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Sample records for disease development depending

  1. Mediator Complex Dependent Regulation of Cardiac Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grueter, Chad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The risk factors for CVD include environmental and genetic components. Human mutations in genes involved in most aspects of cardiovascular function have been identified, many of which are involved in transcriptional regulation. The Mediator complex serves as a pivotal transcriptional regulator that functions to integrate diverse cellular signals by multiple mechanisms including recruiting RNA polymerase II, chromatin modifying proteins and non-coding RNAs to promoters in a context dependent manner. This review discusses components of the Mediator complex and the contribution of the Mediator complex to normal and pathological cardiac development and function. Enhanced understanding of the role of this core transcriptional regulatory complex in the heart will help us gain further insights into CVD. PMID:23727265

  2. Long non-coding RNA-dependent transcriptional regulation in neuronal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may make up a large fraction of cellular transcripts. Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease. In this review, we discuss new findings implicating lncRNAs in controlling development of the central nervous system (CNS). The evolution of the higher vertebrate brain has been accompanied by an increase in the levels and complexities of lncRNAs expressed within the developing nervous system. Although a limited number of CNS-expressed lncRNAs are now known to modulate the activity of proteins important for neuronal differentiation, the function of the vast majority of neuronal-expressed lncRNAs is still unknown. Topics of intense current interest include the mechanism by which CNS-expressed lncRNAs might function in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during neuronal development, and how gain and loss of function of individual lncRNAs contribute to neurological diseases. PMID:24936207

  3. Developing disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Herman, K

    1999-11-01

    Several market forces are driving interest in disease management and its growth, including the need to control costs; improve quality; attract, satisfy, and retain members; and meet accreditation requirements. People with chronic diseases and disabilities represent the most expensive and fastest-growing group of patients in health care, and agencies that develop successful disease management programs for these populations will reap a variety of benefits. PMID:10661985

  4. Pyruvate prevents the development of age-dependent cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease without reducing amyloid and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Isopi, Elisa; Granzotto, Alberto; Corona, Carlo; Bomba, Manuela; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Curcio, Michele; Canzoniero, Lorella M T; Navarra, Riccardo; Lattanzio, Rossano; Piantelli, Mauro; Sensi, Stefano L

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and tau-dependent pathology are key features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, to date, approaches aimed at counteracting these two pathogenic factors have produced only modest therapeutic outcomes. More effective therapies should therefore consider additional pathogenic factors like energy production failure, hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, deregulation of metal ion homeostasis, and neuroinflammation. Pyruvate is an energy substrate associated with neuroprotective properties. In this study, we evaluated protective effects of long-term administration of pyruvate in 3xTg-AD mice, a preclinical AD model that develops amyloid-β- and tau-dependent pathology. Chronic (9 months) treatment with pyruvate inhibited short and long-term memory deficits in 6 and 12 months old 3xTg-AD mice as assessed with the Morris water maze test. Pyruvate had no effects on intraneuronal amyloid-β accumulation and, surprisingly, the molecule increased deposition of phosphorylated tau. Pyruvate did not change aerobic or anaerobic metabolisms but decreased lipid peroxidation, counteracted neuronal hyperexcitability, decreased baseline levels of oxidative stress, and also reduced reactive oxygen species-driven elevations of intraneuronal Zn(2+) as well as glutamate receptor-mediated deregulation of intraneuronal Ca(2+). Thus, pyruvate promotes beneficial cognitive effects without affecting Aβ and tau pathology. The molecule mainly promotes a reduction of hyperexcitability, oxidative stress while favors the regulation of intraneuronal Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) homeostasis rather than acting as energy substrate. Pyruvate can be therefore a valuable, safe, and affordable pharmacological tool to be associated with classical anti-Aβ and tau drugs to counteract the development and progression of AD-related cognitive deficits and neuronal loss. PMID:25434488

  5. Gut Microbiota-Dependent Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) Pathway Contributes to Both Development of Renal Insufficiency and Mortality Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Tang, W. H.; Wang, Zeneng; Kennedy, David J.; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Agatisa-Boyle, Brendan; Li, Xinmin S.; Levison, Bruce S.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbial-dependent metabolite of dietary choline, phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) and L-carnitine, is elevated in chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and associated with coronary artery disease pathogenesis. Objective To both investigate the clinical prognostic value of TMAO in subjects with versus without CKD, and to test the hypothesis that TMAO plays a direct contributory role in the development and progression of renal dysfunction. Methods and Results We first examined the relationship between fasting plasma TMAO and all-cause mortality over 5-year follow-up in 521 stable subjects with CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 ml/min/1.73m2). Median TMAO level among CKD subjects was 7.9 μM (interquartile range 5.2–12.4μM), which was markedly higher (P<0.001) than in non-CKD subjects (n=3,166). Within CKD subjects, higher (4th vs. 1st quartile) plasma TMAO level was associated with a 2.8-fold increased mortality risk. Following adjustments for traditional risk factors, hsCRP and eGFR, elevated TMAO levels remained predictive of 5-year mortality risk (HR 1.93 [95%CI 1.13–3.29], p<0.05). TMAO provided significant incremental prognostic value (net reclassification index 17.26%, p<0.001; and differences in area under Receiver Operator Characteristic curve, 63.26% vs. 65.95 %, p=0.036). Among non-CKD subjects, elevated TMAO levels portend poorer prognosis within cohorts of high and low cystatin C. In animal models, elevated dietary choline or TMAO directly led to progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and dysfunction. Conclusion Plasma TMAO levels are both elevated in patients with CKD and portend poorer long-term survival. Chronic dietary exposures that increase TMAO appear to directly contribute to progressive renal fibrosis and dysfunction. PMID:25599331

  6. Developing Tests of Visual Dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindrat, Alexandra N.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts develop neural adaptive responses to microgravity during space flight. Consequently these adaptive responses cause maladaptive disturbances in balance and gait function when astronauts return to Earth and are re-exposed to gravity. Current research in the Neuroscience Laboratories at NASA-JSC is focused on understanding how exposure to space flight produces post-flight disturbances in balance and gait control and developing training programs designed to facilitate the rapid recovery of functional mobility after space flight. In concert with these disturbances, astronauts also often report an increase in their visual dependency during space flight. To better understand this phenomenon, studies were conducted with specially designed training programs focusing on visual dependency with the aim to understand and enhance subjects ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. The Rod and Frame test (RFT) was used first to assess an individual s visual dependency, using a variety of testing techniques. Once assessed, subjects were asked to perform two novel tasks under transformation (both the Pegboard and Cube Construction tasks). Results indicate that head position cues and initial visual test conditions had no effect on an individual s visual dependency scores. Subjects were also able to adapt to the manual tasks after several trials. Individual visual dependency correlated with ability to adapt manual to a novel visual distortion only for the cube task. Subjects with higher visual dependency showed decreased ability to adapt to this task. Ultimately, it was revealed that the RFT may serve as an effective prediction tool to produce individualized adaptability training prescriptions that target the specific sensory profile of each crewmember.

  7. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  8. Alveolar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  9. Measuring Spatial Dependence for Infectious Disease Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, M. Kate; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Global spatial clustering is the tendency of points, here cases of infectious disease, to occur closer together than expected by chance. The extent of global clustering can provide a window into the spatial scale of disease transmission, thereby providing insights into the mechanism of spread, and informing optimal surveillance and control. Here the authors present an interpretable measure of spatial clustering, τ, which can be understood as a measure of relative risk. When biological or temporal information can be used to identify sets of potentially linked and likely unlinked cases, this measure can be estimated without knowledge of the underlying population distribution. The greater our ability to distinguish closely related (i.e., separated by few generations of transmission) from more distantly related cases, the more closely τ will track the true scale of transmission. The authors illustrate this approach using examples from the analyses of HIV, dengue and measles, and provide an R package implementing the methods described. The statistic presented, and measures of global clustering in general, can be powerful tools for analysis of spatially resolved data on infectious diseases. PMID:27196422

  10. Parasitic diseases and urban development.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Desjeux, P.; Moncayo, A.; Ranque, P.; de Raadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and epidemiology of parasitic diseases in both urban and periurban areas of endemic countries have been changing as development progresses. The following different scenarios involving Chagas disease, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis are discussed: (1) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas without vectors; (2) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas with vectors; (3) infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (4) non-infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (5) urbanization or domestication of natural zoonotic foci; and (6) vectors entering nonendemic urban areas. Cultural and social habits from the rural areas, such as type of house construction and domestic water usage, are adopted by migrants to urban areas and increase the risk of disease transmission which adversely affects employment in urban populations. As the urban health services must deal with the rise in parasitic diseases, appropriate control strategies for the urban setting must be developed and implemented. PMID:2127380

  11. Lymphangiogenesis in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Liersch, Ruediger; Detmar, Michael

    2007-08-01

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in the maintenance of fluid homeostasis, in the afferent immune response, in the intestinal lipid uptake and in the metastatic spread of malignant cells. The recent discovery of specific markers and growth factors for lymphatic endothelium and the establishment of genetic mouse models with impairment of lymphatic function have provided novel insights into the molecular control of the lymphatic system in physiology and in embryonic development. They have also identified molecular pathways whose mutational inactivation leads to human diseases associated with lymphedema. Moreover, the lymphatic system plays a major role in chronic inflammatory diseases and in transplant rejection. Importantly, malignant tumors can directly promote lymphangiogenesis within the primary tumor and in draining lymph nodes, leading to enhanced cancer metastasis to lymph nodes and beyond. Based upon these findings, novel therapeutic strategies are currently being developed that aim at inhibiting or promoting the formation and function of lymphatic vessels in disease. PMID:17721611

  12. Translation of rare disease research into orphan drug development: disease matters.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Harald E; van Weely, Sonja; Büller, Hans A; Leufkens, Hubert G M; de Vrueh, Remco L A

    2009-12-01

    More than 25 years of orphan drug regulations have yielded several new treatments for patients with rare diseases. Here, we show that successful translation of rare disease research into an orphan drug discovery and development programme is dependent on the disease class, its prevalence and the disease-specific scientific output. Our findings indicate that current orphan drug legislation alone is not sufficient to stimulate orphan drug development for diseases with a very low prevalence. Consequently, additional incentives should focus on stimulating the specific needs of rare disease research at disease class level. PMID:19818412

  13. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  14. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  15. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  16. Exposing extinction risk analysis to pathogens: Is disease just another form of density dependence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerber, L.R.; McCallum, H.; Lafferty, K.D.; Sabo, J.L.; Dobson, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the United States and several other countries, the development of population viability analyses (PVA) is a legal requirement of any species survival plan developed for threatened and endangered species. Despite the importance of pathogens in natural populations, little attention has been given to host-pathogen dynamics in PVA. To study the effect of infectious pathogens on extinction risk estimates generated from PVA, we review and synthesize the relevance of host-pathogen dynamics in analyses of extinction risk. We then develop a stochastic, density-dependent host-parasite model to investigate the effects of disease on the persistence of endangered populations. We show that this model converges on a Ricker model of density dependence under a suite of limiting assumptions, including a high probability that epidemics will arrive and occur. Using this modeling framework, we then quantify: (1) dynamic differences between time series generated by disease and Ricker processes with the same parameters; (2) observed probabilities of quasi-extinction for populations exposed to disease or self-limitation; and (3) bias in probabilities of quasi-extinction estimated by density-independent PVAs when populations experience either form of density dependence. Our results suggest two generalities about the relationships among disease, PVA, and the management of endangered species. First, disease more strongly increases variability in host abundance and, thus, the probability of quasi-extinction, than does self-limitation. This result stems from the fact that the effects and the probability of occurrence of disease are both density dependent. Second, estimates of quasi-extinction are more often overly optimistic for populations experiencing disease than for those subject to self-limitation. Thus, although the results of density-independent PVAs may be relatively robust to some particular assumptions about density dependence, they are less robust when endangered populations are

  17. Context-Dependent Learning in People With Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Yun; Winstein, Carolee J; Gordon, James; Petzinger, Giselle M; Zelinski, Elizabeth M; Fisher, Beth E

    2016-01-01

    Context-dependent learning is a phenomenon in which people demonstrate superior performance in the context in which they originally learned a skill but perform less well in a novel context. This study investigated context-dependent learning in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and age-matched nondisabled adults. All participants practiced 3 finger sequences, each embedded within a unique context (colors and locations on a computer screen). One day after practice, the participants were tested either under the sequence-context associations remained the same as during practice, or the sequence-context associations were changed (SWITCH). Compared with nondisabled adults, people with PD demonstrated significantly greater decrement in performance (especially movement time) under the SWITCH condition, suggesting that individuals with PD are more context dependent than nondisabled adults. PMID:26375786

  18. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population.

  19. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2015-07-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States. We found that disease prevalence depended primarily on tree size, tree allometry, and spatial variation in precipitation, while mortality depended on tree size, allometry, competition, spatial variation in summer temperature, and both temporal and spatial variation in summer precipitation. Disease prevalence was highest in large trees with low slenderness found on dry sites. For healthy trees, mortality decreased with diameter, slenderness, and temporal variation in summer precipitation, but increased with competition and spatial variation in summer temperature. Mortality of diseased trees decreased with diameter and aspen relative basal area and increased with mean summer temperature and precipitation. Disease infection increased aspen mortality, especially in trees of intermediate size and trees on plots at climatic extremes (i.e., cool, wet and warm, dry climates). By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate

  20. Vaccinations in disease models with antibody-dependent enhancement.

    PubMed

    Billings, Lora; Fiorillo, Amy; Schwartz, Ira B

    2008-02-01

    This paper examines the effects of single-strain vaccine campaigns on the dynamics of an epidemic multistrain model with antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). ADE is a disease spreading process causing individuals with their secondary infection to be more infectious than during their first infection by a different strain. We follow the two-strain ADE model described in Cummings et al. [D.A.T. Cummings, Doctoral Thesis, Johns Hopkins University, 2004] and Schwartz et al. [I.B. Schwartz, L.B. Shaw, D.A.T. Cummings, L. Billings, M. McCrary, D. Burke, Chaotic desynchronization of multi-strain diseases, Phys. Rev. E, 72:art. no. 066201, 2005]. After describing the model and its steady state solutions, we modify it to include vaccine campaigns and explore if there exists vaccination rates that can eradicate one or more strains of a virus with ADE. PMID:17923138

  1. Developing disease resistant stone fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stone fruit (Prunus spp.) (peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, cherry) and almonds are susceptible to a number of pathogens. These pathogens can cause extensive losses in the field, during transport and storage, and in the market. Breeding for disease resistance requires an extensive knowledge of the...

  2. Understanding scale dependency of climatic processes with diarrheal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, F.; Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The issue of scales in linking climatic processes with diarrheal diseases is perhaps one of the most challenging aspect to develop any predictive algorithm for outbreaks and to understand impacts of changing climate. Majority of diarrheal diseases have shown to be strongly associated with climate modulated environmental processes where pathogens survive. Using cholera as an example of characteristic diarrheal diseases, this study will provide methodological insights on dominant scale variability in climatic processes that are linked with trigger and transmission of disease. Cholera based epidemiological models use human to human interaction as a main transmission mechanism, however, environmental conditions for creating seasonality in outbreaks is not explicitly modeled. For example, existing models cannot create seasonality, unless some of the model parameters are a-priori chosen to vary seasonally. A systems based feedback approach will be presented to understand role of climatic processes on trigger and transmission disease. In order to investigate effect of changing climate on cholera, a downscaling approach using support vector machine will be used. Our preliminary results using three climate models, ECHAM5, GFDL, and HADCM show that varying modalities in future cholera outbreaks.

  3. Recent developments in biomarkers in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer disease, and current demographic trends indicate a life-time risk approaching 4% and predict a doubling of prevalence by 2030. Strategies are being developed to apply recent advances in our understanding of the cause of Parkinson disease to the development of biomarkers that will enable the identification of at-risk individuals, enable early diagnosis and reflect the progression of disease. The latter will be particularly important for the testing of disease-modifying therapies. This review summarizes recent advances in Parkinson disease biomarker development. Recent findings Recent reports continue to reflect the application of a variety of clinical, imaging or biochemical measurements, alone or in combination, to general Parkinson disease populations. Probably the most promising is the assay of alpha-synuclein in the diagnosis and evolution of Parkinson disease. At present, detection techniques are still being refined, but once accurate and reproducible assays are available, it will be important to define the relationship of these to early diagnosis and progression. Alpha-synuclein concentrations may also be modulated by certain disease-modifying agents in development and so may represent a measure of their efficacy. It has to be accepted that no single measure currently fulfils all the necessary criteria for a biomarker in Parkinson disease, but combinations of measures are more likely to deliver benefit. Summary The Parkinson disease biomarker field is approaching a stage when certain combinations of clinical, imaging and biochemical measures may identify a proportion of individuals at risk for developing the disease. However, their general applicability may be limited. Attention is now turning to stratification of Parkinson disease into certain at-risk groups defined by genotype. The application of multimodal screening to these populations may be more

  4. Intrinsic Self-DNA Triggers Inflammatory Disease Dependent on STING

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeonghyun; Ruiz, Phillip; Barber, Glen N.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and severe systemic lupus erythematosus are generally lethal disorders that have been traced to defects in the exonuclease TREX1 (DNase III). Mice lacking TREX1 similarly die at an early age through comparable symptoms, including inflammatory myocarditis, through chronic activation of the stimulator of IFN genes (STING) pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that phagocytes rather than myocytes are predominantly responsible for causing inflammation, an outcome that could be alleviated following adoptive transfer of normal bone marrow into TREX1−/− mice. TREX1−/− macrophages did not exhibit significant augmented ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines compared with normal macrophages following exposure to STING-dependent activators, but rather appeared chronically stimulated by genomic DNA. These results shed molecular insight into inflammation and provide concepts for the design of new therapies. PMID:25261479

  5. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  6. Glia in mammalian development and disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Barres, Ben A

    2015-11-15

    Glia account for more than half of the cells in the mammalian nervous system, and the past few decades have witnessed a flood of studies that detail novel functions for glia in nervous system development, plasticity and disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we review the origins of glia and discuss their diverse roles during development, in the adult nervous system and in the context of disease. PMID:26577203

  7. [Recent developments in genetic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Liebau, M C; Benzing, T

    2011-05-01

    The improved understanding of genetic kidney diseases has given rise to a more detailed understanding of kidney function within the last decade. Insights into the pathophysiological principles of frequent kidney diseases - partly inherited, partly acquired - have been obtained by the investigation of rare genetic disorders and can now serve as a starting point for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this way various clinical multicenter trials, which are based on the observations made in basic science have been established for the very common autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, the influence of genetic aspects on frequent kidney diseases, e. g. diabetic nephropathy, is becoming more obvious. This article aims to give an overview over essential recent development in the field of genetic kidney diseases. PMID:21544793

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Vallaster, Marcus; Vallaster, Caroline Dacwag; Wu, Sean M

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian development, cardiac specification and ultimately lineage commitment to a specific cardiac cell type is accomplished by the action of specific transcription factors (TFs) and their meticulous control on an epigenetic level. In this review, we detail how cardiac-specific TFs function in concert with nucleosome remodeling and histone-modifying enzymes to regulate a diverse network of genes required for processes such as cell growth and proliferation, or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), for instance. We provide examples of how several cardiac TFs, such as Nkx2.5, WHSC1, Tbx5, and Tbx1, which are associated with developmental and congenital heart defects, are required for the recruitment of histone modifiers, such as Jarid2, p300, and Ash2l, and components of ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes like Brg1, Baf60c, and Baf180. Binding of these TFs to their respective sites at cardiac genes coincides with a distinct pattern of histone marks, indicating that the precise regulation of cardiac gene networks is orchestrated by interactions between TFs and epigenetic modifiers. Furthermore, we speculate that an epigenetic signature, comprised of TF occupancy, histone modifications, and overall chromatin organization, is an underlying mechanism that governs cardiac morphogenesis and disease. PMID:22194017

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  11. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD. PMID:27104895

  12. A collagen VI-dependent pathogenic mechanism for Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Soret, Rodolphe; Mennetrey, Mathilde; Bergeron, Karl F; Dariel, Anne; Neunlist, Michel; Grunder, Franziska; Faure, Christophe; Silversides, David W; Pilon, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a severe congenital anomaly of the enteric nervous system (ENS) characterized by functional intestinal obstruction due to a lack of intrinsic innervation in the distal bowel. Distal innervation deficiency results from incomplete colonization of the bowel by enteric neural crest cells (eNCCs), the ENS precursors. Here, we report the generation of a mouse model for HSCR--named Holstein--that contains an untargeted transgenic insertion upstream of the collagen-6α4 (Col6a4) gene. This insertion induces eNCC-specific upregulation of Col6a4 expression that increases total collagen VI protein levels in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding both the developing and the postnatal ENS. Increased collagen VI levels during development mainly result in slower migration of eNCCs. This appears to be due to the fact that collagen VI is a poor substratum for supporting eNCC migration and can even interfere with the migration-promoting effects of fibronectin. Importantly, for a majority of patients in a HSCR cohort, the myenteric ganglia from the ganglionated region are also specifically surrounded by abundant collagen VI microfibrils, an outcome accentuated by Down syndrome. Collectively, our data thus unveil a clinically relevant pathogenic mechanism for HSCR that involves cell-autonomous changes in ECM composition surrounding eNCCs. Moreover, as COL6A1 and COL6A2 are on human Chr.21q, this mechanism is highly relevant to the predisposition of patients with Down syndrome to HSCR. PMID:26571399

  13. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  14. Developing disease resistance in CP-Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance is an important selection criterion in the Canal Point (CP) Sugarcane Cultivar Development Program. Ratoon stunt (RSD, caused by Leifsonia xyli subsp. Xyli Evtsuhenko et al.), leaf scald (caused by Xanthomonas albilineans Ashby, Dowson), mosaic (caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus st...

  15. Retinal angiogenesis in development and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariano, Ray F.; Gardner, Thomas W.

    2004-12-01

    The retina has long been regarded as `an approachable part of the brain' for investigating neurosensory processes. Cell biologists are now capitalizing on the accessibility of the retina to investigate important aspects of developmental angiogenesis, including how it relates to neuronal and glial development, morphogenesis, oxygen sensing and progenitor cells. Pathological angiogenesis also occurs in the retina and is a major feature of leading blinding diseases, particularly diabetic retinopathy. The retina and its clinical disorders have a pivotal role in angiogenesis research and provide model systems in which to investigate neurovascular relationships and angiogenic diseases.

  16. [Development of Disease-modifying Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that can arrest the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as one of the highest priorities of medical research. Two pathological hallmarks, amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein deposition and tau accumulation, are the major targets of DMT. Immunotherapy for Abeta removal and secretase inhibitors/modulators that reduce total or accumulation-prone Abeta are candidate DMTs against Abeta. Compounds that prevent tau aggregation are also under development. Clinical trials that test the efficacy of these DMT candidates are in preparation or ongoing. Recent studies of biomarkers of AD brain lesions have indicated that Abeta and tau accumulation appears 10 to 30 years before the occurrence of dementia and gradually propagate to reach the level that causes symptoms. Therefore, efficacy of DMT has to be evaluated in the preclinical stage of AD. The incidence of preclinical AD in the cognitively normal, aged population are estimated to be around 19%. Thus, currently available biomarkers, amyloid/tau PET imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of Abeta and tau, are, perhaps, too invasive and costly. An international collaborative effort is needed to overcome this issue. PMID:27056864

  17. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available. PMID:26122079

  18. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available. PMID:26122079

  19. Prion disease tempo determined by host-dependent substrate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Charles E.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; van der Merwe, Jacques; Lau, Agnes; Yang, Jing; Grams, Jennifer; Di Bari, Michele A.; Nonno, Romolo; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Langeveld, Jan; McKenzie, Debbie; Westaway, David; Safar, Jiri G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of prion infection can take years or decades to manifest following the initial exposure. Molecular markers of prion disease include accumulation of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc), which is derived from its cellular precursor (PrPC), as well as downregulation of the PrP-like Shadoo (Sho) glycoprotein. Given the overlapping cellular environments for PrPC and Sho, we inferred that PrPC levels might also be altered as part of a host response during prion infection. Using rodent models, we found that, in addition to changes in PrPC glycosylation and proteolytic processing, net reductions in PrPC occur in a wide range of prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and cervid chronic wasting disease. The reduction in PrPC results in decreased prion replication, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for generating PrPSc in vitro. While PrPC downregulation is not discernible in animals with unusually short incubation periods and high PrPC expression, slowly evolving prion infections exhibit downregulation of the PrPC substrate required for new PrPSc synthesis and as a receptor for pathogenic signaling. Our data reveal PrPC downregulation as a previously unappreciated element of disease pathogenesis that defines the extensive, presymptomatic period for many prion strains. PMID:24430187

  20. DNA methylation in hematopoietic development and disease.

    PubMed

    Gore, Aniket V; Weinstein, Brant M

    2016-09-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that can have profound and widespread effects on gene expression and on cellular fate and function. Recent work has indicated that DNA methylation plays a critical role in hematopoietic development and hematopoietic disease. DNA methyltransferases and Ten-eleven translocation enzymes are required to add and remove methyl "marks" from DNA, respectively, and both sets of genes have been found necessary for proper formation and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and for differentiation of downstream hematopoietic lineages during development. DNA methylation and demethylation enzymes have also been implicated in hematopoietic disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Here, we review some of the recent literature regarding the role of DNA methylation in hematopoietic health and disease. PMID:27178734

  1. Developing Cellular Therapies for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros; Stroncek, David; Brooks, Brian P.; Feigal, Ellen; van Meurs, Jan C.; Huang, Christene A.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical advances in vision research have been greatly facilitated by the clinical accessibility of the visual system, its ease of experimental manipulation, and its ability to be functionally monitored in real time with noninvasive imaging techniques at the level of single cells and with quantitative end-point measures. A recent example is the development of stem cell–based therapies for degenerative eye diseases including AMD. Two phase I clinical trials using embryonic stem cell–derived RPE are already underway and several others using both pluripotent and multipotent adult stem cells are in earlier stages of development. These clinical trials will use a variety of cell types, including embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell–derived RPE, bone marrow– or umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stem cells, fetal neural or retinal progenitor cells, and adult RPE stem cells–derived RPE. Although quite distinct, these approaches, share common principles, concerns and issues across the clinical development pipeline. These considerations were a central part of the discussions at a recent National Eye Institute meeting on the development of cellular therapies for retinal degenerative disease. At this meeting, emphasis was placed on the general value of identifying and sharing information in the so-called “precompetitive space.” The utility of this behavior was described in terms of how it could allow us to remove road blocks in the clinical development pipeline, and more efficiently and economically move stem cell–based therapies for retinal degenerative diseases toward the clinic. Many of the ocular stem cell approaches we discuss are also being used more broadly, for nonocular conditions and therefore the model we develop here, using the precompetitive space, should benefit the entire scientific community. PMID:24573369

  2. Aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease depending on different glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2002-07-01

    The aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease comparing to practically healthy persons and patients with coronary heart disease combined with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus depending on different glucose concentration in unguentums of blood incubates with the help of computer microphotometer - visual analyzer was studied. Two-phase behavior of erythrocytes size changing of practically healthy persons depending on glucose concentration in an incubation medium and instability erythrocyte systems of a whole blood to the influence of high glucose concentration were revealed. Influence of high glucose concentration on aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease and its combination with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was revealed.

  3. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate risk to greater risk. For spatial variation in summer temperature, disease exposed lower risk populations to greater mortality probabilities, but the magnitude of this exposure depended on summer precipitation. Furthermore, the importance of diameter and slenderness in mediating responses to climate supports the increasing emphasis on trait variation in studies of ecological responses to global change.

  4. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Jackson, Ian J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma. PMID:25670789

  5. Renal disease and hypertension in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N; Becker, B; Strzelczyk, P; Ritz, E

    1999-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic data demonstrate a dramatic increase in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), thus dispelling the mistaken belief that renal prognosis is benign in NIDDM. Currently, the leading cause of ESRD in the United States, Japan, and in most industrialized Europe is NIDDM, accounting for nearly 90% of all cases of diabetes. In addition to profound economic costs, patients with NIDDM and diabetic nephropathy have a dramatically increased morbidity and premature mortality. NIDDM-related nephropathy varies widely among racial and ethnic groups, genders and lifestyles; and gender may interact with race to affect the disease progression. While the course of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) progresses through well-defined stages, the natural history of NIDDM is less well characterized. NIDDM patients with coronary heart disease have a higher urinary albumin excretion rate at the time of diagnosis and follow-up. This greater risk may also be associated with hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and genes involved in blood pressure are obvious candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. Hyperglycemia appears to be an important factor in the development of proteinuria in NIDDM, but its role and the influence of diet are not yet clear. Tobacco smoking can also be deleterious to the diabetic patient, and is also associated with disease progression. Maintaining euglycemia, stopping smoking and controlling blood pressure may prevent or slow the progression of NIDDM-related nephropathy and reduce extrarenal injury. Treatment recommendations include early screening for hyperlipidemia, appropriate exercise and a healthy diet. Cornerstones of management should also include: (1) educating the medical community and more widely disseminating data supporting the value of early treatment of microalbuminuria; (2) developing a comprehensive, multidisciplinary team approach that involves physicians

  6. New Developments in Extraesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saritas Yuksel, Elif

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms that are usually difficult to diagnose because of the absence of typical GERD symptoms (ie, regurgitation or heartburn). The diagnostic process is further complicated by the lack of a definitive test for identifying GERD as the cause of extraesophageal reflux symptoms. Due to the low predictive value of upper endoscopy and pH testing—as well as the lack of reliability of the symptom index and symptom association probability—extraesophageal reflux disease is still an area of investigation. This paper discusses recent developments in this field, with special emphasis on new diagnostic modalities and treatment options. PMID:23483833

  7. Recent advances in prostate development and links to prostatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    The prostate is a branched ductal-acinar gland that is part of the male reproductive tract. Prostate development depends upon the integration of steroid hormone signals, paracrine interactions between the stromal and epithelial tissue layers, and the actions of cell autonomous factors. Several genes and signaling pathways are known to be required for one or more steps of prostate development including epithelial budding, duct elongation, branching morphogenesis, and/or cellular differentiation. Recent progress in the field of prostate development has included the application of genome-wide technologies including serial analysis of gene expression, expression profiling microarrays, and other large-scale approaches to identify new genes and pathways that are essential for prostate development. The aggregation of experimental results into online databases by organized multilab projects including the Genitourinary Developmental Molecular Atlas Project has also accelerated the understanding of molecular pathways that function during prostate development and identified links between prostate anatomy and molecular signaling. Rapid progress has also recently been made in understanding the nature and role of candidate stem cells in the developing and adult prostate. This has included the identification of putative prostate stem cell markers, lineage tracing, and organ reconstitution studies. However, several issues regarding their origin, precise nature, and possible role(s) in disease remain unresolved. Nevertheless, several links between prostatic developmental mechanisms and the pathogenesis of prostatic diseases including benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer have led to recent progress on targeting developmental pathways as therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23335485

  8. Biomarkers for the Development of New Medications for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bough, Kristopher J; Amur, Shashi; Lao, Guifang; Hemby, Scott E; Tannu, Nilesh S; Kampman, Kyle M; Schmitz, Joy M; Martinez, Diana; Merchant, Kalpana M; Green, Charles; Sharma, Jyoti; Dougherty, Anne H; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant progress in personalized drug development. In large part, this has taken place in the oncology field and been due to the ability of researchers/clinicians to discover and develop novel drug development tools (DDTs), such as biomarkers. In cancer treatment research, biomarkers have permitted a more accurate pathophysiological characterization of an individual patient, and have enabled practitioners to target mechanistically the right drug, to the right patient, at the right time. Similar to cancer, patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) present clinically with heterogeneous symptomatology and respond variably to therapeutic interventions. If comparable biomarkers could be identified and developed for SUDs, significant diagnostic and therapeutic advances could be made. In this review, we highlight current opportunities and difficulties pertaining to the identification and development of biomarkers for SUDs. We focus on cocaine dependence as an example. Putative diagnostic, pharmacodynamic (PD), and predictive biomarkers for cocaine dependence are discussed across a range of methodological approaches. A possible cocaine-dependent clinical outcome assessment (COA)—another type of defined DDT—is also discussed. At present, biomarkers for cocaine dependence are in their infancy. Much additional research will be needed to identify, validate, and qualify these putative tools prior to their potential use for medications development and/or application to clinical practice. However, with a large unmet medical need and an estimated market size of several hundred million dollars per year, if developed, biomarkers for cocaine dependence will hold tremendous value to both industry and public health. PMID:23979119

  9. Matrix-Dependent Perturbation of TGFβ Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jefferson J.; Gerber, Elizabeth E.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is a multipotent cytokine that is sequestered in the extracellular matrix (ECM) through interactions with a number of ECM proteins. The ECM serves to concentrate latent TGFβ at sites of intended function, to influence the bioavailability and/or function of TGFβ activators, and perhaps to regulate the intrinsic performance of cell surface effectors of TGFβ signal propagation. The downstream consequences of TGFβ signaling cascades in turn provide feedback modulation of the ECM. This review covers recent examples of how genetic mutations in constituents of the ECM or TGFβ signaling cascade result in altered ECM homeostasis, cellular performance and ultimately disease, with an emphasis on emerging therapeutic strategies that seek to capitalize on this refined mechanistic understanding. PMID:22641039

  10. [Development of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi

    2010-07-01

    Currently, only donepezil is available for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) in Japan. Clinical trials of galantamine, rivastigmine, and memantine have been completed in Japan, and patients are awaiting government approval for the use of these drugs. The herbal medicine yokukansan was found to be effective for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in patients, and juzentaihoto was found to reduce AD pathology in a mouse model. In addition, muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, serotonergic agonists, other drugs are being developed. These medicines have little effect on the improvement of cognitive functions. The anti-histamine dimebolin was expected to have a significant effect on the improvement of cognitive functions, but unfortunately, it was rejected during phase III clinical trials. Disease modifying drugs such as alpha-secretase activators, beta- and gamma-secretase inhibitors or modulators, inhibitors of Abeta and tau aggregation, enhancers of Abeta degradation, immunotherapies to remove Abeta oligomers and fibrils, and neurotrophic factors are being developed. Some of these drugs are in phase III clinical trials and are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. PMID:20675883

  11. Obesity dependent metabolic signatures associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J.; Caballería, J.; Martínez-Arranz, I.; Domínguez-Díez, A.; Alonso, C.; Muntané, J.; Pérez-Cormenzana, M.; García-Monzón, C.; Mayo, R.; Martín-Duce, A.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Iacono, O. Lo; Tordjman, J.; Andrade, R.J.; Pérez-Carreras, M.; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Tran, A.; Fernández-Escalante, C.; Arévalo, E.; García–Unzueta, M.; Clement, K.; Crespo, J.; Gual, P.; Gómez-Fleitas, M.; Martínez-Chantar, M.L.; Castro, A.; Lu, S.C.; Vázquez-Chantada, M.; Mato, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH) is still very limited. Despite the growing number of studies linking the disease with altered serum metabolite levels, an obstacle to the development of metabolome-based NAFLD predictors has been the lack of large cohort data from biopsy-proven patients matched for key metabolic features such as obesity. We studied 467 biopsied individuals with normal liver histology (n=90) or diagnosed with NAFLD (steatosis, n=246; NASH, n=131), randomly divided into estimation (80% of all patients) and validation (20% of all patients) groups. Qualitative determinations of 540 serum metabolite variables were performed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). The metabolic profile was dependent on patient body-mass index (BMI), suggesting that the NAFLD pathogenesis mechanism may be quite different depending on an individual’s level of obesity. A BMI-stratified multivariate model based on the NAFLD serum metabolic profile was used to separate patients with and without NASH. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87 in the estimation and 0.85 in the validation group. The cutoff (0.54) corresponding to maximum average diagnostic accuracy (0.82) predicted NASH with a sensitivity of 0.71 and a specificity of 0.92 (negative/positive predictive values = 0.82/0.84). The present data, indicating that a BMI-dependent serum metabolic profile may be able to reliably distinguish NASH from steatosis patients, have significant implications for the development of NASH biomarkers and potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22364559

  12. Synaptic AMPA receptor composition in development, plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Henley, Jeremy M; Wilkinson, Kevin A

    2016-06-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are assemblies of four core subunits, GluA1-4, that mediate most fast excitatory neurotransmission. The component subunits determine the functional properties of AMPARs, and the prevailing view is that the subunit composition also determines AMPAR trafficking, which is dynamically regulated during development, synaptic plasticity and in response to neuronal stress in disease. Recently, the subunit dependence of AMPAR trafficking has been questioned, leading to a reappraisal of this field. In this Review, we discuss what is known, uncertain, conjectured and unknown about the roles of the individual subunits, and how they affect AMPAR assembly, trafficking and function under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:27080385

  13. Jordan tobacco dependence treatment guidelines: rationale and development.

    PubMed

    Ayub, H; Obeidat, N; Leischow, S; Glynn, T; Hawari, F

    2016-11-01

    Jordan, a high tobacco-burden country, has been working to expand its tobacco dependence treatment services and has completed development of its first customized treatment guidelines. Our paper presents the development process for these guidelines. A group of national and international experts was formed and a national situation analysis for tobacco dependence treatment practices and a detailed review of international evidence were conducted. The guidelines were then drafted and reviewed by national, regional and international experts and were official endorsed by the Jordanian Ministry of Health before being launched. The guidelines comprise concise descriptions and practical supplementary flowcharts covering the major elements of general tobacco dependence treatment. These are the first comprehensive Arabic-language guidelines, including a section focusing on waterpipe use, and we believe they are a reliable and useful resource for neighbouring countries seeking to develop similar guidelines. PMID:26857722

  14. Osteoarthritis, a disease bridging development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lories, Rik J U; Luyten, Frank P

    2012-01-01

    The osteoarthritic diseases are common disorders characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage in the joints, and associated with remodeling of the subchondral bone, synovitis and the formation of bone outgrowths at the joint margins, osteophytes. From the clinical perspective, osteoarthritis leads to joint pain and loss of function. Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of progressive disability. New data from genetic, translational and basic research have demonstrated that pathways with essential roles in joint and bone development also contribute to the postnatal homeostasis of the articular cartilage and are involved in osteoarthritis, making these potential therapeutic targets. Other systems of interest are the tissue-destructive enzymes that break down the extracellular matrix of the cartilage as well as mediators of inflammation that contribute to synovitis. However, the perspective of a durable treatment over years to decades highlights the need for a personalized medicine approach encompassing a global view on the disease and its management, thereby including nonpharmaceutical approaches such as physiotherapy and advanced surgical methods. Integration of novel strategies based on their efficacy and safety with the identification of individuals at risk and optimal individual rehabilitation management remains a major challenge for the medical community in particular, as the incidence of osteoarthritis is likely to further increase with the overall aging of the population. PMID:23951516

  15. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  16. MicroRNA-dependent Genetic Networks During Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Abernathy, Daniel G.; Yoo, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the structurally and functionally diverse mammalian nervous system requires the integration of numerous levels of gene regulation. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs are key mediators of genetic networks during neural development. Importantly, microRNAs are found to regulate both feedback and feedforward loops during neural development leading to large changes in gene expression. These repressive interactions provide an additional mechanism that facilitates the establishment of complexity within the nervous system. Here, we review studies that have enabled the identification of brain-enriched microRNAs and discuss how genetic networks in neural development depend on microRNAs. PMID:24865244

  17. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenhui; Xue, Guo-Fang; Li, Guanglai; Li, Dongfang; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a member of the incretin hormones and growth factors. Neurons express the GIP receptor, and GIP and its agonists can pass through the blood brain barrier and show remarkable neuroprotective effects by protecting synapse function and numbers, promoting neuronal proliferation, reducing amyloid plaques in the cortex and reducing the chronic inflammation response of the nervous system. Long-acting analogues of GIP that are protease resistant had been developed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. It has been found that such GIP analogues show good protective effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Novel dual agonist peptides that activate the GIP receptor and another incretin receptor, glucagon-like peptide -1 (GLP-1), are under development that show superior effects in diabetic patients compared to single GLP-1 agonists. The dual agonists also show great promise in treating neurodegenerative disorders, and there are currently several clinical trials ongoing, testing GLP-1 mimetics in people with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. PMID:26351802

  19. L-serine in disease and development.

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Tom J; Snell, Keith; Duran, Marinus; Berger, Ruud; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien; Surtees, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid L-serine, one of the so-called non-essential amino acids, plays a central role in cellular proliferation. L-Serine is the predominant source of one-carbon groups for the de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides and deoxythymidine monophosphate. It has long been recognized that, in cell cultures, L-serine is a conditional essential amino acid, because it cannot be synthesized in sufficient quantities to meet the cellular demands for its utilization. In recent years, L-serine and the products of its metabolism have been recognized not only to be essential for cell proliferation, but also to be necessary for specific functions in the central nervous system. The findings of altered levels of serine and glycine in patients with psychiatric disorders and the severe neurological abnormalities in patients with defects of L-serine synthesis underscore the importance of L-serine in brain development and function. This paper reviews these recent insights into the role of L-serine and the pathways of L-serine utilization in disease and during development, in particular of the central nervous system. PMID:12534373

  20. MBT domain proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Reinberg, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain is a “chromatin reader”, a protein module that binds to post-translational modifications on histone tails that are thought to affect a variety of chromatin processes, including transcription. More specifically, MBT domains recognize mono- and di-methylated lysines at a number of different positions on histone H3 and H4 tails. Three Drosophila proteins, SCM, L(3)MBT and SFMBT contain multiple adjacent MBT repeats and have critical roles in development, maintenance of cell identity, and tumor suppression. Although they function in different pathways, these proteins all localize to chromatin in vivo and repress transcription by a currently unknown molecular mechanism that requires the MBT domains. The human genome contains several homologues of these MBT proteins, some of which have been linked to important gene regulatory pathways, such as E2F/Rb- and Polycomb-mediated repression, and to the insurgence of certain neurological tumors. Here, we review the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of MBT proteins and their role in development and disease. PMID:19778625

  1. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  2. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  3. CD8+ T cells prevent antigen-induced antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Zellweger, Raphaël M; Eddy, William E; Tang, William W; Miller, Robyn; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-10-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes pathologies ranging from the febrile illness dengue fever to the potentially lethal severe dengue disease. A major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease is the presence of subprotective DENV-reactive Abs from a previous infection (or from an immune mother), which can induce Ab-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE). However, infection in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs does not always result in severe disease, suggesting that other factors influence disease severity. In this study we investigated how CD8(+) T cell responses influence the outcome of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. Mice were primed with aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted UV-inactivated DENV prior to challenge with DENV. Priming failed to induce robust CD8(+) T cell responses, and it induced nonneutralizing Ab responses that increased disease severity upon infection. Transfer of exogenous DENV-activated CD8(+) T cells into primed mice prior to infection prevented Ab-dependent enhancement and dramatically reduced viral load. Our results suggest that in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs, efficient CD8(+) T cell responses reduce the risk of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. PMID:25217165

  4. Experimental barbiturate dependence. I. Barbiturate dependence development in rats by drug-admixed food (DAF) method.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, E; Izumi, T; Yanaura, S

    1978-04-28

    A method for testing a rat's physical-dependence liability to sedaditive-hypnotic agents and for evaluating that dependence was studied by using the method. Rats received phenobarbital- or barbital-admixed food on a graded-increase dosage schedule over 30-40 days. Manifestations of CNS-suppressing action of either drug (e.g., systemic muscle relaxation, motor incoordination, staggering gait, and ptosis) persisted day and night during the drug medication. Twenty-four to 48 h after withdrawal of either drug, abstinence symptoms (e.g., muscle fasciculation, nuchal twitching, vocalization, increased irritability, ataxia, hyperthermia, and clonic-tonic and grand mal-type convulsions) were evidenced in all animals (N = 6), some of which died after convulsions. These withdrawal signs in rats were classified and found to be closely correlated with the magnitude of weight loss during the withdrawal. The calssification provides a basis for quantitatively assessing physical-dependence liability. The data obtained in the present study suggest that rats, like dogs and monkeys, are suitable experimental animals for tests in early stages of dependence liability, and that the administration of drug-admixed food is a useful method of developing dependence on both barbiturate and morphine-type drugs. PMID:418446

  5. Development of the PROMIS® Nicotine Dependence Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; Tucker, Joan S.; Stucky, Brian D.; Hansen, Mark; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine dependence is a core construct important for understanding cigarette smoking and smoking cessation behavior. This article describes analyses conducted to develop and evaluate item banks for assessing nicotine dependence among daily and nondaily smokers. Methods: Using data from a sample of daily (N = 4,201) and nondaily (N =1,183) smokers, we conducted a series of item factor analyses, item response theory analyses, and differential item functioning analyses (according to gender, age, and race/ethnicity) to arrive at a unidimensional set of nicotine dependence items for daily and nondaily smokers. We also evaluated performance of short forms (SFs) and computer adaptive tests (CATs) to efficiently assess dependence. Results: A total of 32 items were included in the Nicotine Dependence item banks; 22 items are common across daily and nondaily smokers, 5 are unique to daily smokers, and 5 are unique to nondaily smokers. For both daily and nondaily smokers, the Nicotine Dependence item banks are strongly unidimensional, highly reliable (reliability = 0.97 and 0.97, respectively), and perform similarly across gender, age, and race/ethnicity groups. SFs common to daily and nondaily smokers consist of 8 and 4 items (reliability = 0.91 and 0.81, respectively). Results from simulated CATs showed that dependence can be assessed with very good precision for most respondents using fewer than 6 items adaptively selected from the item banks. Conclusions: Nicotine dependence on cigarettes can be assessed on the basis of these item banks via one of the SFs, by using CATs, or through a tailored set of items selected for a specific research purpose. PMID:25118226

  6. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Myrick, H; Brady, K T; Malcolm, R

    2001-01-01

    Neuroscientific underpinnings and pharmacotherapeutic treatments of substance use disorders are rapidly developing areas of study. In particular, there have been exciting new developments in our understanding of the involvement of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter systems and the opiate and serotonin systems in the pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal, alcohol dependence, and in subtypes of individuals with alcoholism. In this article, new developments in the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence will be reviewed. In particular, the use of anticonvulsants in alcohol withdrawal and protracted abstinence syndromes will be discussed. New data on opiate antagonists and acamprosate, an agent that exerts actions through excitatory amino acid systems in relapse prevention, will be reviewed. Finally, there will be a review of new data concerning the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in subtypes of alcoholism and the use of combination pharmacotherapy. PMID:11268820

  7. Super-enhancer lncs to cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Ounzain, Samir; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac development, function and pathological remodelling in response to stress depend on the dynamic control of tissue specific gene expression by distant acting transcriptional enhancers. Recently, super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch or large enhancer clusters, are emerging as sentinel regulators within the gene regulatory networks that underpin cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly evident that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) associated with these sequences play fundamental roles for enhancer activity and the regulation of the gene programs hardwired by them. Here, we review this emerging landscape, focusing on the roles of SEs and their derived lncRNAs in cardiovascular development and disease. We propose that exploration of this genomic landscape could provide novel therapeutic targets and approaches for the amelioration of cardiovascular disease. Ultimately we envisage a future of ncRNA therapeutics targeting the SE landscape to alleviate cardiovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26620798

  8. Epitranscriptional regulation of cardiovascular development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W; Matkovich, Scot J

    2015-01-01

    Development, homeostasis and responses to stress in the heart all depend on appropriate control of mRNA expression programmes, which may be enacted at the level of DNA sequence, DNA accessibility and RNA-mediated control of mRNA output. Diverse mechanisms underlie promoter-driven transcription of coding mRNAs and their translation into protein, and the ways in which sequence alteration of DNA can make an impact on these processes have been studied for some time. The field of epigenetics explores changes in DNA structure that influence its accessibility by transcriptional machinery, and we are continuing to develop our understanding of how these processes modify cardiac RNA production. In this topical review, we do not focus on how DNA sequence and methylation, and histone interactions, may alter its accessibility, but rather on newly described mechanisms by which some transcribed RNAs may alter initial transcription or downstream processing of other RNAs, involving both short non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Here we present examples of how these two classes of non-coding RNAs mediate widespread effects on cardiac transcription and protein output in processes for which we use the broad term ‘epitranscriptional regulation’ and that are complementary to the DNA methylation and histone modification events studied by classical epigenetics. PMID:25433070

  9. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  10. Lower urinary tract development and disease.

    PubMed

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomaliesc such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUVs). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease, and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, the bladder and the urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the postgenomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  11. SOCS proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Trengove, Monique C; Ward, Alister C

    2013-01-01

    Cytokine and growth factor signaling mediates essential roles in the differentiation, proliferation, survival and function of a number of cell lineages. This is achieved via specific receptors located on the surface of target cells, with ligand binding activating key intracellular signal transduction cascades to mediate the requisite cellular outcome. Effective resolution of receptor signaling is also essential, with excessive signaling having the potential for pathological consequences. The Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins represent one important mechanism to extinguish cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling. There are 8 SOCS proteins in mammals; SOCS1-7 and the alternatively named Cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). SOCS1-3 and CISH are predominantly associated with the regulation of cytokine receptor signaling, while SOCS4-7 are more commonly involved in the control of Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Individual SOCS proteins are typically induced by specific cytokines and growth factors, thereby generating a negative feedback loop. As a consequence of their regulatory properties, SOCS proteins have important functions in development and homeostasis, with increasing recognition of their role in disease, particularly their tumor suppressor and anti-inflammatory functions. This review provides a synthesis of our current understanding of the SOCS family, with an emphasis on their immune and hematopoietic roles. PMID:23885323

  12. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  13. Context-dependent symbioses and their potential roles in wildlife diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Alford, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in ecology, evolution and medicine that both the nature (commensal, parasitic and mutualistic) and outcome (symbiont fitness, survival) of symbiotic interactions are often context-dependent. Less is known about the importance of context-dependence in symbioses involved in wildlife disease. We review variable symbioses, and use the amphibian disease chytridiomycosis to demonstrate how understanding context-dependence can improve the understanding and management of wildlife diseases. In chytridiomycosis, the host–pathogen interaction is context-dependent; it is strongly affected by environmental temperature. Skin bacteria can also modify the interaction; some bacteria reduce amphibians' susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. Augmentation of protective microbes is being considered as a possible management tool, but informed application of bioaugmentation requires understanding of how the interactions between host, beneficial bacteria and pathogen depend upon environmental context. The community-level response of the amphibian skin microbiota to environmental conditions may explain the relatively narrow range of environmental conditions in which past declines have occurred. Environmental context affects virulence and the protection provided by mutualists in other host–pathogen systems, including threatened bats and corals. Increased focus on context-dependence in interactions between wildlife and their symbionts is likely to be crucial to the future investigation and management of emerging diseases of wildlife. PMID:22237907

  14. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  15. Noncoding RNAs, Emerging Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Development and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Liu, Jianming; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    A healthy and independent life requires skeletal muscles to maintain optimal function throughout the lifespan, which is in turn dependent on efficient activation of processes that regulate muscle development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Thus, identifying mechanisms that modulate these processes is of crucial priority. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as a class of previously unrecognized transcripts whose importance in a wide range of biological processes and human disease is only starting to be appreciated. In this review, we summarize the roles of recently identified miRNAs and lncRNAs during skeletal muscle development and pathophysiology. We also discuss several molecular mechanisms of these noncoding RNAs. Undoubtedly, further systematic understanding of these noncoding RNAs' functions and mechanisms will not only greatly expand our knowledge of basic skeletal muscle biology, but also significantly facilitate the development of therapies for various muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophies, cachexia, and sarcopenia. PMID:26258142

  16. Social Cognition in Alzheimer’s disease: A separate construct contributing to dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Stephanie; Zahodne, Laura B.; Brandt, Jason; Blacker, Deborah; Albert, Marilyn; Dubois, Bruno; Stern, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which social cognitive changes reflect a discrete constellation of symptoms dissociable from general cognitive changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is unclear. Moreover, whether social cognitive symptoms contribute to disease severity and progression is unknown. The current multicenter study investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between social cognition, general cognition, and dependence in 517 participants with Probable AD. Participants were followed every 6-months for 5.5 years. Results from multivariate latent growth curve models adjusted for sex, age, education, depression, and recruitment site revealed that social cognition and general cognition were unrelated cross-sectionally and over time. However, baseline levels of each were independently related to dependence, and change values of each were independently related to change in dependence. These findings highlight the separability of social and general cognition in AD. Results underscore the relevance of considering social cognition when modeling disease and estimating clinical outcomes related to patient disability. PMID:24656839

  17. Food Restriction Ameliorates the Development of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Gina; Hein, Kyaw Zaw; Nin, Veronica; Edwards, Marika; Chini, Claudia C S; Hopp, Katharina; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Chini, Eduardo N

    2016-05-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic disorder characterized by the accumulation of kidney cysts that ultimately leads to loss of renal function and kidney failure. At present, the treatment for ADPKD is largely supportive. Multiple studies have focused on pharmacologic approaches to slow the development of the cystic disease; however, little is known about the role of nutrition and dietary manipulation in PKD. Here, we show that food restriction (FR) effectively slows the course of the disease in mouse models of ADPKD. Mild to moderate (10%-40%) FR reduced cyst area, renal fibrosis, inflammation, and injury in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular and biochemical studies in these mice indicate that FR ameliorates ADPKD through a mechanism involving suppression of the mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and activation of the liver kinase B1/AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Our data suggest that dietary interventions such as FR, or treatment that mimics the effects of such interventions, may be potential and novel preventive and therapeutic options for patients with ADPKD. PMID:26538633

  18. Echocardiography in pericardial diseases: new developments.

    PubMed

    Veress, Gabriella; Feng, Dali; Oh, Jae K

    2013-05-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most important clinical tools in the diagnosis and management of various pericardial diseases, including constrictive pericarditis, effusive constrictive pericarditis, pericardial effusion, tamponade, absence of the pericardium and cysts or tumors. During recent years, remarkable progress has been made in echocardiography: cardiac tissue Doppler analysis (TDI), strain and strain rate imaging by speckle tracking imaging (STE) and three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography. The assessment of early diastolic annulus velocity and annulus reversus by TDI improves the differentiation of constriction from restrictive myocardial disease, which can be further facilitated by STE as a complementary tool. 3D echocardiography may be useful for the more precise assessment of pericardial diseases, such as pericardial effusion or pericardial masses as it provides incremental value to 2D echocardiography by detecting anatomic structures with higher accuracy. Applications of these newer echocardiographic techniques in the assessment of pericardial diseases are discussed in this chapter. PMID:22752511

  19. Scale dependency of biocapacity and the fallacy of unsustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YUE, Dongxia; MENG, Xingmin; MA, Jinhui

    2014-05-01

    Since the concept of sustainable development was put forward (WCED, 1987), it has become an ideal development mode and a common policy goal, and many indicators have been developed to assess the status of sustainable development. However, among these large numbers of indicators of sustainable development, the EF methodology has gain popularity due to its compatibility with the data format commonly derived from economic and social surveys. To date, area-based information obtained from remote sensing and aerial photography is often used in studies on ecological footprint and sustainability, especially in calculating biocapacity. Given the importance of the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP; i.e. the scale dependency of area-based information), a comprehensive understanding of how the changes of biocapacity across scales (i.e. the resolution of data) is pivotal for regional sustainable development. To this end, based on the Monte Carlo simulation and the GIS technology, we chose two typical river basins in Northwest China (Jinghe River Watershed and Shiyang River Basin) and calculated the biocapacity at different spatial scales based on remote sensing data, with a nominal resolution of 30m at the scale of 1:100,000. The analysis demonstrated that the area sizes of major land covers and subsequently biocapacity showed strong signals of scale dependency, with minor land covers in the region shrinking while major land covers expanding when using large-grain (low resolution) data. The relationship between land cover sizes and their change ratio across scales was shown to follow a logarithm function. The biocapacity estimated at 10×10 km resolution is 10% lower than the one estimated at 1×1 km resolution, casting doubts on many regional and global studies which often rely on coarse scale datasets. Our results not only suggest that fine-scale biocapacity estimates can be extrapolated from coarse-scale ones according to the specific scale-dependent patterns of land

  20. Dependence as a unifying construct in defining Alzheimer’s disease severity

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Trent; Feldman, Howard; Fillit, Howard; Sano, Mary; Schmitt, Frederick; Aisen, Paul; Leibman, Christopher; Mucha, Lisa; Ryan, J. Michael; Sullivan, Sean D.; Spackman, D. Eldon; Neumann, Peter J.; Cohen, Joshua; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews measures of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression in relation to patient dependence and offers a unifying conceptual framework for dependence in AD. Clinicians typically characterize AD by symptomatic impairments in three domains: cognition, function, and behavior. From a patient’s perspective, changes in these domains, individually and in concert, ultimately lead to increased dependence and loss of autonomy. Examples of dependence in AD range from a need for reminders (early AD) to requiring safety supervision and assistance with basic functions (late AD). Published literature has focused on the clinical domains as somewhat separate constructs and has given limited attention to the concept of patient dependence as a descriptor of AD progression. This article presents the concept of dependence on others for care needs as a potential method for translating the effect of changes in cognition, function, and behavior into a more holistic, transparent description of AD progression. PMID:21044778

  1. Epigenetics of osteoarticular diseases: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S B; Wootton, E; De Ferrari, L; Albagha, O M; Salter, D M

    2015-08-01

    A variety of osteoarticular conditions possess an underlying genetic aetiology. Large-scale genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci associated with osteoarticular conditions, but were unable to fully account for their estimated heritability. Epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNA expression may help account for this incomplete heritability. This articles reviews insights from epigenetic studies in osteoarticular diseases, focusing on osteoarthritis, but also examines recent advances in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis, and sarcoma. Genome-wide methylation studies are permitting identification of novel candidate genes and molecular pathways, and the pathogenic mechanisms with altered methylation status are beginning to be elucidated. These findings are gradually translating into improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and clinical applications. Functional studies in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and SLE are now identifying downstream molecular alterations that may confer disease susceptibility. Epigenetic markers are being validated as prognostic and therapeutic disease biomarkers in sarcoma, and clinical trials of hypomethylating agents as treatments for sarcoma are being conducted. In concert with advances in throughput and cost-efficiency of available technologies, future epigenetic research will enable greater characterisation and treatment for both common and rare osteoarticular diseases. PMID:25812537

  2. Nuclear positioning in muscle development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Folker, Eric S.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals, myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, the nuclei are often clustered within the center of the muscle cell. Although this phenotype has been acknowledged for several decades, it is often ignored as a contributor to muscle weakness. Rather, these nuclei are taken only as a sign of muscle repair. Here we review the evidence that mispositioned myonuclei are not merely a symptom of muscle disease but also a cause. Additionally, we review the working models for how myonuclei move from two different perspectives: from that of the nuclei and from that of the cytoskeleton. We further compare and contrast these mechanisms with the mechanisms of nuclear movement in other cell types both to draw general themes for nuclear movement and to identify muscle-specific considerations. Finally, we focus on factors that can be linked to muscle disease and find that genes that regulate myonuclear movement and positioning have been linked to muscular dystrophy. Although the cause-effect relationship is largely speculative, recent data indicate that the position of nuclei should no longer be considered only a means to diagnose muscle disease. PMID:24376424

  3. Bilateral Activity-Dependent Interactions in the Developing Corticospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Kathleen M.; Martin, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent competition between the corticospinal (CS) systems in each hemisphere drives postnatal development of motor skills and stable CS tract connections with contralateral spinal motor circuits. Unilateral restriction of motor cortex (M1) activity during an early postnatal critical period impairs contralateral visually guided movements later in development and in maturity. Silenced M1 develops aberrant connections with the contralateral spinal cord whereas the initially active M1, in the other hemisphere, develops bilateral connections. In this study, we determined whether the aberrant pattern of CS tract terminations and motor impairments produced by early postnatal M1 activity restriction could be abrogated by reducing activity-dependent synaptic competition from the initially active M1 later in development. We first inactivated M1 unilaterally between postnatal weeks 5–7. We next inactivated M1 on the other side from weeks 7–11 (alternate inactivation), to reduce the competitive advantage that this side may have over the initially inactivated side. Alternate inactivation redirected aberrant contralateral CS tract terminations from the initially silenced M1 to their normal spinal territories and reduced the density of aberrant ipsilateral terminations from the initially active side. Normal movement endpoint control during visually guided locomotion was fully restored. This reorganization of CS terminals reveals an unsuspected late plasticity after the critical period for establishing the pattern of CS terminations in the spinal cord. Our findings show that robust bilateral interactions between the developing CS systems on each side are important for achieving balance between contralateral and ipsilateral CS tract connections and visuomotor control. PMID:17928450

  4. Dependability Modeling and Assessment in UML-Based Software Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  5. Dependability modeling and assessment in UML-based software development.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  6. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Dependence Upon Texture Development in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Loftus, Ryan J.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yield (volume of a polymer that is lost due to oxidation per incident atom) of polymers is typically assumed to be reasonably constant with increasing fluence. However polymers containing ash or inorganic pigments, tend to have erosion yields that decrease with fluence due to an increasing presence of protective particles on the polymer surface. This paper investigates two additional possible causes for erosion yields of polymers that are dependent upon atomic oxygen. These are the development of surface texture which can cause the erosion yield to change with fluence due to changes in the aspect ratio of the surface texture that develops and polymer specific atomic oxygen interaction parameters. The surface texture development under directed hyperthermal attack produces higher aspect ratio surface texture than isotropic thermal energy atomic oxygen attack. The fluence dependence of erosion yields is documented for low Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) effective fluences for a variety of polymers under directed hyperthermal and isotropic thermal energy attack.

  7. Activity-dependent FMRP requirements in development of the neural circuitry of learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2015-04-01

    The activity-dependent refinement of neural circuit connectivity during critical periods of brain development is essential for optimized behavioral performance. We hypothesize that this mechanism is defective in fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. Here, we use optogenetic tools in the Drosophila FXS disease model to test activity-dependent dendritogenesis in two extrinsic neurons of the mushroom body (MB) learning and memory brain center: (1) the input projection neuron (PN) innervating Kenyon cells (KCs) in the MB calyx microglomeruli and (2) the output MVP2 neuron innervated by KCs in the MB peduncle. Both input and output neuron classes exhibit distinctive activity-dependent critical period dendritic remodeling. MVP2 arbors expand in Drosophila mutants null for fragile X mental retardation 1 (dfmr1), as well as following channelrhodopsin-driven depolarization during critical period development, but are reduced by halorhodopsin-driven hyperpolarization. Optogenetic manipulation of PNs causes the opposite outcome--reduced dendritic arbors following channelrhodopsin depolarization and expanded arbors following halorhodopsin hyperpolarization during development. Importantly, activity-dependent dendritogenesis in both neuron classes absolutely requires dfmr1 during one developmental window. These results show that dfmr1 acts in a neuron type-specific activity-dependent manner for sculpting dendritic arbors during early-use, critical period development of learning and memory circuitry in the Drosophila brain. PMID:25804740

  8. Activity-dependent FMRP requirements in development of the neural circuitry of learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Caleb A.; Broadie, Kendal

    2015-01-01

    The activity-dependent refinement of neural circuit connectivity during critical periods of brain development is essential for optimized behavioral performance. We hypothesize that this mechanism is defective in fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. Here, we use optogenetic tools in the Drosophila FXS disease model to test activity-dependent dendritogenesis in two extrinsic neurons of the mushroom body (MB) learning and memory brain center: (1) the input projection neuron (PN) innervating Kenyon cells (KCs) in the MB calyx microglomeruli and (2) the output MVP2 neuron innervated by KCs in the MB peduncle. Both input and output neuron classes exhibit distinctive activity-dependent critical period dendritic remodeling. MVP2 arbors expand in Drosophila mutants null for fragile X mental retardation 1 (dfmr1), as well as following channelrhodopsin-driven depolarization during critical period development, but are reduced by halorhodopsin-driven hyperpolarization. Optogenetic manipulation of PNs causes the opposite outcome – reduced dendritic arbors following channelrhodopsin depolarization and expanded arbors following halorhodopsin hyperpolarization during development. Importantly, activity-dependent dendritogenesis in both neuron classes absolutely requires dfmr1 during one developmental window. These results show that dfmr1 acts in a neuron type-specific activity-dependent manner for sculpting dendritic arbors during early-use, critical period development of learning and memory circuitry in the Drosophila brain. PMID:25804740

  9. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  10. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  11. The retromer complex in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex is a multimeric protein complex involved in recycling proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network or plasma membrane. It thus regulates the abundance and subcellular distribution of its cargo within cells. Studies using model organisms show that the retromer complex is involved in specific developmental processes. Moreover, a number of recent studies implicate aberrant retromer function in photoreceptor degeneration, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of retromer-mediated protein trafficking, highlighting key examples of retromer function in vivo. PMID:26199408

  12. Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diem; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Bruelheide, Helge; Bussotti, Filippo; Guyot, Virginie; Jactel, Hervé; Jaroszewicz, Bogdan; Valladares, Fernando; Stenlid, Jan; Boberg, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured the foliar fungal disease incidence on 16 different tree species in 209 plots in six European countries, representing a forest-type gradient from the Mediterranean to boreal forests. Forest plots of single species (monoculture plots) and those with different combinations of two to five tree species (mixed species plots) were compared. Specifically, we analyzed the influence of tree species richness, functional type (conifer vs. broadleaved) and phylogenetic diversity on overall fungal disease incidence. The effect of tree species richness on disease incidence varied with latitude and functional type. Disease incidence tended to increase with tree diversity, in particular in northern latitudes. Disease incidence decreased with tree species richness in conifers, but not in broadleaved trees. However, for specific damage symptoms, no tree species richness effects were observed. Although the patterns were weak, susceptibility of forests to disease appears to depend on the forest site and tree type. PMID:27066232

  13. Current Status of Celiac Disease Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Wungjiranirun, Manida; Kelly, Ciaran P; Leffler, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CeD) is one of the most common immune-mediated diseases. Symptoms and disease activity are incompletely controlled by the gluten-free diet, which is currently the only available therapy. Although no therapies are yet approved, there is a growing field of candidates and an improving understanding of the regulatory pathway. In this review, we briefly discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment paradigm for CeD. We also review the major classes of therapies being considered for CeD and discuss extensively what is known and can be surmised regarding the regulatory pathway for approval of a CeD therapeutic. The coming years will see an increasing number and diversity of potential therapies entering clinical trials and hopefully the first approved agents targeting this significant unmet medical need. Although biomarkers including histology and serology will always be important in therapeutic clinical trials, they currently lack the necessary evidence linking them to improved patient outcomes required for use as primary outcomes for drug approval. For this reason, patient-reported outcomes will likely be primary end points in Phase III CeD trials for the foreseeable future. PMID:27021196

  14. [Factors influencing development and progression of alcoholic liver disease].

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, K; Marot, A; Deltenre, P

    2015-09-01

    Only a minority ot excessive drinkers develop cirrhosis. The main cofactors implicated in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease are obesity, diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Several genetic polymorphisms have been associated with a higher risk of alcoholic cirrhosis. Recent data indicate that gut microbiota could play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the factors that influence development and progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26502621

  15. Strain Mode Dependence of Deformation Texture Developments: Microstructural Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendra, S.; Kanjarla, A. K.; Paranjape, H.; Mishra, S. K.; Mishra, S.; Delannay, L.; Samajdar, I.; van Houtte, P.

    2011-07-01

    Fully recrystallized commercial-purity aluminum sheets were deformed by limiting dome height tests, the following strain modes: uniaxial tension (US), near plane strain tension (PS), and equibiaxial tension (BS) were identified using standard procedure. The deformation texture developments differed significantly depending on the strain mode. Although the full constraints Taylor (FCT) model captured the texture developments in US, it failed to reproduce deformation textures in PS and especially in BS. The Advanced LAMEL (ALAMEL) model and the crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) were, however, successful with respect to all three strain modes. Microtexture data brought out interesting observations of orientation gradients. First, the orientation gradients increased from US to PS to BS. Second, such gradients were mostly around initial (or prior deformation) grain boundary regions. A simple algorithm, and an associated computer program, was developed to demarcate such near boundary gradient zones (NBGZs). The area fraction and severity of NBGZ seemed to affect the texture development; FCT was reasonably successful at low NBGZ, whereas high NBGZ required the ALAMEL and the CPFEM models that are capable of addressing strain heterogeneity and grain interactions.

  16. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows. PMID:27142954

  17. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  18. [Metabolic abnormalities as a basis for age-dependent diseases and aging? State of the art].

    PubMed

    Tereshina, E V

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a number of certain criteria reflecting abnormalities in lipid and glucose metabolism. These abnormalities are considered to be a reason for atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes mellitus type 2. The prevalence of CVD among those with diabetes is 3-5 folds higher than without diabetes. MS demonstrates ethnic and gender variants, its frequency depends on the lifestyle and age. Attention to MS has been attracted in the last decades induced by the obesity epidemic in US. The adipose tissue and high triglyceride blood levels have been regarded as hallmark of MS. It has appeared that metabolic ways of cholesterol, fat and glucose were tightly connected and united in a system of energy expenditure and reproduction. The high prevalence of MS, heart attacks and diabetes in the elderly population makes the evidence of age to be an independent risk factor of the development of metabolic abnormalities. But this problem is still out of the field of interest in gerontology. There exist a number of unsolved questions concerning the function of visceral adipose tissue, the role of free fatty acids in the insulin resistance, mechanisms of inflammation in the old age and so on that can be an object of gerontology. So, a program of advanced researches in this field is discussed. PMID:19827683

  19. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart. PMID:27593162

  20. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibitors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolfertstetter, Stefanie; Huettner, Johannes P.; Schlossmann, Jens

    2013-01-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) exhibit diverse physiological functions in the mammalian system e.g., in vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscles, in platelets, in kidney, in bone growth, nociception and in the central nervous system. Furthermore, PKG were found in insects and in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Two different genes of PKG exist: a) the PKG-I gene that is expressed as cytosolic PKG-Iα or PKG-Iβ isoform, and b) the PKG-II gene, which expresses the membrane associated PKG-II protein. The enzyme kinetics, the localization and the substrates of these PKG enzymes differ utilizing different physiological functions. Various inhibitors of PKG were developed directed against diverse functional regions of the kinase. These inhibitors of PKG have been used to analyse the specific functions of these enzymes. The review article will summarize these different inhibitors regarding their specificity and their present applications in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it will be discussed that the distinct inhibition of the PKG enzymes could be used as a valuable pharmacological target e.g., in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, diarrhea, cancer or malaria. PMID:24275951

  1. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  2. Is 'disease model' an appropriate term to describe the alcohol dependence syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gorman, D M

    1989-01-01

    Caetano (Concepts of alcohol dependence: the two worlds of research and treatment. Alcohol and Alcoholism 23, 225-227, 1988) has suggested that in the U.S.A. opposition from the disease model has been the main reason for the limited application of the alcohol dependence syndrome. In Britain, the charge that the syndrome is a poorly disguised version of the disease model has had a similar effect. This paper describes the main features of the crude biomedical disease model, which critics equate with the alcohol dependence syndrome. It is concluded that the alcohol dependence syndrome does not conform to this, in that it is not presented by its proponents as a discrete entity identified by a core psycho-biological pathology and carries no built-in assumptions about causal processes. It is argued that instead of setting-up and championing competing all-embracing conceptual models, both clinicians and researchers should be flexible and imaginative in their use of concepts. PMID:2697203

  3. A "Whirly" transcription factor is required for salicylic acid-dependent disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Desveaux, Darrell; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Després, Charles; Mess, Jean-Nicholas; Lévesque, Caroline; Fobert, Pierre R; Dangl, Jeffery L; Brisson, Normand

    2004-02-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is critical for plant disease resistance responses; its global control is not well understood. Salicylic acid (SA) can induce plant defense gene expression and a long-lasting disease resistance state called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Plant-specific "Whirly" DNA binding proteins were previously implicated in defense gene regulation. We demonstrate that the potato StWhy1 protein is a transcriptional activator of genes containing the PBF2 binding PB promoter element. DNA binding activity of AtWhy1, the Arabidopsis StWhy1 ortholog, is induced by SA and is required for both SA-dependent disease resistance and SA-induced expression of an SAR response gene. AtWhy1 is required for both full basal and specific disease resistance responses. The transcription factor-associated protein NPR1 is also required for SAR. Surprisingly, AtWhy1 activation by SA is NPR1 independent, suggesting that AtWhy1 works in conjunction with NPR1 to transduce the SA signal. Our analysis of AtWhy1 adds a critical component to the SA-dependent plant disease resistance response. PMID:14960277

  4. Epithelial calcineurin controls microbiota-dependent intestinal tumor development.

    PubMed

    Peuker, Kenneth; Muff, Stefanie; Wang, Jun; Künzel, Sven; Bosse, Esther; Zeissig, Yvonne; Luzzi, Giuseppina; Basic, Marijana; Strigli, Anne; Ulbricht, Andrea; Kaser, Arthur; Arlt, Alexander; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; van den Brink, Gijs R; Schafmayer, Clemens; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Becker, Thomas; Bianchi, Marco E; Bleich, André; Röcken, Christoph; Hampe, Jochen; Schreiber, Stefan; Baines, John F; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation-associated pathways are active in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and contribute to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Calcineurin, a phosphatase required for the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors, shows increased expression in CRC. We therefore investigated the role of calcineurin in intestinal tumor development. We demonstrate that calcineurin and NFAT factors are constitutively expressed by primary IECs and selectively activated in intestinal tumors as a result of impaired stratification of the tumor-associated microbiota and toll-like receptor signaling. Epithelial calcineurin supports the survival and proliferation of cancer stem cells in an NFAT-dependent manner and promotes the development of intestinal tumors in mice. Moreover, somatic mutations that have been identified in human CRC are associated with constitutive activation of calcineurin, whereas nuclear translocation of NFAT is associated with increased death from CRC. These findings highlight an epithelial cell-intrinsic pathway that integrates signals derived from the commensal microbiota to promote intestinal tumor development. PMID:27043494

  5. Path dependence in energy systems and economic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Energy systems are subject to strong and long-lived path dependence, owing to technological, infrastructural, institutional and behavioural lock-ins. Yet, with the prospect of providing accessible cheap energy to stimulate economic development and reduce poverty, governments often invest in large engineering projects and subsidy policies. Here, I argue that while these may achieve their objectives, they risk locking their economies onto energy-intensive pathways. Thus, particularly when economies are industrializing, and their energy systems are being transformed and are not yet fully locked-in, policymakers should take care before directing their economies onto energy-intensive pathways that are likely to be detrimental to their long-run prosperity.

  6. Development and Application of Chronic Disease Risk Prediction Models

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun Min; Stefani, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, non-communicable chronic diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a large proportion of chronic diseases are preventable through risk factor management. However, the prevention efficacy at the individual level is not yet satisfactory. Chronic disease prediction models have been developed to assist physicians and individuals in clinical decision-making. A chronic disease prediction model assesses multiple risk factors together and estimates an absolute disease risk for the individual. Accurate prediction of an individual's future risk for a certain disease enables the comparison of benefits and risks of treatment, the costs of alternative prevention strategies, and selection of the most efficient strategy for the individual. A large number of chronic disease prediction models, especially targeting cardiovascular diseases and cancers, have been suggested, and some of them have been adopted in the clinical practice guidelines and recommendations of many countries. Although few chronic disease prediction tools have been suggested in the Korean population, their clinical utility is not as high as expected. This article reviews methodologies that are commonly used for developing and evaluating a chronic disease prediction model and discusses the current status of chronic disease prediction in Korea. PMID:24954311

  7. Chemicals and environmentally caused diseases in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Jamall, I.S.; Davis, B. )

    1991-06-01

    This chapter discusses international aspects of diseases resulting from exposure to chemical pollutants in the environment, with an emphasis on developing countries. These countries share many of the same problems of air, water, and pesticide pollution that face the more industrialized countries. In developing countries, however, the problems are compounded by a number of unique situations, viz., economic priorities, high burden of infectious diseases, impoverishment, and absence of a regulatory framework for the disposal of toxic chemicals. This discussion emphasizes the importance of interactions among toxicants, malnutrition, and infectious diseases for both urban and rural populations insofar as these interactions contribute to disease. Toxicants not only produce disease directly but also exacerbate diseases with other causes. Specific examples from developing countries demonstrate how human health effects from exposures to environmental chemicals can be assessed. While they do not strictly fall under the rubric of developing countries, the public health consequences of inadequate control of environmental pollution in the East European countries should demonstrate the magnitude of the problem, except that in developing countries the public health consequence of environmental chemicals will be aggravated by the widespread malnutrition and high prevalence of infectious diseases. Much needs to be done before we can adequately quantify the contribution of environmental chemicals to morbidity and mortality in developing countries with the level of sophistication now evident in the charting of infectious diseases in these countries. 52 references.

  8. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  9. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  10. [Views for research development of control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin-Ping; Dong, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Ming-Sen

    2013-12-01

    With the social and technological development, new understandings have been emerged for the research development of the control of parasitic diseases. The present review argues that: the traditional point of view for the control of parasitic diseases, eliminating parasites/media, should be updated. For the long-term interests of science and human perspective, biological diversity, including the parasite biodiversity, and ecological environment should be paid much more attention during the control of parasitic diseases. The leading role of society, economy and culture should be fully developed in the control of parasitic diseases with the progress of scientific and technology, to find a final way of sustainable development in the control of parasitic diseases. PMID:24490386

  11. Primary Cilia in Pancreatic Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Sukanya; O’Hare, Elizabeth A.; Zaghloul, Norann A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia and their anchoring basal bodies are important regulators of a growing list of signaling pathways. Consequently, dysfunction in proteins associated with these structures results in perturbation of the development and function of a spectrum of tissue and cell types. Here, we review the role of cilia in mediating the development and function of the pancreas. We focus on ciliary regulation of major pathways involved in pancreatic development, including Shh, Wnt, TGF-β, Notch, and fibroblast growth factor. We also discuss pancreatic phenotypes associated with ciliary dysfunction, including pancreatic cysts and defects in glucose homeostasis, and explore the potential role of cilia in such defects. PMID:24864023

  12. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator’s original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively. PMID:27124390

  13. Developing countries and neglected diseases: challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Boutayeb, Abdesslam

    2007-01-01

    It is now commonly admitted that the so-called (most) neglected tropical diseases have been given little attention. According to World Health Organization, neglected diseases are hidden diseases as they affect almost exclusively extremely poor populations living in remote areas beyond the reach of health service. The European Parliament recognised that, to our shame, Neglected Diseases have not received the attention they deserve from EU actions. In the Millennium Development Goals they were given very little attention and mentioned just as other disease. Investing in drugs for these diseases is thought to be not marketable or profitable. However, despite their low mortality, neglected diseases are causing severe and permanent disabilities and deformities affecting approximately 1 billion people in the world, yielding more than 20 millions of Disability Adjusted Life Years (56.6 million according to Lancet's revised estimates) and important socio-economic losses. Urgent pragmatic and efficient measures are needed both at international and national levels. PMID:18036265

  14. Elemental diet in steroid-dependent and steroid-refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C J; Giaffer, M H; Cann, P A; Holdsworth, C D

    1991-11-01

    Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease who had symptoms uncontrolled by high-dose steroids (n = 11) or symptoms invariably appearing on reduction or withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy (n = 5) were treated with elemental diet. After 4 wk of dietary treatment, 10 patients were in remission and off all medication. Seven continued to be well without treatment for a minimum of 6 months, and four for at least 1 yr. No patient who subsequently relapsed had further steroid-refractory symptoms. Of the six patients failing to respond to elemental diet, four with steroid-refractory disease required early resective surgery for symptom relief, and two continued with steroid therapy, one in much reduced dosage. Elemental diet can bring about a sustained remission in many patients with Crohn's disease dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids, and reduce the need for surgical intervention. PMID:1951239

  15. Impairment of PARK14-dependent Ca2+ signalling is a novel determinant of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingde; Yen, Allen; Rymarczyk, Grzegorz; Asai, Hirohide; Trengrove, Chelsea; Aziz, Nadine; Kirber, Michael T.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Wolozin, Benjamin; Bolotina, Victoria M.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (idPD) remains enigmatic despite recent successes in identification of genes (PARKs) that underlie familial PD. To find new keys to this incurable neurodegenerative disorder we focused on the poorly understood PARK14 disease locus (Pla2g6 gene) and the store-operated Ca2+ signalling pathway. Analysis of the cells from idPD patients reveals a significant deficiency in store-operated PLA2g6-dependent Ca2+ signalling, which we can mimic in a novel B6.Cg-Pla2g6ΔEx2-VB (PLA2g6 ex2KO) mouse model. Here we demonstrate that genetic or molecular impairment of PLA2g6-dependent Ca2+ signalling is a trigger for autophagic dysfunction, progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and age-dependent L-DOPA-sensitive motor dysfunction. Discovery of this previously unknown sequence of pathological events, its association with idPD and our ability to mimic this pathology in a novel genetic mouse model opens new opportunities for finding a cure for this devastating neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26755131

  16. [Development and regeneration of oligodendrocytes: therapeutic perspectives in demyelinating diseases].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Dalcq, M

    2005-01-01

    The function of the central nervous system (CNS) is in great part depending on glial cells as, for instance, radial glial cells give rise to cortical neurons, and oligodendrocytes synthesize an immense specialized membrane that enwraps axons to make myelin internodes. Myelin allows fast saltatory conduction of action potentials along myelinated nerve tracts and assures the survival of axons. Oligodendrocytes precursors (OP) emerge during development, first in the spinal cord and later in the telencephalon from multipotential neural precursors in germinative zones around the cerebral ventricles. Morphogens and specific growth factors stimulate the growth, migration and survival of OPs toward axons, culminating in myelination. Such precursors can be isolated from human brain and persist in the adult CNS, allowing some degree of remyelination in the course of a demyelinating disease caused by an infectious agent or inflammation such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These remyelinating cells can recapitulate some molecular events of myelination while new OPs are generated by neural stem cells in the subventricular zones and niches. This natural repair process often decreases with time in man, raising questions about the appropriateness of rodent animal models where remyelination is robust. The challenge today in MS is to develop a pharmacology of myelin repair by endogenous precursors which, if successful, might be more likely to result in clinical benefits than transplantation of myelin-forming cells, shown to be so efficient in rodent models. PMID:16768245

  17. Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Michael; Fadda, Roberta; Overton, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their developing cognitive abilities and their limited knowledge about the biological basis of illness, children often have less expertise at disease avoidance than adults. However, affective reactions to contaminants through the acquisition of disgust and the social and cultural transmissions of knowledge about contamination and contagion provide impetus for children to learn effective disease-avoidant behaviours early in their development. In this article, we review the ontogenetic development of knowledge about contamination and contagion with particular attention to the role of socialization and culture. Together with their emerging cognitive abilities and affective reactions to contaminants, informal and formal cultural learning shape children's knowledge about disease. Through this process, the perceptual cues of contamination are linked to threats of disease outcomes and can act as determinants of disease-avoidant behaviours. PMID:22042919

  18. Connexins in skeletal muscle development and disease.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Peter A; Laird, Dale W

    2016-02-01

    Gap junctions consist of clusters of intercellular channels composed of connexins that connect adjacent cells and allow the exchange of small molecules. While the 21 member multi-gene family of connexins are ubiquitously found in humans, only Cx39, Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 have been documented in developing myoblasts and injured adult skeletal muscle while healthy adult skeletal muscle is devoid of connexins. The use of gap junctional blockers and cultured myoblast cell lines have suggested that these connexins play a critical role in myotube formation and muscle regeneration. More recent genetically-modified mouse models where Cx43 function is greatly compromized or ablated have further supported a role for Cx43 in regulating skeletal muscle development. In the last decade, we have become aware of a cohort of patients that have a development disorder known as oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). These patients harbor either gain or loss of Cx43 function gene mutations that result in many organ anomalies raising questions as to whether they suffer from defects in skeletal muscle formation or regeneration upon injury. Interesting, some ODDD patients report muscle weakness and loss of limb control but it is not clear if this is neurogenic or myogenic in origin. This review will focus on the role connexins play in muscle development and repair and discuss the impact of Cx43 mutants on muscle function. PMID:26688333

  19. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  20. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  1. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Harting, J W

    1992-08-21

    In this article the clinical features and aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases are described and current pharmacotherapeutic possibilities are explored. Also reviewed are recent developments and future prospects for the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory bowel diseases, including aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, lipoxygenase inhibitors, fish oil, sucralfate, bismuth compounds, free radical scavengers, (hydroxy)chloroquine, sodium cromoglycate and methotrexate. PMID:1437510

  2. New Developments in Understanding and Treating Adolescent Marijuana Dependence1

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States and worldwide. Marijuana use is a problem of increasing magnitude among adolescents. Use typically begins in adolescence and is associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. Method This article will present an overview of trends in marijuana use, and will review the endocannabinoid system and marijuana. It will discuss recent policy developments in US and their implications, especially for adolescents. Existing treatments will be reviewed, including findings from a recent randomized double-blind trial of N-acetylcysteine, a compound that reverses the dysregulation of the glutamate system that occurs in substance dependence. Conclusions The core treatment approaches include psychosocial interventions, sometimes in combination with each other. While a reduction in days of use is often achieved with most of these approaches, abstinence is a much more elusive goal. The evidence base for effective treatments remains inadequate especially with regard to adolescents, and there is an urgent need for more research in this area. Promising new treatments include N-acetylcysteine in conjunction with contingency management. PMID:25289370

  3. Development of lung adenocarcinomas with exclusive dependence on oncogene fusions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Shimada, Yoko; Shiraishi, Kouya; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Tsuta, Koji; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kato, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    This report delivers a comprehensive genetic alteration profile of lung adenocarcinomas (LADC) driven by ALK, RET, and ROS1 oncogene fusions. These tumors are difficult to study because of their rarity. Each drives only a low percentage of LADCs. Whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation analyses were performed on a Japanese LADC cohort (n = 200) enriched in patients with fusions (n = 31, 15.5%), followed by deep resequencing for validation. The driver fusion cases showed a distinct profile with smaller numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in cancer-related genes or truncating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex genes than in other LADCs (P < 0.0001). This lower mutation rate was independent of age, gender, smoking status, pathologic stage, and tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001) and was validated in nine fusion-positive cases from a U.S. LADCs cohort (n = 230). In conclusion, our findings indicate that LADCs with ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions develop exclusively via their dependence on these oncogene fusions. The presence of such few alterations beyond the fusions supports the use of monotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the fusion products in fusion-positive LADCs. PMID:25855381

  4. Ontogenetic, gravity-dependent development of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rat soleus muscle fiber growth and changes in myosin phenotype during the postnatal, preweaning period would be largely independent of weight bearing. The hindlimbs of one group of pups were unloaded intermittently from postnatal day 4 to day 21: the pups were isolated from the dam for 5 h during unloading and returned for nursing for 1 h. Control pups were either maintained with the dam as normal or put on an alternating feeding schedule as described above. The enlargement of mass (approximately 3 times), increase in myonuclear number (approximately 1.6 times) and myonuclear domain (approximately 2.6 times), and transformation toward a slow fiber phenotype (from 56 to 70% fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain) observed in controls were inhibited by hindlimb unloading. These properties were normalized to control levels or higher within 1 mo of reambulation beginning immediately after the unloading period. Therefore, chronic unloading essentially stopped the ontogenetic developmental processes of 1) net increase in DNA available for transcription, 2) increase in amount of cytoplasm sustained by that DNA pool, and 3) normal transition of myosin isoforms that occur in some fibers from birth to weaning. It is concluded that normal ontogenetic development of a postural muscle is highly dependent on the gravitational environment even during the early postnatal period, when full weight-bearing activity is not routine.

  5. Development of Screening Questionnaire for Detection of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashish; Giri, Om Prakash; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence (AD) is a major reason for morbidity and visits to emergency medical settings. However, the detection of AD is often difficult or overlooked. This study aimed to develop a brief screening questionnaire in Hindi language for detection of AD in an emergency medical setting. Materials and Methods The authors in consultation devised a set of questions related to AD in the Hindi language requiring binary yes/no type of response. These questions were guided by clinical experience, nosological criteria and previously published screening questionnaires. After initial piloting, these questions were administered by the treating doctors to 100 consenting adult patients presenting with possible AD in the emergency medical services of a tertiary care hospital in North India. A diagnosis of AD was arrived at by administering Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview separately. Identification of the most discriminant combinations of items for the detection of AD were based on the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analyses. The final version of the questionnaire was then externally validated on another cohort of patients. Results Based on the analyses, we retained 5 items in the final version of the questionnaire. Sensitivity and specificity values for cut-off scores were calculated. Subsequent external validation revealed satisfactory psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Conclusion The questionnaire represents a simple and brief clinician-administered instrument for screening of AD in an emergency medical setting. PMID:26500989

  6. Modeling Development and Disease with Organoids.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in 3D culture technology allow embryonic and adult mammalian stem cells to exhibit their remarkable self-organizing properties, and the resulting organoids reflect key structural and functional properties of organs such as kidney, lung, gut, brain and retina. Organoid technology can therefore be used to model human organ development and various human pathologies 'in a dish." Additionally, patient-derived organoids hold promise to predict drug response in a personalized fashion. Organoids open up new avenues for regenerative medicine and, in combination with editing technology, for gene therapy. The many potential applications of this technology are only beginning to be explored. PMID:27315476

  7. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  8. [ANALYSIS OF ULTRASONIC, CYTOLOGICAL AND MORPHOLOGIC RESEARCHES RESULTS OF PATIENTS WITH GRAVES' DISEASE (TOXIC GOITER) DEPENDING ON DISEASE DURATION].

    PubMed

    Tronco, N D; Shlyahtych, S L; Buldygina, Yu V; Berezhna, I Y; Antoniv, V R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of research is to arrange the results of ultrasonic and cytological researches during long-term drug treatment (more than 1 year) of patients with Graves' disease. From 2008 to 2013 the detailed examination of 220 patients was carried out in Kyiv City Centre for Endocrine Surgery which operates on the basis of the 3d Clinical Hospital. There were established three kinds of echographic patterns which pointed out the ultrasonic changes of the thyroid gland tissue, occurred during the drug treatment. Among 63 (28.6%) patients with long-term drug treatment the development of space-occupying lesions, occurred due to long duration of disease with long-term usage of tyreostatics, was recorded. After the surgical treatment the extracted thyroid gland tissue was subjected to histological study. The papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland was verified in 4 (6,3 %) of 63 patients with space-occupying lesions. The ultrasonic research of thyroid gland in combination with aspiration puncture biopsy and cytological research are the highly informative methods of examination of patients with Graves' disease which allow to objectify the organ structural condition while the disease duration. PMID:26827451

  9. Crk1/2-dependent signaling is necessary for podocyte foot process spreading in mouse models of glomerular disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Britta; Verma, Rakesh; Soofi, Abdulsalam A.; Garg, Puneet; Zhang, Jidong; Park, Tae-Ju; Giardino, Laura; Ryzhova, Larisa; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Wong, Hetty; Nihalani, Deepak; Salant, David J.; Hanks, Steven K.; Curran, Tom; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    The morphology of healthy podocyte foot processes is necessary for maintaining the characteristics of the kidney filtration barrier. In most forms of glomerular disease, abnormal filter barrier function results when podocytes undergo foot process spreading and retraction by remodeling their cytoskeletal architecture and intercellular junctions during a process known as effacement. The cell adhesion protein nephrin is necessary for establishing the morphology of the kidney podocyte in development by transducing from the specialized podocyte intercellular junction phosphorylation-mediated signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. The present studies extend our understanding of nephrin function by showing that nephrin activation in cultured podocytes induced actin dynamics necessary for lamellipodial protrusion. This process required a PI3K-, Cas-, and Crk1/2-dependent signaling mechanism distinct from the previously described nephrin-Nck1/2 pathway necessary for assembly and polymerization of actin filaments. Our present findings also support the hypothesis that mechanisms governing lamellipodial protrusion in culture are similar to those used in vivo during foot process effacement in a subset of glomerular diseases. In mice, podocyte-specific deletion of Crk1/2 prevented foot process effacement in one model of podocyte injury and attenuated foot process effacement and associated proteinuria in a delayed fashion in a second model. In humans, focal adhesion kinase and Cas phosphorylation — markers of focal adhesion complex–mediated Crk-dependent signaling — was induced in minimal change disease and membranous nephropathy, but not focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Together, these observations suggest that activation of a Cas-Crk1/2–dependent complex is necessary for foot process effacement observed in distinct subsets of human glomerular diseases. PMID:22251701

  10. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  11. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyeon-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  12. The development of new therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, M D; Simms, G A; Weaver, D F

    2010-10-01

    Existing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) fail to address the underlying pathology of the disease; they merely provide short-lived symptomatic relief. Consequently, the progression of AD is unrelenting, leading to a continual decrease in cognitive abilities. Recent advances in understanding the genetic factors that predispose to AD, as well as in biomarker development, have brought with them the promise of earlier and more reliable diagnosis of this disease. As improvements continue to be made in these areas, the shortcomings of current AD treatments appear all the more acute because opportunities for early intervention are hindered by a lack of "curative" or even disease-modifying drugs. This State of the Art report reviews existing AD therapeutics and highlights recent progress made in the design and development of drugs that are aimed at disrupting AD disease progression by inhibition of the protein misfolding of β-amyloid (Aβ) into neurotoxic oligomeric aggregates. PMID:20811351

  13. Development of a Measure of Attitude toward Pulmonary Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaghie, William C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Systematic scale-development procedures, reliability analyses on 2,852 medical students (3 samples), and factor analysis were used to develop and refine a scale reflecting attitudes about pulmonary disease prevention. Development and verification samples included 110 and 2,691 students, respectively. The scale is promising for health education and…

  14. Pharmacological targeting of actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization ameliorates chronic kidney disease in diverse animal models

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Mario; Teng, Beina; Gu, Changkyu; Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Kasaikina, Marina; Pham, Vincent A.; Hanke, Nils; Rong, Song; Gueler, Faikah; Schroder, Patricia; Tossidou, Irini; Park, Joon-Keun; Staggs, Lynne; Haller, Hermann; Erschow, Sergej; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Wei, Changli; Chen, Chuang; Tardi, Nicholas; Hakroush, Samy; Selig, Martin K.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Merscher, Sandra; Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes represents a common pathway in the pathogenesis of proteinuria across a spectrum of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The GTPase dynamin has been implicated in the maintenance of cellular architecture in podocytes through its direct interaction with actin. Furthermore, the propensity of dynamin to oligomerize into higher-order structures in an actin-dependent manner and to crosslink actin microfilaments into higher order structures have been correlated with increased actin polymerization and global organization of the actin cytoskeleton in the cell. We found that use of the small molecule Bis-T-23, which promotes actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization and thus increased actin polymerization in injured podocytes, was sufficient to improve renal health in diverse models of both transient kidney disease and of CKD. In particular, administration of Bis-T-23 in these renal disease models restored the normal ultrastructure of podocyte foot processes, lowered proteinuria, lowered collagen IV deposits in the mesangial matrix, diminished mesangial matrix expansion and extended lifespan. These results further establish that alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of kidney podocytes is a common hallmark of CKD, while also underscoring the significant regenerative potential of injured glomeruli and that targeting the oligomerization cycle of dynamin represents an attractive potential therapeutic target to treat CKD. PMID:25962121

  15. Pharmacological targeting of actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization ameliorates chronic kidney disease in diverse animal models.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Mario; Teng, Beina; Gu, Changkyu; Shchedrina, Valentina A; Kasaikina, Marina; Pham, Vincent A; Hanke, Nils; Rong, Song; Gueler, Faikah; Schroder, Patricia; Tossidou, Irini; Park, Joon-Keun; Staggs, Lynne; Haller, Hermann; Erschow, Sergej; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Wei, Changli; Chen, Chuang; Tardi, Nicholas; Hakroush, Samy; Selig, Martin K; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Merscher, Sandra; Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja

    2015-06-01

    Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes represents a common pathway in the pathogenesis of proteinuria across a spectrum of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The GTPase dynamin has been implicated in the maintenance of cellular architecture in podocytes through its direct interaction with actin. Furthermore, the propensity of dynamin to oligomerize into higher-order structures in an actin-dependent manner and to cross-link actin microfilaments into higher-order structures has been correlated with increased actin polymerization and global organization of the actin cytoskeleton in the cell. We found that use of the small molecule Bis-T-23, which promotes actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization and thus increased actin polymerization in injured podocytes, was sufficient to improve renal health in diverse models of both transient kidney disease and CKD. In particular, administration of Bis-T-23 in these renal disease models restored the normal ultrastructure of podocyte foot processes, lowered proteinuria, lowered collagen IV deposits in the mesangial matrix, diminished mesangial matrix expansion and extended lifespan. These results further establish that alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of kidney podocytes is a common hallmark of CKD, while also underscoring the substantial regenerative potential of injured glomeruli and identifying the oligomerization cycle of dynamin as an attractive potential therapeutic target to treat CKD. PMID:25962121

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  17. Abnormal Thiamine-Dependent Processes in Alzheimer’s Disease. Lessons from Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Jordan, Barry D.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. PMID:22982063

  18. Environmental dependency of amphibian-ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-08-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host-pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host-strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype-genotype-environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

  19. Drug discovery and development for neglected diseases: the DNDi model.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Eric; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2011-01-01

    New models of drug discovery have been developed to overcome the lack of modern and effective drugs for neglected diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness), leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, which have no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry. With the purpose of combining the skills and research capacity in academia, pharmaceutical industry, and contract researchers, public-private partnerships or product development partnerships aim to create focused research consortia that address all aspects of drug discovery and development. These consortia not only emulate the projects within pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, eg, identification and screening of libraries, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, formulation development, and manufacturing, but also use and strengthen existing capacity in disease-endemic countries, particularly for the conduct of clinical trials. The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has adopted a model closely related to that of a virtual biotechnology company for the identification and optimization of drug leads. The application of this model to the development of drug candidates for the kinetoplastid infections of HAT, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis has already led to the identification of new candidates issued from DNDi's own discovery pipeline. This demonstrates that the model DNDi has been implementing is working but its DNDi, neglected diseases sustainability remains to be proven. PMID:21552487

  20. Dependent Narcissism, Organizational Learning, and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Narcissistic leadership can benefit organizational performance. Aberrant narcissism can destroy the psychosocial health of groups, limiting performance. This article examines Dependent Organizational Disorder, a common form of narcissism, which infects leadership, thwarts performance, and interrupts organizational learning. Dependent…

  1. Disease allele-dependent small-molecule sensitivities in blood cells from monogenic diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Stanley Y.; Blodgett, David M.; Ma, Maggie S.; Westly, Elizabeth C.; Clemons, Paul A.; Subramanian, Aravind; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Even as genetic studies identify alleles that influence human disease susceptibility, it remains challenging to understand their functional significance and how they contribute to disease phenotypes. Here, we describe an approach to translate discoveries from human genetics into functional and therapeutic hypotheses by relating human genetic variation to small-molecule sensitivities. We use small-molecule probes modulating a breadth of targets and processes to reveal disease allele-dependent sensitivities, using cells from multiple individuals with an extreme form of diabetes (maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1, caused by mutation in the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4α). This approach enabled the discovery of small molecules that show mechanistically revealing and therapeutically relevant interactions with HNF4α in both lymphoblasts and pancreatic β-cells, including compounds that physically interact with HNF4α. Compounds including US Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs were identified that favorably modulate a critical disease phenotype, insulin secretion from β-cells. This method may suggest therapeutic hypotheses for other nonblood disorders. PMID:21183721

  2. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals. PMID:23943274

  3. Link between Cancer and Alzheimer Disease via Oxidative Stress Induced by Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mitochondrial DNA Overproliferation and Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Obrenovich, Mark E.; Tabrez, Shams; Jabir, Nasimudeen R.; Reddy, V. Prakash; Li, Yi; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Cacabelos, Ramon; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide- (NO-) dependent oxidative stress results in mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations and DNA damage in cases of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, little is known about these pathways in human cancers, especially during the development as well as the progression of primary brain tumors and metastatic colorectal cancer. One of the key features of tumors is the deficiency in tissue energy that accompanies mitochondrial lesions and formation of the hypoxic smaller sized mitochondria with ultrastructural abnormalities. We speculate that mitochondrial involvement may play a significant role in the etiopathogenesis of cancer. Recent studies also demonstrate a potential link between AD and cancer, and anticancer drugs are being explored for the inhibition of AD-like pathology in transgenic mice. Severity of the cancer growth, metastasis, and brain pathology in AD (in animal models that mimic human AD) correlate with the degree of mitochondrial ultrastructural abnormalities. Recent advances in the cell-cycle reentry of the terminally differentiated neuronal cells indicate that NO-dependent mitochondrial abnormal activities and mitotic cell division are not the only important pathogenic factors in pathogenesis of cancer and AD, but open a new window for the development of novel treatment strategies for these devastating diseases. PMID:23691268

  4. Context Dependence of Protein Misfolding and Structural Strains in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anil K.; Rosen, Rebecca F.; Childers, W. Seth; Gehman, John D.; Walker, Lary C.; Lynn, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Vast arrays of structural forms are accessible to simple amyloid peptides and environmental conditions can direct assembly into single phases. These insights are now being applied to the aggregation of the Aβ peptide of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the identification of causative phases. We extend use of the imaging agent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to discriminate among Aβ phases and begin to define conditions of relevance to the disease state. And we specifically highlight the development of methods for defining the structures of these more complex phases. PMID:23893572

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases Contribute to Neuronal Dysfunction in Animal Models of Drug Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) remodel the pericellular environment by regulating the cleavage of extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface components, neurotransmitter receptors, and growth factors that mediate cell adhesion, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Interestingly, increased MMP activity and dysregulation of the balance between MMPs and TIMPs have also been implicated in various pathologic conditions. In this paper, we discuss various animal models that suggest that the activation of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy. PMID:22235372

  6. Emerging viral diseases of livestock in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-12-01

    Emerging and reemerging viral diseases of livestock and human beings are in sharp rise in recent years. Importantly, many of these viruses, including influenza, Hendra, Nipah and corona are of zoonotic importance. Several viral diseases of livestock such as bluetongue, peste des petits ruminants, camel pox, equine infectious anaemia, chicken anaemia and sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever are crossing their traditional boundaries. Emergence of new serotypes and variant forms of viruses as in the case of blue tongue virus, avian infectious bronchitis virus, Newcastle disease virus adds additional level of complexity. The increased incidence of emerging and reemerging viral diseases could be attributed to several factors including deforestation and surge in direct contact of livestock and humans with wild animals and birds. This special issue of "Indian Journal of Virology" is focused on diverse aspects of above diseases: isolation and characterization of viruses, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention measures and vaccine development. PMID:24426290

  7. Overview: end-stage renal disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2002-09-01

    Although the vast majority of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide live in what is called the developing world, little is known about its epidemiology and management. With the current paucity of credible and adequately representative registries, it is justified to resort to innovative means of obtaining information. In this attempt, world-renowned leading nephrologists in 10 developing countries collaborated in filling a 103-item questionnaire addressing epidemiology, etiology, and management of ESRD in their respective countries on the basis of integrating available data from different sources. Through this joint effort, it was possible to identify a number of important trends. These include the expected high prevalence of ESRD, despite the limited access to renal replacement therapy, and the dependence of prevalence on wealth. Glomerulonephritis, rather than diabetes, remains as the main cause of ESRD with significant geographical variations in the prevailing histopathological types. The implementation of different modalities of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is inhibited by the lack of funding, although governments, insurance companies, and donations usually constitute the major sponsors. Hemodialysis is the preferred modality in most countries with the exception of Mexico where chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) takes the lead. In several other countries, dialysis is available only for those on the transplant waiting list. Dialysis is associated with a high frequency of complications particularly HBV and HCV infections. Data on HIV are lacking. Aluminum intoxication remains as a major problem in a number of countries. Treatment withdrawal is common for socioeconomic reasons. Transplantation is offered to an average of 4 per million population (pmp). Recipient exclusion criteria are minimal. Donor selection criteria are generally loose regarding tissue typing, remote viral infection, and, in some countries, blood-relation to the

  8. Roles of EphA2 in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Eun; Son, Alexander I.; Zhou, Renping

    2013-01-01

    The Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has been implicated in the regulation of many aspects of mammalian development. Recent analyses have revealed that the EphA2 receptor is a key modulator for a wide variety of cellular functions. This review focuses on the roles of EphA2 in both development and disease. PMID:24705208

  9. Dispelling myths about rare disease registry system development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rare disease registries (RDRs) are an essential tool to improve knowledge and monitor interventions for rare diseases. If designed appropriately, patient and disease related information captured within them can become the cornerstone for effective diagnosis and new therapies. Surprisingly however, registries possess a diverse range of functionality, operate in different, often-times incompatible, software environments and serve various, and sometimes incongruous, purposes. Given the ambitious goals of the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) by 2020 and beyond, RDRs must be designed with the agility to evolve and efficiently interoperate in an ever changing rare disease landscape, as well as to cater for rapid changes in Information Communication Technologies. In this paper, we contend that RDR requirements will also evolve in response to a number of factors such as changing disease definitions and diagnostic criteria, the requirement to integrate patient/disease information from advances in either biotechnology and/or phenotypying approaches, as well as the need to adapt dynamically to security and privacy concerns. We dispel a number of myths in RDR development, outline key criteria for robust and sustainable RDR implementation and introduce the concept of a RDR Checklist to guide future RDR development. PMID:24131574

  10. [Current Trend of Drug Development for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)].

    PubMed

    Kita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    EBOLA hemorrhagic fever, a typical emerging infectious disease, began in December 2013 in the southern part of Guinea, and killed more than 11000 people by the end of June, 2015. In addition to emerging/re-emerging diseases and the 3 major infectious diseases i.e. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have recently become important tropical diseases of the poor. It is remarkable that Japan succeeded in the eradication of malaria and other tropical diseases, which include lymphatic filariasis and schistosomiasis. However, despite these achievements, it is important to sustain our efforts when we consider global health. This review highlights the significance of elimination and/or control of NTDs, and then introduces the current situation of drug development activities in Japan, which are aimed towards combating tropical infectious diseases. They include studies on a novel drug target, the "mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (Fumarate respiration)" composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II, which plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of many helminths such as Ascaris suum. An additional interesting finding highlighted herein is that ascofuranone, a recently developed anti-African trypanosome drug, shows specific inhibition of fumarate respiration in Echinococcus multilocularis mitochondria. PMID:26831795

  11. Arginase-1-dependent promotion of TH17 differentiation and disease progression by MDSCs in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Zhen, Yu; Ma, Zhanchuan; Li, Huimin; Yu, Jinyu; Xu, Zhong-Gao; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Yi, Huanfa; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-03-23

    Expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) has been documented in some murine models and patients with autoimmune diseases, but the exact role of MDSCs in this process remains largely unknown. The current study investigates this question in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with active SLE showed a significant increase in HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)MDSCs, including both CD14(+)CD66b(-)monocytic and CD14(-)CD66b(+)granulocytic MDSCs, in the peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of MDSCs was positively correlated with the levels of serum arginase-1 (Arg-1) activity, T helper 17 (TH17) responses, and disease severity in SLE patients. Consistently, in comparison with MDSCs from HCs, MDSCs from SLE patients exhibited significantly elevated Arg-1 production and increased potential to promote TH17 differentiation in vitro in an Arg-1-dependent manner. Moreover, in a humanized SLE model, MDSCs were essential for the induction of TH17 responses and the associated renal injuries, and the effect of MDSCs was Arg-1-dependent. Our data provide direct evidence demonstrating a pathogenic role for MDSCs in human SLE. This study also provides a molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis of SLE by demonstrating an Arg-1-dependent effect of MDSCs in the development of TH17 cell-associated autoimmunity, and suggests that targeting MDSCs or Arg-1 may offer potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SLE and other TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27009269

  12. Recent developments in the management of idiopathic cholestatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamad H.; Weeding, Emma; Lindor, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the clinical management of patients with idiopathic cholestatic liver disease has shown significant progress. Advancement of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying these diseases have all contributed considerably to this progress. In this review, we aim to touch briefly on several developments that have occurred in this regard and to discuss novel findings and interventions valuable to clinical practice. PMID:24714257

  13. Sexually transmitted diseases in children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Richens, J

    1994-08-01

    The populations of developing countries have younger age structures than the populations of more developed, Western countries. That is, children, adolescents, and youth constitute a far greater proportion of the populations of developing countries than in developed countries. These young people experiment with sex and sexual intercourse or have coitus on a regular basis depending upon their individual personalities and circumstances. The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among younger age groups in developing countries is not well documented. It may, however, be inferred on the basis of reported experience of STD in surveys of adolescents and young adults that many children are infected with STDs. Some young people have sex consensually, some are coaxed into it, and others are coerced. On the one hand, young children have been thought to contract STD by sitting on the laps of infected, scantily-clad adults where such limited attire is the norm. Close contact between youngsters such as communal sleeping, for example, could then facilitate the spread of the STD among children. Sex, consensual or otherwise, is not involved in such infection and transmission beyond the index adult. On the other hand, however, many children and adolescents are forced to have sexual relations and/or intercourse either directly against their will or as a result of the primal need to ensure their individual survival. For example, there are an estimated 100-200 million street children worldwide; many have little alternative but to sell sex to survive. When having sex, they may not use condoms because they are unaware of the STD risk they face, they have no access to free condoms, clients/employers/peers prevent them from using condoms, or due to a myriad of other reasons. Struggling to survive, many such kids place condom use very low on their list of priorities. Children and adolescents can also become infected and transmit STDs to others by engaging in sexual intercourse

  14. EULAR Sjogren's syndrome disease activity index: development of a consensus systemic disease activity index for primary Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Ravaud, Philippe; Bowman, Simon; Baron, Gabriel; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Theander, Elke; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Bootsma, Hendrika; Mariette, Xavier; Vitali, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a disease activity index for patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren’s Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Methods Thirty-nine SS experts participated in an international collaboration, promoted by EULAR, to develop the ESSDAI. Experts identified 12 organ-specific “domains” contributing to disease activity. For each domain, features of disease activity were classified in 3 or 4 levels according to their severity. Data abstracted from 96 patients with systemic complications of primary SS were used to generate 702 realistic vignettes for which all possible systemic complications were represented. Using the 0–10 physician global assessment (PhGA) scale, each expert scored the disease activity of 5 patient profiles and 20 realistic vignettes. Multiple regression modelling, with PhGA used as the dependent variable, was used to estimate the weight of each domain. Results All 12 domains were significantly associated with disease activity in the multivariate model, domain weights ranged from 1 to 6. The ESSDAI scores varied from 2 to 47 and were significantly correlated with PhGA for both real patient profiles and realistic vignettes (r=0.61 and r=0.58, respectively, p<0.0001). Compared to 57 (59.4%) of the real patient profiles, 468 (66.7%) of the realistic vignettes were considered likely or very likely to be true. Conclusion The ESSDAI is a clinical index designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. Once validated, such a standardized evaluation of primary SS should facilitate clinical research and should be helpful as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19561361

  15. Development of and Access to Products for Neglected Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joshua; Dibner, Maria Staroselsky; Wilson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Prior research on neglected disease drug development suggested inadequate funding was responsible for relatively few new approvals. In response, significantly more resources have been allocated towards development of drugs targeting neglected diseases. Our objective was to reassess drug development between1975 and 1999, evaluate progress in neglected disease drug development since 2000, and explain how increased numbers of approvals are a necessary but insufficient condition to improving access. Methods To assess numbers of approvals targeting neglected diseases, we employed two distinct methodologies: First, to revisit numbers published in Trouiller et al. (2002) we used their method to count marketed new chemical entities (NCEs) between 1975 and 1999. Second, using the G-Finder report as a benchmark, we identified which diseases are currently considered “neglected” to tally approvals in the 1975–1999 and 2000–2009 periods. Searching PharmaProjects and IMS R&D Focus databases as well as websites from numerous drug regulatory agencies, we identified new drug approvals and indications. Also, we examined the World Health Organization's (WHO) Essential Drug List (EDL) to see which drugs and indications were on the list. Findings Upon recount, using Trouiller et al. methodology, we found that between 1975 and 1999 more NCEs (n = 32) targeting tropical diseases and tuberculosis were approved than reported in Trouiller et al. (n = 16). Using the G-Finder method of defining neglected diseases, we found 46 new drug approvals between 1975 and 1999. WHO included 85% of these drugs on the EDL. In the period 2000 to May 2009, despite much greater funding, only 26 new drugs and vaccines for neglected diseases were marketed. Of these, WHO placed 50% on the EDL. Conclusions Product approvals for neglected diseases have increased, though progress has been uneven, with malaria appearing to benefit most in the short run from increased funding, while less

  16. Functions of noncoding RNAs in neural development and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Shan; Sun, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The development of the central nervous system (CNS) relies on precisely orchestrated gene expression regulation. Dysregualtion of both genetic and environmental factors can affect proper CNS development and results in neurological diseases. Recent studies have shown that similar to protein coding genes, noncoding RNA molecules have a significant impact on normal CNS development and on causes and progression of human neurological disorders. In this review, we have highlighted discoveries of functions of noncoding RNAs, in particular microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in neural development and neurological diseases. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs play an essential role in many aspects of neural development, such as proliferation of neural stem cells and progenitors, neuronal differentiation, maturation and synaptogenesis. Misregulation of microRNAs is associated with some mental disorders and neurodegeneration diseases. In addition, long noncoding RNAs are found to play a role in neural development by regulating expression of protein coding genes. Therefore, examining noncoding RNA-mediated gene regulations has revealed novel mechanisms of neural development and provided new insights into the etiology of human neurological diseases. PMID:21969146

  17. Development and validation of techniques for improving software dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1992-01-01

    A collection of document abstracts are presented on the topic of improving software dependability through NASA grant NAG-1-1123. Specific topics include: modeling of error detection; software inspection; test cases; Magnetic Stereotaxis System safety specifications and fault trees; and injection of synthetic faults into software.

  18. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  19. The Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Protects Against Alcoholic Liver Disease Via a Macrophage Autophagy-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Denaës, Timothé; Lodder, Jasper; Chobert, Marie-Noële; Ruiz, Isaac; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages of the liver, play a major role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. We have previously demonstrated that CB2 receptor protects against alcoholic liver disease by inhibiting alcohol-induced inflammation and steatosis via the regulation of Kupffer cell activation. Here, we explored the mechanism underlying these effects and hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory properties of CB2 receptor in Kupffer cells rely on activation of autophagy. For this purpose, mice invalidated for CB2 receptor (CB2(Mye-/-) mice) or for the autophagy gene ATG5 (ATG5(Mye-/-) mice) in the myeloid lineage, and their littermate wild-type mice were subjected to chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding. CB2(Mye-/-) mice showed exacerbated alcohol-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression and steatosis. Studies in cultured macrophages demonstrated that CB2 receptor activation by JWH-133 stimulated autophagy via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent pathway. Moreover, JWH-133 reduced the induction of inflammatory genes by lipopolysaccharide in wild-type macrophages, but not in ATG5-deficient cells. The CB2 agonist also protected from alcohol-induced liver inflammation and steatosis in wild-type mice, but not in ATG5(Mye-/-) mice demonstrating that macrophage autophagy mediates the anti-inflammatory and anti-steatogenic effects of CB2 receptor. Altogether these results demonstrate that CB2 receptor activation in macrophages protects from alcohol-induced steatosis by inhibiting hepatic inflammation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. PMID:27346657

  20. [Exclusive elemental enteral diet in cortico-resistant and cortico-dependent forms of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Le Quintrec, Y; Cosnes, J; Le Quintrec, M; Contou, J F; Baumer, P; Bellanger, J; Gendre, J P

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of elemental diet in steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent Crohn's disease. Elemental diet (Vivonex HN, 39.4 +/- 9.2 kcal/kg/d) was delivered through a nasogastric tube at a constant rate. Twenty therapeutic periods lasting from 20 to 74 days (median, 32 days) were undertaken in 18 patients. Elemental diet was well tolerated. Mean values of hemoglobin, serum albumin, and serum transferrin increased significantly through the therapeutic period; body weight and anthropometric data did not change significantly. The short-term response to elemental diet was excellent in 11 cases, demonstrated by achievement of clinical remission and steroid withdrawal; six patients had an incomplete remission and remained slightly active or had to be maintained under low dose steroids; three patients did not respond to therapy and had to be operated upon. During the follow-up (6-30 months), 8 patients out of 17 had a relapse. Relapse was controlled by medical therapy in 5 cases and led to surgery in the 3 other cases. We conclude that elemental diet, as total parenteral nutrition, is an effective therapy of steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent Crohn's disease. However, elemental diet does not prevent relapse. PMID:3111930

  1. Regulated Noise in the Epigenetic Landscape of Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pujadas, Elisabet; Feinberg, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In this Perspective, we synthesize past and present observations in the field of epigenetics to propose a model in which the epigenome can modulate cellular plasticity in development and disease by regulating the effects of noise. In this model, the epigenome facilitates phase transitions in development and mediates robustness during cell fate commitment. After grounding our argument in a discussion of stochastic noise and non-genetic heterogeneity, we explore the hypothesis that distinct chromatin domains, which are known to be dysregulated in disease and remodeled during development, might underlie cellular plasticity more generally. We then present a modern portrayal of Waddington's epigenetic landscape through a mathematical formalism. We speculate that this new framework might impact how we approach the unraveling of disease mechanisms. In particular, it may help to explain the observation that the variability of DNA methylation and gene expression are increased in cancer, which leads to tumor cell heterogeneity. PMID:22424224

  2. Surveillance for Occupational Respiratory Diseases in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Pinheiro, Germania A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases, including occupational respiratory diseases (ORDs), is increasing worldwide. Nevertheless, epidemiological data on these conditions are scarce in most countries. Therefore, it is important to conduct surveillance to monitor ORDs, particularly in developing countries, where the working population is especially vulnerable and the health system infrastructure is usually weak. This article provides a general framework for the implementation of ORD surveillance in developing countries. The main objectives of surveillance are to describe incidence and prevalence of ORDs, as well as to identify sentinel events and new associations between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Diseases with high morbidity and mortality and those in which early diagnosis with standardized tests are available are especially suitable for surveillance activities. Simple strategies, preferably using existing resources and technology, are the best option for surveillance in developing countries. This article offers examples of specific surveillance systems that are in place in Brazil, China, Cuba, India, and South Africa. PMID:26024351

  3. Somatic development disorders of children with non specific inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Frequency of inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) tends to increase in developing countries. Nearly 25% of cases affects pediatric patients. Inflammatory bowel diseases are often associated with weight loss and stunting in children. Moreover, weight and height deficiencies are often early symptoms. Initially, nonspecific or latent course of disease delays the diagnostic process. Malnutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases can be caused by disorders of digestion and nutrients' absorption, intestinal loss, increased energy expenditure and appetite impairment. Nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory agents lead to disturbance of tissue metabolism - muscle and bone - and retardation of somatic development of affected children. Thus, deficiencies of muscle mass, bone mineral density and body height are observed. Insufficient normalization of somatic features may be the consequence of recurrent nature of disease and specificity of pharmacological treatment. Present work deals with the current state of knowledge concerning the somatic development disorders of children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Abnormal nutritional status, bone mineral density deficits and growth failure of patients have been discussed in the context of their relations and dependencies on inflammatory, nutritional and therapeutic factors. PMID:25182396

  4. Vitamin A-retinoid signaling in pulmonary development and disease.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Hector A; Cardoso, Wellington V

    2016-12-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active form of vitamin A, regulates key developmental processes in multiple organs. In the developing lung, RA is crucial for normal growth and differentiation of airways. Disruption in RA signaling or vitamin A deficiency (VAD) has been linked to aberrant development of the lung including alterations in the airway smooth muscle (SM) differentiation, development, and function. These alterations have been linked to disease states including asthma in both human and animal models. PMID:27480876

  5. 76 FR 52958 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Neglected Tropical Diseases of the Developing World: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... sponsors in the clinical development of drugs for the treatment or prevention of neglected diseases of the... development program for the treatment or prevention of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), including clinical trial designs and internal review standards to support approval of drugs. DATES: Although you...

  6. Potential for Developing Purinergic Drugs for Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Liñán-Rico, Andromeda; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Christofi, Fievos L.

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for IBD, IBS, FD or motility disorders are not adequate, and purinergic drugs offer exciting new possibilities. GI symptoms that could be targeted for therapy include visceral pain, inflammatory pain, dysmotility, constipation and diarrhea. The focus of this review is on potential for developing purinergic drugs for clinical trials to treat GI symptoms. Purinergic receptors are divided into adenosine P1 (A1,A2A,A2B,A3), ionotropic ATP-gated P2X ion channel (P2X1–7) or metabotropic P2Y1,2,4,6,11–14 receptors. There is good experimental evidence for targeting A2A, A2B, A3, P2X7, P2X3 receptors or increasing endogenous adenosine levels to treat IBD, inflammatory pain, IBS/visceral pain, inflammatory-diarrhea and motility disorders. Purine genes are also potential biomarkers of disease. Advances in medicinal-chemistry have an accelerated pace toward clinical trials: Methotrexate and sulfasalazine, used to treat IBD, act by stimulating CD73-dependent adenosine production. ATP protects against NSAID-induced enteropathy and has pain-relieving properties in humans. A P2X7R antagonist AZD9056 is in clinical trials for CD. A3 AR drugs target inflammatory diseases (e.g. CF101; CF102). Dipyridamole, a nucleoside uptake-inhibitor, is in trials for endotoxemia. Drugs for pain in clinical-trials include P2X3/P2X2/3(AF-219) and P2X7(GSK1482160) antagonists and A1(GW493838) or A2A(BVT.115959) agonists. IberogastR is a phytopharmacon targeting purine-mechanisms with efficacy in IBS and FD. Purinergic drugs have excellent safety/efficacy profile for prospective clinical trials in IBD, IBS, FD and inflammatory-diarrhea. Genetic polymorphisms and caffeine consumption may affect susceptibility to treatment. Further studies in animals can clarify mechanisms and test new-generation drugs. Finally, there is still a huge gap in our knowledge of human pathophysiology of purinergic signaling. PMID:24859298

  7. Disease models for the development of therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Motabar, Omid; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Zheng, Wei; Ottinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare diseases in which the function of the lysosome is disrupted by the accumulation of macromolecules. The complexity underlying the pathogenesis of LSDs and the small, often pediatric, population of patients make the development of therapies for these diseases challenging. Current treatments are only available for a small subset of LSDs and have not been effective at treating neurological symptoms. Disease-relevant cellular and animal models with high clinical predictability are critical for the discovery and development of new treatments for LSDs. In this paper, we review how LSD patient primary cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular models are providing novel assay systems in which phenotypes are more similar to those of the human LSD physiology. Furthermore, larger animal disease models are providing additional tools for evaluation of the efficacy of drug candidates. Early predictors of efficacy and better understanding of disease biology can significantly affect the translational process by focusing efforts on those therapies with the higher probability of success, thus decreasing overall time and cost spent in clinical development and increasing the overall positive outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:27144735

  8. Gut microbiota and the development of pediatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Yi; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2015-07-01

    The human gut harbors a huge number of microbes, which are collectively named "microbiota." The dynamic composition of the human gut microbiota is determined by multiple factors, including mode of delivery, diet, environment, and antibiotics. A healthy gut microbiota is helpful to the host in many aspects, including providing nutrients, protection from pathogens, and maturation of immune responses. Dysbiosis plays important roles in various diseases in infancy and later life: necrotizing enterocolitis, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and atopic diseases are some examples. Studies of functional metagenomics by newly developed techniques, such as next-generation sequencing, will not only elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying gut microbiota-host interactions but will also provide new possibilities for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:25917564

  9. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, ‘premature’ vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using ‘endothelial therapy’ aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21557734

  10. A novel study of Copy Number Variations in Hirschsprung disease using the Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) technique

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a congenital malformation of the hindgut produced by a disruption in neural crest cell migration during embryonic development. HSCR has a complex genetic etiology and mutations in several genes, mainly the RET proto-oncogene, have been related to the disease. There is a clear predominance of missense/nonsense mutations in these genes whereas copy number variations (CNVs) have been seldom described, probably due to the limitations of conventional techniques usually employed for mutational analysis. Methods In this study we have aimed to analyze the presence of CNVs in some HSCR genes (RET, EDN3, GDNF and ZFHX1B) using the Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) approach. Results Two alterations in the MLPA profiles of RET and EDN3 were detected, but a detailed inspection showed that the decrease in the corresponding dosages were due to point mutations affecting the hybridization probes regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that CNVs of the gene coding regions analyzed here are not a common molecular cause of Hirschsprung disease. However, further studies are required to determine the presence of CNVs affecting non-coding regulatory regions, as well as other candidate genes. PMID:19925665

  11. Experience-dependent development of spinal motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, F. M.; Zuckerman, K. E.; Kalb, R. G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Locomotor activity in many species undergoes pronounced alterations in early postnatal life, and environmental cues may be responsible for modifying this process. To determine how these events are reflected in the nervous system, we studied rats reared under two different conditions-the presence or absence of gravity-in which the performance of motor operations differed. We found a significant effect of rearing environment on the size and complexity of dendritic architecture of spinal motor neurons, particularly those that are likely to participate in postural control. These results provide evidence that neurons subserving motor function undergo activity-dependent maturation in early postnatal life in a manner analogous to sensory systems.

  12. [What useful developments for my inflammatory bowel disease practice have come from Digestive Disease Week 2014?].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, María

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize reports presented at Digestive Disease Week 2014 that relate to fertility and pregnancy, inflammatory bowel disease in elderly patients, the risk of cancer and its relationship to treatment and finally, developments regarding psychological aspects that may affect patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were selected at the discretion of the author, mainly considering those with conclusions that can be applied immediately to clinical practice. Using anti-TNF drugs during pregnancy is safe in the short term. This currently seems to be true for the medium and the long term. To limit fetal exposure, the mother can safely stop taking the anti-TNF drugs in the second trimester of the pregnancy if she is in remission. Elderly patients with inflammatory bowel disease require stricter monitoring than younger patients due to the risk of complications, especially infections associated with the disease and treatments. The effect of inflammatory bowel disease and the drugs for its treatment on the risk of development is still not well established, but the magnitude of the effect seems possibly lower than previously described. The causal link between psychological factors and the occurrence of IBD relapse is by no means established. PMID:25294263

  13. The Indispensable Role of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masanori; Mulati, Mieradili; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; Kaldis, Philipp; Takeda, Shu; Okawa, Atsushi; Inose, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is tightly regulated through the processes of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Although the involvement of transcription and growth factors on the regulation of skeletal development has been extensively studied, the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins in this process remains elusive. To date, through cell-specific loss-of-function experiments in vivo, no cell cycle regulatory proteins have yet been conclusively shown to regulate skeletal development. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) regulates skeletal development based on chondrocyte-specific loss-of-function experiments performed in a mouse model. Cdk1 is highly expressed in columnar proliferative chondrocytes and is greatly downregulated upon differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cdk1 is essential for proper chondrocyte proliferation and deletion of Cdk1 resulted in accelerated differentiation of chondrocytes. In vitro and ex vivo analyses revealed that Cdk1 is an essential cell cycle regulatory protein for parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) signaling pathway, which is critical to chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. These results demonstrate that Cdk1 functions as a molecular switch from proliferation to hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and thus is indispensable for skeletal development. Given the availability of inhibitors of Cdk1 activity, our results could provide insight for the treatment of diseases involving abnormal chondrocyte proliferation, such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26860366

  14. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  15. De novo development of artistic creativity in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2011-01-01

    The case of an 82-year-old female with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), who developed unusual artistic creativity after development of her disease, is described. The possible pathogenetic mechanism is discussed. The patient showed no inclination toward visual arts during her premorbid years. However, 4 years after development of AD suggestive symptoms she started painting beautiful pictures rather impulsively. Some such paintings have been appreciated even by a qualified art expert. Such de novo development of artistic creativity had been described earlier in subjects with the semantic form of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not in AD. The prevailing concept of lateralized compromise and paradoxical functional facilitation, proposed in connection with FTD subjects, may not be applicable in AD subjects where the affection is more diffuse and more posterior in the brain. Hence, the likely pathogenetic mechanism involved in the case described may remain uncertain. Possibilities are discussed. PMID:22346020

  16. Development and Coherence of Beliefs Regarding Disease Causality and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by a naïve theories perspective on the development of thinking about disease, this study of 188 children aged 6 to 18 examined knowledge of HIV/AIDS causality and prevention using parallel measures derived from open-ended and structured interviews. Knowledge of both risk factors and prevention rules, as well as conceptual understanding of…

  17. Biotechnology in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular biological methods have become increasingly applicable to the diagnosis of infectious diseases and vaccine development. To become widely used the methods need to be easy, safe, sensitive, reproducible and eventually automated to facilitate the evaluation of large number of samples. The p...

  18. An NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism underlies inhibitory synapse development

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinglong; Zhou, Liang; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the mammalian brain GABAergic synaptic transmission provides inhibitory balance to glutamatergic excitatory drive and controls neuronal output. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of GABAergic synapses remain largely unclear. Here we report that NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in individual immature neurons are the upstream signaling molecules essential for GABAergic synapse development, which requires signaling via Calmodulin binding motif in the C0 domain of the NMDAR GluN1 subunit. Interestingly, in neurons lacking NMDARs, while GABAergic synaptic transmission is strongly reduced, the tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors is increased, suggesting a compensatory mechanism for the lack of synaptic inhibition. These results demonstrate a crucial role for NMDARs in specifying the development of inhibitory synapses, and suggest an important mechanism for controlling the establishment of the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition in the developing brain. PMID:26774487

  19. Health innovation networks to help developing countries address neglected diseases.

    PubMed

    Morel, Carlos M; Acharya, Tara; Broun, Denis; Dangi, Ajit; Elias, Christopher; Ganguly, N K; Gardner, Charles A; Gupta, R K; Haycock, Jane; Heher, Anthony D; Hotez, Peter J; Kettler, Hannah E; Keusch, Gerald T; Krattiger, Anatole F; Kreutz, Fernando T; Lall, Sanjaya; Lee, Keun; Mahoney, Richard; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo; Mashelkar, R A; Matlin, Stephen A; Mzimba, Mandi; Oehler, Joachim; Ridley, Robert G; Senanayake, Pramilla; Singer, Peter; Yun, Mikyung

    2005-07-15

    Gross inequities in disease burden between developed and developing countries are now the subject of intense global attention. Public and private donors have marshaled resources and created organizational structures to accelerate the development of new health products and to procure and distribute drugs and vaccines for the poor. Despite these encouraging efforts directed primarily from and funded by industrialized countries, sufficiency and sustainability remain enormous challenges because of the sheer magnitude of the problem. Here we highlight a complementary and increasingly important means to improve health equity: the growing ability of some developing countries to undertake health innovation. PMID:16020723

  20. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    PubMed

    Schaker, Patricia D C; Palhares, Alessandra C; Taniguti, Lucas M; Peters, Leila P; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P; Vieira, Maria L C; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression. PMID:27583836

  1. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in the Lung. From Development to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Alexandra L.; Loomis, Cynthia A.; Munger, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the secreted protein sonic hedgehog (SHH) has emerged as a critical morphogen during embryonic lung development, regulating the interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations in the airway and alveolar compartments. There is increasing evidence that the SHH pathway is active in adult lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer, which raises two questions: (1) What role does SHH signaling play in these diseases? and (2) Is it a primary driver of the disease or a response (perhaps beneficial) to the primary disturbance? In this review we aim to fill the gap between the well-studied period of embryonic lung development and the adult diseased lung by reviewing the hedgehog (HH) pathway during the postnatal period and in adult uninjured and injured lungs. We elucidate the similarities and differences in the epithelial–mesenchymal interplay during the fibrosis response to injury in lung compared with other organs and present a critical appraisal of tools and agents available to evaluate HH signaling. PMID:25068457

  2. The Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Protects Against Alcoholic Liver Disease Via a Macrophage Autophagy-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Denaës, Timothé; Lodder, Jasper; Chobert, Marie-Noële; Ruiz, Isaac; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages of the liver, play a major role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. We have previously demonstrated that CB2 receptor protects against alcoholic liver disease by inhibiting alcohol-induced inflammation and steatosis via the regulation of Kupffer cell activation. Here, we explored the mechanism underlying these effects and hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory properties of CB2 receptor in Kupffer cells rely on activation of autophagy. For this purpose, mice invalidated for CB2 receptor (CB2Mye−/− mice) or for the autophagy gene ATG5 (ATG5Mye−/− mice) in the myeloid lineage, and their littermate wild-type mice were subjected to chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding. CB2Mye−/− mice showed exacerbated alcohol-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression and steatosis. Studies in cultured macrophages demonstrated that CB2 receptor activation by JWH-133 stimulated autophagy via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent pathway. Moreover, JWH-133 reduced the induction of inflammatory genes by lipopolysaccharide in wild-type macrophages, but not in ATG5-deficient cells. The CB2 agonist also protected from alcohol-induced liver inflammation and steatosis in wild-type mice, but not in ATG5Mye−/− mice demonstrating that macrophage autophagy mediates the anti-inflammatory and anti-steatogenic effects of CB2 receptor. Altogether these results demonstrate that CB2 receptor activation in macrophages protects from alcohol-induced steatosis by inhibiting hepatic inflammation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. PMID:27346657

  3. Developing a provisional and national renal disease registry for Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disease registry is a database that includes information about people suffering a special kind of disease. The aim of this study was to first identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) characteristics in some countries with Iran; and second, develop a provisional and NRDR for Iran. Materials and Methods: Retrieval of data of the NRDR was performed by scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, Malaysia, and Iran. This research was applied, and the study was descriptive-comparative. The study population consisted of the NRDR in selected countries in which data were collected by forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, related documents, and people who are active in this regard, and related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and patient support charity. The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as a single center experiences. America and Britain have a preeminent national registry of renal disease compared to other countries. Conclusion: Given that control, prevention, and treatment of chronic renal diseases incur high expenses and the disease is one of leading mortality factors in Iran and across the world and since national registry system for chronic renal diseases can provide better tools and strategies to manage and evaluate patients’ characteristics as well as risk factors which eventually leads to making better decisions. PMID:26109970

  4. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens. PMID:22567321

  5. Small molecule mediated inhibition of RORγ-dependent gene expression and autoimmune disease pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Daliya; Zhao, Linlin; Wu, Lan; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ergun, Ayla; Peng, Liaomin; Quigley, Catherine; Hamann, Stefan; Dunstan, Robert; Cullen, Patrick; Allaire, Norm; Guertin, Kevin; Wang, Tao; Chao, Jianhua; Loh, Christine; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (RORγ) orchestrates a pro-inflammatory gene expression programme in multiple lymphocyte lineages including T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, γδ T cells, innate lymphoid cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. There is compelling evidence that RORγ-expressing cells are relevant targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Unlike Th17 cells, where RORγ expression is induced under specific pro-inflammatory conditions, γδ T cells and other innate-like immune cells express RORγ in the steady state. Small molecule mediated disruption of RORγ function in cells with pre-existing RORγ transcriptional complexes represents a significant and challenging pharmacological hurdle. We present data demonstrating that a novel, selective and potent small molecule RORγ inhibitor can block the RORγ-dependent gene expression programme in both Th17 cells and RORγ-expressing γδ T cells as well as a disease-relevant subset of human RORγ-expressing memory T cells. Importantly, systemic administration of this inhibitor in vivo limits pathology in an innate lymphocyte-driven mouse model of psoriasis. PMID:26694902

  6. COX-2 gene dosage-dependent defects in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Patrick; Frölich, Stefanie; Schreiber, Yannik; Nüsing, Rolf M

    2016-05-15

    Deletion of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 causes impairment of kidney development, including hypothrophic glomeruli and cortical thinning. A critical role for COX-2 is seen 4-8 days postnatally. The present study was aimed at answering whether different COX-2 gene dosage and partial pharmacological COX-2 inhibition impairs kidney development. We studied kidney development in COX-2(+/+), COX-2(+/-), and COX-2(-/-) mice as well as in C57Bl6 mice treated postnatally with low (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and high (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) doses of the selective COX-2 inhibitor SC-236. COX-2(+/-) mice exhibit impaired kidney development leading to reduced glomerular size but, in contrast to COX-2(-/-) mice, only marginal cortical thinning. Moreover, in COX-2(+/-) and COX-2(-/-) kidneys, juxtamedullary glomeruli, which develop in the very early stages of nephrogenesis, also showed a size reduction. In COX-2(+/-) kidneys at the age of 8 days, we observed significantly less expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein and less PGE2 and PGI2 synthetic activity compared with COX-2(+/+) kidneys. The renal defects in COX-2(-/-) and COX-2(+/-) kidneys could be mimicked by high and low doses of SC-236, respectively. In aged COX-2(+/-) kidneys, glomerulosclerosis was observed; however, in contrast to COX-2(-/-) kidneys, periglomerular fibrosis was absent. COX-2(+/-) mice showed signs of kidney insufficiency, demonstrated by enhanced serum creatinine levels, quite similar to COX-2(-/-) mice, but, in contrast, serum urea remained at the control level. In summary, function of both COX-2 gene alleles is absolutely necessary to ensure physiological development of the mouse kidney. Loss of one copy of the COX-2 gene or partial COX-2 inhibition is associated with distinct renal damage and reduced kidney function. PMID:26984955

  7. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  8. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:26659490

  9. From Dependence to Autonomy. The Development of Asian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.; Selvaratnam, Viswanathan, Ed.

    A collection of works on the development of Asian universities is presented, focusing on an aspect of higher education not previously analyzed: the contemporary impact of Western academic systems in Asia. Eleven papers fall into three sections following the introduction, "Twisted Roots: The Western Impact on Asian Higher Education," (P. Altabach).…

  10. The Eyes Absent proteins in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Tadjuidje, Emmanuel; Hegde, Rashmi S

    2013-06-01

    The Eyes Absent (EYA) proteins, first described in the context of fly eye development, are now implicated in processes as disparate as organ development, innate immunity, DNA damage repair, photoperiodism, angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. These functions are associated with an unusual combination of biochemical activities: tyrosine phosphatase and threonine phosphatase activities in separate domains, and transactivation potential when associated with a DNA-binding partner. EYA mutations are linked to multiorgan developmental disorders, as well as to adult diseases ranging from dilated cardiomyopathy to late-onset sensorineural hearing loss. With the growing understanding of EYA biochemical and cellular activity, biological function, and association with disease, comes the possibility that the EYA proteins are amenable to the design of targeted therapeutics. The availability of structural information, direct links to disease states, available animal models, and the fact that they utilize unconventional reaction mechanisms that could allow specificity, suggest that EYAs are well-positioned for drug discovery efforts. This review provides a summary of EYA structure, activity, and function, as they relate to development and disease, with particular emphasis on recent findings. PMID:22971774

  11. CSF-1–dependant donor-derived macrophages mediate chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kylie A.; Flynn, Ryan; Lineburg, Katie E.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Teal, Bianca E.; Olver, Stuart D.; Lor, Mary; Raffelt, Neil C.; Koyama, Motoko; Leveque, Lucie; Le Texier, Laetitia; Melino, Michelle; Markey, Kate A.; Varelias, Antiopi; Engwerda, Christian; Serody, Jonathan S.; Janela, Baptiste; Ginhoux, Florent; Clouston, Andrew D.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is the major cause of late, nonrelapse death following stem cell transplantation and characteristically develops in organs such as skin and lung. Here, we used multiple murine models of cGVHD to investigate the contribution of macrophage populations in the development of cGVHD. Using an established IL-17–dependent sclerodermatous cGVHD model, we confirmed that macrophages infiltrating the skin are derived from donor bone marrow (F4/80+CSF-1R+CD206+iNOS–). Cutaneous cGVHD developed in a CSF-1/CSF-1R–dependent manner, as treatment of recipients after transplantation with CSF-1 exacerbated macrophage infiltration and cutaneous pathology. Additionally, recipients of grafts from Csf1r–/– mice had substantially less macrophage infiltration and cutaneous pathology as compared with those receiving wild-type grafts. Neither CCL2/CCR2 nor GM-CSF/GM-CSFR signaling pathways were required for macrophage infiltration or development of cGVHD. In a different cGVHD model, in which bronchiolitis obliterans is a prominent manifestation, F4/80+ macrophage infiltration was similarly noted in the lungs of recipients after transplantation, and lung cGVHD was also IL-17 and CSF-1/CSF-1R dependent. Importantly, depletion of macrophages using an anti–CSF-1R mAb markedly reduced cutaneous and pulmonary cGVHD. Taken together, these data indicate that donor macrophages mediate the development of cGVHD and suggest that targeting CSF-1 signaling after transplantation may prevent and treat cGVHD. PMID:25157821

  12. Tissue stiffness dictates development, homeostasis, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. PMID:25915734

  13. Systems analysis of salivary gland development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Melinda; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Musselmann, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is a crucial developmental process in which vertebrate organs generate extensive epithelial surface area while retaining a compact size. In the vertebrate submandibular salivary gland, branching morphogenesis is crucial for generation of the large surface area necessary to produce sufficient saliva. However, in many salivary gland diseases, saliva-producing acinar cells are destroyed, resulting in dry mouth and secondary health conditions. Systems-based approaches can provide insights into understanding salivary gland development, function, and disease. The traditional approach to understanding these processes is identification of molecular signals using reductionist approaches; we review current progress with such methods in understanding salivary gland development. Taking a more global approach, multiple groups are currently profiling the transcriptome, the proteome, and other “omes” in both developing mouse tissues and in human patient samples. Computational methods have been successful in deciphering large data sets, and mathematical models are starting to make predictions regarding the contribution of molecules to the physical processes of morphogenesis and of cellular function. A challenge for the future will be to establish comprehensive, publicly accessible salivary gland databases spanning the full range of genes and proteins; plans are underway to provide these resources to researchers in centralized repositories. The greatest challenge for the future will be to develop realistic models that integrate multiple types of data to both describe and predict embryonic development and human disease. PMID:20890964

  14. Replication of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC within macrophages is dependent on TNF-α secretion.

    PubMed

    Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Billard, Elisabeth; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2012-03-01

    Adherent and invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) associated with Crohn's disease are able to survive and to replicate extensively in active phagolysosomes within macrophages. AIEC-infected macrophages release large amounts of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and do not undergo cell death. The aim of the present study was to determine what benefit AIEC bacteria could gain from inducing the release of large amounts of TNF-α by infected macrophages and to what extent the neutralization of TNF-α could affect AIEC intramacrophagic replication. Our results showed that the amount of TNF-α released by infected macrophages is correlated with the load of intramacrophagic AIEC bacteria and their intracellular replication. TNF-α secretion was not related to the number of bacteria entering host cells because when the number of bacteria internalized in macrophage was decreased by blocking lipid raft-dependent and clathrin-coated pits-dependent endocytosis, the amount of TNF-α secreted by infected macrophages was not modified. Interestingly, dose-dependent increases in the number of intracellular AIEC LF82 bacteria were observed when infected macrophages were stimulated with exogenous TNF-α, and neutralization of TNF-α secreted by AIEC-infected macrophages using anti-TNF-α antibodies induced a significant decrease in the number of intramacrophagic bacteria. These results indicate that AIEC bacteria use TNF-α as a Trojan horse to ensure their intracellular replication because replication of AIEC bacteria within macrophages induces the release of TNF-α, which in turn increases the intramacrophagic replication of AIEC. Neutralizing TNF-α secreted by infected macrophages may represent an effective strategy to control AIEC intracellular replication. PMID:22042084

  15. First Selective CYP11B1 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cortisol-Dependent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Outgoing from an etomidate-based design concept, we succeeded in the development of a series of highly active and selective inhibitors of CYP11B1, the key enzyme of cortisol biosynthesis, as potential drugs for the treatment of Cushing's syndrome and related diseases. Thus, compound 33 (IC50 = 152 nM) is the first CYP11B1 inhibitor showing a rather good selectivity toward the most important steroidogenic CYP enzymes aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), the androgen-forming CYP17, and aromatase (estrogen synthase, CYP19). PMID:24900247

  16. Proprioceptor pathway development is dependent on Math1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermingham, N. A.; Hassan, B. A.; Wang, V. Y.; Fernandez, M.; Banfi, S.; Bellen, H. J.; Fritzsch, B.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The proprioceptive system provides continuous positional information on the limbs and body to the thalamus, cortex, pontine nucleus, and cerebellum. We showed previously that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Math1 is essential for the development of certain components of the proprioceptive pathway, including inner-ear hair cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and the pontine nuclei. Here, we demonstrate that Math1 null embryos lack the D1 interneurons and that these interneurons give rise to a subset of proprioceptor interneurons and the spinocerebellar and cuneocerebellar tracts. We also identify three downstream genes of Math1 (Lh2A, Lh2B, and Barhl1) and establish that Math1 governs the development of multiple components of the proprioceptive pathway.

  17. Temperature-Dependent Development of Pasteuria penetrans in Meloidogyne arenaria.

    PubMed

    Serracin, M; Schuerger, A C; Dickson, D W; Weingartner, D P

    1997-06-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is a promising biological control agent of plant-parasitic nematodes. This study was conducted to determine effects of temperature on the bacterium's development in Meloidogyne arenaria. Developmental stages of P. penetrans were viewed with a compound microscope and verified with scanning electron microscopy within each nematode at 100 accumulated degree-day intervals by tracking accumulated degree-days at three temperatures (21, 28, and 35 degrees C). Five predominant developmental stages of P. penetrans were identified with light microscopy: endospore germination, vegetative growth, differentiation, sporulation, and maturation. Mature endospores were detected at 28, 35, and >90 calendar days at 35, 28, and 21 degrees C, respectively. The number of accumulated degree-days required for P. penetrans to reach a specific developmental stage was different for each temperature. Differences were observed in the development of P. penetrans at 21, 28, and 35 degrees C based on regression values fitted for data from 100 to 600 accumulated degree-days. A linear response was observed between 100 to 600 accumulated degree-days; however, after 600 accumulated degree-days the rate of development of P. penetrans leveled off at 21 and 28 degrees C, whereas at 35 degrees C the rate decreased. Results suggest that accumulated degree-days may be useful only in predicting early-developmental stages of P. penetrans. PMID:19274154

  18. Advances in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma characterization and disease model development

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Dennis O’; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Qualman, Stephen J.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a form of soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric malignancies. A complex disease with at least three different subtypes, it is characterized by perturbations in a number of signaling pathways and genetic abnormalities. Extensive clinical studies have helped classify these tumors into high and low risk groups to facilitate different treatment regimens. Research into the etiology of the disease has helped uncover numerous potential therapeutic intervention points which can be tested on various animal models of RMS; both genetically modified models and tumor Xenograft models. Taken together, there has been a marked increase in the survival rate of RMS patients but the highly invasive, metastatic forms of the disease continue to baffle researchers. This review aims to highlight and summarize some of the most important developments in characterization and in vivo model generation for RMS research, in the last few decades. PMID:22127592

  19. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies. PMID:27019769

  20. Fabry Disease – Current Treatment and New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease. PMID:21127742

  1. The EYA-SO/SIX complex in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pin-Xian

    2013-06-01

    Eyes absent (EYA) and Sine oculis (SO/SIX) proteins function as transcriptional activation complexes and play essential roles in organogenesis during embryonic development in regulating cell proliferation and survival and coordination of particular differentiation programs. Mutations of the Eya and So/Six genes cause profound developmental defects in organisms as diverse as flies, frogs, fish, mice, and humans. EYA proteins also possess an intrinsic phosphatase activity, which is essential for normal development. Here, we review crucial roles of EYA and SO/SIX in development and disease in mice and humans. PMID:22806561

  2. Developing Primary Intervention Strategies to Prevent Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Rueter, Kristina; Haynes, Aveni; Prescott, Susan L

    2015-07-01

    Allergic diseases are a major cause of morbidity in the developed world, now affecting up to 40 % of the population with no evidence that this is abating. If anything, the prevalence of early onset allergic diseases such as eczema and food allergy appears to be still increasing. This is almost certainly due to the changing modern environment and lifestyle factors, acting to promote immune dysfunction through early perturbations in immune maturation, immune tolerance and regulation. This early propensity to inflammation may also have implications for the rising risk of other inflammatory non-communicable diseases (NCDs) later in life. Identifying risk factors and pathways for preventing early onset immune disease like allergy is likely to have benefits for many aspects of human health, particularly as many NCDs share similar risk factors. This review focuses on recent advances in primary intervention strategies for promoting early immune health and preventing allergic disease, highlighting the current evidence-based guidelines where applicable and areas requiring further investigation. PMID:26143389

  3. Development of CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease causes inflammation or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract. The number of patients of Crohn's disease is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of Crohn's disease include intestinal stenosis, longitudinal ulcers, and fistulae. Optical endoscope cannot pass through intestinal stenosis in some cases. We propose a new CAD system using abdominal fecal tagging CT images for efficient diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The system displays virtual unfolded (VU), virtual endoscopic, curved planar reconstruction, multi planar reconstruction, and outside views of both small and large intestines. To generate the VU views, we employ a small and large intestines extraction method followed by a simple electronic cleansing method. The intestine extraction is based on the region growing process, which uses a characteristic that tagged fluid neighbor air in the intestine. The electronic cleansing enables observation of intestinal wall under tagged fluid. We change the height of the VU views according to the perimeter of the intestine. In addition, we developed a method to enhance the longitudinal ulcer on views of the system. We enhance concave parts on the intestinal wall, which are caused by the longitudinal ulcer, based on local intensity structure analysis. We examined the small and the large intestines of eleven CT images by the proposed system. The VU views enabled efficient observation of the intestinal wall. The height change of the VU views helps finding intestinal stenosis on the VU views. The concave region enhancement made longitudinal ulcers clear on the views.

  4. Enteric nervous system development: migration, differentiation, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic innervation of the bowel and is the most neurochemically diverse branch of the peripheral nervous system, consisting of two layers of ganglia and fibers encircling the gastrointestinal tract. The ENS is vital for life and is capable of autonomous regulation of motility and secretion. Developmental studies in model organisms and genetic studies of the most common congenital disease of the ENS, Hirschsprung disease, have provided a detailed understanding of ENS development. The ENS originates in the neural crest, mostly from the vagal levels of the neuraxis, which invades, proliferates, and migrates within the intestinal wall until the entire bowel is colonized with enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDCs). After initial migration, the ENS develops further by responding to guidance factors and morphogens that pattern the bowel concentrically, differentiating into glia and neuronal subtypes and wiring together to form a functional nervous system. Molecules controlling this process, including glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor RET, endothelin (ET)-3 and its receptor endothelin receptor type B, and transcription factors such as SOX10 and PHOX2B, are required for ENS development in humans. Important areas of active investigation include mechanisms that guide ENCDC migration, the role and signals downstream of endothelin receptor type B, and control of differentiation, neurochemical coding, and axonal targeting. Recent work also focuses on disease treatment by exploring the natural role of ENS stem cells and investigating potential therapeutic uses. Disease prevention may also be possible by modifying the fetal microenvironment to reduce the penetrance of Hirschsprung disease-causing mutations. PMID:23639815

  5. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation.

    PubMed

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity do not distinguish between occupational and leisure time physical activity. However, in this body of literature, attention has not been paid to the extensive documentation on occupational physical activity imposing a risk of impairment of health - in particular musculoskeletal health in terms of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational tasks and may underlie muscle pain development in spite of rather low relative muscle load. Causal mechanisms include a stereotype recruitment of low threshold motor units (activating type 1 muscle fibers) characterized by a lack of temporal as well as spatial variation in recruitment. In contrast during physical activities at leisure and sport the motor recruitment patterns are more dynamic including regularly relatively high muscle forces - also activating type 2 muscles fibers - as well as periods of full relaxation even of the type 1 muscle fibers. Such activity is unrelated to muscle pain development if adequate recovery is granted. However, delayed muscle soreness may develop following intensive eccentric muscle activity (e.g. down-hill skiing) with peak pain levels in thigh muscles 1-2 days after the exercise bout and a total recovery within 1 week. This acute pain profile is in contrast to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of

  6. Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on fungal disease development in Cucumis sativus

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, A.B.; Teramura, A.H.; Sisler, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion due to increased atmospheric pollutants has received considerable attention because of the potential increase in ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation that will reach the earth's surface. Three cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cultivars were exposed to a daily dose of 11.6 kJ m{sup {minus}2} biologically effective ultraviolet-B (UV-B{sub BE}) radiation in an unshaded greenhouse before and/or after injection by Colletotrichum lagenarium (Pass.) Ell. and Halst. or Cladosporium cucumerinum Ell. and Arth. and analyzed for disease development. Two of these cultivars, Poinsette and Calypso Hybrid, were disease resistant, while the third cultivar, Straight-8, was disease susceptible. Preinfectional treatment of 1 to 7 days with UV-B{sub BE} in Straight-8 led to greater severity of both diseases. Postinfectional UV treatment did not lead to increased disease severity caused by C. lagenarium, while preinfectional UV treatment in both Straight-8 and Poinsette substantially increased disease severity. Although resistant cultivars Poinsette and Calypso Hybrid showed increased anthracnose disease severity when exposed to UV-B, this effect was apparent only on the cotyledons. Both higher spore concentration and exposure to UV-B radiation resulted in greater disease severity. Of the cucumber cultivars tested for UV-B sensitivity, growth in Poinsette was most sensitive and Calypso Hybrid was least sensitive. These preliminary results indicate that the effects of UV-B radiation on disease development in cucumber vary depending on cultivar, timing and duration of UV-B exposure, inoculation level, and plant age.

  7. Development of a Pressure-Dependent Constitutive Model with Combined Multilinear Kinematic and Isotropic Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a pressure-dependent constitutive model with combined multilinear kinematic and isotropic hardening is presented. The constitutive model is developed using the ABAQUS user material subroutine (UMAT). First the pressure-dependent plasticity model is derived. Following this, the combined bilinear and combined multilinear hardening equations are developed for von Mises plasticity theory. The hardening rule equations are then modified to include pressure dependency. The method for implementing the new constitutive model into ABAQUS is given.

  8. [The trend of developing new disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Ishiki, Aiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-03-01

    Development of symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer s disease by cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil was successful. However, it is a disappointment that development of disease-modifying drugs such as anti-amyloid drug based on amyloid-cascade theory has been interrupted or unsuccessful. Therefore, we have to be more cautious regarding inclusion criteria for clinical trials of new drugs. We agree that potentially curative drugs should be started before symptoms begin as a preemptive therapy or prevention trial. The concept of personalized medicine also is important when ApoE4-related amyloid reducing therapy is considered. Unfortunately, Japanese-ADNI has suffered a setback since 2014. However, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare gave a final remark that there was nothing wrong in the data managing process in the J-ADNI data center. We should pay more attention to worldwide challenges of speeding up new drug development. PMID:27025078

  9. Sex-dependent Pathophysiology as Predictors of Comorbidity of Major Depressive Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, SA; Handa, RJ; Goldstein, JM

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong and growing literature showing that key aspects of brain development may be critical antecedents of adult physiology and behavior, or lead to physiological and psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Many are significantly influenced by sex-dependent factors. Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) occupy a key position in regulating homeostatic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral functions. This brain area is a critical link for our understanding of the etiology of a number of disorders with components ranging from mood, to feeding and energy balance, and autonomic nervous system regulation. Thus based on common brain circuitry, the PVN may be a critical anatomical intersection for understanding comorbidities among depression, obesity, and cardiovascular risk. Historically, the majority of approaches to brain development examine neuronal, glial, and vascular factors independently, with notably less emphasis on vascular contributions. The realization that the PVN undergoes a unique vascular developmental process places added value on discerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive its late onset angiogenesis and further implications for neuronal differentiation and function. This has ramifications in humans for understanding chronic, and sometimes fatal, comorbidities that share sex-dependent biological bases in development through functional and anatomical intersections with the hypothalamus. PMID:23503726

  10. Molecular motors in neuronal development, intracellular transport and diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Takemura, Reiko

    2004-10-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), dynein superfamily proteins and myosin superfamily proteins have diverse and fundamental roles in many cellular processes, including neuronal development and the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. During neuronal development, KIFs take significant roles in the regulation of axon-collateral branch extension, which is essential for brain wiring. Cytoplasmic dynein together with LIS1 takes pivotal roles in neocortical layer formation. In axons, anterograde transport is mediated by KIFs, whereas retrograde transport is mediated mainly by cytoplasmic dynein, and dysfunction of motors results in neurodegenerative diseases. In dendrites, the transport of NMDA and AMPA receptors is mediated by KIFs, and the motor has been shown to play a significant part in establishing learning and memory. PMID:15464889

  11. Mud crab susceptibility to disease from white spot syndrome virus is species-dependent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . paramamosain. Based on our single-challenge and serial challenge results, and on previous published work showing that S. serrata is relatively unaffected by WSSV infection, we propose that susceptibility to white spot disease in the genus Scylla is species-dependent and may also be dose-history dependent. In practical terms for shrimp farmers, it means that S. olivacea and S. paramamosain may pose less threat as WSSV carriers than S. serrata. For crab farmers, our results suggest that rearing of S. serrata would be a better choice than S. paramamosain or S. olivacea in terms of avoiding losses from seasonal outbreaks of white spot disease. PMID:21092125

  12. Developing a dependable approach for evaluating waste treatment data

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Decision makers involved with hazardous waste treatment issues are faced with the challenge of making objective evaluations concerning treatment formulations. This work utilizes an effectiveness factor (denoted as {eta}) as the basis for waste treatment evaluations, which was recently developed for application to mixed waste treatability studies involving solidification and stabilization at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The effectiveness factor incorporates an arbitrary treatment criterion {Phi}, which in practice could be the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Unconfined Compressive Strength, Leachability Index, or any other criterion used to judge treatment performance. Three values for {Phi} are utilized when assessing a given treatment formulation: before treatment, after treatment, and a reference value (typically a treatment standard). The expression for {eta} also incorporates the waste loading as the prime experimental parameter, and accounts for the contribution that each hazard has upon the overall treatment performance. Also discussed are general guidelines for numerical boundaries and statistical interpretations of treatment data. Case studies are presented that demonstrate the usefulness of the effectiveness factor and related numerical methods, where the typical hazards encountered are toxic metals within mixed waste.

  13. Transcriptional Regulatory Cascades in Runx2-Dependent Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a complex process that involves very precise control of bone formation and growth as well as remodeling during postnatal life. Although the understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of osteogenesis has increased considerably, the molecular regulatory basis, especially the gene regulatory network of osteogenic differentiation, is still poorly understood. This review provides the reader with an overview of the key transcription factors that govern bone formation, highlighting their function and regulation linked to Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Runx2 as the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, Twist, Msh homeobox 2 (Msx2), and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF) acting upstream of Runx2, Osterix (Osx) acting downstream of Runx2, and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and zinc-finger protein 521 (ZFP521) acting as cofactors of Runx2 are discussed, and their relevance for tissue engineering is presented. References are provided for more in-depth personal study. PMID:23150948

  14. Achieving dependability throughout the development process - A distributed software experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John P. J.; Murphy, Susan C.

    1990-01-01

    Distributed software engineering techniques and methods for improving the specification and testing phases are considered. With multiversion development, multiple implementations allow the use of an automated approach to testing called back-to-back (B/B) testing in which the outputs are compared to detect any discrepancies. However, a specification defect may lead to similar errors in the multiple versions and the underlying fault may not be detected with a B/B testing approach. The use of diverse formal specifications has been proposed as a solution to this problem, since defects in independently written specifications are likely to be different. To examine these issues, an experiment was performed using the design diversity approach in the specification, design, implementation, and testing of distributed software. In the experiment, three diverse formal specifications were used to produce multiple independent implementations of a distributed communication protocol in Ada. The problems encountered in building complex concurrent processing systems in Ada were also studied. Many pitfalls were discovered in mapping the formal specifications into Ada implementations.

  15. Cdh1 regulates craniofacial development via APC-dependent ubiquitination and activation of Goosecoid.

    PubMed

    Shao, Rui; Liu, Jia; Yan, Guang; Zhang, Jinfang; Han, Yujiao; Guo, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhan; Yuan, Zhu; Liu, Jiankang; Malumbres, Marcos; Wan, Lixin; Wei, Wenyi; Zou, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    Craniofacial anomalies (CFAs) characterized by birth defects of skull and facial bones are the most frequent congenital disease. Genomic analysis has identified multiple genes responsible for CFAs; however, the underlying genetic mechanisms for the majority of CFAs remain largely unclear. Our previous study revealed that the Wwp2 E3 ubiquitin ligase facilitates craniofacial development in part through inducing monoubiquitination and activation of the paired-like homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid (Gsc). Here we report that Gsc is also ubiquitinated and activated by the APC(Cdh1) E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to transcriptional activation of various Gsc target genes crucial for craniofacial development. Consistenly, neural crest-specific Cdh1-knockout mice display similar bone malformation as Wwp2-deficient mice in the craniofacial region, characterized by a domed skull, a short snout and a twisted nasal bone. Mechanistically, like Wwp2-deficient mice, mice with Cdh1 deficiency in neural crest cells exhibit reduced Gsc/Sox6 transcriptional activities. Simultaneous deletion of Cdh1 and Wwp2 results in a more severe craniofacial defect compared with single gene deletion, suggesting a synergistic augmentation of Gsc activity by these two E3 ubiquitin ligases. Hence, our study reveals a novel role for Cdh1 in craniofacial development through promoting APC-dependent non-proteolytic ubiquitination and activation of Gsc. PMID:27126000

  16. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P; Goland, Robin S; Clynes, Raphael A; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A(∗)-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  17. North American experience with Low protein diet for Non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moore, Linda W; Tortorici, Amanda R; Chou, Jason A; St-Jules, David E; Aoun, Arianna; Rojas-Bautista, Vanessa; Tschida, Annelle K; Rhee, Connie M; Shah, Anuja A; Crowley, Susan; Vassalotti, Joseph A; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Whereas in many parts of the world a low protein diet (LPD, 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day) is routinely prescribed for the management of patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), this practice is infrequent in North America. The historical underpinnings related to LPD in the USA including the non-conclusive results of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study may have played a role. Overall trends to initiate dialysis earlier in the course of CKD in the US allowed less time for LPD prescription. The usual dietary intake in the US includes high dietary protein content, which is in sharp contradistinction to that of a LPD. The fear of engendering or worsening protein-energy wasting may be an important handicap as suggested by a pilot survey of US nephrologists; nevertheless, there is also potential interest and enthusiasm in gaining further insight regarding LPD's utility in both research and in practice. Racial/ethnic disparities in the US and patients' adherence are additional challenges. Adherence should be monitored by well-trained dietitians by means of both dietary assessment techniques and 24-h urine collections to estimate dietary protein intake using urinary urea nitrogen (UUN). While keto-analogues are not currently available in the USA, there are other oral nutritional supplements for the provision of high-biologic-value proteins along with dietary energy intake of 30-35 Cal/kg/day available. Different treatment strategies related to dietary intake may help circumvent the protein- energy wasting apprehension and offer novel conservative approaches for CKD management in North America. PMID:27435088

  18. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in skeletal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M.; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways are essential regulators of vertebrate skeletal development. FGF signaling regulates development of the limb bud and formation of the mesenchymal condensation and has key roles in regulating chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and bone and mineral homeostasis. This review updates our review on FGFs in skeletal development published in Genes & Development in 2002, examines progress made on understanding the functions of the FGF signaling pathway during critical stages of skeletogenesis, and explores the mechanisms by which mutations in FGF signaling molecules cause skeletal malformations in humans. Links between FGF signaling pathways and other interacting pathways that are critical for skeletal development and could be exploited to treat genetic diseases and repair bone are also explored. PMID:26220993

  19. Infectious Diseases in a Global Economy - Consequences for Developing Nations

    PubMed Central

    Peter, McDonald AM

    2006-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war the world economy has become dominated by Western [largely US] interests. In this period there have developed several pandemics or epidemics of infectious diseases that have affected most nations. HIV, SARS, Avian Influenza, Hepatitis-C, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, drug-resistant TB, viral zoonoses, are specific examples that will be discussed in terms of their genesis, economic impact and consequences for ways of life in the range of economies – developed, developing and under developed countries. The burden falls most on the underdeveloped countries who are least able to mount the resources to combat the consequences of these global infections. The capability to diagnose, prevent, treat and manage is largely in the hands of commercial interests that are anchored into international trade agreements. This circumstance contrasts with the situation that existed for vaccine development and distribution in the early parts of 20th century. Most countries established “public good” institutions that developed vaccines for public health purposes [diphtheria, tetanus, polio, pneumococcal antisera are examples]. In this 21st century the international capability for developing vaccines is largely in the hands of industry. Thus the developing countries need support of UN or similar global organizations to underwrite product development that suits their needs. The process of product development, safety and efficacy assessment will be presented in a manner that indicates the crucial and essential role of developing nations – and why they should receive fair recognition for their contributions.

  20. TGF-β-dependent dendritic cell chemokinesis in murine models of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Ma, Royce; Murray, Lynne A.; Tsui, Ping; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Small airway chronic inflammation is a major pathologic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is refractory to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around small airways in COPD. DCs are critical mediators of antigen surveillance and antigen presentation and amplify adaptive immune responses. How DCs accumulate around airways remains largely unknown. We use 2-photon DC imaging of living murine lung sections to directly visualize the dynamic movement of living DCs around airways in response to either soluble mediators (IL-1β) or environmental stimuli (cigarette smoke or TLR3 ligands) implicated in COPD pathogenesis. We find that DCs accumulate around murine airways primarily by increasing velocity (chemokinesis) rather than directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to all three stimuli. DC accumulation maximally occurs in a specific zone located 26-50 μm from small airways, which overlaps with zones of maximal DC velocity. Our data suggest that increased accumulation of DCs around airways results from increased numbers of highly chemokinetic DCs entering the lung from the circulation with balanced rates of immigration and emigration. Increases in DC accumulation and chemokinesis are partially dependent on ccr6, a crucial DC chemokine receptor, and fibroblast expression of the integrin αvβ8, a critical activator of TGF-β αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation is known to enhance IL-1β-dependent fibroblast expression of the only known endogenous ccr6 chemokine ligand, ccl20. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which αvβ8, ccl20 and ccr6 interact to lead to DC accumulation around airways in response to COPD-relevant stimuli. PMID:26109638

  1. Towards an Age-Dependent Transmission Model of Acquired and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Calero, Miguel; Rábano, Alberto; Cruz, Mabel; Siden, Åke; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Laursen, Henning; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Mølbak, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) might be transmitted by surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential susceptibility to sCJD from surgery at juvenile age and in early adulthood. Methods From Danish and Swedish national registries we identified 167 definite and probable sCJD cases with onset from 1987 through 2003, and 835 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls along with their surgical histories. Main, anatomically or etiologically classified surgical procedures followed by a ≥20-year lag were analyzed using logistic regression, and stratified by age at first-registered surgical discharge. Results The risk of having a diagnosis of CJD depended strongly on age at first surgery with odds ratio (OR) of 12.80 (95% CI 2.56–64.0) in patients <30 years, 3.04 (95% 1.26–7.33) in 30–39 years, and 1.75 (95% CI 0.89–3.45) in ≥40 years, for anatomically classified surgical procedures. Similar figures were obtained for etiologically classified surgical procedures. Conclusions Risk of surgical-acquired sCJD depends on age at exposure; this pattern is similar to age-specific profiles reported for CJD accidentally transmitted by human pituitary-derived growth hormone and susceptibility curves for variant CJD estimated after adjustment for dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. There might be an age-at-exposure-related susceptibility to acquire all CJD forms, including sCJD from routine surgery. PMID:25279832

  2. Recent Advances in Drug Design and Drug Discovery for Androgen- Dependent Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Garrido, Mariana; Silva, Aylín; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the importance of different targets such as 5α-reductase, 17β-HSD, CYP17A, androgen receptor and protein kinase A for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is a well known fact that dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is associated with the development of androgen-dependent afflictions. At the present time, several research groups are attempting to develop new steroidal and non-steroidal molecules with the purpose of inhibiting the synthesis and biological response of DHT. This review also discusses the most recent studies reported in the literature that describe the therapeutic potential of novel compounds, as well as the new drugs, principally inhibitors of 5α-reductase. PMID:26861003

  3. Advances in the Development of Vaccines for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Rosenberg, Roger N.

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of our society is to find a treatment or cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the leading form of age-related dementia and with the increase of life expectancy worldwide, the social and economic burden from this disease will increase dramatically. It is a progressive and, in regard to clinical scores, a highly variable disease. AD pathogenesis has been associated with the accumulation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides in the brain. Hallmarks of AD are the amyloid plaques consisting of fibrillar Abeta and neurofibrillary tangles which are intracellular fibrils of hyperphosphorylated tau protein that develop later in this disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that Abeta deposition is an initial event in the multifactorial pathogenesis and Abeta deposition may precede AD symptoms in some patients by at least 20 years. Amyloid beta therapy with active and passive immunizations against Abeta has a high possibility to be effective in removing Abeta from brain and might thus prevent the downstream pathology. Since 2000 a number of clinical trials for AD immunotherapy have started, have failed, and are continuing to be pursued. This article will review these clinical trials and ongoing research in this regard. PMID:23725605

  4. Disease surveillance at district level: a model for developing countries.

    PubMed

    John, T J; Samuel, R; Balraj, V; John, R

    1998-07-01

    For over a decade we have maintained within a district of 5 million people, a system of prompt reporting of cases of childhood vaccine-preventable diseases, encephalitis, meningitis, hepatitis, and rabies; together with a sentinel laboratory surveillance of cholera, typhoid fever, malaria, HIV infection and antimicrobial-resistance patterns of selected pathogens. The system combined government and private sectors, with every hospital enrolled and participating. Reports were scanned daily on a computer for any clustering of cases. Interventions included investigations, immunisation, antimicrobial treatment, health education, and physical rehabilitation of children with paralysis. All vaccine-preventable diseases have declined markedly, whilst malaria and HIV infections have increased steadily. Annual expense was less than one US cent per head. The reasons for the success and sustainability of this model include simplicity or reporting procedure, low budget, private-sector participation, personal rapport with people in the network, regular feedback of information through a monthly bulletin, and the visible interventions consequent upon reporting. This district-level disease surveillance model is replicable in developing countries for evaluating polio eradication efforts, monitoring immunisation programmes, detecting outbreaks of old or new diseases, and for evaluating control measures. PMID:9800768

  5. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  6. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Jacob A.; Brunt, Vienna E.; Vallerga, Anne K.; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A.; Minson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed. PMID:26594225

  7. Stress factors in the development of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dorian, B; Taylor, C B

    1984-10-01

    The epidemiologic evidence that stress contributes to cardiovascular disease is reviewed. No one characterization of stress has been associated with all manifestations of cardiovascular disease, yet specific characterizations have been associated with particular manifestations of disease. Type A behavior pattern is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and is correlated with the severity and progression of atherosclerosis demonstrated angiographically. Work overload with job dissatisfaction also predisposes to CAD. Socioeconomic disadvantage in a society of urbanization and industrialization increases the risk of hypertension and CAD, while chronic states of anxiety, depression, and helplessness are associated with angina and sudden death. Traumatic life events, especially involving loss of or threat to self-esteem, may precipitate sudden death in patients with preexisting CAD. There is evidence that the mechanism linking the experience of stress and the development of acute coronary events is exposure to sympathetic hyperarousal and a deficit in soothing. Research is needed to determine if work environments can be designed to minimize hyperarousal and provide protective outlets for individuals experiencing such arousal. PMID:6387069

  8. [Clinical study on development of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2004-12-01

    DEVELOPEMENT OF MAC LUNG DISEASE: An increase of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease becomes a problem among respiratory physician today. The reason is still unknown, but it seems to be globally recognized that this type of MAC disease is developing particularly in middle-aged woman. Some papers mentioned the existence of such type of MAC lung disease already early in the 70s, in Japan. Yamamoto described that 17 cases of middle lobe type lung disease out of 154 non-photochoromogen cases, and 76.5% were female, in 1970. Shimoide also pointed such type of 39 cases out of 240 MAC lung disease and 84.6% were female, in 1980. Prince reported MAC lung disease seen in old and middle age female of 21 cases including lethality example of 4 cases without a precedent disease in 1989. After his report, the international consensus of this peculiar type of MAC lung disease seems to be spread. In 1989, we compared 72 cases of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease and 56 cases of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) that was a most typical chronic airway disease at that time in Japan. The average age of disease onset of DPB group was 37.0 +/- 16.3 years old and that of MAC group was 54.5 +/- 16.3 years old. The percentage of female was 32% in DPB group and 87.5% in MAC group. It was highly possible that two groups belong different parent population. We could grasp that nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease patients is a unique group. We observed the serial films of 21 cases of nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease, and divide the progression of the disease to sequential 7 steps as Fig. 1. Small nodules progress to cavities in mean about 10 years. However, why is MAC which is opportunistic pathogen with weak virulence, able to form a lesion at unimpaired lung parenchyma? Is there really normal site? Why dose it start from lingula? Why is MAC seen a lot in woman? While it is extremely pathognomonic clinical picture, and, is an extremely interesting

  9. Mind the gap: models in multiple species needed for therapeutic development in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Howland, David S; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-09-15

    Unraveling the pathophysiology and testing candidate therapeutics in neurodegenerative disorders is, necessarily, highly dependent on model systems. Because Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a single (expanded CAG tract) mutation in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, a richness of model systems, particularly mice, have been engineered to both dissect disease mechanisms and test potential therapeutics. Even so, as with other neurodegenerative diseases, very little success has been achieved in translating HD mouse model drug testing results to the clinic. Because of the considerable costs-human, opportunity, and financial-there is a pressing need to improve the use of existing HD models and also to develop models in higher species beyond rodent, such as sheep, minipig, and nonhuman primate, to bridge the translational gap from preclinical to clinical testing of candidate therapeutics. PMID:25155258

  10. Aneurysm miRNA Signature Differs, Depending on Disease Localization and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Busch, Albert; Busch, Martin; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Kellersmann, Richard; Otto, Christoph; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zernecke, Alma; Lorenz, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Limited comprehension of aneurysm pathology has led to inconclusive results from clinical trials. miRNAs are key regulators of post-translational gene modification and are useful tools in elucidating key features of aneurysm pathogenesis in distinct entities of abdominal and popliteal aneurysms. Here, surgically harvested specimens from 19 abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 8 popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) patients were analyzed for miRNA expression and histologically classified regarding extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammation. DIANA-based computational target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis verified our results, as well as previous ones. miRNA-362, -19b-1, -194, -769, -21 and -550 were significantly down-regulated in AAA samples depending on degree of inflammation. Similar or inverse regulation was found for miR-769, 19b-1 and miR-550, -21, whereas miR-194 and -362 were unaltered in PAA. In situ hybridization verified higher expression of miR-550 and -21 in PAA compared to AAA and computational analysis for target genes and pathway enrichment affirmed signal transduction, cell-cell-interaction and cell degradation pathways, in line with previous results. Despite the vague role of miRNAs for potential diagnostic and treatment purposes, the number of candidates from tissue signature studies is increasing. Tissue morphology influences subsequent research, yet comparison of distinct entities of aneurysm disease can unravel core pathways. PMID:26771601

  11. Aneurysm miRNA Signature Differs, Depending on Disease Localization and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Busch, Martin; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Kellersmann, Richard; Otto, Christoph; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zernecke, Alma; Lorenz, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Limited comprehension of aneurysm pathology has led to inconclusive results from clinical trials. miRNAs are key regulators of post-translational gene modification and are useful tools in elucidating key features of aneurysm pathogenesis in distinct entities of abdominal and popliteal aneurysms. Here, surgically harvested specimens from 19 abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 8 popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) patients were analyzed for miRNA expression and histologically classified regarding extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammation. DIANA-based computational target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis verified our results, as well as previous ones. miRNA-362, -19b-1, -194, -769, -21 and -550 were significantly down-regulated in AAA samples depending on degree of inflammation. Similar or inverse regulation was found for miR-769, 19b-1 and miR-550, -21, whereas miR-194 and -362 were unaltered in PAA. In situ hybridization verified higher expression of miR-550 and -21 in PAA compared to AAA and computational analysis for target genes and pathway enrichment affirmed signal transduction, cell-cell-interaction and cell degradation pathways, in line with previous results. Despite the vague role of miRNAs for potential diagnostic and treatment purposes, the number of candidates from tissue signature studies is increasing. Tissue morphology influences subsequent research, yet comparison of distinct entities of aneurysm disease can unravel core pathways. PMID:26771601

  12. Metal-dependent gene regulation in the causative agent of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Bryan; Yang, X. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is the causative agent of Lyme disease transmitted to humans by ticks of the Ixodes spp. Bb is a unique bacterial pathogen because it does not require iron (Fe2+) for its metabolism. Bb encodes a ferritin-like Dps homolog called NapA (also called BicA), which can bind Fe or copper (Cu2+), and a manganese (Mn2+) transport protein, Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA); both proteins are required for colonization of the tick vector, but BmtA is also required for the murine host. This demonstrates that Bb's metal homeostasis is a critical facet of the complex enzootic life cycle between the arthropod and murine hosts. Although metals are known to influence the expression of virulence determinants during infection, it is unknown how or if metals regulate virulence in Bb. Recent evidence demonstrates that Bb modulates the intracellular Mn2+ and zinc (Zn2+) content and, in turn, these metals regulate gene expression through influencing the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) homolog Borrelia Oxidative Stress Regulator (BosR). This mini-review focuses on the burgeoning study of metal-dependent gene regulation within Bb. PMID:24298449

  13. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narciís; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-07-01

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3 micrograms of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components. PMID:12804866

  14. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narcis; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-05-16

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3& mgr;g of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components. PMID:12706682

  15. Intensity-dependent facial emotion recognition and cognitive functions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Assogna, Francesca; Pontieri, Francesco E; Cravello, Luca; Peppe, Antonella; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Stanzione, Paolo; Pellicano, Clelia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2010-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently display non-motor symptoms. In this study, we investigated intensity-dependent facial emotion recognition in patients with PD and healthy controls (HC), matched for age, gender, and education, and its relationship to individual cognitive domains. Seventy patients with PD and 70 HC were submitted to a clinical, neuropsychological, and psychopathological evaluation. Facial emotion recognition performance was assessed using the Penn Emotion Recognition Test (PERT). The patients with PD recognized fewer low- and high-intensity facial expressions of disgust than HC. This effect was selective, because their global ability to recognize emotions was intact. Both patients with PD and HC recognized high-intensity better than low-intensity emotions, except for disgust, which was recognized better at low intensity. In the patients with PD, overall facial emotion recognition and selective disgust recognition performances were related to deficits in many neuropsychological domains (verbal and visuo-spatial memory, attention, praxis, and verbal fluency). The ability to recognize emotions is a complex cognitive process requiring the integrity of several functions. Therefore, it is likely that structural or functional derangement of the discrete neural pathways involved in these cognitive functions in patients with PD makes it difficult for them to recognize emotions expressed by others. PMID:20663240

  16. Density-dependent host choice by disease vectors: epidemiological implications of the ideal free distribution.

    PubMed

    Basáñez, María-Gloria; Razali, Karina; Renz, Alfons; Kelly, David

    2007-03-01

    The proportion of vector blood meals taken on humans (the human blood index, h) appears as a squared term in classical expressions of the basic reproduction ratio (R(0)) for vector-borne infections. Consequently, R(0) varies non-linearly with h. Estimates of h, however, constitute mere snapshots of a parameter that is predicted, from evolutionary theory, to vary with vector and host abundance. We test this prediction using a population dynamics model of river blindness assuming that, before initiation of vector control or chemotherapy, recorded measures of vector density and human infection accurately represent endemic equilibrium. We obtain values of h that satisfy the condition that the effective reproduction ratio (R(e)) must equal 1 at equilibrium. Values of h thus obtained decrease with vector density, decrease with the vector:human ratio and make R(0) respond non-linearly rather than increase linearly with vector density. We conclude that if vectors are less able to obtain human blood meals as their density increases, antivectorial measures may not lead to proportional reductions in R(0) until very low vector levels are achieved. Density dependence in the contact rate of infectious diseases transmitted by insects may be an important non-linear process with implications for their epidemiology and control. PMID:17112556

  17. Amyloid-β induces NLRP1-dependent neuronal pyroptosis in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, M-S; Tan, L; Jiang, T; Zhu, X-C; Wang, H-F; Jia, C-D; Yu, J-T

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown the aberrant expression of inflammasome-related proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain; these proteins, including NLRP1 inflammasome, are implicated in the execution of inflammatory response and pyroptotic death. Although current data are associated NLRP1 genetic variants with AD, the involvement of NLRP1 inflammasome in AD pathogenesis is still unknown. Using APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice, we found that cerebral NLRP1 levels were upregulated. Our in vitro studies further showed that increased NLRP1-mediated caspase-1-dependent 'pyroptosis' in cultured cortical neurons in response to amyloid-β. Moreover, we employed direct in vivo infusion of non-viral small-interfering RNA to knockdown NLRP1 or caspase-1 in APPswe/PS1dE9 brain, and discovered that these NLRP1 or caspase-1 deficiency mice resulted in significantly reduced neuronal pyroptosis and reversed cognitive impairments. Taken together, our findings indicate an important role for NLRP1/caspase-1 signaling in AD progression, and point to the modulation of NLRP1 inflammasome as a promising strategy for AD therapy. PMID:25144717

  18. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  19. Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world’s poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health. PMID:23849080

  20. Technology innovation for infectious diseases in the developing world.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Ruiz-Esparza, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world's poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health. PMID:23849080

  1. Perspectives on Tissue Interactions in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strand, D.W.; Franco, O.E.; Basanta, D.; Anderson, A.R.A.; Hayward, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    From the morphogenetic movements of the three germ layers during development to the reactive stromal microenvironment in cancer, tissue interactions are vital to maintaining healthy organ morphologic architecture and function. The stromal compartment is thought to be complicit in tumor progression and, as such, represents an opportune target for disease therapies. However, recent developments in our understanding of the diversity of the stromal compartment and the lack of appropriate models to study its relevance in human disease have limited our further understanding of the role of tissue interactions in tumor progression. The failure of any model to fully recapitulate the complexities of systemic biology continues to create a higher imperative for incorporating various perspectives into a broader understanding for the ultimate goal of designing interventional therapies. Understanding this potential, this review examines the biological models used to study stromal-epithelial interactions and includes an attempt to incorporate behavioral terminology to define and mathematically model ecological relationships in stromal-epithelial interactions. In addition, the current attempt to incorporate these diverse ecological perspectives into in silico mathematical models through cross-disciplinary coordination is reviewed, which will provide a fresh perspective on defining cell group behavior and tissue ecology in disease and hopefully lead to the generation of new hypotheses to be empirically validated. PMID:20205682

  2. Mimicking Retinal Development and Disease With Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Divya; Phillips, Jenny; Joseph Phillips, M; Gamm, David M

    2016-04-01

    As applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) continue to be refined and pursued, it is important to keep in mind that the strengths and weaknesses of this technology lie with its developmental origins. The remarkable capacity of differentiating hPSCs to recapitulate cell and tissue genesis has provided a model system to study stages of human development that were not previously amenable to investigation and experimentation. Furthermore, demonstration of developmentally appropriate, stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to specific cell types offers support for their authenticity and their suitability for use in disease modeling and cell replacement therapies. However, limitations to farming cells and tissues in an artificial culture environment, as well as the length of time required for most cells to mature, are some of the many issues to consider before using hPSCs to study or treat a particular disease. Given the overarching need to understand and modulate the dynamics of lineage-specific differentiation in stem cell cultures, this review will first examine the capacity of hPSCs to serve as models of retinal development. Thereafter, we will discuss efforts to model retinal disorders with hPSCs and present challenges that face investigators who aspire to use such systems to study disease pathophysiology and/or screen for therapeutics. We also refer readers to recent publications that provide additional insight and details on these rapidly evolving topics. PMID:27116663

  3. Genetic regulation of human brain development: lessons from Mendelian diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Salazar, Tracy J.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental goals in human genetics is to link gene function to phenotype, yet the function of the majority of the genes in the human body is still poorly understood. This is especially true for the developing human brain. The study of human phenotypes that result from inherited, mutated alleles is the most direct evidence for the requirement of a gene in human physiology. Thus, the study of Mendelian central nervous system(CNS) diseases can be an extremely powerful approach to elucidate such phenotypic/genotypic links and to increase our understanding of the key components required for development of the human brain. In this review, we highlight examples of how the study of inherited neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our knowledge of both the “normal” and diseased human brain, as well as elaborate on the future of this type of research. Mendelian disease research has been, and will continue to be, key to understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie human brain function, and will ultimately form a basis for the design of intelligent, mechanism-specific treatments for nervous system disorders. PMID:21062301

  4. Implications of Differential Age Distribution of Disease-Associated Meningococcal Lineages for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Caroline L.; Ramsay, Mary E.; Chandra, Manosree; Jolley, Keith A.; van der Ende, Arie; Carion, Françoise; Berthelsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Steen; Harðardóttir, Hjördís; Vazquez, Julio A.; Murphy, Karen; Toropainen, Maija; Caniça, Manuela; Ferreira, Eugenia; Diggle, Mathew; Edwards, Giles F.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Stefanelli, Paola; Kriz, Paula; Gray, Steve J.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jacobsson, Susanne; Claus, Heike; Vogel, Ulrich; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Heuberger, Sigrid; Caugant, Dominique A.; Frosch, Matthias; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account for most disease, and these lineages are associated with particular antigens, including vaccine candidates. A collection of 4,048 representative meningococcal disease isolates from 18 European countries, collected over a 3-year period, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Age data were available for 3,147 isolates. The proportions of hyperinvasive lineages, identified as particular clonal complexes (ccs) by MLST, differed among age groups. Subjects <1 year of age experienced lower risk of sequence type 11 (ST-11) cc, ST-32 cc, and ST-269 cc disease and higher risk of disease due to unassigned STs, 1- to 4-year-olds experienced lower risk of ST-11 cc and ST-32 cc disease, 5- to 14-year-olds were less likely to experience ST-11 cc and ST-269 cc disease, and ≥25-year-olds were more likely to experience disease due to less common ccs and unassigned STs. Younger and older subjects were vulnerable to a more diverse set of genotypes, indicating the more clonal nature of genotypes affecting adolescents and young adults. Knowledge of temporal and spatial diversity and the dynamics of meningococcal populations is essential for disease control by vaccines, as coverage is lineage specific. The nonrandom age distribution of hyperinvasive lineages has consequences for the design and implementation of vaccines, as different variants, or perhaps targets, may be required for different age groups. PMID:24695776

  5. The development of a disease oriented eFolder for multiple sclerosis decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Fernandez, James; Amezcua, Lilyana; Liu, Brent

    2010-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The chronic nature of MS necessitates multiple MRI studies to track disease progression. Currently, MRI assessment of multiple sclerosis requires manual lesion measurement and yields an estimate of lesion volume and change that is highly variable and user-dependent. In the setting of a longitudinal study, disease trends and changes become difficult to extrapolate from the lesions. In addition, it is difficult to establish a correlation between these imaged lesions and clinical factors such as treatment course. To address these clinical needs, an MS specific e-Folder for decision support in the evaluation and assessment of MS has been developed. An e-Folder is a disease-centric electronic medical record in contrast to a patient-centric electronic health record. Along with an MS lesion computer aided detection (CAD) package for lesion load, location, and volume, clinical parameters such as patient demographics, disease history, clinical course, and treatment history are incorporated to make the e-Folder comprehensive. With the integration of MRI studies together with related clinical data and informatics tools designed for monitoring multiple sclerosis, it provides a platform to improve the detection of treatment response in patients with MS. The design and deployment of MS e-Folder aims to standardize MS lesion data and disease progression to aid in decision making and MS-related research.

  6. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian JC; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a ‘window’ to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study. PMID:26174843

  7. Heart Valve Structure and Function in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The mature heart valves are made up of highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) and valve interstitial cells (VIC) surrounded by an endothelial cell layer. The ECM of the valves is stratified into elastin-, proteoglycan- and collagen-rich layers that confer distinct biomechanical properties to the leaflets and supporting structures. Signaling pathways have critical functions in primary valvulogenesis as well as maintenance of valve structure and function over time. Animal models provide powerful tools to study valve development and disease processes. Valve disease is a significant public health problem and increasing evidence implicates aberrant developmental mechanisms underlying pathogenesis. Further studies are necessary to determine regulatory pathway interactions underlying pathogenesis in order to generate new avenues for novel therapeutics. PMID:20809794

  8. Latest drug developments in the field of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Craig S; Lebowitz, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been responsible for more deaths annually than any other disease category since 1900, except for the influenza epidemic in 1916. Yet, the drug pipeline has been largely bereft of new entrants. In 2008, one new cardiovascular medication was marketed in the United States. In 2009, there were two new cardiovascular medications. In comparison, there were seven new drugs for oncology in 2009. The present review explores new agents within the context of models currently in the drug pipeline. Of course, there is no guarantee that any of these agents will be marketed. A discussion of the models is illustrative of the types of approaches being used to develop new cardiovascular agents. PMID:22477616

  9. Mechanisms of long noncoding RNA function in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G

    2016-07-01

    Since decades it has been known that non-protein-coding RNAs have important cellular functions. Deep sequencing recently facilitated the discovery of thousands of novel transcripts, now classified as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. LncRNAs are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms, from almost all aspects of gene expression to protein translation and stability. Recent findings implicate lncRNAs as key players of cellular differentiation, cell lineage choice, organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Moreover, lncRNAs are involved in pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, and therefore provide novel biomarkers and pharmaceutical targets. Here we discuss examples illustrating the versatility of lncRNAs in gene control, development and differentiation, as well as in human disease. PMID:27007508

  10. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease: implications for development of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Carl A; Budson, Andrew E

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease marked by a constellation of cognitive disturbances, the earliest and most prominent being impaired episodic memory. Episodic memory refers to the memory system that allows an individual to consciously retrieve a previously experienced item or episode of life. Many recent studies have focused on characterizing how AD pathology impacts particular aspects of episodic memory and underlying mental and neural processes. This review summarizes the findings of those studies and discusses the effects of current and promising treatments for AD on episodic memory. The goal of this review is to raise awareness of the strides that cognitive neuroscientists have made in understanding intact and dysfunctional memory. Knowledge of the specific memorial processes that are impaired in AD may be of great value to basic scientists developing novel therapies and to clinical researchers assessing the efficacy of those therapies. PMID:19086882