations on hydrologic exchange flows between the river and riverbed in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. Interactions between river water and pore water within the upper 1 m of the riverbed were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. The data were recorded at 20 min intervals over a period of 200 days when the mean daily discharge was 218–605 m3 s–1, with hourly stage changes as large as 1.9 m. Differences in head pressure between the river and riverbed were small, often within ±2 cm. Measured temperature gradients in the riverbed indicated significant interactions between the surface and subsurface water. Neither hydraulic nor temperature gradients at most sites were significantly affected by either short- or long-term changes in discharge operations from Hells Canyon Dam. Only 2 out of 14 study sites exhibited acute flux reversals between the river and riverbed resulting from short-term, large magnitude changes in discharge. The findings suggest small-scale piezometric head differences play a minor role in the hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed at the study sites. The processes controlling hydrologic exchange at the study sites are likely to be bedform-induced advective pumping, turbulence at the riverbed surface, and large-scale hydraulic gradients along the longitudinal profile of the riverbed. By incorporating the knowledge of hydrologic exchange processes into water management planning, regional agencies will be better prepared to manage the limited water resources among competing priorities that include salmon recovery, flood control, irrigation supply, hydropower production, and

  18. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon E.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Gunderson, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize geology, coal resources, and coal reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area in southeastern Montana. This report represents the fourth assessment area within the Powder River Basin to be evaluated in the continuing U.S. Geological Survey regional coal assessment program. There are four active coal mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area: the Spring Creek and Decker Mines, both near Decker; the Rosebud Mine, near Colstrip; and the Absaloka Mine, west of Colstrip. During 2011, coal production from these four mines totaled approximately 36 million short tons. A fifth mine, the Big Sky, had significant production from 1969-2003; however, it is no longer in production and has since been reclaimed. Total coal production from all five mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area from 1968 to 2011 was approximately 1.4 billion short tons. The Rosebud/Knobloch coal bed near Colstrip and the Anderson, Dietz 2, and Dietz 3 coal beds near Decker contain the largest deposits of surface minable, low-sulfur, subbituminous coal currently being mined in the assessment area. A total of 26 coal beds were identified during this assessment, 18 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. The total original coal resource in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area for the 18 coal beds assessed was calculated to be 215 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource remaining after subtracting restrictions and areas of burned coal, are about 162 billion short tons. Restrictions included railroads, Federal interstate highways, urban areas, alluvial valley floors, state parks, national forests, and mined-out areas. It was determined that 10 of the 18 coal beds had sufficient areal extent and thickness to be evaluated for recoverable surface resources ([Roland (Baker), Smith, Anderson, Dietz 2, Dietz 3, Canyon, Werner

  19. Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing for Estimation of Groundwater Discharge to a River.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuankun; Liu, Jie; Hu, Yue; Wang, Heshun; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for studying surface water and groundwater interactions have usually been limited to point measurements, such as geochemical sampling and seepage measurement. A new methodology is presented for quantifying groundwater discharge to a river, by using river surface temperature data obtained from airborne thermal infrared remote sensing technology. The Hot Spot Analysis toolkit in ArcGIS was used to calculate the percentage of groundwater discharge to a river relative to the total flow of the river. This methodology was evaluated in the midstream of the Heihe River in the arid and semiarid northwest China. The results show that the percentage of groundwater discharge relative to the total streamflow was as high as 28%, which is in good agreement with the results from previous geochemical studies. The data analysis methodology used in this study is based on the assumption that the river water is fully mixed except in the areas of extremely low flow velocity, which could lead to underestimation of the amount of groundwater discharge. Despite this limitation, this remote sensing-based approach provides an efficient means of quantifying the surface water and groundwater interactions on a regional scale. PMID:26281027

  20. Evolution of cutoffs across meander necks in Powder River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, G.R.; Gay, H.H.; Gay, W.H.; Martinson, H.A.; Meade, R.H.; Moody, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Over a period of several decades, gullies have been observed in various stages of forming, growing and completing the cutoff of meander necks in Powder River. During one episode of overbank flow, water flowing over the down-stream bank of the neck forms a headctu. The headcut migrates up-valley, forming a gully in its wake, until it has traversed the entire neck, cutting off the meander. The river then follows the course of the gully, which is subsequently enlarged as the river develops its new channel. The complete process usually requires several episodes of high water: in only one of the five cases described herein was a meander cutoff initiated and completed during a single large flood.

  1. Projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. C. D.; Sorribas, M.; Melack, J. M.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Bravo, J. M.; Beighley, E.; Forsberg, B. R.; Costa, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and related effects on the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin can have major impacts on human and ecological communities, transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the regional hydrological model MGB-IPH coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model's capability to represent physical processes over the Amazon was demonstrated in previous validation against multi in situ and remotely sensed observations. Future climate projections for the 2070 to 2099 time period were obtained by selecting five climate models from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent Amazon climate. The climate projections present large uncertainty and results from different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes in total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, model projections generally show better agreement with wetter (drier) conditions over western (eastern) portions of the Amazon basin. Results indicate increased mean and maximum river discharge for large rivers draining the Andes in northwestern Amazon, with increased mean and maximum discharge and inundation extent over Peruvian floodplains and Solimões River in western and central Amazonia. Decreased river discharges (mainly in the dry season) are projected for eastern basins, and decreased inundation extent at low water period in the central and lower Amazon.

  2. Estimating river discharge using multiple-tide gauges distributed along a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moftakhari, H. R.; Jay, D. A.; Talke, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimation of freshwater inflow to the ocean from large tidal rivers is vital for water resources management and climate analyses. Discharge gauging stations are typically located beyond the tidal intrusion reach, such that inputs and losses occurring closer to the ocean are not included. Here, we develop a method of estimating river discharge using multiple gauges and time-dependent tidal statistics determined via wavelet analysis. The Multiple-gauge Tidal Discharge Estimate (MTDE) method is developed using data from the Columbia River and Fraser River estuaries and calibrated against river discharge. Next, we evaluate the general applicability of MTDE by testing an idealized two-dimensional numerical model, with a convergent cross-sectional profile, for eighty-one cases in which nondimensional numbers for friction, river flow, and convergence length scale are varied. The simulations suggest that MTDE is applicable to a variety of tidal systems. Model results and data analyses together suggest that MTDE works best with at least three gauges: a reference station near the river mouth, and two upstream gauges that respond strongly to distinct portions of the observed range of flow. The balance between tidal damping and amplifying factors determines the favorable location of the gauges. Compared to previous studies, the MTDE method improves the time resolution of estimates (from 2.5 to <1 week) and is applicable to systems with mixed diurnal/semidiurnal tides. However, model results suggest that tide-induced residual flows such as the Stokes drift may still affect the accuracy of MTDE at seaward locations during periods of low river discharge.

  3. Multi-scale analysis of the fluxes between terrestrial water storage, groundwater, and stream discharge in the Columbia River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal relationships between the measurements of terrestrial water storage (TWS), groundwater, and stream discharge were analyzed at three different scales in the Columbia River Basin (CRB) for water years 2004 - 2012. Our nested watershed approach examined the Snake River ...

  4. Discharge ratings for control gates at Mississippi River Lock and Dam 18, Gladstone, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The water level of the navigation pools on the Mississippi River are maintained by the operation of tainter and roller gates at the locks and dams. Discharge ratings for the gates on Lock and Dam 18, at Gladstone, Illinois, were developed from current meter discharge measurements made in the forebays of the gate structures. Methodology is given to accurately compute the gate openings of the tainter gate. Discharge coefficients, in equations that express discharge as a function of tailwater head , forebay head, and height of gate opening, were determined for conditions of submerged-orifice and free-weir flow. A comparison of the rating discharges with the hydraulic model rating discharges is given for submerged orifice flow for the tainter and roller gates.

  5. Discharge ratings for control gates at Mississippi River lock and dam 17, New Boston, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The water levels of the navigation pools on the Mississippi River are maintained by the operation of tainter and roller gates at the locks and dams. Discharge ratings for the gates on Lock and Dam 17, at New Boston, Illinois, were developed from current meter discharge measurements made in the forebays of the gate structures. Methodology is given to compute the gate openings of the tainter gates accurately. Discharge coefficients , in equations that express discharge as a function of tailwater head, forebay head, and height of gate opening, were determined for conditions of submerged orifice and free weir flow. A comparison of the rating discharges to the hydraulic-model rating discharges is given for submerged orifice flow for the tainter and roller gates.

  6. Discharge ratings for control gates at Mississippi River lock and dam 21, Quincy, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The water levels of the navigation pools on the Mississippi River are maintained by the operation of tainter and roller gates at the locks and dams. Discharge ratings for the gates on Lock and Dam 21, at Quincy, Illinois, were developed from current meter discharge measurements made in the forebays of the gate structures. Methodology is given to compute the gate openings of the tainter gates accurately. Discharge coefficients , in equations that express discharge as a function of tailwater head, forebay head, and height of gate opening, were determined for conditions of submerged orifice and free weir flow. A comparison of the rating discharges to the hydraulic model rating discharges is given for submerged orifice flow for the tainter and roller gates.

  7. Nature of natural gas in anomalously thick coal beds, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Anomalously thick coal beds (as much as 250 ft thick) occur in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River basin, Wyoming. These laterally discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs of fluvial environments. The coal beds include the Anderson-Canyon, Wyodak-Anderson, and Big George zones in the Powder River-Recluse area, Gillette area, and central part of the basin, respectively. The coal resources in these areas are approximately 155 billion short tons. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub 0} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amounts of CO{sub 2} (less than 10%). The methane is isotopically light ({delta}{sup 13}C{sup 1} values of {minus}56.7 to {minus}60.9%). Based on the chemical and isotopic composition of the gases and on the low rank of the coals, the gases are interpreted to be microbial in origin: they were generated by anaerobic bacteria that broke down the coals at low temperatures, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. The adsorbed amounts of methane-rich microbial gas per unit of coal in the Powder River basin are relatively low compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases from other basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource is considered to be large (as much as several trillion cubic feet) because of the vast coal resources.

  8. Quantification of the Beauce's Groundwater contribution to the Loire River discharge using satellite infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalot, E.; Curie, F.; Wawrzyniak, V.; Schomburgk, S.; Piegay, H.; Moatar, F.

    2015-02-01

    Seven Landsat Thermal InfraRed (TIR) images, taken over the period 2000-2010, were used to establish longitudinal temperature profiles of the middle Loire River, where it flows above the Beauce aquifer. Results showed that 75% of the temperature differences, between in situ observations and TIR image based estimations, remained within the ±1 °C interval. The groundwater discharge along the River course was quantified for each identified groundwater catchment areas using a heat budget based on the Loire River temperature variations, estimated from the TIR images. The main discharge area of the Beauce aquifer into the Loire River was located between river kilometers 630 and 650. This result confirms what was obtained using a groundwater budget and spatially locates groundwater input within the Middle sector of the Loire River. According to the heat budgets, groundwater discharge is higher during winter period (13.5 m3 s-1) than during summer (5.3 m3 s-1). Groundwater input is also higher during the flow recession periods of the Loire River.

  9. Predicting the Discharge Rate Contribution of the Binuwang Watershed to the Agos River, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Dakila; Paningbatan, Eduardo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    In 2004, Typhoon Winnie brought torrential rains which triggered massive landslides and floods which devastated the provinces of Infanta, Real and General Nakar in the Philippines. Winnie inflicted USD 111.14 million worth of damage to crops, livestock and infrastructure and left thousands dead or homeless. The Binuwang River is a sub-tributary of the Agos River, but the extent to which it contributes to flooding has not yet been determined. This study measures the depth of the Binuwang River to estimate the discharge rate contribution of the Binuwang River Watershed to the Agos River using an automatic rain gauge recorder and water level loggers set to record at 5-minute intervals. Flood-generating rainfall events were monitored during the onset of Typhoon Nesat (locally called 'Pedring') September 26-27, 2011. The automated rain gauge recorded 227 mm cumulative rainfall over a 6-hour and 41-minute period. It reached a peak rainfall intensity of 17.5 mm per 5-minute interval that generated a discharge height increase of 1.8 m at the monitoring station and a total discharge volume of 99,823 m3 over a 35-hour duration. An 8.81-hour lag time from the peak rainfall to the peak discharge concentration was recorded. A PCRaster-based hydrologic model was used to predict the total discharge hydrograph of the Binuwang River Watershed. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and soil and land use maps were prepared to parameterize the model. The observed and predicted discharge hydrographs were found to be highly correlated. Among the parameters used to calibrate the model hydrologic output, most sensitive are the infiltration saturation coefficient and Manning's roughness coefficient. An increase in the infiltration saturation coefficient resulted in a decreased discharge height, while an increase of Manning's roughness coefficient lengthened the lag time. The predicted discharge volume and height were used to simulate the impact of reforestation and land conversion to cultivated

  10. Orbital forcing of Cretaceous river discharge in tropical Africa and ocean response.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Britta; Flögel, Sascha; Hofmann, Peter; Schulz, Michael; Wagner, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The tropics have been suggested as the drivers of global ocean and atmosphere circulation and biogeochemical cycling during the extreme warmth of the Cretaceous period; but the links between orbital forcing, freshwater runoff and the biogeochemistry of continental margins in extreme greenhouse conditions are not fully understood. Here we present Cretaceous records of geochemical tracers for freshwater runoff obtained from a sediment core off the Ivory Coast that indicate that alternating periods of arid and humid African climate were driven by orbital precession. Our simulations of the precession-driven patterns of river discharge with a global climate model suggest that ocean anoxia and black shale sedimentation were directly caused by high river discharge, and occurred specifically when the northern equinox coincided with perihelion (the minimum distance between the Sun and the Earth). We conclude that, in a warm climate, the oceans off tropical continental margins respond rapidly and sensitively to even modest changes in river discharge. PMID:16148930

  11. Prediction of mean monthly river discharges in Colombia through Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.

    2015-04-01

    The hydro-climatology of Colombia exhibits strong natural variability at a broad range of time scales including: inter-decadal, decadal, inter-annual, annual, intra-annual, intra-seasonal, and diurnal. Diverse applied sectors rely on quantitative predictions of river discharges for operational purposes including hydropower generation, agriculture, human health, fluvial navigation, territorial planning and management, risk preparedness and mitigation, among others. Various methodologies have been used to predict monthly mean river discharges that are based on "Predictive Analytics", an area of statistical analysis that studies the extraction of information from historical data to infer future trends and patterns. Our study couples the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) with traditional methods, e.g. Autoregressive Model of Order 1 (AR1) and Neural Networks (NN), to predict mean monthly river discharges in Colombia, South America. The EMD allows us to decompose the historical time series of river discharges into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMF) that capture the different oscillatory modes of different frequencies associated with the inherent time scales coexisting simultaneously in the signal (Huang et al. 1998, Huang and Wu 2008, Rao and Hsu, 2008). Our predictive method states that it is easier and simpler to predict each IMF at a time and then add them up together to obtain the predicted river discharge for a certain month, than predicting the full signal. This method is applied to 10 series of monthly mean river discharges in Colombia, using calibration periods of more than 25 years, and validation periods of about 12 years. Predictions are performed for time horizons spanning from 1 to 12 months. Our results show that predictions obtained through the traditional methods improve when the EMD is used as a previous step, since errors decrease by up to 13% when the AR1 model is used, and by up to 18% when using Neural Networks is combined with the

  12. Using Width-Based Rating Curves from Spatially Discontinuous Satellite Imagery to Monitor River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, T.

    2014-12-01

    One of the significant technical hurdles to remote estimation of river discharge using river widths is the acquisition of suitable imagery. Most high-resolution, radar-based sensors acquire imagery infrequently (e.g. once or twice per month), while optical sensors are subject to the effects of clouds. Many more images that are partially cloud-free or cover only part of a study area are often available, but their use is problematic because the spatial extent of observable subreaches differs from image to image. Here, a method is presented that allows spatially discontinuous remote observations of river width to be successfully used to estimate discharge despite partial cloudiness and/or inconsistent spatial coverage. The method is demonstrated over 62 km of the Tanana River downstream of Fairbanks, AK. This reach is divided into 1 km subreaches and a separate discharge-width rating curve is produced for each subreach. For any given image, final discharge is estimated as the median discharge calculated from all visible and cloud-free reaches. Application of the method to 28 RapidEye images at 5 m spatial resolution and useable coverage ranging from <20% to 100% suggests that it produces highly accurate estimates of discharge (Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE=6.7%, r2=0.92) when compared with in situ observations. Similar but slightly less accurate results are evident from eleven Landsat TM and ETM+ images (RMSE=12.6%, r2=0.86). These results suggest that the method used here produces estimates of discharge comparable in error characteristics to ground-based measurements, at least when high resolution imagery is used over a river reach with substantial temporal width variability.

  13. Effect of the river discharge implementation in an operational model for the West Iberia coastal area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano, Francisco; Brito, David; Juliano, Manuela; Fernandes, Rodrigo; Neves, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    In the Iberian Peninsula, most of the largest rivers discharge on the Atlantic coast draining almost two thirds of the territory. It is an important source of nutrients and sediments to these coastal areas. Rivers discharges in the Atlantic area when compared with the ones in the Mediterranean side present the particularity that their water before is released into the ocean is previously mixed in their estuaries in a different ratio depending of the estuarine residence time and the discharged flow. In order to evaluate the relative importance of the inland waters in the circulation patterns of Western Iberia, the rivers discharges were implemented in the PCOMS model application (Portuguese Coast Operational Modelling System). To reproduce the water continuum including the different spatial and temporal scales, a methodology consisting in a system of integrated models using the Mohid model was designed. At the watershed level, the Mohid Land model calculated operationally water flow and properties, including nutrients, for the main river catchments of Western Iberian with a 2 km horizontal resolution. Downstream, several operational hydrodynamic and biological estuarine applications used those outcomes as model inputs, filling the gaps in the observation network. From the estuarine models, the tidally modulated water and properties fluxes to the coast were obtained. These fluxes were finally imposed in the Portuguese Coast Operational Modelling System (PCOMS), a fully 3D baroclinic hydrodynamic and ecological regional model that covers the Iberian Atlantic front. The fate of the rivers discharges were analysed by integrating model results in boxes, comparing the climatologies obtained with and without rivers and the rivers area of influence was obtained by lagrangian tracers simulations.

  14. Effects of Mackenzie River Discharge and Bathymetry on Sea Ice in the Beaufort Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Rigor, I. G; Li, P.; Neumann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mackenzie River discharge and bathymetry effects on sea ice in the Beaufort Sea are examined in 2012 when Arctic sea ice extent hit a record low. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature revealed warmer waters closer to river mouths. By 5 July 2012, Mackenzie warm waters occupied most of an open water area about 316,000 sq km. Surface temperature in a common open water area increased by 6.5 C between 14 June and 5 July 2012, before and after the river waters broke through a recurrent landfast ice barrier formed over the shallow seafloor offshore the Mackenzie Delta. In 2012, melting by warm river waters was especially effective when the strong Beaufort Gyre fragmented sea ice into unconsolidated floes. The Mackenzie and other large rivers can transport an enormous amount of heat across immense continental watersheds into the Arctic Ocean, constituting a stark contrast to the Antarctic that has no such rivers to affect sea ice.

  15. Climate change and its impacts on river discharge in two climate regions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Luo, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of climate change and its impacts on annual and seasonal discharge, and the difference between mean flow and extreme flow in different climate regions is of utmost importance to successful water management. To quantify the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of climate change impacts on hydrological processes, this study simulated river discharge in the River Huangfuchuan in semi-arid northern China and the River Xiangxi in humid southern China. We assessed the uncertainty in projected discharge for three time periods (2020s, 2050s and 2080s) using seven equally weighted GCMs for the SRES A1B scenario. Climate projections that were applied to semi-distributed hydrological models Soil Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) in both catchments showed trends toward warmer and wetter conditions, particularly for the River Huangfuchuan. Results based on seven GCMs' projections indicated -1.1 to 8.6 and 0.3 to 7.0 °C changes in seasonal temperature and -29 to 139 and -32 to 85 % changes in seasonal precipitation in River Huangfuchuan and River Xiangxi, respectively. The largest increases in temperature and precipitation in both catchments were projected in the spring and winter seasons. The main projected hydrologic impact was a more pronounced increase in annual discharge in the River Huangfuchuan than in the River Xiangxi. Most of the GCMs projected increased discharge in all seasons, especially in spring, although the magnitude of these increases varied between GCMs. Peak flows was projected to appear earlier than usual in River Huangfuchuan and later than usual in River Xiangxi. While the GCMs were fairly consistent in projecting increased extreme flows in both catchments, the increases were of varying magnitude compared to mean flows. For River Huangfuchuan in the 2080s, median flow changed from -2 to 304 %, compared to a -1 to 145 % change in high flow (Q05 exceedence threshold). For River Xiangxi, low flow (Q95 exceedence threshold) changed

  16. Discharge, gage height, and elevation of 100-year floods in the Hudson River basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, Roger J.

    1978-01-01

    The flood discharge that may be expected to be equaled or exceeded on the average of once in 100 years (100-year flood) was computed by the log-Pearson Type-III frequency relation for 72 stations in the Hudson River basin. These discharges and, where available, their corresponding gage height and elevation above mean sea level are presented in tabular form. A short explanation of computation methods is included. The data are to be used as part of a federally funded study of the water resources and related land resources of the Hudson River basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Using river discharge to access the quality of different precipitation datasets over large-scale basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Florian Pappenberger, ,; Yamazaki, Dai

    2015-04-01

    River discharge is a natural integrator of meteorological variables. The integration is made over a spatial domain (catchment) which is geophysically appropriate, and over time. It takes into account the correlations and covariances between several meteorological variables in a meaningful way, integrating information from a multidimensional variable space. Furthermore, river discharge observations are available and generally reliable. Therefore, river discharge is an important variable to consider in when evaluating the water balance of large-scale basins. In this study we evaluate different precipitation corrections applied to the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis in terms of long-term means and variability of river discharge over several large-scale basins. We compare the original ERA-Interim dataset, the precipitation correction used in the production of the ERA-Interim/Land dataset (adjusted using GPCP) and the WFDEI dataset (adjusted using CRU). Global simulations with the ECMWF land surface model HTESSEL were performed with the different datasets and the simulated runoff routed using the river-floodplain model CaMa-Flood. Preliminary results highlight the deficiencies of ERA-Interim in several tropical basins (e.g. Congo) while the precipitation adjustments in ERA-Interim/Land and in WFDEI degrade the simulations in several northern hemisphere basins dominated by cold processes (e.g. Mackenzie).

  18. Temporal and spatial responses of river discharge to tectonic and climatic perturbations: Choshui River, Taiwan, and Typhoon Mindulle (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliman, J. D.; Lee, T. Y.; Huang, J. C.; Kao, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    One reason that small mountainous rivers discharge disproportionately large quantities of sediment to the coastal ocean is because they are particularly susceptible to short-term episodic events, such as earthquakes and floods. The impact of such events, both temporally and spatially, however, has seldom been monitored. Here we report on the results of probably the most thorough monitoring of a flood ever undertaken: the effect of Typhoon Mindulle (2-4 July 2004) on the character of the water transported by the Choshui River, central western Taiwan, during which 74 million tons of sediment were discharged to the adjacent Taiwan Strait. Results from a series of 113 water samples obtained between 2nd and 4th July from five stations along the middle and lower reaches the river indicate that more than half of the suspended sediment was generated in nearby mountains before the river reached its flood plain. While the concentration of dissolved solids remained more or less constant along the mainstem of the river, the composition changed considerably, reflecting the imprints of local geology. An order-of-magnitude downstream increase in NO3- concentrations reflects the rapid draining of the Tsaoling landslide lake on the Chingshui River, as the 1999 earthquake-generated landslide dam was breached.

  19. Probability analysis of the relation of salinity to freshwater discharge in the St. Sebastian River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, S.M.; Gain, W.S.

    1999-01-01

    The St. Sebastian River lies in the southern part of the Indian River basin on the east coast of Florida. Increases in freshwater discharge due to urbanization and changes in land use have reduced salinity in the St. Sebastian River and, consequently, salinity in the Indian River, affecting the commercial fishing industry. Wind, water temperature, tidal flux, freshwater discharge, and downstream salinity all affect salinity in the St. Sebastian River estuary, but freshwater discharge is the only one of these hydrologic factors which might be affected by water-management practices. A probability analysis of salinity conditions in the St. Sebastian River estuary, taking into account the effects of freshwater discharge over a period from May 1992 to March 1996, was used to determine the likelihood (probability) that salinities, as represented by daily mean specific- conductance values, will fall below a given threshold. The effects of freshwater discharge on salinities were evaluated with a simple volumetric model fitted to time series of measured specific conductance, by using nonlinear optimization techniques. Specific-conductance values for two depths at monitored sites represent stratified flow which results from differences in salt concentration between freshwater and saltwater. Layering of freshwater and saltwater is assumed, and the model is applied independently to each layer with the assumption that the water within the layer is well mixed. The model of specific conductance as a function of discharge (a salinity response model) was combined with a model of residual variation to produce a total probability model. Flow distributions and model residuals were integrated to produce a salinity distribution and determine differences in salinity probabilities as a result of changes in water-management practices. Two possible management alternatives were analyzed: stormwater detention (reducing the peak rate of discharge but not reducing the overall flow volume) and

  20. Modeling discharge, temperature, and water quality in the Tualatin River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Wood, Tamara M.; Lynch, Dennis D.

    1999-01-01

    The discharge, water temperature, and water quality of the Tualatin River in northwestern Oregon was simulated with CE-QUAL-W2, a two-dimensional, laterally averaged model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The model was calibrated for May through October periods of 1991, 1992, and 1993. Nine hypothetical scenarios were tested with the model to provide insight for river managers and regulators.

  1. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  2. Physical Properties of Low-Rank Coal Samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagin, P. N.; Zoback, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    We characterize the mechanical properties of coal samples from the Powder River Basin (Wyoming, USA) by conducting laboratory experiments. We present results from laboratory measurements of adsorption, static and dynamic elastic moduli, and permeability as a function of effective stress, pore pressure, and gas species. Notably, we observe that CO2 adsorption causes the static bulk modulus to decrease by a factor of two, while simultaneously causing the dynamic bulk modulus to increase by several percent. Permeability of both intact and powdered samples decreases by approximately an order of magnitude in the presence of CO2, which is consistent with observations of adsorption-related swelling of the coal matrix. Interestingly, CO2 appears to change the constitutive behavior of coal; helium saturated samples exhibit elastic behavior, while CO2 saturated samples exhibit viscous, anelastic behavior, as evidenced by creep strain observations.

  3. Modification of polyethylene powder with an organic precursor in a spiral conveyor by hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitzau, M.; Wolter, M.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Kersten, H.; Faupel, F.

    2010-06-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films were deposited on polyethylene (PE, (C2H4)n) powder by hollow cathode glow discharge. The reactive species in different HMDSO/Ar plasmas were studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Increasing the HMDSO fraction in the gas mixture additional compounds like CHx, OH, SiC and SiO can be identified. After deposition the formed silicon and carbon containing groups (C-O, C=O, SiC and SiO) on the PE powder surface have been analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Changes in wettability depending on the HMDSO fraction were investigated by contact angle measurements (CAM). The free surface energy of the PE powder decreases with increasing HMDSO fraction in the process gas and encapsulation of the powder particles occurs. An aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface was observed depending on the process gas composition. The higher the HMDSO fraction the less is the aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface.

  4. Retrieval of river discharge solely from satellite imagery and at-many-stations hydraulic geometry: Sensitivity to river form and optimization parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin J.; Smith, Laurence C.; Lee, Jinny

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of river discharge is critically important for water resource management, climate modeling, and improved understanding of the global water cycle, yet discharge is poorly known in much of the world. Remote sensing holds promise to mitigate this gap, yet current approaches for quantitative retrievals of river discharge require in situ calibration or a priori knowledge of river hydraulics, limiting their utility in unmonitored regions. Recently, Gleason and Smith (2014) demonstrated discharge retrievals within 20-30% of in situ observations solely from Landsat TM satellite images through discovery of a river-specific geomorphic scaling phenomenon termed at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG). This paper advances the AMHG discharge retrieval approach via additional parameter optimizations and validation on 34 gauged rivers spanning a diverse range of geomorphic and climatic settings. Sensitivity experiments reveal that discharge retrieval accuracy varies with river morphology, reach averaging procedure, and optimization parameters. Quality of remotely sensed river flow widths is also important. Recommended best practices include a proposed global parameter set for use when a priori information is unavailable. Using this global parameterization, AMHG discharge retrievals are successful for most investigated river morphologies (median RRMSE 33% of in situ gauge observations), except braided rivers (median RRMSE 74%), rivers having low at-a-station hydraulic geometry b exponents (reach-averaged b < 0.1, median RRMSE 86%), and arid rivers having extreme discharge variability (median RRMSE > 1000%). Excluding such environments, 26-41% RRMSE agreement between AMHG discharge retrievals and in situ gauge observations suggests AMHG can meaningfully address global discharge knowledge gaps solely from repeat satellite imagery.

  5. Stream Discharge Database, Little River Experimental Watershed, Georgia, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory (SEWRL) initiated a hydrologic research program on the Little River Experimental Watershed (LREW) in 1967. Continuous stream stage measurement began that year at two fixed-contro...

  6. On planetary torque signals and sub-decadal frequencies in the discharges of large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo G.; Abuin, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    We explore the arguments presented in the past linking changes in the angular momentum modulus, | L | , of the Sun's barycentric orbit, with the discharges of Po River in Europe and Paraná River in South America, looking for any evidence regarding to a possible underlying physical mechanism. We clarify the planetary effect on solar torque presenting new analyses and results; we also improve prior results on Paraná River's cycles finding significant spectral lines around 6.5 yr, 7.6 yr, 8.7 yr, and 10.4 yr. We show that the truly important dynamical parameter in this issue is the vectorial planetary torque. Moreover, following the variations of L respect to the Sun's spin axis of rotation (i.e., a LS relationship), we found virtually the same Paraná River discharge peaks: 6.3 yr, 7.7 yr, 8.6 yr and 9.9 yr. An analysis based on Magnitude Squared Coherence and Wavelet Coherence between Paraná River discharge and our LS relationship shows significant, although intermittently, coherence near 8-yr periodicities. Wavelet Coherence also shows big and significant regions of coherence inside 12-19 yr band. Our results ruled out classical tidal effects in this problem; but suggest that, if these rivers are trully related to solar barycentric motion, the physical origin of this connection might be related to a working solar spin-orbit interaction.

  7. The response time of the Changjiang plume to river discharge in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rui; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Jianrong; Li, Lu

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model was used to study the response time of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River plume to river discharge by artificially increasing the runoff over a short period and investigating the variation of salinity in the plume region. The time lagged between the change of river discharge and the change of salinity that reaches the 10% of the adjusted value is considered as the response time in this study. The response times in the plume region differed slightly when the river discharge during the spring tide and the neap tide was increased. Specifically, the response times near the river mouth and in the plume edge were ~ 1 days and more than 15 days, respectively. The brackish water volumes were also calculated to determine the variations in the plume extensions over time. A tracer was released to study the transport time from the Datong station to the East China Sea using the concept of water age. The tracer transport time ranged from 10 days near the river mouth to more than 50 days at the edge of the plume, which is much longer than the response time of the surface salinity.

  8. Effects of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River discharge on planktonic community respiration in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-Chi; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo; Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Kemp, W. Michael

    2009-03-01

    Planktonic communities tend to flourish on the western margins of the East China Sea (ECS) fueled by substrates delivered largely from the Changjiang River, the fifth largest river in the world. To study the effects of the Changjiang River discharge on planktonic community respiration (CR), physical-chemical variables and key processes were measured in three consecutive summers in the ECS. Results showed that concentrations of nitrate and Chl a, protozoan biomass, bacterial production, as well as CR in the surface water were all negatively correlated with sea surface salinity, reflecting the strong influence of river discharge on the ECS shelf ecosystem. Moreover, mean values of nitrate, Chl a concentrations, and CR rates were proportionally related to the area of Changjiang diluted water (CDW; salinity ≤31.0 practical salinity units (psu)), an index of river discharge rate. Presumably, higher river flow delivers higher nutrient concentrations which stimulate phytoplankton growth, which in turn fuels CR. CR exhibited significant monthly and interannual variability, and rates appear to be dominated by bacteria and phytoplankton. Although the plankton community was relatively productive (mean = 0.8 mg C m-2 d-1) in the CDW, the mean ratio of production to respiration was low (0.42). This suggests that the heterotrophic processes regulating CR were supported by riverine organic carbon input in addition to in situ autotrophic production.

  9. Groundwater Discharge and Salinity Sources to an Impaired Major River in a Semi-Arid Coastal Region: Nueces River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, V.; Murgulet, D.; Hay, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nueces River, an impaired stream located on the South Texas Gulf coast area, has shown water quality degradation due to to increased salinity levels in areas adjacent to the Calallen saltwater reservoir dam. This study investigates the role of submarine groundwater discharge in delivering increased salt contents to the river and how the subsurface hydrology is affected by the presence of a salt barrier (i.e. saltwater dam) which separates the tidal and non-tidal parts of the Nueces river basin. Thus, a combination of resistivity profiling and elemental and stable isotope geochemistry methods has been applied to portions of the river located downstream (tidal) and upstream (non-tidal) of the dam. Preliminary data show that salinity levels gradually increases at the river bank indicating that groundwater is likely a source of solutes to the river in the upper, non-tidal portion. The presence of vertical upwelling of conductive groundwater plumes is also revealed by marine resistivity profiles collected along the river. Different sampling during the spring and summer of 2014 show higher concentration values of major ions (i.e., calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, etc.) and salinity of pore water for the upstream river at several locations while it remains relatively constant for bottom- and surface water. In addition, because the groundwater and porewater have slightly lower pH values, a shift to more acidic surface water accompanied by some increases in dissolved major ion concentrations and salinity suggest that groundwater might represent a source of increased salt content in the upper portion of the river. On the other hand, downstream dissolved major ion concentrations generally decrease in pore- and bottom water from spring to summer and are correlated with decreases in salinity while surface water becomes more saline with an increase in major ions. Therefore, these preliminary data indicate different hydrology systems of the two portions of the

  10. Climate change and its impacts on river discharge in two climate regions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Luo, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of climate change and its impacts on annual and seasonal discharge and the difference between median flow and extreme flow in different climate regions is of utmost importance to successful water management. To quantify the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of climate change impacts on hydrological processes, this study simulated river discharge in the River Huangfuchuan in semi-arid northern China and in the River Xiangxi in humid southern China. The study assessed the uncertainty in projected discharge for three time periods (2020s, 2050s and 2080s) using seven equally weighted GCMs (global climate models) for the SRES (Special Reports on Emissions Scenarios) A1B scenario. Climate projections that were applied to semi-distributed hydrological models (Soil Water Assessment Tools, SWAT) in both catchments showed trends toward warmer and wetter conditions, particularly for the River Huangfuchuan. Results based on seven GCMs' projections indicated changes from -1.1 to 8.6 °C and 0.3 to 7.0 °C in seasonal temperature and changes from -29 to 139 % and -32 to 85 % in seasonal precipitation in the rivers Huangfuchuan and Xiangxi, respectively. The largest increases in temperature and precipitation in both catchments were projected in the spring and winter seasons. The main projected hydrologic impact was a more pronounced increase in annual discharge in the River Huangfuchuan than in the River Xiangxi. Most of the GCMs projected increased discharge in all seasons, especially in spring, although the magnitude of these increases varied between GCMs. The peak flows were projected to appear earlier than usual in the River Huangfuchuan and later than usual in the River Xiangxi, while the GCMs were fairly consistent in projecting increased extreme flows in both catchments with varying magnitude compared to median flows. For the River Huangfuchuan in the 2080s, median flow changed from -2 to 304 %, compared to a -1 to 145 % change in high flow

  11. Assessing SWOT discharge algorithms performance across a range of river types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Smith, L. C.; Gleason, C. J.; Bjerklie, D. M.; Garambois, P. A.; Roux, H.

    2014-12-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2020, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will measure river height, width, and slope, globally, as well as characterizing storage change in lakes, and ocean surface dynamics. Four discharge algorithms have been formulated to solve the inverse problem of river discharge from SWOT observations. Three of these approaches are based on Manning's equation, while the fourth utilizes at-many-stations hydraulic geometry relating width and discharge. In all cases, SWOT will provide some but not all of the information required to estimate discharge. The focus of the inverse approaches is estimation of the unknown parameters. The algorithms use a range of a priori information. This paper will generate synthetic measurements of height, width, and slope for a number of rivers, including reaches of the Sacramento, Ohio, Mississippi, Platte, Amazon, Garonne, Po, Severn, St. Lawrence, and Tanana. These rivers have a wide range of flows, geometries, hydraulic regimes, floodplain interactions, and planforms. One-year synthetic datasets will be generated in each case. We will add white noise to the simulated quantities and generate scenarios with different repeat time. The focus will be on retrievability of the hydraulic parameters across a range of space-time sampling, rather than on ability to retrieve under the specific SWOT orbit. We will focus on several specific research questions affecting algorithm performance, including river characteristics, temporal sampling, and algorithm accuracy. The overall goal is to be able to predict which algorithms will work better for different kinds of rivers, and potentially to combine the outputs of the various algorithms to obtain more robust estimates. Preliminary results on the Sacramento River indicate that all algorithms perform well for this single-channel river, with diffusive hydraulics, with relative RMSE values ranging from 9% to 26% for the various algorithms. Preliminary

  12. Biogeochemical transport in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida: The role of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Orem, W.H.; McPherson, B.F.; Baskaran, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Ba, U, and a suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during high- and low-discharge conditions in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida to examine the role of submarine groundwater discharge in estuarine transport. The fresh water endmember of this still relatively pristine estuary may reflect not only river-borne constituents, but also those advected during active groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange. During both discharge conditions, Ba concentrations indicated slight non-conservative mixing. Such Ba excesses could be attributed either to submarine groundwater discharge or particle desorption processes. Estuarine dissolved organic carbon concentrations were highest at salinities closest to zero. Uranium distributions were lowest in the fresh water sites and mixed mostly conservatively with an increase in salinity. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations were generally lowest ( 28??dpm L- 1) at the freshwater endmember of the estuary and appear to identify regions of the river most influenced by the discharge of fresh groundwater. Activities of four naturally occurring isotopes of Ra (223,224,226,228Ra) in this estuary and select adjacent shallow groundwater wells yield mean estuarine water-mass transit times of less than 1 day; these values are in close agreement to those calculated by tidal prism and tidal frequency. Submarine groundwater discharge rates to the Loxahatchee River estuary were calculated using a tidal prism approach, an excess 226Ra mass balance, and an electromagnetic seepage meter. Average SGD rates ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 ?? 105??m3 d- 1 (20-74??L m- 2 d- 1), depending on river-discharge stage. Such calculated SGD estimates, which must include both a recirculated as well as fresh water component, are in close agreement with results obtained from a first-order watershed mass balance. Average submarine

  13. Geologic applications of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. After digitization, a noise rejection filter was applied to data obtained by USGS aircraft. An albedo image was formed by combining three bands of visible data. Along with the day and nighttime thermal data, the albedo image was used to construct a relative thermal-inertia image. This image, registered to a topographic base, shows there are thermal property differences in the vicinity of the contact between the Fort Union and Wasatch formations in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  14. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two night-time thermal images of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming distinctly show a major thermal feature. This feature is substantially coincident with a drainage divide and the southward facing slope appears cooler, suggesting a lower thermal inertia. An initial examination of regional geologic maps provides no clear evidence to suggest what type of geologic feature or structure may be present, although it can be noted that its northeastern end passes directly through Lead, South Dakota where the Homestake Gold Mine is located.

  15. Stratigraphic framework of the upper Fort Union Formation, TA Hills, Western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Jean N.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to interpret a relationship between the stratigraphy and the environment of deposition of the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills in the western part of the Powder River Basin, Johnson County, Wyoming.  This framework was used to map and correlate coal beds with those mapped by Hose (1955) and Mapel (1959) in the southern and northern parts of the study area, respectively.  More specifically, the established stratigraphic and environmental relationships of the coal beds and associated rocks contribute to a depositional model for the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills.

  16. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F.

    2008-11-15

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  17. Magnitude and frequency of peak discharges for Mississippi River Basin Flood of 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, W.O., Jr.; Eash, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of the 1993 peak discharges in the upper Mississippi River Basin are characterized by applying Bulletin 17B and L-moment methods to annual peak discharges at 115 unregulated watersheds in the basin. The analysis indicated that the 1993 flood was primarily a 50-year or less event on unregulated watersheds less than about 50,000 km2 (20,000 mi2). Of the 115 stations analyzed, the Bulletin 17B and L-moment methods were used to identify 89 and 84 stations, respectively, having recurrence intervals of 50 years or less, and 31 and 26 stations, respectively, having recurrence intervals greater than 50 years for the 1993 peak discharges. The 1993 flood in the upper Mississippi River Basin was significant in terms of (a) peak discharges with recurrence intervals greater than 50 years at approximately 25 percent of the stations analyzed, (b) peak discharges of record at 33 of the 115 stations analyzed, (c) extreme magnitude, duration, and areal extent of precipitation, (d) flood volumes with recurrence intervals greater than 100 years at many stations, and (e) extreme flood damage and loss of lives. Furthermore, peak discharges on several larger, regulated watersheds also exceeded the 100-year recurrence interval. However, for about 75 percent of the 115 unregulated stations in the analysis, the frequency of the 1993 peak discharges was less than a 50-year event.

  18. An Object-Based Method for Estimation of River Discharge from Remotely-Sensed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgett, D. A.; Blesius, L.; Davis, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    High resolution satellite and aerial imagery of fluvial systems contain much information about planform river channel features. However, not much is known about how these forms quantitatively related to river channel process, specifically, discharge. This research explores methods for remote image-based river discharge estimation through Object-Based Image Processing (OBIA) and GIS techniques. Previous efforts in image-based discharge estimation have relied primarily on manual delineation of river features and the input of reach-averaged values of these features into statistically based models for estimation. In addition to analyzing OBIA techniques for channel feature delineation and measurement, this approach investigates techniques of discharge estimation model design, validation, and correction along a reach, utilizing variation in “standard” channel features (e.g. water surface width), along with less tangible channel feature metrics derived from OBIA. Rather than predefine the channel unit of analysis, this work also considers the accuracy of model parameters derived from a range of channel scales, from longer reach-averaged to cross-sectional. High resolution (1 m) color infrared orthoimagery from 2005 and 2009 National Agricultural Inventory Program (NAIP) of 50 river reaches (ranging in discharge from approximately 13 m3s-1 to 856 m3s-1) were utilized for this analysis. These reaches, all near United States Geological Survey (USGS) river gages in California, USA, were split randomly and evenly into 25 reaches each for model design and validation, respectively. This approach allows better isolation of error resulting from user bias in channel feature measurement, and moves toward a more precise, standardized system of measurement for remotely observable channel form.

  19. Origin of thick lower tertiary coal beds in the powder river basin, Wyoming and Montana. Some paleogeographic constraints (Chapter Q). Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Seeland, D.

    1993-01-01

    The late Paleocene and early Eocene paleogeography of the Powder River Basin suggests that the thick coals in the basin formed from peat deposits in dip-elongate swamps near the basin-axis trunk streams. The Powder River Basin has more than 80 percent of the coal resources in Wyoming, and therefore factors not related to climate or subsidence rate must be unique to the Powder River Basin. The most likely factor is regional paleogeography.

  20. Use of a Smartphone for Collecting Data on River Discharge and Communication of Flood Risk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Haro, S.; Lüthi, B.; Philippe, T.

    2015-12-01

    Although many developed countries have well-established systems for river monitoring and flood early warning systems, the population affected in developing countries by flood events is unsettled. Even more, future climate development is likely to increase the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events and therefore bigger impacts on the population can be expected.There are different types of flood forecasting systems, some are based on hydrologic models fed with rainfall predictions and observed river levels. Flood hazard maps are also used to increase preparedness in case of an extreme event, however these maps are static since they do not incorporate daily changing conditions on river stages. However, and especially in developing countries, data on river stages are scarce. Some of the reasons are that traditional fixed monitoring systems do not scale in terms of costs, repair is difficult as well as operation and maintenance, in addition vandalism poses additional challenges. Therefore there is a need of cheaper and easy-to-use systems for collecting information on river stage and discharge. We have developed a mobile device application for determining the water stage and discharge of open-channels (e.g. rivers, artificial channels, irrigation furrows). Via image processing the water level and surface velocity are measured, combining this information with priori knowledge on the channel geometry the discharge is estimated. River stage and discharge measurement via smart phones provides a non-intrusive, accurate and cost-effective monitoring method. No permanent installations, which can be flooded away, are needed. The only requirement is that the field of view contains two reference markers with known scale and with known position relative to the channel geometry, therefore operation and maintenance costs are very low. The other advantage of using smartphones, is that the data collected can be immediately sent via SMS to a central database. This

  1. Variability of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a large semi-arid river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuanxu; Huang, He Qing; Xu, Jiongxin; Brierley, Gary J.; Yao, Zhijun

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThe variability of effective discharge is analysed for three geomorphological zones (gullied hilly loess, valley-hill loess and eolian sand) in the Wuding River basin, China, based on mean daily flow discharge and mean daily suspended sediment discharge from 1959 to 1969, a period when human disturbance in this catchment was less intensive. A modified approach to the determination of discharge class intervals is developed, framed in terms of equal arithmetic intervals of the standard deviation S for all the discharges, such as S, 0.75 S, 0.5 S, and 0.25 S. The average flow duration of effective discharge in the river basin ranges primarily from 0.026% to 3.16% in the two loess regions (corresponding to large flood events), and from 18.75% to 91.51% in the eolian sand region (corresponding to low or moderate flows). The average flow duration of effective discharge is significantly influenced by the size of class intervals and by characteristics of the flow and sediment regime. Using the most appropriate class interval of 0.25 S, the average flow duration of effective discharge is about 0.026% in the two loess regions (other than 0.104% at Hengshan), but in the eolian sand region it reaches 24.50% at Yulin and 52.66% at Hanjiamao, respectively. Histograms of suspended sediment transport indicate that there is a bimodal dominant discharge for suspended sediment transport, with one peak in the range of low flows and the other in the range of large floods. Drainage density and specific sediment yields are lower in the eolian sand region, where effective discharge events occur more frequently and suspended sediment concentration is much lower than that carried by events of the same discharge in the loess region. In contrast, drainage density is higher in the two loess regions, where infrequent hyperconcentrated flows generate high specific sediment yields. Effective discharge differs significantly from bankfull discharge across the whole Wuding River basin.

  2. EFFECTS OF THERMAL DISCHARGES ON PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROCESSES AND WATER QUALITY, VISTULA RIVER, POLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study on the influence of thermal water discharge from the Koezienice power plant on thermal regimes and water quality of the Vistula River was carried out between January 1973 and December 1975. Results of field survey of the thermal plume indicate that under non-extreme condi...

  3. Continuous measurement of suspended-sediment discharge in rivers by use of optical backscatterance sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Wright, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Optical sensors have been used to measure turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration by many marine and estuarine studies, and optical sensors can provide automated, continuous time series of suspended-sediment concentration and discharge in rivers. Three potential problems with using optical sensors are biological fouling, particle-size variability, and particle-reflectivity variability. Despite varying particle size, output from an optical backscatterance sensor in the Sacramento River at Freeport, California, USA, was calibrated successfully to discharge-weighted, cross-sectionally averaged suspended-sediment concentration, which was measured with the equal discharge-, or width-increment, methods and an isokinetic sampler. A correction for sensor drift was applied to the 3-year time series. However, the calibration of an optical backscatterance sensor used in the Colorado River at Cisco, Utah, USA, was affected by particle-size variability. The adjusted time series at Freeport was used to calculate hourly suspended-sediment discharge that compared well with daily values from a sediment station at Freeport. The appropriateness of using optical sensors in rivers should be evaluated on a site-specific basis and measurement objectives, potential particle size effects, and potential fouling should be considered.

  4. Submarine fresh groundwater discharge into Laizhou Bay comparable to the Yellow River flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejing; Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Barry, D. A.; Li, Ling; Luo, Xin; Wang, Chaoyue; Wan, Li; Wang, Xusheng; Jiang, Xiaowei; Ma, Qian; Qu, Wenjing

    2015-03-01

    Near- and off-shore fresh groundwater resources become increasingly important with the social and economic development in coastal areas. Although large scale (hundreds of km) submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the ocean has been shown to be of the same magnitude order as river discharge, submarine fresh groundwater discharge (SFGD) with magnitude comparable to large river discharge is never reported. Here, we proposed a method coupling mass-balance models of water, salt and radium isotopes based on field data of 223Ra, 226Ra and salinity to estimate the SFGD, SGD. By applying the method in Laizhou Bay (a water area of ~6000 km2), we showed that the SFGD and SGD are 0.57 ~ 0.88 times and 7.35 ~ 8.57 times the annual Yellow River flux in August 2012, respectively. The estimate of SFGD ranges from 4.12 × 107 m3/d to 6.36 × 107 m3/d, while SGD ranges from 5.32 × 108 m3/d to 6.20 × 108 m3/d. The proportion of the Yellow River input into Laizhou Bay was less than 14% of the total in August 2012. Our method can be used to estimate SFGD in various coastal waters.

  5. Submarine fresh groundwater discharge into Laizhou Bay comparable to the Yellow River flux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejing; Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Barry, D A; Li, Ling; Luo, Xin; Wang, Chaoyue; Wan, Li; Wang, Xusheng; Jiang, Xiaowei; Ma, Qian; Qu, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Near- and off-shore fresh groundwater resources become increasingly important with the social and economic development in coastal areas. Although large scale (hundreds of km) submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the ocean has been shown to be of the same magnitude order as river discharge, submarine fresh groundwater discharge (SFGD) with magnitude comparable to large river discharge is never reported. Here, we proposed a method coupling mass-balance models of water, salt and radium isotopes based on field data of (223)Ra, (226)Ra and salinity to estimate the SFGD, SGD. By applying the method in Laizhou Bay (a water area of ~6000 km(2)), we showed that the SFGD and SGD are 0.57 ~ 0.88 times and 7.35 ~ 8.57 times the annual Yellow River flux in August 2012, respectively. The estimate of SFGD ranges from 4.12 × 10(7) m(3)/d to 6.36 × 10(7) m(3)/d, while SGD ranges from 5.32 × 10(8) m(3)/d to 6.20 × 10(8) m(3)/d. The proportion of the Yellow River input into Laizhou Bay was less than 14% of the total in August 2012. Our method can be used to estimate SFGD in various coastal waters. PMID:25742712

  6. Emerging and Conventional Contaminants in River Waters Discharging into the Black Sea along the Ukrainian Coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major rivers of Ukraine, including the Dnieper, Dniester, Southern Bug and Danube, discharge approximately 8500 m3/s of freshwater into the northern and western portions of the Black Sea. As one of the largest countries in Europe, Ukraine also has one of the largest human po...

  7. Heated Discharge Control and Management Alternatives: Small Water Bodies and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, James F.

    Basic concepts of waste heat management on shallow and deep small water bodies and rivers are reviewed and examples are given. This study defines a small water body as a body in which the far field hydrothermal effects of a heated discharge can be detected in a major portion or practically all of the water body. Environmental effects due to…

  8. Submarine fresh groundwater discharge into Laizhou Bay comparable to the Yellow River flux

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejing; Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Barry, D. A.; Li, Ling; Luo, Xin; Wang, Chaoyue; Wan, Li; Wang, Xusheng; Jiang, Xiaowei; Ma, Qian; Qu, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Near- and off-shore fresh groundwater resources become increasingly important with the social and economic development in coastal areas. Although large scale (hundreds of km) submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the ocean has been shown to be of the same magnitude order as river discharge, submarine fresh groundwater discharge (SFGD) with magnitude comparable to large river discharge is never reported. Here, we proposed a method coupling mass-balance models of water, salt and radium isotopes based on field data of 223Ra, 226Ra and salinity to estimate the SFGD, SGD. By applying the method in Laizhou Bay (a water area of ~6000 km2), we showed that the SFGD and SGD are 0.57 ~ 0.88 times and 7.35 ~ 8.57 times the annual Yellow River flux in August 2012, respectively. The estimate of SFGD ranges from 4.12 × 107 m3/d to 6.36 × 107 m3/d, while SGD ranges from 5.32 × 108 m3/d to 6.20 × 108 m3/d. The proportion of the Yellow River input into Laizhou Bay was less than 14% of the total in August 2012. Our method can be used to estimate SFGD in various coastal waters. PMID:25742712

  9. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  10. River discharge controls phytoplankton dynamics in the northern San Francisco Bay estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Alpine, A.E.; Cole, B.E.; Wong, R.L.J.; Arthur, J.F.; Ball, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Phytoplankton dynamics in the upper reach of the northern San Francisco Bay estuary are usually characterized by low biomass dominated by microflagellates or freshwater diatoms in winter, and high biomass dominated by neritic diatoms in summer. During two successive years of very low river discharge (the drought of 1976-77), the summer diatom bloom was absent. This is consistent with the hypothesis that formation of the diatom population maximum is a consequence of the same physical mechanisms that create local maxima of suspended sediments in partially-mixed estuaries: density-selective retention of particles within an estuarine circulation cell. Because the estuary is turbid, calculated phytoplankton growth rates are small in the central deep channel but are relatively large in lateral shallow embayments where light limination is less severe. When river discharge falls within a critical range (100-350 m3 s-1) that positions the suspended particulate maximum adjacent to the productive shallow bays, the population of neritic diatoms increases. However, during periods of high discharge (winter) or during periods of very low discharge (drought), the suspended particulate maximum is less well-defined and is uncoupled (positioned downstream or upstream) from the shallow bays of the upper estuary, and the population of neritic diatoms declines. Hence, the biomass and community composition of phytoplankton in this estuary are controlled by river discharge. ?? 1983.

  11. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  12. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  13. Application for 3d Scene Understanding in Detecting Discharge of Domesticwaste Along Complex Urban Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninsalam, Y.; Qin, R.; Rekittke, J.

    2016-06-01

    In our study we use 3D scene understanding to detect the discharge of domestic solid waste along an urban river. Solid waste found along the Ciliwung River in the neighbourhoods of Bukit Duri and Kampung Melayu may be attributed to households. This is in part due to inadequate municipal waste infrastructure and services which has caused those living along the river to rely upon it for waste disposal. However, there has been little research to understand the prevalence of household waste along the river. Our aim is to develop a methodology that deploys a low cost sensor to identify point source discharge of solid waste using image classification methods. To demonstrate this we describe the following five-step method: 1) a strip of GoPro images are captured photogrammetrically and processed for dense point cloud generation; 2) depth for each image is generated through a backward projection of the point clouds; 3) a supervised image classification method based on Random Forest classifier is applied on the view dependent red, green, blue and depth (RGB-D) data; 4) point discharge locations of solid waste can then be mapped by projecting the classified images to the 3D point clouds; 5) then the landscape elements are classified into five types, such as vegetation, human settlement, soil, water and solid waste. While this work is still ongoing, the initial results have demonstrated that it is possible to perform quantitative studies that may help reveal and estimate the amount of waste present along the river bank.

  14. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-06-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE.

  15. Observed shift towards earlier spring discharge in the main Alpine rivers.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Matteo; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio; Navarra, Antonio

    2015-01-15

    In this study, we analyse the observed long-term discharge time-series of the Rhine, the Danube, the Rhone and the Po rivers. These rivers are characterised by different seasonal cycles reflecting the diverse climates and morphologies of the Alpine basins. However, despite the intensive and varied water management adopted in the four basins, we found common features in the trend and low-frequency variability of the spring discharge timings. All the discharge time-series display a tendency towards earlier spring peaks of more than two weeks per century. These results can be explained in terms of snowmelt, total precipitation (i.e. the sum of snowfall and rainfall) and rainfall variability. The relative importance of these factors might be different in each basin. However, we show that the change of seasonality of total precipitation plays a major role in the earlier spring runoff over most of the Alps. PMID:25005239

  16. Assessment of peak discharge uncertainty in the American River basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Flood-discharge data, current-meter and indirect measurements, and stage-discharge relations, the oldest of which dates to the early 1900's, were used to estimate the uncertainty about annual flood peaks in or near the American River Basin at 20 stream-gaging stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey. The study estimates that, in the study area, most flood peaks that were determined from current-meter measurements have an uncertainty of about plus or minus 3 percent, whereas the peaks that were determined from indirect measurements have an uncertainty ranging from plus or minus 10 to plus or minus 70 percent. The study also determined that the stage-discharge relations that have been developed for most of the sites in the American River Basin are correct.

  17. Assessments of Environmental Impacts and Beneficial Use of Coalbed Methane Produced Water in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Morris

    2009-03-15

    Impact on water quality and the beneficial use of the coal bed methane (CBM) produced water are imminent questions to be answered due to the rapidly growing CBM exploration in the Powder River Basin (PRB). The practice of discharging large volumes of water into drainage channels or using it to irrigate rangeland areas has the potential of causing serious problems. The elevated salinity and sodicity in the CBM water may be detrimental to soils, plants and the associated microbial communities. There are limited studies on CBM water characterization; however, a comprehensive understanding of CBM water influence on the local ecosystem is lacking. It is very important that the water applied to soils meets the favorable combination of salinity and sodicity that will allow the plants to grow at good production levels and that will maintain the structure of the soils. The purpose of this study was to access various CBM water treatment technologies and the influence of the treated water on local biogeochemical settings in order to evaluate and identify the proper technologies to treat the CBM produced water from CBM operations, and use it in an environmentally safe manner. Unfortunately, a suitable field site was not identified and the funds for this effort were moved to a different project.

  18. Landforms Affect Gravel-Cobble Bed River Hydraulics at Different Spatial Scales and Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R. L.; Pasternack, G. B.; Wyrick, J. R.; Johnson, T.

    2012-12-01

    River hydraulics are generally modeled to predict inundation extents, assess aquatic species habitat, understand sediment transport regimes, and describe geomorphic processes. These metrics are in turn used to guide floodplain development, instream flow requirements, river rehabilitation projects, reservoir management, and further research. Consequently, the emergence of 2D hydraulic modeling is usually a means to some end other than characterizing and discussing the fundamental aspects of fluvial hydraulics. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the role of different components of multi-scalar, heterogeneous fluvial landforms in controlling the spatial pattern of river hydraulics at 28 different flows ranging from 0.06 to 22 times bankfull discharge. The testbed data for the study consisted of 1-m resolution rasters of depth, velocity, and Shields stress over 37.5 km of the regulated gravel-cobble bed Lower Yuba River (LYR) located in the Sacramento River Valley of California. Each variable was analyzed for its discharge-dependent power function (i.e. at-a-station hydraulic geometry) at segment, reach, and morphologic spatial scales, with data stratified by 8 reaches, 4 inundation zones, two vegetation regions, and 31 morphological units. This was done using all points, not just at cross-sections. At each spatial scale, trend lines were statistically compared to determine if they were differentiated. Mean velocity and Shields stress as a function of discharge vary by reach, including several velocity and Shields stress reversals. The range of mean velocity and Shields stress between reaches increases with discharge. There are several reach-scale velocity reversals that take place among the reaches, especially at 0.3 and 2 times bankfull discharge, whereas there is only one major Shields stress reversal at 6 times bankfull discharge. Stage-dependent cross sectional area and substrate size govern these interactions. The two most downstream reaches had the

  19. Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production

    SciTech Connect

    Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

  20. Diagnostics and Prediction of Anomalous River Discharge in Northern South America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    1990-10-01

    The annual cycles of rainfall and river discharge in northern South America are dominated by the seasonal latitude migration of the intertropical convergence zone. The catchments in the west (Madden. Magdalena and Orinoco) have their high stands between August and December, while those of the Guyanas (Cuyuni, Essequibo, Suriname, Maroni and Oyapock) peak between May and July. Anomalously abundant discharge is in almost all catchments (except Orinoco) associated with the high SO phase (defined by anomalously high/low pressure at Tahiti/Darwin), weakened Caribbean tradewinds. and accelerated cross-equatorial southerly flow over the eastern Pacific.In a series of experiments a sharp distinction was kept between a `dependent' dataset (1940-70, or the part available in the river series) used as training period and an `independent' portion of the record (1971-87) reserved for prediction. Stepwise multiple regression models for bimonthly `seasons' used as input river discharge as regressand, and as regressors index series of Tahiti minus Darwin pressure difference, equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature PWT, zonal wind component over the Caribbean and meridional wind component over the eastern equatorial Pacific, all two seasons earlier. The resulting equations were then used to predict the discharge anomalies in the independent dataset 1971-87. There is considerable predictive skill for various rivers/seasons, with the overall best predictability for the low discharge time of year. In particular, for Magdalena 55% and for Essequibo 74% of the interannual variance of January-February discharge during 1971-87 is predictable by this method, in which for Essequibo PWT serves as sole predictor.

  1. River discharge and flood inundation over the Amazon based on IPCC AR5 scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Rodrigo; Sorribas, Mino; Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila; Melack, John; Bravo, Juan Martin; Beighley, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and related effects over the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin could have major impacts over human and ecological communities, including issues with transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined future changes in discharge and floodplain inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the hydrological model MGB-IPH (Modelo de Grandes Bacias - Instituto de Pesquisas Hidráulicas) coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model was forced using satellite based precipitation from the TRMM 3B42 dataset, and it had a good performance when validated against discharge and stage measurements as well as remotely sensed data, including radar altimetry-based water levels, gravity anomaly-based terrestrial water storage and flood inundation extent. Future scenarios of precipitation and other relevant climatic variables for the 2070 to 2100 time period were taken from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The climate models were chosen based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent (1970 to 2000) Amazon climate. A quantile-quantile bias removal procedure was applied to climate model precipitation to mitigate unreliable predictions. The hydrologic model was then forced using past observed climate data altered by delta change factors based on the past and future climate models aiming to estimate projected discharge and floodplain inundation in climate change scenario at several control points in the basin. The climate projections present large uncertainty, especially the precipitation rate, and predictions using different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes on total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, analyses of results at different regions indicate an increase

  2. Determination of trace elements in high purity alumina powder by helium enhanced direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sehoon; Kim, Sunhye; Hinrichs, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Trace impurities in high purity alumina powder were determined by fast flow direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The non-conductive samples were prepared with high purity graphite powder and used as a sample binder and as a secondary cathode. To improve the sensitivity of the GD-MS analysis, helium was introduced as an additional glow discharge gas to argon plasma. The quantification results of the GD-MS measurement were calculated by external calibration with matrix matched certified reference materials. The GD-MS results for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Ga in the alumina samples agreed well with the certified values of a reference material and the results of chemical analysis using wet sample digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The GD-MS analysis is a rapid analysis technique to determine trace elements in non-conductive alumina to below mg·kg- 1 levels.

  3. Geospatial database of estimates of groundwater discharge to streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Adriana; Masbruch, Melissa D.; Susong, David D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow) initiative, compiled published estimates of groundwater discharge to streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin as a geospatial database. For the purpose of this report, groundwater discharge to streams is the baseflow portion of streamflow that includes contributions of groundwater from various flow paths. Reported estimates of groundwater discharge were assigned as attributes to stream reaches derived from the high-resolution National Hydrography Dataset. A total of 235 estimates of groundwater discharge to streams were compiled and included in the dataset. Feature class attributes of the geospatial database include groundwater discharge (acre-feet per year), method of estimation, citation abbreviation, defined reach, and 8-digit hydrologic unit code(s). Baseflow index (BFI) estimates of groundwater discharge were calculated using an existing streamflow characteristics dataset and were included as an attribute in the geospatial database. A comparison of the BFI estimates to the compiled estimates of groundwater discharge found that the BFI estimates were greater than the reported groundwater discharge estimates.

  4. Sea Surface Salinity Variability in Response to the Congo River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Chao, Y.; Farrara, J. D.; Schumann, G.; Andreadis, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) variability associated with the Congo River discharge is examined using Aquarius satellite-retrieved SSS data and vertical profiles of salinity measured by the Argo floats. The Congo River plume can be clearly identified in the Aquarius SSS data with a westward extension of 500 to 1000 km off the coast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The peak amplitude of the SSS variability associated with the Congo River discharge exceeds 2.0 psu. Using the first two years of Aquarius data, a well-defined seasonal cycle is described: maximum fresh-water anomalies are found in the boreal winter and spring seasons. The fresh-water anomalies during the 2012-2013 winter and spring seasons are significantly fresher than the 2011-2012 winter and spring seasons. Vertical profiles of salinity derived from the Argo floats reveal that these fresh-water anomalies can be traced to 40 meters below the sea surface. Combining the Aquarius SSS data with the Argo vertical profiles of salinity, the 3D volume of these fresh-water anomalies can be inferred and used to estimate the Congo River discharge. Reasonably good agreement is found between the Congo River discharge as observed by a stream gauge at Kinshasa and that estimated from the combined Aquarius and Argo data, indicating that Aquarius data can be used to close the fresh-water budget between the coastal ocean and the Congo River. The precipitation minus evaporation portion of the freshwater flux is found to play a secondary role in this region.

  5. Discharge, water quality, and native fish abundance in the Virgin River, Utah, Nevada, and Arizona, in support of Pah Tempe Springs discharge remediation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Matthew P.; Lambert, Patrick M.; Hardy, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Pah Tempe Springs discharge hot, saline, low dissolved-oxygen water to the Virgin River in southwestern Utah, which is transported downstream to Lake Mead and the Colorado River. The dissolved salts in the Virgin River negatively influence the suitability of this water for downstream agricultural, municipal, and industrial use. Therefore, various remediation scenarios to remove the salt load discharged from Pah Tempe Springs to the Virgin River are being considered. One concern about this load removal is the potential to impact the ecology of the Virgin River. Specifically, information is needed regarding possible impacts of Pah Tempe Springs remediation scenarios on the abundance, distribution, and survival of native fish in the Virgin River. Future efforts that aim to quantitatively assess how various remediation scenarios to reduce the load of dissolved salts from Pah Tempe Springs into the Virgin River may influence the abundance, distribution, and survival of native fish will require data on discharge, water quality, and native fish abundance. This report contains organized accessible discharge, water quality, and native fish abundance data sets from the Virgin River, documents the compilation of these data, and discusses approaches for quantifying relations between abiotic physical and chemical conditions, and fish abundance.

  6. Understanding the relationship between rainfall and river discharge: trends in an Amazonian watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbrega, Rodolfo; Guzha, Alphonce; Freire, Paula; Santos, Celso; Gerold, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    A research challenge in the Amazon rainforest is to understand different environmental patterns in a five million km2 region which with poor and/or unavailable environmental data. Deforestation and degradation in this forest have motivated intense monitoring activities in order to understand its impact and support the formulation of sustainable environmental policies. Time series analysis of hydrologic data is often use as a tool to evaluate watershed responses to climatic and anthropogenic influences. In this study, trend analysis of stream discharge from a 35600 km² watershed (Curuá River), located in southern Amazon was performed using 31 years discharge and rainfall data (1976-2006). The Curuá River is a tributary of Xingu River, site of the controversial Belo Monte dam. The aim of this work was to investigate the temporal variability of discharge, in relation to associated rainfall variability in order to contribute to a better understanding of the hydrological status of the watershed. The Mann Kendall non parametric tests were performed on daily, seasonal and annual discharge data. Frequency analysis using wavelet transform was also done, and annual and seasonal rainfall data was analyzed and correlated to discharge. Results from this study indicate decreasing trends in discharge (intra- and inter-annual) but while there is no evidence of a decreasing trend in in rainfall. Further interpretation of the data for possible causes of discharge changes is needed at the local study level, and implications of these results discussed in the context of climate change, deforestation and water resource management (including dam's constructions last decades). Results from this study do not confirm findings from other regional scale trend analyses, and therefore is it important to quantify the spatial extension of these decreasing stream flow trends in the Amazonia.

  7. Re-Evaluation of the 1921 Peak Discharge at Skagit River near Concrete, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The peak discharge record at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gaging station at Skagit River near Concrete, Washington, is a key record that has come under intense scrutiny by the scientific and lay person communities in the last 4 years. A peak discharge of 240,000 cubic feet per second for the flood on December 13, 1921, was determined in 1923 by USGS hydrologist James Stewart by means of a slope-area measurement. USGS then determined the peak discharges of three other large floods on the Skagit River (1897, 1909, and 1917) by extending the stage-discharge rating through the 1921 flood measurement. The 1921 estimate of peak discharge was recalculated by Flynn and Benson of the USGS after a channel roughness verification was completed based on the 1949 flood on the Skagit River. The 1949 recalculation indicated that the peak discharge probably was 6.2 percent lower than Stewart's original estimate but the USGS did not officially change the peak discharge from Stewart's estimate because it was not more than a 10-percent change (which is the USGS guideline for revising peak flows) and the estimate already had error bands of 15 percent. All these flood peaks are now being used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to determine the 100-year flood discharge for the Skagit River Flood Study so any method to confirm or improve the 1921 peak discharge estimate is warranted. During the last 4 years, two floods have occurred on the Skagit River (2003, 2006) that has enabled the USGS to collect additional data, do further analysis, and yet again re-evaluate the 1921 peak discharge estimate. Since 1949, an island/bar in the study reach has reforested itself. This has complicated the flow hydraulics and made the most recent recalculation of the 1921 flood based on channel roughness verification that used 2003 and 2006 flood data less reliable. However, this recent recalculation did indicate that the original peak-discharge calculation by Stewart may be high, and it added to a

  8. Detection of discharge changes in Pyrenean mountain rivers using seismic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pastor, Pilar; Diaz, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    The seismic noise is a continuous vibration of the ground due to natural and artificial sources (e.g. oceanic waves, human activities). The investigation on this noise allows understanding the physical processes of its sources. Water flow in rivers has been identified as one of the sources of seismic noise at local scale. Its generation is related to two important processes associated, turbulence and transport of sediments. Those processes creates vibrations in the ground that travel as seismic waves and can be monitored using seismic stations close to the river channel. In the work by Díaz et al. (2004) we analysed the seismic signal of one station located in Canfranc underground Laboratory (LSC). We found an unusual signal in the 2-10 Hz frequency band and documented if relationship with the variations in the discharge of the Aragon River (southern Pyrenees), about 400 meters from LSC. We want to highlight that the conditions of this station, located in a tunnel, are privileged, as it is slightly affected by other sources of seismic noise, as wind or cultural noise. We concluded that the seismic record can be used to monitor the river discharge. Following this study, we are now testing if the same observations can this relation can be seen with seismic stations in typical conditions. To do so, we have installed three temporal stations close to Cinca and Segre Rivers (southern Pyrenees) and collected the hydrologic and atmospheric data available in the vicinity of the stations. First results show that a seismic signal associated to river can be identified for moderate increases in river discharge. However, wind gusts also produce seismic noise in similar frequency bands. Our aim now is to discriminate between wind- and river-related seismic noise episodes, in order to be able to monitor river discharges only using seismic data. As seismic data can be recorded and processed in near-real time, the seismic monitor of hydrological events can be of interest to prevent

  9. Characteristics and Trends of River Discharge into Hudson, James, and Ungava Bays, 1964-2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déry, Stephen J.; Stieglitz, Marc; McKenna, Edward C.; Wood, Eric F.

    2005-07-01

    The characteristics and trends of observed river discharge into the Hudson, James, and Ungava Bays (HJUBs) for the period 1964-2000 are investigated. Forty-two rivers with outlets into these bays contribute on average 714 km3 yr-1 [= 0.023 Sv (1 Sv 106 m3s-1)] of freshwater to high-latitude oceans. For the system as a whole, discharge attains an annual peak of 4.2 km3 day-1 on average in mid-June, whereas the minimum of 0.68 km3 day-1 occurs on average during the last week of March. The Nelson River contributes as much as 34% of the daily discharge for the entire system during winter but diminishes in relative importance during spring and summer. Runoff rates per contributing area are highest (lowest) on the eastern (western) shores of the Hudson and James Bays. Linear trend analyses reveal decreasing discharge over the 37-yr period in 36 out of the 42 rivers. By 2000, the total annual freshwater discharge into HJUBs diminished by 96 km3 (-13%) from its value in 1964, equivalent to a reduction of 0.003 Sv. The annual peak discharge rate associated with snowmelt has advanced by 8 days between 1964 and 2000 and has diminished by 0.036 km3 day-1 in intensity. There is a direct correlation between the timing of peak spring discharge rates and the latitude of a river's mouth; the spring freshet varies by 5 days for each degree of latitude. Continental snowmelt induces a seasonal pulse of freshwater from HJUBs that is tracked along its path into the Labrador Current. It is suggested that the annual upper-ocean salinity minimum observed on the inner Newfoundland Shelf can be explained by freshwater pulses composed of meltwater from three successive winter seasons in the river basins draining into HJUBs. A gradual salinization of the upper ocean during summer over the period 1966-94 on the inner Newfoundland Shelf is in accord with a decadal trend of a diminishing intensity in the continental meltwater pulses.

  10. An improved methodology to estimate river stage and discharge using Jason-2 satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, A. K.; Gupta, P. K.; Dutta, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry over inland water bodies is a technique to estimate water level of rivers, lakes and reservoirs. In this study river flow characteristics such as water level and discharge is estimated using Jason-2, 20 Hz waveform data. An improved approach is adopted to retrieve the water level information over the braided reaches of the Brahmaputra river. The morphological dynamics of braided rivers often makes it difficult to retrieve water level accurately. In the proposed methodology, supplementary information from microwave and optical images of monsoon and non-monsoon seasons is used to establish the virtual stations over the main channel of the river. A nested approach is adopted to create dynamic virtual stations to address the frequent channel shifting phenomena over the braided reaches of the river. The results indicate that, there is high variation in backscattering coefficient, which ranges from mean value of 35 dB during the non-monsoon season to 48 dB during the monsoon season. It clearly highlights the seasonal variability of river flow in the Brahmaputra. The water level retrieval is done using Ice-1 retracking algorithm. The statistical analysis of retrieved water level have shown good agreement with in situ (observed) water levels when compared for Jason-2 satellite tracks 53, 166, 231 and 242 passing over the Brahmaputra river. The water level information is converted into discharge time series for the satellite 166 using the rating curve of Guwahati gauge station. The root mean square error of retrieved water levels is in the range of 50-55 cm. Water level retrieved using proposed methodology are compared with Hydroweb and DAHITI water level product. It was found that proposed methodology has enhanced the altimeter derived water level accuracy for the different reaches of the braided Brahmaputra river.

  11. Sea surface salinity variability in response to the Congo river discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Farrara, John D.; Schumann, Guy; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Moller, Delwyn

    2015-05-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) variability associated with the Congo River discharge is examined using Aquarius satellite-retrieved SSS data and vertical profiles of salinity measured by the Argo floats. The Congo River and its adjacent coastal ocean region are selected for study because of their global importance in ocean-freshwater dynamics undermined by the lack of observational data and coordinated efforts to make in situ measurements in this region. With a weekly repeat orbit, Aquarius provides a unique opportunity to routinely map the SSS in this relatively remote and understudied region. The Congo River plume can be clearly identified in the Aquarius SSS data with a northwestward extension of 500-1000 km off the coast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The peak amplitude of the SSS variability associated with the Congo River discharge exceeds 3.0 psu, significantly greater than the designed Aquarius SSS retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu. Using the first two years of Aquarius data from September 2011 to August 2013, a well-defined seasonal cycle is described: maximum freshwater anomalies are found in the boreal winter and spring seasons. The anomalies during the 2012-2013 winter and spring seasons are significantly fresher than the 2011-2012 winter and spring seasons, suggesting a strong year-to-year variability. A strong correlation is found between month-to-month variations in upper ocean salinity (as revealed by Aquarius satellite and Argo observations) and month-to-month variations in the freshwater discharge from the Congo River over a region off the coast of West Africa that is large enough to be easily observed by the Aquarius satellite. Vertical profiles of salinity derived from Argo floats reveal that these freshwater anomalies can be traced to 30 m below the sea surface. Combining the spatial area characterized by strong negative correlations between Aquarius SSS data and Congo discharge with the Argo vertical profiles of salinity, the volume of the

  12. Effects of fluvial discharges on meiobenthic and macrobenthic variability in the Vistula River prodelta (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Mazurkiewicz, Mikołaj; Jankowska, Emilia; Kotwicki, Lech; Damrat, Mateusz; Zajączkowski, Marek

    2016-05-01

    The role of environmental variability produced by river discharges in shaping the spatial and seasonal patterns of meiobenthic and macrobenthic communities was studied in the Vistula River (Baltic Sea) prodelta. Seven stations located in the delta front, the plume influence area and the distal zone of the prodelta were visited over the four seasons of 2012. Meiofauna, macrofauna, water (temperature, salinity, and suspended matter) and sediments (grain size, POC, TN, δ15N and δ13C and photosynthetic pigments) were analysed. The seasonal variations in the river discharges (with maximum flows in spring) resulted in a strong temporal variability in the studied environmental characteristics. In the benthic biota, the signals of seasonal variability, if present, were much weaker than spatial zonation. The benthic communities inhabiting the delta front where the main bulk of fluvial materials was deposited were taxonomically impoverished. The richest fauna dwelled within the plume influence area where the physical disturbance ceased and primary marine production was enhanced by river transported nutrients. In the distal zone outside the river influence, the fauna was dominated by deeper dwelling species, and the numbers of individuals and taxa decreased. Factors related to the riverine discharges (i.e., salinity, mineral suspension, POC and δ13C in the water and sediments) were identified as having high correlation with variability in the meiofaunal and macrofaunal community descriptors. Evidently, the interplay of food (i.e., the quantity and quality of organic matter) and disturbance (i.e., the deposition of river transported minerals) constraints shaped the patterns of benthic variability in the prodelta of the second largest river entering the Baltic Sea.

  13. Water-quality characteristics and trend analyses for the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins, Wyoming and Montana, for selected periods, water years 1991 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.

    2012-01-01

    The Powder River structural basin in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana is an area of ongoing coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development. Waters produced during CBNG development are managed with a variety of techniques, including surface impoundments and discharges into stream drainages. The interaction of CBNG-produced waters with the atmosphere and the semiarid soils of the Powder River structural basin can affect water chemistry in several ways. Specific conductance and sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of CBNG-produced waters that are discharged to streams have been of particular concern because they have the potential to affect the use of the water for irrigation. Water-quality monitoring has been conducted since 2001 at main-stem and tributary sites in the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins in response to concerns about CBNG effects. A study was conducted to summarize characteristics of stream-water quality for water years 2001–10 (October 1, 2000, to September 30, 2010) and examine trends in specific conductance, SAR, and primary constituents that contribute to specific conductance and SAR for changes through time (water years 1991–2010) that may have occurred as a result of CBNG development. Specific conductance and SAR are the focus characteristics of this report. Dissolved calcium, magnesium, and sodium, which are primary contributors to specific conductance and SAR, as well as dissolved alkalinity, chloride, and sulfate, which are other primary contributors to specific conductance, also are described. Stream-water quality in the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins was variable during water years 2001–10, in part because of variations in streamflow. In general, annual runoff was less than average during water years 2001–06 and near or above average during water years 2007–10. Stream water of the Tongue River had the smallest specific conductance values, sodium adsorption ratios

  14. Hydrogeologic framework of the uppermost principal aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, Joanna N.; LeCain, Gary D.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sando, Roy; Long, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Regionally, water in the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer systems flows in a northerly or northeasterly direction from the Powder River structural basin to the Williston structural basin. Groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin generally is easterly or northeasterly. Flow in the uppermost hydrogeologic units generally is more local and controlled by topography where unglaciated in the Williston structural basin than is flow in the glaciated part and in underlying aquifers. Groundwater flow in the Powder River structural basin generally is northerly with local variations greatest in the uppermost aquifers. Groundwater is confined, and flow is regional in the underlying aquifers.

  15. Synoptic Discharge, Water-Property, and pH Measurements for Muddy River Springs Area and Muddy River, Nevada, February 7, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, David A.; Wilson, Jon W.

    2006-01-01

    On February 7, 2001, synoptic discharge measurements at selected sites along the Muddy River in Nevada, indicated three trends in discharge resulting from contributions of spring discharge, influences of diversionary flow, and contributions from shallow ground water. Effects from diversionary and tributary flow were local in nature and resulted in a net gain of 2.6 cubic feet per second throughout the measured reach. The minor increase in discharge may be the result of contributions from ground-water flow and measurement error. Comparison of 1963 and 2001 discharge measurements within the Muddy River Springs area indicated that discharge rates and trends from these source waters were similar. Along the mainstem of the Muddy River, water-temperature measurements indicated a net decrease of 8.8 degrees Celsius. Water samples collected and analyzed for specific conductance indicated a net increase of 390 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, whereas pH measurements remained relatively constant.

  16. The Influence of Dam Discharge Regime and Canyon Orientation on Ecosystem Metabolism in the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, T. A.; Tietjen, T.; Wright, S.

    2005-05-01

    Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam and the beginning of flow regulation of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon in 1963, considerable efforts have been directed toward understanding the aquatic ecology of this altered ecosystem. Understanding what controls resource availability has been a central focus of these efforts because the Colorado River supports populations of sport fish and endangered humpback chub, both of which appear to be strongly resource limited. There is evidence that dam discharge regime and canyon orientation influence algal standing crop due to their effects on water velocity (scour) and solar insolation, respectively. We explored whether these physical factors influenced rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, two different metrics of resource availability, in the clear tailwater section of the Colorado River by conducting whole system metabolism measurements across a range of discharge regimes and in reaches with different orientation (i.e. N-S vs. E-W). We found that while both discharge regime and canyon orientation influence rates of primary production, seasonal changes in light availability appear to have a far stronger influence on rates of primary production in the Colorado River. Water temperature appeared to be the main driver of ecosystem respiration.

  17. The role of discharge variation in scaling of drainage area and food chain length in rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Post, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Food chain length (FCL) is a fundamental component of food web structure. Studies in a variety of ecosystems suggest that FCL is determined by energy supply, environmental stability, and/or ecosystem size, but the nature of the relationship between environmental stability and FCL, and the mechanism linking ecosystem size to FCL, remain unclear. Here we show that FCL increases with drainage area and decreases with hydrologic variability and intermittency across 36 North American rivers. Our analysis further suggests that hydrologic variability is the mechanism underlying the correlation between ecosystem size and FCL in rivers. Ecosystem size lengthens river food chains by integrating and attenuating discharge variation through stream networks, thereby enhancing environmental stability in larger river systems.

  18. A comparative study of fuzzy logic systems approach for river discharge prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Perera, E. D. P.; Zhu, Bing; Amarasekara, J. D.; Vereivalu, V.

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, flood disasters resulting from extreme rainfall have been on the increase in many regions of the world. In developed countries, the usual practice of mitigating flood disasters is by structural means which can reduce infrastructural damages as well as casualties but are unaffordable in most developing countries. The alternative then is to look for non-structural means that involve, among other things, early warning systems which can reduce casualties. The basic technical components of an early warning system involves a measurable input data set that trigger floods, a measurable output data set that quantify the extent of flood and an appropriate mathematical model that transforms the input data set into a corresponding output data set. There are many types of mathematical models that can be used to transform the input data into corresponding output data. The crux of this paper is on one type of data driven mathematical models, namely the use of fuzzy logic approach. The reliability and robustness of the approach are demonstrated with daily and 6-hourly discharge predictions in 4 rivers in 3 countries having contrasting climatological, geographical and land use characteristics. The first application is for two tropical rivers in Sri Lanka using daily upstream rainfall and discharge data to predict downstream discharge with the minimum implication function type Mamdani fuzzy inference system. The second application is for another tropical river in Fiji using similar type of data with daily and 6-h time scales. Both Mamdani type fuzzy inference system with minimum and product implication functions as well as Larsen type inference systems were used. In the third application, daily upstream and tributary discharges were used to predict downstream discharges in a temperate-climate river in China using the TSK type fuzzy inference system with clustering. The methods are robust and the results obtained are within reasonable agreement with observations.

  19. River Discharge and Bathymetry Estimation from Hydraulic Inversion of Surface Currents and Water Surface Elevation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, J.; Holland, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    We developed an inversion model for river bathymetry and discharge estimation based on measurements of surface currents, water surface elevation and shoreline coordinates. The model uses a simplification of the 2D depth-averaged steady shallow water equations based on a streamline following system of coordinates and assumes spatially uniform bed friction coefficient and eddy viscosity. The spatial resolution of the predicted bathymetry is related to the resolution of the surface currents measurements. The discharge is determined by minimizing the difference between the predicted and the measured streamwise variation of the total head. The inversion model was tested using in situ and remote sensing measurements of the Kootenai River east of Bonners Ferry, ID. The measurements were obtained in August 2010 when the discharge was about 223 m3/s and the maximum river depth was about 6.5 m. Surface currents covering a 10 km reach with 8 m spatial resolution were estimated from airborne infrared video and were converted to depth-averaged currents using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements along eight cross-stream transects. The streamwise profile of the water surface elevation was measured using real-time kinematic GPS from a drifting platform. The value of the friction coefficient was obtained from forward calibration simulations that minimized the difference between the predicted and measured velocity and water level along the river thalweg. The predicted along/cross-channel water depth variation was compared to the depth measured with a multibeam echo sounder. The rms error between the measured and predicted depth along the thalweg was found to be about 60cm and the estimated discharge was 5% smaller than the discharge measured by the ADCP.

  20. A Particular River-Whiting Phenomenon Caused by Discharge of Hypolimnetic Water from a Stratified Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingan; Yang, Haiquan; Zhang, David Dian; Xu, Dan; Luo, Jing; Wang, Jingfu

    2015-01-01

    A particular river-whiting phenomenon occurred in the early 2000s in the Xiaoche River and since then it has been reoccurring from June to November each year. Residents were surprised by this phenomenon and worried about it. This study was designed to reveal the forming mechanism of the river-whiting phenomenon. A comparison of T, EC, ORP, DO, TDS and δ34S in the culvert water and discharge pipe water with that in the water column of Aha Reservoir strongly indicated that the culvert water and discharge pipe water derived primarily from the hypolimnetic reservoir water. When the hypolimnetic water enriched in SO42- and H2S, through seepage from the penstock, flows into the Xiaoche River, the water's supersaturation degree with respect to CaSO4 is increased as a result of increased temperature and DO, thus colloid CaSO4 can be formed. This is the essential cause of the river-whiting phenomenon. The sources of high concentrations of SO42- and H2S in hypolimnetic water include not only direct SO42- and H2S input of acid mine drainage as a result of irrational coal mining in the watershed, but also the sulfur-enriched surface sediments which may release H2S through the sulfate reduction processes. The contaminated sediment has acted as an important contamination source for sulfur to the overlying water in Aha Reservoir. There are more than 50,000 large dams in the world until now. With the increase of reservoir age and the persistent accumulation of pollutants within the reservoir system, discharged hypolimnetic water may contain high levels of pollutants and lead to unpredicted disasters. More investigations are needed to illuminate the water quality condition of discharge water from reservoirs and estimate its impacts on the downstream eco-environment. PMID:26361219

  1. A Particular River-Whiting Phenomenon Caused by Discharge of Hypolimnetic Water from a Stratified Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingan; Yang, Haiquan; Zhang, David Dian; Xu, Dan; Luo, Jing; Wang, Jingfu

    2015-01-01

    A particular river-whiting phenomenon occurred in the early 2000s in the Xiaoche River and since then it has been reoccurring from June to November each year. Residents were surprised by this phenomenon and worried about it. This study was designed to reveal the forming mechanism of the river-whiting phenomenon. A comparison of T, EC, ORP, DO, TDS and δ34S in the culvert water and discharge pipe water with that in the water column of Aha Reservoir strongly indicated that the culvert water and discharge pipe water derived primarily from the hypolimnetic reservoir water. When the hypolimnetic water enriched in SO42- and H2S, through seepage from the penstock, flows into the Xiaoche River, the water's supersaturation degree with respect to CaSO4 is increased as a result of increased temperature and DO, thus colloid CaSO4 can be formed. This is the essential cause of the river-whiting phenomenon. The sources of high concentrations of SO42- and H2S in hypolimnetic water include not only direct SO42- and H2S input of acid mine drainage as a result of irrational coal mining in the watershed, but also the sulfur-enriched surface sediments which may release H2S through the sulfate reduction processes. The contaminated sediment has acted as an important contamination source for sulfur to the overlying water in Aha Reservoir. There are more than 50,000 large dams in the world until now. With the increase of reservoir age and the persistent accumulation of pollutants within the reservoir system, discharged hypolimnetic water may contain high levels of pollutants and lead to unpredicted disasters. More investigations are needed to illuminate the water quality condition of discharge water from reservoirs and estimate its impacts on the downstream eco-environment. PMID:26361219

  2. Estimation of natural dissolved-solids discharge in the Upper Colorado River basin, Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.K.; Osen, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    A statistical method was developed to estimate monthly natural dissolved-solids discharge at selected sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Natural dissolved-solids discharge was defined as the rate of inorganic-solute flow past a specific site that would have occurred if there had been no water-resources development in the basin upstream from the site. The method used weighted least-squares regression to fit a model of dissolved-solids discharge as a function of streamflow and several variables representing development. After the model had been calibrated for an individual site, the development variables were assigned a value of zero to yield the relation between dissolved-solids discharge and streamflow for conditions of no upstream development. Natural dissolved-solids discharge was calculated using this relation and estimates of natural streamflow provided by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Limitations of the method included lack of data to verify estimates of the natural dissolved-solids discharge and to represent all the effects of development adequately. However, model statistics indicated a good fit to historical data. Also, the estimates of natural dissolved-solids-discharge had the expected monthly distribution and were consistent between upstream and downstream sites. (USGS)

  3. Water discharge affects Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolt production: a 27 year study in the River Orkla, Norway.

    PubMed

    Hvidsten, N A; Diserud, O H; Jensen, A J; Jensås, J G; Johnsen, B O; Ugedal, O

    2015-01-01

    A model that explains 48% of the annual variation in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolt production in the River Orkla, Norway, has been established. This variation could be explained by egg deposition, minimum daily discharge during the previous winter and minimum weekly discharge during the summer 3 years before smolt migration. All coefficients in the model were positive, which indicates that more eggs and higher minimum discharge levels during the winter before smolt migration and the summer after hatching benefit smolt production. Hence, when the spawning target of the river is reached, the minimum levels of river discharge, in both winter and summer, are the main bottlenecks for the parr survival, and hence for smolt production. The River Orkla was developed for hydropower production in the early 1980s by the construction of four reservoirs upstream of the river stretch accessible to S. salar. Although no water has been removed from the catchment, the dynamics of water flow has been altered, mainly by increasing discharges during winter and reducing spring floods. In spite of the higher than natural winter discharges, minimum winter discharge is still a determinant of smolt production. Hence, in regulated rivers, the maintenance of discharges to ensure that they are as high as possible during dry periods is an important means of securing high S. salar smolt production. PMID:25418585

  4. Impact of river discharge on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in eutrophic estuaries: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; de Swart, Huib E.

    2015-12-01

    Field observations in estuaries reveal that phytoplankton blooms are strongly affected by advection processes related to river flow. To gain quantitative insight into this dependence, experiments were performed with a new idealised model that couples physical and biological processes. Advection of phytoplankton and nutrient by subtidal flow was explicitly accounted for, as well as longitudinal and vertical mixing processes. Results show that the idealised model is capable of reproducing the observed bloom. The specific spatial distribution of phytoplankton population emerges because the latter is suppressed in the upper reach by the advection processes, and the growth is limited in the lower reach by low nutrient concentrations. A sensitivity study of model results to different river discharges reveals the presence of three regimes. In the low discharge regime, blooms form because growth is faster than decay due to advection processes. In the high discharge regime, the situation is opposite and no blooms form. If time scales of growth and advection are comparable (in moderate discharge regime), phytoplankton population increases significantly slower compared to the low discharge regime. Results of additional model runs, in which water depth and the e-folding length scale of estuarine width convergence were varied, revealed that the three regimes occur in all these cases.

  5. Quantifying the suspended sediment discharge to the ocean from the Markham River, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renagi, Ora; Ridd, Peter; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The Markham River is a small river draining a tropical mountain range with altitudes between 1000 and 3000 m and discharges directly into a submarine canyon, the head of which is at 30 m depth and reaches depths of 500 m only 4 km from the shore. As such, the Markham discharge system serves as a possible analogue for rivers discharging onto margins during low stands of sea-level. Located in a tectonically active area and with high rainfall, sediment supply is high and episodic and is sometimes related to catastrophic mountain landslides. The river has an estimated sediment load of 12 Mt yr -1. Occasionally, high energy flows are generated at the river mouth which is evident from the channel morphology and sediment distribution. Profiles of salinity and suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) show that sediment is dispersed via a plume with components at both the surface, intermediate depth along isopycnal surfaces and near the sea bed. The dispersal pattern of the surface freshwater plume is largely determined by the buoyancy force. The surface plume is very thin with salinity gradients 15 ppt m -1 while a Richardson number greater than unity suggested that the mixing zone is highly stratified. Estimates of the horizontal sediment flux gradient of the surface plume along the estuary axis suggest that about 80% of the sediment discharged is lost from the plume within a distance of 2 km from the river mouth. Particle fall velocities estimated from the vertical flux indicate values less than those of flocculated material. Layers of sediment with SSCs between 500 and 1000 mg l -1 were observed at intermediate depths and near the seabed during periods of both high and intermediate discharge. The mass of sediment in a SSC layer at intermediate depths between 150 and 250 m within the canyon channel was estimated to be equivalent to an average of 2 to 3 days of Markham sediment discharge. SSCs near the seabed of between 250 and 750 mg l -1 suggest that layers of

  6. Specific Conductivity Synoptic Surveys to Map Groundwater-Surface Water Discharges in a Lowland River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, H.; Villamizar, S. R.; Harmon, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying distributed groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) discharges at the watershed scale is a challenging but important aspect of tracking nonpoint-source pollutants and their potential impacts on riverine water quality. This work analyzes high spatiotemporal longitudinal river sampling along a 38 km reach of the lower Merced River (LMR) in California's San Joaquin River (SJR) watershed and estimates GW-SW discharges using a simple discretized mixing model. The LMR flow is dam-controlled upstream and has several distributed surface discharges from SW diversions, SW canal inputs, and potential GW discharges influenced by the surrounding agricultural and municipal landscapes. We collected longitudinal datasets covering a wide range of flows (1.3 to 150 m3/s), sampling georeferenced water specific conductance (SC) at intervals of less than 1 minute. Whole-reach gradients of SW specific conductance (SC), representing GW-SW salinity loading (mS/cm/river km), decreased in proportion to the flow and stage, indicating either (1) a simple dilution effect or (2) reduced GW-SW discharges due to a reduced GW-SW hydraulic gradient at higher stages. With respect to distributed discharges, local gradients were significant (p < 0.05), with estimated local salinity loads varying from -0.4 to 8.9 mS/cm/river km for the LMR conditions. Using local groundwater salinity estimates, we inverted a discretized mixing model to estimate distributed groundwater fluxes. Summation of the fluxes agreed well with stream gage estimates. However, local flux estimates were nonuniform, with mid-reach values consistently increasing to a maximum value at intermediate stream flows, then decreasing for greater flows. Causes for this behavior remain uncertain but may be due to one or more of the following: (1) uncertainty in the groundwater salinity data, (2) salinity reduction in the hyporheic zone (e.g., denitrification), and (3) access to preferential GW-SW flowpaths at intermediate flows and stages

  7. Evaluation of seepage and discharge uncertainty in the middle Snake River, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Williams, Marshall L.; Evetts, David M.; Vidmar, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the State of Idaho, Idaho Power Company, and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, evaluated seasonal seepage gains and losses in selected reaches of the middle Snake River, Idaho, during November 2012 and July 2013, and uncertainty in measured and computed discharge at four Idaho Power Company streamgages. Results from this investigation will be used by resource managers in developing a protocol to calculate and report Adjusted Average Daily Flow at the Idaho Power Company streamgage on the Snake River below Swan Falls Dam, near Murphy, Idaho, which is the measurement point for distributing water to owners of hydropower and minimum flow water rights in the middle Snake River. The evaluated reaches of the Snake River were from King Hill to Murphy, Idaho, for the seepage studies and downstream of Lower Salmon Falls Dam to Murphy, Idaho, for evaluations of discharge uncertainty. Computed seepage was greater than cumulative measurement uncertainty for subreaches along the middle Snake River during November 2012, the non-irrigation season, but not during July 2013, the irrigation season. During the November 2012 seepage study, the subreach between King Hill and C J Strike Dam had a meaningful (greater than cumulative measurement uncertainty) seepage gain of 415 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the subreach between Loveridge Bridge and C J Strike Dam had a meaningful seepage gain of 217 ft3/s. The meaningful seepage gain measured in the November 2012 seepage study was expected on the basis of several small seeps and springs present along the subreach, regional groundwater table contour maps, and results of regional groundwater flow model simulations. Computed seepage along the subreach from C J Strike Dam to Murphy was less than cumulative measurement uncertainty during November 2012 and July 2013; therefore, seepage cannot be quantified with certainty along this subreach. For the uncertainty evaluation, average

  8. Calculation of groundwater discharge to the Columbia River in the 100-N Area

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Newcomer, D.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Spane, F.A.

    1992-04-01

    A computer code called WATDIS (an acronym for water discharge) was developed that, when used with the commercially available software, WATER-VEL{trademark}, calculates the volumetric discharge to a specific cross-sectional area of the aquifer. This report describes the development of the WATDIS code and its application. The development of this code is Phase 1 of a two-phased project whose objective is to estimate the amounts of radionuclides reaching the Columbia River through the unconfined aquifer as a result of natural'' conditions.

  9. Predicting groundwater flow system discharge in the river network at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between rivers and aquifers affects the quality and the quantity of surface and subsurface water since it plays a crucial role for solute transport, nutrient cycling and microbial transformations. The groundwater-surface water interface, better known as hyporheic zone, has a functional significance for the biogeochemical and ecological conditions of the fluvial ecosystem since it controls the flux of groundwater solutes discharging into rivers, and vice versa. The hyporheic processes are affected by the complex surrounding aquifer because the groundwater flow system obstructs the penetration of stream water into the sediments. The impact of large-scale stream-aquifer interactions on small scale exchange has generally been analyzed at local scales of a river reach, or even smaller. However, a complete comprehension of how hyporheic fluxes are affected by the groundwater system at watershed scale is still missing. Evaluating this influence is fundamental to predict the consequences of hyporheic exchange on water quality and stream ecology. In order to better understand the actual structure of hyporheic exchange along the river network, we firstly examine the role of basin topography complexity in controlling river-aquifer interactions. To reach this target, we focus on the analysis of surface-subsurface water exchange at the watershed scale, taking into account the river-aquifer interactions induced by landscape topography. By way of a mathematical model, we aim to improve the estimation of the role of large scale hydraulic gradients on hyporheic exchange. The potential of the method is demonstrated by the analysis of a benchmark case's study, which shows how the topographic conformation influences the stream-aquifer interaction and induces a substantial spatial variability of the groundwater discharge even among adjacent reaches along the stream. The vertical exchange velocity along the river evidences a lack of autocorrelation. Both the groundwater

  10. Evaluation of the depth-integration method of measuring water discharge in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, John A.; Troutman, Brent M.

    1992-07-01

    The depth-integration method oor measuring water discharge makes a continuos measurement of the water velocity from the water surface to the bottom at 20 to 40 locations or verticals across a river. It is especially practical for large rivers where river traffic makes it impractical to use boats attached to taglines strung across the river or to use current meters suspended from bridges. This method has the additional advantage over the standard two- and eight-tenths method in that a discharge-weighted suspended-sediment sample can be collected at the same time. When this method is used in large rivers such as the Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio, a microwave navigation system is used to determine the ship's position at each vertical sampling location across the river, and to make accurate velocity corrections to compensate for shift drift. An essential feature is a hydraulic winch that can lower and raise the current meter at a constant transit velocity so that the velocities at all depths are measured for equal lengths of time. Field calibration measurements show that: (1) the mean velocity measured on the upcast (bottom to surface) is within 1% of the standard mean velocity determined by 9-11 point measurements; (2) if the transit velocity is less than 25% of the mean velocity, then average error in the mean velocity is 4% or less. The major source of bias error is a result of mounting the current meter above a sounding weight and sometimes above a suspended-sediment sampling bottle, which prevents measurement of the velocity all the way to the bottom. The measured mean velocity is slightly larger than the true mean velocity. This bias error in the discharge is largest in shallow water (approximately 8% for the Missouri River at Hermann, MO, where the mean depth was 4.3 m) and smallest in deeper water (approximately 3% for the Mississippi River at Vickbsurg, MS, where the mean depth was 14.5 m). The major source of random error in the discharge is the natural

  11. Evaluation of the depth-integration method of measuring water discharge in large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The depth-integration method oor measuring water discharge makes a continuos measurement of the water velocity from the water surface to the bottom at 20 to 40 locations or verticals across a river. It is especially practical for large rivers where river traffic makes it impractical to use boats attached to taglines strung across the river or to use current meters suspended from bridges. This method has the additional advantage over the standard two- and eight-tenths method in that a discharge-weighted suspended-sediment sample can be collected at the same time. When this method is used in large rivers such as the Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio, a microwave navigation system is used to determine the ship's position at each vertical sampling location across the river, and to make accurate velocity corrections to compensate for shift drift. An essential feature is a hydraulic winch that can lower and raise the current meter at a constant transit velocity so that the velocities at all depths are measured for equal lengths of time. Field calibration measurements show that: (1) the mean velocity measured on the upcast (bottom to surface) is within 1% of the standard mean velocity determined by 9-11 point measurements; (2) if the transit velocity is less than 25% of the mean velocity, then average error in the mean velocity is 4% or less. The major source of bias error is a result of mounting the current meter above a sounding weight and sometimes above a suspended-sediment sampling bottle, which prevents measurement of the velocity all the way to the bottom. The measured mean velocity is slightly larger than the true mean velocity. This bias error in the discharge is largest in shallow water (approximately 8% for the Missouri River at Hermann, MO, where the mean depth was 4.3 m) and smallest in deeper water (approximately 3% for the Mississippi River at Vickbsurg, MS, where the mean depth was 14.5 m). The major source of random error in the discharge is the natural

  12. Influence of river discharge and ocean currents on coastal optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Brando, Vittorio E.; Schroeder, Thomas; Clementson, Lesley A.; Dekker, Arnold G.

    2014-08-01

    The variability in the optical properties of a coastal region influenced by river runoff and multiple ocean currents in a southern hemisphere setting has been studied. The study area, Tasmanian coastal waters, is influenced by subtropical currents such as the East Australian Current (EAC) and the Zeehan Current (ZC) mix with cooler sub-Antarctic water (SAW). Freshwater discharges from rivers around the island and their mixing with the ocean currents also influence Tasmanian coastal waters. This study was performed to understand the influence of hydrodynamic processes on coastal optical properties and underwater light propagation. Physical, biogeochemical and optical properties were measured in Tasmanian coastal water during the austral autumn of 2007. In this study we found that physical properties have a good correlation with optical properties indicating the role played by hydrodynamic processes in distribution of optically active substances, optical properties of the water mass and underwater light propagation. Analysis of in situ salinity and temperature confirmed the presence of relatively cooler ZC in the South-West region, a cooler mixture of the ZC and SAW in the South-East, warm and saline EAC waters along the East coast and relatively cooler and fresh Bass straight waters along the North coast. In Tasmanian coastal waters light absorption in the water column is controlled by Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) with regionally varying contributions from Non-Algal Particulate (NAP) matter and phytoplankton. Absorption due to CDOM and NAP show a conservative mixing behaviour indicating that these biogeochemical components were delivered by the river and diluted in the coastal water. Suspended particulate matter in Tasmanian coastal water are highly scattering in nature and the beam attenuation is mainly due to light scattering. Variability in probability of light backscattering was mainly due to varying availability of non-algal particulate matter in

  13. Methods to estimate annual mean spring discharge to the Snake River between Milner Dam and King Hill, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    Many individual springs and groups of springs discharge water from volcanic rocks that form the north canyon wall of the Snake River between Milner Dam and King Hill. Previous estimates of annual mean discharge from these springs have been used to understand the hydrology of the eastern part of the Snake River Plain. Four methods that were used in previous studies or developed to estimate annual mean discharge since 1902 were (1) water-budget analysis of the Snake River; (2) correlation of water-budget estimates with discharge from 10 index springs; (3) determination of the combined discharge from individual springs or groups of springs by using annual discharge measurements of 8 springs, gaging-station records of 4 springs and 3 sites on the Malad River, and regression equations developed from 5 of the measured springs; and (4) a single regression equation that correlates gaging-station records of 2 springs with historical water-budget estimates. Comparisons made among the four methods of estimating annual mean spring discharges from 1951 to 1959 and 1963 to 1980 indicated that differences were about equivalent to a measurement error of 2 to 3 percent. The method that best demonstrates the response of annual mean spring discharge to changes in ground-water recharge and discharge is method 3, which combines the measurements and regression estimates of discharge from individual springs.

  14. Streamflow Regulation Effects on the Mean Annual Discharge of the Large Siberian Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, S.; Yang, D.; Shiklomanov, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    The magnitude of natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrological systems is one of the major scientific questions yet to be answered. The streamflow of the Ob, Yenisei and Lena Rivers has been altered by human through impoundments and diversions to meet water, energy and transportation needs. On seasonal scale, control of flow during spring and early summer has reduced peak discharge, while release of water from the reservoirs during winter months has increased winter discharge. While it is evident that streamflow regulation has a marked effect on the seasonality of discharge, its effects on mean annual discharge (MAD) is more complex. The primary impacts include filling of the reservoirs and long-term intra-annual streamflow regulation; that is, water is captured in the reservoir and then released in the following years. The secondary effects are increased groundwater storage following dam construction and enhanced evaporation from the reservoir surface. At small- to medium-scale watersheds, streamflow regulation on MAD can be well-pronounced. When the watershed area covers million of square kilometers, the impact of streamflow regulation on mean annual discharge becomes questionable and often neglected. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss in which Siberian watersheds streamflow regulation has affected long-term intra-annual variability. Our work was prompted by the knowledge that relative to climatic effects, the impacts of dams are much more direct and often cause abrupt changes in river water regimes. We expected that these changes would be clearly visible in discharge records and in the discharge-precipitation relationship. We have identified and quantified with observations the MAD variability at different frequencies and show how this varies over time in response to precipitation variability. If discharge and precipitation relationship is spiked, then the hypothesis on streamflow regulation was tested through the reconstructed MAD data. Our

  15. Drill hole data for coal beds in the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon; Scott, David C.

    2013-01-01

    This report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming is part of the U.S. Coal Resources and Reserves Assessment Project. Essential to that project was the creation of a comprehensive drill hole database that was used for coal bed correlation and for coal resource and reserve assessments in the PRB. This drill hole database was assembled using data from the USGS National Coal Resources Data System, several other Federal and State agencies, and selected mining companies. Additionally, USGS personnel manually entered lithologic picks into the database from geophysical logs of coalbed methane, oil, and gas wells. Of the 29,928 drill holes processed, records of 21,393 are in the public domain and are included in this report. The database contains location information, lithology, and coal bed names for each drill hole.

  16. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with thick First Leo sandstone lenses, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balch, A.H.; Lee, M.W.; Miller, J.J.; Ryder, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Several new discoveries of oil production in the Leo sandstone, an economic unit in the Pennsylvanian middle member of the Minnelusa formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming-Nebraska-South Dakota, have renewed exploration interest in this area. Vertical seismic profiles (VSP) and model studies suggested that a measurable seismic amplitude anomaly is frequently associated with the thick First Leo sandstone lenses. To test this concept, a surface reflection seismic profile was run between two wells about 12 miles apart. The First Leo was present and productive in one well and thin and barren in the other. The surface profile shows the predicted amplitude anomaly at the well where a thick lens is known to exist. Two other First Leo amplitude anomalies also appear on the surface seismic profile between the two wells, which may indicate the presence of additional lenses.-Authors

  17. An economic framework for analyzing reclamation after energy extraction in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Abby A.

    Wyoming's economy is highly dependent on natural gas and coal production, but energy extraction degrades rangelands. Federal and state laws and policies govern reclamation of disturbed lands. However, establishing sagebrush plant communities is difficult and defining successful reclamation can be challenging. We analyze reclamation costs in the Powder River Basin of northeastern Wyoming using coal company annual reclamation reports. We also construct a probabilistic mathematical programming model that characterizes a coal company's reclamation decision-,making process and proposes a way to incorporate uncertainty into reclamation modeling. We also use results from a plant sciences field experiment to incorporate costs into optimal seed mix and herbicide choice. This thesis also draws attention to the disconnect between the data biologists collect and the data that economists need to model reclamation decision-making.

  18. Coal aquifer contribution to streams in the Powder River Basin, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Elizabeth Brinck

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater contributions to streams can be reduced by groundwater withdrawal associated with coalbed methane and coal mine production. Quantifying the groundwater contribution to streams aids the assessment of potential impacts to in-stream flow and provides information necessary for energy producers to use coproduced water for beneficial purposes, rather than treating it as a waste product. Stream flow, field parameters, common ions, and isotopes of carbon and strontium were measured on Otter Creek and the Powder River in southeastern Montana. Direct streamflow measurements were ineffective because of the magnitude and nature of coalbed contribution. The coal groundwater contribution did not exceed the geochemical detection threshold on two nearby streams. Geochemical models based on isotopic data proved to be the most effective analytical method, resulting in baseflow measurements from coal aquifers of 28-275 l s-1.

  19. Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, D.E.

    2000-07-01

    Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

  20. Comparative evaluation of ensemble Kalman filter, particle filter and variational techniques for river discharge forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirpa, F. A.; Gebremichael, M.; LEE, H.; Hopson, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic data assimilation techniques provide a means to improve river discharge forecasts through updating hydrologic model states and correcting the atmospheric forcing data via optimally combining model outputs with observations. The performance of the assimilation procedure, however, depends on the data assimilation techniques used and the amount of uncertainty in the data sets. To investigate the effects of these, we comparatively evaluate three data assimilation techniques, including ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), particle filter (PF) and variational (VAR) technique, which assimilate discharge and synthetic soil moisture data at various uncertainty levels into the Sacramento Soil Moisture accounting (SAC-SMA) model used by the National Weather Service (NWS) for river forecasting in The United States. The study basin is Greens Bayou watershed with area of 178 km2 in eastern Texas. In the presentation, we summarize the results of the comparisons, and discuss the challenges of applying each technique for hydrologic applications.

  1. The offshore export of sand during exceptional discharge from California rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    Littoral cells along active tectonic margins receive large inputs of sand and gravel from coastal watersheds and commonly lose this sediment to submarine canyons. One hypothesis is that the majority of coarse (sand and gravel) river sediment discharge will be emplaced within and immediately “resupply” local littoral cells. A competing hypothesis is that the infrequent, large floods that supply the majority of littoral sediment may discharge water-sediment mixtures within negatively buoyant hyperpycnal plumes that transport sediment offshore of the littoral cell. Here we summarize pre- and post-flood surveys of two wave-dominated California (United States) river deltas during record to near-record floods to help evaluate these hypotheses: the 1982–1983 delta at the San Lorenzo River mouth and the 2005 delta at the Santa Clara River mouth. Flood sedimentation at both deltas resulted in several meters of aggradation and hundreds of meters of offshore displacement of isobaths. One substantial difference between these deltas was the thick (>2 m) aggradation of sand on the inner shelf of the Santa Clara River delta that contained substantial amounts (∼50%) of littoral-grade sediment. Once deposited on the inner shelf, only a fraction (∼20%) of this river sand was observed to migrate toward the beach over the following 5 yr. Furthermore, simple hypopycnal plume behavior could not explain deposition of this sand on the inner shelf. Thus, during an exceptional flood a substantial amount of littoral-grade sand was exported offshore of the littoral system at the Santa Clara River mouth—likely from hyperpycnal plume processes—and was deposited on the inner shelf.

  2. Freshwater fluxes in the Berau estuary and shelf during peak river discharge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Vegt, M.; Tarya, A.; Hoitink, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Berau Continental Shelf is located close to the Equator in the Indonesian Archipelago, hosting a complex of coral reefs and atolls along its oceanic edge. It is important to understand how river water, sediments, and other materials derived from land are carried to reefs by physical mechanisms, since they can have beneficial as well as negative effects. Furthermore, at several of the atolls unique seagrass meadows are found. These ecosystems need exclusively marine conditions and are intolerant to freshwater. In the Berau Continental shelf much uncertainty remains about how much of the riverine water reaches the reefs and the atolls. In a recent study we showed that tides are the main contributor to the spreading of freshwater at the Berau Continental Shelf under average conditions: relatively small river discharge, weak winds, strong tides. A three-dimensional model (ECOMSED) was calibrated and validated with observational data collected in the context of the East Kalimantan Research Programme. Data-model comparison showed high skill scores and small systematic errors. Model analysis has shown that tides effect the plume by causing vertical mixing, by stratifying the plume due to tidal straining and by transporting freshwater. This causes the depth-integrated freshwater transport to be mainly north-eastward, toward the barrier reef. Under these average conditions freshwater does not reach the atolls. The main aim of this study is to study plume dynamics at the Berau shelf during peak river discharge and peak wind conditions. Because the Berau delta is urbanizing rapidly increasing peak river discharges and sediment loads are expected. In addition, although the yearly mean wind is small, peak wind events concurrent with peak floods might push the stratified top layer of the water column towards the reefs and atolls. Using the results of a hydrological model we estimated realistic peak values of the river discharge based on scenarios for the economical

  3. Groundwater chemistry near an impoundment for produced water, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Bartos, T.T.; Rice, C.A.; McKinley, M.P.; Smith, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is one of the largest producers of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the United States. An important environmental concern in the Basin is the fate of the large amounts of groundwater extracted during CBNG production. Most of this produced water is disposed of in unlined surface impoundments. A 6-year study of groundwater flow and water chemistry at one impoundment, Skewed Reservoir, has produced the most detailed data set for any impoundment in the Basin. Data were collected from a network of 21 observation wells and three suction lysimeters. A groundwater mound formed atop bedrock within initially unsaturated, unconsolidated deposits underlying the reservoir. Heterogeneity in physical and chemical properties of sediments resulted in complex groundwater flow paths and highly variable groundwater chemistry. Sulfate, bicarbonate, sodium, and magnesium were the dominant ions in all areas, but substantial variability existed in relative concentrations; pH varied from less than 3 to more than 9, and total dissolved solids concentrations ranged from less than 5000 to greater than 100,000. mg/L. Selenium was a useful tracer of reservoir water; selenium concentrations exceeded 300 ??g/L in samples obtained from 18 of the 24 sampling points. Groundwater travel time from the reservoir to a nearby alluvial aquifer (a linear distance of 177. m) was calculated at 474. days on the basis of selenium concentrations. The produced water is not the primary source of solutes in the groundwater. Naturally occurring salts and minerals within the unsaturated zone, dissolved and mobilized by infiltrating impoundment water, account for most of the solute mass in groundwater. Gypsum dissolution, cation-exchange, and pyrite oxidation appear to be important reactions. The complex geochemistry and groundwater flow paths at the study site underscore the difficulty in assessing effects of surface impoundments on water resources within the Powder River Basin. ?? 2011.

  4. Viability of underground coal gasification in the 'deep coals' of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the PRB coal geology, hydrology, infrastructure, environmental and permitting requirements and to analyze the possible UCG projects which could be developed in the PRB. Project economics on the possible UCG configurations are presented to evaluate the viability of UCG. There are an estimated 510 billion tons of sub-bituminous coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. These coals are found in extremely thick seams that are up to 200 feet thick. The total deep coal resource in the PRB has a contained energy content in excess of twenty times the total world energy consumption in 2002. However, only approximately five percent of the coal resource is at depths less than 500 feet and of adequate thickness to be extracted by open pit mining. The balance is at depths between 500 and 2,000 feet below the surface. These are the PRB 'deep coals' evaluated for UCG in this report. The coal deposits in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming are thick, laterally continuous, and nearly flat lying. These deposits are ideal for development by Underground Coal Gasification. The thick deep coal seams of the PRB can be harvested using UCG and be protective of groundwater, air resources, and with minimum subsidence. Protection of these environmental values requires correct site selection, site characterization, impact definition, and impact mitigation. The operating 'lessons learned' of previous UCG operations, especially the 'Clean Cavity' concepts developed at Rocky Mountain 1, should be incorporated into the future UCG operations. UCG can be conducted in the PRB with acceptable environmental consequences. The report gives the recommended development components for UCG commercialization. 97 refs., 31 figs., 57 tabs., 1 app.

  5. Laramide thrusting of Bighorn Mountains onto Powder River basin near Buffalo, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.A.; Hinrichs, E.N.; Miller, J.J.; Lee, M.W.; Robbins, S.L.

    1988-07-01

    Recent seismic surveys and exploratory drilling by industry for subthrust oil and gas prospects beneath the Bighorn Mountain front along the western edge of the Powder River basin near Buffalo, Wyoming, reveal a basement-involved thrust of considerable magnitude. A deep test for oil and gas, the ARCO 1-4 Kinney Ranch borehole, was drilled 13 km (8 mi) west of Buffalo and penetrated 750 m (2460 ft) of Precambrian granite gneiss before penetrating the thrust and entering 1475 m (4838 ft) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and another 2199 m (7214 ft) of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The Gulf Granite Ridge 1-9-2D borehole, which was drilled 31 km (19 mi) north-northwest of the ARCO borehole and 5 km (3 mi) northwest of Story, Wyoming, penetrated 1768 m (5800 ft) of granite before entering Upper Cretaceous strata. This borehole penetrated a total of 3021 m (9911 ft) of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. Chevron U.S.A., Inc., supplied to the USGS two very high-quality seismic reflection profiles near the Kinney Ranch and Granite Ridge boreholes. These profiles have been reprocessed by the USGS and integrated with surface geologic mapping, gravity surveys, and other geologic studies by the USGS in progress in the Powder River basin. The seismic profiles near the Kinney Ranch and Granite Ridge boreholes clearly show that sedimentary rocks of the Paleozoic through the Paleocene, which occur beneath the thrust fault, extend more than 11 km (7 mi) west ward from the eastern edge of the basement thrust. The fault plane at the base of the Precambrian granites and gneisses dips 30/degrees/ to the west.

  6. Hydrologic properties of coal-beds in the Powder River Basin, Montana. II. Aquifer test analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, E.P.

    2005-01-01

    A multiple well aquifer test to determine anisotropic transmissivity was conducted on a coal-bed in the Powder River Basin, southeastern Montana, as part of a multidisciplinary investigation to determine hydrologic conditions of coal-beds in the area. For the test, three wells were drilled equidistant from and at different angles to a production well tapping the Flowers-Goodale coal seam, a 7.6-m thick seam confined at a depth of about 110 m. The test was conducted by air-lift pumping for 9 h, and water levels were monitored in the three observation wells using pressure transducers. Drawdown data collected early in the test were affected by interporosity flow between the coal fracture network and the matrix, but later data were suitable to determine aquifer anisotropy, as the slopes of the late-time semilog time-drawdown curves are nearly identical, and the zero-drawdown intercepts are different. The maximum transmissivity, trending N87??E, is 14.9 m2/d, and the minimum transmissivity 6.8 m2/d, giving an anisotropy ratio of 2.2:1. Combined specific storage of the fractures and matrix is 2??10 -5/m, and of the fracture network alone 5??10-6/m. The principal direction of the anisotropy tensor is not aligned with the face cleats, but instead is aligned with another fracture set and with dominant east-west tectonic compression. Results of the test indicate that the Flowers-Goodale coal-bed is more permeable than many coals in the Powder River Basin, but the anisotropy ratio and specific storage are similar to those found for other coal-beds in the basin.

  7. Hydrologic properties of coal-beds in the Powder River Basin, Montana. II. Aquifer test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, E. P.

    2005-07-01

    A multiple well aquifer test to determine anisotropic transmissivity was conducted on a coal-bed in the Powder River Basin, southeastern Montana, as part of a multidisciplinary investigation to determine hydrologic conditions of coal-beds in the area. For the test, three wells were drilled equidistant from and at different angles to a production well tapping the Flowers-Goodale coal seam, a 7.6-m thick seam confined at a depth of about 110 m. The test was conducted by air-lift pumping for 9 h, and water levels were monitored in the three observation wells using pressure transducers. Drawdown data collected early in the test were affected by interporosity flow between the coal fracture network and the matrix, but later data were suitable to determine aquifer anisotropy, as the slopes of the late-time semilog time-drawdown curves are nearly identical, and the zero-drawdown intercepts are different. The maximum transmissivity, trending N87°E, is 14.9 m 2/d, and the minimum transmissivity 6.8 m 2/d, giving an anisotropy ratio of 2.2:1. Combined specific storage of the fractures and matrix is 2×10 -5/m, and of the fracture network alone 5×10 -6/m. The principal direction of the anisotropy tensor is not aligned with the face cleats, but instead is aligned with another fracture set and with dominant east-west tectonic compression. Results of the test indicate that the Flowers-Goodale coal-bed is more permeable than many coals in the Powder River Basin, but the anisotropy ratio and specific storage are similar to those found for other coal-beds in the basin.

  8. Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Resources International

    2002-11-30

    Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

  9. An automated system to simulate the River discharge in Kyushu Island using the H08 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, A.; Jeon, J.; Seto, S.

    2015-12-01

    Kyushu Island is located in southwestern part of Japan, and it is often affected by typhoons and a Baiu front. There have been severe water-related disasters recorded in Kyushu Island. On the other hand, because of high population density and for crop growth, water resource is an important issue of Kyushu Island.The simulation of river discharge is important for water resource management and early warning of water-related disasters. This study attempts to apply H08 model to simulate river discharge in Kyushu Island. Geospatial meteorological and topographical data were obtained from Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) and Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The number of the observation stations of AMeDAS is limited and is not quite satisfactory for the application of water resources models in Kyushu. It is necessary to spatially interpolate the point data to produce grid dataset. Meteorological grid dataset is produced by considering elevation dependence. Solar radiation is estimated from hourly sunshine duration by a conventional formula. We successfully improved the accuracy of interpolated data just by considering elevation dependence and found out that the bias is related to geographical location. The rain/snow classification is done by H08 model and is validated by comparing estimated and observed snow rate. The estimates tend to be larger than the corresponding observed values. A system to automatically produce daily meteorological grid dataset is being constructed.The geospatial river network data were produced by ArcGIS and they were utilized in the H08 model to simulate the river discharge. Firstly, this research is to compare simulated and measured specific discharge, which is the ratio of discharge to watershed area. Significant error between simulated and measured data were seen in some rivers. Secondly, the outputs by the coupled model including crop growth

  10. Cyclic powder formation during pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane in an axially asymmetric radiofrequency argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Despax, B.; Makasheva, K.; Caquineau, H.

    2012-11-01

    A new approach of periodic production of dusty plasma consisting of pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) in argon axially asymmetric radiofrequency (RF) discharge was investigated in this work. The range of plasma operating conditions in which this dusty plasma can exist was closely examined. The obtained results clearly show that a net periodicity in the formation/disappearance of dust particles in the plasma can be maintained on a very large scale of discharge duration. The significance of discharge axial asymmetry to the dust particles behaviour in the plasma is revealed by the development of an asymmetric in shape void shifted towards the powered RF electrode. The key role of the reactive gas and its pulsed injection on each stage of the oscillating process of formation/disappearance of dust particles is disclosed by optical and electrical measurements. It is shown that the period of dusty plasma formation/disappearance is inversely related to the HMDSO injection time. Moreover, the impact of time injection over short period (5 s) is examined. It indicates the conflicting role played by the HMDSO on the reduction of dusty plasma during the reactive gas injection and the reappearance of particles in the plasma during the time off. The electronegative behavior of the plasma in the presence of negatively charged particles seems to explain the energetic modifications in the discharge. A frequency analysis of the floating potential reveals all these cyclic processes. Particularly, in the 10-200 Hz frequency range, the presence and the evolution of dust particles in the plasma over one generation can be observed.

  11. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Powder River Basin Province of Wyoming and Montana--2006 Update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 16.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, 639 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and 131 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Powder River Basin Province.

  12. Effects of high salinity wastewater discharges on unionid mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kathleen Patnode; Hittle, Elizabeth A.; Robert Anderson; Lora Zimmerman; Fulton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of high salinity wastewater (brine) from oil and natural gas drilling on freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, during 2012. Mussel cages (N = 5 per site) were deployed at two sites upstream and four sites downstream of a brine treatment facility on the Allegheny River. Each cage contained 20 juvenile northern riffleshell mussels Epioblasma torulosa rangiana). Continuous specific conductance and temperature data were recorded by water quality probes deployed at each site. To measure the amount of mixing throughout the entire study area, specific conductance surveys were completed two times during low-flow conditions along transects from bank to bank that targeted upstream (reference) reaches, a municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge upstream of the brine-facility discharge, the brine facility, and downstream reaches. Specific conductance data indicated that high specific conductance water from the brine facility (4,000–12,000 µS/cm; mean 7,846) compared to the reference reach (103–188 µS/cm; mean 151) is carried along the left descending bank of the river and that dilution of the discharge via mixing does not occur until 0.5 mi (805 m) downstream. Juvenile northern riffleshell mussel survival was severely impaired within the high specific conductance zone (2 and 34% at and downstream of the brine facility, respectively) and at the municipal wastewater treatment plant (21%) compared to background (84%). We surveyed native mussels (family Unionidae) at 10 transects: 3 upstream, 3 within, and 4 downstream of the high specific conductance zone. Unionid mussel abundance and diversity were lower for all transects within and downstream of the high conductivity zone compared to upstream. The results of this study clearly demonstrate in situ toxicity to juvenile northern riffleshell mussels, a federally endangered species, and to the native unionid mussel assemblage located downstream of a brine discharge to the

  13. Heterogeneous hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharging to an urban river reach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Rivett, Michael O; Roche, Rachel S; Durrant Neé Cleverly, Megan; Walker, Caroline; Tellam, John H

    2015-02-01

    The typically elevated natural attenuation capacity of riverbed-hyporheic zones is expected to decrease chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) groundwater plume discharges to river receptors through dechlorination reactions. The aim of this study was to assess physico-chemical processes controlling field-scale variation in riverbed-hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharge to an urban river reach. The 50-m long pool-riffle-glide reach of the River Tame in Birmingham (UK) studied is a heterogeneous high energy river environment. The shallow riverbed was instrumented with a detailed network of multilevel samplers. Freeze coring revealed a geologically heterogeneous and poorly sorted riverbed. A chlorine number reduction approach provided a quantitative indicator of CHC dechlorination. Three sub-reaches of contrasting behaviour were identified. Greatest dechlorination occurred in the riffle sub-reach that was characterised by hyporheic zone flows, moderate sulphate concentrations and pH, anaerobic conditions, low iron, but elevated manganese concentrations with evidence of sulphate reduction. Transient hyporheic zone flows allowing input to varying riverbed depths of organic matter are anticipated to be a key control. The glide sub-reach displayed negligible dechlorination attributed to the predominant groundwater baseflow discharge condition, absence of hyporheic zone, transition to more oxic conditions and elevated sulphate concentrations expected to locally inhibit dechlorination. The tail-of-pool-riffle sub-reach exhibited patchy dechlorination that was attributed to sub-reach complexities including significant flow bypass of a low permeability, high organic matter, silty unit of high dechlorination potential. A process-based conceptual model of reach-scale dechlorination variability was developed. Key findings of practitioner relevance were: riverbed-hyporheic zone CHC dechlorination may provide only a partial, somewhat patchy barrier to CHC

  14. Isotopic investigation of the discharge driven nitrogen dynamics in a mesoscale river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Christin; Zink, Matthias; Krieg, Ronald; Rode, Michael; Merz, Ralf; Knöller, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Nitrate in surface and groundwater has increased in the last decades due to landuse change, the application of different fertilizer for agricultural landuse and industrial dust in the atmospheric deposition. Increasing nitrate concentrations have a major impact on eutrophication, especially for coastal ecosystems. Therefore it is important to quantify potential nitrate sources and determine nitrate process dynamics with its drivers. The Bode River catchment (total size of 3200 m2) in the Harz Mountains in Germany was intensively investigated by a monitoring approach with 133 sampling points representing the same number of sub-catchments for a period of two years. The area is characterized by a strong anthropogenic gradient, with forest conservation areas in the mountain region, grassland, and intensively mixed farming in the lowlands. Consecutive discharge simulations by a mesoscale hydrological model (mhM) allow a quantitative analysis of nitrate fluxes for all observed tributaries. The investigation of nitrate isotopic signatures for characteristic landscape types allows the delineation of dominant NO3‑ sources: coniferous forests are characterized by recycled nitrified soil nitrogen; grassland is mainly impacted by organic fertilizer (manure) and nitrified soil-N; in agricultural land use areas nitrate predominantly derives from synthetic fertilizer application. Besides source delineation, the relationship between runoff and nitrate dynamics was analyzed for the entire Bode river catchment and, more detailed, for one major tributary with minor artificial reservoirs (Selke River). Thereby, it becomes apparent that nitrate isotopic variations increase with decreasing discharge. This effect might be due to a local, more intense impact of bacterial denitrification under low discharge conditions (higher residence time) in the anoxic soil zone, in the groundwater that discharges into the river and in the hyporheic zone. Generally, δ15N and δ18Oof nitrate decrease

  15. Simulating river discharges on a global scale - Identifying determinants of model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Kynast, E.

    2012-04-01

    Global hydrological models and land surface models are used to understand and simulate the global terrestrial water cycle. They, in particular, are applied to assess global scale impacts of global and climate change on water resources. While in recent years the growing availability of remote sensing products, e.g. evapotranspiration and soil moisture estimates, provide valuable information to validate simulated states and fluxes, however, the validation of simulated river discharges against observed time series is still widely-used. Thereby, most studies focus on: long-term mean monthly or annual discharges, discharge time series of the most downstream gauging stations of large-scale river basins (e.g. Amazon, Brahmaputra, etc.), or correlation-based metrics As global modeling approaches are constrained by simplified physical process representations and the implicit assumption that more or less the same model structure is globally valid, it is important to understand where and why these models perform good or poor in simulating 20th century river runoff and discharge fields. We present an extensive yet deliberately kept generic evaluation of the WaterGAP (Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis) Hydrology Model to simulate 20th century discharges. The model is designed as a conceptual water balance model, in the current version, WaterGAP3, operating on 5 arc minutes global grid. River runoff generated on the individual grid cells is routed along a global drainage direction map taking into account retention in natural surface water bodies, i.e. lakes and wetlands, as well as anthropogenic impacts, i.e. flow regulation and water abstraction for agriculture, industry and domestic purposes. Simulated discharges are evaluated against 1600 observed discharge records provided by the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC). Globally, the selected gauging stations differ substantially concerning their corresponding catchment areas, between 3000 and 3.6 mill sqkm, as well as

  16. Reconnaissance investigations of the discharge and water quality of the Amazon River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltman, Roy Edwin

    1968-01-01

    Selected published estimates of the discharge of Amazon River in the vicinity of Obidos and the mouth are presented to show the great variance of available information. The most reasonable estimates prepared by those who measured some parameters of the flow were studied by Maurice Parde, who concluded that the mean annual discharge is 90,000 to 100,000 cms (cubic meters per second) or 3,200,000 to 3,500,000 cfs (cubic feet per second). A few published estimates of discharge at mouth of 110,000 cms (3,900,000 cfs) based on rainfall-runoff relationships developed for other humid regions of the world are available. Three measurements of discharge made at the Obidos narrows in 1963-64 by a joint Brazil-United States expedition at high, low, and medium river stage are referred to the datum used at the Obidos gage during the period of operation, 1928-46, and a relationship between stage and discharge prepared on the basis of the measurements and supplementary data and computations. Recovery of the original Obidos gage datum is verified by referring the 1963-64 concurrent river stages at Manaus, Obidos, and Taperinha to gage relation curves developed for Manaus-Obidos and Obidos-Taperinha for periods of concurrent operation, 1928-46 and 1931-46, respectively. The average discharge, based on the stage-discharge relation and record of river stage for the period 1928-46, is computed to be 5,500,000 cfs (157,000 cms) for the Obidos site. The greatest known flood at Obidos, that of June 1953, is computed to have been a flow of 12,500,000 cfs (350,000 cms) at stage of 7.6 meters (24.9 feet) in the main channel and an indeterminate amount of overflow which, under the best assumed overflow conditions, may have amounted to about 10 percent of the main channel flow. Overflow discharge at stage equivalent to mean annual discharge is judged to be an insignificant percentage of flow down the main channel. Miscellaneous data collected during the flow measurements show that the tidal

  17. Detection of changes in design discharges due to river engineering works by multilinear flow routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolgay, J.; Danáčová, M.; Šúrek, P.

    2009-04-01

    The attenuation of flood waves on alluvial reaches of rivers was often influenced by engineering works carried out mostly during the last century. This study presents a framework that can be used for estimation of changes in design floods in consequence of these works by detecting changes in the travel-time vs. peak discharge relationship and implementing them into a conceptual hydrologic flood routing model. The applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on two case studies on the Morava and Danube Rivers in Slovakia. First empirical data on the travel time of the flood peaks were collected from a set of flood waves from periods before and after the river engineering works had been completed. The patterns observed in the travel-time vs. peak-discharge relationships from both periods were analysed. Next, a multilinear conceptual flow routing model was fitted to larger floods from both periods. The discrete state space representation of the Kalinin-Miljukov model was used as the basis for a multilinear discrete cascade flood routing model of the river reaches studied. The time distribution scheme of the model inputs was employed in the setup of the model. The travel-time parameter of the multilinear model was allowed to vary with the input discharge into the river reach according to a piecewise linear relationship. The shape and parameters of that relationship were estimated by optimisation on the flood waves from the pre- and post-river training periods with the help of a genetic algorithm using the performance of the multilinear model as the optimization criterion. The resulting travel-time vs. discharge relationships were compared against those detected in the empirical data. It was shown that changes in the flood peak travel-times detected by the genetic optimisation of the performance of the multilinear model on a small number of floods exhibit the same tendencies as found in the empirical data. Since the changes detected in the attenuation of floods

  18. Correlative estimates of discharge for three sites in the upper Lewis River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodhaine, G.L.

    1957-01-01

    In response to increased interest in the power possibilities of tributary streams in the headwater of Lewis River stream-gaging stations were reestablished in 1955 at three sites in the upper Lewis River basin, Washington. The one year of recent record now available and the four years of record obtained during water years 1928-31 provide a reasonable basis for estimates of monthly discharge during the intervening years. In view of the current interest in the discharge of these streams estimates of monthly discharge have been made in the Tacoma district office of the Surface Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey. These estimates and a description of the method of correlation are attached. The three stations and the period covered by the correlative estimates are as follows: Big Creek below Skookum Meadow near Trout Lake, Washington: Oct. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Meadow Creek below Lone Butte Meadow near Trout Lake, Washington: Oct. to Dec. 1928; Oct. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Rush Creek above falls, near Cougar, Wash.: Oct. to Dec. 1928; Dec. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Published records for water years 1928-31 and 1956 are included in the tabulation to provide discharge for the full period Oct. 1927 to Sept. 1956.

  19. The influence of extreme river discharge conditions on the quality of suspended particulate matter in Rivers Meuse and Rhine (The Netherlands).

    PubMed

    Hamers, Timo; Kamstra, Jorke H; van Gils, Jos; Kotte, Marcel C; van Hattum, Albertus G M

    2015-11-01

    As a consequence of climate change, increased precipitation in winter and longer periods of decreased precipitation in summer are expected to cause more frequent episodes of very high or very low river discharge in the Netherlands. To study the impact of such extreme river discharge conditions on water quality, toxicity profiles and pollutant profiles were determined of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected from Rivers Meuse and Rhine. Archived (1993-2003) and fresh (2009-2011) SPM samples were selected from the Dutch annual monitoring program of the national water bodies (MWTL), representing episodes with river discharge conditions ranging from very low to regular to very high. SPM extracts were tested in a battery of in vitro bioassays for their potency to interact with the androgen receptor (AR), the estrogen receptor (ER), the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the thyroid hormone transporter protein transthyretin (TTR). SPM extracts were further tested for their mutagenic potency (Ames assay) and their potency to inhibit bacterial respiration (Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence assay). Target-analyzed pollutant concentrations of the SPM samples and additional sample information were retrieved from a public database of MWTL results. In vitro toxicity profiles and pollutant profiles were analyzed in relation to discharge conditions and in relation to each other using correlation analysis and multivariate statistics. Compared to regular discharge conditions, composition of SPM during very high River Meuse and Rhine discharges shifted to more coarse, sandy, organic carbon (OC) poor particles. On the contrary, very low discharge led to a shift to more fine, OC rich material, probably dominated by algae. This shift was most evident in River Meuse, which is characterized by almost stagnant water conditions during episodes of drought. During such episodes, SPM extracts from River Meuse demonstrated increased potencies to inhibit bacterial respiration and to

  20. Historical trends in precipitation and stream discharge at the Skjern River catchment, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, I. B.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.; Refsgaard, J. C.

    2014-02-01

    A 133 yr data set from the 1055 km2 Skjern River catchment in western Denmark has been analysed with respect to precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration and discharge. The precipitation series have been tested and corrected using the standard normal homogeneity test and subsequently corrected for undercatch. The degree of change in the climatic variables is examined using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. During the last 133 yr the area has experienced a significant change in precipitation of 26 % and a temperature change of 1.4° C, leading to increases in river discharge of 52 % and groundwater recharge of 86 %. A lumped conceptual hydrological model, NAM, was calibrated on the period 1951-1980 and showed generally an excellent match between simulated and observed discharge. The capability of the hydrological model to predict climate change impact was investigated by looking at performances outside the calibration period. The results showed a reduced model fit, especially for recent time periods (after the 1980s), and not all hydrological changes could be explained. This might indicate that hydrological models cannot be expected to predict climate change impacts on discharge as accurately in the future, compared to the performance under present conditions, where they can be calibrated. The (simulated) stream discharge was subsequently analysed using high flow and drought indices based on the threshold method. The extreme signal was found to depend highly on the period chosen as reference to normal. The analysis indicated that no significant amplitude increase of the hydrograph for both wet and dry extremes could be found superimposed on the overall discharge increase.

  1. Discharge ratings for control structures at McHenry Dam on the Fox River, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three measurement of discharge were used to determine discharge ratings for the five adjustable sluice gates, spillway and fish ladder at McHenry Dam on the Fox River in Illinois. Discharge ratings were determined for free weir, free orifice, and submerged orifice flow regimes. Hydraulic conditions that identify flow regimes at McHenry Dam are defined by ratios between headwater depth (h1), tailwater depth (h3), and gate opening (hg). Flow under the sluice gates is identified as weir flow when the ratio of gate opening to headwater depth is greater than 0.73, and as orifice flow when hg/H1 is less than 0.73. Free orifice flow occurs when the ratio of tailwater depth to gate opening is less than 1.3, and submerged orifice flow occurs when h3/hg is greater than 1.3. Flow under the sluice gates is identified as free weir flow when the ratio of tailwater depth to headwater depth is less than 0.75, and as submerged weir flow when h3/h1 is greater than 0.75. Flow over the spillway is identified as free weir flow when the ratio of tailwater depth to headwater depth is less than 0.60, and as submerged weir flow when h3/h1 is greater than 0.60. Discharge coefficients to be used in equations to compute discharge for various hydraulic conditions were determined. Four discharge measurement, ranging from 169 to 2990 cu ft/sec, were used to define discharge coefficients that varies from 2.61 to 3.14 for free weir flow over the spillway. Nineteen discharge measurements, ranging from 180 to 4050 cu ft/sec, were used to define discharge coefficients for free weir, free orifice, and submerged orifice flow under the sluice gates. The average value of the discharge coefficient for free weir flow under the sluice gates is 3.17. Discharge coefficients for free orifice flow varied from 0.48 to 0.66 and the discharge coefficients for submerged orifice flow from the two measurements were 0.59 and 0.67. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Extensional tectonic influence on lower and upper cretaceous stratigraphy and reservoirs, southern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.C.; Rogers, M.H.

    1993-04-01

    The southern Powder River basin has been influenced significantly by an extensional system affecting Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary units. The system is composed of small throw, nearly vertical normal faults which are identified in the Cretaceous marine shales and that we believe are basement derived. Resultant fractures were present at erosional/depositional surfaces, both marine and nonmarine, that, in part, controlled erosion and subsequent deposition of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The normal faults also affected coal deposition in the Tertiary, now exposed at the surface. The erosion and resultant deposition formed extensive stratigraphic traps in Cretaceous units in both conventional and unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are interbedded with mature source rocks that have generated and expelled large amounts of hydrocarbons. Resulting overpressuring in the Fall River through the Niobrara formations has kept fractures open and has preserved primary porosity in the reservoirs. The normal faults offset thin sandstone reservoirs forming permeability barriers. Associated fractures may have provided vertical pathways for organic acids that assisted development of secondary porosity in Upper Cretaceous sandstones. These normal...faults and fractures provide significant potential for the use of horizontal drilling techniques to evaluate fractured, overpressured conventional and unconventional reservoirs.

  3. Well-preserved cut-bank slumps from Paleocene sediments, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, F.W.; Johnson, E.A.

    1989-03-01

    Slump blocks are associated with bases of fluvial channels in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, southeastern Powder River basin, Wyoming. These blocks are composed of thin to medium beds of very fine-grained sandstone containing finer grained organic-rich partings. Slump blocks described from other areas are composed of very cohesive silt and clay; blocks composed predominantly of sand are rare or absent. Our blocks are significant in that the sands were cohesive enough to fail by slumping rather than flow. The sandstone beds within the blocks exhibit small-scale tensional and compressional deformation. Strikes of beds within the blocks are subparallel to paleocurrent measurements from overlying channels, and the average dip of 36/degrees/ is significantly greater than regional dip. The blocks, commonly wedge shaped and averaging 18 m long and 4 m thick, occur in horizontal zones that can be traced for as much as 400 m. The blocks are bounded by arcuate surfaces at the base and sides and commonly overlie mudstone or coaly carbonaceous shale. The tops are unconformably overlain by a chaotic layer averaging 0.8 m thick, composed of randomly oriented fragments of sandstone and abundant plant debris. Active channel fill erosionally overlies the chaotic layer.

  4. Petrographic analyses of Knobloch coal seam (Paleocene), Powder River County, southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A single core of Knobloch coal from Powder River County, southeast Montana, was drilled to obtain samples for coal quality studies. The coal occurs in the lower Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The Knobloch coal core (63 ft long) was divided into 1-ft increments and analyzed using chemical and petrographic methods. Definite variations in maceral content were seen. Preliminary studies show relationship between ash, gelinite, inertinite, and humodetrinite contents. A zone of low gelinite, low humodetrinite, and high inertinite, located in the lower quarter of the seam, implies a period of severe oxidation occurred, possibly as swamp fires. Four zones of high inertinite and high humodetrinite (three in the upper half and one in the lower half of the seam) indicate fluctuations in the water table, allowing moderate oxidation and weathering of plant material and subsequent mechanical reworking of humic grains. Near the center of the seam, a zone of high inertinite, high humodetrinite, and high ash content suggests water levels were high enough to allow significant sediment influx as well as reworking of the humic materials. These conclusions suggest the Knobloch coal is autochthonous and hypautochthonous in origin, a result of several water-table fluctuations and/or climatic changes due to drought.

  5. Water Quality Management With Time Varying River Flow and Discharger Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbay, Jean-Pierre; Smeers, Yves; Tyteca, Daniel

    1983-12-01

    An extension of the classical river quality management problem is presented that allows for time varying operation of the treatment plants. The hydrology of the river is represented by a set of steady state flow regimes; a river water quality model is used for each of these regimes to give a constraint set to be imposed on the discharges in order to achieve the stream standards during that regime. The objective function distinguishes between investment costs, fixed operating costs, and variable operating costs. A treatment system is sought that minimizes the sum of these costs, taking account of the possibility of operating the treatment system at various different levels during the year. The model is quantified and tested on an example.

  6. Geologic history of natural coal-bed fires, Powder River basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heffern, E.L.; Coates, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Coal-bed fires ignited by natural processes have baked and fused overlying sediments to form clinker, a hard red or varicolored rock, through much of the northern Great Plains of the United States (USA). The gently dipping coal beds in the region burn when regional downwasting brings them above the local water table. The resulting clinker forms a rim along the exposed edge of the coal bed in an ongoing process through geologic time. The resistant clinker is left capping buttes and ridges after the softer unbaked strata erode away. Clinker outcrops cover more than 4100 km2 in the Powder River basin (PRB), which lies in Wyoming (WY) and Montana (MT). The clinker in place records tens of billions of tons of coal that have burned, releasing gases into the atmosphere. The amount of clinker that has eroded away was at least an order of magnitude greater than the clinker that remains in place. Fission-track and uranium-thorium/ helium ages of detrital zircon crystals in clinker, and paleomagnetic ages of clinker, show that coal beds have burned naturally during at least the past 4 million years (Ma). The oldest in-place clinker that has been dated, collected from a high, isolated, clinker-capped ridge, has a fission track age of 2.8??0.6 Ma. Evidence of erosion and downcutting is also preserved by clinker clasts in gravel terraces. One clinker boulder in a terrace 360 m above the Yellowstone River has a fission track age of 4.0??0.7 Ma. Coal-bed fires are caused by lightning, wildfires, spontaneous combustion, or human activity on coal outcrops and in mines. Miners, government agencies, and ranchers have extinguished thousands of coal bed fires, but natural ignition continues where fresh coal has access to air. At any given time, hundreds of fires, mostly small, are burning. In the Powder River basin, the total amount of coal burned by natural fires in the last 2 Ma is one to two orders of magnitude greater than the total amount of coal removed by mining in the past

  7. Effects of river discharge and high-tide stage on salinity intrusion in the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River estuaries, southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee Rivers are coastal streams flowing into the Gulf of Mexico that may be affected by either future surface water or groundwater withdrawals. Reduction of river discharge will affect the upstream extent of saltwater intrusion in the rivers; however, under certain reduced low-flow discharges, the estimated change in upstream extent of saltwater intrusion is on the order of several tenths of a mile and frequently is within the range of predicted error. Data on flow, tides, and salinity describe the physical characteristics of the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River systems. Vertical and longitudinal salinity profiles indicate that salinity of the rivers increases downstream and varies substantially at any given location. The Weeki Wachee River system is the best mixed of the three. The Crystal River system exhibited the next best mixed system, and the Withlacoochee River system exhibited the most variation in its salinity regime. The daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion is described by multiple linear-regression analysis based on daily mean streamflow of each river and high-tide stage of the gulf. The equations are used to show the effects of discharge on the daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion in the rivers. (USGS)

  8. User's guide for RIV2; a package for routing and accounting of river discharge for a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground- water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Roger S.

    1988-01-01

    RIV2 is a package for the U.S. Geological Survey 's modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, groundwater flow model developed by M. G. McDonald and A. W. Harbaugh that simulates river-discharge routing. RIV2 replaces RIVI, the original river package used in the model. RIV2 preserves the basic logic of RIV1, but better represents river-discharge routing. The main features of RIV2 are (1) The river system is divided into reaches and simulated river discharge is routed from one node to the next. (2) Inflow (river discharge) entering the upstream end of a reach can be specified. (3) More than one river can be represented at one node and rivers can cross, as when representing a siphon. (4) The quantity of leakage to or from the aquifer at a given node is proportional to the hydraulic-head difference between that specified for the river and that calculated for the aquifer. Also, the quantity of leakage to the aquifer at any node can be limited by the user and, within this limit, the maximum leakage to the aquifer is the discharge available in the river. This feature allows for the simulation of intermittent rivers and drains that have no discharge routed to their upstream reaches. (5) An accounting of river discharge is maintained. Neither stage-discharge relations nor storage in the river or river banks is simulated. (USGS)

  9. NOM degradation during river infiltration: effects of the climate variables temperature and discharge.

    PubMed

    Diem, Samuel; Rudolf von Rohr, Matthias; Hering, Janet G; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Schirmer, Mario; von Gunten, Urs

    2013-11-01

    Most peri-alpine shallow aquifers fed by rivers are oxic and the drinking water derived by riverbank filtration is generally of excellent quality. However, observations during past heat waves suggest that water quality may be affected by climate change due to effects on redox processes such as aerobic respiration, denitrification, reductive dissolution of manganese(III/IV)- and iron(III)(hydr)oxides that occur during river infiltration. To assess the dependence of these redox processes on the climate-related variables temperature and discharge, we performed periodic and targeted (summer and winter) field sampling campaigns at the Thur River, Switzerland, and laboratory column experiments simulating the field conditions. Typical summer and winter field conditions could be successfully simulated by the column experiments. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) was found not to be a major electron donor for aerobic respiration in summer and the DOM consumption did not reveal a significant correlation with temperature and discharge. It is hypothesized that under summer conditions, organic matter associated with the aquifer material (particulate organic matter, POM) is responsible for most of the consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO), which was the most important electron acceptor in both the field and the column system. For typical summer conditions at temperatures >20 °C, complete depletion of DO was observed in the column system and in a piezometer located only a few metres from the river. Both in the field system and the column experiments, nitrate acted as a redox buffer preventing the release of manganese(II) and iron(II). For periodic field observations over five years, DO consumption showed a pronounced temperature dependence (correlation coefficient r = 0.74) and therefore a seasonal pattern, which seemed to be mostly explained by the temperature dependence of the calculated POM consumption (r = 0.7). The river discharge was found to be highly and positively correlated

  10. River flow and ammonium discharge determine spring phytoplankton blooms in an urbanized estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, Richard; Wilkerson, Frances; Parker, Alexander E.; Marchi, Al; Taberski, Karen

    2012-12-01

    Nutrient loadings to urbanized estuaries have increased over the past decades in response to population growth and upgrading to secondary sewage treatment. Evidence from the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) indicates that increased ammonium (NH4) loads have resulted in reduced primary production, a counter-intuitive finding; the NH4 paradox. Phytoplankton uptake of nitrate (NO3), the largest pool of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, is necessary for blooms to occur in SFE. The relatively small pool of ambient NH4, by itself insufficient to support a bloom, prevents access to NO3 and bloom development. This has contributed to the current rarity of spring phytoplankton blooms in the northern SFE (Suisun Bay), in spite of high inorganic nutrient concentrations, improved water transparency and seasonally low biomass of bivalve grazers. The lack of blooms has likely contributed to deleterious bottom-up impacts on estuarine fish. This bloom suppression may also occur in other estuaries that receive large amounts of anthropogenic NH4. In 2010 two rare diatom blooms were observed in spring in Suisun Bay (followed by increased abundances of copepods and pelagic fish), and like the prior bloom observed in 2000, chlorophyll accumulated after NH4 concentrations were decreased. In 2010, low NH4 concentrations were apparently due to a combination of reduced NH4 discharge from a wastewater treatment plant and increased river flow. To understand the interactions of river flow, NH4 discharge and bloom initiation, a conceptual model was constructed with three criteria; 1) NH4 loading must not exceed the capacity of the phytoplankton to assimilate the inflow of NH4, 2) the NH4 concentration must be ≤4 μmol L-1 to enable phytoplankton NO3 uptake, 3) the dilution rate of phytoplankton biomass set by river flow must not exceed the phytoplankton growth rate to avoid "washout". These criteria were determined for Suisun Bay; with sufficient irradiance and present day discharge of 15 tons NH4-N d

  11. Measuring the Discharge of River Flood Using Witnesses Movies Found on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauet, A.; Le Coz, J.; Le Boursicaud, R.; Pénard, L.

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of the discharge of river during extreme flood is of prime importance for the scientific and the research community. Unfortunately, measuring discharge using conventional methods is impossible because the high velocities and the floating debris endanger the operators and the equipment. The typical time-scale for gauging does not match up to the time scale of the dynamic of extreme flood. Finally, floods are mesoscale events that affect generally several watersheds at the same time, and gauging teams do not have the capabilities for covering the whole region of interest. Recently, non intrusive method for measuring discharge have been developed and tested in flood conditions. Doppler surface velocity radar and Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) showed their efficiency for measuring discharge during extreme events, but those methods need to be deployed by operators and the problems of time-scale and space-scale covering aforementioned are not solved. In this study, authors present how flood discharge measurement can benefits from the huge development, the last 10 years, of internet and of the on-line sharing of files. Floods are impressive phenomena, and hundreds of witnesses movies can be found on the internet after every important event. The different steps in order to apply LSPIV analysis to witness movie are detailed: (i) selection of the video of interest; (ii) contact with the author of the video; (iii) preparing the video for the LSPIV analysis : stabilization of the images, field campaigns; (iv) LSPIV analysis, providing surface velocity field; and (v)discharge computation. A case study on the major flash flood of 18 June 2013 of the Gave River at Cauterets, French Pyrennees, is presented. Results show that witnesses movies can bring useful information and allow estimating discharges values. Capabilities and limitations of LSPIV applied to witnesses movies are detailed. Finally, the paper presents an approach conducted within the

  12. Tracking groundwater discharge to a large river using tracers and geophysics.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Glenn A; Gardner, W Payton; Munday, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated large reaches of rivers in which multiple sources of groundwater are responsible for maintaining baseflow. This paper builds upon previous work undertaken along the Fitzroy River, one of the largest perennial river systems in north-western Australia. Synoptic regional-scale sampling of both river water and groundwater for a suite of environmental tracers ((4) He, (87) Sr/(86) Sr, (222) Rn and major ions), and subsequent modeling of tracer behavior in the river, has enabled definition and quantification of groundwater input from at least three different sources. We show unambiguous evidence of both shallow "local" groundwater, possibly recharged to alluvial aquifers beneath the adjacent floodplain during recent high-flow events, and old "regional" groundwater introduced via artesian flow from deep confined aquifers. We also invoke hyporheic exchange and either bank return flow or parafluvial flow to account for background (222) Rn activities and anomalous chloride trends along river reaches where there is no evidence of the local or regional groundwater inputs. Vertical conductivity sections acquired through an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey provide insights to the architecture of the aquifers associated with these sources and general groundwater quality characteristics. These data indicate fresh groundwater from about 300 m below ground preferentially discharging to the river, at locations consistent with those inferred from tracer data. The results demonstrate how sampling rivers for multiple environmental tracers of different types-including stable and radioactive isotopes, dissolved gases and major ions-can significantly improve conceptualization of groundwater-surface water interaction processes, particularly when coupled with geophysical techniques in complex hydrogeological settings. PMID:24124692

  13. The effect of discharge and water quality of the Alafia River, Hillsborough River, and the Tampa Bypass Canal on nutrient loading to Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Y.E.; Levesque, V.A.; Woodham, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    Techniques to measure discharge and nutrient loads in the tidally affected portions of two major rivers tributary to Tampa Bay, the Alafia River and the Hillsborough River, were developed and tested. Discharge, water quality, and total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads for the period April 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992, were evaluated and compared with discharge,water quality, and loads at long-term, nontidal gages in the basins. Long-term discharge and water-quality characteristics at selected sites in the Alafia river and Hillsborough River basins were evaluated. A long-term, decreasing trend in annual-mean discharge was observed for discharges at the Alafia River, Sulphur Springs, and Hillsborough River. Low-flow and high-flow characteristics in the Alafia River and Hillsborough River have changed as well. The decreasing trend in the Alafia River discharges is not due to deficient rainfall but probably is due to decreased ground-water inflow to the river because of long-term declines in the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Daily-mean discharges at the mouth of the Alafia River were more variable than discharges at the long-term gage upstream. Daily-mean discharge near the mouth of the river was negative at times, indicating a net loss of water from the river. Daily-mean discharge from the Hillsborough River was minimal from Apil to May 1991, and from late September 1991 to March 1992. During these periods, discharge from Sulphur Springs was a major source of freshwater to the tidally affected reach of the river. Concentrations of total phosphorus and orthophosphorus in the Alafia River above Lithia Springs were the greatest in the 1960's and have generally declined since then. Total nitrogen concentrations have been declining since about 1981. However, increases in nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentrations are occurring in Lithia Springs, a second-magnitude spring that flows into the Alafia River. Specific conductance of water

  14. A joined multi-metric calibration of river discharge and nitrate loads with different performance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcelo B.; Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Hydrological models are useful tools to investigate hydrology and water quality in catchments. The calibration of these models is a crucial step to adapt the model to the catchment conditions, allowing effective simulations of environmental processes. In the model calibration, different performance measures need to be considered to represent different hydrology and water quality conditions in combination. This study presents a joined multi-metric calibration of discharge and nitrate loads simulated with the ecohydrological model SWAT. For this purpose, a calibration approach based on flow duration curves (FDC) is advanced by also considering nitrate duration curves (NDC). Five segments of FDCs and of NDCs are evaluated separately to consider the different phases of hydrograph and nitrograph. To consider both magnitude and dynamics in river discharge and nitrate loads, the Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE) is used additionally as a statistical performance metric to achieve a joined multi-variable calibration. The results show that a separate assessment of five different magnitudes improves the calibrated nitrate loads. Subsequently, adequate model runs with good performance for different hydrological conditions both for discharge and nitrate are detected in a joined approach based on FDC, NDC, and KGE. In that manner, plausible results were obtained for discharge and nitrate loads in the same model run. Using a multi-metric performance approach, the simultaneous multi-variable calibration led to a balanced model result for all magnitudes of discharge and nitrate loads.

  15. Discharge forecasting using MODIS and radar altimetry: potential application for transboundary flood risk management in Niger-Benue River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, Angelica; Amarnath, Giriraj; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of most widespread natural disasters in the world. Its impact is particularly severe and destructive in Asia and Africa, because the living conditions of some settlements are inadequate to cope with this type of natural hazard. In this context, the estimation of discharge is extremely important to address water management and flood risk assessment. However, the inadequate monitoring network hampers any control and prediction activity that could improve these disastrous situations. In the last few years, remote sensing sensors have demonstrated their effectiveness in retrieving river discharge, especially in supporting discharge nowcasting and forecasting activities. Recently, the potential of radar altimetry was apparent when used for estimating water levels in an ungauged river site with good accuracy. It has also become a very useful tool for estimation and prediction of river discharge. However, the low temporal resolution of radar altimeter observations (10 or 35 days, depending on the satellite mission) may be not suitable for day-by-day hydrological forecasting. Differently, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), considering its proven potential for quantifying the variations in discharge of the rivers at daily time resolution may be more suited to this end. For these reasons, MODIS and radar altimetry data were used in this study to predicting and forecasting the river discharge along the Niger-Benue River, where severe flooding with extensive damage to property and loss of lives occurred. Therefore, an effective method to forecast flooding can support efforts towards creating an early warning system. In order to estimate river discharge, four MODIS products (daily, 8-day, and from AQUA and TERRA satellites) connected at three sites (two gauged and one ungauged) were used. The capability of remote sensing sensors to forecast discharge a few days in advance at a downstream section using MODIS and ENVISAT radar altimetry data

  16. Simulated long-term changes in river discharge and soil moisture due to global warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manabe, S.; Milly, P.C.D.; Wetherald, R.

    2004-01-01

    By use of a coupled ocean atmosphere-land model, this study explores the changes of water availability, as measured by river discharge and soil moisture, that could occur by the middle of the 21st century in response to combined increases of greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols based upon the "IS92a" scenario. In addition, it presents the simulated change in water availability that might be realized in a few centuries in response to a quadrupling of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Averaging the results over extended periods, the radiatively forced changes, which are very similar between the two sets of experiments, were successfully extracted. The analysis indicates that the discharges from Arctic rivers such as the Mackenzie and Ob' increase by up to 20% (of the pre-Industrial Period level) by the middle of the 21st century and by up to 40% or more in a few centuries. In the tropics, the discharges from the Amazonas and Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers increase substantially. However, the percentage changes in runoff from other tropical and many mid-latitude rivers are smaller, with both positive and negative signs. For soil moisture, the results of this study indicate reductions during much of the year in many semiarid regions of the world, such as the southwestern region of North America, the northeastern region of China, the Mediterranean coast of Europe, and the grasslands of Australia and Africa. As a percentage, the reduction is particularly large during the dry season. From middle to high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, soil moisture decreases in summer but increases in winter.

  17. Al-Ga coating mechanism and discharge-charge characteristics of Li-Mn-O cathode powders at -30-55 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Fei-Yi; Yang, Kai-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, LiMn2O4 cathode powders were coated with aluminum and gallium using a solution method with two-stage surface modification to obtain a Mn-based powder with an Al-Ga surface modification layer (MAG). It was found that the MAG powders have a higher capacity and excellent cycle characteristics at 55 °C at various current rates, and that the Al-Ga coating layer inhibits the precipitation of Mn ions, which increases the stability of the structure. In addition, although low temperatures generally lead to a reduction of conductivity and capacitance, the Al-Ga coating layer gives the MAG powders low-temperature resistance, with charge-discharge characteristics better at -30 °C. The Al-Ga surface modification coating layer of LiMn2O4 powder is the LiMn2-x-yAlxGayO4 phase, which reduces the negative impact of temperature variation. As a result, the MAG powders can be used for high C-rate charging-discharging.

  18. Nekton community response to a large-scale Mississippi River discharge: Examining spatial and temporal response to river management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater flow is generally held to be one of the most influential factors affecting community structure and production in estuaries. In coastal Louisiana, the Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion (CFD) is managed to control freshwater discharge from the Mississippi River into Breton Sound basin. Operational since 1991, CFD has undergone several changes in management strategy including pulsed spring flooding, which was introduced in 2001. We used a 20-yr time series of fisheries-independent data to investigate how variation in freshwater inflow (i.e., pre- and post-CFD, and pre and post spring pulsing management) influences the downstream nekton community (abundance, diversity, and assemblage). Analyses of long-term data demonstrated that while there were effects from the CFD, they largely involved subtle changes in community structure. Spatially, effects were largely limited to the sites immediately downstream of the diversion and extended only occasionally to more down-estuary sites. Temporally, effects were 1) immediate (detected during spring diversion events) or 2) delayed (detected several months post-diversion). Analysis of river management found that pulsed spring-time inflow resulted in more significant changes in nekton assemblages, likely due to higher discharge rates that 1) increased marsh flooding, thus increasing marsh habitat accessibility for small resident marsh species, and 2) reduced salinity, possibly causing displacement of marine pelagic species down estuary. ?? 2010.

  19. Plunge location of sediment driven hyperpycnal river discharges considering bottom friction, lateral entrainment, and particle settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, K. B.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2012-12-01

    River discharges with very high sediment loads have the potential to develop into plunging hyperpycnal flows that transition from a river jet to a turbidity current at some location basinward of the river mouth due to the density difference between the turbid river and the receiving water body. However, even if the bulk density of the turbid river is greater than that of the receiving lake or ocean, some distance is needed for the forward inertia of the river to dissipate so that the downward gravitational pull can cause the system to collapse into a subaqueous turbidity current. This collapsing at the plunge point has been found to occur when the densimetric Froude number decreases to a value between 0.3 < Frd < 0.7 (Fang and Stefan 2000, Parker and Toniolo 2007, Dai and Garcia 2010, Lamb et al. 2010). In 2D channel flow analysis at the plunge point, this has led to the concept of a two-fold criterion for plunging. The first is simply for the need of high enough suspended sediment concentration to overcome the density difference between the river fluid and the fluid of the receiving water. The second is the need for sufficiently deep water to reduce the densimetric Froude below the critical value for plunging, which leads to dependence of plunging on the receiving water basin topography (Lamb et al. 2010). In this analysis, we expand on past work by solving a system of ODE river jet equations to account for bottom friction, lateral entrainment of ambient fluid, and particle settling between the river mouth and the plunge location. Typical entrainment and bottom friction coefficients are used and the model is tested against the laboratory density current data of Fang and Stefan (1991). A suite of conditions is solved with variable river discharge velocity, aspect ratio, suspended sediment concentration, and particle size; a range of salinity values and bottom slopes are used for the receiving water body. The plunge location is then expressed as a function of the

  20. Early Holocene Sediment Discharge from Taiwanese Rivers: Intensified Asian Monsoon and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ho-Han; Liu, Char-Shine; Milliman, John; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chang, Jih-Hsin; Wang, Yunshuen

    2016-04-01

    Temporal variations of fluvial sediment discharge can reflect the significant climatic variation. In this study, high-resolution sedimentary records - on the millennial scale - from onshore wells, offshore cores and seismic profiles are used to quantify sediment discharge from small mountainous rivers around Taiwan since the last glacial maximum. While significantly high sediment accumulation rates have been observed in the modern flood plain, shelf and deep-sea basins during the late Pleistocene and Holocene, early Holocene rates are unusually high. In northeast Taiwan, for example, sediment flux from the Lanyang River between 10-12 ka BP appears to have been 10 mt/yr, about 4 fold greater than measured annual discharge prior to 1960. In the southwest Taiwan, the highest sedimentation rate happened during 10-12 ka BP. Long-term average discharge since 8 ka BP has been ~12 mt/yr), less than half the 29 mt/yr that was deposited on the Kaohsiung-Pingtung Plain. These and other sedimentation histories around Taiwan as well as in the South China Sea and the Bay of Bengal indicate that the occurrence of high sediment load cannot be explained solely by general circulation model of sea-level change; climate and climatic change also should be taken into account. We suggest that the intensification of the Asian monsoon, particularly in the case of Taiwan, typhoons, which occurred during the early Holocene may have been the root cause of the increased rainfall and thus increased erosion and sediment delivery. This study reconstructs the long-term sedimentary history of the region since the late Quaternary, especially focuses on the increased sediment discharges during the particularly warm and humid paleo-climatic period in NE and SW Taiwan. Moreover, it could help to better understand and predict fluvial sediment fluxes and their geological and societal impacts in response to future global warming.

  1. Influence of St. Lawrence River discharge on the circulation and hydrography in Canadian Atlantic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Kyoko; Sheng, Jinyu

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effects of freshwater discharge from the St. Lawrence River (SLR) on the three-dimensional circulation and hydrography in Canada's Atlantic waters using a regional shelf circulation model based on the Princeton Ocean Model. The study region comprises the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Scotian Shelf, and the Gulf of Maine. The model forcing includes atmospheric forcing at the sea surface; tidal elevation and currents at the lateral open boundaries; and freshwater discharge from the SLR and other major rivers in the region. The forcing at the lateral open boundaries also includes non-tidal currents as well as temperature and salinity fields produced by a coarse-resolution circulation model for the northwest Atlantic. The shelf circulation model is integrated for 5 years (1999-2003); the simulated hydrography and circulation during the last 4 years are compared to observations to assess the model's performance. Three additional model runs are made, called the climate, wet, and dry runs, in which the SLR discharge values specified in the model are respectively the long-term mean and the long-term mean plus or minus 3.5 standard deviations. Model results from the climate run demonstrate that the variability of freshwater flux in the St. Lawrence Estuary takes ˜100 days to reach Cabot Strait; ˜160 days to reach the central Scotian Shelf; and ˜220 days to reach the eastern Gulf of Maine. Within the Gulf of St. Lawrence, an increase in the SLR discharge results in a stronger Gaspé Current (up to ˜0.1 m s-1 stronger in the wet run than in the dry run) as well as lower salinity in the western part of the gulf. In the winter, the effect of a higher SLR discharge extends along the Scotian Shelf and into the Gulf of Maine, with salinity in both areas lower by ˜0.1 psu in the wet run than in the dry run.

  2. Impact of climate change on river discharge in the Teteriv River basin (Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didovets, Iulii; Lobanova, Anastasia; Krysanova, Valentina; Snizhko, Sergiy; Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    The problem of water resources availability in the climate change context arises now in many countries. Ukraine is characterized by a relatively low availability of water resources compared to other countries. It is the 111th among 152 countries by the amount of domestic water resources available per capita. To ensure socio-economic development of the region and to adapt to climate change, a comprehensive assessment of potential changes in qualitative and quantitative characteristics of water resources in the region is needed. The focus of our study is the Teteriv River basin located in northern Ukraine within three administrative districts covering the area of 15,300 km2. The Teteriv is the right largest tributary of the Dnipro River, which is the fourth longest river in Europe. The water resources in the region are intensively used in industry, communal infrastructure, and agriculture. This is evidenced by a large number of dams and industrial objects which have been constructed from the early 20th century. For success of the study, it was necessary to apply a comprehensive hydrological model, tested in similar natural conditions. Therefore, an eco-hydrological model SWIM with the daily time step was applied, as this model was used previously for climate impact assessment in many similar river basins on the European territory. The model was set up, calibrated and validated for the gauge Ivankiv located close to the outlet of the Teteriv River. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient for the calibration period is 0.79 (0.86), and percent bias is 4,9% (-3.6%) with the daily (monthly) time step. The future climate scenarios were selected from the IMPRESSIONS (Impacts and Risks from High-End Scenarios: Strategies for Innovative Solutions, www.impressions-project.eu) project, which developed 7 climate scenarios under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 based on GCMs and downscaled using RCMs. The results of climate impact assessment for the Teteriv River basin will be presented.

  3. Identification of the best multi-model combination for simulating river discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Singh, R.; Jena, Prachi Pratyasha; Chatterjee, Chandranath; Mishra, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    This paper focuses on the selection of the best multi-model ensemble method that is subsequently used to create an ensemble for the discharge estimation in a catchment of the Mahanadi river basin in India. Ten different multi-model ensemble methods, viz., mean, median, trimmed mean, unconstrained and constrained multiple linear regression, weighted mean based on calibration performance (two variants), linear programming, simple model average and multi model super ensemble, are compared using calibrated and validated data of eight popular hydrological models, MIKE SHE, SWAT, HEC-HMS, AWBM, SIMHYD, SACRAMENTO, SMAR and TANK. Constrained multiple linear regression (MLR_C) method is found to be the most suitable multi-model ensemble method for the study area. MLR_C method is subsequently used to develop 189 possible multi-model ensembles. These ensembles are evaluated for categorical and temporal accuracy, using a proposed SCORE that includes normalized relative operating characteristic (ROC) area and normalized number of skillful days. The results show that an ensemble having five models, one physically based (SWAT) and four conceptual (AWBM, SIMHYD, SACRAMENTO and SMAR), performs the best for the chosen catchment. The best performing ensemble also outperforms all eight individual models in simulating the observed discharge and flow volume. Furthermore, uncertainty in simulating river discharge due to all sources collectively is analyzed through uncertainty analysis.

  4. Decline of Yangtze River water and sediment discharge: Impact from natural and anthropogenic changes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.; Milliman, J. D.; Yang, H. F.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing impact of both climatic change and human activities on global river systems necessitates an increasing need to identify and quantify the various drivers and their impacts on fluvial water and sediment discharge. Here we show that mean Yangtze River water discharge of the first decade after the closing of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003–2012) was 67 km3/yr (7%) lower than that of the previous 50 years (1950–2002), and 126 km3/yr less compared to the relatively wet period of pre-TGD decade (1993–2002). Most (60–70%) of the decline can be attributed to decreased precipitation, the remainder resulting from construction of reservoirs, improved water-soil conservation and increased water consumption. Mean sediment flux decreased by 71% between 1950–1968 and the post-TGD decade, about half of which occurred prior to the pre-TGD decade. Approximately 30% of the total decline and 65% of the decline since 2003 can be attributed to the TGD, 5% and 14% of these declines to precipitation change, and the remaining to other dams and soil conservation within the drainage basin. These findings highlight the degree to which changes in riverine water and sediment discharge can be related with multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors. PMID:26206169

  5. Decline of Yangtze River water and sediment discharge: Impact from natural and anthropogenic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.; Milliman, J. D.; Yang, H. F.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-07-01

    The increasing impact of both climatic change and human activities on global river systems necessitates an increasing need to identify and quantify the various drivers and their impacts on fluvial water and sediment discharge. Here we show that mean Yangtze River water discharge of the first decade after the closing of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003-2012) was 67 km3/yr (7%) lower than that of the previous 50 years (1950-2002), and 126 km3/yr less compared to the relatively wet period of pre-TGD decade (1993-2002). Most (60-70%) of the decline can be attributed to decreased precipitation, the remainder resulting from construction of reservoirs, improved water-soil conservation and increased water consumption. Mean sediment flux decreased by 71% between 1950-1968 and the post-TGD decade, about half of which occurred prior to the pre-TGD decade. Approximately 30% of the total decline and 65% of the decline since 2003 can be attributed to the TGD, 5% and 14% of these declines to precipitation change, and the remaining to other dams and soil conservation within the drainage basin. These findings highlight the degree to which changes in riverine water and sediment discharge can be related with multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors.

  6. Metal discharges by Sinaloa Rivers to the coastal zone of NW Mexico.

    PubMed

    Frías-Espericueta, M G; Mejía-Cruz, R; Osuna López, I; Muy-Rangel, M D; Rubio-Carrasco, W; Aguilar-Juárez, M; Voltolina, D

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work was to survey the discharges of dissolved and particulate Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn of the eight main rivers of Sinaloa State to the Mexican coastal environment. Zn was the most abundant dissolved metal and Fe was the most abundant particulate (8.02-16.90 and 51.8-1,140.3 μg/L, respectively). Only particulate Mn had significantly (p = 0.028) higher values in summer-fall (rainy season), whereas the significantly (p = 0.036) higher values of dissolved Zn were observed in winter and spring. The highest annual total discharges to Sinaloa coastal waters were those of the rivers San Lorenzo and Piaxtla (>2 × 10(3) m.t.) and the lowest those of rivers Baluarte and El Fuerte (349 and 119 m.t., respectively). Pb concentrations may become of concern, because they are higher than the value recommended for the welfare of aquatic communities of natural waters. PMID:24240662

  7. Effect of gold mining activities on water turbidity and river sediment discharge: comparison of two nearby river basin in French Guiana, using remote sensing and field measurements data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjorie, Gallay; Jean-Michel, Martinez; Alain, Laraque; Max, Sarrazin; Jean-Claude, Doudou; Antoine, Gardel; Vincent, Vantrepotte; Franck, Chow-Toun

    2016-04-01

    The Maroni and Oyapock rivers are two nearby basin in French Guiana, South America. The Maroni river drains a basin of 66 000 km² between French Guiana and Surinam. The Oyapock river basin covers 28 000 km² over French Guiana and Brazil. The Both over the Guyana shield presenting very lowest erosion rates. For both rivers, Suspended Sediment Concentration and remote sensing reflectance have been determined, during 3 fields sampling campaigns, using TriOs RAMSES radiometers operating in the 350-900 nm spectral range. Field data are compared with MODIS spaceborne sensors onboard calibration Terra and Aqua satellites. For the first time over the Maroni river, we show that it is possible to monitored from space both Surface Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSSC) and the Turbidity (R²=0,81), making possible to evaluate water quality long term. Combining fields and satellite derived SSSC measurements, we detected an increase of median SSSC (20 to 30 mg/l)and sediment budget in the Maroni river and a stability for the Oyapock river (10 mg/l), since 2000. Almost, relationship between SSSC and river water discharge was investigated for both rivers and for the 2000-2015 period. We show that SSSC and Maroni river discharge present decreasing correlation over the period of study. For the Oyapock River, SSSC and river discharge show good relationship over the period of study. Analysis of land-use change in the Maroni catchment showed an important increase of areas affected by gold mining which explain the observed modification of the Maroni River Suspended Sediment budget.

  8. Assessment of Coal Geology, Resources, and Reserves in the Gillette Coalfield, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luppens, James A.; Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.; Ellis, Margaret S.

    2008-01-01

    The Gillette coalfield, within the Powder River Basin in east-central Wyoming, is the most prolific coalfield in the United States. In 2006, production from the coalfield totaled over 431 million short tons of coal, which represented over 37 percent of the Nation's total yearly production. The Anderson and Canyon coal beds in the Gillette coalfield contain some of the largest deposits of low-sulfur subbituminous coal in the world. By utilizing the abundance of new data from recent coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin, this study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coalfield to date. Eleven coal beds were evaluated to determine the in-place coal resources. Six of the eleven coal beds were evaluated for reserve potential given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining. These restrictions included the presence of railroads, a Federal interstate highway, cities, a gas plant, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as thickness of overburden, thickness of coal beds, and areas of burned coal were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Gillette coalfield for all eleven coal beds assessed, and no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 201 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 164 billion short tons (81 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is the portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined for a stripping ratio of 10:1 or less. After mining and processing losses were subtracted, a total of 77 billion short tons of coal were calculated (48 percent of the original coal resource). Coal reserves are the portion of the recoverable coal that can be mined, processed, and marketed at a profit at the time of the economic

  9. Anatomy and dynamics of a floodplain, Powder River, Montana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pizzuto, J.E.; Moody, J.A.; Meade, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Centimeter-scale measurements on several Powder River floodplains provide insights into the nature of overbank depositional processes that created the floodplains; during a 20-year period after a major flood in 1978. Rising stages initially entered across a sill at the downriver end of the floodplains. Later, as stages continued to rise, water entered the floodplains through distinct low saddles along natural levees. The annual maximum depth of water over the levee crest averaged 0.19 in from 1983 through 1996, and the estimated flow velocities were approximately 0.15 m s-1. Water ponded in the floodplain trough, a topographic low between the natural levee and the pre-flood riverbank, and mud settled as thin layers of nearly constant thickness. Mud layers alternated with sand layers, which were relatively thick near the channel. Together, these beds created a distinctive natural levee. In some locations, individual flood deposits began as a thin mud layer that gradually coarsened upwards to medium-grained sand. Coarsening-upwards sequences form initially as mud because only the uppermost layers of water in the channel supply the first overbank flows, which are rich in mud but starved of sand. At successively higher stages, fine sands and then medium sands increase in concentration in the floodwater and are deposited as fine- and medium-sand layers overlying the initial mud layer. Theoretical predictions from mathematical models of sediment transport by advection and diffusion indicate that these processes acting alone are unlikely to create the observed sand layers of nearly uniform thickness that extend across much of the floodplain. We infer that other transport processes, notably bedload transport, must be important along Powder River. Even with the centimeter-scale measurements of floodplain deposits, daily hydraulic data, and precise annual surface topographic surveys, we were unable to determine any clear correspondence between the gauged flow record of

  10. Stage-Discharge Relations for the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona, 1990-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Kaplinski, Matt; Parnell, Rod; Kohl, Keith; Topping, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents stage-discharge relations for 47 discrete locations along the Colorado River, downstream from Glen Canyon Dam. Predicting the river stage that results from changes in flow regime is important for many studies investigating the effects of dam operations on resources in and along the Colorado River. The empirically based stage-discharge relations were developed from water-surface elevation data surveyed at known discharges at all 47 locations. The rating curves accurately predict stage at each location for discharges between 141 cubic meters per second and 1,274 cubic meters per second. The coefficient of determination (R2) of the fit to the data ranged from 0.993 to 1.00. Given the various contributing errors to the method, a conservative error estimate of ?0.05 m was assigned to the rating curves.

  11. Depositional systems of a synorogenic continental deposit. The upper paleocene and lower Eocene Wasatch formation in the Powder River basin, northeast Wyoming (chapter H). Evolution of sedimentary basins, Powder River Basin. Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Seeland, D.

    1992-01-01

    The synorogenic fluvial and paludal rocks of the upper Paleocene and lower Eocene Wasatch Formation in the Powder River Basin contain large deposits of coal and uranium. These rocks also record the culmination of Laramide tectonic events marked by subsidence in the basin and uplift of the bounding structures. The study establishes the early Eocene plaeogeography of the basin using a two-part approach consisting of (1) sedimentary particle-shape and -size analysis, and (2) paleocurrent studies.

  12. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs (< 100) generally correlated with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Previous study (e.g., Manga, 1999) has shown groundwater responds on shorter time scales than the MTT, but of interest the results presented here indicate that relatively stable and old springs with long MTTs (> 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While

  13. Erosion, sediment discharge, and channel morphology in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Carey, W.R.; Stamer, J.K.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Average annual rates of sheet erosion and sediment discharge were computed for several watersheds in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. Erosion yields ranged from about 900 to 6,000 tons per year per square mile in nine watersheds and were greatest where land use is largely agricultural or transitional. Suspended sediment yields from the same watershed ranged from about 300 to 800 tons per year per square mile and were greatest from urban areas and least from mostly forested watersheds. The impact of suspended sediment on stream quality was evaluated for 14 watersheds. In general, 60 percent or more of the total annual discharge of trace metals and phosphorus was contributed by suspended sediment. Yields of trace metals and nutrients in suspension were consistently greater in urban watersheds. Turbidity in basin streams increased geometrically with increasing concentrations of suspended sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Impact of climate change and anthropogenic activities on stream flow and sediment discharge in the Wei River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Geissen, V.; Ritsema, C. J.; Mu, X.-M.; Wang, F.

    2013-03-01

    Reduced stream flow and increased sediment discharge are a major concern in the Yellow River basin of China, which supplies water for agriculture, industry and the growing populations located along the river. Similar concerns exist in the Wei River basin, which is the largest tributary of the Yellow River basin and comprises the highly eroded Loess Plateau. Better understanding of the drivers of stream flow and sediment discharge dynamics in the Wei River basin is needed for development of effective management strategies for the region and entire Yellow River basin. In this regard we analysed long-term trends for water and sediment discharge during the flood season in the Wei River basin, China. Stream flow and sediment discharge data for 1932 to 2008 from existing hydrological stations located in two subcatchments and at two points in the Wei River were analysed. Precipitation and air temperature data were analysed from corresponding meteorological stations. We identified change-points or transition years for the trends by the Pettitt method and, using double mass curves, we diagnosed whether they were caused by precipitation changes, human intervention, or both. We found significant decreasing trends for stream flow and sediment discharge during the flood season in both subcatchments and in the Wei River itself. Change-point analyses further revealed that transition years existed and that rapid decline in stream flow began in 1968 (P < 0.01), and that sediment discharge began in 1981 (P < 0.01) in the main river. In the two subcatchments, the transition years were 1985 (P < 0.01) and 1994 (P < 0.05) for water discharge, and 1978 and 1979 for sediment discharge (P < 0.05), respectively. The impact of precipitation or human activity on the reduction amount after the transition years was estimated by double mass curves of precipitation vs. stream flow (sediment). For reductions in stream flow and sediment discharge, the contribution rate of human activity was found

  15. Evidence that the crystalline cores of uplifts adjacent to the Powder River Basin were breached during Paleocene time

    SciTech Connect

    Merin, I.S.; Lindholm, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Sandstones in the upper part of the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River basin are dominantly sublitharenite. These rocks contain abundant rock fragments of non-ferroan calcite, dolomite, chert, and foliated fine-grained metamorphic rock (phyllite). The carbonate and chert rock fragments were probably eroded from paleozoic carbonate sequences flanking the Bighorn Mountains or the Black Hills. The phyllitic rock fragments indicate that the crystalline cores of these uplifts were exposed during Paleocene time, which is earlier during the Laramide Orogeny than has been previously demonstrated.

  16. Slaughterhouse effluent discharges into rivers not responsible for environmental occurrence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bibbal, Delphine; Kérourédan, Monique; Loukiadis, Estelle; Scheutz, Flemming; Oswald, Eric; Brugère, Hubert

    2014-01-31

    Enteroaggregative Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains were responsible for a massive outbreak in Europe in 2011, and had been previously isolated from French patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) in slaughterhouse effluents (wastewater, slurry, sludge and effluents), and in river waters near these slaughterhouses. A total of 10,618 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for the presence of EAEC-associated genetic markers (aggR, aap and aatA). None of these markers was detected in E. coli isolated from slaughterhouse samples. A unique enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) O126:H8 was detected in river water sampled upstream from slaughterhouse effluent discharge. These results confirmed that animals might not be reservoirs of EAEC, and that further studies are required to evaluate the role of the environment in the transmission of EAEC to humans. PMID:24388632

  17. A decrease in discharge-normalized DOC export by the Yukon River during summer through autumn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Raymond, P.A.; Wickland, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Climate warming is having a dramatic effect on the vegetation distribution and carbon cycling of terrestrial subarctic and arctic ecosystems. Here, we present hydrologic evidence that warming is also affecting the export of dissolved organic carbon and bicarbonate (DOC and HCO3-) at the large basin scale. In the 831,400 km2 Yukon River basin, water discharge (Q) corrected DOC export significantly decreased during the growing season from 1978-80 to 2001-03, indicating a major shift in terrestrial to aquatic C transfer. We conclude that decreased DOC export, relative to total summer through autumn Q, results from increased flow path, residence time, and microbial mineralization of DOC in the soil active layer and groundwater. Counter to current predictions, we argue that continued warming could result in decreased DOC export to the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean by major subarctic and arctic rivers, due to increased respiration of organic C on land. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Instream Biological Assessment of NPDES Point Source Discharges at the Savannah River Site, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    2001-06-20

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) currently has 31 NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams. These studies were designed to detect biological impacts due to point source discharges. Sampling was initially conducted between November 1997 and July 1998 and was repeated in the summer and fall of 2000. A total of 18 locations were sampled (Table 1, Figure 1). Sampling locations for fish and macroinvertebrates were generally the same. However, different locations were sampled for fish (Road A-2) and macroinvertebrates (Road C) in the lower portion of Upper Three Runs, to avoid interference with ongoing fisheries studies at Road C. Also, fish were sampled in Fourmile Branch at Road 4 rather than at Road F because the stream at Road F was too narrow and shallow to support many fish. Sampling locations and parameters are detailed in Sections 2 and 3 of this report. In general, sampling locations were selected that would permit comparisons upstream and downstream of NPDES outfalls. In instances where this approach was not feasible because effluents discharge into the headwaters of a stream, appropriate unimpacted reference were used for comparison purposes. This report summarizes the results of the sampling that was conducted in 2000 and also compares these data to the data that were collected in 1997 and 1998.

  19. Kriging analysis of mean annual precipitation, Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Skrivan, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Kriging is a statistical estimation technique for regionalized variables which exhibit an autocorrelation structure. Such structure can be described by a semi-variogram of the observed data. The kriging estimate at any point is a weighted average of the data, where the weights are determined using the semi-variogram and an assumed drift, or lack of drift, in the data. Block, or areal, estimates can also be calculated. The kriging algorithm, based on unbiased and minimum-variance estimates, involves a linear system of equations to calculate the weights. Kriging variances can then be used to give confidence intervals of the resulting estimates. Mean annual precipitation in the Powder River basin, Montana and Wyoming, is an important variable when considering restoration of coal-strip-mining lands of the region. Two kriging analyses involving data at 60 stations were made--one assuming no drift in precipitation, and one a partial quadratic drift simulating orographic effects. Contour maps of estimates of mean annual precipitation were similar for both analyses, as were the corresponding contours of kriging variances. Block estimates of mean annual precipitation were made for two subbasins. Runoff estimates were 1-2 percent of the kriged block estimates. (USGS)

  20. Climate control on Quaternary coal fires and landscape evolution, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, C.A.; Reiners, P.W.; Heffern, E.L.

    2009-03-15

    Late Cenozoic stream incision and basin excavation have strongly influenced the modern Rocky Mountain landscape, but constraints on the timing and rates of erosion are limited. The geology of the Powder River basin provides an unusually good opportunity to address spatial and temporal patterns of stream incision. Numerous coal seams in the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations within the basin have burned during late Cenozoic incision, as coal was exposed to dry and oxygen-rich near-surface conditions. The topography of this region is dominated by hills capped with clinker, sedimentary rocks metamorphosed by burning of underlying coal beds. We use (U-Th)/He ages of clinker to determine times of relatively rapid erosion, with the assumption that coal must be near Earth's surface to burn. Ages of 55 in situ samples range from 0.007 to 1.1 Ma. Clinker preferentially formed during times in which eccentricity of the Earth's orbit was high, times that typically but not always correlate with interglacial periods. Our data therefore suggest that rates of landscape evolution in this region are affected by climate fluctuations. Because the clinker ages correlate better with eccentricity time series than with an oxygen isotope record of global ice volume, we hypothesize that variations in solar insolation modulated by eccentricity have a larger impact on rates of landscape evolution in this region than do glacial-interglacial cycles.

  1. Exploration for shallow, compaction-induced gas accumulations, Fort Union Formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.

    1996-06-01

    Commercial quantities of gas have been produced from shallow sandstone reservoirs of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene) in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The two largest accumulations discovered to date, Oedekoven and Chan pools, were drilled on prospects which invoked differential compaction as a mechanism for gas entrapment and prospect delineation. Gas is believed to have accumulated in localized structural highs early in the burial history of lenticular sands. Structural relief is due to the compaction contrast between sand and stratigraphically-equivalent fine-grained sediments. A shallow Fort Union gas play was based on reports of shallow gas shows, the occurrence of thick coals which could have served as sources for bacterial gas, and the presence of lenticular sandstones which may have promoted the development of compaction structures early in the burial process, to which bacterial gas migrated. Five geologic elements related to compactional trap development were used to rank prospects. Drilling of the Oedekoven prospect, which possessed all prospect elements, led to the discovery of the Oedekoven Fort Union gas pool at a depth of 340 ft (104 m). The uncemented, very fine grained, well-sorted {open_quotes}Canyon sand{close_quotes} pay has extremely high intergranular porosity. Low drilling and completion costs associated with shallow, high-permeability reservoirs, an abundance of subsurface control with which to delineate prospects, and existing gas-gathering systems make Fort Union sandstones attractive primary targets in shallow exploration efforts as well as secondary objectives in deeper drilling programs.

  2. The production of a premium solid fuel from Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.; Sethi, V.; Thomas, K.; Grimes, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes our initial evaluation of a process designed to produce premium-quality solid fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The process is based upon our experience gained by producing highly-reactive, high-heating-value char as part of a mild-gasification project. In the process, char containing 20 to 25 wt % volatiles and having a gross heating value of 12,500 to 13,000 Btu/lb is produced. The char is then contacted by coal-derived liquid. The result is a deposit of 6 to 8 wt % pitch on the char particles. The lower boiling component of the coal-derived liquid which is not deposited on the char is burned as fuel. Our economic evaluation shows the process will be economically attractive if the product can be sold for about $20/ton or more. Our preliminary tests show that we can deposit pitch on to the char, and the product is less dusty, less susceptible to readsorption of moisture, and has reduced susceptibility to self heating.

  3. The production of a premium solid fuel from Powder River Basin coal. [COMPCOAL Process

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.; Sethi, V.; Thomas, K.; Grimes, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes our initial evaluation of a process designed to produce premium-quality solid fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The process is based upon our experience gained by producing highly-reactive, high-heating-value char as part of a mild-gasification project. In the process, char containing 20 to 25 wt % volatiles and having a gross heating value of 12,500 to 13,000 Btu/lb is produced. The char is then contacted by coal-derived liquid. The result is a deposit of 6 to 8 wt % pitch on the char particles. The lower boiling component of the coal-derived liquid which is not deposited on the char is burned as fuel. Our economic evaluation shows the process will be economically attractive if the product can be sold for about $20/ton or more. Our preliminary tests show that we can deposit pitch on to the char, and the product is less dusty, less susceptible to readsorption of moisture, and has reduced susceptibility to self heating.

  4. Status Report: USGS coal assessment of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Luppens; Timothy J. Rohrbacher; Jon E. Haacke; David C. Scott; Lee M. Osmonson

    2006-07-01

    This publication reports on the status of the current coal assessment of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This slide program was presented at the Energy Information Agency's 2006 EIA Energy Outlook and Modeling Conference in Washington, DC, on March 27, 2006. The PRB coal assessment will be the first USGS coal assessment to include estimates of both regional coal resources and reserves for an entire coal basin. Extensive CBM and additional oil and gas development, especially in the Gillette coal field, have provided an unprecedented amount of down-hole geological data. Approximately 10,000 new data points have been added to the PRB database since the last assessment (2002) which will provide a more robust evaluation of the single most productive U.S. coal basin. The Gillette coal field assessment, including the mining economic evaluation, is planned for completion by the end of 2006. The geologic portion of the coal assessment work will shift to the northern and northwestern portions of the PRB before the end of 2006 while the Gillette engineering studies are finalized. 7 refs.

  5. Lithologic variations and diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation in northern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.L.; Patterson, P.E.

    1986-08-01

    Regional facies studies show that sandstones in the Muddy Formation, northern Powder River basin, were deposited in fluvial and nearshore marine paleoenvironments. Most sandstones of the fluvial facies contain only minor amounts of clay matrix and are classified as quartzarenite or sublitharenite, whereas those of the shoreface facies contain appreciable clay and are classified as litharenite or arkose. The arkoses are concentrated along a narrow belt that trends northeastward, parallel to the inferred paleoshoreline. Both the fluvial and shoreface sandstones have been variably affected by postdepositional alteration. During early stages of diagenesis, matrix clay was formed predominantly within the shoreface sandstones, owing mainly to alteration of volcanic material. Later, quartz overgrowths and calcite cement were precipitated within the remaining pore spaces in both fluvial and shoreface sandstones. Calcite also replaced detrital framework grains and some of the previously formed matrix clay. During intermediate diagenetic stages, detrital feldspar grains, particularly those in the arkosic shoreface sandstones, were replaced by albite, which characteristically lacks twinning or displays distinctive chessboard texture. Microprobe analyses indicate that both forms are essentially pure albite. During later stages of diagenesis, following maximum burial, much of the calcite was dissolved, producing secondary porosity. Inasmuch as the calcite was precipitated early, i.e., prior to significant compaction, and inasmuch as it replaced both framework grains and authigenic matrix clay, the secondary pores exhibit a relatively high level of interconnection. It is this secondary porosity that has contributed to the migration and storage of hydrocarbons in the Muddy Formation.

  6. Altered volcanic ash partings in Wasatch Formation coal beds of the northern Powder River basin: composition and geologic applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, Bruce Forbes; Phillips, Richard E.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    1979-01-01

    In contrast to the coal-bearing rocks of the Appalachian and Eastern Interior Basins, those of the northern Powder River Basin exhibit more complex stratigraphic and facies relationships, and regional correlations of coal beds are, therefore, more difficult to establish. Recently, however, several coal beds in the Powder River Basin, as well as coal beds in several other coal basins of the Rocky Mountain region, have been found to contain thin but persist·ent layers. of altered volcanic ash described as kaolinitic bentonites (Bohor, 1976, 1977, 1978, Bohor and others, 1976, 1978, Bohor and Pillmore, 1976). These layers serve as isochronous marker horizons which aid in correlating coal beds over broad areas.

  7. Feeding bionomics of juvenile chinook salmon relative to thermal discharges in the central Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford environs of the central Columbia River, Washington consumed almost entirely adult and larval stages of aquatic insects. The food organisms were dominated by midges (Diptera: Tendipedidae); by numbers, adult midges provided 64 and 58% of the diet and larval midges 17 and 18% of the diet, in 1968 and 1969, respectively. The families Hydropsychidae (Trichoptera), Notonectidae (Hemiptera) and Hypogastruridae (Collembola) were of secondary importance. Small fry fed almost exclusively on the small tendipedids. Over 95% of all food organisms originated within the river ecosystem. The distinctive features of food and feeding activity were fourfold: first, relatively few insect groups were utilized; second, the fish depended on drifting, floating, or swimming organisms; third, they visually selected living prey moving in or on the water; and fourth, they were habitat opportunists to a high degree. The 1969 data, were studied to reveal possible thermal effects of heated discharges from plutonium production reactors at Hanford on food and growth parameters. All data were characterized by considerable variation between and within stations. No discernable effects between coldwater and warmwater stations were revealed by analyses of: (1) groups of food organisms utilized, (2) food and feeding activity, (3) numbers of insects consumed, (4) seasonal increases in fish length, (5) fish length-weight relationships, (6) fish coefficients of condition, and (7) stomach biomass. The lack of detectable thermal effects was apparently due to the fact that the main effluent plumes discharge in midstream and the effluents are well mixed before reaching inshore feeding areas. The transient nature of fish groups at each station, influenced by changes in regulated river flows, and the availability of food organisms in the river drift were ecological factors affecting critical thermal evaluation in situ.

  8. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  9. Suspended-sediment and fresh-water discharges in the Ob and Yenisey rivers, 1960-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, R. H.; Bobrovitskaya, N. N.; Babkin, V. I.

    2000-08-01

    Of the world's great rivers, the Ob and Yenisey rank among the largest suppliers of fresh water and among the smallest suppliers of suspended sediment to the coastal ocean. Sediment in the middle reaches of the rivers is mobilized from bordering terraces and exchanged between channels and flood plains. Sediment in the lower reaches of these great rivers is deposited and stored (permanently, on a millennial time scale) in flood plains. Sediment discharges, already small under natural conditions, are diminished further by large manmade reservoirs that trap significant proportions of the moving solids. The long winter freeze and sudden spring breakup impose a peakedness in seasonal water runoff and sediment discharge that contrasts markedly with that in rivers of the tropics and more temperate climates. Very little sediment from the Ob and Yenisey rivers is being transported to the open waters of the Arctic Ocean under present conditions.

  10. Remote Estimation of Greenland Ice Sheet Supraglacial River Discharge using GIS Modeling and WorldView-2 Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, V. W.; Smith, L. C.; Yang, K.; Gleason, C. J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Legleiter, C. J.; Forster, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing surface melting on the Greenland ice sheet and rising sea level have heightened the need for understanding the complex pathways transporting meltwater from the ice sheet surface to the ice edge and the ocean. Satellite images show supraglacial rivers abundantly covering the western ablation zone throughout the melt season, transporting large volumes of meltwater into moulins and to the ice edge, yet these rivers remain poorly studied. Here, a GIS modeling framework is developed to estimate supraglacial river discharge by spatially adapting Manning's equation for use with remotely sensed imagery and is applied to supraglacial rivers on the Greenland Ice Sheet. This framework incorporates high-resolution visible/near-infrared WorldView-2 (WV2) satellite imagery, the Greenland Ice Mapping Project (GIMP) DEM, and a field-calibrated WV2 river bathymetry retrieval algorithm and channel roughness parameter. Orthogonal cross-sections are simulated along river centerlines to extract cross-sectional discharge using Manning's equation for open channel flow. A total of 1,629,502 reach-averaged points were retrieved over 465 river networks of western Greenland in 2012, including attributes of width, depth, velocity, slope, wetted perimeter, hydraulic radius, and discharge. This work provides a method for producing spatially extensive, high-resolution estimates of supraglacial meltwater flux in river networks and into the ice sheet.

  11. Interpolating Stage-Discharge Relationships using Serial LiDAR along the Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madin, I.; English, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating discharge and flood stage along streams is a common and sometimes arduous process for emergency managers and researchers. In most cases this process includes hydrologic and hydraulic modeling to accurately depict inundation in order to examine the height of a particular flow. This study examines the use of multiple lidar data sets along the Sandy River, Oregon to establish relationships between water surface elevations, discharge, and stage height in order to accurately estimate flows without the use of complex models. Airborne lidar elevation data were collected along the Sandy River in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2011. All of these data sets contain water elevations at USGS gauge station 14142500 Sandy River below Bull Run River near Bull Run, Oregon. Real time data from this station provides accurate stage heights and discharge values. This data serves as calibration for water surface elevations extracted from lidar allowing for a linear relationship between the gauge and lidar elevations to be established for each year's lidar derived water surface. A linear regression analysis of this data allows for researchers to predict flow and stage by querying lidar elevations along the channel. This analysis establishes estimated flows through simply input of elevations queried along the banks of the Sandy River. For geologists, this is an efficient method for estimating flows associated with known water marks of historic floods without going through complex modeling processes. In addition to geologic flows, this method allows emergency managers to quickly determine the discharge of potential flood scenarios based solely on lidar elevations. Results of such an analysis are most accurate at the site of the gauge station, but could be expanded upstream and downstream using known base flood elevations as the denominator in a ratio analysis. This study examines the relationship between lidar elevation data and stage discharge relationship with the goal of predicting

  12. Coal geology and assessment of coal resources and reserves in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luppens, James A.; Scott, David C.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the final results of the first assessment of both coal resources and reserves for all significant coal beds in the entire Powder River Basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. The basin covers about 19,500 square miles, exclusive of the part of the basin within the Crow and Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservations in Montana. The Powder River Basin, which contains the largest resources of low-sulfur, low-ash, subbituminous coal in the United States, is the single most important coal basin in the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey used a geology-based assessment methodology to estimate an original coal resource of about 1.16 trillion short tons for 47 coal beds in the Powder River Basin; in-place (remaining) resources are about 1.15 trillion short tons. This is the first time that all beds were mapped individually over the entire basin. A total of 162 billion short tons of recoverable coal resources (coal reserve base) are estimated at a 10:1 stripping ratio or less. An estimated 25 billion short tons of that coal reserve base met the definition of reserves, which are resources that can be economically produced at or below the current sales price at the time of the evaluation. The total underground coal resource in coal beds 10–20 feet thick is estimated at 304 billion short tons.

  13. The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

  14. Freshwater discharge into the Caribbean Sea from the rivers of Northwestern South America (Colombia): Magnitude, variability and recent changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan Camilo; Ortíz, Juan Carlos; Pierini, Jorge; Schrottke, Kerstin; Maza, Mauro; Otero, Luís; Aguirre, Julián

    2014-02-01

    The monthly averaged freshwater discharge data from ten rivers in northern Colombia (Caribbean alluvial plain) draining into the Caribbean Sea were analysed to quantify the magnitudes, to estimate long-term trends, and to evaluate the variability of discharge patterns. These rivers deliver ∼340.9 km3 yr-1 of freshwater to the Caribbean Sea. The largest freshwater supply is provided by the Magdalena River, with a mean discharge of 205.1 km3 yr-1 at Calamar, which is 26% of the total fluvial discharge into this basin. From 2000 to 2010, the annual streamflow of these rivers increased as high as 65%, and upward trends in statistical significance were found for the Mulatos, Canal del Dique, Magdalena, and Fundación Rivers. The concurrence of major oscillation processes and the maximum power of the 3-7 year band fluctuation defined a period of intense hydrological activity from approximately 1998-2002. The wavelet spectrum highlighted a change in the variability patterns of fluvial systems between 2000 and 2010 characterised by a shift towards a quasi-decadal process (8-12 years) domain. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, and quasi-decadal climate processes are the main factors controlling the fluvial discharge variability of these fluvial systems.

  15. Precipitation v. River Discharge Controls on Water Availability to Riparian Trees in the Rhône River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Sargeant, C. I.; Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Evans, C.; Bates, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Water availability to riparian trees in lowlands is controlled through precipitation and its infiltration into floodplain soils, and through river discharge additions to the hyporheic water table. The relative contributions of both water sources to the root zone within river floodplains vary through time, depending on climatic fluctuations. There is currently limited understanding of how climatic fluctuations are expressed at local scales, especially in 'critical zone' hydrology, which is fundamental to the health and sustainability of riparian forest ecosystems. This knowledge is particularly important in water-stressed Mediterranean climate systems, considering climatic trends and projections toward hotter and drier growing seasons, which have the potential to dramatically reduce water availability to riparian forests. Our aim is to identify and quantify the relative contributions of hyporheic (discharge) water v. infiltrated precipitation to water uptake by riparian Mediterranean trees for several distinct hydrologic years, selected to isolate contrasts in water availability from these sources. Our approach includes isotopic analyses of water and tree-ring cellulose, mechanistic modeling of water uptake and wood production, and physically based modeling of subsurface hydrology. We utilize an extensive database of oxygen isotope (δ18O) measurements in surface water and precipitation alongside recent measurements of δ18O in groundwater and soil water and in tree-ring cellulose. We use a mechanistic model to back-calculate source water δ18O based on δ18O in cellulose and climate data. Finally, we test our results via 1-D hydrologic modeling of precipitation infiltration and water table rise and fall. These steps enable us to interpret hydrologic cycle variability within the 'critical zone' and their potential impact on riparian trees.

  16. Evaluation of the satellite-based Global Flood Detection System for measuring river discharge: influence of local factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, B.; Thielen, J.; Salamon, P.; De Groeve, T.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main challenges for global hydrological modelling is the limited availability of observational data for calibration and model verification. This is particularly the case for real-time applications. This problem could potentially be overcome if discharge measurements based on satellite data were sufficiently accurate to substitute for ground-based measurements. The aim of this study is to test the potentials and constraints of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System for converting the flood detection signal into river discharge values. The study uses data for 322 river measurement locations in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. Satellite discharge measurements were calibrated for these sites and a validation analysis with in situ discharge was performed. The locations with very good performance will be used in a future project where satellite discharge measurements are obtained on a daily basis to fill the gaps where real-time ground observations are not available. These include several international river locations in Africa: the Niger, Volta and Zambezi rivers. Analysis of the potential factors affecting the satellite signal was based on a classification decision tree (random forest) and showed that mean discharge, climatic region, land cover and upstream catchment area are the dominant variables which determine good or poor performance of the measurement sites. In general terms, higher skill scores were obtained for locations with one or more of the following characteristics: a river width higher than 1km; a large floodplain area and in flooded forest, a potential flooded area greater than 40%; sparse vegetation, croplands or grasslands and closed to open and open forest; leaf area index > 2; tropical climatic area; and without hydraulic infrastructures. Also, locations where river ice cover is seasonally present obtained higher skill scores. This work provides guidance on the best locations and limitations

  17. Evaluation of the satellite-based Global Flood Detection System for measuring river discharge: influence of local factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, B.; Thielen, J.; Salamon, P.; De Groeve, T.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    One of the main challenges for global hydrological modelling is the limited availability of observational data for calibration and model verification. This is particularly the case for real time applications. This problem could potentially be overcome if discharge measurements based on satellite data were sufficiently accurate to substitute for ground-based measurements. The aim of this study is to test the potentials and constraints of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System for converting the flood detection signal into river discharge values. The study uses data for 322 river measurement locations in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. Satellite discharge measurements were calibrated for these sites and a validation analysis with in situ discharge was performed. The locations with very good performance will be used in a future project where satellite discharge measurements are obtained on a daily basis to fill the gaps where real time ground observations are not available. These include several international river locations in Africa: Niger, Volta and Zambezi rivers. Analysis of the potential factors affecting the satellite signal was based on a classification decision tree (Random Forest) and showed that mean discharge, climatic region, land cover and upstream catchment area are the dominant variables which determine good or poor performance of the measurement sites. In general terms, higher skill scores were obtained for locations with one or more of the following characteristics: a river width higher than 1 km; a large floodplain area and in flooded forest; with a potential flooded area greater than 40%; sparse vegetation, croplands or grasslands and closed to open and open forest; Leaf Area Index > 2; tropical climatic area; and without hydraulic infrastructures. Also, locations where river ice cover is seasonally present obtained higher skill scores. The work provides guidance on the best locations and limitations

  18. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when

  19. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction-modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. PMID:26403720

  20. A stochastic conflict resolution model for trading pollutant discharge permits in river systems.

    PubMed

    Niksokhan, Mohammad Hossein; Kerachian, Reza; Amin, Pedram

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient methodology for developing pollutant discharge permit trading in river systems considering the conflict of interests of involving decision-makers and the stakeholders. In this methodology, a trade-off curve between objectives is developed using a powerful and recently developed multi-objective genetic algorithm technique known as the Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II). The best non-dominated solution on the trade-off curve is defined using the Young conflict resolution theory, which considers the utility functions of decision makers and stakeholders of the system. These utility functions are related to the total treatment cost and a fuzzy risk of violating the water quality standards. The fuzzy risk is evaluated using the Monte Carlo analysis. Finally, an optimization model provides the trading discharge permit policies. The practical utility of the proposed methodology in decision-making is illustrated through a realistic example of the Zarjub River in the northern part of Iran. PMID:18592387

  1. Characteristics of Lake Chad level variability and links to ENSO, precipitation, and river discharge.

    PubMed

    Okonkwo, Churchill; Demoz, Belay; Gebremariam, Sium

    2014-01-01

    This study used trend, correlation, and wavelet analysis to characterize Lake Chad (LC) level fluctuations, river discharge, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and precipitation regimes and their interrelationships. Linear correlation results indicate a negative association between ENSO and LC level, river discharge and precipitation. Trend analysis shows increasing precipitation in the Lake Chad Basin (LCB) but decreasing LC level. The mode of interannual variability in LC level, rainfall, and ENSO analyzed using wavelet analysis is dominated by 3-4-year periods. Results show that variability in ENSO could explain only 31% and 13% of variations in LC level at Kindjeria and precipitation in the northern LCB, respectively. The wavelet transform coherency (WTC) between LC level of the southern pool at Kalom and ENSO is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level and phase-locked, implying a cause-and-effect association. These strong coherencies coincide with the La Niña years with the exception of 1997-1998 El Niño events. The WTC shows strong covariance between increasing precipitation and LC level in the northern pool at a 2- to 4-year band and 3- to 4-year band localized from 1996 to 2010. Implications for water resource planning and management are discussed. PMID:25538946

  2. Characteristics of Lake Chad Level Variability and Links to ENSO, Precipitation, and River Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Demoz, Belay; Gebremariam, Sium

    2014-01-01

    This study used trend, correlation, and wavelet analysis to characterize Lake Chad (LC) level fluctuations, river discharge, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and precipitation regimes and their interrelationships. Linear correlation results indicate a negative association between ENSO and LC level, river discharge and precipitation. Trend analysis shows increasing precipitation in the Lake Chad Basin (LCB) but decreasing LC level. The mode of interannual variability in LC level, rainfall, and ENSO analyzed using wavelet analysis is dominated by 3-4-year periods. Results show that variability in ENSO could explain only 31% and 13% of variations in LC level at Kindjeria and precipitation in the northern LCB, respectively. The wavelet transform coherency (WTC) between LC level of the southern pool at Kalom and ENSO is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level and phase-locked, implying a cause-and-effect association. These strong coherencies coincide with the La Niña years with the exception of 1997-1998 El Niño events. The WTC shows strong covariance between increasing precipitation and LC level in the northern pool at a 2- to 4-year band and 3- to 4-year band localized from 1996 to 2010. Implications for water resource planning and management are discussed. PMID:25538946

  3. Trace elements in the Mississippi River Delta outflow region: Behavior at high discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, Alan M.; Boyle, Edward A.

    1991-11-01

    Samples for dissolved trace element analysis were collected in surface waters of the plume of the Mississippi River during a period of high river discharge. These field data are compared with results of laboratory mixing experiments. The studies show that Cu, Ni, and Mo are largely unreactive in the plume. Surprisingly, Fe also appears to show little reactivity; the pronounced flocculation removal of Fe frequently observed in other estuaries is not seen in this system. This difference may be a consequence of the alkaline nature of the Mississippi which results in low dissolved Fe concentrations in the river (<50 nmol/kg). Zinc, another particle-reactive element, also shows little reactivity. This lack of reactivity for Zn, as well as Cu and Ni, is partly a result of the short residence time of plume waters in shallow areas affected by sedimentary interactions. The chromium distribution shows apparent non-conservative behavior indicative of estuarine removal; however, temporal variation in river concentrations is a more likely explanation for this behavior. For some other elements, complex distributions occur as a consequence of the interplay of physical-chemical and/or biological processes with the dynamic mixing regime. For Cd, desorption from the suspended load plays a major role in determining the distribution. However, sedimentary input may also play a role in the spatial variability of Cd. For V, biological uptake in the plume exerts a strong influence on its distribution. At the time of this study, uptake was large enough to consume both the river flux of V as well as a substantial amount of vanadium supplied by the ocean.

  4. Post-processing of multi-model ensemble river discharge forecasts using censored EMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemri, Stephan; Lisniak, Dmytro; Klein, Bastian

    2014-05-01

    When forecasting water levels and river discharge, ensemble weather forecasts are used as meteorological input to hydrologic process models. As hydrologic models are imperfect and the input ensembles tend to be biased and underdispersed, the output ensemble forecasts for river runoff typically are biased and underdispersed, too. Thus, statistical post-processing is required in order to achieve calibrated and sharp predictions. Standard post-processing methods such as Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) that have their origins in meteorological forecasting are now increasingly being used in hydrologic applications. Here we consider two sub-catchments of River Rhine, for which the forecasting system of the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) uses runoff data that are censored below predefined thresholds. To address this methodological challenge, we develop a censored EMOS method that is tailored to such data. The censored EMOS forecast distribution can be understood as a mixture of a point mass at the censoring threshold and a continuous part based on a truncated normal distribution. Parameter estimates of the censored EMOS model are obtained by minimizing the Continuous Ranked Probability Score (CRPS) over the training dataset. Model fitting on Box-Cox transformed data allows us to take account of the positive skewness of river discharge distributions. In order to achieve realistic forecast scenarios over an entire range of lead-times, there is a need for multivariate extensions. To this end, we smooth the marginal parameter estimates over lead-times. In order to obtain realistic scenarios of discharge evolution over time, the marginal distributions have to be linked with each other. To this end, the multivariate dependence structure can either be adopted from the raw ensemble like in Ensemble Copula Coupling (ECC), or be estimated from observations in a training period. The censored EMOS model has been applied to multi-model ensemble forecasts issued on a

  5. Map Showing Principal Coal Beds and Bedrock Geology of the Ucross-Arvada Area, Central Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ucross-Arvada area is part of the Powder River Basin, a large, north-trending structural depression between the Black Hills on the east and the Bighorn Mountains on the west. Almost all of the study area is within Sheridan and Johnson Counties, Wyoming. Most of the Ucross-Arvada area lies within the outcrop of the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age; the extreme northeast corner falls within the outcrop of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Within the Powder River Basin, both the Wasatch Formation and the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation contain significant coal resources. The map includes locations and elevations of coal beds at 1:50,000 scale for an area that includes ten 7½-minute quadrangles covering some 500 square miles. The Wasatch Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Monument Peak, Walters (also called Ulm 1), Healy (also called Ulm 2), Truman, Felix, and Arvada. The Fort Union Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Roland (of Baker, 1929) and Smith.

  6. Lacustrine and fluvial-deltaic depositional systems, Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, W.B. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    The Powder River basin is a Laramide foreland basin that was filled by a combination of fluvial, deltaic, paludal, and lacustrine sediments. The depositional history of the Fort Union Formation was unraveled in a regional subsurface study using data from approximately 1400 geophysical well logs. The depositional model developed from the subsurface study was tested by selective fieldwork. The Powder River basin originated as a structural and depositional basin in earliest middle Paleocene. As a result of rapid subsidence, a lake (Lake Lebo) formed along the basin axis. Lake Lebo, documented in the mudstone of the Lebo Shale Member, spread rapidly to cover an area greater than 10,000 mi/sup 2/ (25,900 km/sup 2/). During the middle through late Paleocene, Lake Lebo was filled peripherally by fluvial-deltaic systems that are recorded in the coarser clastics of the Tongue River Member. Primary basin fill was from: (1) the eastern margin by elongate deltas fed by suspended to mixed-load fluvial systems issuing from the ancestral Black Hills, and (2) the southwestern margin by mixed to bed-load streams emanating from the Wind River basin. Secondary fill was from the northwest by an elongate delta system fed by a suspended to mixed-load fluvial system flowing from the Bull Mountain basin. 17 figures.

  7. Depositional systems and coal occurrence in the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, W.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is a Laramide foreland basin which was formed as a structural and depositional entity in the Paleocene and was filled by fluvial-deltaic, paludal, and lacustrine sediments of the Fort Union Formation. A regional subsurface study shows that, as a result of rapid subsidence in the middle paleocene, a lake (Lebo Shale Member) formed along the axis of the Powder River Basin and rapidly transgressed an area greater than 10,000 sq mi. (25,900 sq km). From middle through late Paleocene, Lake Lebo was filled peripherally by fluvially dominated deltas (Tongue River Member). Primary fill was from: (1) the east by elongate deltas fed by suspended-load fluvial systems issuing from the Black Hills and; (2) the southwest by lobate deltas fed by mixed-to-bed-load streams sourced to the west. Secondary fill was from the northwest by an elongate delta fed by a suspended-load fluvial system flowing through the Bull Mountain trough. A detailed study of Tongue River coal seams near the center of the basin shows that coal occurrence is facies controlled.

  8. Top-kriging interpolation for extremes discharge estimation in ungauged rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.; Rossi, G.; Chiarello, V.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of peak flow and low flow discharges and associated floods and droughts is fundamental in hydrology and related sciences. Streamflow characteristics are usually estimated starting from measurements of river discharges at stream gauging stations. The problem of estimating streamflow-related variables at locations where no measurements are available is essential in environmental and water engineering practices. Regional analysis is a classical approach to estimate river flow characteristics at sites where little or no data exists. Specific techniques are needed to regionalize the hydrological variables over the considered area. Top-kriging, or topological kriging, is a kriging interpolation procedure that takes into account the geometric organization and structure of hydrographic network, the catchment area and the nested nature of catchments. The continuous processes in space defined for the point variables are represented by a variogram. The channel network structure and the proximity between upstream and downstream catchments are represented by the drainage area as well as the relative positions of the neighbouring catchments. Top-kriging is applied here over the geographical space of Tuscany Region, in Central Italy. The obtained results are compared with classical interpolation techniques (IDW and Ordinary Kriging) and with a Multivariate analysis, based on natural logarithms of seven geomorphoclimatic characteristics. Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA) are implemented to reduce the high-dimensionality of catchments descriptors. The results are validated using a cross-validation method. With the aim to define the most suitable procedure for extremes discharge estimation in nested and not nested catchments, the results are compared through different error measurement methods.

  9. Nutrients and particulate organic matter discharged by the Changjiang (Yangtze River): Seasonal variations and temporal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Li, Daoji; Zhang, Yanwei

    2012-12-01

    From September 2009 to August 2010, intensive monthly sampling of nutrients was conducted at two stations at the mouth of the Changjiang (Yangtze River). Particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) were also measured in selected samples of all months. Most nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, ammonia, and nitrite) as well as POC, PN, and δ13C displayed peak values when the highest or lowest Changjiang monthly discharges occurred, suggesting the Changjiang discharges strongly influence the seasonal variations of these chemicals. The sharply increases in concentrations of ammonia and nitrite in winter probably suggest nitrification was greatly depressed during this cold period. Using five interpolation methods, the annual discharge fluxes of nutrients, POC, and PN from the Changjiang to the East China Sea shelf were calculated. Combining this nutrient data with data from previous studies, the seasonal Mann-Kendall test, in which the influence of seasonal variation was considered, suggests concentrations of nitrate and phosphate in the Changjiang have significantly increased during recent decades at rates of 2.2μM yr-1 and 0.03 μM yr-1, respectively; no significant trend for silicate was noted. Decreased POC annual fluxes along with sharply decreased suspended particulate matter yields were also seen in recent years (1993-2010). However, no distinct changes of δ13C, δ15N, and the POC/PN ratio, which describe the particulate organic matter properties, were observed during this period.

  10. Power law time dependence of river flood decay and its relationship to long term discharge frequency distribution. [California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations have continued into the possibility that significant information on stream flow rates can be obtained from aerial and satellite imagery of river meander patterns by seeking a correlation between the meander and discharge spectra of rivers. Such a correlation could provide the basis for a simple and inexpensive technique for remote sensing of the water resources of large geographical areas, eliminating the need for much hydrologic recording. The investigation of the nature of the meander and discharge spectra and their interrelationship can also contribute to a more fundamental understanding of the processes of both river meander formation and drainage of large basins. It has been found that floods decay with an inverse power law dependence on time. The exponent of this dependence varies from river to river and even from station to station along the same river. This power law time dependence makes possible the forecasting of river discharge with an uncertainty of about 5% for as long as a month following the flood peak.

  11. Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

    1997-03-01

    A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity “hotspots,” yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

  12. Influence of Amur River discharge on phytoplankton photophysiology in the Sea of Okhotsk during late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isada, Tomonori; Iida, Takahiro; Liu, Hongbin; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Nishioka, Jun; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Suzuki, Koji

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton in the Sea of Okhotsk during the late summer of 2006 to characterize their spatiotemporal variability and to test the hypothesis that discharge from the Amur River could influence the algal photophysiology. The highest maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation in photosynthesis (Φcmax; 0.098 mol C mol photons-1) was found near the Amur River mouth, where nitrate was depleted. However, none of the photosynthetic parameters, including primary productivity (PP) at the surface, were correlated with temperature, daily photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), or ambient nutrient concentrations. Variations in Φcmax depended on the variations in not only the mean chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton (ā*ph) but also the slope index of the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton (aph slope), an indicator for the ratio of nonphotosynthetic carotenoids to photosynthetic carotenoids. These results indicated that the phytoplankton assemblages acclimated to the ambient light conditions by regulating their cellular pigments. Additionally, ā*ph and euphotic depth (Zeu) were significantly correlated with salinity, suggesting that photoacclimation of the phytoplankton assemblages observed in this study could be induced by discharge of Amur River. Because spatiotemporal variations in PP were concomitant with Φcmax, ā*ph, and the chlorophyll a concentration, PP models based on inherent optical property (IOP) were suitable for estimating PP in the Sea of Okhotsk. This study is the first to investigate the factors controlling phytoplankton photophysiology in the Sea of Okhotsk, one of the highest primary production areas in the world.

  13. Geophysical and Geochemical Characterization of Subsurface Drip Irrigation Sites, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, B. L.; Bern, C. R.; Sams, J. I., III; Veloski, G.; Minsley, B. J.; Smith, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production in the Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming has increased rapidly since 1997. CBNG production involves the extraction of large amounts of water containing >2000 mg/L total dissolved solids, dominantly sodium bicarbonate. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is a beneficial disposal method of produced waters, provided that waters and associated salts are managed properly. We are studying how water and solute distributions change in soils with progressive irrigation at two PRB sites using a combination of geophysical, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses. Perennial crops are grown at both sites, drip tapes are located at 92 cm depth, and water is applied year-round. The first SDI site is located at the confluence of Crazy Woman Creek and the Powder River. Baseline ground-based and helicopter-borne frequency domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveys were completed in 2007 and 2008, respectively, prior to the installation of the SDI system. Since installation, additional ground-based EMI, resistivity, and downhole geophysical log surveys have been completed along with soil geochemical and mineralogical analyses. Determining baseline physical, chemical, and electrical soil characteristics at this study site is an important step in linking the EMI measurements to the soil characteristics they are intended to assess. EMI surveys indicate that soil conductivity has generally increased with irrigation, but lateral migration of water away from the irrigated blocks is minimal. Median downhole electrical conductivity was positively correlated with soil mass wetness but not correlated with soil mineralogy. Soil-water extract results indicate existing salts are chemically heterogeneous throughout the site and in depth. The observed EMI conductivity variations are therefore primarily attributed to water content changes and secondarily to soil texture. The second SDI site, located northeast of Sheridan, WY, has been operating

  14. NOx EMISSIONS PRODUCED WITH COMBUSTION OF POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL IN A UTILITY BOILER

    SciTech Connect

    John S. Nordin; Norman W. Merriam

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the NOx emissions produced when Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is combusted in a utility boiler. The Clean Air Act regulations specify NOx limits of 0.45 lb/mm Btu (Phase I) and 0.40 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for tangentially fired boilers, and 0.50 lb/mm 13tu (Phase II) and 0.46 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for dry-bottom wall-fired boilers. The Clean Air Act regulations also specify other limits for other boiler types. Compliance for Phase I has been in effect since January 1, 1996. Compliance for Phase II goes into effect on January 1, 2000. Emission limits are expressed as equivalent NO{sub 2} even though NO (and sometimes N{sub 2}O) is the NOx species emitted during combustion. Regulatory agencies usually set even lower NOx emission limits in ozone nonattainment areas. In preparing this report, Western Research Institute (WRI) used published test results from utilities burning various coals, including PRB coal, using state-of-the art control technology for minimizing NOx emissions. Many utilities can meet Clean Air Act NOx emission limits using a combination of tight combustion control and low-NOx burners and by keeping furnaces clean (i.e., no slag buildup). In meeting these limits, some utilities also report problems such as increased carbon in their fly ash and excessive furnace tube corrosion. This report discusses utility experience. The theory of NOx emission formation during coal combustion as related to coal structure and how the coal is combusted is also discussed. From this understanding, projections are made for NOx emissions when processed PRB coal is combusted in a test similar to that done with other coals. As will be shown, there are a lot of conditions for achieving low NOx emissions, such as tight combustion control and frequent waterlancing of the furnace to avoid buildup of deposits.

  15. Genesis of clay mineral assemblages and micropaleoclimatic implications in the Tertiary Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Weaver, J.N. ); Bossiroy, D.; Thorez, J. )

    1990-05-01

    An x-ray diffraction (XRD) study was undertaken on the clay mineralogy of the early Tertiary coal-bearing sequences of the Powder River basin. The vertical and lateral distribution of alternating fluvial conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones, shales, coals, and paleosols reveals a transition from alluvial fans along the basin margin to an alluvial plain and peat bogs basinward. Samples included unweathered shales and mudstones from a borehole and a variety of corresponding surface outcrop samples of Cambrian to Eocene age. Samples older than Tertiary were collected along the basin margin specifically to determine the potential source of parent material during Tertiary sedimentation. XRD analyses were performed on the <2-{mu}m fraction prepared as oriented aggregates. To investigate the materials in their natural state, no chemical pre-treatments the authors applied before the analysis. A series of specific post-treatments, consisting of catonic saturation (Li+, K+), a solution with polyalcohols, heating, acid attack and hydrazine saturation was selectively applied. These post-treatments permit a good discrimination between the mimetic clay minerals such as smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers that constitute the bulk of the clay fraction in the Tertiary rocks. When analyzed only using routine XRD, these swelling minerals are apparently uniformly distributed in the fluvial sedimentary rocks and are better interpreted as a single smectitic population. However, the post-treatments clearly differentiate both qualitatively and quantitatively this smectitic stock. Other clays include illite and kaolinite, which have different degrees of crystallinity, and minor interstratified clays (i.e., illite-chlorite, chlorite-smectite). The clay minerals in pre-Tertiary (and pedogenic) materials are different from those in the Tertiary rocks.

  16. Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

  17. Assessment of ecological risks linked to the discharge of saline industrial effluent into a river.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Yves; Volatier, Laurence; Bazin, Christine; Boisson, Jean-Claude

    2013-03-01

    Discharges of saline effluents into rivers can lead to risks for local aquatic ecosystems. A specific ecological risk assessment methodology has been developed to propose a management tool to organisations responsible for managing rivers and industrial companies producing saline effluents. This methodology involves the detailed description of the spatiotemporal system concerned, the choice of ecological targets to be preserved, and the performance of bioassays adapted to each of the compartments of the river. Following development, it was applied to an industrial effluent in eastern France. For the scenario studied, results obtained suggest a high risk for the organisms of the water column and a low risk for the organisms of the periphyton. This difference can be explained by the structure of the latter which integrate extracellular polymers secreted by the organisms of the biofilm, forming a gel with a porous structure that acts as a barrier to diffusion. The methodology formulated permitted identifying the critical points of the spatiotemporal system studied and then using them as the basis for making well-grounded proposals for management. Lastly, proposals to improve the methodology itself are made, especially concerning the integration of the sediment compartment in the version formulated initially. PMID:22684878

  18. XPS study of porous dental implants fabricated by electro-discharge-sintering of spherical Ti 6Al 4V powders in a vacuum atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Hyun, C. Y.

    2006-04-01

    A single electro-discharge-sintering (EDS) pulse (0.7-2.0 kJ/0.7 g), from a 300 μF capacitor, was applied to atomized spherical Ti-6Al-4V powder in a vacuum to produce a porous-surfaced implant compact. A solid core surrounded by a porous layer was formed by a discharge in the middle of the compact. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the surface characteristics of the implant material. C, O, and Ti were the main constituents, with smaller amounts of Al, V, and N. The implant surface was lightly oxidized and was primarily in the form of TiO 2 with a small amount of metallic Ti. A lightly etched EDS implant sample showed the surface form of metallic Ti, indicating that EDS breaks down the oxide film of the as-received Ti-6Al-4V powder during the discharge process. The EDS Ti-6Al-4V implant surface also contained small amounts of aluminum oxide in addition to TiO 2. However, V detected in the EDS Ti-6Al-4V implant surface did not contribute to the formation of the oxide film. The small amount of N in the implant surface resulted from nitride material that was also found in the as-received Ti-6Al-4V powders.

  19. Processing and Characterization of Novel Biomimetic Nanoporous Bioceramic Surface on β-Ti Implant by Powder Mixed Electric Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Chander; Kansal, H. K.; Pabla, B. S.; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-09-01

    Herein, a β-Ti-based implant was subjected to powder mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) for surface modification to produce a novel biomimetic nanoporous bioceramic surface. The microstructure, surface topography, and phase composition of the non-machined and machined (PMEDMed) surfaces were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The microhardness of the surfaces was measured on a Vickers hardness tester. The corrosion resistance of the surfaces was evaluated via potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid. The application of PMEDM not only altered the surface chemistry, but also imparted the surface with a nanoporous topography or a natural bone-like surface structure. The characterization results confirmed that the alloyed layer mainly comprised bioceramic oxides and carbide phases (TiO2, Nb2O5, ZrO2, SiO2, TiC, NbC, SiC). The microhardness of PMEDMed surface was twofold higher than that of the base material (β-Ti alloy), primarily because of the formation of the hard carbide phases on the machined layer. Electrochemical analysis revealed that PMEDMed surface featured insulative and protective properties and thus displayed higher corrosion resistance ability when compared with the non-machined surface. This result was attributed to the formation of the bioceramic oxides on the machined surface. Additionally, the in vitro biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated using human osteoblastic cell line MG-63. PMEDMed surface with a micro-, sub-micro-, and nano-structured topography exhibited bioactivity and improved biocompatibility relative to β-Ti surface. Furthermore, PMEDMed surface enabled better adhesion and growth of MG-63 when compared with the non-machined substrate.

  20. Changing Snow Cover and Stream Discharge in the Western United States - Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Barton, Jonathan S.; Riggs, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier onset of springtime weather has been documented in the western United States over at least the last 50 years. Because the majority (>70%) of the water supply in the western U.S. comes from snowmelt, analysis of the declining spring snowpack has important implications for the management of water resources. We studied ten years of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover products, 40 years of stream discharge and meteorological station data and 30 years of snow-water equivalent (SWE) SNOw Telemetry (SNOTEL) data in the Wind River Range (WRR), Wyoming. Results show increasing air temperatures for.the 40-year study period. Discharge from streams in WRR drainage basins show lower annual discharge and earlier snowmelt in the decade of the 2000s than in the previous three decades. Changes in streamflow may be related to increasing air temperatures which are probably contributing to a reduction in snow cover, although no trend of either increasingly lower streamflow or earlier snowmelt was observed within the decade of the 2000s. And SWE on 1 April does not show an expected downward trend from 1980 to 2009. The extent of snow cover derived from the lowest-elevation zone of the WRR study area is strongly correlated (r=0.91) with stream discharge on 1 May during the decade of the 2000s. The strong relationship between snow cover and streamflow indicates that MODIS snow-cover maps can be used to improve management of water resources in the drought-prone western U.S.

  1. A Bayesian algorithm for estimation of river depth, roughness and discharge from SWOT measurements of height and inundated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Andreadis, K.; Smith, L. C.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Mersel, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite is a swath-mapping radar interferometer that will provide water elevations over inland water bodies and over the ocean. SWOT represents a fundamentally new approach to characterizing fluvial processes, especially river discharge. However, because SWOT will observe water surface elevations, but not river bathymetric elevations, the cross-sectional flow area will only be observed above the lowest observed river depth. The so-called SWOT hydrology "virtual mission" (VM) has explored several approaches to depth estimation. Simplistic treatment of river depth spatial variability has been a key limitation of most existing VM work; put simply, geomorphology matters. The challenge for SWOT is how to perform the inverse problem of characterizing bathymetry and river flow given SWOT water surface elevation (WSE) measurements. This task falls at the intersection of two disciplines, engineering open channel hydraulics and fluvial geomorphology. In hydraulic formulations the physical form of the channel combined with conservation of mass and momentum dictate a complex spatiotemporal response of WSE to spatial changes in river bathymetry (i.e. changes in bed slope and cross-section) and temporal changes of flow propagating downstream. By combining prior information on river conditions and fluvial geomorphology with SWOT observations, it is essentially possible to do hydraulic modeling backwards, estimating river discharge, bathymetry, and roughness. Here, we present synthetic SWOT observations of water elevations over the Ohio River based on a dynamic simulation of approximately six months. Second, we present a simple Bayesian approach to simultaneously estimate river bathymetry, roughness and discharge. Prior estimates of bathymetry and roughness are generated based on a simple depth estimate, multiplied by random errors with an exponential autocorrelation function. We then implement a Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm to

  2. Modelling river discharge and precipitation from estuarine salinity in the northern Chesapeake Bay: Application to Holocene palaeoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saenger, C.; Cronin, T.; Thunell, R.; Vann, C.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term chronologies of precipitation can provide a baseline against which twentieth-century trends in rainfall can be evaluated in terms of natural variability and anthropogenic influence. However, there are relatively few methods to quantitatively reconstruct palaeoprecipitation and river discharge compared with proxies of other climatic factors, such as temperature. We developed autoregressive and least squares statistical models relating Chesapeake Bay salinity to river discharge and regional precipitation records. Salinity in northern and central parts of the modern Chesapeake Bay is influenced largely by seasonal, interannual and decadal variations in Susquehanna River discharge, which in turn are controlled by regional precipitation patterns. A power regressive discharge model and linear precipitation model exhibit well-defined decadal variations in peak discharge and precipitation. The utility of the models was tested by estimating Holocene palaeoprecipitation and Susquehanna River palaeodischarge, as indicated by isotopically derived palaeosalinity reconstructions from Chesapeake Bay sediment cores. Model results indicate that the early-mid Holocene (7055-5900 yr BP) was drier than the late Holocene (1500 yr BP - present), the 'Mediaeval Warm Period' (MWP) (1200-600 yr BP) was drier than the 'Little Ice Age' (LIA) (500-100 yr BP), and the twentieth century experienced extremes in precipitation possibly associated with changes in ocean-atmosphere teleconnections. ?? 2006 Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd.

  3. Relationships between river discharge and abundance of age 0 redhorses (Moxostoma spp.) in the Oconee River, Georgia, USA, with implications for robust redhorse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, R.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Peterson, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Robust redhorse (Moxostoma robustum) and notchlip redhorse (M. collapsum) are two species of redhorses that reside in the lower Oconee River, Georgia. Robust redhorse is listed as a state endangered species in Georgia and North Carolina, and attempts to investigate factors affecting its reproductive success have met with limited success. Therefore, catch of robust redhorse young were combined with catch of notchlip redhorse to increase sample size. These congeners with similar spawning repertoire were assumed to respond similarly to environmental conditions. River discharge during spawning and rearing seasons may affect abundance of both redhorses in the lower Oconee River. An information-theoretic approach was used to evaluate the relative support of models relating abundance of age 0 redhorses to monthly discharge statistics that represented magnitude, timing, duration, variability and frequency of river discharge events for April through June 1995–2006. The best-approximating model indicated a negative relationship between the abundance of redhorses and mean maximum river discharge and the number of high pulses during June as well as a positive relationship with intermediate duration of low flows during April–June. This model is 9.6 times more plausible than the next best-fitting model, which revealed a negative relationship between the abundance of redhorses and mean maximum river discharge during May and the number of high pulses during June as well as a positive relationship between abundance and intermediate duration of low flows during April–June. Management implications from the results indicate low-stable flows for at least a 2-week period during spawning and rearing may increase reproductive success of robust and notchlip redhorses.

  4. Lagrangian flow observations of the Amazon River discharge into the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limeburner, Richard; Beardsley, Robert C.; Soares, Ivan D.; Lentz, Steven J.; Candela, Julio

    1995-02-01

    Nine satellite-tracked drifters with near-surface drogues were launched in or near the mouth of the Amazon River on the north Brazil shelf during 1989-1991 at four different stages of river discharge. The drifters initially moved along shelf toward the northwest over the north Brazil shelf with mean speeds varying from 41 to 128 cm/s and a maximum along-shelf velocity of 197 cm/s. Many drifters experienced strong acceleration near 2°N between the 5-m and 20-m isobaths, caused in part by the sharp reduction in cross-shelf cross-sectional area near the shore-perpendicular Cabo Norte shoal. The drifter trajectories showed strong cross-shelf tidal variability in the flow field near the Amazon River mouth, and the largest low-frequency, along-shelf variability was located over the open shelf just north of Cabo Norte. Good visual correlation between drifter along-shelf velocity and along-shelf wind stress supports the dynamical model of Lentz (this issue) that subtidal fluctuations in near-surface along-shelf currents in the Amazon River Plume are strongly wind driven. Drifters left the north Brazil shelf after about 5 to 30 days. Three drifters moved northwestward parallel to the northeast coast of South America, crossed the shelf break near 8°N, and moved into deeper North Atlantic water where they began looping in anticyclonic eddies (often called retroflection eddies or loopers) with periods of approximately 11 days as they moved northwestward to the Caribbean Sea. Four drifters initially moved along shelf toward the northwest and then offshore between 3°N and 7°N, where they followed the retroflection of the North Brazil Current. Only one drifter entered the zonal current system that characterizes the equatorial Atlantic circulation.

  5. Global biogeochemical implications of mercury discharges from rivers and sediment burial.

    PubMed

    Amos, Helen M; Jacob, Daniel J; Kocman, David; Horowitz, Hannah M; Zhang, Yanxu; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Horvat, Milena; Corbitt, Elizabeth S; Krabbenhoft, David P; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2014-08-19

    Rivers are an important source of mercury (Hg) to marine ecosystems. Based on an analysis of compiled observations, we estimate global present-day Hg discharges from rivers to ocean margins are 27 ± 13 Mmol a(-1) (5500 ± 2700 Mg a(-1)), of which 28% reaches the open ocean and the rest is deposited to ocean margin sediments. Globally, the source of Hg to the open ocean from rivers amounts to 30% of atmospheric inputs. This is larger than previously estimated due to accounting for elevated concentrations in Asian rivers and variability in offshore transport across different types of estuaries. Riverine inputs of Hg to the North Atlantic have decreased several-fold since the 1970s while inputs to the North Pacific have increased. These trends have large effects on Hg concentrations at ocean margins but are too small in the open ocean to explain observed declines of seawater concentrations in the North Atlantic or increases in the North Pacific. Burial of Hg in ocean margin sediments represents a major sink in the global Hg biogeochemical cycle that has not been previously considered. We find that including this sink in a fully coupled global biogeochemical box model helps to balance the large anthropogenic release of Hg from commercial products recently added to global inventories. It also implies that legacy anthropogenic Hg can be removed from active environmental cycling on a faster time scale (centuries instead of millennia). Natural environmental Hg levels are lower than previously estimated, implying a relatively larger impact from human activity. PMID:25066365

  6. Changes in water clarity in response to river discharges on the Great Barrier Reef continental shelf: 2002-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, K. E.; Logan, M.; Weeks, S. J.; Lewis, S. E.; Brodie, J.

    2016-05-01

    Water clarity is a key factor for the health of marine ecosystems. The Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is located on a continental shelf, with >35 major seasonal rivers discharging into this 344,000 km2 tropical to subtropical ecosystem. This work investigates how river discharges affect water clarity in different zones along and across the GBR. For each day over 11 years (2002-2013) we calculated 'photic depth' as a proxy measure of water clarity (calibrated to be equivalent to Secchi depth), for each 1 km2 pixel from MODIS-Aqua remote sensing data. Long-term and seasonal changes in photic depth were related to the daily discharge volumes of the nearest rivers, after statistically removing the effects of waves and tides on photic depth. The relationships between photic depths and rivers differed across and along the GBR. They typically declined from the coastal to offshore zones, and were strongest in proximity to rivers in agriculturally modified catchments. In most southern inner zones, photic depth declined consistently throughout the 11-year observation period; such long-term trend was not observed offshore nor in the northern regions. Averaged across the GBR, photic depths declined to 47% of local maximum values soon after the onset of river floods, and recovery to 95% of maximum values took on average 6 months (range: 150-260 days). The river effects were strongest at latitude 14.5°-19.0°S, where river loads are high and the continental shelf is narrow. Here, even offshore zones showed a >40% seasonal decline in photic depth, and 17-24% reductions in annual mean photic depth in years with large river nutrients and sediment loads. Our methodology is based on freely available data and tools and may be applied to other shelf systems, providing valuable insights in support of ecosystem management.

  7. The role of effective discharge in the ocean delivery of particulate organic carbon by small, mountainous river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Goni, M.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shown that small, mountainous river systems (SMRS) account for a significant fraction of the global flux of sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean. The enormous number of SMRS precludes intensive studies of the sort conducted on large systems, necessitating development of a conceptual framework that permits cross-system comparison and scaling up. Herein, we introduce the geomorphic concept of effective discharge to the problem of source-to-sink POC transport. This idea recognizes that transport effectiveness is the product of discharge frequency and magnitude, wherein the latter is quantified as a power-law relationship between discharge and load (the 'rating curve'). An analytical solution for effective discharge (Qe) identifies two key variables: the standard deviation of the natural logarithm of discharge (??q), and the rating exponent of constituent i (bi Data from selected SMRS are used to show that for a given river Qe-POC < Qesediment, Qe for different POC constituents (e.g., POCfossil vs. POC(modern) differs in predictable ways, and Qe for a particular constituent can vary seasonally. When coupled with the idea that discharge peaks of small rivers may be coincident with specific oceanic conditions (e.g., large waves, wind from a certain direction) that determine dispersal and burial, these findings have potentially important implications for POC fate on continental margins. Future studies of POC transport in SMRS should exploit the conceptual framework provided herein and seek to identify how constituent-specific effective discharges vary between rivers and respond to perturbations. ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  8. O, H and S Isotopes as Tracers of Groundwater Discharge Into the Rio Grande and the Gila River, Southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastoe, C. J.; Hibbs, B. J.; Hogan, J. F.; Harris, R. C.

    2004-05-01

    In the semi-arid Basin-and-Range province, large rivers commonly enter and exit basins through hard-rock barriers impermeable to groundwater. Isotopic contrasts characteristically exist between river water entering a basin and locally-derived groundwater in basin-fill sediment. Basin aquifers must discharge to the river near the river exit point, and may contribute significantly to river water and solute load. O, H and S isotopes can potentially indicate the location of discharge zones. At times of low river flow, the Gila River enters Safford Basin with isotope delta values, here presented as [d18O‰ , dD‰ , d34S‰ ], of [-8.5, -65, +4.5]. Deep basin water has values [-11.5, -85, +11], the d34S reflecting gypsum evaporite. Values in river water change by km 50 to [-7.5, -60, +4.5] and between km 50 and 80 to [-8.5, -65, +7.5]. The increase in d18O and dD from 0-50 km indicates irrigation water discharge; the change from 50-80 km is accompanied by doubling of sulfate content and requires addition of deep basin water. The Rio Grande enters the Hueco Bolson with isotope composition [-6.5 to -8.5, -65 to -75, +2 to +4], the d18O and dD values defining an evaporation line (RGEL) resulting from passage of water through upstream reservoirs. Basin groundwater is sulfate-rich and has variable isotope composition: [-9 to -11, -66 to -76, +5 to +10]; it includes both evaporated and non-evaporated types. Groundwater discharge is generally insufficient to shift water away from the RGEL, but d34S values in river water increase to +5 to +9‰ with increasing sulfate content downstream of Fabens, TX, indicating discharge of high-d34S groundwater. Variable sewage discharge from Ciudad Juàrez limits the possibility of detecting isotope shifts in Rio Grande water.

  9. Evapotranspiration and River Discharge Interactions With Fire, Partial Success Restoration, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleverly, J. R.; Teet, S. B.; Thibault, J. R.; Dahm, C. N.

    2007-12-01

    Climate change is likely to have profound effects on water supplies in the southwestern United States. The largest rivers in this region are fed by snowmelt, which is predicted by the IPCC to decrease over the coming years. In the Middle Rio Grande of New Mexico, transpiration from phreatophytic vegetation can represent up to one-third of annual depletions. A flux tower network has been established in New Mexico, termed NM-EPSCoR Fluxnet, is providing valuable information on the eco-hydrological response of riparian and upland ecosystems to climate events (like drought), topographically-driven mesoscale forcing from katabatic and anabatic winds, ecosystem restoration, and post-fire recovery ecology. Following removal of non-native from below a cottonwood canopy causes greater insolation of the soil surface, doubling ground heat flux rates and inverting a portion diel energy balance from a heat sink (i.e., H < 0) to a heat source. The strongest cross-correlation (r = 0.5) between river flow and ET was observed when discharge was lagged 14 days behind ET. Neither drought nor fire modified this lag relationship. However, correlation between discharge and ET disappeared entirely following a canopy fire in 2006. Stomatal resistance cottonwood and co-occurring native and non-native vegetation was most strongly limited by vapor pressure deficit, although stomatal resistance was typically measured below this limit because of these plants' access to groundwater. It is also because of abundant groundwater along the Middle Rio Grande that drought has little effect on water and energy fluxes. As climate changes in this region and groundwater becomes more scarce, changes in community composition to non-native species is expected as native species become isolated from groundwater. With a strong understanding of the factors controlling the riparian water cycle, management of the riparian corridor can be achieved such that depletions are minimized while value of the ecosystem

  10. Forest recovery and river discharge at the regional scale of Guangdong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoyi; Wei, Xiaohua; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Mingfang; Li, Yuelin; Qiao, Yuna; Liu, Haigui; Wang, Chunlin

    2010-09-01

    Information on how large-scale forest changes affect water resources is important in China as country-wide reforestation programs are being implemented and concerns have arisen over possible water reduction. In this study, water budget analysis and statistical methods were used to assess the effects of significant forest recovery on river discharge at Guangdong Province based on 50 years of data. We used realized water yield (RWY) as a balance term between the outflows from and inflows to the province to represent the river discharge produced solely in Guangdong Province. The relationship between forest recovery and RWY was inferred after quantitatively examining other contributing variables including precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, development of impervious areas, human water consumption, and reservoir constructions. We applied time series analysis to test the statistical relationship between forest recovery and RWYs at annual, wet season, and dry season intervals. Both approaches showed that large-scale forest recovery did not cause significant water reduction over the past 50 years. This finding is contrary to the widely held perception of the trade-off relationship between carbon (reforestation) and water. There were no significant trends in precipitation or in RWY annually and in the wet season, but there was a significant increase of RWY in the dry season over the past 50 years. It is estimated that forest recovery may play a positive role in redistributing water from the wet season to the dry season and, consequently, in increasing water yield in the dry season. The implication of those research findings for future reforestation programs and water resource protection is also discussed.

  11. The relation between invertebrate drift and two primary controls, discharge and benthic densities, in a large regulated river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Theodore A.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Grams, Paul E.; Yard, Michael D.; Copp, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    1. Invertebrate drift is a fundamental process in streams and rivers. Studies from laboratory experiments and small streams have identified numerous extrinsic (e.g. discharge, light intensity, water quality) and intrinsic factors (invertebrate life stage, benthic density, behaviour) that govern invertebrate drift concentrations (# m−3), but the factors that govern invertebrate drift in larger rivers remain poorly understood. For example, while large increases or decreases in discharge can lead to large increases in invertebrate drift, the role of smaller, incremental changes in discharge is poorly described. In addition, while we might expect invertebrate drift concentrations to be proportional to benthic densities (# m−2), the benthic–drift relation has not been rigorously evaluated. 2. Here, we develop a framework for modelling invertebrate drift that is derived from sediment transport studies. We use this framework to guide the analysis of high-resolution data sets of benthic density and drift concentration for four important invertebrate taxa from the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam (mean daily discharge 325 m3 s−1) that were collected over 18 months and include multiple observations within days. Ramping of regulated flows on this river segment provides an experimental treatment that is repeated daily and allowed us to describe the functional relations between invertebrate drift and two primary controls, discharge and benthic densities. 3. Twofold daily variation in discharge resulted in a >10-fold increase in drift concentrations of benthic invertebrates associated with pools and detritus (i.e. Gammarus lacustris and Potamopyrgus antipodarum). In contrast, drift concentrations of sessile blackfly larvae (Simuliium arcticum), which are associated with high-velocity cobble microhabitats, decreased by over 80% as discharge doubled. Drift concentrations of Chironomidae increased proportional to discharge. 4. Drift of all four taxa was

  12. Excitation-emission matrices applied to the study of urban effluent discharges in the Chubut River (Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Chiarandini Fiore, Jessica Paola; Scapini, María del Carmen; Olivieri, Alejandro César

    2013-08-01

    Natural and contaminated waters of the final reaches of the Chubut River (Patagonia, Argentina) were studied to obtain information about river organic matter and effects of domestic and industrial discharges (fishery effluents and sewages). Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEMs) were obtained from samples only filtered (0.45 μm) and diluted, if necessary, to avoid the inner filter effect. In addition, physicochemical parameters were measured to know the quality of the water and the effluents. Results show that EEMs allow a rapid and simple control of the effluents from fisheries and domestic sewage in Chubut River estuary, necessary to take management decisions. PMID:23325315

  13. Organic Compounds in Produced Waters From Coalbed Methane Wells in the Powder River Basin, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W.; Lerch, H.; Rice, C.; Tatu, C.

    2003-12-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is a significant energy resource, accounting for about 7.5% of natural gas production in the USA. The Powder River Basin (PRB), WY is currently one of the most active CBM drilling sites in the USA. One aspect of concern in the exploitation of CBM resources is the large volumes of water recovered from wells along with the natural gas (so-called produced waters). CBM produced waters may contain coal-derived dissolved substances (inorganic and organic) of environmental concern, and a potential disposal problem for CBM producers. Studies of CBM produced water have mostly focused on inorganics. Dissolved organic compounds in CBM produced water may also present an environmental issue, but little information is available. As part of a larger study of the health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal, we analyzed a number of produced water samples from CBM wells in the PRB, WY for dissolved organic substances. Our goals were results on coal-derived organic compounds in the environment to evaluate potential health and environmental impacts. In 2001, we sampled produced water from 13 CBM wells covering a broad area of the PRB in order to identify and quantify the organic compounds present. In 2002, produced water from 4 of the 2001 CBM wells and 8 new CBM wells were sampled for dissolved organic components. Produced water was collected directly from each well and filtered on site. Organic compounds were isolated from produced water samples by liquid/liquid extraction with methylene chloride and identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic compounds identified by GC/MS in extracts of the produced water samples, included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids. However, most compounds had structures unidentified by GC/MS databases. Many of the identified organic compounds

  14. Characterization of ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers at three areas, Minneapolis-St. Paul area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenberg, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogeology at three areas along the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area were studied to characterize ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the two rivers. Along the Mississippi River between Fridley and Brooklyn Center, a buried valley underlying the Mississippi River cuts through the overlying terrace deposits and glacial-drift deposits into two underlying bedrock hydro- geologic units: the St Peter aquifer, and a rubble zone between the St. Peter and Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifers. Shallow ground-water flow in the near-surface gray and upper red tills and sand and gravel outwash aquifer discharges to springs along the edge of the river. Ground water flowing through the rubble zone and upper part of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer probably discharges through alluvial deposits to the river. In study area 2, along the Minnesota River between Eagan and Bloomington, almost 200 feet of post-glacial alluvium, glaciofluvial sand and gravel, Pleistocene lake deposits, and peat fill a bedrock valley under the present-day Minnesota River. As much as 40 feet of post-glacial peat, silty clay, clay, and muck lie near the river-valley walls. Confining units beneath the river channel impede the discharge of ground water from the underlying Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer to the river. Ground water discharges to wetlands, lakes, and springs along both the north and south side of the river. Along the Mississippi River at Minneapolis about 5 miles upstream of the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers, the Mississippi River lies in a post-glacial valley cut through thin glacial drift into the St. Peter aquifer. Beneath the river, ground water flows from the St. Peter aquifer through the overlying post-glacial ailuvium to the Mississippi River. No confining unit separates the St. Peter aquifer and the river.

  15. Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS), with an Application to Chesapeake Bay River Inputs.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Robert M; Moyer, Douglas L; Archfield, Stacey A

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the analysis of long-term surface water-quality data is proposed and implemented. The goal of this approach is to increase the amount of information that is extracted from the types of rich water-quality datasets that now exist. The method is formulated to allow for maximum flexibility in representations of the long-term trend, seasonal components, and discharge-related components of the behavior of the water-quality variable of interest. It is designed to provide internally consistent estimates of the actual history of concentrations and fluxes as well as histories that eliminate the influence of year-to-year variations in streamflow. The method employs the use of weighted regressions of concentrations on time, discharge, and season. Finally, the method is designed to be useful as a diagnostic tool regarding the kinds of changes that are taking place in the watershed related to point sources, groundwater sources, and surface-water nonpoint sources. The method is applied to datasets for the nine large tributaries of Chesapeake Bay from 1978 to 2008. The results show a wide range of patterns of change in total phosphorus and in dissolved nitrate plus nitrite. These results should prove useful in further examination of the causes of changes, or lack of changes, and may help inform decisions about future actions to reduce nutrient enrichment in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed.Hirsch, Robert M., Douglas L. Moyer, and Stacey A. Archfield, 2010. Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS), With an Application to Chesapeake Bay River Inputs. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) 46(5):857-880. DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2010.00482.x. PMID:22457569

  16. Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity, and Phytotoxicity of Tannery Effluent Discharged into Palar River Basin, Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Suki; Nagarchi, Lubbnaz; Das, Ishita; Mangalam Achuthananthan, Jayasri; Krishnamurthy, Suthindhiran

    2015-01-01

    Ambur, a town located on the banks of Palar River, is considered one of the most polluted areas in India and occupied by hundreds of tanneries and leather product units. The present study was designed to evaluate the toxic effect of discharged tannery effluent (TE) on model agricultural crops, ecofriendly microorganisms, and human blood cells. The phytotoxic effects of TE tested on Allium cepa and Lemna minor revealed inhibition of root growth and significant reduction in number of fronds, protein, and chlorophyll content. Moreover, TE induced chlorosis and tissue necrosis in Nostoc muscorum at low concentration (10%). TE has also negative impact on ecofriendly microorganisms, Bacillus thuringiensis, Rhizobium etli, and Aspergillus terreus which play an important role in the nutrition of plant growth. The genotoxicity of TE was investigated in human leukocytes which showed interference with normal mitotic division with subsequent cell lysis. It also intervened with the normal replication process and induced micronucleus formation in the healthy leukocyte. 5% concentration of TE has been revealed to be toxic to erythrocytes. From this study TE found in the Palar River of Ambur has adverse effects on all the three levels of organisms in ecosystem even at lower concentrations. PMID:26839546

  17. Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity, and Phytotoxicity of Tannery Effluent Discharged into Palar River Basin, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Suki; Nagarchi, Lubbnaz; Das, Ishita; Mangalam Achuthananthan, Jayasri; Krishnamurthy, Suthindhiran

    2015-01-01

    Ambur, a town located on the banks of Palar River, is considered one of the most polluted areas in India and occupied by hundreds of tanneries and leather product units. The present study was designed to evaluate the toxic effect of discharged tannery effluent (TE) on model agricultural crops, ecofriendly microorganisms, and human blood cells. The phytotoxic effects of TE tested on Allium cepa and Lemna minor revealed inhibition of root growth and significant reduction in number of fronds, protein, and chlorophyll content. Moreover, TE induced chlorosis and tissue necrosis in Nostoc muscorum at low concentration (10%). TE has also negative impact on ecofriendly microorganisms, Bacillus thuringiensis, Rhizobium etli, and Aspergillus terreus which play an important role in the nutrition of plant growth. The genotoxicity of TE was investigated in human leukocytes which showed interference with normal mitotic division with subsequent cell lysis. It also intervened with the normal replication process and induced micronucleus formation in the healthy leukocyte. 5% concentration of TE has been revealed to be toxic to erythrocytes. From this study TE found in the Palar River of Ambur has adverse effects on all the three levels of organisms in ecosystem even at lower concentrations. PMID:26839546

  18. SUPPLEMENT TO EFFECTS OF THERMAL DISCHARGES ON PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROCESSES AND WATER QUALITY, VISTULA RIVER, POLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study on the influence of thermal water discharge from the open cooling system of the Kozienice power plant on the thermal regimes and water quality of the Vistula River was carried out in the period from January 1973 to December 1975. Studies carried out downstream of the pl...

  19. Habitat use by a Midwestern U.S.A. riverine fish assemblage: effects of season, water temperature and river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, D.P.; Tiemann, J.S.; Edds, D.R.; Wildhaber, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis that temperate stream fishes alter habitat use in response to changing water temperature and stream discharge was evaluated over a 1 year period in the Neosho River, Kansas, U.S.A. at two spatial scales. Winter patterns differed from those of all other seasons, with shallower water used less frequently, and low-flow habitat more frequently, than at other times. Non-random habitat use was more frequent at the point scale (4.5 m2) than at the larger reach scale (20-40 m), although patterns at both scales were similar. Relative to available habitats, assemblages used shallower, swifter-flowing water as temperature increased, and shallower, slower-flowing water as river discharge increased. River discharge had a stronger effect on assemblage habitat use than water temperature. Proportion of juveniles in the assemblage did not have a significant effect. This study suggests that many riverine fishes shift habitats in response to changing environmental conditions, and supports, at the assemblage level, the paradigm of lotic fishes switching from shallower, high-velocity habitats in summer to deeper, low-velocity habitats in winter, and of using shallower, low-velocity habitats during periods of high discharge. Results also indicate that different species within temperate river fish assemblages show similar habitat use patterns at multiple scales in response to environmental gradients, but that non-random use of available habitats is more frequent at small scales. ?? 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Long Range River Discharge Forecasting Using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite to Predict Conditions for Endemic Cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of conditions of an impending disease outbreak remains a challenge but is achievable if the associated and appropriate large scale hydroclimatic process can be estimated in advance. Outbreaks of diarrheal diseases such as cholera, are related to episodic seasonal variability in river discharge in the regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate and insufficient. However, forecasting river discharge, few months in advance, remains elusive where cholera outbreaks are frequent, probably due to non-availability of geophysical data as well as transboundary water stresses. Here, we show that satellite derived water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Forecasting (GRACE) sensors can provide reliable estimates on river discharge atleast two months in advance over regional scales. Bayesian regression models predicted flooding and drought conditions, a prerequisite for cholera outbreaks, in Bengal Delta with an overall accuracy of 70% for upto 60 days in advance without using any other ancillary ground based data. Forecasting of river discharge will have significant impacts on planning and designing intervention strategies for potential cholera outbreaks in the coastal regions where the disease remain endemic and often fatal.

  1. 33 CFR 157.27 - Discharges: Tank vessels carrying oil exclusively on rivers, lakes, bays, sounds, and the Great...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discharges: Tank vessels carrying oil exclusively on rivers, lakes, bays, sounds, and the Great Lakes, and seagoing tank vessels of less than 150 gross tons. 157.27 Section 157.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED)...

  2. Macroscale water fluxes: 3. Effects of land processes on variability of monthly river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Wetherald, R.T.

    2002-01-01

    A salient characteristic of river discharge is its temporal variability. The time series of flow at a point on a river can be viewed as the superposition of a smooth seasonal cycle and an irregular, random variation. Viewing the random component in the spectral domain facilitates both its characterization and an interpretation of its major physical controls from a global perspective. The power spectral density functions of monthly flow anomalies of many large rivers worldwide are typified by a "red noise" process: the density is higher at low frequencies (e.g., <1 y-1) than at high frequencies, indicating disproportionate (relative to uncorrelated "white noise") contribution of low frequencies to variability of monthly flow. For many high-latitude and arid-region rivers, however, the power is relatively evenly distributed across the frequency spectrum. The power spectrum of monthly flow can be interpreted as the product of the power spectrum of monthly basin total precipitation (which is typically white or slightly red) and several filters that have physical significance. The filters are associated with (1) the conversion of total precipitation (sum of rainfall and snowfall) to effective rainfall (liquid flux to the ground surface from above), (2) the conversion of effective rainfall to soil water excess (runoff), and (3) the conversion of soil water excess to river discharge. Inferences about the roles of each filter can be made through an analysis of observations, complemented by information from a global model of the ocean-atmosphere-land system. The first filter causes a snowmelt-related amplification of high-frequency variability in those basins that receive substantial snowfall. The second filter causes a relatively constant reduction in variability across all frequencies and can be predicted well by means of a semiempirical water balance relation. The third filter, associated with groundwater and surface water storage in the river basin, causes a strong

  3. The Effects of Urbanization and Flood Control on Sediment Discharge of a Southern California River, Evidence of a Dilution Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, J. A.; Orzech, K. M.; Rubin, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    The southern California landscape has undergone dramatic urbanization and population growth during the past 60 years and currently supports almost 20 million inhabitants. During this time, rivers of the region have been altered with damming, channel straightening and hardening, and water transfer engineering. These changes have drastically altered water and sediment discharge from most of the region's drainage basins. Here we focus on changes in sediment discharge from the largest watershed of southern California, the Santa Ana River. Order-of-magnitude drops in the suspended sediment rating curves (the relationship between suspended sediment concentration and instantaneous river discharge) are observed between 1967 and 2001, long after the construction of a major flood control dam in 1941. These sediment concentration decreases do not, however, represent alteration of the total sediment flux from the basin (a common interpretation of sediment rating curves), but rather a dilution of suspended sediment by increases (approx. 4x) in stormwater discharge associated with urbanization. Increases in peak and total stormwater discharge are consistent with runoff patterns from urbanizing landscapes, supporting our hypothesis that the diluting water originated from stormwater runoff generated in urban areas both up- and downstream of dams. Our dilution hypothesis is further supported with water and sediment budgets, dilution calculations, and suspended and bed grain size information.

  4. Interacting Effects of Discharge and Channel Morphology on Transport of Semibuoyant Fish Eggs in Large, Altered River Systems

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Farless, Nicole; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Gregory, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and flow regulation are significant factors related to the decline and extinction of freshwater biota. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids require moving water and some length of unfragmented stream to complete their life cycle. However, it is unknown how discharge and habitat features interact at multiple spatial scales to alter the transport of semi-buoyant fish eggs. Our objective was to assess the relationship between downstream drift of semi-buoyant egg surrogates (gellan beads) and discharge and habitat complexity. We quantified transport time of a known quantity of beads using 2–3 sampling devices at each of seven locations on the North Canadian and Canadian rivers. Transport time was assessed based on median capture time (time at which 50% of beads were captured) and sampling period (time period when 2.5% and 97.5% of beads were captured). Habitat complexity was assessed by calculating width∶depth ratios at each site, and several habitat metrics determined using analyses of aerial photographs. Median time of egg capture was negatively correlated to site discharge. The temporal extent of the sampling period at each site was negatively correlated to both site discharge and habitat-patch dispersion. Our results highlight the role of discharge in driving transport times, but also indicate that higher dispersion of habitat patches relates to increased retention of beads within the river. These results could be used to target restoration activities or prioritize water use to create and maintain habitat complexity within large, fragmented river systems. PMID:24802361

  5. Interacting effects of discharge and channel morphology on transport of semibuoyant fish eggs in large, altered river systems.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Thomas A; Brewer, Shannon K; Farless, Nicole; Grabowski, Timothy B; Gregory, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and flow regulation are significant factors related to the decline and extinction of freshwater biota. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids require moving water and some length of unfragmented stream to complete their life cycle. However, it is unknown how discharge and habitat features interact at multiple spatial scales to alter the transport of semi-buoyant fish eggs. Our objective was to assess the relationship between downstream drift of semi-buoyant egg surrogates (gellan beads) and discharge and habitat complexity. We quantified transport time of a known quantity of beads using 2-3 sampling devices at each of seven locations on the North Canadian and Canadian rivers. Transport time was assessed based on median capture time (time at which 50% of beads were captured) and sampling period (time period when 2.5% and 97.5% of beads were captured). Habitat complexity was assessed by calculating width∶depth ratios at each site, and several habitat metrics determined using analyses of aerial photographs. Median time of egg capture was negatively correlated to site discharge. The temporal extent of the sampling period at each site was negatively correlated to both site discharge and habitat-patch dispersion. Our results highlight the role of discharge in driving transport times, but also indicate that higher dispersion of habitat patches relates to increased retention of beads within the river. These results could be used to target restoration activities or prioritize water use to create and maintain habitat complexity within large, fragmented river systems. PMID:24802361

  6. Tracking stormwater discharge plumes and water quality of the Tijuana River with multispectral aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkovsky, Jan; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Mustain, Neomi M.; Kum, Jamie B.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial-temporal characteristics and environmental factors regulating the behavior of stormwater runoff from the Tijuana River in southern California were analyzed utilizing very high resolution aerial imagery, and time-coincident environmental and bacterial sampling data. Thirty nine multispectral aerial images with 2.1-m spatial resolution were collected after major rainstorms during 2003-2008. Utilizing differences in color reflectance characteristics, the ocean surface was classified into non-plume waters and three components of the runoff plume reflecting differences in age and suspended sediment concentrations. Tijuana River discharge rate was the primary factor regulating the size of the freshest plume component and its shorelong extensions to the north and south. Wave direction was found to affect the shorelong distribution of the shoreline-connected fresh plume components much more strongly than wind direction. Wave-driven sediment resuspension also significantly contributed to the size of the oldest plume component. Surf zone bacterial samples collected near the time of each image acquisition were used to evaluate the contamination characteristics of each plume component. The bacterial contamination of the freshest plume waters was very high (100% of surf zone samples exceeded California standards), but the oldest plume areas were heterogeneous, including both polluted and clean waters. The aerial imagery archive allowed study of river runoff characteristics on a plume component level, not previously done with coarser satellite images. Our findings suggest that high resolution imaging can quickly identify the spatial extents of the most polluted runoff but cannot be relied upon to always identify the entire polluted area. Our results also indicate that wave-driven transport is important in distributing the most contaminated plume areas along the shoreline.

  7. Late Quaternary History of River Discharge and Glaciation in the Southern Kara Sea, Arctic Ocean: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R.; Niessen, F.; Dittmers, K.; Levitan, M.; Levitan, M.; Schoster, F.; Simstich, J.; Steinke, T.; Stepanets, O.

    2001-12-01

    Within the framework of the joint German-Russian project on "The Nature of Continental Run-Off from the Siberian Rivers and its Behavior in the Adjacent Arctic Basin (Siberian River Run-Off-SIRRO)", a multidisciplinary expedition with RV "Akademik Boris Petrov" was carried out in the Ob and Yenisei estuaries and the southern Kara Sea in August-September 2001. From the geological point of view, the variability of river discharge in relationship to climate change and the reconstruction of extent and history of glaciation in the southern Kara Sea during Late Quaternary times are major foci of interest. To reach these goals, an intensive sediment ecosounding (2-12 kHz) survey and sediment coring program has been performed. Based on profiling and sediment core data, the following preliminary statements can be given: (1) The extent of the eastern margin of the Barents Sea LGM Ice Sheet between 74 and 78oN can be mapped in detail. Different types of glacial to nonglacial facies can be distinguished. This ice barrier should have strongly influenced river discharge, diverted towards the NE probably into the Voronin Trough. (2) The local LGM (?) ice sheet on Taymyr Peninsula seems to be not connected with the Barents Sea Ice Sheet. (3) Siberian river discharge reached maximum values during the last deglaciation and displays distinct (cyclic) variability during Holocene times. Further detailed evaluation of the sediment echograph profiles as well as detailed sedimentological studies and AMS 14C datings will follow to support these ideas.

  8. Influence of river discharge on abundance and dissemination of heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacteria along the East Coast of India.

    PubMed

    Prasad, V R; Srinivas, T N R; Sarma, V V S S

    2015-06-15

    In order to examine the influence of discharge from different rivers from peninsular India and urban sewage on intensity and dissemination of heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacteria, a study was carried out during peak discharge period along coastal Bay of Bengal. The coastal Bay received freshwater inputs from the river Ganges while Godavari and Krishna contributed to the south. Contrasting difference in salinity, temperature, nutrients and organic matter was observed between north and south east coast of India. The highest heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacterial abundance was observed in the central coastal Bay that received urban sewage from the major city. Intensity and dissemination of heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacteria displayed linear relation with magnitude of discharge. The coliform load was observed up to 100km from the coast suggesting that marine waters were polluted during the monsoon season and its impact on the ecosystem needs further studies. PMID:25934433

  9. Current tufa sedimentation in a high discharge river: A comparison with other synchronous tufa records in the Iberian Range (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, C.; Auqué, L.; Osácar, C.; Sancho, C.; Lozano, M. V.; Vázquez-Urbez, M.; Pardo, G.

    2015-07-01

    The results from sedimentological, isotopic and hydrochemical analyses of current tufa sedimentation conducted in a high-discharge river (Ebrón River, northeastern Spain; 1.49 m3/s) through six-month monitoring over 3.5 years are discussed in terms of the factors that control local carbonate deposition through space and time, and compared with results from other synchronous tufa records in the same climatic domain. The findings allow for discerning the influence of the riverbed slope, hydrochemistry, discharge and groundwater inputs on tufa attributes and assess the significance of tufa as archives of certain climatic events on a regional scale. In the Ebrón River, the dominant upstream karstic springs from a Jurassic-rock aquifer determined the river's HCO3-Ca composition. Two river stretches were differentiated according to localised increments in both pCO2, resulting from additional groundwater inputs, and SO4 content, influenced by evaporite-bearing units. The variations in tufa's thickness through space were strongly controlled by CO2-rich springs and local slope variations. The monitored sites represent four primary subenvironments with distinct sedimentary facies, whose attributes suggest that 1) the tufa deposition rates in each fluvial subenvironment are mainly controlled by the CO2-outgassing intensity linked to local flow conditions and the biological substrate type, and 2) stromatolites represent the thickest and most complete record. The six-month variations in tufa thickness and calculated calcite mass in the Ebrón River were controlled by temperature-dependent physico-chemical and biological parameters, coupled with high-discharge events that provoked tufa erosion. The smaller deposition of the Ebrón River compared to two other synchronous tufa records in the Iberian Range is linked to 1) the absence of long areas of increased slope, 2) the occurrence of significant CO2-rich groundwater springs in the middle reach, and 3) the higher discharge and

  10. Response of the distributary channel of the Huanghe River estuary to water and sediment discharge regulation in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanyan; Li, Guangxue; Ye, Siyuan; Zhang, Zhiheng; Zhao, Guangming; Li, Jingyang; Zhou, Chunyan; Ding, Wenjie; Yang, Xin

    2010-11-01

    The water and sediment discharge regulation (WSDR) project, which has been performed since 2002 before flood season every year, is of great significance to the river management in China. Until 2007, six experiments have been fulfilled to evaluate the effect of the project on the natural environment. To fill the gap of investigations, a study on flood and suspended sediment transportation and channel changing along the distributary channel of the Huanghe (Yellow) River was conducted during the WSDR project period in 2007. The lower channel was scoured rapidly and the channel became unobstructed gradually several days after the flood peak water was discharged from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir. Within four days after the flood peak at 3 000 m3/s entered the distributary, the channel in the river mouth area was eroded quickly. Both the mean values of area and depth of the main channel were tripled, and the maximum flood carrying capacity increased to 5 500 m3/s or more. Then, the river channel was silted anew in a very short time after completion of the WSDR. Favored by the WSDR project, the river status in April 2008 became better than that of the year before. The adjustment ranges of main channel parameters were about 30%, 10%, and 10% at sections C2, Q4, and Q7, respectively. The process of rapid erosion-deposition was more active 15 km away in the channel from the river mouth due to the marine influence. It is reasonable for discharging sediment at concentration peak from Xiaolangdi Reservoir at the end of the flood peak. As a result, the sediment peak reached the river mouth about two days later than that of the water current. In addition, the WSDR project has improved the development of the estuarine wetland. Wetland vegetation planted along the river banks restrained the water flow as a strainer and improved the main channel stability. It is suggested to draw water at mean rate of 150 m3/s from the Huanghe River during flood periods, because at the rate the water in

  11. Techniques for computing discharge at four Navigation Dams on the Illinois and Des Plaines Rivers in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mades, Dean M.; Weiss, Linda S.; Gray, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques for computing discharge are developed for Brandon Road Dam on the Des Plaines River and for Dresden Island, Marseilles, and Starved Rock Dams on the Illinois River. At Brandon Road Dam, streamflow is regulated by the operation of Tainter gates and headgates. At Dresden Island, Marseilles, and Starved Rock Dams, only Tainter gates are operated to regulate streamflow. The locks at all dams are equipped with culvert valves that are used to fill and empty the lock. The techniques facilitate determination of discharge at locations along the upper Illinois Waterway where no streamflow-gaging stations exist. The techniques are also useful for computing low flows when the water-surface slope between control structures on the river approaches zero and traditional methods of determining discharge based on slope are unsatisfactory. Two techniques can be used to compute discharge at the dams--gate ratings and tailwater ratings . A gate ratingdescribes the relation between discharge, gate opening, tailwater stage, and headwater stage. A tailwater rating describes the relation between tailwater stage and discharge. Gate ratings for Tainter gates at Dresden Island, Marseilles, and Starved Rock Dams are based on a total of 78 measurements of discharge that range from 569 to 86,400 cubic feet per second. Flood hydrographs developed from the gate ratings and Lockmaster records of gate opening and stage compare closely with streamflow records published for nearby streamflow-gaging stations. Additional measurements are needed to verify gate ratings for Tainter gates and headgates at Brandon Road Dam after the dam rehabilitation is completed. Extensive leakage past deteriorated headgates and sluice gates contributed to uncertainty in the ratings developed for this dam. A useful tailwater rating is developed for Marseilles Dam. Tailwater ratings for Dresden Island Dam and Starved Rock Dam are of limited use because of varying downstream channel-storage conditions. A tailwater

  12. Evaluating GCM land surface hydrology parameterizations by computing river discharges using a runoff routing model: Application to the Mississippi basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liston, G. E.; Sud, Y. C.; Wood, E. F.

    1994-01-01

    To relate general circulation model (GCM) hydrologic output to readily available river hydrographic data, a runoff routing scheme that routes gridded runoffs through regional- or continental-scale river drainage basins is developed. By following the basin overland flow paths, the routing model generates river discharge hydrographs that can be compared to observed river discharges, thus allowing an analysis of the GCM representation of monthly, seasonal, and annual water balances over large regions. The runoff routing model consists of two linear reservoirs, a surface reservoir and a groundwater reservoir, which store and transport water. The water transport mechanisms operating within these two reservoirs are differentiated by their time scales; the groundwater reservoir transports water much more slowly than the surface reservior. The groundwater reservior feeds the corresponding surface store, and the surface stores are connected via the river network. The routing model is implemented over the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-Scale International Project Mississippi River basin on a rectangular grid of 2 deg X 2.5 deg. Two land surface hydrology parameterizations provide the gridded runoff data required to run the runoff routing scheme: the variable infiltration capacity model, and the soil moisture component of the simple biosphere model. These parameterizations are driven with 4 deg X 5 deg gridded climatological potential evapotranspiration and 1979 First Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) Global Experiment precipitation. These investigations have quantified the importance of physically realistic soil moisture holding capacities, evaporation parameters, and runoff mechanisms in land surface hydrology formulations.

  13. How are River Discharge - Suspended Sediment Relations Influenced by Watershed and Channel-Floodplain Morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. A.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Erosion, transport and deposition of fine sediment (clay, silt and fine sand) influence the form and function of river systems. Excess suspended sediment degrades stream ecosystems and is implicated as a leading cause of water quality and aquatic life impairment. Consequently, understanding the factors that control fine sediment transport regimes is an interesting topic for basic science and one that has important management and policy implications. Fine sediment is mostly transported in suspension as a non-capacity load; transport rates are dependent on sediment supply in addition to a river's transport capacity. Many studies have investigated watershed-scale topographic, hydrologic, climatic, and land use influences on fine sediment erosion and transport regimes. Several recent studies in a wide range of landscapes have demonstrated that the majority of suspended sediment may be sourced from the near-channel environment; therefore, near-channel morphological characteristics may provide better predictive power compared to watershed averages. This study analyzes recent total suspended solids (TSS) data from 45 gages on 35 separate rivers. The rivers span the state of Minnesota, draining basins ranging from 33 km2 to 68100 km2 with distinct settings in terms of topography, land cover, hydrology and geologic history. We generate rating curves of the form TSS = aQb, where Q is normalized discharge and a and b are parameters that describe the shape of the relations. Values of a range from 4 to 138 mg/L; b values range from -0.53 to 1.86. We use high resolution lidar topography data to characterize the near-channel environment upstream of gages. In addition to commonly studied metrics describing the topographic, climatic/hydrologic and land use setting of the basin, we extract near-channel morphometrics that we hypothesize to influence fine sediment generation and transport: the difference in height of banks/bluffs (a measure of the amount of material available to be

  14. Flow discharge influences on input and transport of particulate and sedimentary organic carbon along a small temperate river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Sikes, Elisabeth L.; Thomas, Burt; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of hydrological conditions and upstream processes on the input and transport of organic carbon from land to sea was investigated in the Mullica River, a small system located in the southeastern New Jersey (USA), using molecular and δ13C compositions. Sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) samples were collected along the river, from upstream (draining predominantly pine-oak forests) in the Pinelands to the Great Bay Estuary (bordered by salt marshes) under normal and high flow conditions. During base river flow, terrestrial biomarkers (e.g., diterpenoids - conifer biomarkers) were detected predominantly upstream and sharply decreased downstream. From mid to down river sites, a mixture of higher plants (primarily from the salt marsh vegetation) and microbial biomarkers (e.g., mycose, cholesterol) predominated. δ13C abundances of individual fatty acids presented a consistent pattern, with depleted values (e.g., δ13Csed = -30.9‰ on average) upstream, becoming heavier toward the Great Bay (e.g., δ13Csed = -23.1‰; δ13CPOC = -22.8‰). During the high discharge event, significant amounts of upland biomarkers (e.g., pimaric acid, ferruginol, ursolic acid) and depleted δ13C values were observed from the Pinelands (δ13Csed = -34.6‰) to mid river (δ13Csed = -32.0‰; δ13CPOC = -30.8‰), clearly demonstrating the transport of terrestrial material farther down river. However, downstream of this point, the occurrence of the terrestrial material strongly decreased, demonstrating that terrestrial plant biomarkers were not transported in significant amounts to the estuarine region, even at high river discharge. Since the mid river site is situated in the upper limit of salt water intrusions, it is likely that flocculation and sedimentation provide a depositional sink for terrestrial OC in the mid Mullica River, thereby depleting the terrigenous signature in downstream OC.

  15. Multi-model assessment of climate change impacts on river discharge in three different regional scale river basins on three continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tobias; Krysanova, Valentina; Hattermann, Fred; Huang, Shaochun; Aich, Valentin; Yang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Projections of climate impacts should be provided at the regional scale using validated regional-scale models in order to supply more reliable results for decision makers and managers. In the last decade climate impact assessment was performed for different regions and sectors using different scenarios and tools. However, the results are hardly comparable and do not allow to create a full picture of impacts and to evaluate their robustness. This study aims at comparing climate impacts on seasonal water discharge as well as on trends in projected discharge quantiles. Uncertainties from different sources are evaluated. The intercomparison of impacts was done for three regions on three continents which are characterized by very different climate and land use conditions: the Rhine in Europe, the Upper Niger in Africa and the Upper Yellow River in Asia. The climate impact assessment was performed using scenarios from five General Climate Models (GCMs). The bias-corrected climate scenarios for this study were provided by the ISI-MIP project. The following GCMs were used: HadGEM2-ES, IPSL-CM5ALR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, GFDL-ESM2M, and NorESM1-M. The hydrological impact assessment was conducted applying the hydrological impact models HBV, SWIM and VIC. Our results suggest that the five GCMs contribute more to overall uncertainty of river discharge than the three hydrological models. Projected trends in river discharge are more variable and more often contradictory when different GCMs are compared. However, we also found significant opposite trend direction for projected river discharge using different hydrological models but the same climate input data.

  16. Geochemical processes controlling selenium in ground water after mining, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Rice, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical data for samples of overburden from three mines in the Powder River Basin indicate a statistically significant (0.01 confidence level) positive correlation (r = 0.74) between Se and organic C. Results of factor analysis with varimax rotation on the major and trace element data from the rock samples indicate large (>50) varimax loadings for Se in two of the three factors. In Factor 1, the association of Se with constituents common to detrital grains indicates that water transporting the detrital particles into the Powder River Basin also carried dissolved Se. The large (>50) varimax loadings of Se and organic C in Factor 2 probably are due to the organic affinities characteristic of Se. Dissolved Se concentrations in water samples collected at one coal mine are directly related to the dissolved organic C concentrations. Hydrophilic acid concentrations in the water samples from the mine ranged from 35 to 43% of the total dissolved organic C, and hydrophobic acid concentrations ranged from 40 to 49% of the total dissolved organic C. The largest dissolved organic C concentrations in water from the same mine (34-302 mg/l), coupled with the large proportion of acidic components, may saturate adsorption sites on geothite and similar minerals that comprise the aquifer material, thus decreasing the extent of selenite (SeO32-) adsorption as a sink for Se as the redox state of ground water decreases. ?? 1989.

  17. Geology of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, with reference to subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beikman, Helen M.

    1962-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is a structural and topographic basin occupying an area of about 20,000 square miles in northeastern Wyoming arid southeastern Montana. The Basin is about 230 miles long in a northwest-southeast direction and is about 100 miles wide. It is bounded on three sides by mountains in which rocks of Precambrian age are exposed. The Basin is asymmetrical with a steep west limb adjacent to the Bighorn Mountains and a gentle east limb adjacent to the Black Hills. Sedimentary rocks within the Basin have a maximum thickness of about 18,000 feet and rocks of every geologic period are represented. Paleozoic rocks are about 2,500 feet thick and consist of marine bonate rocks and sandstone; Mesozoic rocks are about 9,500 feet thick and consist of both marine and nonmarine siltstone and sandstone; and Cenozoic rocks are from 4,000 to 6,000 feet thick and consist of coal-bearing sandstone and shale. Radioactive waste could be stored in the pore space of permeable sandstone or in shale where space could be developed. Many such rock units that could be used for storing radioactive wastes are present within the Powder River Basin. Permeable sandstone beds that may be possible reservoirs for storage of radioactive waste are present throughout the Powder River Basin. These include sandstone beds in the Flathead Sandstone and equivalent strata in the Deadwood Formation, the Tensleep Sandstone and equivalent strata in the Minnelusa Formation and the Sundance Formation in rocks of pre-Cretaceous age. However, most of the possible sandstone reservoirs are in rocks of Cretaceous age and include sandstone beds in the Fall River, Lakota, Newcastle, Frontier, Cody, and Mesaverde Formations. Problems of containment of waste such as clogging of pore space and chemical incompatibility would have to be solved before a particular sandstone unit could be selected for waste disposal. Several thick sequences of impermeable shale such as those in the Skull Creek, Mowry, Frontier

  18. Use of an ADCP to compute suspended-sediment discharge in the tidal Hudson River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Gary R.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Litten, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can provide data needed for computation of suspended-sediment discharge in complex river systems, such as tidal rivers, in which conventional methods of collecting time-series data on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and water discharge are not feasible. Although ADCPs are not designed to measure SSC, ADCP data can be used as a surrogate under certain environmental conditions. However, the software for such computation is limited, and considerable post-processing is needed to correct and normalize ADCP data for this use. This report documents the sampling design and computational procedure used to calibrate ADCP measures of echo intensity to SSC and water velocity to discharge in the computation of suspended-sediment discharge at the study site on the Hudson River near Poughkeepsie, New York. The methods and procedures described may prove useful to others doing similar work in different locations; however, they are specific to this study site and may have limited applicability elsewhere.

  19. Causes for the decline of suspended-sediment discharge in the Mississippi River system, 1940-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.; Moody, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Before 1900, the Missouri-Mississippi River system transported an estimated 400 million metric tons per year of sediment from the interior of the United States to coastal Louisiana. During the last two decades (1987-2006), this transport has averaged 145 million metric tons per year. The cause for this substantial decrease in sediment has been attributed to the trapping characteristics of dams constructed on the muddy part of the Missouri River during the 1950s. However, reexamination of more than 60 years of water- and sediment-discharge data indicates that the dams alone are not the sole cause. These dams trap about 100-150 million metric tons per year, which represent about half the decrease in sediment discharge near the mouth of the Mississippi. Changes in relations between water discharge and suspended-sediment concentration suggest that the Missouri-Mississippi has been transformed from a transport-limited to a supply-limited system. Thus, other engineering activities such as meander cutoffs, river-training structures, and bank revetments as well as soil erosion controls have trapped sediment, eliminated sediment sources, or protected sediment that was once available for transport episodically throughout the year. Removing major engineering structures such as dams probably would not restore sediment discharges to pre-1900 state, mainly because of the numerous smaller engineering structures and other soil-retention works throughout the Missouri-Mississippi system. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Neural network modelling of sediment-discharge relationships: Pictorial analysis of six computational methodologies applied to two rivers in Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, N. Ab; Abrahart, R. J.; Clifford, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    Neural networks can be trained to model the sediment-discharge relationship: numerous illustrative applications exist. The standard method of reporting involves using a scatterplot of observed versus predicted records, plus a handful of global statistics, to support an assessment of model skill. This traditional approach will nevertheless result in undesirable side effects since it reinforces the 'black box' criticisms and associated demonisation that is sometimes levelled at computational intelligence solutions: no 'line-of-best-fit' is ever supplied. This paper in contrast compares and evaluates six computational methods for modelling the sediment-discharge relationship from a structural and behavioural standpoint in which the exact nature of each model is visualised for the purposes of diagnostic appraisal and scientific enlightenment. The following methods are compared: backpropagation neural network; corrected power function; simple linear regression; piecewise linear regression using an M5 Model Tree; LOWESS; and Robust LOWESS. Modelling is restricted to a consideration of bivariate relationships. The models were developed on daily river discharge and sediment concentration datasets for two rivers in Missouri: Lower Salt River and Little Black River. Each dataset was divided into two parts using different methods and each model was first calibrated on one sub-set and thereafter tested on the other. The datasets were next swapped over and the process repeated. Each model is also evaluated using statistical measures calculated in HydroTest (http://www.hydrotest.org.uk/). The need for more benchmarking exercises of a similar nature is highlighted.

  1. Flocculation in a decaying shear field and its implications for mud removal in near-field river mouth discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Kyle; Keyvani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    We measure the change in floc size in a decaying shear field that mimics the decay found in a river mouth discharge. The primary questions explored are: (1) how far from equilibrium are the flocs during the decay? And, (2) how significant are the changes in size, and hence settling velocity, brought on by the changes in shear when it comes to predicting settling flux? These questions are examined in the laboratory using a camera system that allows for flocs to be sized within a turbulent suspension. We also examine how inclusion of various approaches to account for flocculation impacts the plume concentration and deposition rates in a simple river mouth discharge model. In the experiments, flocs grew from their initial size of 20-50 μm up to 100-200 μm due only to changes in shear over time scales of decay similar to those in a small river mouth discharge. It is estimated that such growth would lead to fourfold or greater fold increase in the mud settling velocity within the first few kilometers from the river mouth, even though floc sizes were only 0.5-0.8 of their equilibrium values. The plume modeling highlights the strong dependence of the mud deposition rate on the method chosen to account for flocs, and the importance of the settling to entrainment velocity ratio in dictating plume concentrations.

  2. A thermal profile method to identify potential ground-water discharge areas and preferred salmonid habitats for long river reaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.; Maloy, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal regime of riverine systems is a major control on aquatic ecosystems. Ground water discharge is an important abiotic driver of the aquatic ecosystem because it provides preferred thermal structure and habitat for different types of fish at different times in their life history. In large diverse river basins with an extensive riverine system, documenting the thermal regime and ground-water discharge is difficult and problematic. A method was developed to thermally profile long (5-25 kilometers) river reaches by towing in a Lagrangian framework one or two probes that measure temperature, depth, and conductivity. One probe is towed near the streambed and, if used, a second probe is towed near the surface. The probes continuously record data at 1-3-second intervals while a Global Positioning System logs spatial coordinates. The thermal profile provides valuable information about spatial and temporal variations in habitat, and, notably, indicates ground-water discharge areas. This method was developed and tested in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, in summer 2001 during low flows in an extreme drought year. The temperature profile comprehensively documents the longitudinal distribution of a river's temperature regime that cannot be captured by fixed station data. The example profile presented exhibits intra-reach diversity that reflects the many factors controlling the temperature of a parcel of water as it moves downstream. Thermal profiles provide a new perspective on riverine system temperature regimes that represent part of the aquatic habitat template for lotic community patterns.

  3. Evaluation of Ecotoxicological Risks Related to the Discharge of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) in a Periurban River

    PubMed Central

    Angerville, Ruth; Perrodin, Yves; Bazin, Christine; Emmanuel, Evens

    2013-01-01

    Discharges of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) into periurban rivers present risks for the concerned aquatic ecosystems. In this work, a specific ecotoxicological risk assessment methodology has been developed as management tool to municipalities equipped with CSOs. This methodology comprises a detailed description of the spatio-temporal system involved, the choice of ecological targets to be preserved, and carrying out bioassays adapted to each compartment of the river receiving CSOs. Once formulated, this methodology was applied to a river flowing through the outskirts of the city of Lyon in France. The results obtained for the scenario studied showed a moderate risk for organisms of the water column and a major risk for organisms of the benthic and hyporheic zones of the river. The methodology enabled identifying the critical points of the spatio-temporal systems studied, and then making proposals for improving the management of CSOs. PMID:23812025

  4. Antibiotic resistance gene abundances associated with waste discharges to the Almendares River near Havana, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Graham, David W; Olivares-Rieumont, Susana; Knapp, Charles W; Lima, Lazaro; Werner, David; Bowen, Emma

    2011-01-15

    Considerable debate exists over the primary cause of increased antibiotic resistance (AR) worldwide. Evidence suggests increasing AR results from overuse of antibiotics in medicine and therapeutic and nontherapeutic applications in agriculture. However, pollution also can influence environmental AR, particularly associated with heavy metal, pharmaceutical, and other waste releases, although the relative scale of the "pollution" contribution is poorly defined, which restricts targeted mitigation efforts. The question is "where to study and quantify AR from pollution versus other causes to best understand the pollution effect". One useful site is Cuba because industrial pollution broadly exists; antibiotics are used sparingly in medicine and agriculture; and multiresistant bacterial infections are increasing in clinical settings without explanation. Within this context, we quantified 13 antibiotic resistance genes (ARG; indicators of AR potential), 6 heavy metals, 3 antibiotics, and 17 other organic pollutants at 8 locations along the Almendares River in western Havana at sites bracketing known waste discharge points, including a large solid waste landfill and various pharmaceutical factories. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found between sediment ARG levels, especially for tetracyclines and β-lactams (e.g., tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), bla(OXA)), and sediment Cu and water column ampicillin levels in the river. Further, sediment ARG levels increased by up to 3 orders of magnitude downstream of the pharmaceutical factories and were highest where human population densities also were high. Although explicit links are not shown, results suggest that pollution has increased background AR levels in a setting where other causes of AR are less prevalent. PMID:21133405

  5. Controls on bacterial gas accumulations in thick Tertiary coal beds and adjacent channel sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Coal beds, as much as 250 ft thick, and adjacent sandstones in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation are reservoirs for coal-derived natural gas in the Powder River basin. The discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs about 3 mi{sup 2} in size, adjoining networks of fluvial channels infilled by sand. Coal-bed thickness was controlled by basin subsidence and depositional environments. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub o} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Although the coals are relatively low rank, they display fracture systems. Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amount of Co{sub 2} ({lt}10%). The methane is isotopically light and enriched in deuterium. The gases are interpreted to be generated by bacterial processes and the fermentation pathway, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. Large amounts of bicarbonate water generated during early stages of coalification will have to be removed from the fracture porosity in the coal beds before desorption and commercial gas production can take place. Desorbed amounts of methane-rich, bacterial gas in the Powder River basin are relatively low ({lt}60 Scf/ton) compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases (hundreds of Scf/ton) from other Rocky Mountain basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource in both the coal beds and the adjacent sandstones is considered to be large (as much as 40 Tcf) because of the vast coal resources (as much as 1.3 trillion tons).

  6. Exploration for shallow compaction-induced gas accumulations in sandstones of the Fort Union Formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Commercial quantities of gas have been produced from shallow sandstone reservoirs of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene) in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin. The two largest accumulations discovered to date, Oedekoven and Chan pools, were drilled on prospects which invoked differential compaction as a mechanism for gas entrapment and prospect delineation. Coal-sourced bacterial gas may have accumulated in localized structural highs early in the burial history of lenticular sand bodies and associated sediments. Structural relief is due to the compaction contrast between sand and stratigraphically equivalent fine-grained sediments. A shallow gas play targeting sandstones as potential reservoirs was initiated in the Recluse area in response as sources for bacterial gas, and the presence of lenticular sandstones that may have promoted the development of compaction structures early in the burial process, to which early-formed bacterial gas migrated. Prospects were ranked based on a number of geologic elements related to compaction-induced trap development. Drilling of the Oedekoven prospect, which possessed all prospect elements, led to the discovery and development of the Oedekoven Fort Union gas pool, which has produced nearly 2 BCF of gas from a depth of 340 ft. Production figures from the Oedekoven and Chan pools demonstrate the commercial gas potential of Fort Union sandstone reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The shallow depths of the reservoirs, coupled with low drilling and completion costs, an abundance of subsurface control with which to delineate prospects, and an existing network of gas-gathering systems, make them attractive primary targets in shallow exploration efforts as well as secondary objectives in deeper drilling programs.

  7. Discharge and water-depth estimates for ungauged rivers: Combining hydrologic, hydraulic, and inverse modeling with stage and water-area measurements from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ganming; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Tseng, Kuo-Hsin; Shum, C. K.

    2015-08-01

    Anticipating future global freshwater scarcity and providing mitigation require timely knowledge of spatiotemporal dynamics of discharge for gauged and, more challengingly, ungauged rivers. This study describes a coupled hydrologic (SWAT) and hydraulic (XSECT) modeling approach set in a genetic algorithm framework for estimating discharge and water depth for ungauged rivers from space. The method was tested in the Red River of the North basin by comparing simulated discharges and depths from 2006 to 2010 to in situ observations from across the basin. Results showed that calibration using only remotely sensed data (i.e., water levels from ENVISAT altimetry and water extents from LANDSAT) along the main stem of the Red River yielded daily and monthly estimates of river discharge, which correlated to measured discharges at three gaging stations on the main stem with R2 values averaging 0.822 and 0.924, respectively. The comparisons of modeled and measured discharges were also extended to smaller tributaries, yielding a mean R2 of 0.809 over seven gaging stations. The modeling approach also provided estimates of water depth that correlated to observations at four stations with an average R2 of 0.831. We conclude that the integrated modeling approach is able to estimate discharge and water depth from space for larger ungauged rivers. This study also implies that in situ discharge data may not be necessary for successful hydrologic model calibration.

  8. Trends in major-ion constituents and properties for selected sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds, Montana and Wyoming, based on data collected during water years 1980-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Sando, Thomas R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Lorenz, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information relating to flow-adjusted temporal trends in major-ion constituents and properties for 16 sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds based on data collected during 1980–2010. In association with this primary purpose, the report presents background information on major-ion characteristics (including specific conductance, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium adsorption ratio, sodium, alkalinity, chloride, fluoride, dissolved sulfate, and dissolved solids) of the sampling sites and coal-bed methane (CBM) produced water (groundwater pumped from coal seams) in the site watersheds, trend analysis methods, streamflow conditions, and factors that affect trend results. The Tongue and Powder River watersheds overlie the Powder River structural basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. Limited extraction of coal-bed methane (CBM) from the PRB began in the early 1990’s, and increased dramatically during the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. CBM-extraction activities produce discharges of water with high concentrations of dissolved solids (particularly sodium and bicarbonate ions) relative to most stream water in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds. Water-quality of CBM produced water is of concern because of potential effects of sodium on agricultural soils and potential effects of bicarbonate on aquatic biota. Two parametric trend-analysis methods were used in this study: the time-series model (TSM) and ordinary least squares regression (OLS) on time, streamflow, and season. The TSM was used to analyze trends for 11 of the 16 study sites. For five sites, data requirements of the TSM were not met and OLS was used to analyze trends. Two primary 10-year trend-analysis periods were selected. Trend-analysis period 1 (water years 1986–95; hereinafter referred to as period 1) was selected to represent variability in major-ion concentrations in the Tongue and Powder River

  9. Ice Sheet Hydrologic Network Development and Functioning Examined with In Situ River Discharge from Nested Watersheds in Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennermalm, A. K.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Smith, L. C.; Chu, V. W.; Moustafa, S.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland surface meltwater created on the ice sheet periphery and interior surfaces is routed to its margin through a complex hydrologic network including storage in firn layers, glacial lakes, streams, and transport pathways through moulins, crevasses, and other conduits. However, development and functioning of this network is still unclear, partly because of lack of observational data. In this study, we contrast in situ ice sheet river discharge losses observed at four nested, and overlapping drainage basins of difference sizes (8 - ~9,750 km2), and three automated weather stations (K-transect AWS) within the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (AK) River watershed (a.k.a. Watson River) in Southwest Greenland between 2009 and 2011. By analyzing timing, magnitude and extent of ice sheet surface melting and river discharge in smaller watersheds nested within larger watersheds, better understanding is obtained of how scale, space, and time influence storages and export of meltwater. The rich dataset for the AK River watershed provides unique insights into development and functioning of the hydrological network for one of Greenland's largest land terminating glaciers.

  10. On the Development of an Integrated Hydrologic, Hydraulic, and Inverse Modeling Approach for Estimating Discharges and Water Depths for Ungauged Rivers from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, G.; Schwartz, F. W.; Tseng, K. H.; Shum, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of hydrologic processes in large river basins has been benefitting from a variety of remotely sensed data. These are useful in augmenting the conventional ground-surface and gage data that have long been available, or in providing what is often the only available information for ungauged river basins. The goal of this study is to demonstrate an innovative modeling approach that uses satellite data to enhance understanding of rivers, particularly ungauged rivers. The paper describes a prototype system - SWAT-XG, coupling SWAT and XSECT models in a Genetic Algorithm framework, for estimating discharge and depth for ungauged rivers from space. SWAT-XG was rigorously tested in the Red River of the North basin by validating discharge and depth products from 2006 to 2010 using in-situ observations across the basin. Results show that SWAT-XG, calibrated against remotely sensed data alone (i.e., water levels from ENVISAT altimetry and water extents from LANDSAT), was able to provide estimates of daily and monthly river discharge with mean R2 values of 0.822 and 0.924, respectively, against data from three gaging stations on the main stem. SWAT-XG also simulated the discharges of smaller tributaries well (yielding a mean R2 of 0.809 over seven gaging stations), suggesting that the SWAT-XG is a powerful estimator of river discharge at a basin scale. Results also show that the SWAT-XG simulated river's vertical dynamics quite well, providing water-depth estimates with an average R2 of 0.831. We conclude that the SWAT-XG advances the ability to estimate discharge and water depth from space for ungauged rivers. SWAT-XG would help to solve global big data problem for river studies and offer potential for understanding and quantifying the global water cycles. This study also implies that in-situ discharge data may not be necessary for a successful hydrologic model calibration.

  11. Study of DC discharge plasma polymerization kinetics, film properties and applications and initial study of silica powder surface modification by RF plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sheyu

    1998-09-01

    In this work, two kinds of plasma polymerization for surface modification are discussed. In part-I, DC plasma polymerization is investigated for film properties, film growth mechanism and film application. The monomers heaxamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and pyrrole were selected to study the deposition rates change with discharge parameters such as pressure, flow rate, power, discharge current density. Structures and properties of film deposited at extreme conditions (high power/low pressure or low power/high pressure) were studied with FT-IR, SEM, TOF-SIMS, AIM, surface energy measurement and tribology test. This work also investigated DC plasma polymerization kinetics by combining plasma parameters with film deposited rate at different conditions. Both single and double Langmuir probes were used to measure the plasma parameters in pulsed power and continuous discharges. Plasma density and electron temperature are reported. A DC plasma polymerization kinetic model is Proposed based on the experimental data and a best-fit mathematical method. DC plasma polymerization application was the other object of this study. Cold-rolled steel and copper were coated with pyrrole and HMDSO, respectively. Corrosion rate were obtained from electrochemical polarization methods, and tests in humidity chamber directly. Various monomers were used to change the substrate surface energy. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface were achieved respectively by different monomers. A water-soluble film was obtained with acrylic acid in mild plasma conditions. In part-II, a initial study of powder surface modification has been done. The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of changing powder surface properties with plasma-polymerized coatings. RF inductive plasma was used as a source to excite plasma polymerization for powder treatment. Plasma-polymerized pyrrole films were deposited on silica surface. Several techniques such as SEM, EDX, TOF-SIMS, FT-IF, DSC&TGA, and surface energy

  12. Application of microwave discharge for the synthesis of TiB{sub 2} and BN nano- and microcrystals in a mixture of Ti-B powders in a nitrogen atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M. Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Iskhakova, L. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Letunov, A. A.; Malakhov, D. V.; Milovich, F. O.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2013-10-15

    Synthesis of titanium diboride and boron nitride nano- and microcrystals by means of a pulsed microwave discharge in a mixture of Ti-B powders in a nitrogen atmosphere is considered. For this purpose, a new type of reactor with a free surface of the powder mixture was used. The reactor design permits free expansion of the reaction products into the reactor volume and their deposition on the reactor walls. Conditions for the synthesis of TiB{sub 2} and BN compounds were studied as functions of the energy input in the discharge, the powder component ratio, the rate of the nitrogen flow through the reactor, and the structure and phase composition of the compounds deposited on the reactor walls. The synthesis of boron nitride and titanium diboride in crystal structures is proven. An important role in the process of synthesis is played by the heating of the mixture due to the titanium diboride synthesis reaction, its behavior in the bulk of the reactor, and the titanium concentration in the powder mixture. It is also found that, as the number of discharges in the bulk of the reactor increases, a dust cloud forms. The luminescence of this cloud indicates that the initiated discharge proceeds not only on the powder surface and in the powder bulk, but also in the reactor volume.

  13. Flood discharges and hydraulics near the mouths of Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek in the New River Gorge National River, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, studied the frequency and magnitude of flooding near the mouths of five tributaries to the New River in the New River Gorge National River. The 100-year peak discharge at each tributary was determined from regional frequency equations. The 100-year discharge at Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek was 3,400 cubic feet per second, 640 cubic feet per second, 8,200 cubic feet per second, 7,100 cubic feet per second, and 9,400 cubic feet per second, respectively. Flood elevations for each tributary were determined by application of a steady-state, one-dimensional flow model. Manning's roughness coefficients for the stream channels ranged from 0.040 to 0.100. Bridges that would be unable to contain the 100-year flood within the bridge opening included: the State Highway 82 bridge on Wolf Creek, the second Fayette County Highway 25 bridge upstream from the confluence with New River on Dunloup Creek, and an abandoned log bridge on Mill Creek.

  14. Human activity and climate variability impacts on sediment discharge and runoff in the Yellow River of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Wang, Fei; Mu, Xingmin; Guo, Lanqin; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Guangju

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the variability of sediment discharge and runoff in the Hekou-Longmen segment in the middle reaches of the Yellow River, China. Our analysis is based on Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), sediment discharge, runoff, and monthly meteorological data (1961-2010). The climate conditions are controlled via monthly regional average precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (ET0) that are calculated with the Penman-Monteith method. Data regarding water and soil conservation infrastructure and their effects were investigated as causal factors of runoff and sediment discharge changes. The results indicated the following conclusions: (1) The sediment concentration, sediment discharge, and annual runoff, varied considerably during the study period and all of these factors exhibited larger coefficients of variation than ET0 and precipitation. (2) Sediment discharge, annual runoff, and sediment concentration significantly declined over the study period in a linear fashion. This was accompanied by an increase in ET0 and decline in precipitation that were not significant. (3) Within paired years with similar precipitation and potential evapotranspiration conditions (SPEC), all pairs showed a decline in runoff, sediment discharge, and sediment concentration. (4) Human impacts in this region were markedly high as indicated by NDVI, and soil and water measurements, and especially the soil and water conservation infrastructure resulting in an approximately 312 Mt year-1 of sediment deposition during 1960-1999.

  15. Natural born indicators: Great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae) as monitors of river discharge influence on estuarine ichthyofauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ester; Morais, Pedro; Leopold, Mardik; Campos, Joana; Antunes, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The ecological traits of piscivorous marine birds have been acknowledged to reflect ecosystem changes. We used the great cormorant as our indicator species in the Minho estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe) to assess the temporal variation of their diet and the factors that could influence that variation. Pellets were collected in a night roost, located centrally in the estuary, during two consecutive wintering periods (2005-2006 and 2006-2007). The great cormorant population showed a high degree of feeding plasticity and most of the variation in cormorants' diet was attributed to river discharge fluctuations. Overall, during periods of increased river discharge, marine and marine opportunistic species disappeared from diet, whereas freshwater species increased. The cormorants in this study were using a roost in the middle of the estuary, so they were facing a changing food base over time, in accordance to variation in river discharges. The birds did not keep their diet constant but rather took what became locally available, notwithstanding their broad foraging range. Therefore, we suggest that great cormorants may be considered good samplers of local ichthyofauna and thus, temporal variation in the local prey can be followed by analyzing cormorants' diet.

  16. Impact of river discharge on distribution of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its fluxes in the coastal Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. D.; Viswanadham, R.; Bharathi, M. D.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Kumar, M. D.

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was conducted to examine the influence of river discharge on variations in DMS and DMSPt during peak discharge period along the coastal Bay of Bengal. The southern coastal Bay of Bengal (SCB) received a large quantity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and nitrogen nutrients from the monsoonal estuaries and vice versa to the northern coastal Bay of Bengal (NCB) by glacial river (Ganges). The higher concentration of DMSPt was observed in the NCB compared with SCB associated with low nitrate, and low salinity suggesting that their stress on phytoplankton increased DMSPt production in the former region. The concentrations of DMS and DMSPt in the surface waters displayed a linear relation with biovolume of Bacillariophyceae and Dinophyceae suggesting significant contributions by these two groups. In contrast, the weak spatial variability in DMS was attributed to removal of DMS to the atmosphere or bacterial consumption. The mean sea-to-air flux of DMS amounted to 5.5 ± 4 μmol S m- 2 d- 1 suggesting that the coastal Bay of Bengal is a significant source to atmospheric DMS during study period. This study revealed that river discharge brought a significant modification in the chemical characteristics of the coastal Bay of Bengal leading to variable stress (salinity and nutrients) on phytoplankton resulting in a significant flux of DMS to the atmosphere.

  17. Low-Flow Characteristics and Discharge Profiles for Selected Streams in the Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina, Through 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J.C.; Pope, B.F.

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the magnitude and frequency of low-flow discharges is an important part of evaluating surface-water resources and planning for municipal and industrial economic expansion. Low-flow characteristics are summarized in this report for 67 continuous-record gaging stations and 121 partial-record measuring sites in the Cape Fear River Basin of North Carolina. Records of discharge collected through the 1998 water year were used in the analyses. Flow characteristics included in the summary are (1) average annual unit flow; (2) 7Q10 low-flow discharge, the minimum average discharge for a 7-consecutive-day period occurring, on average, once in 10 years; (3) 30Q2 low-flow discharge; (4) W7Q10 low-flow discharge, similar to 7Q10 discharge except that only flow during November through March is considered; and (5) 7Q2 low-flow discharge. Low-flow characteristics in the Cape Fear River Basin vary widely in response to changes in geology and soil types. The area of the basin with the lowest potentials for sustained base flows is underlain by the Triassic basin in parts of Durham, Wake, and Chatham Counties. Typically, these soils are derived from basalt and fine-grained sedimentary rocks that allow very little infiltration of water into the shallow aquifers for storage and later release to streams during periods of base flow. The area of the basin with the highest base flows is the Sand Hills region in parts of Moore, Harnett, Hoke, and Cumberland Counties. Streams in the Sand Hills have the highest unit low flows in the study area as well as in much of North Carolina. Well-drained sandy soils in combination with higher topographic relief relative to other areas in the Coastal Plain contribute to the occurrence of high potentials for sustained base flows. A number of sites in the upper part of the Cape Fear River Basin underlain by the Carolina Slate Belt and Triassic basin, as well many sites in lower areas of the Coastal Plain (particularly the Northeast Cape

  18. After a century-Revised Paleogene coal stratigraphy, correlation, and deposition, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Spear, Brianne D.; Kinney, Scott A.; Purchase, Peter A.; Gallagher, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    The stratigraphy, correlation, mapping, and depositional history of coal-bearing strata in the Paleogene Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Powder River Basin were mainly based on measurement and description of outcrops during the early 20th century. Subsequently, the quality and quantity of data improved with (1) exploration and development of oil, gas, and coal during the middle 20th century and (2) the onset of coalbed methane (CBM) development during the late 20th and early 21st centuries that resulted in the drilling of more than 26,000 closely spaced wells with accompanying geophysical logs. The closeness of the data control points, which average 0.5 mi (805 m) apart, made for better accuracy in the subsurface delineation and correlation of coal beds that greatly facilitated the construction of regional stratigraphic cross sections and the assessment of resources. The drillhole data show that coal beds previously mapped as merged coal zones, such as the Wyodak coal zone in the Wyoming part of the Powder River Basin, gradually thinned into several discontinuous beds and sequentially split into as many as 7 hierarchical orders westward and northward. The thinning and splitting of coal beds in these directions were accompanied by as much as a ten-fold increase in the thicknesses of sandstone-dominated intervals within the Wyodak coal zone. This probably resulted from thrust loading by the eastern front of the Bighorn uplift accompanied by vertical displacement along lineaments that caused subsidence of the western axial part of the Powder River Basin during Laramide deformation in Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Accommodation space was thereby created for synsedimentary alluvial infilling that controlled thickening, thinning, splitting, pinching out, and areal distribution of coal beds. Equally important was differential subsidence between this main accommodation space and adjoining areas, which influenced the overlapping, for example, of the

  19. Coal-spoil and ground-water chemical data from two coal mines; Hanna Basin and Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented describing chemical and mineralogical composition of spoil material and chemical quality of groundwater at 2 Wyoming mine sites. Samples were collected at Medicine Bow-Seminoe Number 1 mining area in the Hanna basin and at the Cordero Mine in the Powder River basin. The data collected from these sites, along with similar data from other coal-mining states in the West, are used to evaluate methods used in predicting post-mining groundwater quality. The data include mineral-composition analyses, paste-extract analyses, and sulfur-forms analyses of coal spoil, chemical analyses of water from batch-mixing experiments; and analyses of water samples collected from wells in the coal aquifers and from wells in the saturated spoils. (USGS)

  20. Revised Subsurface Stratigraphic Framework of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Spear, Brianne D.; Purchase, Peter A.; Gallagher, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    Described in this report is an updated subsurface stratigraphic framework of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and Eocene Wasatch Formation in the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This framework is graphically presented in 17 intersecting west-east and north-south cross sections across the basin. Also included are: (1) the dataset and all associated digital files and (2) digital files for all figures and table 1 suitable for large-format printing. The purpose of this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Report is to provide rapid dissemination and accessibility of the stratigraphic cross sections and related digital data to USGS customers, especially the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), to facilitate their modeling of the hydrostratigraphy of the PRB. This report contains a brief summary of the coal-bed correlations and database, and is part of a larger ongoing study that will be available in the near future.

  1. Stratigraphy and depositional history of Coyote Creek-Miller Creek Trend, Lower Cretaceous Fall River formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer, T.A.; Gustason, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend produces high-gravity, low-sulfur oil from a series of Fall River fields in an area generally characterized by west-southwestward monoclinal dip. The trend includes, from south to north, the Coyote Creek South, Coyote Creek, Donkey Creek, Kummerfeld, and Miller Creek fields. The Wood and West Moorcroft fields produce oil from very similar Fall River traps located several miles east and northeast, respectively, of Miller Creek. Only Donkey Creek includes structural closure; all of the other fields produce from purely stratigraphic traps. The reservoir sandstones are characterized by upward-fining sequences. These sequences locally replace and are generally easily distinguishable from two regionally correlative upward-coarsening sequences. Analyses of cores and nearby outcrops indicate that the upward-fining sequences accumulated on point bars of a meandering river; the upward-coarsening sequences were deposited on the fronts of northwestward-prograding deltas. Detailed mapping of the fluvial and delta-front facies demonstrates that the Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend, together with the Wood and West Moorcroft fields, represents a meander-belt system that was contemporaneous with the younger of the two delta-front units. Each of the stratigraphic-type fields occurs at a convexity along the eastern edge of the irregularly shaped meander belt; each consists of numerous point bars. Clay plugs, which resulted from infilling of abandoned meander loops, were preferentially preserved along the margins of the meander belt, where they now serve as updip permeability barriers between the oil-bearing fluvial and water-wet delta-front sandstones.

  2. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex B sandstone of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book of reservoir paragenesis includes detailed descriptions of the petrology of depositional facies of the Sussex B sandstone of the Sussex Sandstone Member of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming.

  3. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex 'B' sandstone of the upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine Fields, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, D.K.

    1991-05-03

    Using petrologic and sedimentologic studies, the paper characterizes the influence of sedimentologic and petrologic variations on reservoir heterogeneity in the Sussex 'B' sandstone in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Effects of authigenic minerals on reservoir properties are described in detail for selected inter-ridge and ridge facies sandstones.

  4. Discharge and sediment loads in the Boise River drainage basin, Idaho 1939-40

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, S.K.; Benedict, Paul Charles

    1948-01-01

    The Boise River project is a highly developed agricultural area comprising some 520 square miles of valley and bench lands in southwestern Idaho. Water for irrigation is obtained from the Boise River and its tributaries which are regulated by storage in Arrow Rock and Deer Flat reservoirs. Distribution of water to the farms is effected by 27 principal canals and several small farm laterals which divert directly from the river. The- New York Canal, which is the largest, not only supplies water to smaller canals and farm laterals, but also is used to fill Deer Flat Reservoir near Nampa from which water is furnished to farms in the lower valley. During the past 15 years maintenance costs in a number of those canals have increased due to deposition of sediment in them and in the river channel itself below the mouth of Moore Creek. Interest in determining the runoff and sediment loads from certain areas in the Boise River drainage basin led to an investigation by the Flood Control Coordinating Committee of the Department of Agriculture. Measurements of daily discharge and sediments loads were made by the Geological Survey at 13 stations in the drainage basin during the 18-month period ended June 30, 1940. The stations were on streams in areas having different kinds of vegetative cover and subjected to different kinds of land-use practice. Data obtained during the investigation furnish a basis for certain comparisons of runoff and sediment loads from several areas arid for several periods of time. Runoff measured at stations on the. Boise River near Twin Springs and on Moore Creek near Arrow Rock was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and was below the average annual runoff for the period of available record. Runoff measured at the other stations on the project also was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and probably did not exceed the average for the previous 25 years. The sediment loads measured during the spring runoff in 1939 were smaller at most stations than

  5. Evaluation of aerial thermal infrared remote sensing to identify groundwater-discharge zones in the Meduxnekeag River, Houlton, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Caldwell, James M.; O'Donnell, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Residents of the area near Houlton, Maine, have observed seasonal episodic blooms of algae and documented elevated concentrations of fecal-coliform bacteria and inorganic nutrients and low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Meduxnekeag River. Although point and nonpoint sources of urban and agricultural runoff likely contribute to water-quality impairment, the role of shallow groundwater inflows in delivering such contaminants to the Meduxnekeag River has not been well understood. To provide information about possible groundwater inflows to the river, airborne thermal infrared videography was evaluated as a means to identify and classify thermal anomalies in a 25-mile reach of the mainstem and tributaries of the Meduxnekeag River near Houlton, Maine. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, collected thermal infrared images from a single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft during flights on December 3–4, 2003, and November 26, 2004. Eleven thermal anomalies were identified on the basis of data from the December 2003 flight and 17 from the November 2004 flight, which covered the same reaches of stream. Following image analysis, characterization, and prioritization, the georeferenced infrared images of the thermal anomalies were compared to features on topographic maps of the study area. The mapped anomalies were used to direct observations on the ground to confirm discharge locations and types of inflow. The variations in grayscale patterns on the images were thus confirmed as representing shallow groundwater-discharge zones (seeps), outfalls of treated wastewater, or ditches draining runoff from impervious surfaces.

  6. Effects of uranium mining discharges on water quality in the Puerco River basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Gray, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    From 1967 until 1986, uranium mine dewatering increased dissolved gross alpha, gross beta, uranium and radium activities and dissolved selenium and molybdenum concentrations in the Puerco River as indicated by time trends, areal patterns involving distance from the mines and stream discharge. Additionally, increased dissolved uranium concentrations were identified in groundwater under the Puerco River from where mine discharges entered the river to approximately the Arizona-New Mexico State line about 65 km downstream. Total mass of uranium and gross alpha activity released to the Puerco River by mine dewatering were estimated as 560 Mg (560 × 106 g) and 260 Ci, respectively. In comparison, a uranium mill tailings pond spill on 16 July 1979, released an estimated 1.5 Mg of uranium and 46 Ci of gross alpha activity. Mass balance calculations for alluvial ground water indicate that most of the uranium released did not remain in solution. Sorption of uranium on sediments and uptake of uranium by plants probably removed the uranium from solution.

  7. Impact of discharges from point and nonpoint sources on water quality of the upper Reedy River near Greenville, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahal, D.I.; Speiran, G.K.

    1983-01-01

    Impacts of discharge from nonpoint sources in the urban area of Greenville, South Carolina and from the point source, the Mauldin Road Wastewater Treatment Plant, on water quality of the Reedy River were studied from October 1979 through September 1980. Streamflow and water-quality data were collected before and during two storms. The pH and concentrations of organic nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate plus nitrate, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, and orthophosphate were determined. Streamflow and concentrations of dissolved oxygen were measured continuously at three stations from May through September 1980. Discharge from the point source resulted in average daily concentrations of dissolved oxygen less than 5 milligrams per liter in the Reedy River on 34 days during low streamflow in the summer of 1980. During periods of high streamflow that resulted from the two storms. Dissolved oxygen remained at about 5 milligrams per liter in the Reedy River because increased dilution of loads of oxygen-demanding materials reduced the impacts of these loads on the quality of the Reedy River. (USGS)

  8. U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Land Management Cooperative Coalbed Methane Project in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence that earthquakes threaten the Mississippi, Ohio, and Wabash River valleys of the Central United States abounds. In fact, several of the largest historical earthquakes to strike the continental United States occurred in the winter of 1811-1812 along the New Madrid seismic zone, which stretches from just west of Memphis, Tenn., into southern Illinois (fig. 1). Several times in the past century, moderate earthquakes have been widely felt in the Wabash Valley seismic zone along the southern border of Illinois and Indiana (fig. 1). Throughout the region, between 150 and 200 earthquakes are recorded annually by a network of monitoring instruments, although most are too small to be felt by people. Geologic evidence for prehistoric earthquakes throughout the region has been mounting since the late 1970s. But how significant is the threat? How likely are large earthquakes and, more importantly, what is the chance that the shaking they cause will be damaging?The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative project in 1999 to collect technical and analytical data on coalbed methane (CBM) resources and quality of the water produced from coalbeds in the Wyoming part of the Powder River Basin. The agencies have complementary but divergent goals and these kinds of data are essential to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management tasks. The project also addresses the general public need for information pertaining to Powder River Basin CBM resources and development. BLM needs, which relate primarily to the management of CBM resources, include improved gas content and gas in-place estimates for reservoir characterization and resource/reserve assessment, evaluation, and utilization. USGS goals include a basinwide assessment of CBM resources, an improved understanding of the nature and origin of coalbed gases and formation waters, and the development of predictive

  9. Differentiating between rain, snow, and glacier contributions to river discharge in the western Himalaya using remote-sensing data and distributed hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Hendrik; Bookhagen, Bodo; Scherler, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Rivers draining the southern Himalaya provide most of the water supply for the densely populated Indo-Gangetic plains. Despite the importance of water resources in light of climate change, the relative contributions of rainfall, snow and glacier melt to discharge are not well understood, due to the scarcity of ground-based data in this complex terrain. Here, we quantify discharge sources in the Sutlej Valley, western Himalaya, from 2000 to 2012 with a distributed hydrological model that is based on daily, ground-calibrated remote-sensing observation. Based on the consistently good model performance, we analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrologic components and quantified their contribution to river discharge. Our results indicate that the Sutlej River's annual discharge at the mountain front is sourced to 55% by effective rainfall (rainfall reduced by evapotranspiration), 35% by snow melt and 10% by glacier melt. In the high-elevation orogenic interior glacial runoff contributes ∼30% to annual river discharge. These glacier melt contributions are especially important during years with substantially reduced rainfall and snowmelt runoff, as during 2004, to compensate for low river discharge and ensure sustained water supply and hydropower generation. In 2004, discharge of the Sutlej River totaled only half the maximum annual discharge; with 17.3% being sourced by glacier melt. Our findings underscore the importance of calibrating remote-sensing data with ground-based data to constrain hydrological models with reasonable accuracy. For instance, we found that TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) product 3B42 V7 systematically overestimates rainfall in arid regions of our study area by a factor of up to 5. By quantifying the spatiotemporal distribution of water resources we provide an important assessment of the potential impact of global warming on river discharge in the western Himalaya. Given the near-global coverage of the utilized remote

  10. The influence of Savannah River discharge and changing SRS cooling water requirements on the potential entrainment of ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Entrainment (i.e., withdrawal of fish larvae and eggs in cooling water) at the SRS Savannah River intakes is greatest when periods of high river water usage coincide with low river dischargeduring the spawning season. American shad and striped bass are the two species of greatest concern because of their recreational and/or commercial importance and because they produce drifting eggs and larvae vulnerable to entrainment. In the mid-reaches of the Savannah River, American shad and striped bass spawn primarily during April and May. An analysis of Savannah River discharge during April and May 1973--1989 indicated the potential for entrainment of 4--18% of the American shad and striped bass larvae and eggs that drifted past the SRS. This analysis assumed the concurrent operation of L-, K-, and P-Reactors. Additional scenarios investigated were: (1) shutting down L- and P-Reactors, and operating K-Reactor with a recycle cooling tower; and (2) shutting down L- and P-Reactors, eliminating minimum flows to Steel Creek, and operating K-Reactor with a recycle cooling tower. The former scenario reduced potential entrainment to 0.7--3.3%, and the latter scenario reduced potential entrainment to 0.20.8%. Thus, the currently favored scenario of operating K-Reactor with a cooling tower and not operating L- and P-Reactors represents a significant lessening of the impact of SRS operations.

  11. Statistical summary of the chemical quality of surface water in the Powder River coal basin, the Hanna coal field, and the Green River coal region, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the chemical quality of surface water in the three principal coal-producing areas of Wyoming was intensified by the U.S. Geologic Survey during 1975-81, in response to interest spurred by a dramatic increase in surface mining of the areas. This statistical summary consists of descriptive statistics and regression analyses of data from 72 stations on streams in the Powder River coal basin, the Hanna coal field, and the Green River coal region of Wyoming. The mean dissolved-solids concentrations in streams ranged from 15 to 4,800 mg/L. Samples collected near mountainous areas or in the upstream reaches of perennial streams in the plains had the smallest concentrations of dissolved solids, and the predominant ions were calcium and bicarbonate. Samples from ephemeral, intermittent, and the downstream reaches of perennial streams in the plains contained relatively large dissolved-solids concentrations, and the predominant ions usually were sodium and sulfate. Regression models showed that the concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, alkalinity, sulfate, and chloride correlated well with specific-conductance values in many of the streams. (USGS)

  12. Uncertainty in stream discharges mesured with the index velocity method in an alpine river with unstable bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Elise; Thollet, Fabien; Camenen, Benoit; Le Coz, Jerome; Mansanarez, Valentin; Dramais, Guillaume; Gautheron, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The ability to provide an instantaneous and continuous time series for flow discharge in a river is a fundamental issue for flood risk or drought assessment or for ecological studies by estimating fine sediments and associated pollutant flux. Automated direct measurement of streamflow discharge is difficult at present and one or more surrogate measurements are generally used to estimate it. Moreover, alpine rivers are often characterized by a very unstable bed due to active sediment transport. As a consequence, hydrometric stations generally suffer from frequent rating curve shifts. This study deals with a hydrometric station located on the downstream part of the Arvan River in Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, France. A Sommer RQ-24 radar was installed at the station, that continuously measures both water surface level and surface velocity. Regular stream gaugings were achieved by measuring either local velocities with a conventional current-meter during low flow periods or surface velocities using a handheld radar velocimeter during floods when the reach is not wadable. First, a classical stage-discharge relationship was developed thanks to these gaugings by applying the BaRatin software using Bayesian inference, which allows the definition of hydraulic priors and gives an estimation of the uncertainties. Since rating curve shifts frequently occur, large uncertainties can be observed in the rating curve for low flow. Second, the index velocity method (IVM) was also applied to this site and a new method for estimating the related uncertainties is suggested. It showed that the IVM significantly reduces the uncertainties in the discharge estimation for low flows. Moreover, the combined surface level and velocity measurements are useful to detect rating curve shifts and thus periods of stable hydraulic control.

  13. Coal Quality and Major, Minor, and Trace Elements in the Powder River, Green River, and Williston Basins, Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Trippi, Michael H.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Olson, Carol M.; Sullivan, Jonah E.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and nineteen independent coalbed methane (CBM) gas operators in the Powder River and Green River Basins in Wyoming and the Williston Basin in North Dakota, collected 963 coal samples from 37 core holes (fig. 1; table 1) between 1999 and 2005. The drilling and coring program was in response to the rapid development of CBM, particularly in the Powder River Basin (PRB), and the needs of the RMG BLM for new and more reliable data for CBM resource estimates and reservoir characterization. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with the gas operators to drill and core Fort Union coal beds, thus supplying core samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, real-time results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high pressure methane adsorption isotherm data (Stricker and others, 2006). The USGS determined the ultimate composition of all coal core samples; for selected samples analyses also included proximate analysis, calorific value, equilibrium moisture, apparent specific gravity, and forms of sulfur. Analytical procedures followed those of the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM; 1998). In addition, samples from three wells (129 samples) were analyzed for major, minor, and trace element contents. Ultimate and proximate compositions, calorific value, and forms of sulfur are fundamental parameters in evaluating the economic value of a coal. Determining trace element concentrations, along with total sulfur and ash yield, is also essential to assess the environmental effects of coal use, as is the suitability of the coal for cleaning, gasification, liquefaction, and other treatments. Determination of coal quality in the deeper part (depths greater than 1,000 to 1,200 ft) of the PRB (Rohrbacher and others, 2006; Luppens and others, 2006) is especially important, because these coals are targeted for future

  14. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  15. The effects of precipitation, river discharge, land use and coastal circulation on water quality in coastal Maine

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Jordan, Linda M.; Carlson, Amy E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; Yund, Philip O.

    2015-01-01

    Faecal pollution in stormwater, wastewater and direct run-off can carry zoonotic pathogens to streams, rivers and the ocean, reduce water quality, and affect both recreational and commercial fishing areas of the coastal ocean. Typically, the closure of beaches and commercial fishing areas is governed by the testing for the presence of faecal bacteria, which requires an 18–24 h period for sample incubation. As water quality can change during this testing period, the need for accurate and timely predictions of coastal water quality has become acute. In this study, we: (i) examine the relationship between water quality, precipitation and river discharge at several locations within the Gulf of Maine, and (ii) use multiple linear regression models based on readily obtainable hydrometeorological measurements to predict water quality events at five coastal locations. Analysis of a 12 year dataset revealed that high river discharge and/or precipitation events can lead to reduced water quality; however, the use of only these two parameters to predict water quality can result in a number of errors. Analysis of a higher frequency, 2 year study using multiple linear regression models revealed that precipitation, salinity, river discharge, winds, seasonality and coastal circulation correlate with variations in water quality. Although there has been extensive development of regression models for freshwater, this is one of the first attempts to create a mechanistic model to predict water quality in coastal marine waters. Model performance is similar to that of efforts in other regions, which have incorporated models into water resource managers' decisions, indicating that the use of a mechanistic model in coastal Maine is feasible. PMID:26587258

  16. The effects of precipitation, river discharge, land use and coastal circulation on water quality in coastal Maine.

    PubMed

    Tilburg, Charles E; Jordan, Linda M; Carlson, Amy E; Zeeman, Stephan I; Yund, Philip O

    2015-07-01

    Faecal pollution in stormwater, wastewater and direct run-off can carry zoonotic pathogens to streams, rivers and the ocean, reduce water quality, and affect both recreational and commercial fishing areas of the coastal ocean. Typically, the closure of beaches and commercial fishing areas is governed by the testing for the presence of faecal bacteria, which requires an 18-24 h period for sample incubation. As water quality can change during this testing period, the need for accurate and timely predictions of coastal water quality has become acute. In this study, we: (i) examine the relationship between water quality, precipitation and river discharge at several locations within the Gulf of Maine, and (ii) use multiple linear regression models based on readily obtainable hydrometeorological measurements to predict water quality events at five coastal locations. Analysis of a 12 year dataset revealed that high river discharge and/or precipitation events can lead to reduced water quality; however, the use of only these two parameters to predict water quality can result in a number of errors. Analysis of a higher frequency, 2 year study using multiple linear regression models revealed that precipitation, salinity, river discharge, winds, seasonality and coastal circulation correlate with variations in water quality. Although there has been extensive development of regression models for freshwater, this is one of the first attempts to create a mechanistic model to predict water quality in coastal marine waters. Model performance is similar to that of efforts in other regions, which have incorporated models into water resource managers' decisions, indicating that the use of a mechanistic model in coastal Maine is feasible. PMID:26587258

  17. A stage-normalized function for the synthesis of stage-discharge relations for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiele, Stephen M.; Torizzo, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed to construct stage-discharge rating curves for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, using two stage-discharge pairs and a stage-normalized rating curve. Stage-discharge rating curves formulated with the stage-normalized curve method are compared to (1) stage-discharge rating curves for six temporary stage gages and two streamflow-gaging stations developed by combining stage records with modeled unsteady flow; (2) stage-discharge rating curves developed from stage records and discharge measurements at three streamflow-gaging stations; and (3) stages surveyed at known discharges at the Northern Arizona Sand Bar Studies sites. The stage-normalized curve method shows good agreement with field data when the discharges used in the construction of the rating curves are at least 200 cubic meters per second apart. Predictions of stage using the stage-normalized curve method are also compared to predictions of stage from a steady-flow model.

  18. Depositional environments, sequence stratigraphy, and trapping mechanisms of Fall River Formation in Donkey Creek and Coyote Creek oil fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, P.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Donkey Creek and Coyote Creek fields contain combined reserves of approximately 35 million bbl of oil and are within a trend of fields on the eastern flank of the Powder River basin that totals over 100 million bbl of reserves. The principal producing formation is the Lower Cretaceous Fall River Sandstone. A study of 45 cores and 248 logs from the three pools in the Donkey Creek and Coyote fields has shown that the Fall River is composed of three progradational deltaic units deposited during a period of rising relative sea level. These are locally eroded and are filled by a fluvial point-bar complex deposited following a lowering of relative sea level. Four important depositional facies have been recognized: the delta-front and distributary-channel sandstone of the highstand deltaic sequence and the point-bar sandstone and channel-abandonment of the lowstand fluvial sequence. Stratigraphic traps in Coyote Creek and south Donkey Creek pools are the result of permeable (250 md) point-bar sandstone (250 bbl oil/day ip) bounded updip by impermeable (0.1 md) channel abandonment mudstone. Most of the oil in the central Donkey Creek pool is produced from permeable (76 md) distributary-channel sandstone (150 bbl oil/day ip), which is restricted to the western flank of a structural nose. Lesser production, on the crest and upper western flank of the structure, is obtained from the less permeable (2.8 md) delta-front sandstone (50 bbl oil/day ip). Production is possibly limited to the crest and western flank by hydrodynamic processes.

  19. Stratigraphy, depositional history, and trapping mechanisms of Lone Tree Creek and Lodgepole Creek oil fields, Lower Cretaceous Fall River formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gustason, E.R.; Ryer, T.A.

    1985-05-01

    Stratigraphically trapped accumulations of oil in the Lone Tree Creek and Lodgepole Creek fields occur within and just updip from a fluvial meander belt within the Fall River Formation. The meander belt can be mapped north-to-south over a distance of at least 100 mi (161 km) in the eastern part of the Powder River basin. The northern part of the meander belt contains the oil fields of the Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend; the southern part contains only the relatively small Lone Tree Creek and Lodgepole Creek fields. These small fields are of considerable interest, as they display a style of stratigraphic trapping of hydrocarbons not observed in the prolific Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend. The stratigraphic traps of the Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend occur at updip facing convexities along the eastern edge of the meander belt, with abandonment clay plugs serving as lateral permeability barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Oil has been produced in part of the Lone Tree Creek field from a similar trap. The remaining part of Lone Tree Creek field and Lodgepole creek field produce from stratigraphic traps formed by lateral pinch-outs of delta-front sandstone bodies. These traps are situated updip from and apparently in continuity with the meander-belt deposits, indicating that they may have been charged with hydrocarbons that found their way through the clay-plug barriers along the margin of the meander belt. Similar, undiscovered traps may exist updip from Fall River meander belts elsewhere in the basin.

  20. Geologic setting of a new Paleocene mammal locality in the northern Powder River Basin, Montana ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, L.N.; Honey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The fossil-bearing unit is at approximately the same stratigraphic horizon as the lowest coal bed in the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formations. The fossils occur approx 50m above the base of the Tongue River Member in a 0.6m thick, yellowish-gray, sandy conglomerate that is interpreted to be a fluvial channel-lag deposit. The fauna includes fossils of fish, turtles, crocodiles, and mammals. Mammals thus far recovered include 21 species distributed between 17 families. Genera known from rocks of both the Torrejonian and the Tiffanian land mammal ages (middle and late Paleocene) are present, but the evolutionary stage of Aphronorus and the mutual presence of Nannodectes and a primitive species of Ectocion suggest a Tiffanian (late Paleocene) age for the deposit.-from Authors

  1. Ground-water resources and potential hydrologic effects of surface coal mining in the northern Powder River basin, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Steven E.; Lewis, Barney D.; Lee, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    The shallow ground-water system in the northern Powder River Basin consists of Upper Cretaceous to Holocene aquifers overlying the Bearpaw Shale--namely, the Fox Hills Sandstone; Hell Creek, Fort Union, and Wasatch Formations; terrace deposits; and alluvium. Ground-water flow above the Bearpaw Shale can be divided into two general flow patterns. An upper flow pattern occurs in aquifers at depths of less than about 200 feet and occurs primarily as localized flow controlled by the surface topography. A lower flow pattern occurs in aquifers at depths from about 200 to 1,200 feet and exhibits a more regional flow, which is generally northward toward the Yellowstone River with significant flow toward the Powder and Tongue Rivers. The chemical quality of water in the shallow ground-water system in the study area varies widely, and most of the ground water does not meet standards for dissolved constituents in public drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Water from depths less than 200 feet generally is a sodium sulfate type having an average dissolved-solids concentration of 2,100 milligrams per liter. Sodium bicarbonate water having an average dissolved-solids concentration of 1,400 milligrams per liter is typical from aquifers in the shallow ground-water system at depths between 200 and 1,200 feet. Effects of surface coal mining on the water resources in the northern Powder River Basin are dependent on the stratigraphic location of the mine cut. Where the cut lies above the water-yielding zone, the effects will be minimal. Where the mine cut intersects a water-ieldin