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Sample records for discrete hypoechoic ring

  1. Discrete breathers for a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger ring coupled to a central site.

    PubMed

    Jason, Peter; Johansson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    We examine the existence and properties of certain discrete breathers for a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model where all but one site are placed in a ring and coupled to the additional central site. The discrete breathers we focus on are stationary solutions mainly localized on one or a few of the ring sites and possibly also the central site. By numerical methods, we trace out and study the continuous families the discrete breathers belong to. Our main result is the discovery of a split bifurcation at a critical value of the coupling between neighboring ring sites. Below this critical value, families form closed loops in a certain parameter space, implying that discrete breathers with and without central-site occupation belong to the same family. Above the split bifurcation the families split up into several separate ones, which bifurcate with solutions with constant ring amplitudes. For symmetry reasons, the families have different properties below the split bifurcation for even and odd numbers of sites. It is also determined under which conditions the discrete breathers are linearly stable. The dynamics of some simpler initial conditions that approximate the discrete breathers are also studied and the parameter regimes where the dynamics remain localized close to the initially excited ring site are related to the linear stability of the exact discrete breathers. PMID:26871085

  2. On sound transmission into a stiffened cylindrical shell with rings and stringers treated as discrete elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the transmission of an oblique plane sound wave into a finite cylindrical shell stiffened by stringers and ring frames. The rings and stringers are modeled as discrete structural elements. The numerical case studied was typical of a narrow-bodied jet transport fuselage. The numerical results show that the ring-frequency dip in the transmission loss curve that is present for a monocoque shell is still present in the case of a stiffened shell. The ring frequency effect is a result of the cylindrical geometry of the shell. Below the ring frequency, stiffening does not appear to have any significant effect on transmission loss, but above the ring frequency, stiffeners can enhance the transmission loss of a cylindrical shell.

  3. Are Irregular Hypoechoic Breast Masses on Ultrasound Always Malignancies?: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youe Ree; Kim, Hun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Irregular hypoechoic masses in the breast do not always indicate malignancies. Many benign breast diseases present with irregular hypoechoic masses that can mimic carcinoma on ultrasonography. Some of these diseases such as inflammation and trauma-related breast lesions could be suspected from a patient's symptoms and personal history. Careful ultrasonographic examination and biopsy could help to differentiate these from malignancies. PMID:26576116

  4. Two-dimensionally stacked heterometallic layers hosting a discrete chair dodecameric ring of water clusters: synthesis and structural study.

    PubMed

    Kenfack Tsobnang, Patrice; Wenger, Emmanuel; Biache, Coralie; Lambi Ngolui, John; Ponou, Siméon; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2014-10-01

    The stacked two-dimensional supramolecular compound catena-{Co(amp)3Cr(ox)3·6H2O} (amp = 2-picolylamine, ox = oxalate) has been synthesized from the bimolecular approach using hydrogen bonds. It is built from layers in which both Co(amp)(3+) (D) and Cr(ox)(3-) (A) ions are bonded in a repeating DADADA… pattern along the a and c axes by multiple hydrogen bonds. These layers host a well resolved R12 dodecameric discrete ring of water clusters built by six independent molecules located around the 2c centrosymmetric Wyckoff positions of the P21/n space group in which the compound crystallizes. These clusters are ranged along the [001] direction, occupy 733.5 Å(3) (22.0%) of the unit cell and have a chair conformation via 12 hydrogen bonds. The water molecules of the cluster are linked with stronger hydrogen bonds than those between the cluster and its host, which explains the single continuous step of the dehydration process of the compound. PMID:25274525

  5. Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The essence of vortex physics is that at certain low-energy scales elementary excitations of a point particle theory can behave like strings rather than particles. Vortices are the resulting string-like solutions; their thickness sets the distance scale beyond which physics is string-like rather than particle-like. String degrees of freedom are massless in the sense that excitations on a string can have an arbitrarily low frequency. Non-string degrees of freedom correspond to massive particles and are absent from the low energy spectrum. This article considers only field theories with vortices at low energies. The possible existence of a class of solitons in these vortex theories will be discussed. They are vortex rings: they are localized and finite in energy, and able to carry the quantum numbers of point particles. Rings are thus particle-like solutions of a vortex theory, which is itself a limit of a point particle field theory.

  6. In vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" phenomenon in rat arterial bloodstream: a preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-07-01

    The "black hole," a hypo-echoic hole at the center of the bloodstream surrounded by a hyper-echoic zone in cross-sectional views, has been observed in ultrasound backscattering measurements of blood with red blood cell aggregation in in vitro studies. We investigated whether the phenomenon occurs in the in vivo arterial bloodstream of rats using a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. Longitudinal and cross-sectional ultrasound images of the rat common carotid artery (CCA) and abdominal aorta were obtained using a 40-MHz ultrasound system. A high-frame-rate retrospective imaging mode was employed to precisely examine the dynamic changes in blood echogenicity in the arteries. When the imaging was performed with non-invasive scanning, blood echogenicity was very low in the CCA as compared with the surrounding tissues, exhibiting no hypo-echoic zone at the center of the vessel. Invasive imaging of the CCA by incising the skin and subcutaneous tissues at the imaging area provided clearer and brighter blood echo images, showing the "black hole" phenomenon near the center of the vessel in longitudinal view. The "black hole" was also observed in the abdominal aorta under direct imaging after laparotomy. The aortic "black hole" was clearly observed in both longitudinal and cross-sectional views. Although the "black hole" was always observed near the center of the arteries during the diastolic phase, it dissipated or was off-center along with the asymmetric arterial wall dilation at systole. In conclusion, we report the first in vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" caused by the radial variation of red blood cell aggregation in arterial bloodstream. PMID:24785440

  7. Ba4KFe3O9: A Novel Ferrite Containing Discrete Six-member Rings of Corner-sharing FeO4 Tetrahedra

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingbiao; Nellutla, Saritha; Son, Won-Joon; Vaughn, Shae A.; Ye, Longfei; Smith, Mark D.; Caignaert, Vincent; Lufaso, Michael; Pekarek, Thomas M.; Smirnov, Alex I.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of a new iron containing oxide, Ba4KFe3O9, were grown from a hydroxide melt and the crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. This ferrite represents the first complex oxide containing isolated 6-member rings of corner sharing FeO4 tetrahedra. Mössbauer measurements are indicative of two tetrahedral high-spin Fe3+ coordination environments. The observed magnetic moment (~3.9 BM) at 400 K is significantly lower than the calculated spin-only (~5.2 BM) value indicating the presence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the oxide. Our density functional calculations confirm the strong antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Fe3+ sites within each 6-member ring and estimate the nearest neighbor spin exchange integral as ~200 K; next nearest neighbor interactions are shown to be negligible. The lower than expected effective moment for Ba4KFe3O9 calculated from χT data is explained as resulting from the occupation of lower lying magnetic states in which more spins are paired. X-band (9.5 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of powder sample consist of a single line at g~2.01 that is characteristic of Fe3+ ions in a tetrahedral environment, thus, confirming the Mössbauer results. Further analysis of the EPR line shape reveals the presence of two types of Fe6 magnetic species with an intensity ratio of ~1:9. Both species have Lorentzian line shapes and indistinguishable g-factors but differ in the peak-to-peak line widths (δBpp). The line width ratio δBpp(major)/δBpp(minor) ~ 3.6 correlates well with the ratio of the Weiss constants, θminor/θmajor ~ 4. PMID:21905756

  8. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  9. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  10. Lectures on algebraic system theory: Linear systems over rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamen, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The presentation centers on four classes of systems that can be treated as linear systems over a ring. These are: (1) discrete-time systems over a ring of scalars such as the integers; (2) continuous-time systems containing time delays; (3) large-scale discrete-time systems; and (4) time-varying discrete-time systems.

  11. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  12. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  13. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  14. Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    When seen from the unlit side, the rings of Saturn present a much different appearance from that familiar to telescopic observers. Relatively opaque areas like the B Ring turn black, while lightly populated zones, such as the C Ring and the Cassini Division, prove to excellent diffuse transmitters of sunlight. The A Ring, with intermediate opacity, is at an intermediate level of brightness.

  15. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  16. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  17. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  18. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Araki, S.; Black, G. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Charnoz, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Esposito, L. W.; Ferrari, C.; Festou, M.; French, R. G.; Giuliatti-Winter, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.; Karjalainen, R. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Krueger, H.; Larson, S. M.; Levison, H. F.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Namouni, F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Poulet, F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Salo, H. J.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2002-08-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in our view and understanding of planetary rings. We now know that each of the giant planets in the Solar System possesses a complex and unique ring system. Recent studies have identified complex gravitational interactions between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto, or collisions between, parent bodies. Yet, as far as we have come, our understanding is far from complete. The fundamental questions confronting ring scientists at the beginning of the twenty-first century are those regarding the origin, age and evolution of the various ring systems, in the broadest context. Understanding the origin and age requires us to know the current ring properties, and to understand the dominant evolutionary processes and how they influence ring properties. Here we discuss a prioritized list of the key questions, the answers to which would provide the greatest improvement in our understanding of planetary rings. We then outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities for the coming decade in planetary ring science.

  19. Discrete Trials Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages of emphasizing discrete trials "teaching" over discrete trials "training" are presented first, followed by a discussion of discrete trials as a method of teaching that emerged historically--and as a matter of necessity for difficult learners such as those with autism--from discrete trials as a method for laboratory research. The…

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  1. Electrodynamic processes in the ring system of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Hill, J. R.; Ip, W.-H.; Goertz, C. K.; Gruen, E.

    1984-01-01

    A number of recently observed Saturn ring phenomena are discussed in terms of their electrodynamic implications. Voyager 1 and 2 observations of the rotating near-radial spokes in the B Ring, waves and braids of the F Ring, and discrete episodic bursts of broadband radio emission, claimed by some to originate in a ring, are addressed. Several other phenomena are considered, including the origin and evolution of the diffuse E Ring and G Ring (which appear to be composed of fine dust), as well as the existence of a number of sharp discontinuities in the main ring system, within the context of gravitoelectrodynamics of charged dust in the magnetosphere.

  2. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  3. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  4. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or

  5. Principles of Discrete Time Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The physics of discreteness; 3. The road to calculus; 4. Temporal discretization; 5. Discrete time dynamics architecture; 6. Some models; 7. Classical cellular automata; 8. The action sum; 9. Worked examples; 10. Lee's approach to discrete time mechanics; 11. Elliptic billiards; 12. The construction of system functions; 13. The classical discrete time oscillator; 14. Type 2 temporal discretization; 15. Intermission; 16. Discrete time quantum mechanics; 17. The quantized discrete time oscillator; 18. Path integrals; 19. Quantum encoding; 20. Discrete time classical field equations; 21. The discrete time Schrodinger equation; 22. The discrete time Klein-Gordon equation; 23. The discrete time Dirac equation; 24. Discrete time Maxwell's equations; 25. The discrete time Skyrme model; 26. Discrete time quantum field theory; 27. Interacting discrete time scalar fields; 28. Space, time and gravitation; 29. Causality and observation; 30. Concluding remarks; Appendix A. Coherent states; Appendix B. The time-dependent oscillator; Appendix C. Quaternions; Appendix D. Quantum registers; References; Index.

  6. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  7. RADIOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ABDOMINAL ANATOMY IN CAPTIVE RING-TAILED LEMURS (LEMUR CATTA).

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-06-01

    The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is primarily distributed in south and southwestern Madagascar. It is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Various abdominal diseases, such as hepatic lipidosis, intestinal ulcers, cystitis, urinary tract obstruction, and neoplasia (e.g., colonic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma), have been reported in this species. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic and ultrasonographic abdominal anatomy in captive ring-tailed lemurs to provide guidance for clinical use. Radiography of the abdomen and ultrasonography of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and urinary bladder were performed in 13 and 9 healthy captive ring-tailed lemurs, respectively, during their annual health examinations. Normal radiographic and ultrasonographic reference ranges for abdominal organs were established and ratios were calculated. The majority (12/13) of animals had seven lumbar vertebrae. The sacrum had mainly (12/13) three segments. Abdominal serosal detail was excellent in all animals, and hypaxial muscles were conspicuous in the majority (11/13) of animals. The spleen was frequently (12/13) seen on the ventrodorsal (VD) view and rarely (3/13) on the right lateral (RL) view. The liver was less prominent and well contained within the ribcage. The pylorus was mostly (11/13) located to the right of the midline. The right and left kidneys were visible on the RL and VD views, with the right kidney positioned more cranial and dorsal to the left kidney. On ultrasonography, the kidneys appeared ovoid on transverse and longitudinal views. The medulla was hypoechoic to the renal cortex. The renal cortex was frequently (8/9) isoechoic and rarely (1/9) hyperechoic to the splenic parenchyma. The liver parenchyma was hypoechoic (5/5) to the renal cortex. Knowledge of the normal radiographic and ultrasonographic abdominal anatomy of ring-tailed lemurs may be useful in the diagnosis of diseases and in

  8. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  9. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  10. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  11. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  12. The Discrete Hanging Cable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Using the methods of finite difference equations the discrete analogue of the parabolic and catenary cable are analysed. The fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio arise in the treatment of the catenary.

  13. Discretizations of axisymmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we discuss stability properties of various discretizations for axisymmetric systems including the so-called cartoon method which was proposed by Alcubierre et al. for the simulation of such systems on Cartesian grids. We show that within the context of the method of lines such discretizations tend to be unstable unless one takes care in the way individual singular terms are treated. Examples are given for the linear axisymmetric wave equation in flat space.

  14. Algebraic K-theory of discrete subgroups of Lie groups.

    PubMed

    Farrell, F T; Jones, L E

    1987-05-01

    Let G be a Lie group (with finitely many connected components) and Gamma be a discrete, cocompact, torsion-free subgroup of G. We rationally calculate the algebraic K-theory of the integral group ring ZGamma in terms of the homology of Gamma with trivial rational coefficients. PMID:16593834

  15. Algebraic K-theory of discrete subgroups of Lie groups

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, F. T.; Jones, L. E.

    1987-01-01

    Let G be a Lie group (with finitely many connected components) and Γ be a discrete, cocompact, torsion-free subgroup of G. We rationally calculate the algebraic K-theory of the integral group ring ZΓ in terms of the homology of Γ with trivial rational coefficients. PMID:16593834

  16. A discrete fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2005-11-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  17. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  18. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  19. Signet-ring cell carcinoma of the appendix: a case report with an emphasis on sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Jong; Kim, Hyuk Jung; Jang, Suk Ki; Yeon, Jae Woo; Kim, Ki-Ho; Paik, So Ya

    2016-04-01

    In this report, we present a rare case of primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the appendix in a 51-year-old woman with right lower quadrant pain. Since non-specific concentric appendiceal wall thickening was found in a radiologic evaluation, it was misdiagnosed as non-tumorous appendicitis. An in-depth examination of the correlation between sonographic and histopathologic findings demonstrated that a single markedly thickened hypoechoic layer was well correlated with the diffuse infiltration of tumor cells in both the submucosal and muscle layers. If this sonographic finding is observed in certain clinical settings, such as potential ovarian and peritoneal metastasis, submucosal infiltrative tumors, including signet-ring cell carcinoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26753605

  20. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  1. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  2. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  3. What Is Discrete Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Karen Tobey

    This paper cites information received from a number of sources, e.g., mathematics teachers in two-year colleges, publishers, and convention speakers, about the nature of discrete mathematics and about what topics a course in this subject should contain. Note is taken of the book edited by Ralston and Young which discusses the future of college…

  4. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  5. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  6. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  7. Basin-ring spacing on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.; Spudis, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radial spacing between concentric rings of impact basins that lack central peaks is statistically similar and nonrandom on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars, both inside and outside the main ring. One spacing interval, (2.0 ?? 0.3)0.5D, or an integer multiple of it, dominates most basin rings. Three analytical approaches yield similar results from 296 remapped or newly mapped rings of 67 multi-ringed basins: least-squares of rank-grouped rings, least-squares of rank and ring diameter for each basin, and averaged ratios of adjacent rings. Analysis of 106 rings of 53 two-ring basins by the first and third methods yields an integer multiple (2 ??) of 2.00.5D. There are two exceptions: (1) Rings adjacent to the main ring of multi-ring basins are consistently spaced at a slightly, but significantly, larger interval, (2.1 ?? 0.3)0.5D; (2) The 88 rings of 44 protobasins (large peak-plus-inner-ring craters) are spaced at an entirely different interval (3.3 ?? 0.6)0.5D. The statistically constant and target-invariant spacing of so many rings suggests that this characteristic may constrain formational models of impact basins on the terrestrial planets. The key elements of such a constraint include: (1) ring positions may not have been located by the same process(es) that formed ring topography; (2) ring location and emplacement of ring topography need not be coeval; (3) ring location, but not necessarily the mode of ring emplacement, reflects one process that operated at the time of impact; and (4) the process yields similarly-disposed topographic features that are spatially discrete at 20.5D intervals, or some multiple, rather than continuous. These four elements suggest that some type of wave mechanism dominates the location, but not necessarily the formation, of basin rings. The waves may be standing, rather than travelling. The ring topography itself may be emplaced at impact by this and/or other mechanisms and may reflect additional, including post-impact, influences. ?? 1987

  8. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  9. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  10. A paradigm for discrete physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.; Etter, T.; Manthey, M.J.; Gefwert, C.

    1987-01-01

    An example is outlined for constructing a discrete physics using as a starting point the insight from quantum physics that events are discrete, indivisible and non-local. Initial postulates are finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute nonuniqueness (i.e., homogeneity in the absence of specific cause) and additivity.

  11. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  12. On semi ring bornologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  13. Theory of radio occultation by Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    The radio occultation technique, as applied to Saturn's rings, is developed as a new method for the study of the physical properties of planetary ring systems. The rings are treated as a Doppler-spread radar target composed of an ensemble of discrete scatterers. The mathematical formulation of the received signal as a random-phasor-sum process is carried out following a conventional radar theory approach, providing a convenient starting point for deriving coherent signal parameters. A classical result is rederived for the equivalent refractive index of the medium. The analysis is generalized to include ringlets of arbitrary width and it is shown that when the width is such that two adjacent rays are differentially perturbed in phase, ray bending that causes focusing of the coherent signal may result. The diffuse component is also treated in detail.

  14. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  15. Discrete chaotic cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulski, Zbigniew; Szczepaski, Janusz

    In the paper we propose a new method of constructing cryptosystems utilising a nonpredictability property of discrete chaotic systems. We formulate the requirements for such systems to assure their safety. We also give examples of practical realisation of chaotic cryptosystems, using a generalisation of the method presented in [7]. The proposed algorithm of encryption and decryption is based on multiple iteration of a certain dynamical chaotic system. We assume that some part of the initial condition is a plain message. As the secret key we assume the system parameter(s) and additionally another part of the initial condition.

  16. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings. PMID:16601188

  17. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  18. Neptune - full ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This pair of Voyager 2 images (FDS 11446.21 and 11448.10), two 591-s exposures obtained through the clear filter of the wide angle camera, show the full ring system with the highest sensitivity. Visible in this figure are the bright, narrow N53 and N63 rings, the diffuse N42 ring, and (faintly) the plateau outside of the N53 ring (with its slight brightening near 57,500 km).

  19. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  20. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 0.75 million km from Saturn on 12 November 1980. The kinks and braids of this tightly-constrained ring are visible along with the outer edge of the A Ring. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  1. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  2. Discrete-Time Goldfishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calogero, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    The original continuous-time ''goldfish'' dynamical system is characterized by two neat formulas, the first of which provides the N Newtonian equations of motion of this dynamical system, while the second provides the solution of the corresponding initial-value problem. Several other, more general, solvable dynamical systems ''of goldfish type'' have been identified over time, featuring, in the right-hand (''forces'') side of their Newtonian equations of motion, in addition to other contributions, a velocity-dependent term such as that appearing in the right-hand side of the first formula mentioned above. The solvable character of these models allows detailed analyses of their behavior, which in some cases is quite remarkable (for instance isochronous or asymptotically isochronous). In this paper we introduce and discuss various discrete-time dynamical systems, which are as well solvable, which also display interesting behaviors (including isochrony and asymptotic isochrony) and which reduce to dynamical systems of goldfish type in the limit when the discrete-time independent variable l=0,1,2,... becomes the standard continuous-time independent variable t, 0≤t<∞.

  3. Jovian Ring System Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired this mosaic of Jupiter's ring system (top) when the spacecraft was in Jupiter's shadow looking back toward the Sun. Jupiter's ring system (inset diagram) is composed of three parts: an outermost gossamer ring, a flat main ring, and an innermost donut-shaped halo. These rings are made up of dust-sized particles that are blasted off of the nearby inner satellites by small impacts. This image was taken on November 9, 1996 at a distance of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles).

  4. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus. PMID:19812546

  5. Discrete anti-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P. ); Starson, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields'' with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance,'' allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall'' up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound. 23 refs.

  6. Discrete Sibson interpolation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung W; Linsen, Lars; Kreylos, Oliver; Owens, John D; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Natural-neighbor interpolation methods, such as Sibson's method, are well-known schemes for multivariate data fitting and reconstruction. Despite its many desirable properties, Sibson's method is computationally expensive and difficult to implement, especially when applied to higher-dimensional data. The main reason for both problems is the method's implementation based on a Voronoi diagram of all data points. We describe a discrete approach to evaluating Sibson's interpolant on a regular grid, based solely on finding nearest neighbors and rendering and blending d-dimensional spheres. Our approach does not require us to construct an explicit Voronoi diagram, is easily implemented using commodity three-dimensional graphics hardware, leads to a significant speed increase compared to traditional approaches, and generalizes easily to higher dimensions. For large scattered data sets, we achieve two-dimensional (2D) interpolation at interactive rates and 3D interpolation (3D) with computation times of a few seconds. PMID:16509383

  7. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    2015-01-01

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration. PMID:26146530

  8. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.; Kastenbaum, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  9. Discrete stability in stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, R.

    1994-12-31

    In this lecture we study stability properties of stochastic programs with recourse where the probability measure is approximated by a sequence of weakly convergent discrete measures. Such discrete approximation approach gives us a possibility to analyze explicitly the behavior of the second stage correction function. The approach is based on modern functional analytical methods of an approximation of extremum problems in function spaces, especially on the notion of the discrete convergence of vectors to an essentially bounded measurable function.

  10. A ring-source model for jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1978-01-01

    A model consisting of two ring sources was developed to study the direct radiation of jet noise in terms of correlation, coherence, and phase and also to aid in solving the inverse radiation problem of determining the noise source in terms of far-field measurements. The rings consist of discrete sources which are either monopoles or quadrupoles with Gaussian profiles. Only adjacent sources, both within the rings and between rings, are correlated. Results show that from the far-field information can be used to determine when the sources are compact or noncompact with respect to the acoustic wavelength and to distinguish between the types of sources. In addition, from the inverse radiation approach, the center of mass, the location and separation distance of the ring, and the diameters can be recovered.

  11. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the "bright ring" echogenicity from porcine blood upstream in a stenosed tube.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Choi, Min Joo; Shung, K Kirk

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the echogenicity variation due to blood flow disturbance near a stenosis under pulsatile flow, a series of in vitro experiments were performed in a rigid tube with an eccentric stenosis of 70% area reduction in a mock flow loop. An ultrasonic B-mode with a Doppler spectrogram was used to correlate echogenicity with flow speed and stroke rate. This paper reports echogenicity variation upstream of a stenosis under pulsatile flow. The experimental results showed that blood flow disturbed by the stenosis affects echogenicity and red blood cell rouleaux upstream. A hypoechoic "black hole" was shown at the center of the stream at systole. During diastole, the "bright ring" in cross-sectional images was observed as eddy-like or parabolic profiles in longitudinal images. These images could be reconstructed into a 3-dimensional animation, providing a better understanding of dynamic changes of the rouleaux distribution upstream of a stenosis under pulsatile flow. PMID:19406719

  12. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  13. Traceable Ring Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Koutarou

    The ring signature allows a signer to leak secrets anonymously, without the risk of identity escrow. At the same time, the ring signature provides great flexibility: No group manager, no special setup, and the dynamics of group choice. The ring signature is, however, vulnerable to malicious or irresponsible signers in some applications, because of its anonymity. In this paper, we propose a traceable ring signature scheme. A traceable ring scheme is a ring signature except that it can restrict “excessive” anonymity. The traceable ring signature has a tag that consists of a list of ring members and an issue that refers to, for instance, a social affair or an election. A ring member can make any signed but anonymous opinion regarding the issue, but only once (per tag). If the member submits another signed opinion, possibly pretending to be another person who supports the first opinion, the identity of the member is immediately revealed. If the member submits the same opinion, for instance, voting “yes” regarding the same issue twice, everyone can see that these two are linked. The traceable ring signature can suit to many applications, such as an anonymous voting on a BBS. We formalize the security definitions for this primitive and show an efficient and simple construction in the random oracle model.

  14. Sunset on Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is a rare view of Saturn's rings seen just after the Sun has set below the ring plane, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope on Nov. 21, 1995.

    This perspective is unusual because the Earth is slightly above (2.7 degrees latitude) Saturn's rings and the Sun is below them. Normally we see the rings fully illuminated by the Sun.

    The photograph shows three bright ring features: the F Ring, the Cassini Division, and the C Ring (moving from the outer rings to the inner). The low concentration of material in these rings allows light from the Sun to shine through them. The A and B rings are much denser, which limits the amount of light that penetrates through them. Instead, they are faintly visible because they reflect light from Saturn's disk.

    Scientists believe that the F Ring is slightly warped because it disappears part way around on the right (West) side. Hubble's high resolution shows the that A Ring's shadow obscures part of the F ring (right).

    The image was assembled from 20 exposures taken with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 over 8 hours.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  15. Structuring eccentric-narrow planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaloizou, J. C. B.; Melita, M. D.

    2005-06-01

    A simple and general description of the dynamics of a narrow-eccentric ring is presented. We view an eccentric ring which precesses uniformly at a slow rate as exhibiting a global m=1 mode, which can be seen as originating from a standing wave superposed on an axisymmetric background. We adopt a continuum description using the language of fluid dynamics which gives equivalent results for the secular dynamics of thin rings as the well-known description in terms of a set of discrete elliptical streamlines formulated by Goldreich and Tremaine (1979, Astron. J. 84, 1638-1641). We use this to discuss the nonlinear mode interactions that appear in the ring through the excitation of higher m modes because of the coupling of the m=1 mode with an external satellite potential, showing that they that can lead to the excitation of the m=1 mode through a feedback process. In addition to the external perturbations by neighboring satellites, our model includes effects due to inelastic inter-particle collisions. Two main conditions for the ring to be able to maintain a steady m=1 normal mode are obtained. One can be expressed as an integral condition for the normal mode pattern to precess uniformly, which requires the correct balance between the differential precession induced by the oblateness of the central planet, self-gravity and collisional effects is the continuum form of that obtained from the N streamline model of Goldreich and Tremaine (1979, Astron. J. 84, 1638-1641). The other condition, not before examined in detail, is for the steady maintenance of the nonzero radial action that the ring contains because of its finite normal mode. This requires a balance between injection due to eccentric resonances arising from external satellites and additional collisional damping associated with the presence of the m=1 mode. We estimate that such a balance can occur in the ɛ-ring of Uranus, given its currently observed physical and orbital parameters.

  16. Pattern Formation in Spatially Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    The preceding chapters have dealt with the spatiotemporal behavior of spatially continuous systems. We now turn our attention to the dynamical behavior and stability properties of spatially discrete systems. A wide variety of phenomena in chemistry, biology, physics, and other fields involve the coupling between nonlinear, discrete units. Examples include arrays of Josephson junctions, chains of coupled diode resonators, coupled chemical or biochemical reactors, myelinated nerve fibers, neuronal networks, and patchy ecosystems. Such networks of coupled nonlinear units often combine dynamical and structural complexity [422]. Cells in living tissues, for example, are arranged in a variety of geometries. One-dimensional rings of cells were already considered by Turing [440]. Other types of lattices, such as open-ended linear arrays, tubes, rectangular and hexagonal arrays, and irregular arrangements in two or three dimensions are also found, see for example [5]. Cells interact with adjacent cells in various distinct ways. For example, signaling between cells may occur via diffusion through gap junctions [352, 230] or by membrane-bound proteins, juxtacrine signaling [339, 340, 471].

  17. Discrete Mathematics and Curriculum Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Margaret J.

    1996-01-01

    Defines discrete mathematics as the mathematics necessary to effect reasoned decision making in finite situations and explains how its use supports the current view of mathematics education. Discrete mathematics can be used by curriculum developers to improve the curriculum for students of all ages and abilities. (SLD)

  18. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The article gives ideas that lecturers of undergraduate Discrete Mathematics courses can use in order to make the subject more interesting for students and encourage them to undertake further studies in the subject. It is possible to teach Discrete Mathematics with little or no reference to computing. However, students are more likely to be…

  19. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  20. Features in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Harris, Craig C.; Simmons, Karen E.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic, uniform search of Voyage 2 photopolarimeter system (PSS) data set for all significant features of Saturn's rings is described. On August 25, 1981, the PSS observed the occultation of the star Delta Scorpii by the rings of Saturn, and the timing of the data taking was rapid enough that the spatial resolution in the radial direction in the ring plane was better than 100 m. Tabular information and figures for 216 significant features that were found are presented.

  1. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  2. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  3. Discrete subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M M; Varma, M P; Cleland, J; O'Kane, H O; Webb, S W; Mulholland, H C; Adgey, A A

    1981-01-01

    Data concerning 17 consecutive patients with discrete subaortic stenosis are recorded. Twelve patients underwent operative resection of the obstructing lesion. Of these all except one were symptomatic and all had electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular hypertrophy with strain. They had a peak resting systolic left ventricular outflow tract gradient of greater than 50 mmHg as predicted from the combined cuff measurement of systolic blood pressure and the echocardiographically estimated left ventricular systolic pressure and/or as determined by cardiac catheterisation. The outflow tract gradient as predicted from M-mode echocardiography and peak systolic pressure showed close correlation with that measured at cardiac catheterisation or operation. During the postoperative follow-up from one month to 11 years, of 11 patients, one patient required a further operation for recurrence of the obstruction four years after the initial operation. All patients are now asymptomatic. Five patients have not had an operation. The left ventricular outflow tract gradient as assessed at the time of cardiac catheterisation was greater than 50 mmHg. One patient has been lost to follow-up. The remaining four have been followed from four to eight years and have remained asymptomatic and the electrocardiograms have remained unchanged. Careful follow-up of all patients is essential with continuing clinical assessment, electrocardiograms, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms, and if necessary cardiac catheterisation. Prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis is also essential. Images PMID:6457617

  4. Viscosity in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Shu, F. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of estimating the viscosity in Saturn's rings from the damping rate of waves observed to be propagating within the rings is discussed. The wavetrains of attempts using spiral density waves as a diagnostic suffer significant complications that compromise the interpretations. A method that considers the damping of spiral bending waves was used to deduce a kinematic viscosity of 260 (+150, -100) sqcm/sec for the middle of the A ring where bending waves are excited by the 5:3 vertical resonance with Mimas. This value implies upper limits on the particle velocity dispersion and local ring thickness of 0.4 cm/sec and 30 m, respectively.

  5. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  6. Integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierski, A. F.; Laybourn, P. J. R.

    1988-02-01

    Ring-waveguide and pill-box structures down to 12 microns in diameter, made in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure material, have been designed with output stripe waveguides coupled to the rings via Y-junctions. The waveguides were defined by reactive ion etching, although the inner boundaries of some of the ring waveguides relied on stress and carrier confinement. Lasing has been observed with pulsed drive current, and has been shown to correspond to resonances in the rings, although other resonances have been observed in some of the structures. This type of structure is suitable for use as a light source in monolithic integrated optics.

  7. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  8. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  9. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  10. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  11. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  12. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  13. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  14. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  15. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  16. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  17. The discrete variational derivative method based on discrete differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Takaharu; Matsuo, Takayasu; Sugihara, Masaaki

    2012-05-01

    As is well known, for PDEs that enjoy a conservation or dissipation property, numerical schemes that inherit this property are often advantageous in that the schemes are fairly stable and give qualitatively better numerical solutions in practice. Lately, Furihata and Matsuo have developed the so-called “discrete variational derivative method” that automatically constructs energy preserving or dissipative finite difference schemes. Although this method was originally developed on uniform meshes, the use of non-uniform meshes is of importance for multi-dimensional problems. On the other hand, the theories of discrete differential forms have received much attention recently. These theories provide a discrete analogue of the vector calculus on general meshes. In this paper, we show that the discrete variational derivative method and the discrete differential forms by Bochev and Hyman can be combined. Applications to the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the Klein-Gordon equation on triangular meshes are provided as demonstrations. We also show that the schemes for these equations are H1-stable under some assumptions. In particular, one for the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation is obtained by combination of the energy conservation property and the discrete Poincaré inequality, which are the temporal and spacial structures that are preserved by the above methods.

  18. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations. PMID:20059064

  20. Exact discretization by Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2016-08-01

    A discretization of differential and integral operators of integer and non-integer orders is suggested. New type of differences, which are represented by infinite series, is proposed. A characteristic feature of the suggested differences is an implementation of the same algebraic properties that have the operator of differentiation (property of algebraic correspondence). Therefore the suggested differences are considered as an exact discretization of derivatives. These differences have a property of universality, which means that these operators do not depend on the form of differential equations and the parameters of these equations. The suggested differences operators allows us to have difference equations whose solutions are equal to the solutions of corresponding differential equations. The exact discretization of the derivatives of integer orders is given by the suggested differences of the same integer orders. Similarly, the exact discretization of the Riesz derivatives and integrals of integer and non-integer order is given by the proposed fractional differences of the same order.

  1. Novel approach to data discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Grzegorz; Kowalski, Karol; Jankowski, Cezary

    2015-09-01

    Discretization is an important preprocessing step in data mining. The data discretization method involves determining the ranges of values for numeric attributes, which ultimately represent discrete intervals for new attributes. The ranges for the proposed set of cuts are analyzed, in order to obtain a minimal set of ranges while retaining the possibility of classification. For this purpose, a special discernibility function can be constructed as a conjunction of alternative cuts set for each pair of different objects of different decisions- cuts discern these objects. However, the data mining methods based on discernibility matrix are insufficient for large databases. The purpose of this paper is the idea of implementation of a new data discretization algorithm that is based on statistics of attribute values and that avoids building the discernibility matrix explicitly. Evaluation of time complexity has shown that the proposed method is much more efficient than currently available solutions for large data sets.

  2. Chaos in Periodic Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuming; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Panpan; Huang, Qiuling

    This paper focuses on chaos in periodic discrete systems, whose state space may vary with time. Some close relationships between some chaotic dynamical behaviors of a periodic discrete system and its autonomous induced system are given. Based on these relationships, several criteria of chaos are established and some sufficient conditions for no chaos are given for periodic discrete systems. Further, it is shown that a finite-dimensional linear periodic discrete system is not chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Wiggins. In particular, an interesting problem of whether nonchaotic rules may generate a chaotic system is studied, with some examples provided, one of which surprisingly shows that a composition of globally asymptotically stable maps can be chaotic. In addition, some properties of sign pattern matrices of non-negative square matrices are given for convenience of the study.

  3. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  4. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  5. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  6. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  7. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  8. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.

    1991-02-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  9. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  10. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  11. Review of finite fields: Applications to discrete Fourier, transforms and Reed-Solomon coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, J. S. L.; Truong, T. K.; Benjauthrit, B.; Mulhall, B. D. L.; Reed, I. S.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide a step-by-step approach to the subject of finite fields. Rigorous proofs and highly theoretical materials are avoided. The simple concepts of groups, rings, and fields are discussed and developed more or less heuristically. Examples are used liberally to illustrate the meaning of definitions and theories. Applications include discrete Fourier transforms and Reed-Solomon coding.

  12. Heating Saturn's Clumpy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    We model Cassini CIRS data using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer -- thermal balance technique first developed for protostellar disks, with the goals of:1. Exploring whether the A- and B-ring temperatures' variation with viewing angle is consistent with the wake structures suggested by the observed azimuthal asymmetry in optical depth, by analytic arguments, and by numerical N-body modeling.2. Better constraining the shape, size, spacing and optical depths of substructure in the A-ring, using the unexpectedly high temperatures observed at equinox. If the wake features have high enough contrast, Saturn-shine may penetrate the gaps between the wakes and heat thering particles both top and bottom.3. Determining how much of the heating of the A- and B-rings' unlit sides is due to radiative transport and how much is due to particle motions, especially vertical motions. This will help in constraining the rings' surface densities and masses.

  13. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  14. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mosaic of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This detailed mosaic of the underside of the Cassini Division was obtained by Voyager 1 with a resolution of about 10 kilometers. The classical Cassini Division appears here to the right of center as five bright rings with substantial blacks gap on either side. The inner edge of the A Ring, to the left of center, is the brightest part of this image. The fine-scale wave structure in this region has been interpreted as being the result of gravitational density waves.

  16. Saturn's B rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's B Ring and Cassini Division was taken through the Clear filter from a distance of 12.6 million km on 3 November 1980. The Cassini Division separating the A and B Rings is clearly not an empty region. The Division shows several substantial well-defined ringlets. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  18. Saturn's E ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, W. A.; Kreidl, T.; Westphal, J. A.; Danielson, G. E.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Pascu, D.; Currie, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the tenuous E ring of Saturn made by an earth-based CCD system at the time of the ring-plane crossing of March 1980 are presented. The observations were made with the CCD system attached to the 1.8-m Perkins reflector at Lowell Observatory using a pupil mask behind a focal plane mask to suppress telescopic diffraction. Photometric analysis of the CCD images reveal the edge-on brightness profile of the ring, beginning at a distance of 3 Saturn radii, to peak sharply in the vicinity of the orbit of Enceladus at about 4 Saturn radii, then decrease to a distance of over 8 Saturn radii. In addition, beyond Enceladus, the edge-on width of the ring is observed to increase with radial distance, reaching nearly 5 arcsec at 7 Saturn radii. Observations suggest, on the one hand, that the E ring is associated with Enceladus and possibly represents material ejected from the satellite, and on the other, that the ring is at an early stage in its evolution.

  19. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  20. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  1. On Cryptographic Schemes Based on Discrete Logarithms and Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, Marc

    At CRYPTO 2003, Rubin and Silverberg introduced the concept of torus-based cryptography over a finite field. We extend their setting to the ring of integers modulo N. We so obtain compact representations for cryptographic systems that base their security on the discrete logarithm problem and the factoring problem. This results in smaller key sizes and substantial savings in memory and bandwidth. But unlike the case of finite fields, analogous trace-based compression methods cannot be adapted to accommodate our extended setting when the underlying systems require more than a mere exponentiation. As an application, we present an improved, torus-based implementation of the ACJT group signature scheme.

  2. Discretion or discretions? Delineating professional discretion: the case of English medical practice.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Calnan, Michael

    2013-11-01

    There has much debate about the extent to which professional discretion has been challenged by recent organisational changes such as through the new forms of governance associated with the introduction of the principles of the New Public Management (NPM) into health systems and other public sector services. What appears to be missing from these debates is a detailed analysis of the concept of professional discretion itself. This paper attempts to fill this gap by delineating the key concepts of professional discretion evident in the literature and exploring their significance in an empirical study of the influence of the 2004 new general medical services contract (nGMS) and the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a prescriptive pay-for-performance system designed to standardise the quality of care provision in general medical practice in the United Kingdom. The study adopted a longitudinal design using semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs, N = 62) working in the English National Health Service (NHS) between 2007 and 2009. A multi-dimensional conception of discretion was used to explore how GP discretion might have been influenced by contractual changes and in particular, QOF. The findings suggest that through a complex interplay of factors, a post-QOF reduction in GP discretion was identifiable, highlighting different potential sources of constraint such as in the social, organisational and economic dimensions of discretion. The evidence also suggested the emergence of a new form of organisational medical professionalism within general practice characterised by standardisation, bureaucracy and performance management. PMID:24034951

  3. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  4. What's up with witch rings?

    PubMed

    Heard, Priscilla; Phillips, David

    2015-01-01

    'Witch rings' are well-known novelty rings that show a size-change illusion when rotated. We have replicated the illusion of expansion of the reflections in the rings in a variety of contexts with animations, though not as yet so successfully imitated the sense that the whole ring expands and contracts. PMID:26489222

  5. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  6. Mapping Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Pilorz, S. H.; Deau, E.

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and quick temperature responses are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid, coherent particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias (Ferrari et al. 2005). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded millions of spectra of Saturn's rings since its arrival at Saturn in 2004 (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 (16.7 and 1000 µm) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks in this wavelength range. FP1 spectra can be used to infer ring temperatures. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is dominated by the solar radiation absorbed by its constituent particles. When ring particles enter Saturn's shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off. As a result, ring particles cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  7. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  8. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Tylmann, Karol

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used in this study to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. Complementary to analog experiments, the numerical approach allows a detailed analysis of the material dynamics and the shear zone development during progressive shear strain. The geometry of the heterogeneous stress network is visible in the form of force-carrying grain bridges and adjacent, volumetrically dominant, inactive zones. We demonstrate how the shear zone thickness and dilation depend on the level of normal (overburden) stress, and we show how high normal stress can mobilize material to great depths. The particle rotational axes tend to align with progressive shear strain, with rotations both along and reverse to the shear direction. The results from successive laboratory ring-shear experiments on simple granular materials are compared to results from similar numerical experiments. The simulated DEM material and all tested laboratory materials deform by an elastoplastic rheology under the applied effective normal stress. These results demonstrate that the DEM is a viable alternative to continuum models for small-scale analysis of sediment deformation. It can be used to simulate the macromechanical behavior of simple granular sediments, and it provides an opportunity to study how microstructures in subglacial sediments are formed during progressive shear strain.

  9. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  10. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  11. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  12. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  13. [Fast and accurate extraction of ring-down time in cavity ring-down spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Ling, Liu-Yi; Duan, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Research is conducted to accurate and efficient algorithms for extracting ring-down time (r) in cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) which is used to measure NO3 radical in the atmosphere. Fast and accurate extraction of ring-down time guarantees more precise and higher speed of measurement. In this research, five kinds of commonly used algorithms are selected to extract ring-down time which respectively are fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm, linear regression of the sum (LRS) algorithm, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and least squares (LS) algorithm. Simulated ring-down signals with various amplitude levels of white noises are fitted by using five kinds of the above-mentioned algorithms, and comparison and analysis is conducted to the fitting results of five kinds of algorithms from four respects: the vulnerability to noises, the accuracy and precision of the fitting, the speed of the fitting and preferable fitting ring-down signal waveform length The research results show that Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and linear regression of the sum algorithm are able to provide more precise results and prove to have higher noises immunity, and by comparison, the fitting speed of Leven- berg-Marquardt algorithm turns out to be slower. In addition, by analysis of simulated ring-down signals, five to ten times of ring-down time is selected to be the best fitting waveform length because in this case, standard deviation of fitting results of five kinds of algorithms proves to be the minimum. External modulation diode laser and cavity which consists of two high reflectivity mirrors are used to construct a cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection system. According to our experimental conditions, in which the noise level is 0.2%, linear regression of the sum algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm are selected to process experimental data. The experimental results show that the accuracy and precision of linear regression of

  14. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  15. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  16. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    SciTech Connect

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm{sup 2} exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  17. Some discrete multiple orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesú, J.; Coussement, J.; van Assche, W.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the theory of discrete orthogonal polynomials (on a linear lattice) to polynomials satisfying orthogonality conditions with respect to r positive discrete measures. First we recall the known results of the classical orthogonal polynomials of Charlier, Meixner, Kravchuk and Hahn (T.S. Chihara, An Introduction to Orthogonal Polynomials, Gordon and Breach, New York, 1978; R. Koekoek and R.F. Swarttouw, Reports of the Faculty of Technical Mathematics and Informatics No. 98-17, Delft, 1998; A.F. Nikiforov et al., Classical Orthogonal Polynomials of a Discrete Variable, Springer, Berlin, 1991). These polynomials have a lowering and raising operator, which give rise to a Rodrigues formula, a second order difference equation, and an explicit expression from which the coefficients of the three-term recurrence relation can be obtained. Then we consider r positive discrete measures and define two types of multiple orthogonal polynomials. The continuous case (Jacobi, Laguerre, Hermite, etc.) was studied by Van Assche and Coussement (J. Comput. Appl. Math. 127 (2001) 317-347) and Aptekarev et al. (Multiple orthogonal polynomials for classical weights, manuscript). The families of multiple orthogonal polynomials (of type II) that we will study have a raising operator and hence a Rodrigues formula. This will give us an explicit formula for the polynomials. Finally, there also exists a recurrence relation of order r+1 for these multiple orthogonal polynomials of type II. We compute the coefficients of the recurrence relation explicitly when r=2.

  18. Sliding-Ring Catenanes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Frasconi, Marco; Wu, Yilei; Liu, Wei-Guang; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-08-17

    Template-directed protocols provide a routine approach to the synthesis of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), in which the mechanical bonds are stabilized by a wide variety of weak interactions. In this Article, we describe a strategy for the preparation of neutral [2]catenanes with sliding interlocked electron-rich rings, starting from two degenerate donor-acceptor [2]catenanes, consisting of a tetracationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) cyclophane (CBPQT(4+)) and crown ethers containing either (i) hydroquinone (HQ) or (ii) 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) recognition units and carrying out four-electron reductions of the cyclophane components to their neutral forms. The donor-acceptor interactions between the CBPQT(4+) ring and both HQ and DNP units present in the crown ethers that stabilize the [2]catenanes are weakened upon reduction of the cyclophane components to their radical cationic states and are all but absent in their fully reduced states. Characterization in solution performed by UV-vis, EPR, and NMR spectroscopic probes reveals that changes in the redox properties of the [2]catenanes result in a substantial decrease of the energy barriers for the circumrotation and pirouetting motions of the interlocked rings, which glide freely through one another in the neutral states. The solid-state structures of the fully reduced catenanes reveal profound changes in the relative dispositions of the interlocked rings, with the glycol chains of the crown ethers residing in the cavities of the neutral CBPQT(0) rings. Quantum mechanical investigations of the energy levels associated with the four different oxidation states of the catenanes support this interpretation. Catenanes and rotaxanes with sliding rings are expected to display unique properties. PMID:27398609

  19. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  20. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  1. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  2. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  3. The covariant chiral ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, Antoine; Troost, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We construct a covariant generating function for the spectrum of chiral primaries of symmetric orbifold conformal field theories with N = (4 , 4) supersymmetry in two dimensions. For seed target spaces K3 and T 4, the generating functions capture the SO(21) and SO(5) representation theoretic content of the chiral ring respectively. Via string dualities, we relate the transformation properties of the chiral ring under these isometries of the moduli space to the Lorentz covariance of perturbative string partition functions in flat space.

  4. Discrete implementations of scale transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurdjanovic, Dragan; Williams, William J.; Koh, Christopher K.

    1999-11-01

    Scale as a physical quantity is a recently developed concept. The scale transform can be viewed as a special case of the more general Mellin transform and its mathematical properties are very applicable in the analysis and interpretation of the signals subject to scale changes. A number of single-dimensional applications of scale concept have been made in speech analysis, processing of biological signals, machine vibration analysis and other areas. Recently, the scale transform was also applied in multi-dimensional signal processing and used for image filtering and denoising. Discrete implementation of the scale transform can be carried out using logarithmic sampling and the well-known fast Fourier transform. Nevertheless, in the case of the uniformly sampled signals, this implementation involves resampling. An algorithm not involving resampling of the uniformly sampled signals has been derived too. In this paper, a modification of the later algorithm for discrete implementation of the direct scale transform is presented. In addition, similar concept was used to improve a recently introduced discrete implementation of the inverse scale transform. Estimation of the absolute discretization errors showed that the modified algorithms have a desirable property of yielding a smaller region of possible error magnitudes. Experimental results are obtained using artificial signals as well as signals evoked from the temporomandibular joint. In addition, discrete implementations for the separable two-dimensional direct and inverse scale transforms are derived. Experiments with image restoration and scaling through two-dimensional scale domain using the novel implementation of the separable two-dimensional scale transform pair are presented.

  5. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  6. Interaction of multiple co-axial co-rotating vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Suyang; Liu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Fish and birds gain hydrodynamic force from a wake of discrete or linked vortex chain, which is the existence form of vortex rings in nature. Vortex rings with the same formation time are generated successively with different time interval by a piston-cylinder arrangement, and the velocity fields are measured using DPIV. The motion of multiple interacting vortex rings is first reported in laboratorial experiments. Besides the most attracting leapfrogging phenomenon, two other phenomena, suction and weak influence, are also clearly presented using the method of Lagrangian coherent structures. Due to the induced effect of wake vortex rings, the formation process of the forming vortex rings is different from that of a single isolated vortex ring, indicating that another distinct timescale exists, together with formation number proposed by Gharib (1998 JFM), determining the mechanisms of vortex rings. When the rear vortex ring leapfrogs, the limiting case is that the rear contracting ring is axis-touching. If an axis-touching ring is further squeezed by the wake vortex, the vortex structure will collapse, which can be explained by Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle. According to this principle, it is impossible for two optimal formed vortex rings to leapfrog. Financial support from the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2014CB744802) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  8. Hybrid integrated metro ring node subsystem on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, Reinald; Fujita, Junichiro; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Zhuromskyy, Oleksandr; Eldada, Louay A.

    2003-07-01

    We report on a hybrid integrated metro ring node subsystem on a chip that consists of an array of four independent reconfigurable optical add-drop circuits, each with power monitoring and automatic load balancing, and supporting shared and dedicated protection protocols in two-fiber metro ring optical networks. The four-channel metro ring node chip has polymeric optical waveguiding circuitry, thermally actuated with heaters consisting of resistive strips of metal. Photodiode arrays are flip-chip mounted on top of 45° mirrors cut in the waveguides of optical power taps. The mirrors are fabricated by Excimer laser ablation of the polymer followed by smoothing and metalization. The non-integrated implementation of a metro ring node uses 48 discrete elements, namely 8 1×2 switches, 8 2×2 switches, 8 VOAs, 12 taps, and 12 photodiodes. The proposed integrated solution is an exemplary embodiment of the benefits of optoelectronic integration as it provides, when compared to the discrete solution, significant cost reduction, space savings, lower electrical power consumption, higher reliability (fewer devices, runs cooler), and fewer board-level fiber interconnects.

  9. Flushing Ring for EDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earwood, L.

    1985-01-01

    Removing debris more quickly lowers cutting time. Operation, cutting oil and pressurized air supplied to ring placed around workpiece. Air forces oil through small holes and agitates oil as it flows over workpiece. High flow rate and agitation dislodge and remove debris. Electrical discharge removes material from workpiece faster.

  10. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  11. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Models of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Brophy, T. G.; Stewart, Glen R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager occultations provide several uniform and high quality data sets for Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. These data are intercompared, and theoretical models for the particle sizes and the particle transport are developed. The major topics covered include: ring size distribution, torques and resonances, and satellite wakes.

  13. Tool Support Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tool support ring requires only single repositioning to give broaching tool access to series of 66 holes located on circle. Permits use of tools designed for hand-held use (such as electric drill) where less portable setup (such as milling machine) otherwise required.

  14. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  15. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  16. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  17. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  18. Regimes of operation states in passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y. D.; Shum, P.; Tang, D. Y.; Lu, C.; Guo, X.; Paulose, V.; Man, W. S.; Tam, H. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The principal of passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring lasers is summarized, including its three output operation states: normal soliton, bound-solitons and noise-like pulse. The experimental results of the passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring lasers developed by us are given. Bound-solitons with different discrete separations and three-bound-solitons state have been observed in our fiber laser for the first time. The relationship among three operation states in fiber soliton laser is analyzed.

  19. Do tree ring chronologies have missing rings that distort volcanic cooling signal?: Tree ring records not distorted by missing rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    Tree ring records are often used as a proxy for past climate. Trees form a new growth ring each year, and ring widths are related to temperature and other conditions at cold sites. Some recent studies have noted that tree ring width chronologies and resulting climate reconstructions do not appear to show the widespread cooling in the past millennium that would be expected following large volcanic eruptions. One hypothesis suggests that regional cooling after a volcanic eruption could be so severe that many trees do not form a ring at all, which leads researchers to misdate the tree ring chronology.

  20. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  1. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  2. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound biomedical B-scan images using discrete topological derivative.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Nedumaran; Ramamurthy, Sivakumar; Velusamy, Sekar; Manickam, Gayathri Kanakaraj

    2012-02-01

    Over three decades, several despeckling techniques have been developed by researchers to reduce the speckle noise inherently present in ultrasound B-scan images without losing the diagnostic information. The topological derivative (TD) is the recently adopted technique in the area of biomedical image processing. In this work, we computed the topological derivative for an appropriate function associated to the ultrasound B-scan image gradient by assigning a diffusion factor k, which indicates the cost endowed to that particular image. In this article, a novel image denoising approach, called discrete topological derivative (DTD) has been implemented. The algorithm has been developed in MATLAB7.1 and tested over 200 ultrasound B-scan images of several organs such as the liver, kidney, gall bladder and pancreas. Further, the performance of the DTD algorithm has been estimated by calculating important performance metrics. A comparative study was carried out between the DTD and the traditional despeckling techniques. The calculated peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) (the ratio between the maximum possible power of a signal and the power of corrupting noise that affects the fidelity of its representation) value of the DTD despeckled liver image is found to be 28 which is comparable with the outperformed speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) filter. SRAD filter is an edge-sensitive diffusion method for speckled images of ultrasonic and radar imaging applications. Canny edge detection and visual inspection of DTD filtered images by the trained radiologist found that the DTD algorithm preserves the hypoechoic and hyperechoic regions resulting in improved diagnosis as well as tissue characterization. PMID:22230135

  3. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  4. Dark Energy from Discrete Spacetime

    PubMed Central

    Trout, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  5. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    PubMed

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  6. Class of discrete Gabor expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shidong; Healy, Dennis M., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    We present a new approach to studying a discrete Gabor expansion (DGE). We show that, in general, DGE is not the usual biorthogonal decomposition, but belongs to a larger and looser decomposition scheme which we call pseudo frame decomposition. It includes the DGE scheme proposed as a special case. The standard dual frame decomposition is also a special case. We derive algorithms using techniques for Gabor sequences to compute 'biorthogonal' sequences through proper matrix representation. Our algorithms involve solutions to a linear system to obtain the 'biorthogonal' windows. This approach provides a much broader mathematical view of the DGE, and therefore, establishes a wider mathematical foundation towards the theory of DGE. The general algorithm derived also provides a whole class of discrete Gabor expansions, among which 'good' ones can be generated. Simulation results are also provided.

  7. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    Saturn's icy ring particles, with their low thermal conductivity, are almost ideal for the operation of the Yarkovsky effects. The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by a near balancing of the seasonal Yarkovsky effect with the Yarkovsky- Schach effect. The two effects, which are photon thrust due to temperature gradients, may confine the A and B rings to within their observed dimensions. The C ring may be sparsely populated with icy particles because Yarkovsky drag has pulled them into Saturn, leaving the more slowly orbitally decaying rocky particles. Icy ring particles ejected from the B ring and passing through the C ring, as well as some of the slower rocky particles, should fall on Saturn's equator, where they may create a luminous "Ring of Fire" around Saturn's equator. This predicted Ring of Fire may be visible to Cassini's camera. Curiously, the speed of outwards Yarkovsky orbital evolution appears to peak near the Cassini Division. The connection between the two is not clear. D. Nesvorny has speculated that the resonance at the outer edge of the B ring may impede particles from evolving via Yarkovsky across the Division. If supply from the B ring is largely cut off, then Yarkovsky may push icy particles outward, away from the inner edge of the A ring, leaving only the rocky ones in the Division. The above scenarios depend delicately on the properties of the icy particles.

  8. A FORTRAN Program for Discrete Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, James O.; Brewer, James K.

    1976-01-01

    A Fortran program is presented for discriminant analysis of discrete variables. The program assumes discrete, nominal data with no distributional, variance-covariance assumptions. The program handles a maximum of fifty predictor variables and twelve outcome groups. (Author/JKS)

  9. Efficient genetic algorithms using discretization scheduling.

    PubMed

    McLay, Laura A; Goldberg, David E

    2005-01-01

    In many applications of genetic algorithms, there is a tradeoff between speed and accuracy in fitness evaluations when evaluations use numerical methods with varying discretization. In these types of applications, the cost and accuracy vary from discretization errors when implicit or explicit quadrature is used to estimate the function evaluations. This paper examines discretization scheduling, or how to vary the discretization within the genetic algorithm in order to use the least amount of computation time for a solution of a desired quality. The effectiveness of discretization scheduling can be determined by comparing its computation time to the computation time of a GA using a constant discretization. There are three ingredients for the discretization scheduling: population sizing, estimated time for each function evaluation and predicted convergence time analysis. Idealized one- and two-dimensional experiments and an inverse groundwater application illustrate the computational savings to be achieved from using discretization scheduling. PMID:16156928

  10. Anomalies and Discrete Chiral Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2009-09-07

    The quantum anomaly that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.

  11. Discrete vortex representation of magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    We present an alternative approach to statistical analysis of an intermittent ideal MHD fluid in two dimensions, based on the hydrodynamical discrete vortex model applied to the Elsasser variables. The model contains negative temperature states which predict the formation of magnetic islands, but also includes a natural limit under which the equilibrium states revert to the familiar twin-vortex states predicted by hydrodynamical turbulence theories. Numerical dynamical calculations yield equilibrium spectra in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  12. Discrete-contact nanowire photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Michelle J.; Wen, Wen; Maldonado, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A series of finite-element simulations have been performed to assess the operational characteristics of a new semiconductor nanowire solar cell design operating under high-level injection conditions. Specifically, the steady-state current-voltage behavior of a cylindrical silicon (Si) nanowire with a series of discrete, ohmic-selective contacts under intense sunlight illumination was investigated. The scope of the analysis was limited to only the factors that impact the net internal quantum yield for solar to electricity conversion. No evaluations were performed with regards to optical light trapping in the modeled structures. Several aspects in a discrete-contact nanowire device that could impact operation were explored, including the size and density of ohmic-selective contacts, the size of the nanowire, the electronic quality and conductivity of the nanowire, the surface defect density of the nanowire, and the type of ohmic selectivity employed at each contact. The analysis showed that there were ranges of values for each parameter that supported good to excellent photoresponses, with certain combinations of experimentally attainable material properties yielding internal energy conversion efficiencies at the thermodynamic limit for a single junction cell. The merits of the discrete-contact nanowire cell were contrasted with "conventional" nanowire photovoltaic cells featuring a uniform conformal contact and also with planar point-contact solar cells. The unique capacity of the discrete-contact nanowire solar cell design to operate at useful energy conversion efficiencies with low quality semiconductor nanowires (i.e., possessing short charge-carrier lifetimes) with only light doping is discussed. This work thus defines the impetus for future experimental work aimed at developing this photovoltaic architecture.

  13. Symmetric Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Orchard, Jeff

    2008-09-01

    The Stockwell Transform (ST) is a time-frequency signal decomposition that is gaining in popularity, likely because of its direct relation with the Fourier Transform (FT). A discrete and non-redundant version of the ST, denoted the Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform (DOST), has made the use of the ST more feasible. However, the matrix multiplication required by the DOST can still be a formidable computation, especially for high-dimensional data. Moreover, the symmetric property of the ST and FT is not present in the DOST. In this paper, we investigate a new Symmetric Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform (SDOST) that still keeps the non-redundant multiresolution features of the DOST, while maintaining a symmetry property similar to that of the FT. First, we give a brief introduction for the ST and the DOST. Then we analyze the DOST coefficients and modify the transform to get a symmetric version. A small experiment shows that the SDOST has kept the abilities of the DOST and demonstrates the advantage of symmetry when applying the SDOST.

  14. Interference in discrete Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cormick, Cecilia; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2006-12-15

    We analyze some features of the class of discrete Wigner functions that was recently introduced by Gibbons et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] to represent quantum states of systems with power-of-prime dimensional Hilbert spaces. We consider ''cat'' states obtained as coherent superpositions of states with positive Wigner function; for such states we show that the oscillations of the discrete Wigner function typically spread over the entire discrete phase space (including the regions where the two interfering states are localized). This is a generic property, which is in sharp contrast with the usual attributes of Wigner functions that make them useful candidates to display the existence of quantum coherence through oscillations. However, it is possible to find subsets of cat states with a natural phase-space representation, in which the oscillatory regions remain localized. We show that this can be done for interesting families of stabilizer states used in quantum error-correcting codes, and illustrate this by analyzing the phase-space representation of the five-qubit error-correcting code.

  15. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  16. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  17. Planetary rings: Structure and history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.

    The composition and structure of planetary rings provide the key evidence to understand their origin and evolution. Before the first space observations, we were able to maintain an idealized view of the rings around Saturn, the only known ring system at that time. Rings were then discovered around Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. Saturn's F ring was discovered by Pioneer 11. Our ideal view of circular, planar, symmetric and unchanging rings was shattered by observations of inclined, eccentric rings, waves and wavy edges, and numerous processes acting at rates that give timescales much younger than the solar system. Moons within and near the rings sculpt them and are the likely progenitors of future rings. The moonlet lifetimes are much less than Saturn's age. The old idea of ancient rings gave rise to youthful rings, that are recently created by erosion and destruction of small nearby moons. Although this explanation may work well for most rings, Saturn's massive ring system provides a problem. It is extremely improbable that Saturn's rings were recently created by the destruction of a moon as large as Mimas, or even by the breakup of a large comet that passed too close to Saturn. The history of Saturn's rings has been a difficult problem, now made even more challenging by the close-up Cassini measurements. Cassini observations show unexpected ring variability in time and space. Time variations are seen in ring edges, in the thinner D and F rings, and in the neutral oxygen cloud, which outweighs the E ring in the same region around Saturn. The rings are inhomogeneous, with structures on all scales, sharp gradients and edges. Compositional gradients are sharper than expected, but nonetheless cross structural boundaries. This is evidence for ballistic transport that has not gone to completion. The autocovariance maximizes in the middle of the A ring, with smaller structure near the main rings' outer edge. Density wave locations have a fresher ice composition. The

  18. Connector contact-ring bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligon, J.

    1976-01-01

    Use of device eliminates crimp connectors and ferrules, resulting in compact termination assembly and efficient use of back-shell space. Pair of insulator rings, one at each end of assembly, provides spacing between disc caps and contact rings.

  19. A ring galaxy in Canes Venatici and related ring galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Nishida, M.T. Kobe Women's University )

    1991-04-01

    A spectroscopic observation was made of a ring-shaped object in Canes Venatici. A bright knot at the edge of the ring has a recession velocity of 10,960 + or - 30 km/s and so is confirmed as an extragalactic object. It shows no sign of nuclear activity but appears to be an H II region of intermediate excitation class. The linear diameter of the ring is 14.2 + or - 0.8 kpc, a typical size for ring galaxies. Recession velocities of several other ring galaxies are also given. 24 refs.

  20. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-01

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn. PMID:17842136

  1. Electrostatic forces in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Shan, Linhua; Havnes, O.

    1988-01-01

    The average charge on a particle in a particle-plasma cloud, the plasma potential inside the cloud, and the Coulomb force acting on the particle are calculated. The net repulsive electrostatic force on a particle depends on the plasma density, temperature, density of particles, particle size, and the gradient of the particle density. In a uniformly dense ring the electrostatic repulsion is zero. It is also shown that the electrostatic force acts like a pressure force, that even a collisionless ring can be stable against gravitational collapse, and that a finite ring thickness does not necessarily imply a finite velocity dispersion. A simple criterion for the importance of electrostatic forces in planetary rings is derived which involves the calculation of the vertical ring thickness which would result if only electrostatic repulsion were responsible for the finite ring thickness. Electrostatic forces are entirely negligible in the main rings of Saturn and the E and G rings. They may also be negligible in the F ring. However, the Uranian rings and Jupiter's ring seem to be very much influenced by electrostatic repulsion. In fact, electrostatic forces could support a Jovian ring which is an order of magnitude more dense than observed.

  2. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  3. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  4. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  5. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Oligomeric ferrocene rings.

    PubMed

    Inkpen, Michael S; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J P; Winter, Rainer F; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category-differently sized rings comprising only 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e(-) waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (∼10(7) s(-1)), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ∼1-2 nm). PMID:27554408

  7. Swarming rings of bacteria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, M. P.; Levitov, L. S.

    1996-03-01

    The behavior of bacterii controlled by chemotaxis can lead to a complicated spatial organization, producing swarming rings, and steady or moving aggregates( E. O. Budrene, and H. C. Berg, Complex patterns formed by motile cells of Escherichia coli. Nature 349, 630-633 (1991). ). We present a simple theory that explains the experimentally observed structures, by solving analytically two coupled differential equations, for the densities of bacterii and of chemoattractant. The equations have an interesting relation to the exactly solvable Burgers equation, and admit soliton-like solutions, that can be steady or moving. In addition, we find that there are singular solutions to the equations in which the bacterial density diverges. The theory agrees very well with the experiment: the solitons correspond to the observed travelling rings, the singularities describe formation of aggregates. In particular, the theory explains why the velocity of swarming rings decreases with the increase of the food concentration, the fact apparently not accounted by other existing approaches( L. Tsimring et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 75, 1859 (1995); Woodward, et al, Biophysical Journal, 68, 2181-2189 (1995). ).

  8. Discrete element modelling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A. D.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Soft, deformable sediments are often present under glaciers. Subglacial sediments deform under the differential load of the ice, and this causes the overlying glacier to accelerate its motion. Understanding the rheology of subglacial sediment is therefore important for models of glacial dynamics. Previous studies of the mechanical behaviour of subglacial sediments have primarily relied on analytical considerations and laboratory shearing experiments. As a novel approach, the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed that is exposed to stress conditions comparable to subglacial environments. The numerical approach allows close monitoring of the mechanical and rheological behaviour under a range of conditions. Of special interest is bed shear strength, strain distribution and -localization, mode of deformation, and role of effective normal pressure during shearing. As a calibration benchmark, results from laboratory ring-shear experiments on granular material are compared to similar numerical experiments. The continuously recorded stress dynamics in the laboratory shear experiments are compared to DEM experiments, and the micro-mechanical parameters in the contact model of the DEM code are calibrated to match the macroscopic Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria parameters, constrained from successive laboratory shear tests under a range of normal pressures. The data-parallel nature of the basic DEM formulation makes the problem ideal for utilizing the high arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia Cuda C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a soft-body contact model. Scene rendering is performed using a custom Cuda ray-tracing algorithm. Efforts on optimization of the particle algorithm are discussed, and future plans of expansion are presented.

  9. Uranus rings and two moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Voyager 2 has discovered two 'shepherd' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons -- designated 1986U7 and 1986U8 -- are seen here on either side of the bright epsilon ring; all nine of the known Uranian rings are visible. The image was taken Jan. 21, 1986, at a distance of 4.1 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) and resolution of about 36 km (22 mi). The image was processed to enhance narrow features. The epsilon ring appears surrounded by a dark halo as a result of this processing; occasional blips seen on the ring are also artifacts. Lying inward from the epsilon ring are the delta, gamma and eta rings; then the beta and alpha rings; and finally the barely visible 4, 5 and 6 rings. The rings have been studied since their discovery in 1977, through observations of how they diminish the light of stars they pass in front of. This image is the first direct observation of all nine rings in reflected sunlight. They range in width from about 100 km (60 mi) at the widest part of the epsilon ring to only a few kilometers for most of the others. The discovery of the two ring moons 1986U7 and 1986U8 is a major advance in our understanding of the structure of the Uranian rings and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions of how these narrow rings are kept from spreading out. Based on likely surface brightness properties, the moons are of roughly 2O- and 3O-km diameter, respectively. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. New instability of Saturn's ring

    SciTech Connect

    Goertz, C.K.; Morfill, G.

    1988-05-01

    Perturbations in the Saturn ring's mass density are noted to be prone to instabilities through the sporadic elevation of submicron-size dust particles above the rings, which furnishes an effective angular momentum exchange between the rings and Saturn. The dust thus elevated from the ring settles back onto it at a different radial distance. The range of wavelength instability is determinable in light of the dust charge, the average radial displacement of the dust, and the fluctuation of these quantities. It is suggested that at least some of the B-ring's ringlets may arise from the instability.

  11. New rings found around Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    Images of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera in September, with the Sun directly behind the planet, have revealed the existence of two new rings around the planet and have confirmed the presence of two other suspected rings, NASA announced on11 October. Two of the rings are associated with, and share the orbits of, one or more Saturn moonlets, and scientists expect to find a moonlet in at least one of the other two rings. Because the moonlets are so small, their gravity is too weak to retain material on their surfaces when struck by meteoroids, and this material creates diffuse rings along theirpaths.

  12. Planetary ring dynamics and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Durisen, Richard H.; Shu, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for a moonlet belt in the region between Saturn's close-in moonrings Pandora and Prometheus is discussed. It is argued that little-known observations of magnetospheric electron density by Pioneer 11 imply substantial, ongoing injections of mass into the 2000 km region which surrounds the F ring. A hypothesis is presented that these events result naturally from interparticle collisions between the smaller members of an optically thin belt of moonlets. Also discussed is work on Uranus ring structure and photometry, image processing and analysis of the Jonian ring strucure, photometric and structural studies of the A ring of Saturn, and improvements to an image processing system for ring studies.

  13. Driven discrete time quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Craig S.; Barkhofen, Sonja; Sansoni, Linda; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the driven discrete time quantum walk (QW), where walkers are added during the walk instead of only at the beginning. This leads to interference in walker number and very different dynamics when compared to the original QW. These dynamics have two regimes, which we illustrate using the one-dimensional line. Then, we explore a search application which has certain advantages over current search protocols, namely that it does not require a complicated initial state nor a specific measurement time to observe the marked state. Finally, we describe a potential experimental implementation using existing technology.

  14. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  15. Flexible optical manipulation of ring resonator by frequency detuning and double-port excitation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Zhu, Tongtong; Lv, Haiyi; Cao, Yongyin; Sun, Fangkui; Ding, Weiqiang

    2016-07-11

    Optical force exerted on a ring resonator, which can move freely in plane, is investigated using the finite-difference in time-domain method. In order to manipulate the ring resonator more flexibly, two assistant waveguides are introduced to form a microring resonator based add-drop device. Results show that a blue tuned source is more suitable for the manipulation of the ring, rather than the central resonant frequency as expected. A red-tuned frequency, however, is difficult to trap the ring stably. When the frequency detuning is combined with selected double-port excitation, the ring can be trapped stably at some discrete positions, some determined regions, or be transported continuously along the waveguide. This optically reconfigurable opto-mechanical resonant system may find potential applications in tunable photonic devices and precise sensing. PMID:27410856

  16. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  17. Discreteness effects in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-05-01

    We analyse numerically the effects of small population size in the initial transient regime of a simple example population dynamics. These effects play an important role for the numerical determination of large deviation functions of additive observables for stochastic processes. A method commonly used in order to determine such functions is the so-called cloning algorithm which in its non-constant population version essentially reduces to the determination of the growth rate of a population, averaged over many realizations of the dynamics. However, the averaging of populations is highly dependent not only on the number of realizations of the population dynamics, and on the initial population size but also on the cut-off time (or population) considered to stop their numerical evolution. This may result in an over-influence of discreteness effects at initial times, caused by small population size. We overcome these effects by introducing a (realization-dependent) time delay in the evolution of populations, additional to the discarding of the initial transient regime of the population growth where these discreteness effects are strong. We show that the improvement in the estimation of the large deviation function comes precisely from these two main contributions.

  18. Clusters in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hvelplund, P.; Andersen, J. U.; Hansen, K.

    1999-01-15

    Anions of fullerenes and small metal clusters have been stored in the storage rings ASTRID and ELISA. Decays on a millisecond time scale are due to electron emission from metastable excited states. For the fullerenes the decay curves have been interpreted in terms of thermionic emission quenched by radiative cooling. The stored clusters were heated by a Nd:YAG laser resulting in increased emission rates. With an OPO laser this effect was used to study the wavelength dependence of the absorption of light in hot C{sub 60}{sup -} ion molecules.

  19. The Structure of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Murray, C. D.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.

    Our understanding of the structure of Saturn's rings has evolved steadily since their discovery by Galileo Galilei in 1610. With each advance in observations of the rings over the last four centuries, new structure has been revealed, starting with the recognition that the rings are a disk by Huygens in 1656 through discoveries of the broad organization of the main rings and their constituent gaps and ringlets to Cassini observations that indirectly reveal individual clumps of particles tens of meters in size. The variety of structure is as broad as the range in scales. The main rings have distinct characteristics on a spatial scale of 104 km that suggest dramatically different evolution and perhaps even different origins. On smaller scales, the A and C ring and Cassini Division are punctuated by gaps from tens to hundreds of kilometer across, while the B ring is littered with unexplained variations in optical depth on similar scales. Moons are intimately involved with much of the structure in the rings. The outer edges of the A and B rings are shepherded and sculpted by resonances with the Janus—Epimetheus coorbitals and Mimas, respectively. Density waves at the locations of orbital resonances with nearby and embedded moons make up the majority of large-scale features in the A ring. Moons orbiting within the Encke and Keeler gaps in the A ring create those gaps and produce wakes in the nearby ring. Other gaps and wave-like features await explanation. The largest ring particles, while not massive enough to clear a gap, produce localized propeller-shaped disturbances hundreds of meters long. Particles throughout the A and B rings cluster into strands or self-gravity wakes tens of meters across that are in equilibrium between gravitational accretion and Keplerian shear. In the peaks of strong density waves particles pile together in a cosmic traffic jam that results in kilometer-long strands that may be larger versions of self-gravity wakes. The F ring is a showcase

  20. Orbits of nine Uranian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; French, R. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Elias, J. H.; Mink, D. J.; Liller, W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of a stellar occultation by Uranus and its nine rings are presented and used to examine the structures and kinematics of the rings. The observations of the occultation of the K giant star KM 12 were obtained in the K band with the 4-m CTIO telescope at a signal-to-noise ratio higher than any previously obtained. Ring occultation profiles reveal the alpha ring to possibly have a double structure and less abrupt boundaries than the gamma ring, which exhibits diffraction fringes, while the eta ring is a broad ring with an unresolved narrow component at its inner edge. The present timing data, as well as previous occultation timings, are fit to a kinematic model in which all nine rings are treated as coplanar eclipses of zero inclination, precessing due to the zonal harmonics of the Uranian gravitational potential to obtain solutions for the ring orbits. Analysis of the residuals from the fitted orbits reveals that the proposed model is a good representation of ring kinematics. The reference system defined by the orbit solutions has also been used to obtain a value of 0.022 + or - 0.003 for the ellipticity of Uranus and a Uranian rotation period of 15.5 h.

  1. Observational studies of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1987-01-01

    Several noteworthy phenomena in Saturn's rings were investigated which have until now received an inadequate amount of attention. Among these are the periodic variation of the spokes in the B ring and eccentric features throughout the rings. One of the major discoveries by Voyager was the existence of eccentric features within the predominantly circular rings of Saturn. Several of these nonaxisymmetric features are narrow elliptical rings which share many characteristics with the rings of Uranus. In recent work, two narrow ringlets were added to the list of eccentric features in the rings of Saturn. Voyager imaging and occultation data are now in hand, as well as image-processing software which allows accurate absolute positional measurements to be made in Voyager imaging data. Work is in progress to re-examine this region of Saturn's rings and to study the possibility of a dynamical interaction between the outer B ring edge, the Huygens ringlet and the nearby Mimas 2:1 resonance. An understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of this region promises to yield important clues to a matter of great interest in both theoretical and observation ring studies.

  2. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youn Cheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon; Sakellariou, George; Allgaier, Jürgen; Takano, Atsushi; Brás, Ana R.; Chang, Taihyun; Gooßen, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Richter, Dieter; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/η0,ring=2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of rings viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1ring~ Z1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring~ Z1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/η0,ring~ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the- art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year old problem. PMID:26229737

  3. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  4. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  5. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  6. Observers for discrete-time nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Walter D.

    Observer synthesis for discrete-time nonlinear systems with special applications to parameter estimation is analyzed. Two new types of observers are developed. The first new observer is an adaptation of the Friedland continuous-time parameter estimator to discrete-time systems. The second observer is an adaptation of the continuous-time Gauthier observer to discrete-time systems. By adapting these observers to discrete-time continuous-time parameter estimation problems which were formerly intractable become tractable. In addition to the two newly developed observers, two observers already described in the literature are analyzed and deficiencies with respect to noise rejection are demonstrated. Improved versions of these observers are proposed and their performance demonstrated. The issues of discrete-time observability, discrete-time system inversion, and optimal probing are also addressed.

  7. Perfectly Matched Layers versus discrete transparent boundary conditions in quantum device simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mennemann, Jan-Frederik Jüngel, Ansgar

    2014-10-15

    Discrete transparent boundary conditions (DTBC) and the Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) method for the realization of open boundary conditions in quantum device simulations are compared, based on the stationary and time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The comparison includes scattering state, wave packet, and transient scattering state simulations in one and two space dimensions. The Schrödinger equation is discretized by a second-order Crank–Nicolson method in case of DTBC. For the discretization with PML, symmetric second-, fourth-, and sixth-order spatial approximations as well as Crank–Nicolson and classical Runge–Kutta time-integration methods are employed. In two space dimensions, a ring-shaped quantum waveguide device is simulated in the stationary and transient regime. As an application, a simulation of the Aharonov–Bohm effect in this device is performed, showing the excitation of bound states localized in the ring region. The numerical experiments show that the results obtained from PML are comparable to those obtained using DTBC, while keeping the high numerical efficiency and flexibility as well as the ease of implementation of the former method. -- Highlights: •In-depth comparison between discrete transparent boundary conditions (DTBC) and PML. •First 2-D transient scattering state simulations using DTBC. •First 2-D transient scattering state simulations of the Aharonov–Bohm effect.

  8. Discrete dissipative localized modes in nonlinear magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Rosanov, Nikolay N; Vysotina, Nina V; Shatsev, Anatoly N; Shadrivov, Ilya V; Powell, David A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2011-12-19

    We analyze the existence, stability, and propagation of dissipative discrete localized modes in one- and two-dimensional nonlinear lattices composed of weakly coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) excited by an external electromagnetic field. We employ the near-field interaction approach for describing quasi-static electric and magnetic interaction between the resonators, and demonstrate the crucial importance of the electric coupling, which can completely reverse the sign of the overall interaction between the resonators. We derive the effective nonlinear model and analyze the properties of nonlinear localized modes excited in one-and two-dimensional lattices. In particular, we study nonlinear magnetic domain walls (the so-called switching waves) separating two different states of nonlinear magnetization, and reveal the bistable dependence of the domain wall velocity on the external field. Then, we study two-dimensional localized modes in nonlinear lattices of SRRs and demonstrate that larger domains may experience modulational instability and splitting. PMID:22274234

  9. A Discretized Method for Deriving Vortex Impulse from Volumetric Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Noam; Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    Many biological and mechanical systems transfer momentum through a fluid by creating vortical structures. To study this mechanism, we derive a method for extracting impulse and its time derivative from flow fields observed in experiments and simulations. We begin by discretizing a thin-cored vortex filament, and extend the model to account for finite vortex core thickness and asymmetric distributions of vorticity. By solely using velocity fields to extract vortex cores and calculate circulation, this method is applicable to 3D PIV datasets, even with low spatial resolution flow fields and measurement noise. To assess the performance of this analysis method, we simulate vortex rings and arbitrary vortex structures using OpenFOAM computational fluid dynamics software and analyze the wake momentum using this model in order to validate this method. We further examine a piston-vortex experiment, using 3D synthetic particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) to capture velocity fields. Strengths, limitations, and improvements to the framework are discussed.

  10. Multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization

    PubMed Central

    Gahalaut, K.P.S.; Kraus, J.K.; Tomar, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    We present (geometric) multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization of scalar second order elliptic problems. The smoothing property of the relaxation method, and the approximation property of the intergrid transfer operators are analyzed. These properties, when used in the framework of classical multigrid theory, imply uniform convergence of two-grid and multigrid methods. Supporting numerical results are provided for the smoothing property, the approximation property, convergence factor and iterations count for V-, W- and F-cycles, and the linear dependence of V-cycle convergence on the smoothing steps. For two dimensions, numerical results include the problems with variable coefficients, simple multi-patch geometry, a quarter annulus, and the dependence of convergence behavior on refinement levels ℓ, whereas for three dimensions, only the constant coefficient problem in a unit cube is considered. The numerical results are complete up to polynomial order p=4, and for C0 and Cp-1 smoothness. PMID:24511168

  11. Multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization.

    PubMed

    Gahalaut, K P S; Kraus, J K; Tomar, S K

    2013-01-01

    We present (geometric) multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization of scalar second order elliptic problems. The smoothing property of the relaxation method, and the approximation property of the intergrid transfer operators are analyzed. These properties, when used in the framework of classical multigrid theory, imply uniform convergence of two-grid and multigrid methods. Supporting numerical results are provided for the smoothing property, the approximation property, convergence factor and iterations count for V-, W- and F-cycles, and the linear dependence of V-cycle convergence on the smoothing steps. For two dimensions, numerical results include the problems with variable coefficients, simple multi-patch geometry, a quarter annulus, and the dependence of convergence behavior on refinement levels [Formula: see text], whereas for three dimensions, only the constant coefficient problem in a unit cube is considered. The numerical results are complete up to polynomial order [Formula: see text], and for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] smoothness. PMID:24511168

  12. Discrete modelling of drapery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, Klaus; Giacomini, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Drapery systems are an efficient and cost-effective measure in preventing and controlling rockfall hazards on rock slopes. The simplest form consists of a row of ground anchors along the top of the slope connected to a horizontal support cable from which a wire mesh is suspended down the face of the slope. Such systems are generally referred to as simple or unsecured draperies (Badger and Duffy 2012). Variations such as secured draperies, where a pattern of ground anchors is incorporated within the field of the mesh, and hybrid systems, where the upper part of an unsecured drapery is elevated to intercept rockfalls originating upslope of the installation, are becoming more and more popular. This work presents a discrete element framework for simulation of unsecured drapery systems and its variations. The numerical model is based on the classical discrete element method (DEM) and implemented into the open-source framework YADE (Šmilauer et al., 2010). The model takes all relevant interactions between block, drapery and slope into account (Thoeni et al., 2014) and was calibrated and validated based on full-scale experiments (Giacomini et al., 2012).The block is modelled as a rigid clump made of spherical particles which allows any shape to be approximated. The drapery is represented by a set of spherical particle with remote interactions. The behaviour of the remote interactions is governed by the constitutive behaviour of the wire and generally corresponds to a piecewise linear stress-strain relation (Thoeni et al., 2013). The same concept is used to model wire ropes. The rock slope is represented by rigid triangular elements where material properties (e.g., normal coefficient of restitution, friction angle) are assigned to each triangle. The capabilities of the developed model to simulate drapery systems and estimate the residual hazard involved with such systems is shown. References Badger, T.C., Duffy, J.D. (2012) Drapery systems. In: Turner, A.K., Schuster R

  13. Classicality in discrete Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cormick, Cecilia; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Gottesman, Daniel; Paz, Juan Pablo; Pittenger, Arthur O.

    2006-01-15

    Gibbons et al., [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] have recently defined discrete Wigner functions W to represent quantum states in a Hilbert space with finite dimension. We show that such a class of Wigner functions W can be defined so that the only pure states having non-negative W for all such functions are stabilizer states, as conjectured by Galvao, [Phys. Rev. A 71, 042302 (2005)]. We also show that the unitaries preserving non-negativity of W for all definitions of W in the class form a subgroup of the Clifford group. This means pure states with non-negative W and their associated unitary dynamics are classical in the sense of admitting an efficient classical simulation scheme using the stabilizer formalism.

  14. Determinant Expressions for Discrete Integrable Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogo, Kiyoshi

    2006-08-01

    Explicit formulas for several discrete integrable maps with periodic boundary condition are obtained, which give the sequential time developments in a form of the quotient of successive determinants of tri-diagonal matrices. We can expect that such formulas make the corresponding numerical simulations simple and stable. The cases of discrete Lotka-Volterra and discrete KdV equations are demonstrated by using the common algorithm computing determinants of tri-diagonal matrices.

  15. A discrete event method for wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a discrete event interpretation of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) and digital wave guide network (DWN) wave simulation schemes. The discrete event method is formalized using the discrete event system specification (DEVS). The scheme is shown to have errors that are proportional to the resolution of the spatial grid. A numerical example demonstrates the relative efficiency of the scheme with respect to FDTD and DWN schemes. The potential for the discrete event scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and attenuation errors is discussed.

  16. Scalar discrete nonlinear multipoint boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jesus; Taylor, Padraic

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we provide sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions to scalar discrete nonlinear multipoint boundary value problems. By allowing more general boundary conditions and by imposing less restrictions on the nonlinearities, we obtain results that extend previous work in the area of discrete boundary value problems [Debra L. Etheridge, Jesus Rodriguez, Periodic solutions of nonlinear discrete-time systems, Appl. Anal. 62 (1996) 119-137; Debra L. Etheridge, Jesus Rodriguez, Scalar discrete nonlinear two-point boundary value problems, J. Difference Equ. Appl. 4 (1998) 127-144].

  17. Images of Jupiter's Sulfur Ring.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, C B

    1980-01-11

    Images of the ring of singly ionized sulfur encircling Jupiter obtained on two successive nights in April 1979 show that the ring characteristics may change dramatically in approximately 24 hours. On the first night the ring was narrow and confined to the magnetic equator inside Io's orbit. On the second it was confined symmetrically about the centrifugal symmetry surface and showed considerable radial structure, including a "fan" extending to Io's orbit. Many of the differences in the ring on the two nights can be explained in terms of differences in sulfur plasma temperature. PMID:17809102

  18. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  19. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  20. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1989-01-01

    Spiral density waves and spiral bending waves have been observed at dozens of locations within Saturn's rings. These waves are excited by resonant gravitational perturbations from moons orbiting outside the ring system. Modeling of spiral waves yields the best available estimates for the mass and the thickness of Saturn's ring system. Angular momentum transport due to spiral density waves may cause significant orbital evolution of Saturn's rings and inner moons. Similar angular momentum transfer may occur in other astrophysical systems such as protoplanetary disks, binary star systems with disks and spiral galaxies with satellites.

  1. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  2. Gravitomagnetic field of rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the so-called gravitoelectromagnetic formalism, according to which the equations of the gravitational field can be written in analogy with classical electromagnetism, we study the gravitomagnetic field of a rotating ring, orbiting around a central body. We calculate the gravitomagnetic component of the field, both in the intermediate zone between the ring and the central body, and far away from the ring and central body. We evaluate the impact of the gravitomagnetic field on the motion of test particles and, as an application, we study the possibility of using these results, together with the Solar System ephemeris, to infer information on the spin of ring-like structures.

  3. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  4. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  5. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  6. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  7. Anticipating the Filtrons of Automata by Complex Discrete Systems Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, Pawel

    2002-09-01

    Filtrons of automata are coherent structures (discrete solitons) supported by iterated automata maps (IAMs). They differ from signals of cellular automata. The signals emerge during parallel processing of strings, while IAMs transform strings in serial. We relate the filtron and its supporting automaton with a particular complex discrete system (CDS). This CDS has the form of a processing ring net. Its computation is characterized by four components: instructions of processing nodes (I), inter-processor communication constraints (C), initial data (D), and synchronization (S). We present an analysis of a computation performed within this CDS. It is useful in the problems of searching for any of the mentioned four components assuming that remaining three are known. We give a technique of anticipating the filtrons with a desired parameter C when I, S and D are given. We show how to decide the synchronization S when I, C and D are assumed, and how to determine instructions I when the desired filtron is described by known C, D and S.

  8. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, A.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Larsen, N. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. In the DEM, the material is simulated on a grain-by-grain basis, and defining the micromechanical properties of the inter-particle contacts parameterizes the model. For validating the numerical approach, the macromechanical behavior of the numerical material is compared to the results from successive laboratory ring-shear experiments. Overall, there is a good agreement between the geotechnical behavior of the real granular materials and the numerical results. The materials deform by an elasto-plastic rheology under the applied effective normal stress and horizontal shearing. The peak and ultimate shear strengths depend linearly on the magnitude of the normal stress by the Mohr-Coulomb constitutive relationship. The numerical approach allows for a detailed analysis of the material dynamics and shear zone development during progressive shear strain. We demonstrate how the shear zone thickness and dilation increase with the magnitude of the normal stress. The stresses are distributed heterogeneously through the granular material along stress-carrying force chains. Between the force chains are the volumetrically dominant inactive zones. Overall, the force chain orientation is parallel to the maximum compressive stress. The data-parallel nature of the basic DEM formulation makes the problem ideal for utilizing the high arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia CUDA C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a linear-elastic soft-body contact model. We have coupled the DEM model to a model for porewater flow, and we present early results of particle-porewater interactions. The two-way mechanical coupling is used to investigate pore-pressure feedbacks, which may be very important for the dynamics of soft

  9. Status of NSLS-II Storage Ring Vacuum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doom,L.; Hseuh,H.; Ferreira, M.; Longo, C.; Ravindranath, V.; Settepani, P.; Sharma, S.; Wilson, K.

    2009-05-04

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a 3-GeV, high-flux and high- brightness synchrotron radiation facility with a nominal current of 500 mA. The storage ring vacuum system will have extruded aluminium chambers with ante-chamber for photon fans and distributed NEG strip pumping. Discrete photon absorbers will be used to intercept the un-used bending magnet radiation. In-situ bakeout will be implemented to achieve fast conditioning during initial commissioning and after interventions.

  10. Light Scattering and Compositional Analysis of Saturn's Rings Using Cassini UVIS Spectral Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Saturn's ring particles are roughly centimeter to several-meter-sized objects that are covered with a regolith of icy grains. In general the composition of the regolith of an object can be investigated by comparing photometric models to reflectance spectra of the surface. However, since the rings as a whole are not a solid surface and the A and B ring particles clump together into self-gravity wakes, the light scattering behavior of the rings has a complex dependence on the geometry of the observations. In order to deal with this we first determine the ring particle albedo for the A, B, and C rings and the Cassini Division at discrete far ultraviolet wavelengths across the water ice absorption edge at 165 nm. We next use the retrieved albedos to compare to spectral models that use available optical constants in the FUV for water ice and various plausible non-water-ice contaminants such as organic tholins, silicates, and other ices.. We retrieve the ring particle albedo by comparing observations of the lit face of the rings to a single scattering Chandrasekhar model. We then compare the observations to photometric models where we assume that the non-water-ice constituents are either embedded in water ice grains so that the effective optical constants are a linear combination of constituent optical constants or that the regolith consists of discrete grains of water ice and non-ice constituents. We find that the best fit of the compositional models to the ring particle albedo is for water ice abundances greater than 95% and water ice grain sizes of a few microns.

  11. Constructions of two polycatenanes and one polypseudo-rotaxane by discrete tetrahedral cages and stool-like building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long; Ju, Ping; Meng, Xian-Rui; Kuang, Xiao-Jun; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2012-09-01

    Mechanically Interlocked molecules, such as catenanes and rotaxanes, are of great interest due to their fascinating structures and potential applications, while such molecules have been mainly restricted to comprising components of interlocked rings or polygons. The constructions of infinite polycatenanes and polyrotaxanes by discrete cages remain great challenge, and only two infinite polycatenanes fabricated by discrete cages have been reported so far, while the structures of polyrotaxanes and polypseudo-rotaxanes fabricated by discrete build units have not been documented to date. Herein we report the first example of a two-dimensional (2D) polypseudo-rotaxane fabricated by stool-like build units, the second example of a one-dimensional (1D) polycatenane, and the second example of a three-dimensional (3D) polycatenane, which were assemblied by discrete tetrahedral cages. The pores of dehydrated 3D polycatenane are dynamic, and display size-dependent adsorption/desorption behaviors of alcohols.

  12. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  13. Running Rings Around the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and current status of WebRing, a service that links related Web sites into a central hub. Discusses it as a viable alternative to other search engines and examines issues of free speech, use by the business sector, and implications for WebRing after its purchase by Yahoo! (LRW)

  14. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  15. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  16. Particle Motion Near a Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of a particle moving near a classical ring is studied under a Hill-type approximation. A classical ring is comprised of particles of equal mass arranged symmetrically about a massive central body, the particles having a uniform rotation rate.

  17. Percolation assisted excitation transport in discrete-time quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefaňák, M.; Novotný, J.; Jex, I.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent transport of excitations along chains of coupled quantum systems represents an interesting problem with a number of applications ranging from quantum optics to solar cell technology. A convenient tool for studying such processes are quantum walks. They allow us to determine all the process features in a quantitative way. We study the survival probability and the transport efficiency on a simple, highly symmetric graph represented by a ring. The propagation of excitation is modeled by a discrete-time (coined) quantum walk. For a two-state quantum walk, where the excitation (walker) has to leave its actual position to the neighboring sites, the survival probability decays exponentially and the transport efficiency is unity. The decay rate of the survival probability can be estimated using the leading eigenvalue of the evolution operator. However, if the excitation is allowed to stay at its present position, i.e. the propagation is modeled by a lazy quantum walk, then part of the wave-packet can be trapped in the vicinity of the origin and never reaches the sink. In such a case, the survival probability does not vanish and the excitation transport is not efficient. The dependency of the transport efficiency on the initial state is determined. Nevertheless, we show that for some lazy quantum walks dynamical, percolations of the ring eliminate the trapping effect and efficient excitation transport can be achieved.

  18. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  19. Discretization vs. Rounding Error in Euler's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Carlos F.

    2011-01-01

    Euler's method for solving initial value problems is an excellent vehicle for observing the relationship between discretization error and rounding error in numerical computation. Reductions in stepsize, in order to decrease discretization error, necessarily increase the number of steps and so introduce additional rounding error. The problem is…

  20. Discrete/PWM Ballast-Resistor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Roger J.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit offers low switching loss and automatic compensation for failure of ballast resistor. Discrete/PWM ballast-resistor controller improved shunt voltage-regulator circuit designed to supply power from high-resistance source to low-impedance bus. Provides both coarse discrete voltage levels (by switching of ballast resistors) and continuous fine control of voltage via pulse-width modulation.

  1. Discrete Fractional Diffusion Equation of Chaotic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Cheng; Baleanu, Dumitru; Xie, He-Ping; Zeng, Sheng-Da

    Discrete fractional calculus is suggested in diffusion modeling in porous media. A variable-order fractional diffusion equation is proposed on discrete time scales. A function of the variable order is constructed by a chaotic map. The model shows some new random behaviors in comparison with other variable-order cases.

  2. Discreteness and Gradience in Intonational Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussenhoven, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Three experimental techniques that can be used to investigate the gradient of discrete nature of intonational differences, the semantic task, the imitation task, and the pitch range task are discussed and evaluated. It is pointed out that categorical perception is a sufficient but not a necessary, property of phonological discreteness. (Author/VWL)

  3. Uranus rings - An optical search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The discovery of rings surrounding Uranus has prompted reexamination of telescopic observations made a year ago with a solid-state area detector called a charge-coupling device (CCD). The extreme narrowness of the rings apparently caused them to be hidden in glare from the planet, the reflectivity of which is very high in the blue and green regions of the spectrum. However, Uranus appears as a much darker image in the near-infrared spectral regions detected by the CCD. Although no direct evidence of the rings is obtainable from the CCD images, some simplifying assumptions permit the deduction from the CCD data that average reflectivity of individual particles composing the rings is at most a few percent, much closer to that of carbonaceous chondritic material than to that of the ice-coated particles in Saturn's rings.

  4. Discrete breathers in graphane: Effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimova, J. A.; Murzaev, R. T.; Lobzenko, I. P.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Zhou, Kun

    2016-05-01

    The discrete breathers in graphane in thermodynamic equilibrium in the temperature range 50-600 K are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. A discrete breather is a hydrogen atom vibrating along the normal to a sheet of graphane at a high amplitude. As was found earlier, the lifetime of a discrete breather at zero temperature corresponds to several tens of thousands of vibrations. The effect of temperature on the decay time of discrete breathers and the probability of their detachment from a sheet of graphane are studied in this work. It is shown that closely spaced breathers can exchange energy with each other at zero temperature. The data obtained suggest that thermally activated discrete breathers can be involved in the dehydrogenation of graphane, which is important for hydrogen energetics.

  5. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new discrete elements (L/sub N/) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates S/sub N/ method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective, in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, L/sub N/ is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than S/sub N/, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the L/sub N/ method.

  6. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  7. MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

    2000-09-01

    We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

  8. Seipin Is a Discrete Homooligomer†

    PubMed Central

    Binns, Derk; Lee, SungKyung; Hilton, Christopher L.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Goodman, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    Seipin is a transmembrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and concentrates at junctions between the ER and cytosolic lipid droplets. Mutations in the human seipin gene, including the missense mutation A212P, lead to congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL), characterized by the lack of normal adipose tissue and accumulation of fat in liver and muscles. In both yeast and CGL patient fibroblasts, seipin is required for normal lipid droplet morphology; in its absence droplets appear to bud abnormally from the ER. Here we report the first purification and physical characterization of seipin. Yeast seipin is in a large discrete protein complex. Affinity purification demonstrated that seipin is the main if not exclusive protein in the complex. Detergent sucrose gradients in H2O, and D2O and gel filtration were used to determine the size of the seipin complex and account for detergent binding. Both seipin-myc13 (seipin fused to 13 tandem copies of the myc epitope) expressed from the endogenous promoter and overexpressed seipin-mCherry form ~500 kDa proteins consisting of about 9 copies of seipin. The yeast orthologue of the human A212P allele forms only smaller complexes and is unstable; we hypothesize that this accounts for its null phenotype in humans. Seipin appears as a toroid by negative staining electron microscopy. We speculate that seipin plays at least a structural role in organizing droplets or in communication between droplets and ER. PMID:21062080

  9. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  10. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.