Science.gov

Sample records for discovery involving devastating

  1. Get Involved in Planetary Discoveries through New Worlds, New Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, Christine; Shipp, S. S.; Halligan, E.; Dalton, H.; Boonstra, D.; Buxner, S.; SMD Planetary Forum, NASA

    2013-01-01

    "New Worlds, New Discoveries" is a synthesis of NASA’s 50-year exploration history which provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of our solar system. As NASA spacecraft head to and arrive at key locations in our solar system, "New Worlds, New Discoveries" provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system to educators and the general public! The site combines the amazing discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of ongoing missions, and connects them to the related planetary science topics. "New Worlds, New Discoveries," which includes the "Year of the Solar System" and the ongoing celebration of the "50 Years of Exploration," includes 20 topics that share thematic solar system educational resources and activities, tied to the national science standards. This online site and ongoing event offers numerous opportunities for the science community - including researchers and education and public outreach professionals - to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students, and the public about planetary science. Visitors to the site will find valuable hands-on science activities, resources and educational materials, as well as the latest news, to engage audiences in planetary science topics and their related mission discoveries. The topics are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved? How did life begin and evolve on Earth, and has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system? Scientists and educators are encouraged to get involved either directly or by sharing "New Worlds, New Discoveries" and its resources with educators, by conducting presentations and events, sharing their resources and events to add to the site, and adding their own public events to the site’s event calendar! Visit to find quality resources and ideas. Connect with

  2. Getting Involved with the Discovery Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asplund, Shari

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Program represents the implementation of NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin's vision of 'faster, better, cheaper' planetary missions; encompasses a series of low-cost solar system exploration missions intended to accomplish high quality, focused planetary science investigations using innovative, streamlined, and efficient approaches to assure the highest science value for the cost; and aims to enhance our understanding of the solar system by exploring the planets, their moons and other small bodies, either by traveling to them or remotely from the vicinity of Earth. The objectives of this program include the following: (1) Provide exciting and important scientific data to the global community; (2) Pursue new and innovative ways of doing business; (3) Encourage technological development by designing and testing new technologies and transferring them to the private sector; (4) Increase public awareness of, and appreciation for, solar system exploration through exciting education and public outreach activities; (5) Support national education initiatives through mission-specific programs; and (6) Ensure participation of small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HBCUs, and other minority educational institutions in procurements.

  3. Huanglongbing: a devastating disease of citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease is devastating the citrus industry worldwide, from Asia to the Americas. The only major citrus regions free of this disease are the Mediterranean and Australia/New Zealand. To date there is no cure, no resistance and no therapy for HLB and production ra...

  4. Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2010-01-01

    All common fractions can be written in decimal form. In this Discovery article, the author suggests that teachers ask their students to calculate the decimals by actually doing the divisions themselves, and later on they can use a calculator to check their answers. This article presents a lesson based on the research of Bolt (1982).

  5. Recent discoveries concerning the involvement of transcription factors from the Grainyhead-like family in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mlacki, Michal; Kikulska, Agnieszka; Krzywinska, Ewa; Pawlak, Magdalena; Wilanowski, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    The Grainyhead-like (GRHL) family of transcription factors has three mammalian members, which are currently termed Grainyhead-like 1 (GRHL1), Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), and Grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). These factors adopt a DNA-binding immunoglobulin fold homologous to the DNA-binding domain of key tumor suppressor p53. Their patterns of expression are tissue and developmentally specific. Earlier studies of the GRHL proteins focused on their functions in mammalian development. In recent years, these factors have been linked to many different types of cancer: squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, breast cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, neuroblastoma, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. The roles of GRHL proteins in these various types of cancer are complex, and in some cases appear to be contradictory: they can serve to promote cancer development, or they may act as tumor suppressors, depending on the particular GRHL protein involved and on the cancer type. The reasons for obvious discrepancies in results from different studies remain unclear. At the molecular level, the GRHL transcription factors regulate the expression of genes whose products are involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and polarity. We herein review the roles of GRHL proteins in cancer development, and we critically examine relevant molecular mechanisms, which were proposed by different authors. We also discuss the significance of recent discoveries implicating the involvement of GRHL transcription factors in cancer and highlight potential future applications of this knowledge in cancer treatment. PMID:26069269

  6. Involvement of Drug Transporters in Organ Toxicity: The Fundamental Basis of Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; El-Kattan, Ayman; Zhang, Yan; Ray, Adrian S; Lai, Yurong

    2016-04-18

    Membrane transporters play a pivotal role in many organs to maintain their normal physiological functions and contribute significantly to drug absorption, distribution, and elimination. Knowledge gained from gene modified animal models or human genetic disorders has demonstrated that interruption of the transporter activity can lead to debilitating diseases or organ toxicities. Herein we describe transporter associated diseases and organ toxicities resulting from transporter gene deficiency or functional inhibition in the liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and central nervous system (CNS). While proposing additional transporters as targets for drug-induced organ toxicity, strategies and future perspectives are discussed for transporter risk assessment in drug discovery and development. PMID:26889774

  7. A Multimodal Data Analysis Approach for Targeted Drug Discovery Involving Topological Data Analysis (TDA).

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Muthuraman; Jiang, Dadi; Denko, Nicholas; Koong, Albert C

    2016-01-01

    In silico drug discovery refers to a combination of computational techniques that augment our ability to discover drug compounds from compound libraries. Many such techniques exist, including virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS), high-throughput screening (HTS), and mechanisms for data storage and querying. However, presently these tools are often used independent of one another. In this chapter, we describe a new multimodal in silico technique for the hit identification and lead generation phases of traditional drug discovery. Our technique leverages the benefits of three independent methods-virtual high-throughput screening, high-throughput screening, and structural fingerprint analysis-by using a fourth technique called topological data analysis (TDA). We describe how a compound library can be independently tested with vHTS, HTS, and fingerprint analysis, and how the results can be transformed into a topological data analysis network to identify compounds from a diverse group of structural families. This process of using TDA or similar clustering methods to identify drug leads is advantageous because it provides a mechanism for choosing structurally diverse compounds while maintaining the unique advantages of already established techniques such as vHTS and HTS. PMID:27325272

  8. The Children's War: Their Reactions to Devastating Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Joan D.; Donnelly, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature reveals that there is little or no information on children's psychological reactions to devastating events, such as the Oklahoma City bombing, the Gulf War, or the recent destruction of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This article explores children's psychological reactions in light of Piagetian theory.…

  9. An Example of Discovery Research Involving the Transfer of Stimulus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The initial purpose of the present study was to replicate procedures for teaching preschool children to recruit attention at appropriate times by having an experimenter signal the availability and unavailability of attention (i.e., arrange a multiple schedule involving reinforcement and extinction; Tiger & Hanley, 2004). Following the development…

  10. Towards the discovery of novel genetic component involved in stress resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Juraniec, Michal; Lequeux, Hélène; Hermans, Christian; Willems, Glenda; Nordborg, Magnus; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Salis, Pietrino; Vromant, Maud; Lutts, Stanley; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2014-02-01

    The exposure of plants to high concentrations of trace metallic elements such as copper involves a remodeling of the root system, characterized by a primary root growth inhibition and an increase in the lateral root density. These characteristics constitute easy and suitable markers for screening mutants altered in their response to copper excess. A forward genetic approach was undertaken in order to discover novel genetic factors involved in the response to copper excess. A Cu(2+) -sensitive mutant named copper modified resistance1 (cmr1) was isolated and a causative mutation in the CMR1 gene was identified by using positional cloning and next-generation sequencing. CMR1 encodes a plant-specific protein of unknown function. The analysis of the cmr1 mutant indicates that the CMR1 protein is required for optimal growth under normal conditions and has an essential role in the stress response. Impairment of the CMR1 activity alters root growth through aberrant activity of the root meristem, and modifies potassium concentration and hormonal balance (ethylene production and auxin accumulation). Our data support a putative role for CMR1 in cell division regulation and meristem maintenance. Research on the role of CMR1 will contribute to the understanding of the plasticity of plants in response to changing environments. PMID:24134393

  11. Prelaminated Gracilis Flap with Buccal Mucosal Graft for Salvage of Devastated Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Nikolavsky, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    In patients with devastated bulbous urethra, that is, bulbar necrosis, failed fasciocutaneous repairs and “watering can perineum” repair options are limited by paucity of reliable local tissue suitable for reconstruction. In this case report we demonstrate a novel variation of a two-stage technique for reconstruction of a devastated bulbous urethra in a 57-year-old male who suffered penetrating trauma to his previously reconstructed urethra. Because of extensive loss of local tissue from the prior reconstruction and subsequent trauma and infection a 2-stage technique with use of gracilis was employed. This technique involved creation of two independently vascularized urethral hemi-plates prelaminated with buccal mucosa graft (BMG). In the first stage the dorsal plate was created by quilting buccal graft onto corpora cavernosa to create a temporary augmented perineal urethrostomy. In the same stage the future ventral neourethral plate was created by grafting another BMG onto the exposed distal gracilis muscle. Eight weeks later the two prelaminated plates were anastomosed by tunneling the gracilis-BMG composite into the perineum. At 8-month follow-up patient has normal voiding and continence. To our knowledge this is the first report of reconstructing an entire segment of devastated urethra in such a manner. PMID:26257976

  12. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Chekan, Jonathan R.; Cox, Courtney L.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Nair, Satish K.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research, the cyclodehydratase responsible for azoline biogenesis in thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) natural products remains enigmatic. The collaboration of two proteins, C and D, is required for cyclodehydration. The C protein is homologous to E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes, while the D protein is within the YcaO superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that TOMM YcaOs phosphorylate amide carbonyl oxygens to facilitate azoline formation. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an uncharacterized YcaO from Escherichia coli (Ec-YcaO). Ec-YcaO harbors an unprecedented fold and ATP-binding motif. This motif is conserved among TOMM YcaOs and is required for cyclodehydration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C protein regulates substrate binding and catalysis and that the proline-rich C-terminus of the D protein is involved in C protein recognition and catalysis. This study identifies the YcaO active site and paves the way for the characterization of the numerous YcaO domains not associated with TOMM biosynthesis. PMID:25129028

  13. Examining the causes of a devastating debris flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-08-01

    Storm-triggered landslides cause loss of life, property damage, and landscape alterations. For instance, the remnants of Hurricane Camille in 1969 caused 109 deaths in central Virginia, after 600 millimeters of rain fell in mountainous terrain in 6 hours. More recently, on 8 August 2010, a rainstorm-induced landslide devastated the Chinese county of Zhouqu, causing more than 1000 deaths. A new modeling study by Ren examines the multiple factors, natural and human caused, that came together to produce this event. Three things contribute to storm-triggered landslides: geological condition, surface loading and vegetation roots, and extreme precipitation.

  14. A Journey of Self-Discovery: An Intervention Involving Massage, Yoga and Relaxation for Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties Attending Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lesley; Gilchrist, Mollie; Stapley, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on an intervention involving massage, yoga and relaxation delivered to young children with identified emotional and behavioural difficulties, and at risk of exclusion. Children (n = 126) were invited by the head teacher to participate in the Self-discovery Programme (involving massage, yoga, breath work and relaxation) with…

  15. Autonomy in the face of a devastating diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, M

    1998-01-01

    Literary accounts of traumatic events can be more informative and insightful than personal testimonials. In particular, reference to works of literature can give us a more vivid sense of what it is like to receive a devastating diagnosis. In turn this can lead us to question some common assumptions about the nature of autonomy, particularly for patients in these circumstances. The literature of concentration camp and labour camp experiences can help us understand what it is like to have one's life-plans altered utterly and unexpectedly. Contrary to common views of autonomy which have difficulty in characterising autonomous action when long-standing assumptions are suddenly lost, these examples show that autonomy is possible in these circumstances. We need a theory of autonomy which can deal with traumatic events and is useful in the clinical context. PMID:9603000

  16. A Journey of Self-Discovery: An Intervention Involving Massage, Yoga and Relaxation for Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties Attending Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lesley; Gilchrist, Mollie; Stapley, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on an intervention involving massage, yoga and relaxation delivered to young children with emotional and behavioural difficulties. Children (n = 126) were invited to participate in the Self-discovery Programme (SDP) with parental consent. A total of 107 children aged 8-11 years completed the SDP and all measures. Children were…

  17. Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis—a rare but devastating peritoneal disease

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Zia; Summers, Angela; Van Dellen, David; Augustine, Titus; Herrick, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a devastating but, fortunately, rare complication of long-term peritoneal dialysis. The disease is associated with extensive thickening and fibrosis of the peritoneum resulting in the formation of a fibrous cocoon encapsulating the bowel leading to intestinal obstruction. The incidence of EPS ranges between 0.7 and 3.3% and increases with duration of peritoneal dialysis therapy. Dialysis fluid is hyperosmotic, hyperglycemic, and acidic causing chronic injury and inflammation in the peritoneum with loss of mesothelium and extensive tissue fibrosis. The pathogenesis of EPS, however, still remains uncertain, although a widely accepted hypothesis is the “two-hit theory,” where, the first hit is chronic peritoneal membrane injury from long standing peritoneal dialysis followed by a second hit such as an episode of peritonitis, genetic predisposition and/or acute cessation of peritoneal dialysis, leading to EPS. Recently, EPS has been reported in patients shortly after transplantation suggesting that this procedure may also act as a possible second insult. The process of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells is proposed to play a central role in the development of peritoneal sclerosis, a common characteristic of patients on dialysis, however, its importance in EPS is less clear. There is no established treatment for EPS although evidence from small case studies suggests that corticosteroids and tamoxifen may be beneficial. Nutritional support is essential and surgical intervention (peritonectomy and enterolysis) is recommended in later stages to relieve bowel obstruction. PMID:25601836

  18. The devastating effects a fire burn in a child.

    PubMed

    Istek, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    Burn injuries are a serious global public health concern with significant worldwide mortality and morbidity rates. Burns are among the most devastating of all injuries, with outcomes ranging from physical impairment and disability to emotional and mental consequences. Paediatric burns requiring treatment often incur significant health and opportunity costs, and frequently result in death or long-term disability. A recent systemic review showed that almost 50% of patients hospitalised with severe burns in Europe were younger than 16 years of age, and nearly 60% were male. This report discusses the case of a 2-year-old boy with second and third-degree skin burns over almost 45% of his body, including his head and arms, who presented to the eye clinic at the State Hospital in Hakkari 1 month after a fire burn accident. Both eyes had been burnt and the bilateral anterior chambers had been injured so badly that the patient was left blind. PMID:26055581

  19. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Hepatopancreas of Microbial Challenged Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xihong; Cui, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yuan; Song, Chengwen; Shi, Guohui

    2013-01-01

    Background The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is an important economic crustacean and has been seriously attacked by various diseases, which requires more and more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. Recently, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology provides a powerful and efficient method for transcript analysis and immune gene discovery. Methods/Principal Findings A cDNA library from hepatopancreas of E. sinensis challenged by a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 108 cfu·mL−1) was constructed and randomly sequenced using Illumina technique. Totally 39.76 million clean reads were assembled to 70,300 unigenes. After ruling out short-length and low-quality sequences, 52,074 non-redundant unigenes were compared to public databases for homology searching and 17,617 of them showed high similarity to sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr) database. For function classification and pathway assignment, 18,734 (36.00%) unigenes were categorized to three Gene Ontology (GO) categories, 12,243 (23.51%) were classified to 25 Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), and 8,983 (17.25%) were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Potentially, 24, 14, 47 and 132 unigenes were characterized to be involved in Toll, IMD, JAK-STAT and MAPK pathways, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This is the first systematical transcriptome analysis of components relating to innate immune pathways in E. sinensis. Functional genes and putative pathways identified here will contribute to better understand immune system and prevent various diseases in crab. PMID:23874555

  20. Discovery of Microorganisms and Enzymes Involved in High-Solids Decomposition of Rice Straw Using Metagenomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    D’haeseleer, Patrik; Khudyakov, Jane; Burd, Helcio; Hadi, Masood; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.; Thelen, Michael P.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.

    2013-01-01

    High-solids incubations were performed to enrich for microbial communities and enzymes that decompose rice straw under mesophilic (35°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Thermophilic enrichments yielded a community that was 7.5 times more metabolically active on rice straw than mesophilic enrichments. Extracted xylanase and endoglucanse activities were also 2.6 and 13.4 times greater, respectively, for thermophilic enrichments. Metagenome sequencing was performed on enriched communities to determine community composition and mine for genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes. Proteobacteria were found to dominate the mesophilic community while Actinobacteria were most abundant in the thermophilic community. Analysis of protein family representation in each metagenome indicated that cellobiohydrolases containing carbohydrate binding module 2 (CBM2) were significantly overrepresented in the thermophilic community. Micromonospora, a member of Actinobacteria, primarily housed these genes in the thermophilic community. In light of these findings, Micromonospora and other closely related Actinobacteria genera appear to be promising sources of thermophilic lignocellulolytic enzymes for rice straw deconstruction under high-solids conditions. Furthermore, these discoveries warrant future research to determine if exoglucanases with CBM2 represent thermostable enzymes tolerant to the process conditions expected to be encountered during industrial biofuel production. PMID:24205054

  1. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Battaglia, Giovanni Giorgio; Garozzo, Maurizio; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; Pączek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P; Gharavi, Ali G

    2014-11-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six new genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geospatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation, and genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  2. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J.; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Vecchio, Lucia Del; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; Pączek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J.; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six novel genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geo-spatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation and the genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  3. Discovery of a Novel Prolactin in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates: Evolutionary Perspectives and Its Involvement in Teleost Retina Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xigui; Hui, Michelle N. Y.; Liu, Yun; Yuen, Don S. H.; Zhang, Yong; Chan, Wood Yee; Lin, Hao Ran; Cheng, Shuk Han; Cheng, Christopher H. K.

    2009-01-01

    Background The three pituitary hormones, viz. prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and somatolactin (SL), together with the mammalian placental lactogen (PL), constitute a gene family of hormones with similar gene structure and encoded protein sequences. These hormones are believed to have evolved from a common ancestral gene through several rounds of gene duplication and subsequent divergence. Principal Findings In this study, we have identified a new PRL-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates through bioinformatics and molecular cloning means. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this novel protein is homologous to the previously identified PRL. A receptor transactivation assay further showed that this novel protein could bind to PRL receptor to trigger the downstream post-receptor event, indicating that it is biologically active. In view of its close phylogenetic relationship with PRL and also its ability to activate PRL receptor, we name it as PRL2 and the previously identified PRL as PRL1. All the newly discovered PRL2 sequences possess three conserved disulfide linkages with the exception of the shark PRL2 which has only two. In sharp contrast to the classical PRL1 which is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, PRL2 was found to be mainly expressed in the eye and brain of the zebrafish but not in the pituitary. A largely reduced inner nuclear layer of the retina was observed after morpholino knockdown of zebrafish PRL2, indicating its role on retina development in teleost. Significance The discovery of this novel PRL has revitalized our understanding on the evolution of the GH/PRL/SL/PL gene family. Its unique expression and functions in the zebrafish eye also provide a new avenue of research on the neuroendocrine control of retina development in vertebrates. PMID:19584915

  4. Devastating renal outcome caused by skin infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun-Hua; Fang, Yu-Wei; Yang, An-Hung; Tsai, Ming Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging pathogen that infects the skin and soft tissue. However, there are few reports of renal complications from MRSA involving immunoglobulin (Ig)A-dominated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Favorable renal outcomes from IgA GN are achieved by administering timely therapy. In the present study, we describe the case of a healthy young woman suffering from a cutaneous MRSA infection that initially presented with gross hematuria. Six months after eradicating the infection, severe impairment of renal function was noted because of intractable nausea and vomiting. Renal pathology revealed advanced IgA nephropathy with fibrocellular crescent formation. An aggressive treatment plan using immunosuppressants was not adopted because of her irreversible renal pathology, and she was therefore administered maintenance hemodialysis. This instructive case stresses the importance of being aware of the signs of IgA nephropathy post-MRSA infection, such as cutaneous lesions that are mostly painless and accompanied by hematuria and mild proteinuria. If the kidney cannot be salvaged, it will undergo irreversible damage with devastating consequences. PMID:27368023

  5. A facial reconstruction and identification technique for seriously devastating head wounds.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Frišhons, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Many authors have focused on facial identification techniques, and facial reconstructions for cases when skulls have been found are especially well known. However, a standardized facial identification technique for an unknown body with seriously devastating head injuries has not yet been developed. A reconstruction and identification technique was used in 7 cases of accidents involving trains striking pedestrians. This identification technique is based on the removal of skull bone fragments, subsequent fixation of soft tissue onto a universal commercial polystyrene head model, precise suture of dermatomuscular flaps, and definitive adjustment using cosmetic treatments. After reconstruction, identifying marks such as scars, eyebrows, facial lines, facial hair and partly hairstyle become evident. It is then possible to present a modified picture of the reconstructed face to relatives. After comparing the results with photos of the person before death, this technique has proven to be very useful for identifying unknown bodies when other identification techniques are not available. This technique is useful for its being rather quick and especially for its results. PMID:25965304

  6. Gene discovery for enzymes involved in limonene modification or utilization by the mountain pine beetle-associated pathogen Grosmannia clavigera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg; Breuil, Colette

    2014-08-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals. PMID:24837377

  7. Gene Discovery for Enzymes Involved in Limonene Modification or Utilization by the Mountain Pine Beetle-Associated Pathogen Grosmannia clavigera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals. PMID:24837377

  8. De Novo Assembly and Discovery of Genes That Are Involved in Drought Tolerance in Tibetan Sophora moorcroftiana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huie; Yao, Weijie; Fu, Yaru; Li, Shaoke; Guo, Qiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Sophora moorcroftiana, a Leguminosae shrub species that is restricted to the arid and semi-arid regions of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, is an ecologically important foundation species and exhibits substantial drought tolerance in the Plateau. There are no functional genomics resources in public databases for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the drought tolerance of S. moorcroftiana. Therefore, we performed a large-scale transcriptome sequencing of this species under drought stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 62,348,602 clean reads were obtained. The assembly of the clean reads resulted in 146,943 transcripts, including 66,026 unigenes. In the assembled sequences, 1534 transcription factors were identified and classified into 23 different common families, and 9040 SSR loci, from di- to hexa-nucleotides, whose repeat number is greater than five, were presented. In addition, we performed a gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment. The results indicated significant differences in the gene expression profiles among the control, mild stress and severe stress. In total, 4687, 5648 and 5735 genes were identified from the comparison of mild versus control, severe versus control and severe versus mild stress, respectively. Based on the differentially expressed genes, a Gene Ontology annotation analysis indicated many dehydration-relevant categories, including ‘response to water ‘stimulus’ and ‘response to water deprivation’. Meanwhile, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis uncovered some important pathways, such as ‘metabolic pathways’ and ‘plant hormone signal transduction’. In addition, the expression patterns of 25 putative genes that are involved in drought tolerance resulting from quantitative real-time PCR were consistent with their transcript abundance changes as identified by RNA-seq. The globally sequenced genes covered a considerable proportion of the S

  9. Vibrational duetting mimics to trap and disrupt mating of the devastating Asian citrus psyllid insect pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is the primary vector of a bacterium that produces a devastating disease of citrus, huanglongbing. Efficient surveillance of ACP at low population densities is essential for timely pest management programs. ACP males search for mates on tree branches by producing vibra...

  10. Talking about Twisters: Relations between Mothers' and Children's Contributions to Conversations about a Devastating Tornado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Burch, Melissa M.; Van Abbema, Dana L.; Ackil, Jennifer K.

    2007-01-01

    Mother-child dyads who experienced a devastating tornado talked about the storm and about two affectively more positive or neutral events at each of two time points: 4 months and 10 months after the storm. The conversations were analyzed to determine whether mothers and/or children's contributions differed as a function of event type and whether…

  11. Vibrational duetting mimics to trap and disrupt mating of the devasting Asian citrus psyllid insect pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is the primary vector of a bacterium that produces a devastating disease of citrus, huanglongbing. Efficient surveillance of ACP at low population densities is essential for timely pest management programs. ACP males search for mates on tree branches by producing vibra...

  12. The concept of skin bleaching in Africa and its devastating health implications.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Melanie Miyanji

    2008-01-01

    Africa is considered a continent of mystery and intrigue with absurd concepts and beliefs. Cosmetic dermatology is no less intriguing than other issues. While quick judgement may be passed condemning attitudes and misconceptions in this field, we need to analyze factors that contribute to such ideas. Acquiring a lighter skin forms the basis of Skin Care and Cosmetology in dark skinned people. This regrettably has far reaching devastating effects on health and individual finances. This in return has enriched unscrupulous stake holders. Help from the international medical fraternity and the pharmaceutical/cosmetology industry is required to end this evil. PMID:18280901

  13. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei.

    PubMed

    Vega, Fernando E; Brown, Stuart M; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Brodie, Eoin L; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies. PMID:26228545

  14. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab

    2015-07-31

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. We find the draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.

  15. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab

    2015-07-31

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complexmore » polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. We find the draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.« less

  16. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies. PMID:26228545

  17. Mental health in Aceh--Indonesia: A decade after the devastating tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Yessi, Sarifah; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-02-01

    The province of Aceh has suffered enormously from the perennial armed conflict and the devastating Tsunami in 2004. Despite the waves of external aid and national concern geared toward improving healthcare services as part of the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts after the Tsunami, mental health services still require much attention. This paper aims to understand the mental healthcare system in Aceh Province, Indonesia; its main focus is on the burden, on the healthcare system, its development, service delivery and cultural issues from the devastating Tsunami in 2004 until the present. We reviewed those published and unpublished reports from the local and national government, from international instances (UN bodies, NGOs) and from the academic literature pertaining to mental health related programs conducted in Aceh. To some extent, mental health services in Aceh have been improved compared to their condition before the Tsunami. The development programs have focused on procurement of policy, improvement of human resources, and enhancing service delivery. Culture and religious beliefs shape the pathways by which people seek mental health treatment. The political system also determines the development of the mental health service in the province. The case of Aceh is a unique example where conflict and disaster serve as the catalysts toward the development of a mental healthcare system. Several factors contribute to the improvement of the mental health system, but security is a must. Whilst the Acehnese enjoy the improvements, some issues such as stigma, access to care and political fluctuations remain challenging. PMID:26957340

  18. Discovery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA's Discovery Systems Project is given. The topics of discussion include: 1) NASA's Computing Information and Communications Technology Program; 2) Discovery Systems Program; and 3) Ideas for Information Integration Using the Web.

  19. Guided Discoveries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Presented are four mathematical discoveries made by students on an arithmetical function using the Fibonacci sequence. Discussed is the nature of the role of the teacher in directing the students' discovery activities. (KR)

  20. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part II: moving from resuscitative to end-of-life or palliative treatment.

    PubMed

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-11-01

    The model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events addresses decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps. Part II concerns communications moving from resuscitative to palliative and end-of-life treatments. After completing the steps involved in determining decision-making, emergency physicians (EPs) should consider starting palliative measures versus continuing resuscitative treatment. As communications related to these end-of-life decisions increasingly fall within the scope of emergency medicine (EM) practice, we need to become educated about and comfortable with them. PMID:23167864

  1. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Liberty, Lee; Finlayson, David; Geist, Eric; Labay, Keith; Byerly, Mike

    2016-03-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost - the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120-360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20-50 m (˜0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ˜21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (˜465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake-triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought.

  2. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel; Haeussler, Peter J.; Lee Liberty; David Finlayson; Geist, Eric L.; Labay, Keith; Michael Byerly

    2016-01-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost – the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120–360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20–50 m (∼0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ∼21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (∼465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake- triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought. 

  3. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Liberty, Lee; Finlayson, David; Geist, Eric; Labay, Keith; Byerly, Mike

    2016-03-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost - the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120-360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20-50 m (∼0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ∼21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (∼465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake-triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought.

  4. Drug discovery in academia.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S

    2004-03-01

    Drug discovery and development is generally done in the commercial rather than the academic realm. Drug discovery involves target discovery and validation, lead identification by high-throughput screening, and lead optimization by medicinal chemistry. Follow-up preclinical evaluation includes analysis in animal models of compound efficacy and pharmacology (ADME: administration, distribution, metabolism, elimination) and studies of toxicology, specificity, and drug interactions. Notwithstanding the high-cost, labor-intensive, and non-hypothesis-driven aspects of drug discovery, the academic setting has a unique and expanding niche in this important area of investigation. For example, academic drug discovery can focus on targets of limited commercial value, such as third-world and rare diseases, and on the development of research reagents such as high-affinity inhibitors for pharmacological "gene knockout" in animal models ("chemical genetics"). This review describes the practical aspects of the preclinical drug discovery process for academic investigators. The discovery of small molecule inhibitors and activators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is presented as an example of an academic drug discovery program that has yielded new compounds for physiology research and clinical development. PMID:14761879

  5. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  6. Comparative genomics guided discovery of two missing archaeal enzyme families involved in the biosynthesis of the pterin moiety of tetrahydromethanopterin and tetrahydrofolate.

    PubMed

    de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Phillips, Gabriela; Grochowski, Laura L; El Yacoubi, Basma; Jenney, Francis; Adams, Michael W W; Murzin, Alexey G; White, Robert H

    2012-11-16

    C-1 carriers are essential cofactors in all domains of life, and in Archaea, these can be derivatives of tetrahydromethanopterin (H(4)-MPT) or tetrahydrofolate (H(4)-folate). Their synthesis requires 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin diphosphate (6-HMDP) as the precursor, but the nature of pathways that lead to its formation were unknown until the recent discovery of the GTP cyclohydrolase IB/MptA family that catalyzes the first step, the conversion of GTP to dihydroneopterin 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate [El Yacoubi, B.; et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 37586-37593 and Grochowski, L. L.; et al. (2007) Biochemistry46, 6658-6667]. Using a combination of comparative genomics analyses, heterologous complementation tests, and in vitro assays, we show that the archaeal protein families COG2098 and COG1634 specify two of the missing 6-HMDP synthesis enzymes. Members of the COG2098 family catalyze the formation of 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin from 7,8-dihydroneopterin, while members of the COG1634 family catalyze the formation of 6-HMDP from 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin. The discovery of these missing genes solves a long-standing mystery and provides novel examples of convergent evolutions where proteins of dissimilar architectures perform the same biochemical function. PMID:22931285

  7. Comparative Genomics Guided Discovery of Two Missing Archaeal Enzyme Families Involved in the Biosynthesis of the Pterin Moiety of Tetrahydromethanopterin and Tetrahydrofolate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    C-1 carriers are essential cofactors in all domains of life, and in Archaea, these can be derivatives of tetrahydromethanopterin (H4-MPT) or tetrahydrofolate (H4-folate). Their synthesis requires 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin diphosphate (6-HMDP) as the precursor, but the nature of pathways that lead to its formation were unknown until the recent discovery of the GTP cyclohydrolase IB/MptA family that catalyzes the first step, the conversion of GTP to dihydroneopterin 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate or 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate [El Yacoubi, B.; et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 37586–37593 and Grochowski, L. L.; et al. (2007) Biochemistry46, 6658–6667]. Using a combination of comparative genomics analyses, heterologous complementation tests, and in vitro assays, we show that the archaeal protein families COG2098 and COG1634 specify two of the missing 6-HMDP synthesis enzymes. Members of the COG2098 family catalyze the formation of 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin from 7,8-dihydroneopterin, while members of the COG1634 family catalyze the formation of 6-HMDP from 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin. The discovery of these missing genes solves a long-standing mystery and provides novel examples of convergent evolutions where proteins of dissimilar architectures perform the same biochemical function. PMID:22931285

  8. The effect of surface cover and soil devastation on infiltration rate in steep forest plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Y.; Hiraoka, M.; Kato, H.; Gomi, T.; Miyata, S.; Mizugaki, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese cypress (Hinoki; Chamaecyparis obtusa) is a major commercial tree species in Japan, and without thinning of high-density stands, canopy closure prevents development of understory vegetation. Therefore there is a concern for overlandflow and sediment yield due to infiltration rate lowering. We developed a light-weight rainfall simulator based on the design of Meyer and Harmon (1979). A flat fan Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle (Spraying systems Co., USA) is mounted on the manifold at 2.13 m high from the plot surface. The nozzle oscillates so that the spray fan sweeps across the targeting 1 m x 1 m plot. The Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle produces large raindrops larger than 2 mm in diameter, and can simulate the high raindrop kinetic energy of natural throughfall. A targeted rainfall rate is 180 mm/h. About 30 sprinkling experiments have been conducted on 35-degree hillslopes with varying surface cover in 5 locations in Japan. We obtained the minimum infiltration rate of 14 mm/h where the surface cover is very little. The infiltration rates were plotted against the total understory vegetation and dry weight of total surface cover including litter. The infiltration rate increased with the increasing total surface cover, and generally higher regression coefficient was found for the case of the total surface cover. In some cases, high infiltration rates were obtained where surface cover is low. Two possible explanations can be made; 1) surface soil (especially fine particles) has been washed away, where soil is mostly composed of gravel and the percentage of fine fraction is low, or 2) because of long-term soil loss by raindrop detachment, remaining soil looks like "ghanging"h between exposed fine root networks of Japanese cypress, where soil bulk density is significantly lower than other site. Therefore the infiltration rate in the devastated Japanese cypress plantations is not only controlled by loss of surface vegetation by low light condition, but soil

  9. Earth observation data based rapid flood-extent modelling for tsunami-devastated coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hese, Sören; Heyer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Earth observation (EO)-based mapping and analysis of natural hazards plays a critical role in various aspects of post-disaster aid management. Spatial very high-resolution Earth observation data provide important information for managing post-tsunami activities on devastated land and monitoring re-cultivation and reconstruction. The automatic and fast use of high-resolution EO data for rapid mapping is, however, complicated by high spectral variability in densely populated urban areas and unpredictable textural and spectral land-surface changes. The present paper presents the results of the SENDAI project, which developed an automatic post-tsunami flood-extent modelling concept using RapidEye multispectral satellite data and ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM V2) data of the eastern coast of Japan (captured after the Tohoku earthquake). In this paper, the authors developed both a bathtub-modelling approach and a cost-distance approach, and integrated the roughness parameters of different land-use types to increase the accuracy of flood-extent modelling. Overall, the accuracy of the developed models reached 87-92%, depending on the analysed test site. The flood-modelling approach was explained and results were compared with published approaches. We came to the conclusion that the cost-factor-based approach reaches accuracy comparable to published results from hydrological modelling. However the proposed cost-factor approach is based on a much simpler dataset, which is available globally.

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: the most devastating vascular complication of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, V; Humbert, M; Coghlan, G; Nash, P; Steen, V

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating vascular complication of a number of CTDs. In patients with SSc, PAH has a dramatic impact on prognosis and survival and is the single most common cause of disease-related death.Yearly echocardiographic screening for PAH is recommended in patients with SSc. If suspected, confirmation of PAH diagnosis by right heart catheterization is necessary. Treatment goals for patients with PAH associated with SSc (PAH-SSc) aim to slow disease progression and improve quality of life. Some measures used to gauge the effect of treatment in patients with PAH-SSc remain to be fully validated; the 6-min walk distance, for example, is a simple and reproducible means of assessing exercise capacity, but there exists a need to understand what constitutes a clinically relevant change in this specific patient population. Currently, pharmacological intervention in PAH-SSc may target one or more of three pathophysiological pathways in PAH. The prostacyclin analogue epoprostenol has been shown to improve exercise capacity and haemodynamics in PAH-SSc patients and similar data are available from smaller studies on trepostinil and iloprost. The dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been shown to improve exercise capacity and haemodynamics in PAH-SSc, and similar data have been obtained in small numbers of patients treated with the endothelin receptor A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan. Impaired production of nitric oxide may be addressed by inhibiting phosphodiesterase type-5 with sildenafil or possibly tadalafil. Combinations of multiple targeted therapies may be beneficial to this patient population. PMID:19487219

  11. Bacterial Symbionts of a Devastating Coffee Plant Pest, the Stinkbug Antestiopsis thunbergii (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yu; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Serracin, Mario; Tulgetske, Genet M.; Miller, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Stinkbugs of the genus Antestiopsis, so-called antestia bugs or variegated coffee bugs, are notorious pests of coffee plants in Africa. We investigated the symbiotic bacteria associated with Antestiopsis thunbergii, a major coffee plant pest in Rwanda. PCR, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of bacterial genes identified four distinct bacterial lineages associated with A. thunbergii: a gammaproteobacterial gut symbiont and symbionts representing the genera Sodalis, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia. In situ hybridization showed that the gut symbiont densely occupied the lumen of midgut crypts, whereas the Sodalis symbiont, the Spiroplasma symbiont, and the Rickettsia symbiont sparsely and sporadically infected various cells and tissues. Diagnostic PCR survey of 154 A. thunbergii individuals collected at 8 localities in Rwanda revealed high infection frequencies (100% for the gut symbiont, 51.3% for the Sodalis symbiont, 52.6% for the Spiroplasma symbiont, and 24.0% for the Rickettsia symbiont). These results suggest that the gut symbiont is the primary symbiotic associate of obligate nature for A. thunbergii, whereas the Sodalis symbiont, the Spiroplasma symbiont, and the Rickettsia symbiont are the secondary symbiotic associates of facultative nature. We observed high coinfection frequencies, i.e., 7.8% of individuals with quadruple infection with all the symbionts, 32.5% with triple infections with the gut symbiont and two of the secondary symbionts, and 39.6% with double infections with the gut symbiont and any of the three secondary symbionts, which were statistically not different from the expected coinfection frequencies and probably reflected random associations. The knowledge of symbiotic microbiota in A. thunbergii will provide useful background information for controlling this devastating coffee plant pest. PMID:24727277

  12. Bacterial symbionts of a devastating coffee plant pest, the stinkbug Antestiopsis thunbergii (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yu; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Serracin, Mario; Tulgetske, Genet M; Miller, Thomas A; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-06-01

    Stinkbugs of the genus Antestiopsis, so-called antestia bugs or variegated coffee bugs, are notorious pests of coffee plants in Africa. We investigated the symbiotic bacteria associated with Antestiopsis thunbergii, a major coffee plant pest in Rwanda. PCR, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of bacterial genes identified four distinct bacterial lineages associated with A. thunbergii: a gammaproteobacterial gut symbiont and symbionts representing the genera Sodalis, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia. In situ hybridization showed that the gut symbiont densely occupied the lumen of midgut crypts, whereas the Sodalis symbiont, the Spiroplasma symbiont, and the Rickettsia symbiont sparsely and sporadically infected various cells and tissues. Diagnostic PCR survey of 154 A. thunbergii individuals collected at 8 localities in Rwanda revealed high infection frequencies (100% for the gut symbiont, 51.3% for the Sodalis symbiont, 52.6% for the Spiroplasma symbiont, and 24.0% for the Rickettsia symbiont). These results suggest that the gut symbiont is the primary symbiotic associate of obligate nature for A. thunbergii, whereas the Sodalis symbiont, the Spiroplasma symbiont, and the Rickettsia symbiont are the secondary symbiotic associates of facultative nature. We observed high coinfection frequencies, i.e., 7.8% of individuals with quadruple infection with all the symbionts, 32.5% with triple infections with the gut symbiont and two of the secondary symbionts, and 39.6% with double infections with the gut symbiont and any of the three secondary symbionts, which were statistically not different from the expected coinfection frequencies and probably reflected random associations. The knowledge of symbiotic microbiota in A. thunbergii will provide useful background information for controlling this devastating coffee plant pest. PMID:24727277

  13. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Meijie; Wang, Yingeng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Rong, Xiaojun; Chen, Guiping; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform) were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs) in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway. PMID:26193268

  14. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Meijie; Wang, Yingeng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Rong, Xiaojun; Chen, Guiping; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform) were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs) in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway. PMID:26193268

  15. Seismotectonic Models of the Three Recent Devastating SCR Earthquakes in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Kayal, J.

    2007-12-01

    During the last decade, three devastating earthquakes, the Killari 1993 (Mb 6.3), Jabalpur 1997 (Mb 6.0) and the Bhuj 2001 (Mw 7.7) occurred in the Stable Continental Region (SCR), Peninsular India. First, the September 30, 1993 Killari earthquake (Mb 6.3) occurred in the Deccan province of central India, in the Latur district of Maharashtra state. The local geology in the area is obscured by the late Cretaceous-Eocene basalt flows, referred to as the Deccan traps. This makes it difficult to recognize the geological surface faults that could be associated with the Killari earthquake. The epicentre was reported at 18.090N and 76.620E, and the focal depth at 7 +/- 1 km was precisely estimated by waveform inversion (Chen and Kao, 1995). The maximum intensity reached to VIII and the earthquake caused a loss of about 10,000 lives and severe damage to property. The May 22, 1997 Jabalpur earthquake (Mb 6.0), epicentre at 23.080N and 80.060E, is a well studied earthquake in the Son-Narmada-Tapti (SONATA) seismic zone. A notable aspects of this earthquake is that it was the first significant event in India to be recorded by 10 broadband seismic stations which were established in 1996 by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). The focal depth was well estimated using the "converted phases" of the broadband seismograms. The focal depth was given in the lower crust at a depth of 35 +/- 1 km, similar to the moderate earthquakes reported from the Amazona ancient rift system in SCR of South America. Maximum MSK intensity of the Jabalpur earthquake reached to VIII in the MSK scale and this earthquake killed about 50 people in the Jabalpur area. Finally, the Bhuj earthquake (MW 7.7) of January 26, 2001 in the Gujarat state, northwestern India, was felt across the whole country, and killed about 20,000 people. The maximum intensity level reached X. The epicenter of the earthquake is reported at 23.400N and 70.280E, and the well estimated focal depth at 25 km. A total of about

  16. 47 CFR 1.729 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 1.729 Section 1.729..., and Reports Involving Common Carriers Formal Complaints § 1.729 Discovery. (a) Subject to paragraph (i... seek discovery of any non-privileged matter that is relevant to the material facts in dispute in...

  17. 47 CFR 1.729 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 1.729 Section 1.729..., and Reports Involving Common Carriers Formal Complaints § 1.729 Discovery. (a) Subject to paragraph (i... seek discovery of any non-privileged matter that is relevant to the material facts in dispute in...

  18. 47 CFR 1.729 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 1.729 Section 1.729..., and Reports Involving Common Carriers Formal Complaints § 1.729 Discovery. (a) Subject to paragraph (i... seek discovery of any non-privileged matter that is relevant to the material facts in dispute in...

  19. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  20. Interoperability and information discovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, E.

    2001-01-01

    In the context of information systems, there is interoperability when the distinctions between separate information systems are not a barrier to accomplishing a task that spans those systems. Interoperability so defined implies that there are commonalities among the systems involved and that one can exploit such commonalities to achieve interoperability. The challenge of a particular interoperability task is to identify relevant commonalities among the systems involved and to devise mechanisms that exploit those commonalities. The present paper focuses on the particular interoperability task of information discovery. The Global Information Locator Service (GILS) is described as a policy, standards, and technology framework for addressing interoperable information discovery on a global and long-term basis. While there are many mechanisms for people to discover and use all manner of data and information resources, GILS initiatives exploit certain key commonalities that seem to be sufficient to realize useful information discovery interoperability at a global, long-term scale. This paper describes ten of the specific commonalities that are key to GILS initiatives. It presents some of the practical implications for organizations in various roles: content provider, system engineer, intermediary, and searcher. The paper also provides examples of interoperable information discovery as deployed using GILS in four types of information communities: bibliographic, geographic, environmental, and government.

  1. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia K.; Rhee, Michele; Swinney, David C.; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D) model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives. PMID:25685324

  2. The devastating outcome of massive subcutaneous injection of highly viscous fluids in male-to-female transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Hage, J J; Kanhai, R C; Oen, A L; van Diest, P J; Karim, R B

    2001-03-01

    Illicit subcutaneous injections of massive quantities of highly viscous fluids are still performed, often by unqualified persons. Fifteen male-to-female transsexuals consulted the authors regarding their devastating long-term outcomes after the injection of up to 8 liters of alleged silicone or mineral oil to feminize their bodies. After a latency period of up to 17 years, these injections led to complications ranging from scarring and deformity to infections. These patients were treated conservatively for inflammation and infection or surgically by resection of the oil-infested areas. In view of the potential dangers, feminization by the injection of high-viscosity fluids should be soundly condemned. PMID:11304599

  3. Discovery Scarp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    One of the most prominent lobate scarps (Discovery Scarp), photographed by Mariner 10 during it's first encounter with Mercury, is located at the center of this image (extending from the top to near bottom). This scarp is about 350 kilometers long and transects two craters 35 and 55 kilometers in diameter. The maximum height of the scarp south of the 55-kilometer crater is about 3 kilometers. Notice the shallow older crater (near the center of the image) perched on the crest of the scarp. (FDS 17389 and 27399)

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  4. Devastated but Not Defeated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Colleges and universities in other parts of Louisiana and the nation are opening their doors to the 72,000 college students in the greater New Orleans area who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Dr. E. Joseph Savoie, Louisiana's commissioner of higher education, says the state's board of regents is making arrangements to allow the students to…

  5. Devastated Stellar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nasty effects of living near a group of massive stars: radiation and winds from the massive stars (white spot in center) are blasting planet-making material away from stars like our sun. The planetary material can be seen as comet-like tails behind three stars near the center of the picture. The tails are pointing away from the massive stellar furnaces that are blowing them outward.

    The picture is the best example yet of multiple sun-like stars being stripped of their planet-making dust by massive stars.

    The sun-like stars are about two to three million years old, an age when planets are thought to be growing out of surrounding disks of dust and gas. Astronomers say the dust being blown from the stars is from their outer disks. This means that any Earth-like planets forming around the sun-like stars would be safe, while outer planets like Uranus might be nothing more than dust in the wind.

    This image shows a portion of the W5 star-forming region, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. Light with a wavelength of 3.5 microns is blue, while light from the dust of 24 microns is orange-red.

  6. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  7. Discovery as a process

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  8. The Art of Questions and Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Daniel H.

    The discovery method, according to the author, promotes logical thinking, is motivational in nature, makes learning more permanent, produces more usable knowledge, and gets students actively involved. A discovery lesson is characterized by the following: (1) the concept to be learned is not announced, (2) experiences and activities are developed…

  9. Similarities and differences between the massive eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) devastations that occurred in Lake Balaton in 1991 and 1995.

    PubMed

    Bálint, T; Ferenczy, J; Kátai, F; Kiss, I; Kráczer, L; Kufcsák, O; Láng, G; Polyhos, C; Szabó, I; Szegletes, T; Nemcsók, J

    1997-06-01

    In the past few years, two massive eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) devastations occurred in Lake Balaton, Hungary. In 1991, 300 tons of eel perished in the western basin of the lake, while in the summer of 1995 30 tons of eel died in the eastern part of the lake. Investigations carried out to find the causes of these ecocatastrophes included measurements of certain biochemical parameters: the blood sugar level, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.2.3), glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT, EC 2.6.1.1) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT, EC 2.6.1.2) activities in the blood serum of the collected eels. In both 1991 and 1995, deltamethrin (DM), the active ingredient of the insecticide K-OTHRIN 1 ULV used against mosquitoes, was detected in the eels; in 1995 it was demonstrated in several other animal species, i.e., bream (Abramis brama L.), pike perch (Stizostedion lucioperca L.), and the common gull (Larus canus), and in sediment samples from the lake. Additionally, laboratory experiments were carried out to study the effects of DM on eels. In 1991, eels were collected from the western (the site of the devastation) and eastern basins of the lake. The eels from the eastern basin were used as controls. At that time, the AChE activity in the blood serum of the eels from the western basin was significantly inhibited compared to that in animals from the eastern basin (P < 0.05, Student t test). Eels from the western part of the lake had GOT and GPT levels 20 and 100%, respectively, higher than those of eels from the eastern part of the lake. The blood glucose level was much higher in the eels from the affected area of the lake as compared to those from the eastern part. The brain and liver of the eels contained DM residues at 20 micrograms/kg wet tissue (Gönczy, 1992). Gönczy suspected that one of the causes of the massive eel loss in 1991 was the presence of DM in the fish. In 1995, when the eel devastation occurred in

  10. Nomogram for Predicting Time to Death After Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment in Patients With Devastating Neurological Injury.

    PubMed

    He, X; Xu, G; Liang, W; Liu, B; Xu, Y; Luan, Z; Lu, Y; Ko, D S C; Manyalich, M; Schroder, P M; Guo, Z

    2015-08-01

    Reliable prediction of time of death after withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment in patients with devastating neurological injury is crucial to successful donation after cardiac death. Herein, we conducted a study of 419 neurocritical patients who underwent life support withdrawal at four neurosurgical centers in China. Based on a retrospective cohort, we used multivariate Cox regression analysis to identify prognostic factors for patient death, which were then integrated into a nomogram. The model was calibrated and validated using data from an external retrospective cohort and a prospective cohort. We identified 10 variables that were incorporated into a nomogram. The C-indexes for predicting the 60-min death probability in the training, external validation and prospective validation cohorts were 0.96 (0.93-0.98), 0.94 (0.91-0.97), and 0.99 (0.97-1.00), respectively. The calibration plots after WLST showed an optimal agreement between the prediction of time to death by the nomogram and the actual observation for all cohorts. Then we identified 22, 26 and 37 as cut-points for risk stratification into four groups. Kaplan-Meier curves indicated distinct prognoses between patients in the different risk groups (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we have developed and validated a nomogram to accurately identify potential cardiac death donors in neurocritical patients in a Chinese population. PMID:25810114

  11. Commentary: The devastating effects of ignoring child maltreatment in psychiatry--a commentary on Teicher and Samson 2016.

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, Bessel

    2016-03-01

    Despite the numerous studies over the past 30 years that have clarified the devastating effects of child maltreatment on mental and physical health, the role of trauma within the caregiving system remains unrecognized both in our diagnostic systems and in our dominant treatment paradigms. Research of people with histories of caregiver abuse and neglect consistently demonstrates problems with concentration, anger, panic, depression, food intake, drugs, and sleep, as well as decreased Heart RateVariability, higher levels of stress hormones, and reduced or impaired immune response. Their relationship between documented brain changes and psychopathology is complex. Traumatic life experiences during childhood and adolescence are far more common than expected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that child maltreatment may be the most costly public health issue in the United States, Eradicating child abuse in America would reduce the overall rate of depression by more than half, alcoholism by two-thirds, and suicide, serious drug abuse, and domestic violence by three quarters. It would also have a significantly positive effect on workplace performance, and vastly decrease the need for incarceration. The current practice of applying multiple distinct comorbid diagnoses to traumatized children prevents a comprehensive treatment approach. Approaching their problems from a framework of memories of discreet traumatic ignores the fact that the damage affects the brain's neural circuitry and goes well beyond dealing with discrete painful events. Our great challenge is to learn to utilize the brain's neuroplasticity to reorganize defective brain circuits. PMID:26889892

  12. Acute stress-related psychological impact in children following devastating natural disaster, the Sikkim earthquake (2011), India

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Rakesh; Sarkar, Sumantra; Banerjee, Indira; Hazra, Avijit; Majumder, Debabrata; Sabui, Tapas; Dutta, Sudip; Saren, Abhisek; Pan, Partha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychological stress following natural disaster is common. Despite several earthquakes in India, data on evaluation of acute stress among the child victims in the early postdisaster period is scarce. Immediately following a devastating earthquake (6.9 Richter) at Sikkim on September, 18 2011, many children attended North Bengal Medical College, the nearest government tertiary care institution, with unusual stress symptoms. Objective: Evaluation of acute stress symptoms in children in the immediate postearthquake period. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done over 4 weeks and includes all the children from 1 to 12 years presenting with unusual physical or behavioral symptoms. Those with major injuries requiring admission were excluded. They were divided into two age groups. For older children (8-12 years) the 8-item Children Impact of Event Scale (CIES) was used for screening of stress. Unusual symptoms were recorded in younger children (1-8 years) as CIES is not validated < 8 years. Result: A total of 84 children (2.66%) out of 3154 had stress symptoms. Maximum attendance was noted in first 3 days (65.47%) and declined gradually. In children ≥ 8 years, 48.78% had psychological stress, which was statistically significant on CIES scores without any gender predilection. Static posturing (41.86%), sleeplessness (32.55%), anorexia (9.30%), recurrent vomiting (13.95%), excessive crying (13.95%), or night-awakenings (4.65%) were found in younger children (n = 43) and three required admission. Conclusion: This study represent the first Indian data showing statistically significant psychological impact in older children (8-12 years) and various forms of physical stress symptoms in young children (1-8 years) following earthquake. PMID:24174793

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Reveals the Trace of the Ancient Settlers of a Violently Devastated Late Bronze and Iron Ages Village.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Carolina; Baeta, Miriam; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; García-Romero, Noemí; Llanos, Armando; M de Pancorbo, Marian

    2016-01-01

    La Hoya (Alava, Basque Country) was one of the most important villages of the Late Bronze and Iron Ages of the north of the Iberian Peninsula, until it was violently devastated around the 4th century and abandoned in the 3rd century B.C. Archaeological evidences suggest that descendants from La Hoya placed their new settlement in a nearby hill, which gave rise to the current village of Laguardia. In this study, we have traced the genetic imprints of the extinct inhabitants of La Hoya through the analysis of maternal lineages. In particular, we have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 41 human remains recovered from the archaeological site for comparison with a sample of 51 individuals from the geographically close present-day population of Laguardia, as well as 56 individuals of the general population of the province of Alava, where the archaeological site and Laguardia village are located. MtDNA haplotypes were successfully obtained in 25 out of 41 ancient samples, and 14 different haplotypes were identified. The major mtDNA subhaplogroups observed in La Hoya were H1, H3, J1 and U5, which show a distinctive frequency pattern in the autochthonous populations of the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis was performed to test the most likely model for the local demographic history. The results did not sustain a genealogical continuity between Laguardia and La Hoya at the haplotype level, although factors such as sampling effects, recent admixture events, and genetic bottlenecks need to be considered. Likewise, the highly similar subhaplogroup composition detected between La Hoya and Laguardia and Alava populations do not allow us to reject a maternal genetic continuity in the human groups of the area since at least the Iron Age to present times. Broader analyses, based on a larger collection of samples and genetic markers, would be required to study fine-scale population events in these human groups. PMID

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Reveals the Trace of the Ancient Settlers of a Violently Devastated Late Bronze and Iron Ages Village

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Carolina; Baeta, Miriam; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; García-Romero, Noemí; Llanos, Armando; M. de Pancorbo, Marian

    2016-01-01

    La Hoya (Alava, Basque Country) was one of the most important villages of the Late Bronze and Iron Ages of the north of the Iberian Peninsula, until it was violently devastated around the 4th century and abandoned in the 3rd century B.C. Archaeological evidences suggest that descendants from La Hoya placed their new settlement in a nearby hill, which gave rise to the current village of Laguardia. In this study, we have traced the genetic imprints of the extinct inhabitants of La Hoya through the analysis of maternal lineages. In particular, we have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 41 human remains recovered from the archaeological site for comparison with a sample of 51 individuals from the geographically close present-day population of Laguardia, as well as 56 individuals of the general population of the province of Alava, where the archaeological site and Laguardia village are located. MtDNA haplotypes were successfully obtained in 25 out of 41 ancient samples, and 14 different haplotypes were identified. The major mtDNA subhaplogroups observed in La Hoya were H1, H3, J1 and U5, which show a distinctive frequency pattern in the autochthonous populations of the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis was performed to test the most likely model for the local demographic history. The results did not sustain a genealogical continuity between Laguardia and La Hoya at the haplotype level, although factors such as sampling effects, recent admixture events, and genetic bottlenecks need to be considered. Likewise, the highly similar subhaplogroup composition detected between La Hoya and Laguardia and Alava populations do not allow us to reject a maternal genetic continuity in the human groups of the area since at least the Iron Age to present times. Broader analyses, based on a larger collection of samples and genetic markers, would be required to study fine-scale population events in these human groups. PMID

  15. A Discovery-Based Experiment Involving Rearrangement in the Conversion of Alcohols to Alkyl Halides: Permanent Magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in the First-Semester Organic Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Tucker, Ryand J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in large-section first-semester organic chemistry lab courses is limited by the availability of experiments that not only hinge on first-semester lecture topics, but which also produce at least 0.5 mL of neat liquid sample. This article reports a discovery-based experiment that meets both…

  16. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  17. An underwater landslide or slump on an active submarine fault - a possible source of a devastating tsunami?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-12-01

    A Mw 7.7 earthquake and subsequent large-scale tsunami occurred on 17th July 2006 off the southern coast of Java Island, Indonesia. A maximum of 7.7 m inundation height was recorded in Pangandaran on the southern coast of Java, according to the field survey just after the tsunami (Tsuji et al., 2006). However, since there are few residents who noticed the earthquake tremors, the earthquake may possibility be so-called "tsunami earthquake". The aftershocks from July to September occurred on the fore-arc area and their CMT solution suggests the predominant north-south tensile stress. R/V MIRAI passed the aftershock area in 2004 and 2005 with continuous multibeam bathymetric survey. The processed topographic map shows a lot of amphitheatres with the scale of 8-20 km along the fault scarps. Convexity landforms are located below the footwall of the amphitheatres, apparently the relics of an underwater landslide, and their relative elevation exceeds 1000 m in maximum. This area is characterised by the southeastern extension of Mentawai Fault and its associated minor faults ranging from the Sumatra fore-arc area. The observed amphitheatres and relics of underwater landslides are located along the active faults. Considering that the tsunami wave height distribution is concentrated on a specific narrow area compared with the scale of the mainshock, the mainshock possibly triggered underwater landslides on these amphitheatres and the slides generated a large-scale tsunami. The Ryukyu district was attacked by a M7-class earthquake followed by a devastating tsunami in 1771. 'The East Ishigaki Fault,' one of the across-arc active normal faults in this area was studied precisely by multibeam echo sounding. The study revealed a slump on the segmented active fault. The slump itself may generate a tsunami with the wave height of several meters and might cause the 1771 tsunami together with the faulting itself. Some recent geohazards also show that a landslide or a slump is

  18. Partial lateral forcing experiments reveal how multi-scale processes induce devastating rainfall: a new application of regional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongwei; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    The 1998 extremely heavy rainfall events over East Asia are investigated through partial lateral forcing (PLF) experiments with the Weather Research and Forecasting model to determine the impacts of the synoptic (SY), intra-seasonal (IS), and inter-annual (IA) forcing across the lateral boundary on the extreme climate anomalies. The large-scale lateral boundary forcing was derived from an ensemble reanalysis dataset and decomposed into climatological, SY, IS, and IA components. The PLF experiments show that the IS forcing not only triggers the monsoon onset and drives two northward propagation events of the subtropical front but also has dominant contributions to the two heaviest rainfall events over the Yangtze River Basin (YRB) and South China, suggesting the critical role of the intra-seasonal variability in the devastating 1998 floods. Previous studies perceived that the northward propagating IS oscillation from the tropics regulates the extreme heavy rainfall of East Asia summer monsoon in 1998. However, we find that the IS forcing from the mid-latitude plays a more important role than the forcing from the tropics in generating the two extreme rainfall events in 1998. During the first extreme event in June, the IS forcing across the western boundary is the major cause of the northward advance of the subtropical front and the heavy rainfall over the YRB and South China, with the IS forcing across the northern boundary providing the second largest contribution. During the second extreme event (July 15-August 5), the IS forcing from the eastern boundary plays a dominant role in driving the southward retreat and northward advance of the subtropical front, causing another heavy rainfall over the YRB and South China. The western and northern IS forcing also has large contributions to the second extreme event. We have estimated the contributions to the seasonal anomalous rainfall by the three types of forcing. The SY forcing tends to have a moderate effect on the YRB

  19. Long-Term Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as Bridging Strategies to Lung Transplantation in Rapidly Devastating Isolated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Oliviero; Moscatelli, Andrea; Conte, Massimo; Grasso, Chiara; Magnano, Gian Michele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Martelli, Alberto; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2016-05-01

    Isolated pulmonary involvement in pediatric Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is extremely rare. While the multisystem-LCH course varies from spontaneous remission to rapid deterioration with lethal outcome, single system involvement is generally associated with favorable prognosis. A child with isolated pulmonary LCH had an extremely rapid progression leading to respiratory failure, despite treatment with prednisone and vinblastine. Since lung hyperinflation and cystic degeneration contraindicated conventional mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was chosen for 50 days as a bridge to lung transplantation. The mechanisms involved in disease progression and the usefulness of long-term ECMO are discussed. PMID:26840616

  20. Design for a Superconductor Discovery Engine (SCODEngine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O. Paul

    2010-03-01

    One of the grand challenges of superconductivity is achieving a paradigm shift from discovery by serendipity to discovery by design. Periodic Table-based Maps that involve electronegativity, valence electrons and atomic number that correlate with superconducting transition temperature can be used to design novel superconductors. Combining these maps with experimental databases on superconductors, databases of crystal structures and integrating material design software engine, we can re-design many known superconductor families and predict novel systems. By adding search engine technology with a ``knowledge discovery engine'', we produce a superconductor discovery engine (SCODEngine). The SCODEngine enables us to discover novel superconductors with the accelerated speed of a Google search. We have produced a primitive SCODEngine that may revolutionize novel superconductor search and discovery.

  1. NASA Discovery Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review concepts for Discover-class missions that would follow the first two missions (MESUR-Pathfinder and NEAR) of this new program. The concepts had been generated by scientists involved in NASA's Solar System Exploration Program to carry out scientifically important investigations within strict guidelines -- $150 million cap on development cost and 3 year cap on development schedule. Like the Astrophysics Small Explorers (SMEX), such 'faster and cheaper' missions could provide vitality to solar system exploration research by returning high quality data more frequently and regularly and by involving many more young researchers than normally participate directly in larger missions. An announcement of opportunity (AO) to propose a Discovery mission to NASA is expected to be released in about two years time. One purpose of the workshop was to assist Code SL in deciding how to allocate its advanced programs resources. A second, complimentary purpose was to provide the concept proposers with feedback to allow them to better prepare for the AO.

  2. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology – due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented – by preventing malaria or early EBV infection – were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world’s poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  3. The discovery of the structure of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, G. L.

    2003-04-01

    On 25 April 1953, Nature published a letter by Francis Crick and James Watson, at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, proposing a structure for DNA. This letter marked the beginning of a revolution in biology. Besides Crick and Watson, two other scientists, Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, played key roles in the discovery. After sketching the early careers of the four scientists, the present article gives an account of the physics and chemistry involved in the discovery, and the events leading up to it.

  4. STS-92 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Viewed from across the waters of Banana Creek, clouds of smoke and steam are illuminated by the flames from Space Shuttle Discovery'''s perfect on-time launch at 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery carries a crew of seven on a construction flight to the International Space Station. Discovery also carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Discovery'''s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  5. Computational drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Si-sheng; Lu, Jun-yan; Kong, Xiang-qian; Liang, Zhong-jie; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang

    2012-01-01

    Computational drug discovery is an effective strategy for accelerating and economizing drug discovery and development process. Because of the dramatic increase in the availability of biological macromolecule and small molecule information, the applicability of computational drug discovery has been extended and broadly applied to nearly every stage in the drug discovery and development workflow, including target identification and validation, lead discovery and optimization and preclinical tests. Over the past decades, computational drug discovery methods such as molecular docking, pharmacophore modeling and mapping, de novo design, molecular similarity calculation and sequence-based virtual screening have been greatly improved. In this review, we present an overview of these important computational methods, platforms and successful applications in this field. PMID:22922346

  6. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. PMID:27470984

  7. Discovery and Classification in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2013-10-01

    Preface; Abbreviations; Introduction: the natural history of the heavens and the natural history of discovery; Part I. Entrée: 1. The Pluto affair; Part II. Narratives of Discovery: 2. Moons, rings, and asteroids: discovery in the realm of the planets; 3. In Herschel's gardens: nebulous discoveries in the realm of the stars; 4. Dwarfs, giants, and planets (again!): the discovery of the stars themselves; 5. Galaxies, quasars, and clusters: discovery in the realm of the galaxies; Part III. Patterns of Discovery: 6. The structure of discovery; 7. The varieties of discovery; 8. Discovery and classification; Part IV. Drivers of Discovery: 9. Technology and theory as drivers of discovery; Part V. The Synthesis of Discovery: 10. Luxuriant gardens and the master narrative; 11. The meaning of discovery; Appendix I; Appendix II.

  8. Decades of Discovery

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    2011-06-01

    For the past two-and-a-half decades, the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy has been at the forefront of scientific discovery. Over 100 important discoveries supported by the Office of Science are represented in this document.

  9. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  10. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  11. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  12. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part I: decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-09-01

    Making decisions for a patient affected by sudden devastating illness or injury traumatizes a patient's family and loved ones. Even in the absence of an emergency, surrogates making end-of-life treatment decisions may experience negative emotional effects. Helping surrogates with these end-of-life decisions under emergent conditions requires the emergency physician (EP) to be clear, making medical recommendations with sensitivity. This model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events comprises the following steps: 1) determine the patient's decision-making capacity; 2) identify the legal surrogate; 3) elicit patient values as expressed in completed advance directives; 4) determine patient/surrogate understanding of the life-limiting event and expectant treatment goals; 5) convey physician understanding of the event, including prognosis, treatment options, and recommendation; 6) share decisions regarding withdrawing or withholding of resuscitative efforts, using available resources and considering options for organ donation; and 7) revise treatment goals as needed. Emergency physicians should break bad news compassionately, yet sufficiently, so that surrogate and family understand both the gravity of the situation and the lack of long-term benefit of continued life-sustaining interventions. EPs should also help the surrogate and family understand that palliative care addresses comfort needs of the patient including adequate treatment for pain, dyspnea, or anxiety. Part I of this communications model reviews determination of decision-making capacity, surrogacy laws, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps; Part II (which will appear in a future issue of AEM) covers communication moving from resuscitative to end-of-life and palliative treatment. EPs should recognize acute devastating illness or injuries, when appropriate, as opportunities to initiate end-of-life discussions and to

  13. Scientific Discoveries: What Is Required for Lasting Impact.

    PubMed

    Lømo, Terje

    2016-01-01

    I have been involved in two scientific discoveries of some impact. One is the discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP), the phenomenon that brief, high-frequency impulse activity at synapses in the brain can lead to long-lasting increases in their efficiency of transmission. This finding demonstrated that synapses are plastic, a property thought to be necessary for learning and memory. The other discovery is that nerve-evoked muscle impulse activity, rather than putative trophic factors, controls the properties of muscle fibers. Here I describe how these two discoveries were made, the unexpected difficulties of reproducing the first discovery, and the controversies that followed the second discovery. I discuss why the first discovery took many years to become generally recognized, whereas the second caused an immediate sensation and entered textbooks and major reviews but is now largely forgotten. In the long run, discovering a new phenomenon has greater impact than falsifying a popular hypothesis. PMID:26273911

  14. Worldwide Discoveries Help People Everywhere

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Worldwide Discoveries Help People Everywhere Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... shows examples of discoveries and their impact. Diseases Discoveries The Benefits for All Americans Huntington's Disease Venezuela— ...

  15. Purposive discovery of operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Michael H.; Bresina, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The Generate, Prune & Prove (GPP) methodology for discovering definitions of mathematical operators is introduced. GPP is a task within the IL exploration discovery system. We developed GPP for use in the discovery of mathematical operators with a wider class of representations than was possible with the previous methods by Lenat and by Shen. GPP utilizes the purpose for which an operator is created to prune the possible definitions. The relevant search spaces are immense and there exists insufficient information for a complete evaluation of the purpose constraint, so it is necessary to perform a partial evaluation of the purpose (i.e., pruning) constraint. The constraint is first transformed so that it is operational with respect to the partial information, and then it is applied to examples in order to test the generated candidates for an operator's definition. In the GPP process, once a candidate definition survives this empirical prune, it is passed on to a theorem prover for formal verification. We describe the application of this methodology to the (re)discovery of the definition of multiplication for Conway numbers, a discovery which is difficult for human mathematicians. We successfully model this discovery process utilizing information which was reasonably available at the time of Conway's original discovery. As part of this discovery process, we reduce the size of the search space from a computationally intractable size to 3468 elements.

  16. Viral surveillance and discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

    2014-01-01

    The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

  17. A matched case-control study of toxoplasmosis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: still a devastating complication.

    PubMed

    Conrad, A; Le Maréchal, M; Dupont, D; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Balsat, M; Labussière-Wallet, H; Barraco, F; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Gilis, L; Chidiac, C; Ferry, T; Wallet, F; Rabodonirina, M; Salles, G; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis (TXP) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Little is known about the risk factors and there is no consensus on prophylactic measures. To investigate the risk factors, we conducted a single-centre, retrospective matched case-control study among adults who underwent AHSCT from January 2006 to March 2015 in our hospital. TXP cases were identified from the prospectively maintained hospital's database. The 1:2 control population consisted of the two patients who received an AHSCT immediately before and after each case with similar donor relationship (related, unrelated) but who did not develop TXP. Risk factors were identified by conditional logistic regression. Clinical features and outcome of TXP were examined. Twenty-three (3.9%) cases of TXP (20 diseases, three infections) were identified among 588 AHSCT recipients. Twenty (87%) cases had a positive pre-transplant Toxoplasma gondii serology. In comparison with 46 matched control patients, risk factors were the absence of effective anti-Toxoplasma prophylaxis (odds ratio (OR) 11.95; 95% CI 3.04-46.88; p <0.001), high-grade (III-IV) acute graft-versus-host-disease (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.04-9.23; p 0.042) and receipt of the tumour necrosis factor-α blocker etanercept (OR 12.02; 95% CI 1.33-108.6; p 0.027). Mortality attributable to TXP was 43.5% (n = 10). Non-relapse mortality rates during the study period of cases and controls were 69.6% (n = 16) and 17.4% (n = 8), respectively. Lung involvement was the dominant clinical feature (n = 14). Two cases were associated with graft failure, one preceded by haemophagocytic syndrome. Given TXP-related morbidity and attributable mortality, anti-Toxoplasma prophylaxis is essential for optimized management of seropositive AHSCT recipients. PMID:27172809

  18. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.; Dean, F.F.

    1997-02-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  19. Discovery Touches Down!

    NASA Video Gallery

    Discovery has completed its final mission, STS-133, for NASA's Space Shuttle Program landing on-time at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:57 a.m. EST, March 9, 2011 after 202 orbits around Eart...

  20. NASA's Discovery Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kicza, Mary; Bruegge, Richard Vorder

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Program represents an new era in planetary exploration. Discovery's primary goal: to maintain U.S. scientific leadership in planetary research by conducting a series of highly focused, cost effective missions to answer critical questions in solar system science. The Program will stimulate the development of innovative management approaches by encouraging new teaming arrangements among industry, universities and the government. The program encourages the prudent use of new technologies to enable/enhance science return and to reduce life cycle cost, and it supports the transfer of these technologies to the private sector for secondary applications. The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous and Mars Pathfinder missions have been selected as the first two Discovery missions. Both will be launched in 1996. Subsequent, competitively selected missions will be conceived and proposed to NASA by teams of scientists and engineers from industry, academia, and government organizations. This paper summarizes the status of Discovery Program planning.

  1. Toxins and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. PMID:25448391

  2. The Discovery of Noggin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses recently published work that appears to have many of the answers to the question of how the nervous system develops. Focuses on the discovery of what is believed to be neural inducer, a protein called noggin. (LZ)

  3. Implementing a Discovery Layer: A Rookie's Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Noah; Leach-Murray, Susan; Parker, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The year 2011 was the PALNI (Private Academic Library Network of Indiana) consortium's "rookie season" for the implementation of Primo, the 2010 Discovery Layer 500 race winner. In this article, the authors report on their transition to the cloud within Ex Libris Ltd.'s Primo TotalCare environment: their preparation, the steps involved to move to…

  4. The Discovery of Insulin: A Case Study of Scientific Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of scientific research sometimes involves a trial-and-error procedure. Popular reviews of successful results from this approach often sanitize the story by omitting unsuccessful trials, thus painting the rosy impression that research simply follows a direct route from hypothesis to experiment to scientific discovery. The discovery of…

  5. Metabolic Disturbances in Diseases with Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Schuck, Patrícia F.; Wenk, Gary L.; Ferreira, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses. PMID:25110608

  6. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  7. A Decade of Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a fascinating account of some of the most significant scientific discoveries and technological innovations coming out of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories. This remarkable book illustrates how the men and women of the National Laboratories are keeping us on the cutting edge. Though few Americans are familiar with the scope and scale of the work conducted at these National Laboratories, their research is literally changing our lives and bettering our planet. The book describes the scientific discoveries and technological advancements "in recognition of the men and women working in DOE's seventeen national laboratories across the country." Through highly vivid and accessible stories, this book details recent breakthroughs in three critical areas: 1) Energy and Environment, 2) National Security and 3) Life and Physical Science. The book illustrates how this government-funded research has resulted in more energy-efficient buildings; new, cleaner alternative fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; safer, more efficient, nuclear power plants; improved responses to disease outbreaks; more secure and streamlined airport security; more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases; and astonishing discoveries that are altering our understanding of the universe and enabling scientific breakthroughs in fields such as nanotechnology and particle physics. Specifically, it contains 37 stories. A Decade of Discovery is truly a recent history of discovery - and a fascinating look at what the next decade holds.

  8. DB DISCOVERY. Discovery Programs for SBH Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, A.

    1992-12-01

    DB DISCOVERY is a suite of programs for analyzing results of SBH experiments and for discovering patterns and correlations with the existing sequence data. The bundles of data that are analyzed as a unit are prepared by DB EXP ASSEMBLY programs. The DB DISCOVERY programs are written in the UNIX shell style and execute in the context of the database. The data in the database are accessed through the Sybase db-library. The programs are typically combined in UNIX shell scripts which perform particular data analysis tasks. The suite consists of the DBB, DBC, DBE, DBF, DBG, DBH programs, and an improved version of the SMPL program which is also part of the PYTHIA suite. DBB, DBC, and DBD are used to generate desired clone signatures, which consist either of hybridiztion intensities or a partial sequence. DBE discovers groups of similar clones based on their signatures. DBG, DBH, and DBF are used for analyzing the clustering information, comparing different groupings of clones, and for clustering error correction information. The improved version of SMPL compares partial sequences with known DNA sequences in order to identify already-sequenced clones and possible sequence similarities with sequenced DNA.

  9. Discovery of Charm

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Goldhaber, G.

    1984-11-01

    In my talk I will cover the period 1973 to 1976 which saw the discoveries of the J/psi and psi' resonances and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the tau lepton and the D0030099,D0015599 charmed meson doublet. Occasionally I will refer briefly to more recent results. Since this conference is on the history of the weak-interactions I will deal primarily with the properties of naked charm and in particular the weakly decaying doublet of charmed mesons. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or MARK I which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976.

  10. Scientific Discovery for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul; Quarless, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The scientific discovery process comes alive for 70 minority students each year at Uniondale High School in New York where students have won top awards for "in-house" projects. Uniondale High School is in a middle-income school district where over 95% of students are from minority groups. Founded in 2000, the Uniondale High School Research Program…

  11. The Discovery of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a model for explaining the spread of human population explosion on North American continent since its discovery 12,000 years ago. The model may help to map the spread of Homo sapiens throughout the New World by using the extinction chronology of the Pleistocene megafauna. (Author/PS)

  12. The Discovery Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    At the Center for Discovery (The Center), a private, non-profit agency 80 miles northwest of New York City in the Catskill Mountains, children are growing and learning at their own pace, in their own way, with careful attention focused on communication and social/emotional development. Children with autism are being educated to be social beings,…

  13. Birds. Nature Discovery I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sally F.

    The birds of New England and their particular habitats are explored in this guide which is part of a series of Nature Discovery publications. The materials are designed to directly supplement the natural science curricula and to complement other subject areas including social studies, language arts, music, and art. The program is designed for…

  14. Historian's Discovery of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frijhoff, Willem

    2012-01-01

    The "discovery of childhood" is a tricky notion because childhood is as much a fact of a biological and psychological nature as a cultural notion that through the centuries has been the object of changing perceptions, definitions, and images. Children barely speak in history; virtually everything we know about them is mediated by adults. Then how…

  15. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  16. STS-85 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Blasting through the hazy late morning sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery soars from Launch Pad 39A at 10:41 a.m. EDT Aug. 7 on the 11-day STS-85 mission. Aboard Discovery are Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr.; Pilot Kent V. Rominger, Payload Commander N. Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason, a Canadian Space Agency astronaut . The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2) free-flyer. The CRISTA-SPAS-2 will be deployed on flight day 1 to study trace gases in the Earths atmosphere as a part of NASAs Mission to Planet Earth program. Also aboard the free-flying research platform will be the Middle Atmosphere High Resolution Spectrograph Instrument (MAHRSI). Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), a Japanese Space Agency-sponsored experiment. Also in Discoverys payload bay are the Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments.

  17. COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158852.html COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment Study may help pinpoint ... will progress, a discovery they believe could improve COPD treatment. Their research might help doctors determine which ...

  18. The Discovery Method in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belbin, R. M.

    In the form of a discussion between faceless people, this booklet concerns discovery learning and its advantages. Subjects covered in the discussions are: Introducing the Discovery Method; An Experiment with British Railways; The OECD Research Projects in U.S.A., Austria, and Sweden; How the Discovery Method Differs from Other Methods; Discovery…

  19. Recent Discoveries and Bible Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Discusses recent discoveries for "Bible" translation with a focus on the "Dead Sea Scrolls." Examines recent discoveries that provide direct support for alternative reading of biblical passages and those discoveries that have contributed additional insight to knowledge of cultural practices, especially legal and religious practices. (DB)

  20. The Discovery and Development of a Novel Vaccine to Protect against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Gary W; Jones, Thomas R; Liberator, Paul; Hao, Li; Harris, Shannon; McNeil, Lisa K; Zhu, Duzhang; Perez, John; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have had a major impact on the reduction of many diseases globally. Vaccines targeted against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) due to serogroups A, C, W, and Y are used to prevent these diseases. Until recently no vaccine had been identified that could confer broad protection against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB). MnB causes IMD in the very young, adolescents and young adults and thus represents a significant unmet medical need. In this brief review, we describe the discovery and development of a vaccine that has the potential for broad protection against this devastating disease. PMID:25483509

  1. Discovery of Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Erin; Thoennessen, Michael

    2011-10-01

    To date, no comprehensive study has been undertaken regarding the initial detection and identification of isotopes. At NSCL, a project has been initiated to catalog and report the initial observation of every isotope. The conditions characterizing the successful discovery of an isotope include a clear and unambiguous mass and element identification through decay curves, mass spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectra, and/or relationships to other isotopes, as well as the publication of such findings in a refereed journal. I will present the documentation for eight elements: cesium, lanthanum, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium. The year and author of each initial publication along with the location and methods of production and identification will be shown. A summary and overview of all ~3000 isotopes documented so far as a function of discovery year, method and place will also be presented.

  2. Challenges of Antibacterial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The discovery of novel small-molecule antibacterial drugs has been stalled for many years. The purpose of this review is to underscore and illustrate those scientific problems unique to the discovery and optimization of novel antibacterial agents that have adversely affected the output of the effort. The major challenges fall into two areas: (i) proper target selection, particularly the necessity of pursuing molecular targets that are not prone to rapid resistance development, and (ii) improvement of chemical libraries to overcome limitations of diversity, especially that which is necessary to overcome barriers to bacterial entry and proclivity to be effluxed, especially in Gram-negative organisms. Failure to address these problems has led to a great deal of misdirected effort. PMID:21233508

  3. Recommendation Knowledge Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, David; Stretch, Christopher

    Recently we presented a novel approach to the discovery of recommendation rules from a product case base that take account of all features of a recommended product, including those with respect to which the user's preferences are unknown. In this paper, we investigate the potential role of default preferences in the discovery of recommendation rules. As we show in the domain of digital cameras, the potential benefits include a dramatic reduction in the effective length of the discovered rules and increased coverage of queries representing the user's personal preferences. Another important finding of the research presented is that in a recommender system that takes account of default preferences, many of the products in the case base may never be recommended.

  4. Discovery concepts for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Nagy, A. F.; Jakosky, B. M.; Barth, C. A.; Waite, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Two focused Mars missions that would fit within the guidelines for the proposed Discovery line are discussed. The first mission would deal with the issue of the escape of the atmosphere (Mars') to space. A complete understanding of this topic is crucial to deciphering the evolution of the atmosphere, climate change, and volatile inventories. The second mission concerns the investigation of remanent magnetization of the crust and its relationship to the ionosphere and the atmosphere.

  5. Discovery management workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Two dozen participants assembled under the direction of the NASA Solar System Exploration Division (SEED) April 13-15, 1993. Participants supported the goals of cheaper and faster solar system exploration. The workshop concluded that the Discovery Program concept and goals are viable. Management concerns are articulated in the final report. Appendix A includes lists of participants in alphabetical order, by functional area, and by organization type. Appendix B includes the agenda for the meeting.

  6. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  7. Discoveries in Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindjee; Beatty, J. T.; Gest, H.; Allen, J. F.

    "Life Is Bottled Sunshine" [Wynwood Reade, Martyrdom of Man, 1924]. This inspired phrase is a four-word summary of the significance of photosynthesis for life on earth. The study of photosynthesis has attracted the attention of a legion of biologists, biochemists, chemists and physicists for over 200 years. Discoveries in Photosynthesis presents a sweeping overview of the history of photosynthesis investigations, and detailed accounts of research progress in all aspects of the most complex bioenergetic process in living organisms.

  8. The language of discovery.

    PubMed

    Souba, Wiley

    2011-01-01

    Discovery, as a public attribution, and discovering, the act of conducting research, are experiences that entail "languaging" the unknown. This distinguishing property of language - its ability to bring forth, out of the unspoken realm, new knowledge, original ideas, and novel thinking - is essential to the discovery process. In sharing their ideas and views, scientists create co-negotiated linguistic distinctions that prompt the revision of established mental maps and the adoption of new ones. While scientific mastery entails command of the conversational domain unique to a specific discipline, there is an emerging conversational domain that must be mastered that goes beyond the language unique to any particular specialty. Mastery of this new conversational domain gives researchers access to their hidden mental maps that limit their ways of thinking about and doing science. The most effective scientists use language to recontextualize their approach to problem-solving, which triggers new insights (previously unavailable) that result in new discoveries. While language is not a replacement for intuition and other means of knowing, when we try to understand what's outside of language we have to use language to do so. PMID:21688238

  9. The language of discovery

    PubMed Central

    Souba, Wiley

    2011-01-01

    Discovery, as a public attribution, and discovering, the act of conducting research, are experiences that entail “languaging” the unknown. This distinguishing property of language ‐ its ability to bring forth, out of the unspoken realm, new knowledge, original ideas, and novel thinking – is essential to the discovery process. In sharing their ideas and views, scientists create co‐negotiated linguistic distinctions that prompt the revision of established mental maps and the adoption of new ones. While scientific mastery entails command of the conversational domain unique to a specific discipline, there is an emerging conversational domain that must be mastered that goes beyond the language unique to any particular specialty. Mastery of this new conversational domain gives researchers access to their hidden mental maps that limit their ways of thinking about and doing science. The most effective scientists use language to recontextualize their approach to problem‐solving, which triggers new insights (previously unavailable) that result in new discoveries. While language is not a replacement for intuition and other means of knowing, when we try to understand what’s outside of language we have to use language to do so. PMID:21688238

  10. Component architecture in drug discovery informatics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter M

    2002-05-01

    This paper reviews the characteristics of a new model of computing that has been spurred on by the Internet, known as Netcentric computing. Developments in this model led to distributed component architectures, which, although not new ideas, are now realizable with modern tools such as Enterprise Java. The application of this approach to scientific computing, particularly in pharmaceutical discovery research, is discussed and highlighted by a particular case involving the management of biological assay data. PMID:12058611

  11. An Extended Model for E-Discovery Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, David

    Most models created for electronic discovery (e-discovery) in legal proceedings tend to ignore the technical aspects mainly because they assume that only traditional digital forensic tasks are involved. However, this assumption is incorrect. The time frames for conducting e-discovery procedures are very restricted, and investigations are carried out in real time with strict non-disclosure dispositions and changing demands as the cases unfold. This paper presents an augmented model and architecture for e-discovery designed to cope with the technological complexities in real-world scenarios. It also discusses how e-discovery operations should be handled to ensure cooperation between digital forensic professionals and legal teams while guaranteeing that non-disclosure agreements and information confidentiality are preserved.

  12. 14 CFR 406.143 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 406.143 Section 406.143... Transportation Adjudications § 406.143 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery... after a complaint has been filed. (b) Methods of discovery. The following methods of discovery...

  13. 5 CFR 1201.73 - Discovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery procedures. 1201.73 Section... AND PROCEDURES Procedures for Appellate Cases Discovery § 1201.73 Discovery procedures. (a) Initiating discovery. A party seeking discovery must start the process by serving a request for discovery on...

  14. 14 CFR 406.143 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 406.143 Section 406.143... Transportation Adjudications § 406.143 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery... after a complaint has been filed. (b) Methods of discovery. The following methods of discovery...

  15. 14 CFR 406.143 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 406.143 Section 406.143... Transportation Adjudications § 406.143 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery... after a complaint has been filed. (b) Methods of discovery. The following methods of discovery...

  16. The Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Sebring, T. A.; Smith, B. W.; de Kock, M.; Wiecha, O.

    2004-11-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2-m telescope to be built at a new site near Happy Jack, Arizona. The DCT features a large prime focus mosaic CCD camera with a 2-degree-diameter field of view especially designed for surveys of KBOs, Centaurs, NEAs and other moving or time-variable targets. The telescope can be switched quickly to a Ritchey-Chretien configuration for optical/IR spectroscopy or near-IR imaging. This flexibility allows timely follow-up physical studies of high priority objects discovered in survey mode. The ULE (ultra-low-expansion) meniscus primary and secondary mirror blanks for the telescope are currently in fabrication by Corning Glass. Goodrich Aerospace, Vertex RSI, M3 Engineering and Technology Corp., and e2v Technologies have recently completed in-depth conceptual design studies of the optics, mount, enclosure, and mosaic focal plane, respectively. The results of these studies were subjected to a formal design review in July, 2004. Site testing at the 7760-ft altitude Happy Jack site began in 2001. Differential image motion observations from 117 nights since January 1, 2003 gave median seeing of 0.84 arcsec FWHM, and the average of the first quartile was 0.62 arcsec. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for securing long-term access to this site on the Coconino National Forest is nearing completion and ground breaking is expected in the spring of 2005. The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately undertaken with the DCT. An additional partner can be accommodated in the project. Interested parties should contact the lead author.

  17. Drug discovery: new models for industry-academic partnerships.

    PubMed

    Tralau-Stewart, Cathy J; Wyatt, Colin A; Kleyn, Dominique E; Ayad, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The re-focusing of pharmaceutical industry research away from early discovery activities is stimulating the development of novel models of drug discovery, notably involving academia as a 'front end'. In this article the authors explore the drivers of change, the role of new entrants (universities with specialised core facilities) and novel partnership models. If they are to be sustainable and deliver, these new models must be flexible and properly funded by industry or public funding, rewarding all partners for contributions. The introduction of an industry-like process and experienced management teams signals a revolution in discovery that benefits society by improving the value gained from publicly funded research. PMID:18992364

  18. Drug discovery in jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Despite striking advances in the biomedical sciences, the flow of new drugs has slowed to a trickle, impairing therapeutic advances as well as the commercial success of drug companies. Reduced productivity in the drug industry is caused mainly by corporate policies that discourage innovation. This is compounded by various consequences of mega-mergers, the obsession for blockbuster drugs, the shift of control of research from scientists to marketers, the need for fast sales growth, and the discontinuation of development compounds for nontechnical reasons. Lessons from the past indicate that these problems can be overcome, and herein, new and improved directions for drug discovery are suggested. PMID:17080187

  19. Efficient exact motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Tobias; Rahmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding over-represented patterns in a collection of biosequences. It is one of the classical sequence analysis problems, but still has not been satisfactorily solved in an exact and efficient manner. This is partly due to the large number of possibilities of defining the motif search space and the notion of over-representation. Even for well-defined formalizations, the problem is frequently solved in an ad hoc manner with heuristics that do not guarantee to find the best motif. Results: We show how to solve the motif discovery problem (almost) exactly on a practically relevant space of IUPAC generalized string patterns, using the p-value with respect to an i.i.d. model or a Markov model as the measure of over-representation. In particular, (i) we use a highly accurate compound Poisson approximation for the null distribution of the number of motif occurrences. We show how to compute the exact clump size distribution using a recently introduced device called probabilistic arithmetic automaton (PAA). (ii) We define two p-value scores for over-representation, the first one based on the total number of motif occurrences, the second one based on the number of sequences in a collection with at least one occurrence. (iii) We describe an algorithm to discover the optimal pattern with respect to either of the scores. The method exploits monotonicity properties of the compound Poisson approximation and is by orders of magnitude faster than exhaustive enumeration of IUPAC strings (11.8 h compared with an extrapolated runtime of 4.8 years). (iv) We justify the use of the proposed scores for motif discovery by showing our method to outperform other motif discovery algorithms (e.g. MEME, Weeder) on benchmark datasets. We also propose new motifs on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Availability and Implementation: The method has been implemented in Java. It can be obtained from http://ls11-www

  20. [The discovery of insulin].

    PubMed

    Lestradet, H

    1996-02-01

    When a medical problem is intensively studied by many teams in the world, it is frequent to see the solution found simultaneously in different countries. However that was not exactly the case concerning the extraction of a potent insulin able to cure Diabetes Mellitus. It seems necessary, seventy five years later, when passions are quenched, to reconsider the chronology of the history and put Paolesco but also Collip at the right places much before Banting and Best to whom, by a curious misinterpretation of facts, was attributed the priority of this fundamental discovery. PMID:8705382

  1. Research Discoveries After Kubin

    PubMed Central

    Vensko, Nancy W.; Ferguson, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will discuss commercializing discoveries made at research organizations, particularly with a view to the In re Kubin case, decided April 3, 2009, by the Federal Circuit. Here, the existence of a general method of isolating DNA molecules was held to be relevant to the question whether the DNA molecules themselves would have been obvious under § 103 of the patent act. How are DNA inventions patented anyway? What does it take for academic research to reach patients? How might the decision of In re Kubin effect research commercialization and technology transfer? PMID:20543971

  2. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  3. STS-82 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. 'Joe' Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission.

  4. Network discovery with DCM

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Li, Baojuan; Daunizeau, Jean; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about inferring or discovering the functional architecture of distributed systems using Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM). We describe a scheme that recovers the (dynamic) Bayesian dependency graph (connections in a network) using observed network activity. This network discovery uses Bayesian model selection to identify the sparsity structure (absence of edges or connections) in a graph that best explains observed time-series. The implicit adjacency matrix specifies the form of the network (e.g., cyclic or acyclic) and its graph-theoretical attributes (e.g., degree distribution). The scheme is illustrated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series to discover functional brain networks. Crucially, it can be applied to experimentally evoked responses (activation studies) or endogenous activity in task-free (resting state) fMRI studies. Unlike conventional approaches to network discovery, DCM permits the analysis of directed and cyclic graphs. Furthermore, it eschews (implausible) Markovian assumptions about the serial independence of random fluctuations. The scheme furnishes a network description of distributed activity in the brain that is optimal in the sense of having the greatest conditional probability, relative to other networks. The networks are characterised in terms of their connectivity or adjacency matrices and conditional distributions over the directed (and reciprocal) effective connectivity between connected nodes or regions. We envisage that this approach will provide a useful complement to current analyses of functional connectivity for both activation and resting-state studies. PMID:21182971

  5. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  6. Network discovery with DCM.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl J; Li, Baojuan; Daunizeau, Jean; Stephan, Klaas E

    2011-06-01

    This paper is about inferring or discovering the functional architecture of distributed systems using Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM). We describe a scheme that recovers the (dynamic) Bayesian dependency graph (connections in a network) using observed network activity. This network discovery uses Bayesian model selection to identify the sparsity structure (absence of edges or connections) in a graph that best explains observed time-series. The implicit adjacency matrix specifies the form of the network (e.g., cyclic or acyclic) and its graph-theoretical attributes (e.g., degree distribution). The scheme is illustrated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series to discover functional brain networks. Crucially, it can be applied to experimentally evoked responses (activation studies) or endogenous activity in task-free (resting state) fMRI studies. Unlike conventional approaches to network discovery, DCM permits the analysis of directed and cyclic graphs. Furthermore, it eschews (implausible) Markovian assumptions about the serial independence of random fluctuations. The scheme furnishes a network description of distributed activity in the brain that is optimal in the sense of having the greatest conditional probability, relative to other networks. The networks are characterised in terms of their connectivity or adjacency matrices and conditional distributions over the directed (and reciprocal) effective connectivity between connected nodes or regions. We envisage that this approach will provide a useful complement to current analyses of functional connectivity for both activation and resting-state studies. PMID:21182971

  7. Causality discovery technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Ertl, T.; Jirotka, M.; Trefethen, A.; Schmidt, A.; Coecke, B.; Bañares-Alcántara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Causality is the fabric of our dynamic world. We all make frequent attempts to reason causation relationships of everyday events (e.g., what was the cause of my headache, or what has upset Alice?). We attempt to manage causality all the time through planning and scheduling. The greatest scientific discoveries are usually about causality (e.g., Newton found the cause for an apple to fall, and Darwin discovered natural selection). Meanwhile, we continue to seek a comprehensive understanding about the causes of numerous complex phenomena, such as social divisions, economic crisis, global warming, home-grown terrorism, etc. Humans analyse and reason causality based on observation, experimentation and acquired a priori knowledge. Today's technologies enable us to make observations and carry out experiments in an unprecedented scale that has created data mountains everywhere. Whereas there are exciting opportunities to discover new causation relationships, there are also unparalleled challenges to benefit from such data mountains. In this article, we present a case for developing a new piece of ICT, called Causality Discovery Technology. We reason about the necessity, feasibility and potential impact of such a technology.

  8. Discovery and Classification in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades after Martin Harwit's pioneering Cosmic Discovery (1981), and following on the recent IAU Symposium "Accelerating the Rate of Astronomical Discovery,” we have revisited the problem of discovery in astronomy, emphasizing new classes of objects. 82 such classes have been identified and analyzed, including 22 in the realm of the planets, 36 in the realm of the stars, and 24 in the realm of the galaxies. We find an extended structure of discovery, consisting of detection, interpretation and understanding, each with its own nuances and a microstructure including conceptual, technological and social roles. This is true with a remarkable degree of consistency over the last 400 years of telescopic astronomy, ranging from Galileo's discovery of satellites, planetary rings and star clusters, to the discovery of quasars and pulsars. Telescopes have served as "engines of discovery” in several ways, ranging from telescope size and sensitivity (planetary nebulae and spiral galaxies), to specialized detectors (TNOs) and the opening of the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomy (pulsars, pulsar planets, and most active galaxies). A few classes (radiation belts, the solar wind and cosmic rays), were initially discovered without the telescope. Classification also plays an important role in discovery. While it might seem that classification marks the end of discovery, or a post-discovery phase, in fact it often marks the beginning, even a pre-discovery phase. Nowhere is this more clearly seen than in the classification of stellar spectra, long before dwarfs, giants and supergiants were known, or their evolutionary sequence recognized. Classification may also be part of a post-discovery phase, as in the MK system of stellar classification, constructed after the discovery of stellar luminosity classes. Some classes are declared rather than discovered, as in the case of gas and ice giant planets, and, infamously, Pluto as a dwarf planet.

  9. High Tc: The Discovery of RBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. W.

    2007-03-01

    It was said by Emerson that ``there is no history; there is only biography.'' This is especially true when the events are recounted by a person who, himself, has been heavily involved and the line between history and autobiography can become blurred. However, it is reasonable to say that discovery itself is not a series of accidents but an inevitable product of each development stage of scientific knowledge as was also pointed out by Holden et al. (1) The discovery of RBCO (2,3) with R = Y, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu is no exception. In this presentation, I will briefly recount several events that were crucial to the discovery of RBCO: those before 1986 (4) that sowed the seeds in our group important to our later high temperature superconductivity effort; those in 1986 (5) that were critical to our discovery of the 93 K RBCO soon after the discovery of the 35 K high temperature superconductor by M"uller and Bednorz (6); and those in 1987 when the barrier of the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature of 77 K was finally conquered. 1. G. J. Holton et al., American Scientist 84, 364 (1996). 2. M. K. Wu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 908 (1987). 3. P. H. Hor et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1891 (1987). 4. C. W. Chu et al., S. S. Comm. 18, 977 (1976); C. W. Chu and V. Diatchenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 572 (1978); T. H. Lin et al., Phys. Rev. B(RC) 29, 1493 (1984); J. H. Lin et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 58, 363 (1985). 5. C. W. Chu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 405 (1987); C. W. Chu et al., Science 235, 567 (1987). 6. J. G. Bednorz and K. A. M"uller, Z. Phys. B64, 189 (1986).

  10. Prepared to react? Assessing the functional capacity of the primary health care system in rural Orissa, India to respond to the devastating flood of September 2008

    PubMed Central

    Phalkey, Revati; Dash, Shisir R.; Mukhopadhyay, Alok; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; Marx, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Early detection of an impending flood and the availability of countermeasures to deal with it can significantly reduce its health impacts. In developing countries like India, public primary health care facilities are frontline organizations that deal with disasters particularly in rural settings. For developing robust counter reacting systems evaluating preparedness capacities within existing systems becomes necessary. Objective The objective of the study is to assess the functional capacity of the primary health care system in Jagatsinghpur district of rural Orissa in India to respond to the devastating flood of September 2008. Methods An onsite survey was conducted in all 29 primary and secondary facilities in five rural blocks (administrative units) of Jagatsinghpur district in Orissa state. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was administered face to face in the facilities. The data was entered, processed and analyzed using STATA® 10. Results Data from our primary survey clearly shows that the healthcare facilities are ill prepared to handle the flood despite being faced by them annually. Basic utilities like electricity backup and essential medical supplies are lacking during floods. Lack of human resources along with missing standard operating procedures; pre-identified communication and incident command systems; effective leadership; and weak financial structures are the main hindering factors in mounting an adequate response to the floods. Conclusion The 2008 flood challenged the primary curative and preventive health care services in Jagatsinghpur. Simple steps like developing facility specific preparedness plans which detail out standard operating procedures during floods and identify clear lines of command will go a long way in strengthening the response to future floods. Performance critiques provided by the grass roots workers, like this one, should be used for institutional learning and effective preparedness planning. Additionally each

  11. Optogenetics enlightens neuroscience drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Optogenetics - the use of light and genetics to manipulate and monitor the activities of defined cell populations - has already had a transformative impact on basic neuroscience research. Now, the conceptual and methodological advances associated with optogenetic approaches are providing fresh momentum to neuroscience drug discovery, particularly in areas that are stalled on the concept of 'fixing the brain chemistry'. Optogenetics is beginning to translate and transit into drug discovery in several key domains, including target discovery, high-throughput screening and novel therapeutic approaches to disease states. Here, we discuss the exciting potential of optogenetic technologies to transform neuroscience drug discovery. PMID:26612666

  12. Hubble: 20 Years of Discovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hubble's discoveries have revolutionized nearly all areas of current astronomical research from planetary science to cosmology. Actor and writer Brent Spiner narrates a visual journey back in time ...

  13. Rickets before the discovery of vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, Jeffrey L H; Bijvoet, Olav L M

    2014-01-01

    The story of rickets leading to the discovery of vitamin D is an extraordinary tale, spread over many centuries and involving some remarkable characters with much speculation and a few mysteries, before reaching an exciting climax. It would be wrong to credit a single person as discovering rickets or being the first to describe its features, for reasons that will be set out here. Yet the emergence of the term ‘rickets' is as important as the discovery of vitamin D itself and the possible causes of its deficiency. It permitted identification of a hitherto ill-defined disease entity, typically occurring in infants and children. It also provided a way for deciding if features of diseases that had been described earlier in the history of medicine could be seen as the symptoms and signs of related conditions. PMID:24466409

  14. Discovery of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per

    2013-02-01

    The mysterious invisible radiation that ionized air was studied a century ago by many scientists. Finally, on 7 August 1912, Victor Hess in his seventh balloon flight that year, reached an altitude of about 5000 m. With his electroscopes on board the hydrogen-filled balloon he observed that the ionization instead of decreasing with altitude increased significantly. Hess had discovered cosmic rays, a discovery that gave him the 1936 Nobel Prize in physics. When research resumed after World War I focus was on understanding the nature of the cosmic radiation. Particles or radiation? Positive or negative? Electrons, positrons or protons? Progress came using new instruments like the Geiger-Muller tube and around 1940 it was clear that cosmic rays were mostly protons.

  15. Serendipity in anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hargrave-Thomas, Emily; Yu, Bo; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-01-10

    It was found that the discovery of 5.8% (84/1437) of all drugs on the market involved serendipity. Of these drugs, 31 (2.2%) were discovered following an incident in the laboratory and 53 (3.7%) were discovered in a clinical setting. In addition, 263 (18.3%) of the pharmaceuticals in clinical use today are chemical derivatives of the drugs discovered with the aid of serendipity. Therefore, in total, 24.1% (347/1437) of marketed drugs can be directly traced to serendipitous events confirming the importance of this elusive phenomenon. In the case of anticancer drugs, 35.2% (31/88) can be attributed to a serendipitous event, which is somewhat larger than for all drugs. The therapeutic field that has benefited the most from serendipity are central nervous system active drugs reflecting the difficulty in designing compounds to pass the blood-brain-barrier and the lack of laboratory-based assays for many of the diseases of the mind. PMID:22247822

  16. Serendipity in anticancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave-Thomas, Emily; Yu, Bo; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-01-01

    It was found that the discovery of 5.8% (84/1437) of all drugs on the market involved serendipity. Of these drugs, 31 (2.2%) were discovered following an incident in the laboratory and 53 (3.7%) were discovered in a clinical setting. In addition, 263 (18.3%) of the pharmaceuticals in clinical use today are chemical derivatives of the drugs discovered with the aid of serendipity. Therefore, in total, 24.1% (347/1437) of marketed drugs can be directly traced to serendipitous events confirming the importance of this elusive phenomenon. In the case of anticancer drugs, 35.2% (31/88) can be attributed to a serendipitous event, which is somewhat larger than for all drugs. The therapeutic field that has benefited the most from serendipity are central nervous system active drugs reflecting the difficulty in designing compounds to pass the blood-brain-barrier and the lack of laboratory-based assays for many of the diseases of the mind. PMID:22247822

  17. Biomarkers for kidney involvement in pediatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Rubinstein, Tamar B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN), the renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus, is currently diagnosed by histopathology obtained by percutaneous renal biopsy and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in both adults and children. LN is more prevalent and severe in children, requiring aggressive and prolonged immunosuppression. The consequences of the diagnosis and its treatment have devastating long-term effects on the growth, well-being and quality of life of affected children. The paucity of reliable clinical indicators of the presence and severity of renal involvement have contributed to a halt in the reduction of progression to end-stage renal disease in recent years. Here, we discuss the recent development of biomarkers in the management of LN and their role as therapeutic targets. PMID:26079958

  18. Academic Freedom and Civil Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoornstra, Charles D.; Liethen, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of a university to do research free from undue interference is discussed in light of two court cases: Buchanan vs. American Motors Corp. and Dow Chemical Co. vs. Allen. Their principal significance lies in sparing nonparty researchers from the discovery process notwithstanding the acknowledged breadth of discovery. (MLW)

  19. Discovery Reconceived: Product before Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Dor

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the question, "What exactly about a mathematical concept should students discover, when they study it via discovery learning?", I present and demonstrate an interpretation of discovery pedagogy that attempts to address its criticism. My approach hinges on decoupling the solution process from its resultant product. Whereas theories of…

  20. Self Assessment and Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning in higher education has been reported to be effective in assisting learners to understand difficult concepts and retain long term information. This paper seeks to illustrate how one self assessment model may be used to demonstrate discovery learning in a collaborative atmosphere of students sharing and getting to know each…

  1. Discovery Learning Strategies in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singaravelu, G.

    2012-01-01

    The study substantiates that the effectiveness of Discovery Learning method in learning English Grammar for the learners at standard V. Discovery Learning is particularly beneficial for any student learning a second language. It promotes peer interaction and development of the language and the learning of concepts with content. Reichert and…

  2. Politics, Chemistry, and the Discovery of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Emilie; Settle, Frank A., Jr.

    2001-07-01

    The discovery of fission is an interesting scientific saga involving the fundamentals of chemistry and physics. It is played out in the late 1930s on a European stage. Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn head a cast of characters that include scientific notables Fritz Strassmann, Otto Frisch, James Chadwick, Enrico Fermi, Ida Noddack, Irene Curie, and Neils Bohr. The plot includes the scientific method, the interdependence of chemistry and physics, the influence of external politics, and human frailty. The events surrounding this discovery did not allow the scientists involved to receive equal recognition. Fortunately, the passage of time and extensive historical research are restoring equality.

  3. 4 CFR 28.43 - Compelling discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compelling discovery. 28.43 Section 28.43 Accounts... Procedures Discovery § 28.43 Compelling discovery. (a) Motion for an order compelling discovery. Motions for orders compelling discovery shall be submitted to the administrative judge as set forth at §...

  4. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one...

  5. 39 CFR 963.14 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 963.14 Section 963.14 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.14 Discovery. Discovery is to be conducted on a... such discovery as he or she deems reasonable and necessary. Discovery may include one or more of...

  6. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122... § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  7. 39 CFR 963.14 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 963.14 Section 963.14 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.14 Discovery. Discovery is to be conducted on a... such discovery as he or she deems reasonable and necessary. Discovery may include one or more of...

  8. 37 CFR 42.224 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 42.224 Section 42... Post-Grant Review § 42.224 Discovery. Notwithstanding the discovery provisions of subpart A: (a) Requests for additional discovery may be granted upon a showing of good cause as to why the discovery...

  9. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one...

  10. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one...

  11. 37 CFR 42.224 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 42.224 Section 42... Post-Grant Review § 42.224 Discovery. Notwithstanding the discovery provisions of subpart A: (a) Requests for additional discovery may be granted upon a showing of good cause as to why the discovery...

  12. 24 CFR 180.500 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 180.500 Section 180.500... OPPORTUNITY CONSOLIDATED HUD HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MATTERS Discovery § 180.500 Discovery. (a) In general. This subpart governs discovery in aid of administrative proceedings under this part. Discovery...

  13. 15 CFR 25.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 25.21 Section 25.21... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  14. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service... AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery...

  15. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122... § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  16. 39 CFR 963.14 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery. 963.14 Section 963.14 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.14 Discovery. Discovery is to be conducted on a... such discovery as he or she deems reasonable and necessary. Discovery may include one or more of...

  17. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 185.122 Section 185.122... § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  18. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service... AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery...

  19. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties... § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery... sanctions proceeding. (b) Limitations on discovery. The administrative law judge shall place such...

  20. 24 CFR 180.500 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 180.500 Section 180.500... OPPORTUNITY CONSOLIDATED HUD HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MATTERS Discovery § 180.500 Discovery. (a) In general. This subpart governs discovery in aid of administrative proceedings under this part. Discovery...

  1. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one...

  2. 15 CFR 25.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 25.21 Section 25.21... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  3. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties... § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery... sanctions proceeding. (b) Limitations on discovery. The administrative law judge shall place such...

  4. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties... § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery... sanctions proceeding. (b) Limitations on discovery. The administrative law judge shall place such...

  5. 39 CFR 963.14 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discovery. 963.14 Section 963.14 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.14 Discovery. Discovery is to be conducted on a... such discovery as he or she deems reasonable and necessary. Discovery may include one or more of...

  6. 39 CFR 952.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 952.21 Section 952.21 Postal Service... AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.21 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery...

  7. 24 CFR 180.500 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discovery. 180.500 Section 180.500... OPPORTUNITY CONSOLIDATED HUD HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MATTERS Discovery § 180.500 Discovery. (a) In general. This subpart governs discovery in aid of administrative proceedings under this part. Discovery...

  8. 15 CFR 25.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 25.21 Section 25.21... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for..., discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of discovery....

  9. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one...

  10. 30 CFR 44.24 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 44.24 Section 44.24 Mineral... Discovery. Parties shall be governed in their conduct of discovery by appropriate provisions of the Federal... discovery. Alternative periods of time for discovery may be prescribed by the presiding administrative...

  11. 30 CFR 44.24 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 44.24 Section 44.24 Mineral... Discovery. Parties shall be governed in their conduct of discovery by appropriate provisions of the Federal... discovery. Alternative periods of time for discovery may be prescribed by the presiding administrative...

  12. 30 CFR 44.24 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery. 44.24 Section 44.24 Mineral... Discovery. Parties shall be governed in their conduct of discovery by appropriate provisions of the Federal... discovery. Alternative periods of time for discovery may be prescribed by the presiding administrative...

  13. 30 CFR 44.24 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 44.24 Section 44.24 Mineral... Discovery. Parties shall be governed in their conduct of discovery by appropriate provisions of the Federal... discovery. Alternative periods of time for discovery may be prescribed by the presiding administrative...

  14. 19 CFR 356.20 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 356.20 Section 356.20 Customs Duties... § 356.20 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery... sanctions proceeding. (b) Limitations on discovery. The administrative law judge shall place such...

  15. Resilience of aging populations after devastating earthquake event and its determinants - A case study of the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chih-Hsuan; Hung, Hung-Chih

    2016-04-01

    1.Background Major portions of urban areas in Asia are highly exposed and vulnerable to devastating earthquakes. Many studies identify ways to reduce earthquake risk by concentrating more on building resilience for the particularly vulnerable populations. By 2020, as the United Nations' warning, many Asian countries would become 'super-aged societies', such as Taiwan. However, local authorities rarely use resilience approach to frame earthquake disaster risk management and land use strategies. The empirically-based research about the resilience of aging populations has also received relatively little attention. Thus, a challenge arisen for decision-makers is how to enhance resilience of aging populations within the context of risk reduction. This study aims to improve the understanding of the resilience of aging populations and its changes over time in the aftermath of a destructive earthquake at the local level. A novel methodology is proposed to assess the resilience of aging populations and to characterize their changes of spatial distribution patterns, as well as to examine their determinants. 2.Methods and data An indicator-based assessment framework is constructed with the goal of identifying composite indicators (including before, during and after a disaster) that could serve as proxies for attributes of the resilience of aging populations. Using the recovery process of the Chi-Chi earthquake struck central Taiwan in 1999 as a case study, we applied a method combined a geographical information system (GIS)-based spatial statistics technique and cluster analysis to test the extent of which the resilience of aging populations is spatially autocorrelated throughout the central Taiwan, and to explain why clustering of resilient areas occurs in specific locations. Furthermore, to scrutinize the affecting factors of resilience, we develop an aging population resilience model (APRM) based on existing resilience theory. Using the APRM, we applied a multivariate

  16. Workshop on Discovery Lessons-Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Discovery Program's continuous improvement effort, a Discovery Program Lessons-Learned workshop was designed to review how well the Discovery Program is moving toward its goal of providing low-cost research opportunities to the planetary science community while ensuring continued U.S. leadership in solar system exploration. The principal focus of the workshop was on the recently completed Announcement of Opportunity (AO) cycle, but the program direction and program management were also open to comment. The objective of the workshop was to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the process up to this point, with the goal of improving the process for the next AO cycle. The process for initializing the workshop was to solicit comments from the communities involved in the program and to use the feedback as the basis for establishing the workshop agenda. The following four sessions were developed after reviewing and synthesizing both the formal feedback received and informal feedback obtained during discussions with various participants: (1) Science and Return on Investment; (2) Technology vs. Risk; Mission Success and Other Factors; (3) Cost; and (4) AO.AO Process Changes and Program Management.

  17. System for Information Discovery

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-09-25

    SID characterizes natural language based documents so that they may be related and retrieved based on content similarity. This technology processes textual documents, autonoumsly identifies the major topics of the document set, and constructs an interpretable, high dimensional representation of each document. SID also provides the ability to interactively reweight representations based on user need, so users may analyze the dataset from multiple points of view. The particular advantages SID offers are speed, data compression,more » flexibility in representation, and incremental processing. SPIRE consists of software for visual analysis of text-based information sources. This technology enables users to make discoveries about the content of very large sets of textual documents without requiring the user to read or presort the documents. It employs algorithms for text and word proximity analysis to identify the key themes within the documents. The results of this analysis are projected onto a visual spatial proximity display (Galaxies or Themescape) where document proximity represents the degree of relatedness of theme.« less

  18. Discovery and Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Don; Rodger, Caroline

    The uses of Raman spectroscopy in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) discovery, development and release cover a wide variety of sample types and applications. However, the technique does not have a high prominence in the pharmaceutical industry despite being recognised by regulatory authorities as a suitable methodology for the analysis and release of pharmaceutical API and products. One reason is that other analytical techniques are well established and changing to Raman methods is cost prohibitive considering return on investments (ROI). In addition the technique is often regarded as being one for "experts" and not one for main stream applications. As a consequence Raman spectroscopy is frequently the 2nd or 3rd technique of choice for a specific application. However, due to its unique sampling attributes (e.g. micro and macro measurements direct from the sample, through glass, from well plates or in the presence of water) and selectivity, applications of this technology are found throughout the life cycles of pharmaceutical products. It can therefore be considered to be a spectroscopic common denominator. This chapter highlights a number of routine, specialised and niche Raman spectroscopy applications which have been used in the development of new medicines while detailing some of the limitations of these approaches.

  19. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. PMID:26960264

  20. Establishing an in vivo assay system to identify components involved in environmental RNA interference in the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Keita; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Zhang, Yuanji; Segers, Gerrit; Bolognesi, Renata; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of environmental RNA interference (RNAi), in which gene expression is suppressed via feeding with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules, opened the door to the practical application of RNAi-based techniques in crop pest management. The western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) is one of the most devastating corn pests in North America. Interestingly, WCR displays a robust environmental RNAi response, raising the possibility of applying an RNAi-based pest management strategy to this pest. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the WCR environmental RNAi process will allow for determining the rate limiting steps involved with dsRNA toxicity and potential dsRNA resistance mechanisms in WCR. In this study, we have established a two-step in vivo assay system, which allows us to evaluate the involvement of genes in environmental RNAi in WCR. We show that laccase 2 and ebony, critical cuticle pigmentation/tanning genes, can be used as marker genes in our assay system, with ebony being a more stable marker to monitor RNAi activity. In addition, we optimized the dsRNA dose and length for the assay, and confirmed that this assay system is sensitive to detect well-known RNAi components such as Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. We also evaluated two WCR sid1- like (sil) genes with this assay system. This system will be useful to quickly survey candidate systemic RNAi genes in WCR, and also will be adaptable for a genome-wide RNAi screening to give us an unbiased view of the environmental/systemic RNAi pathway in WCR. PMID:25003334

  1. STS-105 Shuttle Orbiter Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is a view of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it approaches the International Space Station (ISS) during the STS-105 mission. Visible in the payload bay of Discovery are the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo at right, which stores various supplies and experiments to be transferred into the ISS; at center, the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) which carries the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS); and two Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) containers at left. Aboard Discovery were the ISS Expedition Three crew, who were to replace the Expedition Two crew that had been living on the ISS for the past five months.

  2. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  3. Implications of the Higgs Discovery for Gravity and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovic, Dejan

    2013-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the greatest discoveries in this century. The standard model is finally complete. Apart from its significance in particle physics, this discovery has profound implications for gravity and cosmology in particular. Many perturbative quantum gravity interactions involving scalars are not suppressed by powers of Planck mass. Since gravity couples anything with mass to anything with mass, then Higgs must be strongly coupled to any other fundamental scalar in nature, even if the gauge couplings are absent in the original Lagrangian. Since the Large Hadron Collider data indicate that the Higgs is very much standard model-like, there is very little room for nonstandard model processes, e.g. invisible decays. This severely complicates any model that involves light enough scalar that the Higgs can kinematically decay to. Most notably, these are the quintessence models, models including light axions, and light scalar dark matter models.

  4. Discovery of natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guild, P.W.

    1976-01-01

    Mankind will continue to need ores of more or less the types and grades used today to supply its needs for new mineral raw materials, at least until fusion or some other relatively cheap, inexhaustible energy source is developed. Most deposits being mined today were exposed at the surface or found by relatively simple geophysical or other prospecting techniques, but many of these will be depleted in the foreseeable future. The discovery of deeper or less obvious deposits to replace them will require the conjunction of science and technology to deduce the laws that governed the concentration of elements into ores and to detect and evaluate the evidence of their whereabouts. Great theoretical advances are being made to explain the origins of ore deposits and understand the general reasons for their localization. These advances have unquestionable value for exploration. Even a large deposit is, however, very small, and, with few exceptions, it was formed under conditions that have long since ceased to exist. The explorationist must suppress a great deal of "noise" to read and interpret correctly the "signals" that can define targets and guide the drilling required to find it. Is enough being done to ensure the long-term availability of mineral raw materials? The answer is probably no, in view of the expanding consumption and the difficulty of finding new deposits, but ingenuity, persistence, and continued development of new methods and tools to add to those already at hand should put off the day of "doing without" for many years. The possibility of resource exhaustion, especially in view of the long and increasing lead time needed to carry out basic field and laboratory studies in geology, geophysics, and geochemistry and to synthesize and analyze the information gained from them counsels against any letting down of our guard, however (17). Research and exploration by government, academia, and industry must be supported and encouraged; we cannot wait until an eleventh

  5. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    companion that exploded in a supernova, disrupting its orbit," McLaughlin said. Astronomers and students will work together in the coming months to find answers to these questions. The PSC is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The PSC, led by NRAO Education Officer Sue Ann Heatherly and Project Director Rachel Rosen, includes training for teachers and student leaders, and provides parcels of data from the GBT to student teams. The project involves teachers and students in helping astronomers analyze data from the GBT, a giant, 17-million-pound telescope. Some 300 hours of observing data were reserved for analysis by student teams. Thompson, Snider, and Mabry have been working with about 170 other students across the country. The responsibility for the work, and for the discoveries, is theirs. They are trained by astronomers and by their teachers to distinguish between pulsars and noise. The students' collective judgment sifts the pulsars from the noise. All three students had analyzed thousands of data plots before coming upon this one. Casey Thompson, who has been with the PSC for three years, has analyzed more than 30,000 plots. "Sometimes I just stop and think about the fact that I'm looking at data from space," Thompson said. "It's really special to me." In addition to this discovery, two other astronomical objects have been discovered by students. In 2009, Shay Bloxton of Summersville, WV, discovered a pulsar that spins once every four seconds, and Lucas Bolyard of Clarksburg, WV, discovered a rapidly rotating radio transient, which astronomers believe is a pulsar that emits radio waves in bursts. Those involved in the PSC hope that being a part of astronomy will give students an appreciation for science. Maybe the project will even produce some of the next generation of astronomers. Snider, surely, has been inspired. "The PSC changed my career path

  6. Discovery – Development of Rituximab

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded the development of rituximab, one of the first monoclonal antibody cancer treatments. With the discovery of rituximab, more than 70 percent of patients diagnosed with non-hodgkin lymphoma now live five years past their initial diagnosis.

  7. Computer-aided drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Computational approaches are an integral part of interdisciplinary drug discovery research. Understanding the science behind computational tools, their opportunities, and limitations is essential to make a true impact on drug discovery at different levels. If applied in a scientifically meaningful way, computational methods improve the ability to identify and evaluate potential drug molecules, but there remain weaknesses in the methods that preclude naïve applications. Herein, current trends in computer-aided drug discovery are reviewed, and selected computational areas are discussed. Approaches are highlighted that aid in the identification and optimization of new drug candidates. Emphasis is put on the presentation and discussion of computational concepts and methods, rather than case studies or application examples. As such, this contribution aims to provide an overview of the current methodological spectrum of computational drug discovery for a broad audience. PMID:26949519

  8. Discovery of the krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Heim, M.; Fritsch, A.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-07-15

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-07-19

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug-resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  10. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  11. Drug discovery: lessons from evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, John

    2011-01-01

    A common view within the pharmaceutical industry is that there is a problem with drug discovery and we should do something about it. There is much sympathy for this from academics, regulators and politicians. In this article I propose that lessons learnt from evolution help identify those factors that favour successful drug discovery. This personal view is influenced by a decade spent reviewing drug development programmes submitted for European regulatory approval. During the prolonged gestation of a new medicine few candidate molecules survive. This process of elimination of many variants and the survival of so few has much in common with evolution, an analogy that encourages discussion of the forces that favour, and those that hinder, successful drug discovery. Imagining a world without vaccines, anaesthetics, contraception and anti-infectives reveals how medicines revolutionized humanity. How to manipulate conditions that favour such discoveries is worth consideration. PMID:21395642

  12. Serendipity: Accidental Discoveries in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Royston M.

    1989-06-01

    Many of the things discovered by accident are important in our everyday lives: Teflon, Velcro, nylon, x-rays, penicillin, safety glass, sugar substitutes, and polyethylene and other plastics. And we owe a debt to accident for some of our deepest scientific knowledge, including Newton's theory of gravitation, the Big Bang theory of Creation, and the discovery of DNA. Even the Rosetta Stone, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the ruins of Pompeii came to light through chance. This book tells the fascinating stories of these and other discoveries and reveals how the inquisitive human mind turns accident into discovery. Written for the layman, yet scientifically accurate, this illuminating collection of anecdotes portrays invention and discovery as quintessentially human acts, due in part to curiosity, perserverance, and luck.

  13. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This wide lux image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station shows the base of the launch pad as well as the orbiter just clearing the gantry. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches.

  14. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 35mm camera was used to expose this image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches. The launch pad and orbiter can be seen reflected in the water directly in front of it.

  15. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 70mm camera was used to expose this image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches. The launch pad and orbiter can be seen reflected in the water directly in front of it.

  16. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 35mm camera was used to expose this close-up image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches.

  17. A Safer, Discovery-Based Nucleophilic Substitution Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail

    2009-01-01

    A discovery-based nucleophilic substitution experiment is described in which students compare the reactivity of chloride and iodide ions in an S[subscript N]2 reaction. This experiment improves upon the well-known "Competing Nucleophiles" experiment in that it does not involve the generation of hydrogen halide gas. The experiment also introduces…

  18. Historical Review of Californium-252 Discovery and Development

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stoddard, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed. (PLG)

  19. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving /sup 252/Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed. (PLG)

  20. Discovery in Motion: Movement Exploration for Problem-Solving and Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Pamela J.

    The movement-exploration activities described in this book are designed to appeal to primary-level children's natural instinct toward imaginative play and discovery and offer opportunities to develop physical skills in a familiar environment. The discovery of the physical self involves body-part and body-surface identification, isolated movements…

  1. Drug discovery from plant sources: An integrated approach

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Chandrakant; Gupta, Arun; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Katiyar, Shefali

    2012-01-01

    New drug discovery is facing serious challenges due to reduction in number of new drug approvals coupled with exorbitant rising cost. Advent of combinatorial chemistry provided new hope of higher success rates of new chemical entities (NCEs); however, even this scientific development has failed to improve the success rate in new drug discovery. This scenario has prompted us to come out with a novel approach of integrated drug discovery, where Ayurvedic wisdom can synergize with drug discovery from plant sources. Initial steps in new drug discovery involve identification of NCEs, which can be either sourced through chemical synthesis or can be isolated from natural products through biological activity guided fractionation. The sources of many of the new drugs and active ingredients of medicines are derived from natural products. The starting point for plant-based new drug discovery should be identification of the right candidate plants by applying Ayurvedic wisdom, traditional documented use, tribal non-documented use, and exhaustive literature search. Frequency analysis of the ingredients of the ancient documented formulations and analysis of their Ayurvedic attributes may provide an in-depth idea of the predominance of particular Ayurvedic characteristics based on which appropriate candidate plants may be selected for bioactivity-based fractionation. The integration of Ayurvedic wisdom with drug discovery also brings the need for a paradigm shift in the extraction process from sequential to parallel extraction. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the identified plant may lead to standardized extract or isolated bioactive druggable compound as the new drug. This integrated approach would lead to saving of cost and time, coupled with enhanced success rate in drug discovery. PMID:23049178

  2. A Passion for Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, Peter

    2008-06-11

    The human side of doing theoretical physics is explored through stories about the interactions between physicists and about the way world events can affect not only the scientists behavior, but even their scientific interests and style. These stories cluster nicely around certain bigger themes to create an overarching whole. This happens both on account of some interesting narrative structures intrinsic to the science of Physics itself and on account of the way Physics integrates into the general culture. The stories concern Einstein, Schroedinger, Pauli, Heisenberg, Stueckelberg, Jordan and Fock and also involve some mathematicians like Emmy Noether, Teichmueller and Bers and even the psychologist C.G. Jung.

  3. Automated Knowledge Discovery From Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael; DeCoste, Dennis; Mazzoni, Dominic; Scharenbroich, Lucas; Enke, Brian; Merline, William

    2007-01-01

    A computational method, SimLearn, has been devised to facilitate efficient knowledge discovery from simulators. Simulators are complex computer programs used in science and engineering to model diverse phenomena such as fluid flow, gravitational interactions, coupled mechanical systems, and nuclear, chemical, and biological processes. SimLearn uses active-learning techniques to efficiently address the "landscape characterization problem." In particular, SimLearn tries to determine which regions in "input space" lead to a given output from the simulator, where "input space" refers to an abstraction of all the variables going into the simulator, e.g., initial conditions, parameters, and interaction equations. Landscape characterization can be viewed as an attempt to invert the forward mapping of the simulator and recover the inputs that produce a particular output. Given that a single simulation run can take days or weeks to complete even on a large computing cluster, SimLearn attempts to reduce costs by reducing the number of simulations needed to effect discoveries. Unlike conventional data-mining methods that are applied to static predefined datasets, SimLearn involves an iterative process in which a most informative dataset is constructed dynamically by using the simulator as an oracle. On each iteration, the algorithm models the knowledge it has gained through previous simulation trials and then chooses which simulation trials to run next. Running these trials through the simulator produces new data in the form of input-output pairs. The overall process is embodied in an algorithm that combines support vector machines (SVMs) with active learning. SVMs use learning from examples (the examples are the input-output pairs generated by running the simulator) and a principle called maximum margin to derive predictors that generalize well to new inputs. In SimLearn, the SVM plays the role of modeling the knowledge that has been gained through previous simulation trials

  4. 42 CFR 426.432 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 426.432 Section 426.432 Public Health... § 426.432 Discovery. (a) General rule. If the ALJ orders discovery, the ALJ must establish a reasonable timeframe for discovery. (b) Protective order—(1) Request for a protective order. Any party receiving...

  5. 29 CFR 2700.56 - Discovery; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery; general. 2700.56 Section 2700.56 Labor... Hearings § 2700.56 Discovery; general. (a) Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more... upon property for inspecting, copying, photographing, and gathering information. (b) Scope of...

  6. 42 CFR 426.532 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 426.532 Section 426.532 Public Health... an NCD § 426.532 Discovery. (a) General rule. If the Board orders discovery, the Board must establish a reasonable timeframe for discovery. (b) Protective order—(1) Request for a protective order....

  7. 39 CFR 955.15 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery. 955.15 Section 955.15 Postal Service... APPEALS § 955.15 Discovery. (a) The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery procedure, the Board may issue any order which...

  8. 39 CFR 955.15 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 955.15 Section 955.15 Postal Service... APPEALS § 955.15 Discovery. (a) The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery procedure, the Board may issue any order which...

  9. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120... PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1..., discovery is available only as ordered by the presiding officer. The presiding officer shall regulate...

  10. 42 CFR 426.532 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discovery. 426.532 Section 426.532 Public Health... an NCD § 426.532 Discovery. (a) General rule. If the Board orders discovery, the Board must establish a reasonable timeframe for discovery. (b) Protective order—(1) Request for a protective order....

  11. 49 CFR 386.37 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 386.37 Section 386.37 Transportation... and Hearings § 386.37 Discovery. (a) Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following...; and requests for admission. (b) Discovery may not commence until the matter is pending before...

  12. 24 CFR 26.18 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discovery. 26.18 Section 26.18... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Discovery § 26.18 Discovery. (a) General. The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures, which may commence at any time after an answer...

  13. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 1503.633 Section 1503.633... Rules of Practice in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any party may initiate discovery described in this section, without the consent or approval of the ALJ,...

  14. 29 CFR 1955.32 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discovery. 1955.32 Section 1955.32 Labor Regulations...) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS Preliminary Conference and Discovery § 1955.32 Discovery... allow discovery by any other appropriate procedure, such as by interrogatories upon a party or...

  15. 49 CFR 1121.2 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE RAIL EXEMPTION PROCEDURES § 1121.2 Discovery. Discovery shall follow the procedures set forth at 49 CFR part 1114, subpart B. Discovery may begin upon the filing of the petition for... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 1121.2 Section 1121.2...

  16. 43 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Discovery. 35.21 Section 35.21 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for...) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The...

  17. 22 CFR 224.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 224.21 Section 224.21 Foreign....21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of... parties, discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ shall regulate the timing of...

  18. 49 CFR 604.38 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 604.38 Section 604.38 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Hearings. § 604.38 Discovery. (a) Permissible forms of discovery shall be within the discretion of the PO. (b) The PO shall limit the frequency and extent of discovery permitted...

  19. 13 CFR 134.213 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery. 134.213 Section 134.213... OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Rules of Practice § 134.213 Discovery. (a) Motion. A party may obtain discovery only upon motion, and for good cause shown. (b) Forms. The forms of discovery which a Judge...

  20. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Prehearing Procedures and Discovery § 164.51 Other discovery. (a) General. Except as so provided by § 164.50(b) supra, further discovery, under this subpart, shall be...

  1. 49 CFR 1121.2 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE RAIL EXEMPTION PROCEDURES § 1121.2 Discovery. Discovery shall follow the procedures set forth at 49 CFR part 1114, subpart B. Discovery may begin upon the filing of the petition for... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discovery. 1121.2 Section 1121.2...

  2. 13 CFR 134.213 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discovery. 134.213 Section 134.213... OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Rules of Practice § 134.213 Discovery. (a) Motion. A party may obtain discovery only upon motion, and for good cause shown. (b) Forms. The forms of discovery which a Judge...

  3. 49 CFR 1121.2 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE RAIL EXEMPTION PROCEDURES § 1121.2 Discovery. Discovery shall follow the procedures set forth at 49 CFR part 1114, subpart B. Discovery may begin upon the filing of the petition for... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discovery. 1121.2 Section 1121.2...

  4. 49 CFR 604.38 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 604.38 Section 604.38 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Hearings § 604.38 Discovery. (a) Permissible forms of discovery shall be within the discretion of the PO. (b) The PO shall limit the frequency and extent of discovery permitted...

  5. 19 CFR 354.10 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discovery. 354.10 Section 354.10 Customs Duties... ANTIDUMPING OR COUNTERVAILING DUTY ADMINISTRATIVE PROTECTIVE ORDER § 354.10 Discovery. (a) Voluntary discovery. All parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures regarding any matter,...

  6. 12 CFR 263.53 - Discovery depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery depositions. 263.53 Section 263.53... Discovery depositions. (a) In general. In addition to the discovery permitted in subpart A of this part, limited discovery by means of depositions shall be allowed for individuals with knowledge of...

  7. 10 CFR 13.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discovery. 13.21 Section 13.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are...) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The...

  8. 31 CFR 16.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discovery. 16.21 Section 16.21 Money... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized... to require the creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery...

  9. 31 CFR 16.21 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discovery. 16.21 Section 16.21 Money... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized... to require the creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery...

  10. 39 CFR 955.15 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discovery. 955.15 Section 955.15 Postal Service... APPEALS § 955.15 Discovery. (a) The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures. In connection with any deposition or other discovery procedure, the Board may issue any order which...