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  1. The nature of impairments of memory in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Harris, John P; Vaux, Emma; Hadid, Rebecca; Kean, Rebecca; Butler, Laurie T

    2015-08-01

    Possible impairments of memory in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, in which stimulus words were presented visually, participants were tested on conceptual or perceptual memory tasks, with retrieval being either explicit or implicit. Compared with healthy controls, ESRD patients were impaired when memory required conceptual but not when it required perceptual processing, regardless of whether retrieval was explicit or implicit. An impairment of conceptual implicit memory (priming) in the ESRD group represented a previously unreported deficit compared to healthy aging. There were no significant differences between pre- and immediate post-dialysis memory performance in ESRD patients on any of the tasks. In Experiment 2, in which presentation was auditory, patients again performed worse than controls on an explicit conceptual memory task. We conclude that the type of processing required by the task (conceptual vs. perceptual) is more important than the type of retrieval (explicit vs. implicit) in memory failures in ESRD patients, perhaps because temporal brain regions are more susceptible to the effects of the illness than are posterior regions. PMID:25980628

  2. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  3. Sleep Disorders in ESRD Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Mohammad Reza; Safavi, Amin; Haghverdi, Masoumeh; Saedi, Babak

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure affects different aspects of normal life. Among different manifestations, sleep problem can be considered as a common complaint of ESRD (End Stage Renal Disease) patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the interrelationship between sleep disorders in ESRD patients and their characteristics. Through a cross-sectional study (2010-2011), 88 ESRD patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis thrice weekly were recruited to enter the study. We used a self-administered questionnaire into which the data were reflected. The patients selected their specific sleep disorders using a nine-item scale while the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) determined both the presence and severity of sleep disorders. The data was finally analyzed with their baseline characteristics, dialysis characteristics, medication/stimulants use, and clinical and biochemical parameters. Over 95% of the patients had, at least, one specific sleep disorder while the ESS revealed 36.36% of patients as normal, 59.09% as having mild sleep disorders, and 4.54% as having moderate to severe sleep disorders. Sleep disorders were significantly correlated with older ages (P=0.035), dialysis dose (P=0.001), blood creatinine levels (P=0.037), upper airways obstruction (P=0.035), hepatomegaly (P=0.006), hepatic failure (P=0.001), higher blood TSH levels (P=0.039), history of hypothyroidism (P=0.005), and the use of levodopa (P=0.004), anti-hypertensive medications (P=0.006), benzodiazepines (P=0.006), Eprex (Erythropoietin) (P=0.001), Venofer (Iron Sucrose Injection) (P=0.013), and phosphate-binders agents (P=0.018). Sleep disorders are common findings among ESRD patients and seem to be a more complicated issue than a simple accumulation of the wastes products in the body. Whatever the causes of sleep disorders are, disorder-specific treatments should be considered. PMID:27107522

  4. How do We Manage Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with CKD and ESRD?

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Ha, Sung Kyu

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. In addition, patients with pre-dialysis CKD appear to be more likely to die of heart disease than of kidney disease. CKD accelerates coronary artery atherosclerosis by several mechanisms, notably hypertension and dyslipidemia, both of which are known risk factors for coronary artery disease. In addition, CKD alters calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, resulting in hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, including the coronary arteries. Mortality of patients on long-term dialysis therapy is high, with age-adjusted mortality rates of about 25% annually. Because the majority of deaths are caused by cardiovascular disease, routine cardiac catheterization of new dialysis patients was proposed as a means of improving the identification and treatment of high-risk patients. However, clinicians may be uncomfortable exposing asymptomatic patients to such invasive procedures like cardiac catheterization, thus noninvasive cardiac risk stratification was investigated widely as a more palatable alternative to routine diagnostic catheterization. The effective management of coronary artery disease is of paramount importance in uremic patients. The applicability of diagnostic, preventive, and treatment modalities developed in nonuremic populations to patients with kidney failure cannot necessarily be extrapolated from clinical studies in non-kidney failure populations. Noninvasive diagnostic testing in uremic patients is less accurate than in nonuremic populations. Initial data suggest that dobutamine echocardiography may be the preferred diagnostic method. PCI with stenting is a less favorable alternative to CABG, however, it has a faster recovery time, reduced invasiveness, and no overall mortality difference in nondiabetic and non-CKD patients compared with CABG. CABG is associated with reduced repeat revascularizations, greater relief of angina, and increased long term

  5. Healthcare systems and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) therapies--an international review: access to ESRD treatments.

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H; de Alvaro, F; Williams, P F

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of healthcare technology and economics can be used to assess the access to healthcare, its quality and efficacy as well as its cost and cost efficiency. This report addresses these issues for the provision of care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. An international comparison of access to ESRD treatment modalities was made with reference to the healthcare provider structure in a range of industrial countries. The countries were grouped into 'public' (Beveridge model), 'mixed' (Bismarck model) and 'private' (Private Insurance model). In 'public' provider countries, 20-52% of dialysis patients are treated with home therapies (haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis), and the number of patients with renal transplants is 45-81% of all ESRD patients. In 'mixed' provider countries, only 9 17% of all dialysis patients are treated with home therapies, and 20-48% of ESRD patients have renal transplants. In 'private' provider countries, 17% of US and 6% Japanese dialysis patients are treated with home therapies. Japan has 0.3% and the US has 26% of ESRD patients who receive renal transplants. It thus seems that provider structure influences access to and choice of ESRD treatment. With a growing elderly population and longer life expectancy, there will be an increased requirement for ESRD treatments in all industrial countries. Equal access to, and quality of ESRD care in the future will require adequate funding and reimbursement strategies in a cost-constrained healthcare environment. growing elderly population, new and innovative healthcare technologies, increasing expectations of the population and the dilemma of economic constraints. Therefore, new disciplines such as health technology assessment and healthcare economics are developing to support the needs of health policy decision makers. Their main objective is to create a balance between the three key factors of a healthcare system: access to healthcare (equity for all), quality of healthcare

  6. Prevalence of sleep disorders among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Haitham; Mohab, Amr

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disorders are common among the patients undergoing dialysis in end stage renal disease (ESRD). Although variable, their prevalence has been reported to be higher when compared to the general population. The most frequently reported complaints are insomnia, restless leg syndrome (RLS), sleep-disordered breathing and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders in end stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis (group I with 30 patients) and CKD patients (group II with 30 patients) in comparison to 30 normal population (control group). In addition to laboratory investigations which included creatinine clearance using Cockroft and Gault formula, hemoglobin level (Hb), blood urea, serum creatinine, serum albumin, serum calcium and phosphorus and lipid profile, all subjects underwent one night of laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) consisting of a standard montage of electroencephalography (EEG) (C3/A1 and O2/C3 or O1/C4), monopolar left and right electrooculography (EOG) referenced to the opposite mastoid, surface mentalis electromyography (EMG), respiratory airflow (measured by thermistor) and effort (piezoelectric sensors), electrocardiography (ECG), anterior tibialis EMG and pulse oximetry. For hemodialysis subjects, this study was performed on a night immediately following hemodialysis treatment. The results showed that patients on hemodialysis have sleep disorders, and that sleep disorders are common in group I and II than control group. The percentage of sleep disorders in hemodialysis patients were as follows: insomnia (69%), followed by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome OSAS (24%), RLS and periodic limb movement PLM (18%), nightmares (13%), EDS (12%), sleepwalking (2%), possible rapid eye movement behavior disorders RED (2%), possible narcolepsy (1.4%). While the percentage of sleep disorders in CKD patients were as follows: insomnia (54%), followed by RLS (19%), PLM (12%), OSAS (16

  7. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III–V, and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III–V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III–V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in

  8. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III-V, and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III-V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III-V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in binary

  9. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50 mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  10. Serum Globotriaosylceramide Assay as a Screening Test for Fabry Disease in Patients with ESRD on Maintenance Dialysis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Yup; Hyun, Young-Youl; Lee, Ji-Eun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook; Cho, Seong-Tae; Chun, No-Won; Jeoung, Byoung-Chunn; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Kim, Keong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Nam; Kim, Yung-A; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Yung-Chun; Lim, Hun-Kwan; Oh, Keong-Sik; Son, Seong-Hwan; Yu, Beong-Hee; Wee, Kyeong-So; Lee, Eun-Jong; Lee, Young-Ki; Noh, Jung-Woo; Kim, Seung-Jung; Choi, Kyu-Bok; Yu, Suk-Hee; Pyo, Heui-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive and progressive disease caused by α-galactosidase A (α-GaL A) deficiency. We sought to assess the prevalence of unrecognized Fabry disease in dialysis-dependent patients and the efficacy of serum globotriaosylceramide (GL3) screening. Methods A total of 480 patients of 1,230 patients among 17 clinics were enrolled. Serum GL3 levels were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Additionally, we studied the association between increased GL3 levels and cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or left ventricular hypertrophy. Results Twenty-nine patients had elevated serum GL3 levels. The α-GaL A activity was determined for the 26 patients with high GL3 levels. The mean α-GaL A activity was 64.6 nmol/hr/mg (reference range, 45 to 85), and no patient was identified with decreased α-GaL A activity. Among the group with high GL3 levels, 15 women had a α-GaL A genetics analysis. No point mutations were discovered among the women with high GL3 levels. No correlation was observed between serum GL3 levels and α-GaL A activity; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.01352 (p = 0.9478). No significant correlation was observed between increased GL3 levels and the frequency of cardiovascular disease or cerebrovascular disease. Conclusions Fabry disease is very rare disease in patients with end-stage renal disease. Serum GL3 measurements as a screening method for Fabry disease showed a high false-positive rate. Thus, serum GL3 levels determined by tandem mass spectrometry may not be useful as a screening method for Fabry disease in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:21179280

  11. Maintenance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell responses in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and implications for diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; Waruk, Jillian L M; Mesa, Christine; Lopez, Carmen; Bueti, Joe; Ball, T Blake; Kiazyk, Sandra A

    2016-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit elevated risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, but current diagnostics, including the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA), exhibit poor sensitivity in ESRD. We tested 80 ESRD patients and found an 18.75% prevalence of IGRA positivity. A subset of patients was assessed for Mtb-specific expression of 44 cytokines/chemokines, and CD4+ T cell phenotype and function. Similar to non-ESRD IGRA+ individuals, Mtb-specific IFNγ, IL-1RA, IP-10, MCP-3 and IL-2 responses were identified in the ESRD IGRA+ group. 27% of the ESRD IGRA- group exhibited MCP-3 or IL-2 Mtb-specific responses, which may identify cases of latent TB infection in ESRD. Stimulation of PBMC with PPD demonstrated similar CD4+ T cell production of IFNγ, TNFα and GM-CSF by ESRD patients. The reported low sensitivity of the IGRA in ESRD cohorts is therefore unlikely to be due to poor T cell cytokine secretion, and may instead reflect defects in antigen presentation. PMID:27181992

  12. A Simple Tool to Predict ESRD Within 1 Year in Elderly Patients with Advanced CKD

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Goswami, Puja; Azem, Reem; Babineau, Denise C.; Rahman, Mahboob

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in older patients; currently, no tools are available to predict the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within 1 year. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a model to predict the 1 year risk for ESRD in elderly subjects with advanced CKD. DESIGN Retrospective study SETTING Veterans Affairs Medical Center PARTICIPANTS Patients over 65 years of age with CKD with an estimated (eGFR) less than 30mL/min/1.73m2. MEASUREMENTS The outcome was ESRD within 1 year of the index eGFR. Cox regression was used to develop a predictive model (VA risk score) which was validated in a separate cohort. RESULTS Of the 1,866 patients in the developmental cohort, 77 developed ESRD. Risk factors for ESRD in the final model were age, congestive heart failure, systolic blood pressure, eGFR, potassium, and albumin. In the validation cohort, the C index for the VA risk score was 0.823. The risk for developing ESRD at 1 year from lowest to highest tertile was 0.08%, 2.7%, and 11.3% (P<0.001). The C-index for the recently published Tangri model in the validation cohort was 0.780. CONCLUSION A new model using commonly available clinical measures shows excellent ability to predict the onset of ESRD within the next year in elderly subjects. Additionally, the Tangri model had very good predictive ability. Patients and physicians can use these risk models to inform decisions regarding preparation for renal replacement therapy in patients with advanced CKD. PMID:23617782

  13. How the ESRD Quality Incentive Program Could Potentially Improve Quality of Life for Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Sara N.

    2015-01-01

    For over 20 years, the quality of medical care of the Medicare ESRD Program has been a concern. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have implemented the ESRD Quality Incentive Program, which uses the principles of value-based purchasing; dialysis providers are paid for performance on predefined quality measures, with a goal of improving patient outcomes and the quality of patient care. The ESRD Quality Incentive Program measures have been criticized, because they are largely disease oriented and use easy-to-obtain laboratory-based indicators, such as Kt/V and hemoglobin, that do not reflect outcomes that are most important to patients and have had a minimal effect on survival or quality of life. A key goal of improving quality of care is to enhance quality of life, a patient-important quality measure that matters more to many patients than even survival. None of the ESRD Quality Incentive Program measures assess patient-reported quality of life. As outlined in the National Quality Strategy, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are holding providers accountable in six priority domains, in which quality measures have been and are being developed for value-based purchasing. Three measures—patient experience and engagement, clinical care, and care coordination—are particularly relevant to quality care in the ESRD Program; the 2014 ESRD Quality Incentive Program includes six measures, none of which provide data from a patient-centered perspective. Value-based purchasing is a well intentioned step to improve care of patients on dialysis. However, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services need to implement significant change in what is measured for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program to be patient centered and aligned with patients’ values, preferences, and needs. This paper provides examples of potential quality measures for patient experience and engagement, clinical care, and care coordination, which if implemented, would be much more

  14. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work...

  15. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. (a) ESRD patients. (1) A Medicare beneficiary who has been... not disenroll the beneficiary except as provided in § 417.460. (b) Hospice patients. A...

  16. Catheter-related mortality among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2008-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  17. Prognostic Value of Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients with Dialysis-Dependent ESRD.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nishant R; Charytan, David M; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Skali Lami, Hicham; Veeranna, Vikas; Cheezum, Michael K; Taqueti, Viviany R; Kato, Takashi; Foster, Courtney R; Hainer, Jon; Gaber, Mariya; Klein, Josh; Dorbala, Sharmila; Blankstein, Ron; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2016-06-01

    Capillary rarefaction of the coronary microcirculation is a consistent phenotype in patients with dialysis-dependent ESRD (dd-ESRD) and may help explain their excess mortality. Global coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive, quantitative marker of myocardial perfusion and ischemia that integrates the hemodynamic effects of epicardial stenosis, diffuse atherosclerosis, and microvascular dysfunction. We tested whether global CFR provides risk stratification in patients with dd-ESRD. Consecutive patients with dd-ESRD clinically referred for myocardial perfusion PET imaging were retrospectively included, excluding patients with prior renal transplantation. Per-patient CFR was calculated as the ratio of stress to rest absolute myocardial blood flow. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, including age, overt cardiovascular disease, and myocardial scar/ischemia burden, were used to assess the independent association of global CFR with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The incremental value of global CFR was assessed with relative integrated discrimination index and net reclassification improvement. In 168 patients included, median global CFR was 1.4 (interquartile range, 1.2-1.8). During follow-up (median of 3 years), 36 patients died, including 21 cardiovascular deaths. Log-transformed global CFR independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.01 per 0.5-unit increase; 95% confidence interval, <0.01 to 0.14; P<0.001) and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio, 0.01 per 0.5-unit increase; 95% confidence interval, <0.01 to 0.15; P=0.002). For all-cause mortality, addition of global CFR resulted in risk reclassification in 27% of patients. Thus, global CFR may provide independent and incremental risk stratification for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with dd-ESRD. PMID:26459635

  18. Management of the patient with ESRD after withdrawal from dialysis.

    PubMed

    DeVelasco, R; Dinwiddie, L C

    1998-12-01

    When dialysis no longer achieves the goal of prolonging quality life for the ESRD patient, withdrawal from dialysis is an option. Many patients, their families, and caregivers cannot make an informed decision to withdraw because they do not have sufficient information or, worse, are misinformed about what the patient might experience. This paper reviews the clinical circumstances in which dialysis is discontinued as well as the physiological signs and symptoms of the uremic-related death. Palliative management of those symptoms is from one nephrologist's model and provides a starting point for dialogue about this necessary care. PMID:10188396

  19. Multinodular Goiter Spontaneous Hemorrhage in ESRD Patients Result in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen-Hui; Shao, Chu-Xiao; Xin, Jun; Li, Jie; Mao, Ming-Feng; Yu, Xue-Ping; Jin, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Euthyroid multinodular goiters may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. Here, we present a case admitted to the nephrologist with multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage along with respiratory failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which required urgent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with ESRD who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goiter resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency partial thyroidectomy were performed, revealing multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage by postoperative histopathology. Several cases of benign goiters necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Goiters are among the rare diagnoses in patients consulting at our institution's Nephrology. This case illustrates that ESRD patients with benign goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure due to airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. It was found in agreement with previous reports. This case highlights that ESRD patient at risk of this life threatening complication such as multinodular goiter hemorrhage should be managed with elective thyroidectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26871832

  20. Increased hospitalizations and death in patients with ESRD secondary to lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sule, S; Fivush, B; Neu, A; Furth, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ system, including the kidneys. Using a large national dataset, our goal was to compare the morbidity as measured by hospitalization and mortality rates between hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to SLE to those with ESRD due to other causes. Methods The risk of hospitalization was calculated by Poisson regression with clustering for repeated measures using the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Hospitalization Analytic File in strata of pediatric and adult patients. Cox proportional hazard ratio was used to assess the mortality risk in hospitalized patients. Subjects were censored at transplantation or end of follow-up. Results Adult patients with ESRD secondary to SLE were hospitalized more frequently than other adults (incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15–1.77) and had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.89, 95% CI: 1.66–2.5). Mortality was higher in hospitalized pediatric patients with SLE compared to pediatric patients with other causes of ESRD (HR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.75–2.31) and adults with SLE (HR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.79–2.34). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that there is a trend toward increased hospitalization rates in pediatric and adult patients with SLE. Among these hospitalized patients with SLE, there is an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. PMID:22736748

  1. Clinical outcomes in pediatric hemodialysis patients in the USA: lessons from CMS' ESRD CPM Project.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2009-07-01

    Although prospective randomized trials have provided important information and allowed the development of evidence-based guidelines in adult hemodialysis (HD) patients, with approximately 800 prevalent pediatric HD patients in the United States, such studies are difficult to perform in this population. Observational data obtained through the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS') End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project have allowed description of the clinical care provided to pediatric HD patients as well as identification of risk factors for failure to reach adult targets for clinical parameters such as hemoglobin, single-pool Kt/V (spKt/V) and serum albumin. In addition, studies linking data from the ESRD CPM Project and the United States Renal Data System have allowed evaluation of associations between achievement of those targets and the outcomes of hospitalization and death. The results of those studies, while unable to prove cause and effect, suggest that the adult ESRD CPM targets may assist in identifying pediatric HD patients at risk for poor outcomes. PMID:18509683

  2. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs. PMID:11952931

  3. The United States Renal Data System: a source of national norms for ESRD patient outcome and process of care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, R A

    1995-04-01

    The Annual Data Report of the United States Renal Data System provides a rich resource of published summaries of the United States norms for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient outcome and process of care. It includes summaries of patient mortality rates, hospitalization rates, causes of death, and rates of withdrawal from dialysis based on a near-census of ESRD patients in the United States. Norms for some measures of the process of delivering dialysis therapy, including dose of dialysis are also reported, based on a national random sample of ESRD patients. National summaries of measures of patient outcome and process of care provide a useful benchmark against which specific experience can be compared. Such comparisons can be part of a quality improvement program that encourages caregivers to provide high quality care to ESRD patients. While the Annual Data Report provides summaries of several fundamental measures related to high quality care, including patient survival and quality of life, other measures need to be developed and studied, including more direct measures of quality of life. PMID:7614354

  4. Strategies for Postmarketing Surveillance of Drugs and Devices in Patients with ESRD Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Moshe; Yeh, Robert W.; Herzog, Charles A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Summary The lack of evidence on the effectiveness and safety of interventions in chronic dialysis patients has been a subject of continuing criticism. New technologies are often introduced into the market without having specifically studied or even included patients with advanced kidney disease. Therefore, the need to generate valid effectiveness and safety data in this vulnerable subpopulation is of utmost importance. The US Food and Drug Administration has recently placed an increased focus on safety surveillance, and sponsors must now meet this additional postmarketing commitment. In patients with ESRD, the unique data collection environment in the United States allows for creative and efficient study designs to meet the needs of patients, providers, and sponsors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the methodological and practical aspects of the different options for postmarketing study design in this field, with critical appraisal of their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23970129

  5. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  6. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  7. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  8. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  9. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  10. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion rates among US chronic dialysis patients during changes to Medicare end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reimbursement systems and erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) labels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several major ESRD-related regulatory and reimbursement changes were introduced in the United States in 2011. In several large, national datasets, these changes have been associated with decreases in erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) utilization and hemoglobin concentrations in the ESRD population, as well as an increase in the use of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in this population. Our objective was to examine the use of RBC transfusion before and after the regulatory and reimbursement changes implemented in 2011 in a prevalent population of chronic dialysis patients in a large national claims database. Methods Patients in the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Databases with evidence of chronic dialysis were selected for the study. The proportion of chronic dialysis patients who received any RBC transfusion and RBC transfusion event rates per 100 patient-months were calculated in each month from January 1, 2007 to March 31, 2012. The results were analyzed overall and stratified by primary health insurance payer (commercial payer or Medicare). Results Overall, the percent of chronic dialysis patients with RBC transfusion and RBC transfusion event rates per 100 patient-months increased between January 2007 and March 2012. When stratified by primary health insurance payer, it appears that the increase was driven by the primary Medicare insurance population. While the percent of patients with RBC transfusion and RBC transfusion event rates did not increase in the commercially insured population between 2007 and 2012 they did increase in the primary Medicare insurance population; the majority of the increase occurred in 2011 during the same time frame as the ESRD-related regulatory and reimbursement changes. Conclusions The regulatory and reimbursement changes implemented in 2011 may have contributed to an increase in the use of RBC transfusions in chronic dialysis patients in the MarketScan dataset who were covered by Medicare plus

  11. Association of Left Atrial Volume With Mortality Among ESRD Patients With Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Referred for Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.M.; Mark, Patrick B.; Cunningham, Anthony F.; Steedman, Tracey; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Stevens, Kathryn K.; Dargie, Henry J.; Jardine, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death. Left atrial volume (LAV), measured using echocardiography, predicts death in patients with ESRD. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a volume-independent method of accurately assessing cardiac structure and function in patients with ESRD. Study Design Single-center prospective observational study to assess the determinants of all-cause mortality, particularly LAV, in a cohort of ESRD patients with LVH, defined using CMR imaging. Setting & Participants 201 consecutive ESRD patients with LVH (72.1% men; mean age, 51.6 ± 11.7 years) who had undergone pretransplant cardiovascular assessment were identified using CMR imaging between 2002-2008. LVH was defined as left ventricular mass index >84.1 g/m2 (men) or >74.6 g/m2 (women) based on published normal left ventricle dimensions for CMR imaging. Maximal LAV was calculated using the biplane area-length method at the end of left ventricle systole and corrected for body surface area. Predictors CMR abnormalities, including LAV. Outcome All-cause mortality. Results 54 patients died (11 after transplant) during a median follow-up of 3.62 years. Median LAV was 30.4 mL/m2 (interquartile range, 26.2-58.1). Patients were grouped into high (median or higher) or low (less than median) LAV. There were no significant differences in heart rate and mitral valve Doppler early to late atrial peak velocity ratio. Increased LAV was associated with higher mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed poorer survival in patients with higher LAV (log rank P = 0.01). High LAV and left ventricular systolic dysfunction conferred similar risk and were independent predictors of death using multivariate analysis. Limitations Only patients undergoing pretransplant cardiac assessment are included. Limited assessment of left ventricular diastolic function

  12. The ethics of end-of-life care for patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Davison, Sara N

    2012-12-01

    Patients with ESRD have extensive and unique palliative care needs, often for years before death. The vast majority of patients, however, dies in acute care facilities without accessing palliative care services. High mortality rates along with a substantial burden of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms and an increasing prevalence of decisions to withhold and stop dialysis all highlight the importance of integrating palliative care into the comprehensive management of ESRD patients. The focus of renal care would then extend to controlling symptoms, communicating prognosis, establishing goals of care, and determining end-of-life care preferences. Regretfully, training in palliative care for nephrology trainees is inadequate. This article will provide a conceptual framework for renal palliative care and describe opportunities for enhancing palliative care for ESRD patients, including improved chronic pain management and advance care planning and a new model for delivering high-quality palliative care that includes appropriate consultation with specialist palliative care. PMID:22997341

  13. Association Between the Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of ESRD in Renal Diseases: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Wu, Yu-Lin; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) use may be associated with nephritis and acute renal injury. The risk of PPIs and deterioration of renal function, in patients with renal diseases, needs to be investigated. A case-control study was conducted in a nation-wide data setting from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). This case-control study used data extracted from NHIRD between the years 2006 and 2011. We used propensity scores to match 3808 patients suffering from renal diseases (ICD-9-CM codes 580–589), with patients (aged ≥20 years) who had had a recent diagnosis of end-stage renal diseases (ESRDs) and had undertaken renal replacement therapy during the period of 2006 to 2011. The 3808 control subjects were selected from people who had a history of renal diseases, but no ESRD. The risk of ESRD in patients with renal diseases and PPIs use was estimated by using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The use of a PPIs was associated with a significantly higher risk of ESRD (adjusted OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.71–2.06) in renal disease patients. Of all the types of PPI combined, the adjusted OR was 1.92 (95% CI = 1.74–2.13) for those on <100 cumulative DDD and was 1.74-fold (95% CI = 1.52–2.00) for those on ≥100 cumulative DDD. PPIs use is associated with the risk of ESRD in patients with renal diseases. It is necessary that appropriate prescription of PPIs coordinated with the close monitoring renal function of patients diagnosed with renal disease. PMID:27082596

  14. [Iron-based Phosphate Binders for ESRD Patients].

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Mario; Mangano, Michela; Magagnoli, Lorenza; Di Lullo, Luca; Galassi, Andrea; Brancaccio, Diego; Bellasi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Several factors influence the choice of phosphate binder for patients, including older age, male gender, post-menopause, diabetes, low bone turnover, vascular/valvular calcification and inflammation. Unlike calcium-based phosphate binders, non-calcium-based phosphate binders, such as sevelamer and lanthanum carbonate, have been able to reduce the progression of bone disease to adynamic bone among patients with CKD. New iron-based phosphate binders are now available. With multiple options available for the reduction of phosphate, the focus has been on agents that do not contain calcium. This is because it is thought that calcium itself functions as a substrate for calcification. PMID:27545638

  15. Anthropometric and Metabolic Risk Factors for ESRD Are Disease-Specific: Results from a Large Population-Based Cohort Study in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zitt, Emanuel; Pscheidt, Constanze; Concin, Hans; Kramar, Reinhard; Lhotta, Karl; Nagel, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Anthropometric and metabolic risk factors for all-cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may vary in their impact depending on the specific primary renal disease. Methods In this Austrian population-based prospective cohort study (n = 185,341; 53.9% women) the following data were collected between 1985 and 2005: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 1988, blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and smoking status. These data were merged with the Austrian Dialysis and Transplant Registry to identify ESRD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause ESRD as well as for cause-specific ESRD due to the following primary renal diseases: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), vascular nephropathy (VN), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and other diseases (OD). Results During a mean follow-up of 17.5 years 403 participants developed ESRD (ADPKD 36, VN 97, DN 86, and OD 184). All parameters except TG and GGT were significantly associated with all-cause ESRD risk. Particular cause-specific ESRD risk factor patterns were found: for ADPKD increased risk from hypertension (HR 11.55); for VN from smoking (HR 1.81), hypertension (HR 2.37), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 9.27); for DN from smoking (HR 1.77), BMI (≥30 vs. 18.5–24.9 kg/m2: HR 7.55), FBG (≥6.94 vs. <5.55 mmol/L: HR 7.67), hypertension (HR 1.08), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 2.02), GGT (HR 2.14); and for OD from hypertension (HR 2.29), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 6.99) and TC (≥6.22 vs. <5.18 mmol/L: HR 1.56). Conclusions Particular anthropometric and metabolic ESRD risk factors differ in importance depending on the primary renal disease. This needs to be considered for future preventive and therapeutic strategies addressing cause-specific ESRD. PMID:27537361

  16. Comparison of Mortality of ESRD Patients with Lupus by Initial Dialysis Modality

    PubMed Central

    Pagan, Javier; Chokshi, Ruchir; Virmani, Sharad; Diego, Jorge M.; Byers, Patricia; Isakova, Tamara; Munoz Mendoza, Jair; Nayer, Ali; Contreras, Jose Roberto; Panama, Gabriel; Lenz, Oliver; Carpintero, Maria; Muchayi, Timothy; Roth, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Little is known regarding whether mortality among ESRD patients with SLE differs between those initiating with peritoneal dialysis (PD) versus hemodialysis (HD). This study compared the mortality risk of ESRD patients with SLE initiating with PD versus HD after matching their baseline sociodemographic and clinical factors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Of 11,023 ESRD patients with SLE initiating dialysis with PD or HD between 1995 and 2006 with complete records in the US Renal Data System, 1352 pairs were matched on 13 predictors utilizing a predicted probability of group membership into the PD group using propensity score matching. The primary outcome was overall mortality. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular-related and infection-related mortality. Outcomes were compared between groups with survival statistics. The period of observation ended on December 31, 2009. The median follow-up was 3 years. Results Matched pairs were predominantly women (86%) with a median age of 39 years. Matched pairs had a balance (P≥0.05) of all baseline factors. Matched pairs had a similar risk of overall mortality (hazard ratio, 0.96 [95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.13]; mortality, 21.4% [290 to 1352] versus 22.5% [304 to 1352] for PD versus HD) within the first 3 years of observation. Matched pairs also had similar cardiovascular-related mortality (10.5% versus 9.5% for PD versus HD) and infection-related mortality (3% versus 4.4% for PD versus HD). Conclusions In ESRD patients with SLE, the mortality was similar among those initiating with PD versus HD after predictors were matched between groups. PMID:25189924

  17. The Beneficial Effects of Renal Transplantation on Altered Oxidative Status of ESRD Patients.

    PubMed

    Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, José Ignacio; Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Preciado-Rojas, Priscila; Gómez-Navarro, Benjamín; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso Martín

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT), has been considered the best therapeutic option for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the effect of RT on the evolution of oxidative DNA status. Methods. Prospective cohort (N = 50 receptors of RT); genotoxic damage, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N- glycosylase-1 (hOGG1); and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were evaluated. Results. Before RT, 8-OHdG were significantly elevated (11.04 ± 0.90 versus 4.73 ± 0.34 ng/mL) compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001), with normalization after 6 months of 4.78 ± 0.34 ng/mL (p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed with hOGG1 enzyme before RT with 2.14 ± 0.36 ng/mL (p = 0.01) and decreased significantly at the end of the study to 1.20 ng/mL (p < 0.001) but was higher than controls, 0.51 ± 0.07 ng/mL (p < 0.03). Antioxidant SOD was elevated at 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (p = 0.001) before RT; however, 6 months after RT it decreased significantly to 16.9 ± 1.6 IU/mL (p = 0.002), without achieving the levels of healthy controls (p = 0.01). The GPx, before RT, was significantly diminished with 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (39.0 ± 1.58) (p = 0.01), while, in the final results, levels increased significantly to 30.38 ± 3.16 IU/mL (p = 0.001). Discussion. Patients with ESRD have important oxidative damage before RT. The RT significantly reduces oxidative damage and partially regulates the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx). PMID:27547292

  18. The Beneficial Effects of Renal Transplantation on Altered Oxidative Status of ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, José Ignacio; Preciado-Rojas, Priscila; Gómez-Navarro, Benjamín; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso Martín

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT), has been considered the best therapeutic option for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the effect of RT on the evolution of oxidative DNA status. Methods. Prospective cohort (N = 50 receptors of RT); genotoxic damage, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N- glycosylase-1 (hOGG1); and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were evaluated. Results. Before RT, 8-OHdG were significantly elevated (11.04 ± 0.90 versus 4.73 ± 0.34 ng/mL) compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001), with normalization after 6 months of 4.78 ± 0.34 ng/mL (p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed with hOGG1 enzyme before RT with 2.14 ± 0.36 ng/mL (p = 0.01) and decreased significantly at the end of the study to 1.20 ng/mL (p < 0.001) but was higher than controls, 0.51 ± 0.07 ng/mL (p < 0.03). Antioxidant SOD was elevated at 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (p = 0.001) before RT; however, 6 months after RT it decreased significantly to 16.9 ± 1.6 IU/mL (p = 0.002), without achieving the levels of healthy controls (p = 0.01). The GPx, before RT, was significantly diminished with 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (39.0 ± 1.58) (p = 0.01), while, in the final results, levels increased significantly to 30.38 ± 3.16 IU/mL (p = 0.001). Discussion. Patients with ESRD have important oxidative damage before RT. The RT significantly reduces oxidative damage and partially regulates the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx). PMID:27547292

  19. Blood pressure control. Improving medication compliance among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Krevolin, Larry; Ilagan, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Medication compliance among individuals with hypertension symbolizes a growing concern within the medical community. It is said that roughly 50% of hypertensive patients in the United States do not comply with their medication regimen. Uncontrolled hypertension in turn can lead to kidney failure and other complications. Because compliance to medication regimens is complex and difficult to ascertain, solutions to this problem must be multifactorial. PMID:26454916

  20. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD...

  3. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD...

  4. 42 CFR 405.2110 - Designation of ESRD networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of ESRD networks. 405.2110 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2110 Designation of ESRD networks. CMS designated ESRD networks in which the approved ESRD facilities collectively provide the necessary care for ESRD...

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  6. Extreme Levels of HbA1c Increase Incident ESRD Risk in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Competing Risk Analysis in National Cohort of Taiwan Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether HbA1c is a predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in type 2 diabetes patients remains unclear. This study evaluated relationship between HbA1c and ESRD in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients aged ≥ 30 years who were free of ESRD (n = 51 681) were included from National Diabetes Care Management Program from 2002–2003. Extended Cox proportional hazard model with competing risk of death served to evaluate association between HbA1c level and ESRD. Results A total of 2613 (5.06%) people developed ESRD during a follow-up period of 8.1 years. Overall incidence rate of ESRD was 6.26 per 1000 person-years. Patients with high levels of HbA1c had a high incidence rate of ESRD, from 4.29 for HbA1c of  6.0%–6.9% to 10.33 for HbA1c ≥ 10.0% per 1000 person-years. Patients with HbA1c < 6.0% particularly had a slightly higher ESRD incidence (4.34 per 1000 person-years) than those with HbA1c  of 6.0%–6.9%. A J-shaped relationship between HbA1c level and ESRD risk was observed. After adjustment, patients with HbA1c < 6.0% and ≥ 10.0% exhibited an increased risk of ESRD (HR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.62–2.44; HR: 4.42, 95% CI: 3.80–5.14, respectively) compared with those with HbA1c of 6.0%–6.9%. Conclusions Diabetes care has focused on preventing hyperglycemia, but not hypoglycemia. Our study revealed that HbA1c level ≥ 7.0% was linked with increased ESRD risk in type 2 diabetes patients, and that HbA1c < 6.0% also had the potential to increase ESRD risk. Our study provides epidemiological evidence that appropriate glycemic control is essential for diabetes care to meet HbA1c targets and improve outcomes without increasing the risk to this population. Clinicians need to pay attention to HbA1c results on diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26098901

  7. Utilization of Acute Care among Patients with ESRD Discharged Home from Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Toles, Mark; Massing, Mark; Jackson, Eric; Peacock-Hinton, Sharon; O’Hare, Ann M.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Older adults with ESRD often receive care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) after an acute hospitalization; however, little is known about acute care use after SNF discharge to home. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study used Medicare claims for North and South Carolina to identify patients with ESRD who were discharged home from a SNF between January 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Nursing Home Compare data were used to ascertain SNF characteristics. The primary outcome was time from SNF discharge to first acute care use (hospitalization or emergency department visit) within 30 days. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify patient and facility characteristics associated with the outcome. Results Among 1223 patients with ESRD discharged home from a SNF after an acute hospitalization, 531 (43%) had at least one rehospitalization or emergency department visit within 30 days. The median time to first acute care use was 37 days. Characteristics associated with a shorter time to acute care use were black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04 to 1.51), dual Medicare-Medicaid coverage (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), higher Charlson comorbidity score (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.12), number of hospitalizations during the 90 days before SNF admission (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.22), and index hospital discharge diagnoses of cellulitis, abscess, and/or skin ulcer (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.45). Home health use after SNF discharge was associated with a lower rate of acute care use (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.87). There were no statistically significant associations between SNF characteristics and time to first acute care use. Conclusions Almost one in every two older adults with ESRD discharged home after a post–acute SNF stay used acute care services within 30 days of discharge. Strategies to reduce acute care utilization in these patients are needed. PMID:25649158

  8. Increased Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Requiring Chronic Dialysis is Associated With Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Kang; Liu, Jia-Sin; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is known that many medical adverse events can be caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); however, epidemiologic evidence has not granted an affirmative relationship between NSAID use and the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We aimed to investigate the relationship in a Chinese population between short-term NSAID use and development of ESRD requiring chronic dialysis. A retrospective case-crossover design was used in this study. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance database, we identified 109,400 incident chronic ESRD patients with dialysis initiation from 1998 to 2009. For each patient, we defined the case period as 1 to 14 days and the control period as 105 to 118 days, respectively, before the first dialysis date. The washout period was 90 days between the case and control period. Detailed information about NSAID use was compared between the case and control periods. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a conditional logistic regression model. NSAID use was found to be a significant risk factor associated with dialysis commencement. The adjusted OR was 2.73 (95% CI: 2.62–2.84) for nonselective NSAIDs and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.83–2.57) for celecoxib. The OR reached 3.05 for the use of acetic acid derivatives. Compared with the oral forms, significantly higher risks were seen in parenteral NSAID use (OR: 8.66, 95% CI: 6.12–20.19). NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution, especially for those in ESRD high-risk groups. PMID:26402800

  9. Acute Kidney Injury Increases Risk of ESRD among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Collins, Allan J.

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged ≥67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for ≥2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease. PMID:19020007

  10. Treatment Center and Geographic Variability in Pre-ESRD Care Associate with Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Wasse, Haimanot; McClellan, Ann C.; Kipp, Adam; Waller, Lance A.; Rocco, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    Late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the contribution of center-to-center and geographic variability of pre-ESRD nephrology care to mortality of patients with ESRD is unknown. We evaluated the pre-ESRD care of >30,000 incident hemodialysis patients, 5088 (17.8%) of whom died during follow-up (median 365 d). Approximately half (51.3%) of incident patients had received at least 6 mo of pre-ESRD nephrology care, as reported by attending physicians. Pre-ESRD nephrology care was independently associated with survival (odds ratio 1.54; 95% confidence interval 1.45 to 1.64). There was substantial center-to-center variability in pre-ESRD care, which was associated with increased facility-specific death rates. As the proportion of patients who were in a treatment center and receiving pre-ESRD nephrology care increased from lowest to highest quintile, the mortality rate decreased from 19.6 to 16.1% (P = 0.0031). In addition, treatment centers in the lowest quintile of pre-ESRD care were clustered geographically. In conclusion, pre-ESRD nephrology care is highly variable among treatment centers and geographic regions. Targeting these disparities could have substantial clinical impact, because the absence of ≥6 mo of pre-ESRD care by a nephrologist is associated with a higher risk for death. PMID:19321704

  11. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  12. Association of Body Mass Index with Patient-Centered Outcomes in Children with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ku, Elaine; Glidden, David V; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Portale, Anthony A; Grimes, Barbara; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is associated with less access to transplantation among adults with ESRD. To examine the association between body mass index at ESRD onset and survival and transplantation in children, we performed a retrospective analysis of children ages 2-19 years old beginning RRT from 1995 to 2011 using the US Renal Data System. Among 13,172 children, prevalence of obesity increased from 14% to 18%, whereas prevalence of underweight decreased from 12% to 9% during this period. Over a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 10,004 children had at least one kidney transplant, and 1675 deaths occurred. Risk of death was higher in obese (hazard ratio [HR], 1.17; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.32) and underweight (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.47) children than children with normal body mass indices. Obese and underweight children were less likely to receive a kidney transplant (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.97; HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.89, respectively). Obese children had lower odds of receiving a living donor transplant (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.98) if the transplant occurred within 18 months of ESRD onset. Adjustment for transplant in a time-dependent Cox model attenuated the higher risk of death in obese but not underweight children (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.24). Lower rates of kidney transplantation may, therefore, mediate the higher risk of death in obese children with ESRD. The increasing prevalence of obesity among children starting RRT may impede kidney transplantation, especially from living donors. PMID:26054540

  13. Medicare program; standards for quality of water used in dialysis and revised guidelines on reuse of hemodialysis filters for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients--HCFA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1995-09-18

    This final rule revises the Medicare conditions for coverage of suppliers of end-stage renal disease services. The revisions remove general language in the regulations regarding water quality; incorporate by reference standards for monitoring the quality of water used in dialysis as published by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) in its document, "Hemodialysis Systems" (second edition); and update existing regulations to incorporate by reference the second edition of AAMI's voluntary guidelines on "Reuse of Hemodialyzers." PMID:10151653

  14. Anabolic interventions in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Storer, Thomas W

    2009-11-01

    ESRD produces a chronic catabolic state that results in significant skeletal muscle atrophy, weakness, and physical dysfunction. Any intervention that can ameliorate this process can significantly improve quality of life. Some studies have shown that endurance exercise training, even at low intensities, may exhibit anabolic effects and improved physical function. However, resistance exercise training is of primary interest as an anabolic intervention because it is the mode of exercise that is most efficacious in stimulating anabolic responses, improved muscle performance, and physical function. A relatively small number of controlled trials of resistance training in ESRD patients have failed to show significant changes in LBM, although some studies have shown significant improvements in other markers of anabolism. Increases in muscle strength with resistance training are typical but improved physical function, either by objective measurement or self-report, are equivocal. Study durations, loads used during training, and relatively small sample sizes may in part explain the inability of previous studies to observe more substantial changes in LBM and physical function. Androgens and growth hormone have been shown to significantly improve LBM and strength, although longer-term studies for safety and efficacy are necessary before their general recommendation for patients with ESRD. PMID:19801139

  15. Dementia and cognitive impairment in ESRD: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Yaffe, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, including dementia, is a common but poorly recognized problem among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), affecting 16–38% of patients. Dementia is associated with high risks of death, dialysis withdrawal, hospitalization, and disability among patients with ESRD; thus, recognizing and effectively managing cognitive impairment may improve clinical care. Dementia screening strategies should take into account patient factors, the time available, the timing of assessments relative to dialysis treatments, and the implications of a positive screen for subsequent management (for example, transplantation). Additional diagnostic testing in patients with cognitive impairment, including neuroimaging, is largely based on the clinical evaluation. There is limited data on the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy for dementia in the setting of ESRD; therefore, decisions about the use of these medications should be individualized. Management of behavioral symptoms, evaluation of patient safety, and advance care planning are important components of dementia management. Prevention strategies targeting vascular risk factor modification, and physical and cognitive activity have shown promise in the general population and may be reasonably extrapolated to the ESRD population. Modification of ESRD-associated factors such as anemia and dialysis dose or frequency require further study before they can be recommended for treatment or prevention of cognitive impairment. PMID:20861818

  16. Patient-centered care: an opportunity to accomplish the "Three Aims" of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD program.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Ann M; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L Funk; Diamond, Louis; Moss, Alvin H

    2014-12-01

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the "Three Aims" put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition's vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients. PMID:25035275

  17. Improving end-of-life care for ESRD patients: an initiative for professionals.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alvin H; Armistead, Nancy C

    2013-09-01

    The Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients convened subject matter experts (SMEs) to assess the current state of palliative care for pre-dialysis (chronic kidney disease) and end-stage renal disease patients (stages 3-5). The SMEs noted that in the final month of life, dialysis patients have the higher percentage of hospitalizations, longer length of stay, greater intensive care admissions, and higher number of deaths in hospitals than cancer or heart failure patients, but use hospice only half as much as these two groups. The group identified a strategic approach and framework for achieving specific aims to improve palliative care education of health care providers, raise awareness of supportive care resources, define palliative care skills for nephrologists, and continue the implementation of shared decision-making for individualized patient-centered care. PMID:24266270

  18. Computer-based learning for ESRD patient education: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Frisby, A J

    1995-07-01

    Computer use in everyday life has expanded human potential in virtually every possible arena. In health care, computer technology affects direct clinical care through diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, and documentation processes. Patient care systems use computer technology to manage billing, scheduling, and multiple other administrative functions. Computer technology for education of health care professionals has been primarily in selected undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs. Computer-based continuing education for health care professionals has been available for at least a decade, but computer-based patient education is just now beginning to emerge as a learning option. This article describes examples of patient education programs using different types of hardware and software and explores potential areas for further development of this area for end-stage renal disease patients and families. Computer technology is not a replacement for professional involvement in patient education, but rather offers a new arena of media to enhance and expand current teaching and learning resources. Computer-based learning is characterized by features representative of many highly regarded principles of adult education. Further, instructional design concepts used for program development are fundamentally sound for patient education. PMID:7614360

  19. ESRD care within the US Department of Veterans Affairs: a forward-looking program with an illuminating past.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne; Crowley, Susan T

    2014-03-01

    The first governmental agency to provide maintenance hemodialysis to patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was the Veterans Administration (VA; now the US Department of Veterans Affairs). Many historical VA policies and programs set the stage for the later care of both veteran and civilian patients with ESRD. More recent VA initiatives that target restructuring of care models based on quality management, system-wide payment policies to promote cost-effective dialysis, and innovation grants aim to improve contemporary care. The VA currently supports an expanded and diversified nationwide treatment program for patients with ESRD using an integrated patient-centered care paradigm. This narrative review of ESRD care by the VA explores not only the medical advances, but also the historical, socioeconomic, ethical, and political forces related to the care of veterans with ESRD. PMID:24331978

  20. Liver cirrhosis leads to poorer survival in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ae Jin; Lim, Hye Jin; Ro, Han; Jung, Ji Yong; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Chang, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Liver cirrhosis (LC) is an important problem in patients withend-stage renal disease (ESRD). Few studies have investigated the inf luence ofLC on mortality in patients with ESRD. This study investigated the associationbetween LC and mortality among patients with ESRD and compare mortality betweentwo dialysis modalities. Methods: Adult patients (≥ 18 years of age) starting dialysis for ESRD were enrolledin the present study from 2000 to 2011. We analyzed 1,069 patients withESRD; of these, 742 patients were undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and 327 patientswere undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Results: The prevalence of LC was 44 of 1,069 patients (4.1%). The cumulative 1-,3-, and 5-year survival rates of noncirrhotic patients were 93%, 83%, and 73%, respectively,whereas the equivalent survival rates of cirrhotic patients were 90%,68%, and 48%, respectively (p = 0.011). After adjustment, LC was an independentrisk factor for death in patients with ESRD. No difference in mortality associatedwith LC was found between the HD and PD subgroups. Conclusions: Of the patients with ESRD, cirrhotic patients had poorer survivalthan noncirrhotic patients. Among patients with ESRD and LC, survival of patientsundergoing PD may be comparable with that of patients undergoing HD. PMID:27017394

  1. Risk of Retinal Artery Occlusion in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Retrospective Large-Scale Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Ko, Shun-Yao; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-04-01

    There is globally increasing prevalence and incidence in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). These patients are frequently reported to have retinal abnormalities and both diseases share some systemic risk factors. Hence, it is clinically relevant to determine whether ESRD is a predictor of retinal artery occlusion (RAO).To investigate the risk of RAO in ESRD patients.A retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. The study included 93,766 ESRD patients recruited between 2000 and 2009 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The same number control group included age- and sex-matched patients without ESRD selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, 2000. Data for each patient were collected from the index date until December 2011.The incidence and risk of RAO were compared between the 2 groups. The hazard ratio (HR) for RAO after adjustment for potential confounders was calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative RAO incidence rate.In total, 237 ESRD patients and 73 controls exhibited RAO during follow-up; thus, the RAO incidence rate in ESRD patients was 4.49 times (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.45-5.83) that in the control patients. After adjustment for potential confounders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease, ESRD patients were 2.78 times (95% CI, 2.02-3.84) more likely to develop RAO in cohort for the total sample. Among patients with hypertension, the RAO incidence rate was significantly higher in the ESRD group, and hypertension significantly increased RAO risk even after adjustment for other confounders in the cohort.ESRD increases the risk of RAO, particularly in ESRD patients with hypertension. Therefore, clinicians should educate ESRD patients about RAO and ensure appropriate blood pressure control. PMID:27057891

  2. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  3. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network...

  4. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network...

  6. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network...

  7. 42 CFR 405.2112 - ESRD network organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ESRD network organizations. 405.2112 Section 405... End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services § 405.2112 ESRD network organizations. CMS will designate an administrative governing body (network organization) for each network. The functions of a network...

  8. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Nuha Mahmoud; Al-Hababi, Fadel Hassan; Eid, Amr Ekhlas

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. Methodology A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. Conclusion The high Relative Risk (RR) observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD. PMID:25380295

  9. Rate of ESRD Exceeds Mortality among African Americans with Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelei; Wright, Jackson T.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Greene, Tom; Norris, Keith; Lewis, Julia

    2010-01-01

    In several studies, patients with CKD seemed to be at greater risk for dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD) than reaching ESRD. The purpose of this study was to compare incident ESRD rates with rates of total mortality, CVD death, and a CVD composite (CVD mortality and CVD hospitalization) among participants who had hypertensive nephrosclerosis and were enrolled in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK). The study period included the AASK trial phase (1996 through 2001) and a subsequent cohort phase (2002 through 2007). The AASK enrolled 1094 participants. Of the 764 participants who completed the trial phase without an event, 691 (90%) enrolled in the cohort phase. During 11 years of follow-up, there were 59 CVD-related deaths and 118 non–CVD-related deaths. The rate of ESRD (3.9/100 patient-years) was significantly higher than the rates of total mortality (2.2/100 patient-years), CVD mortality (0.8/100 patient-years), and the CVD composite (3.2/100 patient-years). The incidence rate ratio of ESRD to CVD mortality was 5.0. The rate of ESRD consistently exceeded the various mortality rates across most of the subgroups defined by age, gender, income, education, previous CVD, baseline urine protein excretion, and baseline estimated GFR. In conclusion, AASK participants were more likely to reach ESRD than to die. PMID:20651163

  10. Association of Family History of ESRD, Prevalent Albuminuria, and Reduced GFR With Incident ESRD

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Warnock, David G.; Judd, Suzanne; Muntner, Paul; Patzer, Rachel E.; Bradbury, Brian D.; McClure, Leslie A.; Newsome, Britt B.; Howard, George

    2013-01-01

    Background The contribution of albuminuria to the increased risk of incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in individuals with a family history of ESRD has not been well studied. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Study Setting & Participants We analyzed data for family history of ESRD collected from 19,409 participants of the Renal REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) cohort study. Predictor Family history of ESRD was ascertained by asking “Has anyone in your immediate family ever been told that he or she had kidney failure? This would be someone who is on or had been on dialysis or someone who had a kidney transplant.” Study Outcomes Incidence rate for ESRD. Measurements Morning urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Incident cases of ESRD were identified through the US Renal Data System. Results A family history of ESRD was reported by 11.1% of participants. Mean eGFRs for those with and without a family history of ESRD were 87.5 ± 22.2 (SD) and 86.5 ± 19.3 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively (P = 0.05) and the respective geometric mean ACRs were 12.2 and 9.7 mg/g (P < 0.001). ESRD incidence rates for those with and without a family history of ESRD were 244.3 and 106.1/100,000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, and race, the ESRD HR for those with versus those without a family history of ESRD was 2.13 (95% CI, 1.18-3.83). Adjustment for comorbid conditions and socioeconomic status attenuated this association (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.00-3.28), and further adjustment for baseline eGFR and ACR completely attenuated the association between family history of ESRD and incident ESRD (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.69-1.80). Limitations The report of a family history of ESRD was not validated. Conclusion Family history of ESRD is common in older Americans and the increased risk of ESRD associated with a family history reflects lower GFR, higher albuminuria, and comorbid conditions

  11. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and survival of HIV infected patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, P L; Umana, W O; Simmens, S J; Watson, J; Bosch, J P

    1993-08-01

    As the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients has increased in the U.S., the number of infected patients treated for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has stabilized at about 1 to 2% of the hemodialyzed population. Little has been written regarding the role of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in the treatment of HIV infected patients with ESRD. To evaluate the effectiveness of CAPD as a long term therapy for HIV infected patients with ESRD, we reviewed our ESRD program's experience. We entered 392 patients from its inception in February 1984 until April 1992. Thirty-one, or 7.9% of our population were HIV infected. Twenty, or 64.5% had stage IV infection. Patients were entered into our chronic hemodialysis (HD) or CAPD program according to standard clinical criteria. Eight HIV infected patients elected to start CAPD, while 23 patients were treated exclusively with HD. The proportion of stage IV infected patients was similar in both treatment modality groups. HIV infected ESRD patients were younger than non-HIV infected patients (37.5 +/- 9.7 vs. 49.8 +/- 15.7 years, respectively, P < 0.0001) at the start of treatment. We used Cox regression techniques to analyze survival data. Mean survival time for our entire non-HIV infected ESRD population (N = 361) was 44.0 +/- 33.9 months. Mean survival time for HIV infected patients with ESRD was 15.5 +/- 9.9 months. Median survival for HIV infected ESRD patients was 13 months compared to 38 months for the non-infected population. As expected, mean survival time in HIV infected ESRD patients was significantly diminished compared to non-infected ESRD patients (P < 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8377381

  12. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  13. Risk of Band Keratopathy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Jan, Ren-Long; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Chang, Yuh-Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study is a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study to investigate the risk of band keratopathy following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study cohort included 94,039 ESRD on-dialysis patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585 and registered between January 2000 to December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 94,039 patients selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. In total, 230 ESRD patients and 26 controls had band keratopathy (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, indicating a significantly elevated risk of band keratopathy in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 12.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.14-18.32). After adjustment for potential confounders including sarcoidosis, hyperparathyroidism, iridocyclitis, and phthisis bulbi, ESRD patients were 11.56 times more likely to develop band keratopathy in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 11.56, 95% CI = 7.70-17.35). In conclusion, ESRD increases the risk of band keratopathy. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologists and ophthalmologists is important to deal with band keratopathy following ESRD and prevent visual acuity impairments. PMID:27346848

  14. Risk of Band Keratopathy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Jan, Ren-Long; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Chang, Yuh-Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study is a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study to investigate the risk of band keratopathy following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study cohort included 94,039 ESRD on-dialysis patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585 and registered between January 2000 to December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 94,039 patients selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. In total, 230 ESRD patients and 26 controls had band keratopathy (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, indicating a significantly elevated risk of band keratopathy in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 12.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.14–18.32). After adjustment for potential confounders including sarcoidosis, hyperparathyroidism, iridocyclitis, and phthisis bulbi, ESRD patients were 11.56 times more likely to develop band keratopathy in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 11.56, 95% CI = 7.70–17.35). In conclusion, ESRD increases the risk of band keratopathy. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologists and ophthalmologists is important to deal with band keratopathy following ESRD and prevent visual acuity impairments. PMID:27346848

  15. Depression in African-American patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Paul L.; Patel, Somir S.; Peterson, Rolf A.

    2002-01-01

    There are few data on the epidemiology, consequences and treatment of depression in African-American patients with kidney disease in the US, even though such patients disproportionately bear the burden of this illness. This paper reviews data on the diagnosis and pathogenesis of depression and its consequences in patients with and without kidney disease, in addition to work on the epidemiology of depression in the African-American population and in the US End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. African Americans are thought to have similar susceptibility to the development of depression as other populations in the US, but diminished access to care for this group of patients may be associated with differential outcomes. Data are presented from longitudinal studies of psychosocial outcomes in a population comprising primarily African-American patients with ESRD, and is reviewed the treatment of depression in patients with and without kidney disease. There are few studies of the management of depression that focus on minority populations. The authors agree with recommendations that treatment trials should include minority patients, patients with medical comorbidities, and the elderly, and assess function and quality of life as outcomes. The relationships between age, marital status and satisfaction, ethnicity, and perception of quality of life and depressive affect level and diagnosis of depression, and medical outcomes have not been determined in ESRD patients, or in African-American patients with ESRD. There are few studies of drugs for the treatment of depression in ESRD patients, and only one small randomized controlled trial. These have shown that therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors appears to be a safe treatment option for patients with ESRD. The long-term effectiveness of therapy, and its association with clinically important outcomes such as perception of quality of life, compliance, and survival have not been evaluated in ESRD patients. Also

  16. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed. PMID:27067614

  17. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  18. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Brent, Gregory A; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Soldin, Offie P; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J; Brunelli, Steven M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  19. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  20. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  1. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  2. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  3. A Longitudinal Study of Left Ventricular Function and Structure from CKD to ESRD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Martin; Delafontaine, Patrice; Dries, Daniel; Foster, Elyse; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Go, Alan S.; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Rahman, Mahboob; Tao, Kaixiang; Wright, Jackson T.; Xie, Dawei; Hsu,, Chi-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Abnormal left ventricular structure and function are associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes among patients with CKD and ESRD. A better understanding of changes in left ventricular mass and ejection fraction during the transition from CKD to ESRD may provide important insights to opportunities to improve cardiac outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a longitudinal study of a subset of participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort who were enrolled from 2003 to 2007 and followed through January of 2011. Participants were included if they had serial echocardiograms performed at advanced CKD (defined as estimated GFR<20 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and again after ESRD (defined as need for hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis). Results A total of 190 participants (44% female, 66% black) had echocardiograms during advanced CKD and after ESRD. Mean (SD) estimated GFR at advanced CKD was 16.9 (3.5) ml/min per 1.73 m2. Mean (SD) time between the advanced CKD echocardiogram and ESRD echocardiogram was 2.0 (1.0) years. There was no significant change in left ventricular mass index (62.3–59.5 g/m2.7, P=0.10) between advanced CKD and ESRD; however, ejection fraction significantly decreased (53%–50%, P=0.002). Interactions for age, race, dialysis modality, and diabetes status were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Mean left ventricular mass index did not change significantly from advanced CKD to ESRD; however, ejection fraction declined during this transition period. Although left ventricular mass index is fixed by advanced stages of CKD, ejection fraction decline during more advanced stages of CKD may be an important contributor to cardiovascular disease and mortality after dialysis. PMID:23411431

  4. Polymorphisms of the ELANE Gene Promoter Region in End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Rafael; Freitas, Bruno; Miranda, Vasco; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have a high mortality rate that exceeds that of non-ESRD population. The hemodialysis procedure induces neutrophil activation and elastase release, which might have a role in the inflammatory process and in the development of oxidative stress. The ELANE gene encodes the neutrophil elastase. We analyzed the effect of ELANE promoter region polymorphisms and its relation with the circulating levels of elastase, as well as several clinical, biochemical and inflammatory markers in 123 ESRD patients. We found two duplications in heterozygosity in the promoter region and a new polymorphism, the c.-801G>A. ESRD patients heterozygous for the c.-903T>G polymorphism had no changes in the circulating levels of elastase or other evaluated variables, and those homozygous for the c.-741G>A polymorphism showed significant effects on neutrophils count, as well as in neutrophils/lymphocytes ratio, which might be associated with an increased inflammatory process. PMID:27136588

  5. Leptin in end stage renal disease (ESRD): a link between fat mass, bone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mallamaci, F; Tripepi, G; Zoccali, C

    2005-01-01

    Adipose tissue is now considered an important system operating strictly in concert with other systems. The adipocyte is the main producer of two pleiotropic compounds, leptin and adiponectin, modulating inflammation and having multiple effects in disparate organs including the cardiovascular and the central nervous system. Leptin has disparate influences on various physiologic and organ systems including glucose homeostasis, hematopoiesis and the reproductive and cardiovascular systems and is a crucial hormone for the regulation of food intake and body weight. Peripherally, leptin modulates insulin sensitivity and high leptin triggers insulin resistance and vice versa. Obesity, a situation where circulating leptin attains very high levels is accompanied by increased bone mass, a phenomenon which may depend on direct stimulation of osteoblasts by leptin. However in animal models the stimulating effect of leptin on the osteoblast is counterbalanced by a strong inhibitor effect on bone formation in the central nervous system. Two recent studies reported an inverse link between leptin, bone mass and PTH in dialysis patients suggesting that leptin may be implicated in low bone turnover in these patients, likely by a mechanism involving the central nervous system. Leptin induces vascular calcifications in vitro. In uremic man leptin is unrelated to valvular calcifications but predicts incident cardiovascular events in overweight and obese dialysis patients. Leptin seems to be a relevant player in the emerging connection between bone and cardiovascular alterations in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:16245256

  6. Sources of drug coverage among Medicare beneficiaries with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Howell, Benjamin L; Powers, Christopher A; Weinhandl, Eric D; St Peter, Wendy L; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2012-05-01

    Despite extensive use of prescription medications in ESRD, relatively little is known about the participation of Medicare ESRD beneficiaries in the Part D program. Here, we quantitated the sources of drug coverage among ESRD beneficiaries and explored the Part D plan preferences of ESRD beneficiaries with regard to deductibles, coverage gaps, and monthly premiums. We obtained data on beneficiary sources of creditable coverage, characteristics of Part D plans, demographics, and residence from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Chronic Condition Data Warehouse and identified beneficiaries with ESRD from the US Renal Data System. We found that a substantial proportion (17.0%) of ESRD beneficiaries lacked a known source of creditable drug coverage in 2007 and 64.3% were enrolled in Part D. Of those enrolled, 72% received the Medicare Part D low-income subsidy. ESRD beneficiaries who enrolled in standalone Part D plans without the assistance of the low-income subsidy tended to prefer more comprehensive coverage options. In conclusion, more outreach is needed to ensure that beneficiaries who lack coverage obtain the coverage they need and that ESRD beneficiaries join the best plans for managing their disease and accompanying comorbid conditions. PMID:22402802

  7. Individuals with a family history of ESRD are a high-risk population for CKD: implications for targeted surveillance and intervention activities.

    PubMed

    McClellan, William M; Satko, Scott G; Gladstone, Elisa; Krisher, Jenna O; Narva, Andrew S; Freedman, Barry I

    2009-03-01

    Activities intended to improve the detection, treatment, and control of chronic kidney disease (CKD) should be incorporated into existing health care systems and targeted to high-risk populations to avoid redundancy and waste of resources. One high-risk population consists of first- or second-degree family members of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), who are 2 to 3 times as likely to have incident ESRD, have high rates of impaired kidney function and undetected and uncontrolled high blood pressure, and are more likely to be obese. These individuals usually are unaware of their underlying CKD and may discount their own risk of ESRD. The ESRD Network 6 Family History Project shows that the ESRD Networks, which constitute a national CKD surveillance system for patients with stage 5 CKD, may be an existing resource that can be used to identify relatives of incident patients with ESRD and provide these families with information about CKD. Nationally available resources have been developed by the National Kidney Disease Education Program for use with these at-risk families. Individuals interested in population-based CKD control activities should be aware of and use these resources. PMID:19231753

  8. Percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bocksch, Wolfgang; Fateh-Moghadam, Suzanne; Mueller, Eda; Huehns, Sonja; Waigand, Juergen; Dietz, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represent a growing number of patients in the cardiac catheterization laboratories worldwide. This is a consequence of the growing absolute number of ESRD patients in developed countries, better noninvasive diagnostic tools, better catheterization facilities and last-but-not-least better education of referring physicians about the incidence and prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) for patients with ESRD. There is growing evidence of the positive impact of coronary revascularization on long-term outcome of these patients. ESRD patients have a high comorbidity and are therefore better candidates for the less invasive approach using percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rather than coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). From the view of the interventional cardiologist, ESRD patients represent one of the most challenging patient cohort concerning technical challenges and potential risk of complication for the patient. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) including debulking techniques and stent implantation is the current standard therapy for patients with symptomatic single-vessel disease (SVD) and the preferred therapy for most patients with focal, polyfocal or even diffuse multi-vessel disease (MVD). Coronary bypass surgery is reserved for a decreasing number of patients with mechanically untreatable coronary lesions and unprotected left main stem stenosis. The problem of restenosis and subsequent target lesion revascularization has been decreased to a minimum by the use of drug-eluting stents (DES), even though prospective randomized trials including ESRD patients are lacking. In case of acute coronary syndromes, the need for immediate coronary angiography and subsequent revascularization by means of PCI should be pointed out. PMID:16534221

  9. Asymptomatic pontine and extra-pontine lesions in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kanwar; Das, Chandan J; Bagchi, Soumita; Agarwal, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome leading to central pontine/extra-pontine myelinolysis (CPM/EPM) occurs mainly in patients with history of alcohol abuse, malnourishment, following liver transplantation and less commonly, in association with other systemic diseases. Asymptomatic CPM/EPM is rare. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who develop CPM/EPM are usually symptomatic with florid neurologic manifestations. Herein, we present a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis who was incidentally detected to have pontine and extra-pontine lesions suggestive of myelinolysis without any neurologic signs or symptoms. PMID:26997398

  10. Improving adequacy of hemodialysis in Northern California ESRD patients: a final project report. Provider Participants and Medical Review Board of the TransPacific Renal Network.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Josephson, M

    2000-10-01

    The National Core Indicators Project, initiated in 1994, has brought progressive changes in adequacy of dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the TransPacific Renal Network and across the United States. The 1998 Core Indicator Project showed each Network's standing for percentage of patients with urea reduction ratio (URR) > or = 0.65 and average URR. The TransPacific Renal Network ranked 12(th) among the 18 Networks for this adequacy measure. The goals of this project were to improve the Network standing in the United States for the percent of patients with URR > or = 0.65, eliminate or reduce the barriers to achieving adequate dialysis, and evaluate URR versus KT/V data and the variances occurring with these measures. In January 1999, data were collected from all 113 Northern California hemodialysis facilities for quarter 4, 1998, to evaluate adequacy. Each facility provided patient population (N) for KT/V and URR samples, facility averages for KT/V and URR, number of patients with KT/V > or = 1.2 and URR > or = 0.65, and data on post-blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) sampling methods. A random selection of 10% (12) providers with data below the US and Network standards was selected for an intensive assessment. Using baseline measurements, on-site data were collected from a random selection of the patient population. Chart data were reviewed, analyzed, and discussed in an exit interview with the facility management. On-site visits were performed in July/June 1999. The primary focus included adequacy data and process of care that affect adequacy outcomes, concurrent review of patients receiving treatment at the time of the site visit, and general medical record review. In Phase I, only 12 facilities showed an average URR below 0.65. All facilities reported an average KT/V greater than the DOQI target of 1.2. Forty-two facilities had their percentage of patients with a URR below the national benchmark; only 18 facilities had their percentage of patients

  11. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Werner, C W; Saad, T F

    1999-01-01

    In the United States, there is a large and growing population of patients undergoing dialysis because of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). These patients present special management considerations for dentists, including antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis (BE). ESRD patients, particularly those with an arteriovenous shunt for hemodialysis access, are predisposed to valvular endocarditis. Thus, BE prevention is the primary goal of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental or other invasive procedures in these patients. Bacteremia may predispose to infection of synthetic vascular access grafts, although this form of endovascular infection in ESRD patients has not been as well-characterized as BE. Antibiotic prophylaxis may be of some benefit for prevention of synthetic graft infections as well as BE. Poor dentist and physician compliance with BE prophylaxis regimens, as well as errors in dosing, timing, or duration of prophylaxis, have been reported. These problems are of particular concern in the treatment of chronically ill patients. In this article, we review the rationale for prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental procedures in ESRD patients with vascular access. We also elaborate on the current American Heart Association guidelines for BE prophylaxis, and address special considerations for ESRD patients. PMID:10860073

  12. Time trends in the association of ESRD incidence with area-level poverty in the US population.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Bridget H; Kramer, Holly; Vellanki, Kavitha; Leehey, David; Brown, Julia; Shoham, David A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the temporal trends of the association between area-level poverty status and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence. We hypothesized that the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence has increased significantly over time. Patient data from the United States Renal Data System were linked with data from the 2000 and 2010 US census. Area-level poverty was defined as living in a zip code-defined area with ≥20% of households living below the federal poverty line. Negative binomial regression models were created to examine the association between area-level poverty status and ESRD incidence by time period in the US adult population while simultaneously adjusting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code. Time was categorized as January 1, 1995 through December 31, 2004 (Period 1) and January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2010 (Period 2). The percentage of adults initiating dialysis with area-level poverty increased from 27.4% during Period 1 to 34.0% in Period 2. After accounting for the distribution of age, sex, and race/ethnicity within a zip code, area-level poverty status was associated with a 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22, 1.25)-fold higher ESRD incidence. However, this association differed by time period with 1.04-fold (95% CI 1.02, 1.05) higher ESRD incidence associated with poverty status for Period 2 compared with the association between ESRD and poverty status in Period 1. Area-level poverty and its association with ESRD incidence is not static over time. PMID:26094617

  13. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin. PMID:27206740

  14. Effects of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Teresa; Lennon, Emily S; Akbar, Hina; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Oliphant, Carrie S; Khouzam, Rami N

    2016-03-01

    Blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are routinely used in patients with chronic kidney disease because of their cardiovascular (CV) and renoprotective effects. However, there are no uniform recommendations about RAAS blockers for CV protection in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population other than the preferred drug class for blood pressure control. This uncertainty stems from the fact that patients with ESRD were generally excluded from randomized controlled trials evaluating the cardioprotective benefits of RAAS blockers. It is important to weigh the potential harms associated with the use of RAAS blockers, such as electrolyte disturbances and worsening anemia, with their role in protection of residual kidney function, alleviation of thirst and potential CV benefits. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the use of RAAS blockers in patients with ESRD. PMID:26992264

  15. Medicare end stage renal disease population, 1982-87

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbaugh, M. Zermain; Sarsitis, Ida M.; Milam, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    A synopsis is given between the relationship of the number of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients to the total Medicare population and their associated expenditures. The aging trend within the ESRD population is examined in terms of enrollment statistics and incidence (new cases) counts. Also, longitudinal trends in expenditures, program enrollment, and incidence of ESRD are included. Findings indicate that the ESRD population is growing at a faster rate than Medicare in general. Further, within ESRD, the beneficiary population is aging. PMID:10113457

  16. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8–10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30–2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32–1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00–1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF. This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  17. Captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiabadi, Fatemeh Musavi; Nikvarz, Naemeh

    2016-01-01

    Sialadenitis is a rare adverse effect of captopril. We report a case of captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A 20-year-old man with ESRD encountered parotid and submandibular swelling after receiving two doses of captopril, administered sublingually. Despite of prescribing dexamethasone, resuming hemodialysis, and discontinuing other drugs that also can cause parotitis, he improved later than what was reported in patients with normal renal function. In conclusion recovery from captopril-induced sialadenitis in patients with ESRD may be more prolonged than that of patients with normal renal function; moreover, early hemodialysis which helps in drug removal may be the most effective treatment. PMID:27162811

  18. Data management to understand outcomes and trends in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Wish, J B

    1998-12-01

    Although a number of databases currently exist for the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program in the United States, these databases are difficult to use to drive continuous quality improvement (CQI) activities at the ESRD provider level. The largest databases, such as the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) and the Medicare billing system, can generate facility-specific profiles for a limited set of parameters, but these parameters are not appropriately derived and validated clinical performance measures (CPMs) and the data on which they are based are 1 to 2 years old. The ESRD Core Indicators Project uses a sampling methodology to generate annual "snapshots" of the ESRD program but cannot generate facility-specific profiles to drive CQI. The ESRD Networks have the capability of collecting provider-specific data to drive CQI activities by generating profiles based on validated CPMs, but the Networks have been hampered in doing so by an aging data management infrastructure. The Standardized Information Management System (SIMS) and the Vital Information System for Outcomes Improvement in Nephrology (VISION) projects will provide the electronic highway for transmission of data from the Networks to the Health Care Financing Administration and from ESRD providers to the Networks, respectively. This will allow for paperless real time collection, validation, analysis, and management of quality of care data to drive CQI activities at the provider level. The Data Management and Analysis Proposal (DMAP) of the Forum of ESRD Networks recommends the establishment of a virtual service bureau to integrate all of the above ESRD databases to facilitate national and focused quality improvement projects, provide user-friendly database access for scholarly activities, and link financial and clinical data sets to generate cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:9892386

  19. Six-minute walking test in children with ESRD: discrimination validity and construct validity.

    PubMed

    Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul; van Bergen, Monique; Groothoff, Jaap; Nauta, Jeroen; van Hoeck, Koen; Lilien, Marc; Helders, Paul

    2009-11-01

    The six-minute walking test (6MWT) may be a practical test for the evaluation functional exercise capacity in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to investigate the 6MWT performance in children with ESRD compared to reference values obtained in healthy children and, secondly, to study the relationship between 6MWT performance with anthropometric variables, clinical parameters, aerobic capacity and muscle strength. Twenty patients (13 boys and seven girls; mean age 14.1 +/- 3.4 years) on dialysis participated in this study. Anthropometrics were taken in a standardized manner. The 6MWT was performed in a 20-m-long track in a straight hallway. Aerobic fitness was measured using a cycle ergometer test to determine peak oxygen uptake (V O(2peak)), peak rate (W(peak)) and ventilatory threshold (VT). Muscle strength was measured using hand-held myometry. Children with ESRD showed a reduced 6MWT performance (83% of predicted, p < 0.0001), irrespective of the reference values used. The strongest predictors of 6MWT performance were haematocrit and height. Regression models explained 59% (haematocrit and height) to 60% (haematocrit) of the variance in 6MWT performance. 6MWT performance was not associated with V O(2peak), strength, or other anthropometric variables, but it was significantly associated with haematocrit and height. Children with ESRD scored lower on the 6MWT than healthy children. Based on these results, the 6MWT may be a useful instrument for monitoring clinical status in children with ESRD, however it cannot substitute for other fitness tests, such as a progressive exercise test to measure V O(2peak) or muscle strength tests. PMID:19633871

  20. Death Does Matter—Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRDPos) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRDNeg) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRDPos patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRDNeg patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRDPos patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRDPos patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRDNeg patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRDPos patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD. PMID:26817891

  1. CKD in an Electronic Health Record Problem List: Quality of Care, ESRD, and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Schold, Jesse D.; Arrigain, Susana; Sharp, John W; Jain, Anil K; Schreiber, Martin J.; Simon, James F.; Nally, Joseph V

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether CKD recognition in an electronic health record (EHR) problem list improves processes of care or clinical outcomes of ESRD and death is unclear. Methods We identified patients who had at least 1 year of follow up (2005–2009) in our EHR based CKD registry (n=25,742). CKD recognition was defined by having ICD-9 codes for CKD, diabetic kidney disease, or hypertensive kidney disease in the problem list. We calculated proportions of patients with and without CKD recognition and examined differences by demographics, clinical factors, and development of ESRD or mortality. We evaluated differences in the proportion of patients with CKD specific labs checked before and after recognition among cases and propensity-matched controls. Results Only 11% (n=2735) had CKD recognition in the problem list and they were younger (68 vs. 71 yrs), a higher proportion were male (61% vs. 37%) and African-American (21% vs. 10%) compared to those unrecognized. CKD-specific labs for patients with eGFR 30–59 including iPTH (23% vs. 6%), Vitamin D (22% vs. 18%), phosphorus (29% vs. 7%), and a urine check for proteinuria (55% vs. 36%) were significantly more likely to be done among those with CKD recognition. (all p<0.05) Similar results were found for eGFR<30 except for proteinuria and in our propensity score matched control analysis. There was no independent association of CKD recognition with ESRD or mortality. Conclusions CKD recognition in the EHR problem list was low, but translated into more CKD specific processes of care; however ESRD or mortality were not affected. PMID:24714513

  2. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography. PMID:24530671

  3. Relationships of race and ethnicity to progression of kidney dysfunction and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Alberto

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is much higher for blacks, Native Americans, and Asians than for whites. The incidence of kidney disease is also higher for populations of Hispanic ethnicity. ESRD attributed to diabetes (ESRD-DM), hypertension (ESRD-HT), and glomerulonephritis (ESRD-GN), in this order of frequency, are the major categories of ESRD in the United States for all race/ethnic groups. By using the incidence rates of ESRD, during the period from 1997 through 2000, and with whites as reference, the highest rate ratio (RR) was observed for ESRD-HT in blacks (RR = 5.96), ESRD-DM in Native Americans (RR = 5.11), and ESRD-GN in Asians (RR=2.20). The data suggest that the excess of ESRD observed for racial/ethnic minorities may be reduced by interventions aimed at prevention/control of hypertension and diabetes. The data suggest that before developing ESRD, patients with chronic renal failure from minority groups have to face more barriers to receive high-quality health care. This may explain why they see nephrologists later and are less likely to receive renal transplantation at initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Improvements in quality of care after initiating RRT may explain the lower mortality and higher scores in heath-related quality of life observed for patients from racial/ethnic minorities. PMID:14730535

  4. Genomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toru; Matsuura, Keiko; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Hijiya, Naoki; Narimatsu, Takahiro; Nomura, Takeo; Sato, Fuminori; Nagashima, Yoji; Kashima, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Ohyama, Chikara; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seto, Masao; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the genomic profile of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by analyzing genomic copy number aberrations. Seventy-nine tumor samples from 63 patients with RCC-ESRD were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 × 44K Oligo Micro Array (Agilent Technologies Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the 63 cases could be divided into two groups, Clusters A and B. Cluster A was comprised mainly of clear cell RCC (CCRCC), whereas Cluster B was comprised mainly of papillary RCC (PRCC), acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC. Analysis of the averaged frequencies revealed that the genomic profiles of Clusters A and B resembled those of sporadic CCRCC and sporadic PRCC, respectively. Although it has been proposed on the basis of histopathology that ACD-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC and PRCC-ESRD are distinct subtypes, the present data reveal that the genomic profiles of these types, categorized as Cluster B, resemble one another. Furthermore, the genomic profiles of PRCC, ACD-associated RCC and clear cell papillary RCC admixed in one tissue tended to resemble one another. On the basis of genomic profiling of RCC-ESRD, we conclude that the molecular pathogenesis of CCRCC-ESRD resembles that of sporadic CCRCC. Although various histologic subtypes of non-clear cell RCC-ESRD have been proposed, their genomic profiles resemble those of sporadic PRCC, suggesting that the molecular pathogenesis of non-CCRCC-ESRD may be related to that of sporadic PRCC. PMID:22145865

  5. Obesity Paradox in End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongha; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Streja, Elani; Molnar, Miklos Z; Flegal, Katherine M.; Gillen, Daniel; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    In the general population, obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, an “obesity paradox” or “reverse epidemiology” (to include lipid and hypertension paradoxes) has been consistently reported, i.e. a higher body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better survival. This survival advantage of large body size is relatively consistent for hemodialysis patients across racial and regional differences, although published results are mixed for peritoneal dialysis patients.. Recent data indicate that both higher skeletal muscle mass and increased total body fat are protective, although there are mixed data on visceral (intra-abdominal) fat. The obesity paradox in ESRD is unlikely to be due to residual confounding alone and has biologic plausibility. Possible causes of the obesity paradox include protein-energy wasting and inflammation, time discrepancy among competitive risk factors (undernutrition versus overnutrition), hemodynamic stability, alteration of circulatory cytokines, sequestration of uremic toxin in adipose tissue, and endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction. The obesity paradox may have significant clinical implications in the management of ESRD patients especially if obese dialysis patients are forced to lose weight upon transplant wait-listing. Well-designed studies exploring the causes and consequences of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risk factors, including the obesity paradox, among ESRD patients could provide more information on mechanisms. These could include controlled trials of nutritional and pharmacologic interventions to examine whether gain in lean body mass or even body fat can improve survival and quality of life in these patients. PMID:24438733

  6. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  7. END STAGE RENAL DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH WILMS TUMOR: RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL WILMS TUMOR STUDY GROUP AND THE U.S. RENAL DATA SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Norman E.; Grigoriev, Yevgeny A.; Peterson, Susan M.; Collins, Allan J.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Green, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately assess the full spectrum of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in Wilms tumor survivors by combining the unique resources of the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTSG) and the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), and to confirm preliminary reports of an increased incidence of ESRD in those with the Wilms tumor-aniridia (WAGR) syndrome. Material and Methods: ESRD was ascertained for 5,910 patients enrolled on NWTSG studies during 1969-1994 both by record linkage to USRDS and by direct follow-up. Cumulative ESRD incidence was estimated accounting for inter-current mortality. Results: Ten of 115 cases of ESRD (9%) were ascertained by NWTSG alone, 13 (11%) by USRDS alone and 92 (80%) by both. Cumulative incidence of ESRD at 20 years from diagnosis of unilateral Wilms tumor (WT) was 74% for 17 patients with Deny-Drash syndrome (DDS), 36% for 37 patients with WAGR syndrome, 7% for 125 male patients with hypospadias or cryptorchism (GU anomalies) and 0.6% for 5,347 patients with none of these conditions. The incidence for bilateral Wilms tumor was 50% for DDS (n=6), 90% for WAGR (n=10), 25% for GU anomaly (n=25) and 12% for other patients (n=409). ESRD for patients with WAGR syndrome or GU anomalies tended to occur relatively late, often during or after adolescence. Conclusions: The risk of ESRD is remarkably low for the majority of WT patients. Those with WAGR syndrome or associated GU anomalies, however, are at higher risk and should be screened indefinitely to facilitate prospective management of impaired renal function. PMID:16217371

  8. Epidemiological Study of RRT-Treated ESRD in Nanjing - A Ten-Year Experience in Nearly Three Million Insurance Covered Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu-Chen; Huang, Han-Ming; Sun, Ling; Tan, Chao-Ming; Gao, Min; Liu, Hong; Tang, Ri-Ning; Wang, Yan-Li; Wang, Bei; Ma, Kun-Ling; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been a great challenge to the health care system of China. However, the exact epidemiological data for ESRD in China remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the epidemiology of ESRD treated by renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Nanjing based on analysing ten-year data of Nanjing three million insurance covered population. Methods Using the electronic registry system of Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI), we included all subjects insured by UEBMI in Nanjing from 2005 to 2014 and identified subjects who developed ESRD and started RRT in this cohort. Results The UEBMI population in Nanjing increased from 1,301,882 in 2005 to 2,921,065 in 2014, among which a total of 5,840 subjects developed ESRD and received RRT. Over the 10-year period, the adjusted incidence rates of RRT in the UEBMI cohort gradually decreased from 289.3pmp in 2005 to 218.8pmp in 2014. However, the adjusted prevalence rate increased steadily from 891.7pmp in 2005 to 1,228.6pmp in 2014. The adjusted annual mortality rate decreased from 138.4 per 1000 patient-years in 2005 to 97.8 per 1000 patient-years in 2014. The long-term survival rate fluctuated over the past decade, with the 1-year survival rate ranging from 85.1% to 91.7%, the 3-year survival rate from 69.9% to 78.3% and the 5-year survival rate from 58% to 65.4%. Conclusion Nanjing is facing an increasing burden of ESRD with its improvement of medical reform. The ten-year complete registry data on RRT in urban employees in Nanjing provided a unique opportunity to understand the real threat of ESRD confronting China during its process of health care transition. PMID:26889828

  9. Relationship Between Age and Pre-End Stage Renal Disease Care in Elderly Patients Treated with Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Harford, Rubette; Clark, Mary Jo; Norris, Keith C; Yan, Guofen

    2016-01-01

    Receipt of pre-end stage renal disease (ESRD) clinical care can improve outcomes for patients treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD). This study addressed age-related variations in receipt of a composite of recommended care to include nephrologist and dietician care, and use of an arteriovenous fistula at first outpatient maintenance HD. Less than 2% of patients treated with maintenance HD received all three forms of pre-ESRD care, and 63.3% received none of the three elements of care. The mean number of pre-ESRD care elements received by the oldest group (80 years and older) did not differ from the youngest group (less than 55 years), but was less than the 55 to 66 and 67 to 79 years groups; adjusted ratios of 0.93 (0.92 to 0.94; p < 0.001) and 0.94 (0.92 to 0.95; p < 0.001), respectively. A major effort is needed to ensure comprehensive pre-ESRD care for all patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially for the youngest and oldest patient groups, who were less likely to receive recommended pre-ESRD care. PMID:27254965

  10. Increased Upper and Lower Tract Urothelial Carcinoma in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan during 1997–2008

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Chen, Pau-Chung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Background. Urothelial cancer (UC) is the leading cancer of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Taiwan. The aims of this study were to explore the time trends of UC incidences and propose possible etiologic factors. Methods. Abstracting from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), there were 90,477 newly diagnosed cases of ESRD between 1997 and 2008 covering the patients aged 40–85. Among them, 2,708 had developed UC after diagnosis of ESRD. The CIR40–85 (cumulative incidence rate) of upper tract UC (UTUC) and lower tract UC (LTUC) were calculated for ESRD patients and general population, as well as SIR40–85 (standardized incidence ratio) for comparison. Results. Female ESRD patients were found to have 9–18 times of elevated risks of UC, while those of males were increased up to 4–14 times. The time trends of CIR40–84 and SIR40–84 of UTUC in females appear to decline after calendar year 2000. These trends may be related to AA associated herbal products after 1998. Conclusions. Patients with ESRD are at increased risks for both LTUC and UTUC in Taiwan. We hypothesize that the time trends associate with the consumption of aristolochic acid in Chinese herbal products (female predominant). PMID:25025033

  11. Interplay between Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione Peroxidase, and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Polymorphisms on the Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease among Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chen, Yen-Ching; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), play an important role in the risk for cancer and metabolic disorders. However, little is known regarding the effect of antioxidant SNPs on renal events. Methods. We prospectively enrolled multicenter patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and those without chronic kidney disease (CKD) of Han Chinese origin, with SOD2 (Val16Ala), GPX1 (Pro197Leu), and PPAR-γ (Pro12Ala, C161T) genotyped. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the significant risk determinants for ESRD. Results. Compared to ESRD patients, non-CKD subjects were more likely to have T allele at SOD2 Val16Ala (p = 0.036) and CC genotype at PPAR-γ Pro12Ala (p = 0.028). Regression analysis showed that TT genotype of SOD2 Val16Ala conferred significantly lower ESRD risk among patients without diabetes (odds ratio 0.699; p = 0.018). GPX1 SNP alone did not alter the risk. We detected significant interactions between SNPs including PPAR-γ Pro12Ala, C161T, and GPX1 regarding the risk of ESRD. Conclusion. This is the first and largest study on the association between adverse renal outcomes and antioxidant SNPs among Han Chinese population. Determination of SOD2 and PPAR-γ SNPs status might assist in ESRD risk estimation. PMID:26881045

  12. Diffuse Interstitial Brain Edema in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wen, Ji-qiu; Qi, Rong-feng; Luo, Song; Zhong, Jian-hui; Chen, Hui-juan; Ji, Gong-jun; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate white matter (WM) alterations and their correlation with cognition function in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. This prospective HIPAA-complaint study was approved by our institutional review board. Eighty HD ESRD patients and 80 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included. Neuropsychological (NP) tests and laboratory tests, including serum creatinine and urea, were performed. DTI data were processed to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps with TBSS. FA and MD difference between the 2 groups were compared. We also explored the associations of FA values in WM regions of lower FA with ages, NP tests, disease, and dialysis durations, serum creatinine and urea levels of ESRD patients. Compared with controls, HD ESRD patients had lower FA value in the corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiate, posterior thalamic radiation, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and right cingulum (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). Almost all WM regions had increased MD in HD ESRD patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). In some regions with lower FA, FA values showed moderate correlations with ages, NP tests, and serum urea levels. There was no correlation between FA values and HD durations, disease durations, and serum creatinine levels of ESRD patients (all P > 0.05). Diffuse interstitial brain edema and moderate WM integrity disruption occurring in HD ESRD patients, which correlated with cognitive dysfunction, and serum urea levels might be a risk factor for these WM changes. PMID:25526483

  13. Relationship between Age and pre-End Stage Renal Disease Care in Elderly Patients Treated With Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Rubette; Clark, Mary Jo; Norris, Keith C.; Yan, Guofen

    2016-01-01

    Receipt of pre-end-stage renal disease (ESRD) clinical care can improve outcomes for patients treated with maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). The study addressed age-related variations in receipt of a composite of recommended care to include nephrologist and dietician care and use of arterio-venous fistula at first outpatient MHD. Less than 2% of patients treated with MHD received all three forms of pre-ESRD care, and 63.3% received none of the three elements of care. The mean number of pre-ESRD care elements received by the oldest group (≥80 years) did not differ from the youngest group (<55 years), but was less than the 55-66 and 67-79 years groups; adjusted ratios of 0.93 (0.92-0.94; p<0.001) and 0.94 (0.92-0.95; p<0.001), respectively. A major effort is needed to ensure comprehensive pre-ESRD care for all patients with advanced CKD, especially for the youngest and oldest patient groups, who were less likely to receive recommended pre-ESRD care. PMID:27254965

  14. Vascular access in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bessias, Nikolaos; Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Tziviskou, Effie; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-01-01

    During the last few years, the number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been increasing worldwide. Establishment of a viable vascular access is of primary importance in these patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the available vascular access modalities [namely arteriovenous (AV) fistulae, AV grafts, and central venous catheters (CVCs)] in elderly ESRD patients. AV fistulae seem to be superior when compared with other vascular access alternatives with respect to patency, morbidity and mortality rates. On the other hand, due to the age-related advanced atherosclerosis in the elderly, higher failure rates for AV fistulae in this age group have been described. Two controversial issues, namely the higher infection and thrombosis rates in elderly ESRD patients, are also discussed. Current evidence suggests that old age should not comprise a drawback when selecting the appropriate vascular access modality (AV fistula, AV graft or CVC) for the performance of hemodialysis. The possible vascular access options in elderly ESRD patients should not be different from younger individuals. PMID:18792799

  15. Medical Director Responsibilities to the ESRD Network

    PubMed Central

    DeOreo, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The 18 regional ESRD Networks are established in legislation and contract with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to improve the quality and safety of dialysis, maximize patient rehabilitation, encourage collaboration among and between providers toward common quality goals, and improve the reliability and the use of data in pursuit of quality improvement. The Networks are funded by a $0.50 per treatment fee deducted from the reimbursement to dialysis providers, and their deliverables are determined by a statement of work, which is updated in a new contract every 3 years. The Conditions for Coverage require dialysis providers to participate in Network activities, and failure to do so can be the basis for sanctions against the provider. However, the Networks attempt to foster a collegial relationship with dialysis facilities by offering tools, educational activities, and other resources to assist the facilities in meeting the evolving requirements by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on the basis of national aims and domains for quality improvement in health care that transcend the ESRD program. Because of his/her responsibility for implementing the quality assessment and performance improvement activities in the facility, the medical director has much to gain by actively participating in Network activities, especially those focused on quality, safety, patient grievance, patient engagement, and coordination of care. Membership on Network committees can also foster the professional growth of the medical director through participation in quality improvement activity development and implementation, authorship of articles in peer-reviewed journals, creation of educational tools and presentations, and application of Network-sponsored materials to improve patient outcomes, engagement, and satisfaction in the medical director’s facility. The improvement of care of patients on dialysis will be beneficial to the facility in achieving its goals of

  16. Medical Director Responsibilities to the ESRD Network.

    PubMed

    DeOreo, Peter B; Wish, Jay B

    2015-10-01

    The 18 regional ESRD Networks are established in legislation and contract with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to improve the quality and safety of dialysis, maximize patient rehabilitation, encourage collaboration among and between providers toward common quality goals, and improve the reliability and the use of data in pursuit of quality improvement. The Networks are funded by a $0.50 per treatment fee deducted from the reimbursement to dialysis providers, and their deliverables are determined by a statement of work, which is updated in a new contract every 3 years. The Conditions for Coverage require dialysis providers to participate in Network activities, and failure to do so can be the basis for sanctions against the provider. However, the Networks attempt to foster a collegial relationship with dialysis facilities by offering tools, educational activities, and other resources to assist the facilities in meeting the evolving requirements by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on the basis of national aims and domains for quality improvement in health care that transcend the ESRD program. Because of his/her responsibility for implementing the quality assessment and performance improvement activities in the facility, the medical director has much to gain by actively participating in Network activities, especially those focused on quality, safety, patient grievance, patient engagement, and coordination of care. Membership on Network committees can also foster the professional growth of the medical director through participation in quality improvement activity development and implementation, authorship of articles in peer-reviewed journals, creation of educational tools and presentations, and application of Network-sponsored materials to improve patient outcomes, engagement, and satisfaction in the medical director's facility. The improvement of care of patients on dialysis will be beneficial to the facility in achieving its goals of

  17. Cardiovascular complications in patients with end stage renal disease on maintenance haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sweety, S A; Arzu, J; Rahman, M; Salim, M A; Mahmood, M

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), National Institute of Kidney Diseases & Urology (NIKDU) and Kidney Foundation from July 2005 to June 2007 to find the cardiovascular complications in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Patients of both sexes with age ranging from 18-59 years and getting at least 8 hours of haemodialysis per week for the last 3 months were enrolled in the study. A total of 126 such patients were included in the study. Among 126 patients 77(61.1%) developed some types of cardiovascular complications. In terms of type of complications 63.6% of the patients had LVH, 23.4% had ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10.4% had congestive heart failure (CCF) and 2.6% cardiomyopathy. Over 96% patients were hypertensive, followed by 46.8% diabetics and 42.1% smokers. Presence of hypertension, diabetes, family history of diabetes and hypertension were observed to be significantly higher in patients who developed cardiovascular complications (p<0.05). It is deserved that cardiovascular complications (CVC) are very common in ESRD patients on maintenance haemodialysis (MHD). Poor control of blood pressure, low Haemoglobin level and poor glycaemic control are higher in ESRD patients on MHD and are possibly related to the development of cardiovascular complications. PMID:24858162

  18. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve, but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level <200 ng/dl, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  20. Patient's view of dialysis care: development of a taxonomy and rating of importance of different aspects of care. CHOICE study. Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD.

    PubMed

    Rubin, H R; Jenckes, M; Fink, N E; Meyer, K; Wu, A W; Bass, E B; Levin, N; Powe, N R

    1997-12-01

    . Patients value certain aspects of dialysis care highly, and these aspects differed in some respects for the relatively small number of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients studied. Construction of brief questionnaires for quality assessment and assurance requires thoughtful consideration of what questions to include. Knowing patients' priorities regarding the most important aspects of care that have high potential for dissatisfaction may be helpful to continuous quality improvement of end-stage renal disease care. PMID:9398123

  1. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, G.; Kher, V.; Saxena, S.; Jayakumar, M.; Chafekar, D.; Pargaonkar, P.; Shetty, M.; Reddy, Y. N. V.; Reddy, Y. N. V.

    2012-01-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:23087553

  2. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  3. Spatial Disassociation of Disrupted Functional Connectivity for the Default Mode Network in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhanhong; Zong, Xiaopeng; Dong, Jianwei; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Yikai; Li, Zibo; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the aberrant functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and their clinical relevance. Materials and Methods Resting-state functional MRI data were collected from 31 patients with ESRD (24 men, 24–61 years) and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 21 men, 26-61years). A whole-brain seed-based functional connectivity analysis of these collected R-fMRI data was performed by locating the seeds in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to investigate the functional connectivity of the posterior and anterior DMN over the whole brain, respectively. Results Compared to the HCs, the patients exhibited significantly decreased functional connectivity with the PCC in the left middle temporal gyrus, the right anterior cingulate gyrus, and the bilateral medial superior frontal gyrus. For the vmPFC seed, only the right thalamus showed significantly decreased functional connectivity in the patients with ESRD compared to HCs. Interestingly, functional connectivity between the PCC and right medial superior frontal gyrus exhibited a significantly positive correlation with the hemoglobin level in the patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest a spatially specific disruption of functional connectivity in the DMN in patients with ESRD, thereby providing novel insights into our understanding of the neurophysiology mechanism that underlies the disease. PMID:27560146

  4. APOL1 renal-risk genotypes associate with longer hemodialysis survival in prevalent nondiabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Comeau, Mary E; Bonomo, Jason A; Rocco, Michael V; Burkart, John M; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Lea, Janice P; Krisher, Jenna O; Clay, Margo J; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, evidence supports that African Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) survive longer on dialysis. Renal-risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1), associated with nondiabetic nephropathy and less subclinical atherosclerosis, may contribute to dialysis outcomes. Here, APOL1 renal-risk variants were assessed for association with dialytic survival in 450 diabetic and 275 nondiabetic African American hemodialysis patients from Wake Forest and Emory School of Medicine outpatient facilities. Outcomes were provided by the ESRD Network 6-Southeastern Kidney Council Standardized Information Management System. Dates of death, receipt of a kidney transplant, and loss to follow-up were recorded. Outcomes were censored at the date of transplantation or through 1 July 2015. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were computed separately in patients with nondiabetic and diabetic ESRD, adjusting for the covariates age, gender, comorbidities, ancestry, and presence of an arteriovenous fistula or graft at dialysis initiation. In nondiabetic ESRD, patients with 2 (vs. 0/1) APOL1 renal-risk variants had significantly longer dialysis survival (hazard ratio 0.57), a pattern not observed in patients with diabetes-associated ESRD (hazard ratio 1.29). Thus, 2 APOL1 renal-risk variants are associated with longer dialysis survival in African Americans without diabetes, potentially relating to presence of renal-limited disease or less atherosclerosis. PMID:27157696

  5. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: A nationwide, population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-06-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan.Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003.During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8-10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93-2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30-2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32-1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00-1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF.This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  6. Comparison of survival in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Hayati, Fatemeh; Valavi, Ehsan; Rekabi, Fazlollah; Mousavi, Marzieh Beladi

    2015-03-01

    Although the life expectancy of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has improved in recent years, it is still far below that of the general population. In this retrospective study, we compared the survival of patients with ESRD receiving hemodialysis (HD) versus those on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study was conducted on patients referred to the HD and PD centers of the Emam Khomini Hospital and the Aboozar Children's Hospital from January 2007 to May 2012 in Ahvaz, Iran. All ESRD patients on maintenance HD or PD for more than two months were included in the study. The survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the differences between HD and PD patients were tested by the log-rank test. Overall, 239 patients, 148 patients on HD (61.92%) and 91 patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) (38.55%) with mean age of 54.1 ± 17 years were enrolled in the study. Regardless of the causes of ESRD and type of renal replacement therapy (RRT), one-, two- and three-year survival of patients was 65%, 51% and 35%, respectively. There was no significant difference between type of RRT in one- (P-value = 0.737), two- (P-value = 0.534) and three- (P-value = 0.867) year survival. There was also no significant difference between diabetic and non-diabetic patients under HD and CAPD in the one-, two- and three-year survival. Although the three-year survival of diabetic patients under CAPD was lower than that of non-diabetic patients (13% vs. 34%), it was not statistically significant (P-value = 0.50). According to the results of the current study, there is no survival advantage of PD during the first years of initiation of dialysis, and the one-, two- and three-year survival of HD and PD patients is also similar. PMID:25758900

  7. Rationale and study design of a three-period, 58-week trial of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder in patients with ESRD on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Connelly, Carolyn; Schulman, Gerald; Koury, Mark J; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders arise as a result of aberrant bone mineral metabolism in patients with advancing levels of renal dysfunction and end-stage renal disease. One of the cornerstones of treatment is the use of phosphate-binding agents. We describe the rationale and study design for a clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. This trial is a three-period, international, multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, consisting of a 2-week washout period, a 52-week safety assessment period in which subjects are randomized to ferric citrate or active control, and a 4-week efficacy assessment period in which subjects randomized to ferric citrate in the safety assessment period are randomized to ferric citrate or placebo. Eligible subjects include end-stage renal disease patients who have been treated with thrice-weekly hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for at least 3 months in dialysis clinics in the United States and Israel. Primary outcome measure will be the effect of ferric citrate vs. placebo on the change in serum phosphorus. Safety assessments will be performed by monitoring adverse events, concomitant medication use, and sequential blood chemistries (including iron parameters, phosphorus, and calcium). This three-period trial will assess the efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. If proven safe and efficacious, ferric citrate will likely provide an additional phosphate binder to treat chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders. PMID:22702490

  8. Efficacy of loop diuretics in the management of undocumented patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salman; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles; Workeneh, Biruh

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 6000 patients who are undocumented immigrants have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and routinely present to public safety-net hospitals for life-saving emergent dialysis treatments. Because these patients lack a dialysis unit, they often do not have access to medication management consistently coordinated by a nephrologist, and this can result in more frequent emergency department (ED) utilization and cost of care. We hypothesized that patients who were taking loop diuretics had fewer ED visits for emergency dialysis. Loop diuretics can potentially take advantage of residual renal function and mitigate excess fluid gain that can induce heart failure and high potassium, the two most common indications for emergency dialysis. In our univariable analysis, patients on furosemide had 3.1 fewer ED visits on average compared with patients who are not on furosemide. After adjusting for vintage and serum potassium measures, the average number of ED visits was about 1.1 visits less in furosemide-treated patients compared with patients not receiving furosemide (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to 2.1). These results suggest that loop diuretics may have an important role in undocumented patients with ESRD with residual renal function. Further study to develop practical approaches to the care of undocumented patients with ESRD is greatly needed. PMID:27260551

  9. A Matter of Choice: Opportunities and Obstacles Facing People with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Feder, Judith; Nadel, Mark V; Krishnan, Mahesh

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure is an overwhelming, life-shattering event, but patients with ESRD do not see themselves as being at the end stage of their lives. On the contrary, patients opting for kidney dialysis are choosing to live. Ideally, then, public policy would support patients' choices about how to live-specifically, the choice to continue working. Many patients with ESRD faced with the limitations of their health status and the demands of their treatment understandably choose to leave their jobs, a choice that is facilitated by the availability of public disability and health insurance. However, other patients who have the desire and opportunity to continue working may not get the guidance and support that can actually make their employment possible. Specifically, current disability and health insurance may fail to provide timely treatment and employment counseling to help patients with ESRD remain in their jobs. We, therefore, propose that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services support ESRD Networks to initiate more timely employment and treatment counseling in both the ESRD and the late-stage pre-ESRD setting. Although it is too late to require such counseling in the new network scope of work for 2016-2020, active experimentation in the next few years can lay the groundwork for a subsequent contract. PMID:26553796

  10. Periodontitis and the end-stage renal disease patient receiving hemodialysis maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ronald G; Kotanko, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Atherosclerotic complications, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are highly prevalent and associated with increased systemic inflammation in patients who have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and are receiving renal hemodialysis maintenance therapy. In the general population, an increasing body of evidence suggests periodontitis can contribute to systemic inflammation and may contribute to atherosclerotic complications. In addition, results of recent interventional trials suggest effective periodontal therapy may decrease systemic inflammation as well as endothelial dysfunction, an early predictor of atherosclerotic complications. Because moderate-to-severe periodontitis appears to be highly prevalent in the renal hemodialysis population, effective periodontal therapy may reduce systemic inflammation and thereby become a treatment consideration for this population. This article will acquaint dental practitioners with ESRD and the association between systemic inflammation and mortality. Also discussed are the possible contributions of destructive periodontal diseases to systemic inflammation and the dental management of patients receiving renal replacement therapies. PMID:19824568

  11. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.220 Methodology for calculating the per.... The methodology for determining the per treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment...

  12. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  13. Influence of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism on plasma homocysteine concentration in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, H A; Choi, J S; Ha, K S; Yang, D H; Chang, S K; Hong, S Y

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to observe the influence of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (677C-->T substitution) on plasma homocysteine levels in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who received a relatively large amount of folate (2 mg/d) and are undergoing hemodialysis. A cross-sectional study of plasma homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate was performed in patients with ESRD. The study population for the MTHFR gene study included 312 healthy subjects and 106 patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis. The C677T transition in the MTHFR gene was detected by HinF 1 restriction enzyme analysis and subsequent electrophoresis in a 3% agarose gel. The genotype of the MTHFR gene in 106 patients with ESRD was homozygous C677T mutation (VV) in 17 patients (16.1%) and heterozygous (AV) in 63 patients (58.4%); 26 patients (24.5%) did not carry this mutation (AA). The mean levels of homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate in the patients with ESRD were 23.3 +/- 14.0 mmol/L, 620.2 +/- 98.5 pmol/L, and 138.6 +/- 55.6 nmol/L, respectively. There was no significant difference in homocysteine levels among the three genotypes: 28.2 +/- 19.4 mmol/L for VV, 22.7 +/- 14.9 mmol/L for AV, and 23.4 +/- 11.1 mmol/L for AA genotype (P > 0.05). There was no difference in genotype distribution between the patient groups of less than 25th and greater than 75th percentiles, classified according to plasma homocysteine levels (P = 0.47). In conclusion, with high-dose folate supplementation, the hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with ESRD does not seem to be caused by the 677C-->T mutation in the MTHFR gene. PMID:10430972

  14. Pancreatitis with pancreatic tail swelling associated with incretin-based therapies detected radiologically in two cases of diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hirosuke; Sugitani, Seita; Yamaji, Shuhei; Otsu, Satoko; Higashi, Yoshihito; Ohtomo, Yumiko; Inoue, Gen

    2012-01-01

    We herein report two cases of pancreatitis associated with incretin-based therapies in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing dialysis. A 75-year-old woman with a history of liraglutide use and a 68-year-old man with a history of vildagliptin use both presented with nausea. They showed elevated levels of pancreatic enzymes and pancreatic tail swelling on CT. Their symptoms improved after discontinuing the drugs. In the absence of any obvious secondary causes of pancreatitis, we believe that the pancreatitis observed in these cases was associated with the incretin-based therapies. Few reports have been published on the safety and efficacy of incretin-based therapies in ESRD patients, and it remains uncertain whether the changes in the pancreas observed in the present cases are characteristic of ESRD patients. PMID:23124148

  15. Effect of α -Lipoic Acid on Oxidative Stress in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Intravenous Iron.

    PubMed

    Showkat, Arif; Bastnagel, William R; Hudson, Joanna Q

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Intravenous (IV) iron has been shown to increase oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in oxidative stress markers following administration of IV sodium ferric gluconate (SFG) to ESRD patients with and without administration of the antioxidant, α -lipoic acid. This is an open-label, crossover study. 125 mg of IV SFG was administered during control (C) and intervention (I) visits. During the I visit, 600 mg of α -lipoic acid was given orally prior to IV SFG. Blood samples were collected at defined time periods for F2-isoprostane (FIP), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and iron indices. We recruited ten African-American ESRD subjects: 50% male; mean age 45 ± 9 years; mean hemoglobin 13 ± 1 g/dL; ferritin 449 ± 145 ng/mL; transferrin saturation 27 ± 4%. There were no significant differences in iron indices between the two visits after IV SFG. MDA, FIP, and LHP increased significantly for both C and I visits with a greater increase in the I group. Administration of IV SFG results in an acute rise in oxidative stress in ESRD patients. In contrast to previous studies, administration of α -lipoic acid was associated with a greater increase in oxidative stress. PMID:24967245

  16. Effect of α-Lipoic Acid on Oxidative Stress in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Intravenous Iron

    PubMed Central

    Showkat, Arif; Bastnagel, William R.; Hudson, Joanna Q.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Intravenous (IV) iron has been shown to increase oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in oxidative stress markers following administration of IV sodium ferric gluconate (SFG) to ESRD patients with and without administration of the antioxidant, α-lipoic acid. This is an open-label, crossover study. 125 mg of IV SFG was administered during control (C) and intervention (I) visits. During the I visit, 600 mg of α-lipoic acid was given orally prior to IV SFG. Blood samples were collected at defined time periods for F2-isoprostane (FIP), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and iron indices. We recruited ten African-American ESRD subjects: 50% male; mean age 45 ± 9 years; mean hemoglobin 13 ± 1 g/dL; ferritin 449 ± 145 ng/mL; transferrin saturation 27 ± 4%. There were no significant differences in iron indices between the two visits after IV SFG. MDA, FIP, and LHP increased significantly for both C and I visits with a greater increase in the I group. Administration of IV SFG results in an acute rise in oxidative stress in ESRD patients. In contrast to previous studies, administration of α-lipoic acid was associated with a greater increase in oxidative stress. PMID:24967245

  17. Filtration of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Julia; Heisler, Martin; Totzeck, Matthias; Kleophas, Werner; Hetzel, Gerd R.; Kelm, Malte; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Rassaf, Tienush

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are characterized by increased morbidity and mortality due to highest prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that controls cellular signaling in human physiology, pathophysiology, and diseases. Increased MIF plasma levels promote vascular inflammation and development of atherosclerosis. We have shown that MIF is associated with vascular dysfunction in ESRD patients. Whether hemodialysis (HD) affects circulating MIF plasma levels is unknown. We here aimed to investigate whether HD influences the circulating MIF pool in ESRD patients. Methods and Results An observational single-center study was conducted. MIF plasma levels in ESRD patients were assessed before, during, and after a HD session (n = 29). Healthy age-matched volunteers served as controls to compare correlations of MIF plasma levels with inflammatory plasma components (n = 20). MIF removed from the circulating blood pool could be detected in the dialysate and allowed for calculation of totally removed MIF (MIF content in dialysate 219±4 μg/HD-session). MIF plasma levels were markedly decreased 2 hour after initiation of HD (MIF plasma level pre-HD 84.8±6 ng/ml to intra-HD 61.2±5 ng/ml p<0.001) and were replenished already 20 min after termination of HD to basal levels (intra-HD 61.2±5 ng/ml to post-HD 79.8±5 ng/ml, p<0.001). Conclusion MIF is a dialyzable plasma component that is effectively filtrated during HD from the patient blood pool in large amounts. After removal of remarkable amounts of MIF during a single HD session, MIF plasma pool is early reconstituted after termination of HD from unknown sources. PMID:26485680

  18. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD. PMID:27452672

  19. Practical approach to evaluate asymptomatic coronary artery disease in end-stage renal disease patients at the initiation of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akihito; Sakakibara, Masaki; Asada, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ishii, Hideki; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-04-01

    The high prevalence of significant asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been reported in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the initiation of dialysis. However, the approach to evaluate asymptomatic CAD for these patients has not been established. The aim of this study is to assess the applicability of our practical approach at the initiation of dialysis. We prospectively enrolled 182 consecutive ESRD patients who initiated dialysis. After echocardiography as primary screening, pharmacologic stress thallium-201 scintigraphy and/or coronary angiography (CAG) were performed to diagnose CAD. The patients were classified into two groups: those with coronary artery stenosis by CAG (CAD+ group), those without coronary artery stenosis by CAG or with negative scintigraphy examination (CAD- group). Of the eligible 93 patients without the history of CAD, 22 patients were allocated to the CAD+ group (18 of 26 patients with abnormal echocardiography and 4 of 13 patients with positive scintigraphy examination) and 71 patients to the CAD- group. Patients were followed up for an average of 520 ± 304 days. The event-free survival rate of major adverse cardiac events was significantly lower in the CAD+ group than in the CAD- group (P < 0.001). There was no cardiovascular event including major adverse cardiac events, unstable angina, coronary revascularization or stroke in the CAD- group during the first year of dialysis. Patients without CAD diagnosed by our approach had favorable clinical outcomes. Our approach may be useful for screening of occult CAD in ESRD patients at the initiation of dialysis. PMID:24720408

  20. Benefits of a mainstreamed summer camp experience for teens with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Klee, K M

    1992-01-01

    This is a report on a pilot project integrating children with end stage renal disease (ESRD) with well children for a summer camp experience. As the teen with ESRD prepares to enter the work force and college, he/she will have to adapt to a variety of situations that will not adapt to his/her unique medical condition. These issues motivated a pilot project in which 9 ESRD children were mainstreamed into a 2 week, YMCA summer camp experience. Pre and post questionnaires were developed and distributed to the camper, family, and the cabin counselor along with interviews to assess the value of the experience. All the children left camp more independent and knowledgeable about their self-care. The results of this pilot project indicate that children with ESRD can adapt to their environment and increase independence, self-care and self-esteem through supervised mainstreamed experiences. PMID:1361839

  1. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  2. Outcomes of Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and End-Stage Renal Disease Receiving Dialysis and Targeted Therapies: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Aditya V.; Matrana, Marc R.; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Flaherty, Amber L.; Jonasch, Eric; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are limited regarding outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) receiving targeted therapy. We retrospectively identified patients with mRCC and ESRD treated at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2002 to 2012. Fourteen patients were identified with a median number of targeted therapies (TTs) per patient of 3 (range, 1–4). Outcomes in patients with mRCC and ESRD were similar to those reported in patients with normal kidney function. Introduction Limited data are available regarding patients with renal cell carcinoma and ESRD treated with TTs. The objective of this study was to explore the tolerability and safety of TT in patients with mRCC and ESRD. Patients and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with mRCC and ESRD treated at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2002 to 2012. Patient characteristics including demographic, histology, treatment, and adverse events are reported. Duration of treatment (TOT) was determined from date of drug initiation to discontinuation. Overall survival (OS) was determined from initiation of TT to death. Statistics are descriptive. Results Fourteen patients were identified. Ten patients had clear-cell histology and 4 had papillary histology. The median number of TTs per patient was 3 (range, 1–4) with median TOT of 28 months for all TTs. Eighty-eight percent of all toxicities were Grade 1 to 2; no Grade 4 toxicities were noted. Treatment discontinuations included 3 patients treated with sorafenib due to hand-foot syndrome, intolerable fatigue, and squamous cell skin cancer development; 2 patients treated with pazopanib due to intolerable fatigue and increased transaminase levels; and 1 patient treated with everolimus due to pneumonitis. Eight patients died from progressive disease. Median OS from initiation of TT was 28.5 months and 35 months from time of diagnosis. Conclusion Toxicities were mild to moderate and

  3. Rationale and Design of a Patient-Centered Medical Home Intervention for Patients with End-stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Anna C.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gallardo, Rani; Berbaum, Michael L.; Lash, James P.; Castillo, Sheila; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K.; Tulley, John; Arruda, Jose A.; Hynes, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., more than 400,000 individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require hemodialysis (HD) for renal replacement therapy. ESRD patients experience a high burden of morbidity, mortality, resource utilization, and poor quality of life (QOL). Under current care models ESRD patients receive fragmented care from multiple providers at multiple locations. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a team approach, providing coordinated care across the healthcare continuum. While this model has shown some early benefits for complex chronic diseases such as diabetes, it has not been applied to HD patients. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial implementing a Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD). The PCMH-KD extends the existing dialysis care team (comprised of a nephrologist, dialysis nurse, dialysis technician, social worker, and dietitian) by adding a general internist, pharmacist, nurse coordinator, and a community health worker, all of whom will see the patients together, and separately, as needed. The primary goal is to implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve care coordination, quality of life, and healthcare use for HD patients. Approximately 240 patients will be recruited from two sites; a non-profit university-affiliated dialysis center and an independent for-profit dialysis center. Outcomes include: i) patient-reported outcomes, including QOL and satisfaction; ii) clinical outcomes, including blood pressure and diet; iii) healthcare use, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations; and iv) staff perceptions. Given the significant burden that patients with ESRD on HD experience, enhanced care coordination provides an opportunity to reduce this burden and improve QOL. PMID:25735489

  4. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Methods Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Results Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). Conclusions These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. PMID:26644125

  5. Peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with renal insufficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, Mauri; Fiengo, Leslie; Biancari, Fausto

    2012-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common among diabetic patients with renal insufficiency, and most of the diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have peripheral arterial disease. Ischaemia is probably overrepresented as an etiological factor for a diabetic foot ulcer in this group of patients compared with other diabetic patients. ESRD is a strong risk factor for both ulceration and amputation in diabetic patients. It increases the risk of nonhealing of ulcers and major amputation with an OR of 2.5-3. Renal disease is a more important predictor of poor outcome after revascularizations than commonly expected. Preoperative vascular imaging is also affected by a number of limitations, mostly related to side effects of contrast agents poorly eliminated because of kidney dysfunction. Patients with renal failure have high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Persistent ischaemia, extensive infection, forefoot and heel gangrene, poor run-off, poor cardiac function, and the length of dialysis-dependent renal failure all affect the outcome adversely. Despite dismal overall outcome, recent data indicate that by proper selection, favourable results can be obtained even in ESRD patients, with the majority of studies reporting 1-year limb salvage rates of 65-75% after revascularization among survivors. High 1-year mortality of 38% reported in a recent review has to be taken into consideration, though. The preferential use of endovascular-first approach is attractive in this vulnerable multimorbid group of patients, but the evidence for endovascular treatment is very scarce. The need for complete revascularization of the foot may be even more important than in other patients with ischaemic ulcerated diabetic foot because there are a number of factors counteracting healing in these patients. Typically, half of the patients are reported to lose their legs despite open bypass. To control tissue damage and improve chances of ulcer healing, one should understand that

  6. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them. PMID:25936672

  7. Effect of Hemodialysis on Plasma Myeloperoxidase Activity in End Stage Renal Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, A Madhusudhana; Apoorva, R; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V; Venu, G

    2012-07-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD) have an increased oxidative stress, with a high risk of atherosclerosis and other co-morbid conditions. Recent studies have suggested that myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in dialysis patients. Furthermore, dialysis treatment 'per se' can aggravate oxidative stress. Hence this study was designed to determine whether HD leads to an alteration in the plasma levels of MPO and malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress in ESRD patients on maintenance HD. To study the effect of HD, plasma MPO and MDA were determined before and after HD in forty ESRD patients (24 men and 16 women, age between 8 and 71 years, median being 40.5 years) on maintenance HD. Plasma MPO and MDA were assayed by spectrophotometric methods. Haematological and other biochemical parameters were obtained from patients' case records. Plasma MPO and MDA levels were significantly higher after HD when compared with pre-dialysis levels (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between MPO and MDA (r = 0.184, p = 0.10) and other biochemical parameters (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant correlation between MPO and MDA with haemodialysis vintage (p < 0.05). In univariate regression analysis duration of HD (β = 1.470, p = 0.045, β = 0.388, p = 0.013), was independently associated with MPO and MDA. Although HD is indispensable for survival of patients with ESRD, it is fraught with undesirable side-effects, such as an increase in the plasma MPO and MDA levels. The elevated levels of MPO contribute to the increased oxidative stress as free radicals are produced by the reaction catalyzed by it. PMID:26405383

  8. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  9. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  10. [AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: HOW AND WHY SHOULD WE IDENTIFY THE PATIENTS "RAPIDLY PROGRESSING" TO END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE?].

    PubMed

    Bodson, A; Meunier, P; Krzesinski, J-M; Jouret, F

    2016-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common inherited disease characterised by the progressive development of multiple and bilateral cysts in kidneys and other organs. Most patients with ADPKD will develop, sooner or later, end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The morbidity and mortality associated with ESRD prompt physicians to identify early ADPKD patients considered as "rapid progressors", who have the greatest risk to rapidly develop ESRD. The rate of progression can be assessed by clinical--especially with the "predicting renal outcome in polycystic kidney disease score" (PROPKD-Score)-, biological (a decline of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 4.4-5.9 ml/min/year and/or the doubling of serum creatinine within a 36-month period), or radiological criteria (total kidney volume (TKV) adjusted for the size > 600 cc/m and/or TKV annual growth rate > 5 %). Nowadays, there is no curative treatment for ADPKD. However, vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists, such as tolvaptan, appear to slow down the growth of renal cysts and the slope of GFR decline. The current management of ADPKD patients is mostly based on correcting the risk factors for progression, i.e. encouraging (over)-hydration, normalizing blood pressure, stimulating smoking cessation. PMID:27295898

  11. The role of APD in the improvement of outcomes in an ESRD program.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Wim; Veys, Nic; Vanholder, Raymond; Lameire, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We review the role of automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) in improving outcomes of an end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program. As the "integrated care approach" becomes accepted as the preferred strategy for treatment of ESRD patients, we looked for the potential place of APD in such an approach. APD has probably the same advantages as CAPD as a first-line renal replacement modality in suitable patients willing to perform PD. There is currently no hard evidence that residual renal function (RRF) should decline more rapidly in APD than in CAPD, at least if a dry abdomen during the day is avoided. The detection of peritonitis is probably more delayed in APD, but the frequency of peritonitis is lower, and there is no hard evidence pointing to a poorer outcome of peritonitis in APD as compared to CAPD. Quality of life is at least as good in APD, which is mostly related to the increased possibilities for adapting the exchange pattern to employment-related time frames. APD also has the potential to prolong technique success in patients failing CAPD rather than transferring them to hemodialysis. Nevertheless, APD remains more expensive and technically complicated, thereby missing the beauty of CAPD's simplicity. Therefore we believe that APD has its role in an integrated approach and that all patients should be informed of its potential. It would, however, not be correct to present APD as the preferred PD method for all patients, as it also has some drawbacks that make it less suitable for some categories of patients. In all cases, patients should have a free and informed choice. PMID:12437538

  12. The Association of Losartan and Ramipril Therapy With Kidney and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Shih-Chun; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Sun, Chien-An; Chien, Wu-Chien; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Kao, Sen-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this nation-wide cohort study was to assess the association of using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We used Cox's proportional hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and first hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (CVD) for losartan and ramipril versus conventional antihypertensive agents. In total, 136,266 hypertensive patients with CKD in Taiwan were followed up from 2001 to 2008. In an average follow-up of 5.9 years, 7364 (5.40%) patients reached ESRD, 4165 (3.06%) patients died, and 6163 (4.52%) patients had their first hospitalization for CVD. Use of losartan or ramipril was associated with a lower risk of the endpoints compared with the conventional group. In the losartan group, the risks of ESRD, all- and cardiovascular-cause mortality, and first hospitalization for CVD were decreased by 9.2% (P = 0.01), 24.6% (P < 0.001), 12.4% (P = 0.03), and 36.0% (P = 0.01), respectively. In the ramipril group, these risks decreased by 7.6% (P = 0.02) for ESRD, 56.9% (P < 0.001) for all-cause mortality, 7.5% (P = 0.04) for cardiovascular mortality, and 24.7% (P < 0.001) for first hospitalization. This study indicated that losartan and ramipril had distinct association on the prognosis of hypertensive patients with CKD, and was first to disclose that the mean time to reach each endpoint for patients in the losartan, ramipril, and conventional group was not significantly different. However, further study is needed to confirm results of the present study. PMID:26632888

  13. Recombinant human erythropoietin and the quality of life of end-stage renal disease patients: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W

    1991-10-01

    The clinical and quality of life outcomes of hemodialysis patients improve remarkably following treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (Epo). However, few studies have compared the quality of life of Epo patients with that of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on various treatment modalities. Data obtained in three separate studies of ESRD patients were comparatively analyzed. Over 1,500 patients from 23 dialysis and transplant centers were studied. Both objective and subjective quality of life were examined. Objective quality of life indicators included employment status, functional ability, and health status. Subjective quality of life indicators included well-being, life satisfaction, psychological affect, and happiness. Quality of life varied significantly across treatment modality, with transplant recipients generally reporting the highest levels of objective and subjective quality of life. However, hemodialysis patients treated with Epo reported a statistically significant improvement between baseline and 10 months' follow-up on all quality of life indicators, except employment. Epo patients reported a level of overall life satisfaction that exceeded that of patients on all ESRD treatment modalities. Among transplant recipients, diabetics reported the poorest quality of life, while patients on conventional immunosuppressive therapy often had a quality of life that exceeded that of patients on cyclosporine therapy. Some of these findings may be explained by case-mix differences, as well as differing study designs. Quality of life remains a significant concern among ESRD patients and the physicians and medical professionals responsible for their care. Unfortunately, the rehabilitation potential of many patients, despite the availability of Epo, and the success of transplantation, remains unmet. PMID:1928082

  14. Surgical Fracture Repair in Chronic Renal Failure Patients on Hemodialysis An Analysis of Complications and Hospital Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, Ravi; Manoli, Arthur; Goch, Manoli; Egol, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    In end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD), it is known that renal bone disease has a negative impact on postoperative complication rate of fracture repair compared to non-ESRD patients. Previous studies have examined complications following surgical hip fracture repair in ESRD patients on HD. However, there is paucity of information outside of hip fracture repair. This study was undertaken to investigate complications associated with surgical fracture repair in ESRD patients on hemodialysis and to compare quality measures with a control group for various fracture types. Data of all consecutive ESRD patients on HD was collected prospectively starting in 2013. Charts of 2,558 ESRD patients on HD from 2010 to 2013 were also reviewed. Thirty-four patients who underwent surgical fracture repair were included in the study. Additionally, 1,000 patients without ESRD who underwent fracture repair were also identified, and a random sample of 267 patients was selected for inclusion as a control group. Primary outcomes were major complications as defined by the Clavien-Dindo complication rating system for orthopaedic surgery. Secondary outcomes were minor complications, defined by the same method. Demographic information and hospital quality measures, such as hospital length of stay (LOS) and discharge disposition, were also collected. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of BMI, ethnicity, or gender distribution. The ESRD patients were older than control patients (62.6 versus 46.8 years; p > 0.01). Overall, the complication rate in the ESRD group was 14.7% compared to 3% in the control group (p < 0.05) while the rate of major complications was similar (5.8% versus 2.2%, p = 0.2). The rate of minor complications was higher in the ESRD group though this did not reach statistical significance (8.8% versus 1%, p = 0.07). Median LOS was significantly higher in the ESRD group (15.9 versus 6.4 days; p < 0.01), and patients in the ESRD group

  15. Health-related quality of life in patients with pediatric onset of end-stage renal disease: state of the art and recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Lidwien A; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Noordzij, Marlies; Groothoff, Jaap W

    2016-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is increasingly recognized as a key outcome in both clinical and research settings in the pediatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This review aims to: (1) summarize the current knowledge on HRQoL and socioprofessional outcomes and (2) provide strategies for incorporation of HRQoL assessment into clinical practice. Studies report that pediatric patients with ESRD have significantly lower HRQoL scores compared with children with other chronic diseases. Patients treated by dialysis are at particularly high risk for impaired HRQoL. Furthermore, patients more often have impaired neurocognitive functioning and lower academic achievement. Important determinants of impaired HRQoL include medical factors (i.e., receiving dialysis, disabling comorbidities, cosmetic side effects, stunted growth), sociodemographic factors (i.e., female gender, non-Western background) and psychosocial factors (i.e., noneffective coping strategies). Contrary to the situation in childhood, adult survivors of pediatric ESRD report a normal mental HRQoL. Despite this subjective feeling of well-being, these patients have on average experienced significantly more difficulties in completing their education, developing intimate relationships, and securing employment. Several medical and psychosocial strategies may potentially improve HRQoL in children with ESRD. Regular assessment of HRQoL and neurocognitive functioning in order to identify areas in which therapies and interventions may be required should be part of standard clinical care. PMID:26310616

  16. Epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Amal A.; Al-Shaikh, Fahdah; Vamos, Eszter P.; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the epidemiology of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Design Mixed-methods systematic review. Setting The countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) which consist of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman. Participants Defined to have ESRD or patients on regular dialysis for a minimum dialysis period of at least three months. Since many outcomes were reviewed, studies that estimated the incidence and prevalence of ESRD as outcomes should not have defined the study population as ESRD population or patients on regular dialysis. Studies where the study population mainly comprised children or pregnant woman were excluded. Main outcome measures The trends of the incidence, prevalence, and mortality rate of ESRD; also, causes of mortality, primary causes and co-morbid conditions associated with ESRD. Results 44 studies included in this review show that the incidence of ESRD has increased while the prevalence and mortality rate of ESRD in the GCC has not been reported sufficiently. The leading primary causes of ESRD recorded in the countries of the GCC is diabetes with the most prevalent co-morbid conditions being Hypertension and Hepatitis C Virus infection; the most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease and sepsis. Conclusions This review highlights that the lack of national renal registries data is a critical issue in the countries of the GCC. The available data also do not provide an accurate and updated estimate for relevant outcomes. Additionally, considering the increasing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), these results stressed the needs and the importance of preventative strategies for leading causes of ESRD. Furthermore, more studies are needed to describe the epidemiology of ESRD and for assessing the overall quality of renal care. PMID:22768372

  17. Hepatitis B surface antigenemia following recombinant Engerix B hepatitis B vaccine in an 81-year-old ESRD patient on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay A C; Nesbit, Ashley; Weisenbeck, Jacquelyn; Hurlburt, Jill

    2010-05-01

    The first cases of transient hepatitis B surface antigenemia (HBsAg) in adults following hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization were reported in the 1990s. HBV immunization is mandatory for all hemodialysis (HD) patients. Ly et al. who demonstrated transient HBsAg in eight out of nine HD patients following HBV vaccine concluded that HD patients should not be screened for HBV within a week of HBV immunization and that positive HBsAg within a month of HBV immunization must be interpreted with caution. We present an 81-year-old woman on HD, who needed a booster Recombivax (Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) vaccine after remaining hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) negative from previous vaccinations. The HD Unit had switched to Engerix B (GlaxoSmithKline, Atlanta, GA, USA) HBV vaccine. Two days after the first Engerix B vaccine, HBsAg was detected. She was asymptomatic; ALT was 25 U/L. Repeat testing for HBsAg, HBsAb, hepatitis B E antigen (HB E Ag), and hepatitis B DNA (HB DNA), a week later, all returned negative. Previous reports of transient HBsAg following HBV vaccines were after Engerix B vaccination. Our patient is unusual since she had received both brands of HBV vaccines, sequentially, at different times. Twice, HBsAg tests completed as early as 5 days following Recombivax vaccine were negative. We submit that positive HBsAg tests are more likely following Engerix B vaccines. We reemphasize previous recommendations that patients should not be screened for HBsAg < 4 weeks following HBV immunization. This is particularly important in HD units where hepatitis B screening is carried out routinely all year round and hepatitis B vaccinations are commonplace. Very strict schedules must be adopted to avoid false positive HBsAg tests. PMID:20446799

  18. Red blood cell calcium homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gafter, U.; Malachi, T.; Barak, H.; Djaldetti, M.; Levi, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Low cell calcium level is essential for preservation of red blood cell (RBC) membrane deformability and survival. RBCs from patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstrate reduction in membrane deformability, possibly as a result of increased RBC cellular calcium level. To evaluate calcium homeostasis in RBCs from patients with ESRD, we measured cell calcium level, basal and calmodulin-stimulated calcium-stimulated Mg-dependent ATPase (CaATPase) activity, and calcium 45 efflux were measured before and after hemodialysis. The in vitro effect of uremic plasma and of urea on CaATPase activity of normal RBCs was tested, and 45Ca influx into RBCs of patients undergoing hemodialysis also was determined. A morphologic evaluation of red cells from patients with ESRD was performed with a scanning electron microscope. RBC calcium level in patients (mean +/- SEM 21.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/L of cells; n = 28) was higher than in controls (4.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/L of cells; n = 24; p less than 0.001). Hemodialysis had no effect on cell calcium level. Both basal and calmodulin-stimulated RBC CaATPase activities in patients with ESRD (n = 9) were reduced by approximately 50% (p less than 0.01), but after hemodialysis, enzyme activity returned to normal. 45Ca efflux from calcium-loaded cells, which was 2574.0 +/- 217.0 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours before hemodialysis, increased to 3140.7 +/- 206.8 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours after hemodialysis (p less than 0.005). In vitro incubation of normal RBCs with uremic plasma depressed CaATPase activity, but incubation with urea had no effect. RBCs of patients with ESRD revealed increased 45Ca influx, 7.63 +/- 1.15 mumol/L of cells per hour versus 4.61 +/- 0.39 mumol/L of cells per hour (p less than 0.025). RBCs of patients revealed a high incidence of spherocytosis and echynocytosis, which correlated with a high cell calcium level (r = 0.894, p less than 0.01).

  19. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts Patency Loss of Arteriovenous Fistula in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Ting, Kai-Ting; Chi, Wen-Che; Lin, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chun; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AAC) is recognized as an important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of AAC grade on patency rates of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in this specific population. The data of 286 ESRD patients who had an initial AVF placed were reviewed. The extent of AAC identified on chest radiography was divided into four grades (0–3). The association between AAC grade, other clinical factors, and primary patency of AVF was then analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of AAC grade 2 (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.80 (1.15–2.84); p = 0.011) and grade 3 (3.03 (1.88–4.91); p < 0.001), and higher level of intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.047) were associated with primary patency loss of AVF. In subgroup analysis, which included AVF created by a surgeon assisted with preoperative vascular mapping, only AAC grade 3 (2.41 (1.45–4.00); p = 0.001), and higher intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.025) level were correlated with AVF patency loss. In conclusion, higher AAC grade and intact-parathyroid hormone level predicted primary patency loss of AVF in an ESRD population. PMID:27101807

  20. Potential impact of peer mentoring on treatment choice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2015-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the resultant end stage renal disease (ESRD) are associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost for the individual patient and society. CKD is among the major contributors to years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality. Also, while the disability adjusted life years (DALY) for many conditions decreased between 1990 and 2010, the DALY for CKD has increased by 69%. In addition to the physical disability, CKD is associated with high prevalence (27.9%) of major depressive episodes, associated with limitations of employment, and a significant negative effect on quality of life (QOL). A major determinant of QOL is satisfaction with treatment choice. There is consensus among investigators that patients who are actively engaged in their own care experience improved health outcomes. The shared decision making (SDM) approach allows patients and providers the opportunity to work in partnership to make decisions that are congruent with the patient's values, preferences, and distinct situations. SDM has been associated with improved outcomes among patients with various chronic disease states. Mentoring, particularly by trained peers, has been used as an approach to enhance SDM in several chronic conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will focus on care of patients with CKD as a model for the study of the impact of peer mentoring on SDM and choice of treatment for ESRD. PMID:25841945

  1. Blood pressure control, drug therapy, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Gabriel; Greene, Tom; Agodoa, Lawrence Y; Cheek, DeAnna; Junco, George; Dowie, Donna; Lash, James; Lipkowitz, Michael; Miller, Edgar R; Ojo, Akinlou; Sika, Mohammed; Wilkening, Beth; Toto, Robert D

    2005-07-01

    The African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension examined the effect on renal function decline of 2 blood pressure (BP) goals (low mean arterial pressure [MAP] < or =92 versus usual MAP 102 to 107 mm Hg) and 3 antihypertensives (ramipril versus amlodipine versus metoprolol). We previously reported that in all drug groups combined the BP intervention had similar effects on the primary outcome of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) slope or the main secondary clinical composite outcome of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), death, or GFR decline by 50% or 25 mL/min per 1.73 m2. This report examines the effect of the BP intervention separately in the 3 drug groups. The BP effect was similar among the drug groups for either GFR slope or the main clinical composite. However, the BP effect differed significantly among the drug groups for the composite of ESRD or death (P=0.035) and ESRD alone (P=0.021). Higher event rates for amlodipine patients assigned to the usual BP goal (0.087 per patient-year for ESRD or death and 0.064 per patient-year for ESRD) were seen compared with the remaining groups of the factorial design (range, 0.041 to 0.050 for ESRD or death; and range, 0.027 to 0.036 for ESRD). The low BP goal was associated with reduced risk of ESRD or death (risk reduction 51%; 95% confidence interval, 13% to 73%) and ESRD (54%; 8% to 77%) for amlodipine patients, but not for patients assigned to the other drug groups. These secondary analyses suggest a benefit of the low BP goal among patients assigned to amlodipine, but they must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:15897360

  2. Progressive rise in red blood cell distribution width predicts mortality and cardiovascular events in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Kim, Sung Jun; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Chung, Sungjin; Yang, Chul Woo; Shin, Seok Joon

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a robust marker of adverse clinical outcomes in various populations. However, the clinical significance of a progressive rise in RDW is undetermined in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic importance of a change in RDW in ESRD patients. Three hundred twenty-six incident dialysis patients were retrospectively analyzed. Temporal changes in RDW during 12 months after dialysis initiation were assessed by calculating the coefficients by linear regression. Patients were divided into two groups: an RDW-decreased group who had negative coefficient values (n = 177) and an RDW-increased group who had positive values (n = 149). The associations between rising RDW and mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events were investigated. During a median follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1.0-7.7 years), 75 deaths (24.0%) and 60 non-fatal CV events (18.4%) occurred. The event-free survival rate for the composite of end-points was lower in the RDW-increased group (P = 0.004). After categorizing patients according to baseline RDW, the event-free survival rate was lowest in patients with a baseline RDW >14.9% and increased RDW, and highest in patients with a baseline RDW ≤14.9% and decreased RDW (P = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, rising RDW was independently associated with the composite of end-points (hazard ratio = 1.75, P = 0.007), whereas the baseline RDW was not. This study shows that a progressive rise in RDW independently predicted mortality and CV events in ESRD patients. Rising RDW could be an additive predictor for adverse CV outcomes ESRD patients. PMID:25961836

  3. Management of patients with atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease in light of the latest guidelines.

    PubMed

    Młodawska, Elżbieta; Tomaszuk-Kazberuk, Anna; Łopatowska, Paulina; Musiał, Włodzimierz J; Małyszko, Jolanta

    2016-05-31

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the rate reaches even 30% in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients with AF and CKD have a significantly higher risk of thrombotic complications, particularly ischemic stroke, and at the same time, a higher bleeding risk (proportionally to the grade of renal failure). In addition, AF and CKD share a number of comorbidities and risk factors, which results in increased mortality rates. Moreover, disturbances in hemostasis are common complications of kidney disease. Their occurrence and severity correlate with worsening renal function, including ESRD. At present, the incidence of bleeding is declining, while thrombotic complications have become the predominant cause of mortality. Prophylactic antithrombotic treatment reduces the rate of stroke and other thrombotic complications. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have long been used in anticoagulant therapy, and more recently, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced, which are direct thrombin inhibitors. NOACs are a valuable anticoagulant option in this group of patients as long as a summary of product characteristics is followed. They are at least as effective as warfarin, while being safer, especially when it comes to intracranial hemorrhage. Renal function should be evaluated before initiation of NOACs and reevaluated when clinically indicated. Importantly, disturbances in hemostasis in patients with CKD and ESRD may lead to unexpected complications, such as extensive bleeding. If anticoagulation is administered to patients on dialysis, effects of an individual dialysis modality as well as interactions with other drugs given (eg, heparin) should be considered. PMID:27243343

  4. End Stage Renal Disease as a Potential Risk Factor for Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Ni; Yang, Te-Cheng; Lin, Jian-Teng; Lian, Ie-Bin

    2015-11-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has been reported to be an important risk factor for systemic vascular disease. Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is closely related with cardiovascular diseases; however, its association with ESRD had not been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate whether ESRD is a risk factor for RVO, including central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). This population-based study is based on the longitudinal data from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5344 patients with diagnosis of ESRD on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis during the period from January 1996 to December 2011. For each ESRD patient, we selected 20 non-ESRD patients matched on age and sex. Each ESRD patient and his/her controls were followed from the initiation of renal dialysis until either the diagnosis of RVO or censorship. Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the hazard of RVO between cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) adjusted by the comorbidities of RVO including diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, hypercholesteremia, and hypertriglyceridemia. After stratifying by DM status, the statistics were applied again to examine the associations among the DM cohort and non-DM cohort.The 16-year RVO cumulative incidence for ESRD cohort was 2-fold to the non-ESRD (1.01% vs 0.46%). After matching with age, sex, hypertension, and hypercholesteremia, the adjusted HR was 1.46 (95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.01, P value = 0.018). By further excluding patients with DM, the adjusted HR escalated to 2.43 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-3.83, P < 0.001). In contrast, there was no significant risk of ESRD on RVO in the DM patients (HR = 1.03). We conclude that among the non-DM patients, ESRD cases had significantly higher RVO rate than the non-ESRD, which indicates that ESRD maybe a potential risk factor for the development of RVO in

  5. Sleep Quality, Mood, Alertness and Their Variability in CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Argyropoulos, Christos; Buysse, Daniel J.; Nayar, Harry; Weisbord, Steven D.; Unruh, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Little is known about the association of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with sleep quality, mood, and alertness. In this report, we assessed these symptoms among patients with advanced CKD (stages 4–5) and those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and compared them to healthy controls without known kidney disease. Methods Patients were recruited from local dialysis units, outpatient nephrology clinics and the Thomas E. Starzl Transplant Institute. Healthy control subjects matched for age, gender and race were drawn from an archival database. Daily symptoms of sleep quality, mood, and alertness were assessed by visual analogue scales of the Pittsburgh Sleep Diary. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the Short Form-36 instrument. Results Sixty-nine dialysis patients and 23patients with advanced CKD demonstrated worse scores in sleep quality, mood, and alertness (p < 0.001) than controls. In adjusted analyses, European-American race, dialysis dependency, younger age, and physical performance SF-36 components were significantly associated with poor sleep quality, mood and alertness (p < 0.05). The dialysis population demonstrated higher day-to-day variability in scores than either the advanced CKD patients or the controls. Conclusion Advanced CKD and dialysis dependency are associated with impaired and highly variable sleep quality, mood, and alertness. PMID:20090370

  6. Renal Parenchymal Area and Risk of ESRD in Boys with Posterior Urethral Valves

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Furth, Susan L.; Zderic, Stephen A.; Canning, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Approximately 20% of boys with posterior urethral valves develop ESRD; however, few factors associated with the risk of ESRD have been identified. The objective of this study was to determine if renal parenchymal area, defined as the area of the kidney minus the area of the pelvicaliceal system on first postnatal ultrasound, is associated with the risk of ESRD in infants with posterior urethral valves. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort of boys who were diagnosed with posterior urethral valves at less than 6 months of age between 1988 and 2011 and followed for at least 1 year at a free-standing children’s hospital was assembled. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier analysis were used to estimate the association between renal parenchymal area and time to ESRD. Cox models were adjusted for age at presentation, minimum creatinine 1 month after bladder decompression, and vesicoureteral reflux. Results Sixty patients were followed for 393 person-years. Eight patients developed ESRD. Median renal parenchymal area was 15.9 cm2 (interquartile range=13.0–21.6 cm2). Each 1-cm2 increase in renal parenchymal area was associated with a lower risk of ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.98). The rate of time to ESRD was 10 times higher in boys with renal parenchymal area<12.4 cm2 than boys with renal parenchymal area≥12.4 cm2 (P<0.001). Renal parenchymal area could best discriminate children at risk for ESRD when the minimum creatinine in the first 1 month after bladder decompression was between 0.8 and 1.1 mg/dl. Conclusion In boys with posterior urethral valves presenting during the first 6 months of life, lower renal parenchymal area is associated with an increased risk of ESRD during childhood. The predictive ability of renal parenchymal area, which is available at time of diagnosis, should be validated in a larger, prospectively-enrolled cohort. PMID:24311709

  7. Assessing the outcome of rehabilitation in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Porter, G A

    1994-07-01

    Assessing the rehabilitative/restorative process requires the definition of desired outcome. Traditionally, medicine has defined the desired outcome of treatment as curing disease. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) cannot be cured by applying current biotechnology. Thus, to assess treatment interventions in patients with ESRD, the desired outcome must be expanded to incorporate the broader components of health, which include physical, mental, and social well-being or quality of life. Based on this expanded definition of health, desirable treatment outcomes in patients with ESRD include employment of those able to work, individual control over the effects of kidney disease and dialysis, enhanced fitness, improved communications with caregivers and family, improved compliance with the dialysis regimen, and resumption of many activities enjoyed before the initiation of dialysis. Broadening the definition of desired outcome requires new measurement techniques. Measurement instruments for health status must evaluate fixed disease, which imposes certain limits on expected outcome; mutable health status, which represents the focus of intervention; and factors unrelated to healthcare, which will modify the scope of intervention that can be prescribed. Health-care status involves both self-reported evaluation and physical assessment. The reporting forms should be comprehensive, convenient, controlled, and valid. Such forms can be targeted to gain information about the natural evolution of a disease or disability process, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment or other intervention on altering the disease or disability outcome, and to measure the quality of care. Two examples of the application of health status assessment will be reviewed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8023836

  8. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Böger, Carsten A.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Man; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Huang, Chunmei; Yang, Qiong; Teumer, Alexander; Krane, Vera; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Haak, Thomas; Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Coresh, Josef; Kollerits, Barbara; Haun, Margot; Paulweber, Bernhard; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Guo; Shlipak, Michael G.; Powe, Neil; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Dehghan, Abbas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bochud, Murielle; Siscovick, David; Rettig, Rainer; Kronenberg, Florian; Wanner, Christoph; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Heid, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m2 at follow-up) and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls). SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR) were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1). SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04) and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03) were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression. PMID:21980298

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Bond, T Christopher; Claxton, Ami; Sood, Vipan C; Kootsikas, Maria; Agnese, Wendy; Sibbel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%–90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124) undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315). The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being “moderately” to “extremely bothered” by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization – higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units) and intravenous (IV) iron (237.2 to 247.6 units) and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%), as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey). These results highlight the need to better identify and manage ESRD patients impacted by pruritus, as this symptom is associated with negative clinical outcomes and increased resource utilization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the current economic burden of pruritus in ESRD

  10. An open-label, non-randomised, phase 1, single-dose study to assess the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring intermittent haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sunzel, Maria; Learoyd, Maria; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yan; Ngo, Ngoc; Edeki, Timi

    2015-12-01

    For patients with normal renal function, the recommended ceftaroline fosamil dose is a 600 mg 1-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 12 h (q12h). In patients with a creatinine clearance of ≤30 mL/min, including those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the recommended dose is a 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h. This phase 1 study (NCT01664065) evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion in patients with ESRD. Patients with ESRD (n=8) participated in two treatment periods (ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg administered pre- and post-haemodialysis) separated by >1 week. Healthy volunteers (n=7) received a single 600 mg dose of ceftaroline fosamil. Blood (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and dialysate samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. In patients with ESRD, the geometric mean [coefficient of variation (%CV)] plasma ceftaroline area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) following post-haemodialysis ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg infusion was 64.8 (38.9)μg·h/mL, similar to that in volunteers following a 600 mg infusion [62.7 (9.4)μg·h/mL]. Ceftaroline AUC0-∞ decreased by ca. 50% when infusion was initiated pre-haemodialysis. In the pre-haemodialysis treatment period, 80% of the ceftaroline fosamil dose was recovered in dialysate as ceftaroline (73%) and ceftaroline M-1 (7%). The frequency of adverse events was similar across patients with ESRD (pre- and post-haemodialysis) and volunteers (43%, 50% and 43% of subjects, respectively). Ceftaroline fosamil 200 mg 1-h i.v. infusion q12h, administered post-haemodialysis on dialysis days, is an appropriate dosage regimen for ESRD patients. PMID:26545441

  11. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  12. Nonadherence of Oral Antihyperglycemic Medication Will Increase Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Ya; Chien, Li-Nien; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2015-11-01

    Poor glycemic control is related to an increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study investigated the association between medication adherence and the risk of ESRD in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus.In this population-based cohort study, we used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to identify 559,864 patients with newly diagnosed or treated diabetes mellitus who were ages from 20 to 85 years between 2001 and 2008. We identified 1695 patients with ESRD during the study period. The mean follow-up time of the patients with ESRD was 5.7 years. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate the hazard ratios for ESRD among the patients with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus.After adjustment for various covariates, nonadherence to oral antihyperglycemic medication (OAM) was associated with a higher risk of ESRD compared with adherence to OAM (hazard ratio [HR], 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.23). The effects of nonadherence to OAM on the risk of ESRD were significant for patients without hypertension, without gout, without chronic kidney disease, undergoing OAM polytherapy, and undergoing metformin polytherapy (HR [95% CIs], 1.18 [1.00-1.39], 1.13 [1.02-1.26], 1.17 [1.03-1.33], 1.22 [1.08-1.38], and 1.13 [1.02-1.25], respectively).In conclusion, nonadherence to OAM therapy is associated with ESRD. Adherence to medication therapy can prevent the progressive loss of renal function and ESRD for patients with diabetes. PMID:26632708

  13. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Goh, Anne C H; Go, Alan S; Lundstrom, Robert J; Zaroff, Jonathan; Jang, James J; Allen, Elaine

    2016-05-15

    The optimal coronary revascularization strategy (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] or percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains uncertain. We performed an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies comparing CABG and PCI in patients with ESRD using a random-effects model for the primary outcome of long-term all-cause mortality. Our review registered through PROSPERO included observational studies published after 2011 to ensure overlap with previous studies and identified 7 new studies for a total of 23. We found that the median sample size in the selected studies was 125 patients (25 to 15,784) with a large variation in the covariate risk adjustment and only 3 studies reporting the indications for the revascularization strategy. CABG was associated with a small reduction in mortality (relative risk 0.92, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.96) with significant heterogeneity demonstrated (p = 0.005, I(2) = 48.6%). Subgroup analysis by categorized "year of study initiation" (<1990, 1991 to 2003, >2004) further confirmed the summary estimate trending toward survival benefit of CABG along with a substantial decrease in heterogeneity after 2004 (p = 0.64, I(2) = 0%). In conclusion, our updated systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrated that in patients with ESRD referred for coronary revascularization, CABG was associated with a small decrease in the relative risk of long-term mortality compared with PCI. The generalizability of the finding to all patients with ESRD referred for coronary revascularization is limited because of a lack of known indications for coronary revascularization, substantial variation in covariate risk adjustment, and lack of randomized clinical trial data. PMID:27013385

  14. Geographic variation and neighborhood factors are associated with low rates of pre-end-stage renal disease nephrology care.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hua; Lovasik, Brendan P; Pastan, Stephen O; Chang, Howard H; Chowdhury, Ritam; Patzer, Rachel E

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation of pre-end-stage renal disease (pre-ESRD) nephrology care has not been studied across the United States. Here we sought to identify geographic differences in pre-ESRD care, assess for county-level geographic and sociodemographic risk factors, and correlate with patient outcomes using facility-level mortality. Patients from 5387 dialysis facilities across the United States from 2007 to 2010 were included from the Dialysis Facility Report. Marginal generalized estimating equations were used for modeling with geographic cluster analysis to detect clusters of facilities with low rates of pre-ESRD care. On average, 67% of patients received pre-ESRD care in the United States but with significant variability across regions ranging from 3 to 99%. Five geographic clusters of facilities with low rates of pre-ESRD care were the metropolitan areas of San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, and Baltimore, along with Southern states along the Mississippi River. Dialysis facilities with the lowest rates of pre-ESRD care were more likely to be located in urban counties with high African-American populations and low educational attainment. A 10% higher proportion of patients receiving pre-ESRD care was associated with 1.3% lower patient mortality as reflected by facility-level mortality. Thus, geographic and sociodemographic factors can be used to design quality improvement initiatives to increase access to nephrology care nationwide and improve patient outcomes. PMID:25901471

  15. Decreased retinol-binding protein 4 in the sera of patients with end-stage renal disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W X; Zhou, W; Zhang, Z M; Zhang, Z Q; He, J F; Shi, B Y

    2014-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have very high serum RBP4 levels. However, whether successful kidney transplantation alleviates these elevated serum RBP4 levels is unclear. The serum RBP4 levels of 24 ESRD patients were determined before transplantation and at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after kidney transplantation. The control group included 22 healthy subjects. Serum RBP4 concentrations were measured using a commercial kit via the immunologic turbidimetric method, and were related to biomarkers for renal and liver function. The serum RBP4 level of ESRD patients before kidney transplantation (160.8 ± 29.1 mg/L) was approximately 7-fold higher than that of normal controls (22.6 ± 11.0 mg/L; P = 0.000). The serum RBP4 level before transplantation was significantly higher than that at 1 day (65.3 ± 28.4 mg/L), 1 week (48.3 ± 22.9 mg/L), and 1 month after transplantation (53.1 ± 25.5 mg/L; P = 0.000). However, these values were still higher than those of controls (P = 0.000). Univariate regression analysis showed that the percent changes in serum RBP4 concentration before and after kidney transplantation were positively correlated with serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphate, and pre-albumin concentrations and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate. The serum RBP4 concentration of patients with ESRD decreased significantly after kidney transplantation; therefore, we found that serum RBP4 concentration was related to renal function. PMID:25299197

  16. Calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia in a patient with granulomatous mycosis fungoides and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Ohashi, Naro; Tsuji, Naoko; Naito, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Shinsuke; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikura, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Yasuda, Hideo; Kato, Akihiko; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Tokura, Yoshiki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide

    2013-05-01

    An 86-year-old man, diagnosed as having mycosis fungoides in May 2008 and treated with repeated radiation therapy, was admitted to our hospital for initiation of hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in April 2012. On admission, his corrected serum calcium level was 9.3 mg/dL, and his intact parathyroid hormone level was 121.9 pg/mL (normal range 13.9-78.5 pg/mL), indicating secondary hyperparathyroidism due to ESRD. After starting hemodialysis, urinary volume diminished rapidly. The serum calcium level increased (12.7 mg/dL), and the intact parathyroid hormone level was suppressed (< 5 pg/mL), while the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) level increased (114 pg/mL, normal range: 20.0-60.0 pg/mL) in June 2012. The possibilities of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis were ruled out. Skin biopsies from tumorous lesions revealed a diagnosis of granulomatous mycosis fungoides. The serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels and the degrees of skin lesions went in parallel with the increased serum calcium and calcitriol levels. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia possibly associated with granulomatous mycosis fungoides. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides is rare, and its association with calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia has not been reported. Careful attention to calcium metabolism is needed in patients with granulomatous mycosis fungoides, especially in patients with ESRD. PMID:24175265

  17. Low Serum Creatine Kinase Level Predicts Mortality in Patients with a Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Marie; Chassé, Jean-François; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum creatine kinase (sCK) reflects CK activity from striated skeletal muscle. Muscle wasting is a risk factor for mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether sCK is a predictor of mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a CKD population. Methods We included 1801 non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients from the NephroTest cohort. We used time-fixed and time-dependent cause-specific Cox models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of death and for the risk of ESRD associated with gender-specific sCK tertiles. Results Higher sCK level at baseline was associated with a lower age, a higher body mass index, and a higher level of 24 h urinary creatinine excretion, serum albumin and prealbumin (p<0.001). Men, patients of sub-Saharan ancestry, smokers and statin users also experienced a higher level of sCK. In a time-fixed Cox survival model (median follow-up 6.0 years), the lowest gender-specific sCK tertile was associated with a higher risk of death before and after adjustment for confounders (Crude model: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 (95% CI: 1.34–2.32) compared to the highest tertile; fully-adjusted model: HR 1.37 (95% CI: 1.02–1.86)). Similar results were obtained with a time-dependent Cox model. The sCK level was not associated with the risk of ESRD. Conclusion A low level of sCK is associated with an increased risk of death in a CKD population. sCK levels might reflect muscle mass and nutritional status. PMID:27248151

  18. Incident ESRD and Treatment-Resistant Hypertension: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rikki M.; Calhoun, David A.; Bell, Emmy K.; Bowling, C. Barrett; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Oparil, Suzanne; McClellan, William; Warnock, David G.; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that treatment-resistant hypertension is common and increasing in prevalence among US adults. While hypertension is a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), few data are available on the association between treatment-resistant hypertension and ESRD risk. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants We analyzed data from 9,974 Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants treated for hypertension without ESRD at baseline. Predictor Treatment-resistant hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) with concurrent use of 3 antihypertensive medication classes including a diuretic or use of ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes including a diuretic regardless of BP level. Outcome Incident ESRD was identified by linkage of REGARDS Study participants with the US Renal Data System. Measurements During a baseline in-home study visit, BP was measured twice and classes of antihypertensive medication being taken were determined by pill bottle inspection. Results Over a median follow-up of 6.4 years, there were 152 incident cases of ESRD (110 ESRD cases among 2,147 with treatment-resistant hypertension and 42 ESRD cases among 7,827 without treatment-resistant hypertension). The incidence of ESRD per 1,000 person-years for hypertensive participants with and without treatment-resistant hypertension was 8.86 (95% CI, 7.35–10.68) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.65–1.19), respectively. After multivariable adjustment, the HR for ESRD comparing hypertensive participants with versus without treatment-resistant hypertension was 6.32 (95% CI, 4.30–9.30). Of the participants who developed incident ESRD during follow-up, 72% had treatment-resistant hypertension at baseline. Limitations BP, eGFR, and albuminuria assessed at a single time point. Conclusions Individuals with treatment-resistant hypertension are at increased risk for ESRD. Appropriate clinical management strategies are

  19. Risk of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the risk of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD).A retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study.ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 585.The study cohort included 93,804 ESRD patients registered with the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between January 2000 and December 2009. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 93,804 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of NAION were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for NAION after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative incidence rate of NAION.The incidence of NAION following ESRD.In total, 133 ESRD patients (0.14%) and 51 controls (0.05%) had NAION (P < 0.001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of NAION in the ESRD patients compared with the controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.11-4.67). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypotension, hyperlipidemia, and 2-way interaction terms between any 2 factors, ESRD patients were 3.12 times more likely to develop NAION than non-ESRD patients in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 3.12, 95% CI = 2.10-4.64). Additionally, patients with hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed higher incidence rates of NAION in the ESRD group compared with the controls: 2.31 (95% CI = 1.40-3.82) for hypertension and 2.72 (95% CI = 1.14-6.50) for hyperlipidemia.ESRD increased the risk of NAION, which is an interdisciplinary emergency. Close

  20. Heart Failure in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Segall, Liviu; Nistor, Ionut; Covic, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Heart failure (HF) is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is strongly associated with mortality in these patients. However, the treatment of HF in this population is largely unclear. Study Design. We conducted a systematic integrative review of the literature to assess the current evidence of HF treatment in CKD patients, searching electronic databases in April 2014. Synthesis used narrative methods. Setting and Population. We focused on adults with a primary diagnosis of CKD and HF. Selection Criteria for Studies. We included studies of any design, quantitative or qualitative. Interventions. HF treatment was defined as any formal means taken to improve the symptoms of HF and/or the heart structure and function abnormalities. Outcomes. Measures of all kinds were considered of interest. Results. Of 1,439 results returned by database searches, 79 articles met inclusion criteria. A further 23 relevant articles were identified by hand searching. Conclusions. Control of fluid overload, the use of beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, and optimization of dialysis appear to be the most important methods to treat HF in CKD and ESRD patients. Aldosterone antagonists and digitalis glycosides may additionally be considered; however, their use is associated with significant risks. The role of anemia correction, control of CKD-mineral and bone disorder, and cardiac resynchronization therapy are also discussed. PMID:24959595

  1. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    PubMed

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen

  2. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Chun; Hou, Jia-Jeng; Jong, Ing-Ching; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Ma, Tsung-Liang; Hsu, Yueh-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE) program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80%) chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs) were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P = 0.108) and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P = 0.090). Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD. PMID:27042665

  3. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Pei-Chun; Hou, Jia-Jeng; Jong, Ing-Ching; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE) program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80%) chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs) were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P = 0.108) and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P = 0.090). Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD. PMID:27042665

  4. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  5. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike. PMID:22578674

  6. The Economics of Late-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Health care reimbursement is undergoing a fundamental change from volume-driven to value-driven care. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is marshaling this change and empowering hospitals through Accountable Care Organizations to accept risk. ESRD care/nephrology was awarded the only disease-specific Accountable Care Organization, ESRD Seamless Care Organizations. Dialysis providers in partnership with nephrologists will be exploring how ESRD Seamless Care Organizations will drive improvement in care. CKD care and economics will no longer be isolated from ESRD but possibly more closely linked to global patient outcomes. Preparation for these changes will require unique co-operation and collaboration between nephrologists, dialysis providers, payers, and hospitals/health care systems. Early pilot trials, demonstration projects, and special need programs have suggested value care can be delivered. Whether these results are scalable needs to be determined. PMID:27324674

  7. Chromosome 2q31.1 associates with ESRD in women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sandholm, Niina; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Salem, Rany M; Brennan, Eoin P; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; McKay, Gareth J; Sadlier, Denise M; Williams, Winfred W; Martin, Finian; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Tarnow, Lise; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tryggvason, Karl; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Comeau, Mary E; Langefeld, Carl D; Godson, Catherine; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Maxwell, Alexander P; Florez, Jose C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2013-10-01

    Sex and genetic variation influence the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes. We performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 3652 patients from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study with type 1 diabetes to determine whether sex-specific genetic risk factors for ESRD exist. A common variant, rs4972593 on chromosome 2q31.1, was associated with ESRD in women (P<5×10(-8)) but not in men (P=0.77). This association was replicated in the meta-analysis of three independent type 1 diabetes cohorts (P=0.02) and remained significant for women (P<5×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.47 to 2.24]) upon combined meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. rs4972593 is located between the genes that code for the Sp3 transcription factor, which interacts directly with estrogen receptor α and regulates the expression of genes linked to glomerular function and the pathogenesis of nephropathy, and the CDCA7 transcription factor, which regulates cell proliferation. Further examination revealed potential transcription factor-binding sites within rs4972593 and predicted eight estrogen-responsive elements within 5 kb of this locus. Moreover, we found sex-specific differences in the glomerular expression levels of SP3 (P=0.004). Overall, these results suggest that rs4972593 is a sex-specific genetic variant associated with ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and may underlie the sex-specific protection against ESRD. PMID:24029427

  8. Antidiabetic Therapy in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Suzanne M; Simon, Barbara; Kobrin, Sidney M

    2015-01-01

    There has been substantial growth in the variety of available antidiabetic agents during the last decade and a half. The role of these newer agents in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population, and their relative benefits and risks in this population compared to patients without ESRD are not yet clear. This stems from the altered state of glucose homeostasis in ESRD, which places patients at high risk for hypoglycemia and, in certain situations, hyperglycemia. In addition, there is a dearth of evidence to support a benefit of tight glycemic control on either micro- or macrovascular outcomes in ESRD patients; furthermore, the metrics by which glycemic control is conventionally measured are less valid in ESRD. In this review, we will discuss noninsulin and insulin-based therapies as well as unique challenges, contraindications, advantages, and disadvantages to their use in ESRD. We will also review issues pertinent to both hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. PMID:25898790

  9. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Tilea, Anca M; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2015-07-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine-Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population. PMID:25677388

  10. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26264780

  11. Risk of Retinal Vein Occlusion Following End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study was designed as a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. The subjects were ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585. The study cohort included 92,774 ESRD patients registered between January 2000 and December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 92,774 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of RVO were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for RVO after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to calculate the RVO cumulative incidence rate. The main outcome measure was the incidence of RVO following ESRD. In total, 904 ESRD patients (0.97%) and 410 controls (0.44%) had RVO (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of RVO in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.72–3.43). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease, ESRD patients were 3.05 times more likely to develop RVO in the full cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.64–3.51). In addition, hypertension patients showed high incidence rate of RVO in the ESRD group compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval = 1.44–2.03) and maintained significant risk of RVO after adjustment for other confounders in the

  12. Risk of Retinal Vein Occlusion Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study was designed as a retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. The subjects were ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), code 585. The study cohort included 92,774 ESRD patients registered between January 2000 and December 2009 at the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 92,774 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of RVO were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for RVO after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the RVO cumulative incidence rate. The main outcome measure was the incidence of RVO following ESRD.In total, 904 ESRD patients (0.97%) and 410 controls (0.44%) had RVO (P < 0.0001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of RVO in the ESRD patients compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.72-3.43). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease, ESRD patients were 3.05 times more likely to develop RVO in the full cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = 2.64-3.51). In addition, hypertension patients showed high incidence rate of RVO in the ESRD group compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval = 1.44-2.03) and maintained significant risk of RVO after adjustment for other confounders in the cohort (adjusted

  13. Direct costs associated with chronic kidney disease among type 2 diabetic patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Satyavani, K.; Kothandan, H.; Jayaraman, M.; Viswanathan, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the direct costs of medical care among hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 209 (M:F, 133:76) patients were divided into groups based on the severity of kidney disease. Group 1 subjects had undergone renal transplantation (n = 12), group 2 was CKD patients on hemodialysis (n = 45), group 3 was patients with CKD, prior to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (n = 66), and group 4 (n = 86) consisted of subjects without any complications. Details about expenditure per hospitalization, length of stay during admission, direct medical and nonmedical cost, expenditure for the previous two years, and source of bearing the expenditure were recorded in a questionnaire. Diabetic patients with CKD prior to ESRD spend more per hospitalization than patients without any complications. [Median ₹ 12,664 vs. 3,214]. The total median cost of CKD patients on hemodialysis was significantly higher than other CKD patients (INR 61,170 vs. 12,664). The median cost involved in kidney transplantation was ₹ 392,920. The total expenditure for hospital admissions in two years was significantly higher for dialysis than transplantation. Patients on hemodialysis or kidney transplantation tend to stay longer as inpatient admissions. The source of funds for the expenditure was mainly personal savings (46%). The expenditure on hospital admissions for CKD was considerably higher, and so, there is a need to develop a protocol on a cost-effective strategy for the treatment of CKD. PMID:25120290

  14. Sequence Variants of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Gene and the Clinical Courses of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hu, Fu-Chang; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background. PPAR-γ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reportedly play an important role in determining metabolic risk among diverse population. Whether PPAR-γ SNPs affect the clinical courses in ESRD patients is unknown. Methods. From a multicenter cohort, we identified 698 patients with prevalent ESRD between 2002 and 2003, and other 782 healthy subjects as control. Two PPAR-γ SNPs, Pro12Ala (rs1801282) and C161T (rs3856806), were genotyped and their association with ESRD was examined. Both groups were prospectively followed until 2007, and the predictability of genotypes for the long-term survival of ESRD patients was analyzed. Results. After multivariable-adjusted regression, GG genotype of Pro12Ala was significantly more likely to associate with ESRD (P < 0.001) among patients with non-diabetes-related ESRD. Cox's proportional hazard regression showed that both Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms were significant predictors of mortality in ESRD patients with DM (Pro12Ala: GG versus other genotypes, hazard ratio [HR] <0.01; P < 0.001; for C161T, CC versus TT genotypes, HR 2.86; P < 0.001; CT versus TT genotypes, HR 1.93; P < 0.001). Conclusion. This is the first and largest study to evaluate PPAR-γ SNPs in ESRD patients. Further mechanistic study is needed to elucidate the role of PPAR-γ among ESRD patients. PMID:25784779

  15. Comparison of Measured GFR, Serum Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Beta-Trace Protein to Predict ESRD in African Americans With Hypertensive CKD

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Nrupen A.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Kusek, John W.; Contreras, Gabriel; Bakris, George; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are at highest risk to progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) is necessary to reduce the burden of kidney failure. The relative utility of traditional markers of kidney function, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and serum creatinine, and emerging markers of kidney function, including cystatin C and beta-trace protein (BTP), to predict ESRD and mortality has yet to be established. Study Design Randomized clinical trial followed by an observational cohort study. Setting & Participants 865 African American individuals with hypertensive CKD enrolled in a clinical trial of two levels of blood pressure control and three different antihypertensive drugs as initial therapy and subsequently followed by an observational cohort study. Predictors Quintile of measured GFR (mGFR) by iothalamate clearance, serum creatinine, serum creatinine-based estimated GFR (eGFRSCr), cystatin C, and BTP. Outcomes and Measurements Incidence of ESRD and mortality. Results A total of 246 participants reached ESRD over a median follow-up of 102 months. The incidence rate of ESRD was higher with higher quintiles of each marker. The association between higher BTP and ESRD was stronger than those for the other markers, including mGFR. All the markers remained significantly associated with ESRD after adjustment for mGFR and relevant covariates (all p<0.05), with BTP retaining the strongest association (HR for highest versus lowest quintile, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.2-14.9). Associations with the combined endpoint of ESRD or mortality (n=390) were weaker, but remained significant for cystatin C (p=0.05) and BTP (p=0.004). Limitations The ability of these markers to predict ESRD and mortality in other racial and ethnic groups and among individuals with CKD due to other causes is unknown. Conclusions Plasma BTP and cystatin C may be useful adjuncts to serum creatinine and mGFR in evaluating risk for progression of

  16. Cerebral blood flow changes in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients: an arterial-spin labeling MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao Lu; Wen, Ji Qiu; Zhang, Long Jiang; Zheng, Gang; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Ya; Zheng, Li Juan; Wu, Long; Chen, Hui Juan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Lu, Guang Ming; Ji, Xue Man; Zhang, Zong Jun

    2016-08-01

    We used arterial-spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, a non-invasive technique to evaluate cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD), and nondialysis ESRD patients compared with healthy cohort. Ninety seven ESRD patients including 32 PD patients (20 male, 12 female; mean age 33 ± 8 years), 33 HD patients (22 male, 11 female; mean age 33 ± 8 years) and 32 nondialysis patients (20 male, 12 female; mean age 35 ± 7 years) and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (20 male, 11 female; mean age 32 ± 8 years) were included in this study. All subjects underwent ASL MR imaging, neuropsychologic tests, and ESRD patients underwent laboratory testing. CBF values were compared among PD, HD, nondialysis patients and control groups. Correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis were performed to investigate the association between CBF values and hemoglobin, neuropsychologic test results, serum creatinine, urea levels, disease duration, and dialysis duration. Elevated CBFs of whole brain region, gray matter, and white matter were found in all ESRD patient groups compared with healthy controls (all P < 0.001). However, compared with non-dialysis ESRD patients, both PD and HD patients had widespread regional CBF decline mainly in bilateral frontal and anterior cingulate cortices. There were no differences for CBF between PD and HD patient groups. Negative correlations were observed between mean CBFs of whole brain region, gray matter, and white matter and the hemoglobin level in all ESRD patients. Multiple linear regression showed elevated CBF of multiple brain areas correlated with some neuropsychological tests in ESRD patients (all P < 0.001, AlphaSim corrected), but the association was not present or shrank after adjusting hemoglobin level. This study found that mean CBF was predominantly increased in patients with ESRD, which correlated with their

  17. Interferon-Based Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Reduces All-Cause Mortality in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: An 8-Year Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Hung, Peir-Haur; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The long-term survival of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who received interferon treatment has not been extensively evaluated.The HCV cohort was the ESRD patients with de novo HCV infection from 2004 to 2011; they were classified into treated and untreated groups according to interferon therapy records. Patients aged <20 years and those with a history of hepatitis B, kidney transplantation, or cancer were excluded. The control cohort included ESRD patients without HCV infection matched 4:1 to the HCV cohort by age, sex, and year of ESRD registration. We followed up all study participants until kidney transplantation, death, or the end of 2011, whichever came first. We assessed risk of all-cause mortality by using the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model with time-dependent covariate.In the HCV cohort, 134 patients (6.01%) received interferon treatment. Compared with the uninfected control cohort, the treated group had a lower risk of death (hazard ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22-0.99). The untreated group had a 2.62-fold higher risk (95% CI 1.24-5.55) of death compared with the treated group. For the HCV cohort without cirrhosis or hepatoma, the risk of death in the treated group was further markedly reduced (hazard ratio 0.17, 95% CI 0.04-0.68) compared with that in the control cohort.For ESRD patients with HCV infection, receiving interferon treatment is associated with a survival advantage. Such an advantage is more prominent in HCV patients without cirrhosis or hepatoma. PMID:26632730

  18. Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS): an efficient tool for depression screening in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Neitzer, Andrea; Sun, Sumi; Doss, Sheila; Moran, John; Schiller, Brigitte

    2012-04-01

    Depression is common in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Various screening tools for depression in ESRD patients are available. This study aimed to validate the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS) with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as depression screening tool in conventional hemodialysis (CHD) patients. One hundred sixty two CHD patients were studied with both screening questionnaires. We used the Pearson Correlation Coefficient to measure the agreement between BDI-II and BDI-FS scores from 134 patients who responded to both questionnaires. Receiver operating characteristics curve and area under the curve were constructed to determine a valid BDI-FS cutoff score to identify ESRD patients at risk for depression. BDI-II and BDI-FS scores strongly correlated (Pearson r = 0.85, p < 0.0001). At a BDI-II cutoff ≥16, receiver operating characteristics showed the best balance between sensitivity and specificity for the BDI-FS cutoff value of ≥4 with a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.5%, 99.9%) and a specificity of 91.8% (95% CI: 84.5%, 96.4%). When applying the above cutoff scores, prevalence of depressive symptoms in all completed questionnaires was found to be 28.7% (BDI-II) and 30.1% (BDI-FS), respectively. The BDI-FS was found to be an efficient and effective tool for depression screening in ESRD patients which can be easily implemented in routine dialysis care. PMID:22754932

  19. Risk factors for mortality in end-stage kidney disease patients under online-hemodiafiltration: three-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Martins, Pedro de; Moura, Alexandra; Madureira, José; Alija, Pablo; Oliveira, José Gerardo; Lopez, Martin; Filgueiras, Madalena; Amado, Leonilde; Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Miranda, Vasco; Mesquita, Edgar; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Verónica; Lobato, Luísa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the predictors of mortality in a group of end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) patients under dialysis, by performing a three-year follow-up study. From the 236 patients included in this study, 54 patients died during the three-year follow-up period. Our data showed that the risk of death was higher in patients presenting lower levels of mean cell hemoglobin concentration, transferrin, and albumin. Our study showed that poor nutritional status and an inflammatory-induced iron depleted erythropoiesis are important factors for mortality in these patients. PMID:27028295

  20. Management of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; García Juárez, Ignacio; Rincón Pedrero, Rodolfo; Torre, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, mainly in those on hemodialysis (HD). The seroprevalence of HCV in developing countries ranges between 7% and 40%. Risk factors for this infection in the CKD population include the number of blood transfusions, duration of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and prevalence of HCV in HD. Chronic HCV infection in patients with ESRD is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality in the pre and post kidney transplant periods. The increase in mortality is directly associated with liver complications and an elevated cardiovascular risk in HCV-infected patients on hemodialysis. Antiviral treatment may improve the prognosis of patients with HCV, and standard interferon remains the cornerstone of treatment. Treatment of HCV in patients with CKD is complex, but achieving a sustained viral response may decrease the frequency of complications after transplantation. It appears that HCV-infected patients who remain on maintenance dialysis are at increased risk of death compared with HCV patients undergoing renal transplantation. PMID:25767389

  1. Changes in the quality of life of patients with end-stage renal disease treated with high-efficiency bicarbonate hemodialysis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    De Icaza, E; Arredondo, A; Calderon, C; Hernandez, G

    1997-01-01

    In accordance with the epidemiological changes in Mexico, the results of this study are intended to contribute to the evaluation of the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program of the health services in Mexico. We measured the quality of life of 21 ESRD patients before and after 6 months of exposure to treatment with high-efficiency hemodialysis with bicarbonate (HEHD/bicarbonate). We cross-sectionally assessed the Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) index and the biochemical status of the subject pool. The QALY score for patients undergoing HEHD/bicarbonate after 6 months was significantly higher than with the previous dialysis modality (0.95 and 0.74, respectively, p = 0.02). The marked similarities of the biochemical status variables indicated there was little or no effect in the improvement of the quality of life of patients. Dialysis modality likely exerts an important influence on the quality of life of chronic dialysis patients; thus we believe HEHD/bicarbonate does offer greater benefits than hemodialysis alone. Longitudinal studies are needed to better ascertain the effect of the case mix, the treatment approach, and the characteristics of the dialysis in relation to the improvement of the quality of life of ESRD patients. PMID:9044456

  2. Prognostic Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, Cara M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the annual mortality rate for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing, likely due to an increase in kidney transplantation rate, the survival probability for ESRD patients from day one of dialysis has not changed, and is still poor with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 34%. This is contributed to by a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. In order to improve survival outcomes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular related mortality need to be identified. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index can be used to assess heart rate control and may predict cardiovascular mortality. This paper will discuss how HRV, baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index are altered in renal disease and the utility of these indices as markers of cardiac risk in this patient population. PMID:22294981

  3. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oseltamivir in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with automated peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Rayner, Craig R; Giraudon, Mylène; Kamal, Mohamed A; Morcos, Peter N; Robson, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at increased risk of developing complications associated with influenza infection. Oseltamivir is indicated for influenza treatment in ESRD patients, but the disposition is poorly understood in this patient population. This study aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oseltamivir in automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and construct a pharmacokinetic model to assist with optimized dosing. METHODS Ten adults with ESRD were prescribed an aggressive APD regimen consisting of three continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) sessions during the day and two continuous ambulatory (CAPD) sessions overnight. Oseltamivir was administered as a single 75 mg dose, immediately before APD treatment. RESULTS Oseltamivir was rapidly eliminated via first-pass metabolism, with most of the dose (Fraction metabolized = 0.964) reaching the circulation as the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate. This metabolite was cleared slowly and was quantifiable throughout the sampling interval. The disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate was described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively. Metabolite clearance by CCPD [0.32 l h−1 (70 kg)−1] was 1.9-fold faster than via CAPD [0.17 l h−1 (70 kg)−1], with renal elimination being dominant in patients with residual urine production. Model simulations showed that a single 75 mg dose attained target exposures in patients with negligible or low urine clearance. However, higher doses are recommended for further investigation in patients with high residual renal function. In all patients, oseltamivir was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS In APD patients with anuria or low residual renal elimination, a single 75 mg dose of oseltamivir produced exposures at the upper end of the safety margin. PMID:25289522

  4. Usefulness of resistive index on spectral Doppler ultrasonography in the detection of renal cell carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of the resistive index (RI) on spectral Doppler ultrasonography (US) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods: Seventeen ESRD patients with kidneys in which renal masses were suspected in routine US were subjected. They underwent computed tomography scans and additional Doppler US for the characterization of the detected lesions. All underwent radical nephrectomy with the suspicion of RCC. Fourteen patients finally were included. RI measurements were conducted in the region of the suspected renal mass and the background renal parenchyma. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reproducibility of the RI measurement. A paired t-test was used to compare the RI values between the renal mass and the background renal parenchyma (P<0.05). Results: The RI values measured at the RCCs were significantly lower than those measured at the background renal parenchyma (0.41-0.65 vs. 0.75-0.89; P<0.001). The intrareader reproducibility proved to be excellent and good for the renal masses and the parenchyma, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion: RI on spectral Doppler US is useful in detecting RCC in patients with ESRD. The RI values measured at the RCCs were significantly lower than those measured at the background renal parenchyma. PMID:24936507

  5. Hemodialysis versus Peritoneal Dialysis: A Comparison of Survival Outcomes in South-East Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Khin, Lay-Wai; Lau, Titus; Chua, Horng-Ruey; Vathsala, A.; Lee, Evan; Luo, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies comparing patient survival of hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) have yielded conflicting results and no such study was from South-East Asia. This study aimed to compare the survival outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who started dialysis with HD and PD in Singapore. Methods Survival data for a maximum of 5 years from a single-center cohort of 871 ESRD patients starting dialysis with HD (n = 641) or PD (n = 230) from 2005–2010 was analyzed using the flexible Royston-Parmar (RP) model. The model was also applied to a subsample of 225 propensity-score-matched patient pairs and subgroups defined by age, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. Results After adjusting for the effect of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of death was higher in patients initiating dialysis with PD than those initiating dialysis with HD (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67–2.59; p<0.001), although there was no significant difference in mortality between the two modalities in the first 12 months of treatment. Consistently, in the matched subsample, patients starting PD had a higher risk of death than those starting HD (HR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.30–2.28, p<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that PD may be similar to or better than HD in survival outcomes among young patients (≤65 years old) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Conclusion ESRD patients who initiated dialysis with HD experienced better survival outcomes than those who initiated dialysis with PD in Singapore, although survival outcomes may not differ between the two dialysis modalities in young and healthier patients. These findings are potentially confounded by selection bias, as patients were not randomized to the two dialysis modalities in this cohort study. PMID:26444003

  6. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression.Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66-1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57-11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39-19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use.This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  7. Safety and efficacy of liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and end-stage renal disease: protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten; Jensen, Tonny; Resuli, Marsela; Hansen, Pernille M; Christensen, Karl B; Holst, Jens J; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Owing to renal clearance, several antidiabetic agents cannot be used in patients with ESRD. The present protocol describes an investigator-initiated trial aiming to test safety and efficacy of treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and dialysis-dependent ESRD. Methods and analysis Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes and ESRD will be compared with 20 matched patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function in a randomised, parallel, placebo-controlled (1 : 1), double-blinded setting. All participants will receive 12 weeks of daily treatment with liraglutide/placebo in an individually titrated dose of 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 mg. Over nine visits, plasma liraglutide, glycaemic control, β-cell response, cardiovascular parameters, various biomarkers and adverse events will be assessed. The primary endpoint will be evaluated from dose-corrected plasma trough liraglutide concentration at the final trial visit to determine potential accumulation in the ESRD group. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the Danish Medicines Agency, the Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark and the Danish Data Protection Agency. An external monitoring committee (The Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospitals) will oversee the study. The results of the study will be presented at national and international scientific meetings, and publications will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01394341 PMID:23624993

  8. Primary prevention of atrial fibrillation with beta-blockers in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Tse; Chiang, Jiun-Yang; Liao, Min-Tsun; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Hwang, Juey Jen; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Lin, Lian-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that beta-blocker lower the risk of development of atrial fibrillation (AF) and in-hospital stroke after cardiac surgery. This study was to assess whether beta-blockers could decrease incidence of new-onset AF in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). We identified patients from a nation-wide database called Registry for Catastrophic Illness, which encompassed almost 100% of the patients receiving dialysis therapy in Taiwan from 1995 to 2008. Propensity score matching and Cox’s proportional hazards regression model were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for new-onset AF. Among 100066 patients, 41.7% received beta-blockers. After a median follow-up of 1500 days, the incidence of new-onset AF significantly decreased in patients treated with beta-blockers (HR = 0.483, 95% confidence interval = 0.437-0.534). The prevention of new-onset AF was significantly better in patients taking longer duration of beta-blockers therapy (P for time trend <0.001). The AF prevention effect remains robust in subgroup analyses. In conclusion, beta-blockers seem effective in the primary prevention of AF in ESRD patients. Hence, beta-blockers may be the target about upstream treatment of AF. PMID:26643783

  9. ESRD due to Multiple Myeloma in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Reule, Scott; Sexton, Donal J; Solid, Craig A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Foley, Robert N

    2016-05-01

    Although management of multiple myeloma has changed substantially in the last decade, it is unknown whether the burden of ESRD due to multiple myeloma has changed, or whether survival of patients with multiple myeloma on RRT has improved. Regarding ESRD due to multiple myeloma necessitating RRT in the United States, we evaluated temporal trends between 2001 and 2010 for demography-adjusted incidence ratios, relative to rates in 2001-2002, and mortality hazards from RRT initiation, relative to hazards in 2001-2002. In this retrospective cohort study, we used the US Renal Data System database (n=1,069,343), 2001-2010, to identify patients with ESRD due to multiple myeloma treated with RRT (n=12,703). Demography-adjusted incidence ratios of ESRD from multiple myeloma decreased between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010 in the overall population (demography-adjusted incidence ratio 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.86) and in most demographic subgroups examined. Mortality rates were 86.7, 41.4, and 34.4 per 100 person-years in the first 3 years of RRT, respectively, compared with 32.3, 20.6, and 21.3 in matched controls without multiple myeloma. Unadjusted mortality hazards ratios declined monotonically after 2004 to a value of 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.77 in 2009-2010, and declines between 2001-2002 and 2008-2009 were observed (P<0.05) in most demographic subgroups examined. Findings were similar when adjustment was made for demographic characteristics, comorbidity markers, and laboratory test values. These data suggest the incidence of RRT from multiple myeloma in the United States has decreased in the last decade, and clinically meaningful increases in survival have occurred for these patients. PMID:26516209

  10. 42 CFR 413.235 - Patient-level adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.235 Patient-level adjustments. Adjustments to... dialysis (new patient), and co-morbidities, as specified by CMS. (b) CMS adjusts the per treatment...

  11. 42 CFR 413.235 - Patient-level adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.235 Patient-level adjustments. Adjustments to... dialysis (new patient), and co-morbidities, as specified by CMS. (b) CMS adjusts the per treatment...

  12. 42 CFR 413.235 - Patient-level adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.235 Patient-level adjustments. Adjustments to... dialysis (new patient), and co-morbidities, as specified by CMS. (b) CMS adjusts the per treatment...

  13. Anti-Hyperglycemic Agents and New-Onset Acute Myocardial Infarction in Diabetic Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Tse; Wu, Chih-Chen; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lin, Lian-Yu; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Chen, Pau-Chung; Hwang, Juey-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are a high-stakes combination for cardiovascular disease. Patients with decreased kidney function and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have increased risk of hypoglycemia when attaining better glycemic control, leading to higher risk of myocardial infarction (MI). For these patients, which kinds of anti-hyperglycemic agents would be associated with higher risk of MI is not clear. Methods We identified patients from a nation-wide database called Registry for Catastrophic Illness, which encompassed almost 100% of the patients receiving dialysis therapy in Taiwan from 1995 to 2008. Patients with diabetes and ESRD were selected as the study cohort. Propensity score adjustment and Cox's proportional hazards regression model were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for new-onset MI. Results Among 15,161 patients, 39% received insulin, 40% received sulfonylureas, 18% received meglitinides and 3% received thiazolidinedione (TZD). After a median follow-up of 1,357 days, the incidence of MI was significant increase in patients taking sulfonylureas (HR = 1.523, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.331–1.744), meglitinides (HR = 1.251, 95% CI = 1.048–1.494) and TZD (HR = 1.515, 95% CI = 1.071–2.145) by using patients receiving insulin therapy as the reference group. The risk of MI remains higher in other three groups in subgroup analyses. Conclusions In conclusion, among diabetic patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis, the use of sulfonylureas, meglitinides and TZD are associated with higher risk of new-onset MI as compared with insulin. PMID:27513562

  14. Patient Perception of Treatment Burden is High in Celiac Disease Compared to Other Common Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sveta; Akbari, Mona; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Hansen, Joshua; Theethira, Thimmaiah; Tariq, Sohaib; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The only treatment for celiac disease (CD) is life-long adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Noncompliance is associated with signs and symptoms of celiac disease, yet long-term adherence rates are poor. It is not known how the burden of the GFD compares to other medical treatments, and there are limited data on the socio-economic factors influencing treatment adherence. In this study we compared treatment burden and health state in CD compared with other chronic illnesses and evaluated the relationship between treatment burden and adherence. Methods A survey was mailed to participants with: CD, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), congestive heart failure (CHF), and end stage renal disease on dialysis (ESRD). Surveys included demographic information and visual analog scales measuring treatment burden, importance of treatment, disease-specific and overall health status. Results We collected surveys from 341 celiac and 368 non-celiac participants. Celiac participants reported high treatment burden, greater than participants with GERD or HTN and comparable to ESRD. Conversely, patients with CD reported the highest health state of all groups. Factors associated with high treatment burden in CD included poor adherence, concern regarding food cost, eating outside the home, higher income, lack of college education and time limitations in preparing food. Poor adherence in CD was associated with increased symptoms, income, and low perceived importance of treatment. Discussion Participants with CD have high treatment burden but also excellent overall health status in comparison with other chronic medical conditions. The significant burden of dietary therapy for celiac disease argues for the need for safe adjuvant treatment as well as interventions designed to lower the perceived burden of the GFD. PMID:24980880

  15. Aortic Aging in ESRD: Structural, Hemodynamic, and Mortality Implications.

    PubMed

    London, Gérard M; Safar, Michel E; Pannier, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Aging incurs aortic stiffening and dilation, but these changes are less pronounced in peripheral arteries, resulting in stiffness and geometry gradients influencing progression of the forward and reflected pressure waves. Because premature arterial aging is observed in ESRD, we determined the respective roles of stiffness and aortic geometry gradients in 73 controls and 156 patients on hemodialysis. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial PWV to evaluate the stiffness gradient [(brachial PWV/aortic PWV)(0.5)] and ascending aortic and aortic bifurcation diameters to assess aortic taper (ascending aortic diameter/aortic bifurcation diameter). The global reflection coefficient was estimated from characteristic impedance and vascular resistance. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine mortality risk. The age-associated increase in aortic PWV was higher in patients (P<0.001). In controls, aortic ascending and bifurcation diameters increased with age, with an unchanged aortic taper. In patients on hemodialysis, age did not associate with increased ascending aortic diameter but did associate with increased aortic bifurcation diameter and decreased aortic taper, both of which also associated with abdominal aortic calcifications and smaller global reflection coefficient (P<0.001). In patients, multivariate models revealed all-cause and cardiovascular mortality associated with age, aortic PWV, and aortic bifurcation diameter with high specificity and sensitivity. Using stiffness gradient, aortic taper, or global reflection coefficient in the model produced similar results. Thus, whereas aortic stiffness is a known independent predictor of mortality, these results indicate the importance of also evaluating the aortic geometry in patients on hemodialysis. PMID:26475595

  16. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zahed, N S; Zamanifar, N; Nikbakht, H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1(st) month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2(nd) month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis. PMID:27512294

  17. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Zahed, N. S.; Zamanifar, N.; Nikbakht, H.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1st month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2nd month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis. PMID:27512294

  18. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18–61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22–58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients. Results Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM) but also gray matter (GM) regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part) in the patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease. PMID:27227649

  19. The Relationship Between Volume Overload in End-Stage Renal Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Brown, Lee K; Unruh, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common, underdiagnosed, and undertreated among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As in all cases, pathogenesis of OSA is related to repeated upper airway (UA) occlusion or narrowing, but in ESRD, additional contributory factors likely include uremic destabilization of central respiratory control and anatomic changes in the UA related to fluid status. Pulmonary congestion is common in acute and chronic kidney failure and is a consequence of cardiomyopathy and fluid overload, two potentially reversible risk factors. Emerging evidence suggests that volume overload also reduces the UA caliber. The diminution in UA area as well as destabilization of ventilatory control in ESRD have been postulated as causes of increased OSA prevalence and severity in these patients, and creates a vicious cycle wherein OSA exacerbates fluid overload disorders such as in congestive heart failure (CHF) and ESRD, which then further worsen OSA. Dialysis modalities may differ in their effects on volume status, the accumulation of uremic toxins, and acid-base status, and as a consequence, on the emergence and severity of OSA. Given the contribution of excess fluid to both the severity of nocturnal hypoxia and UA narrowing, establishing and maintaining dry weight is of particular importance when managing OSA in ESRD. Clinical trials to determine the extent to which more aggressive fluid removal in ESRD patients may alleviate OSA are needed. PMID:25940851

  20. The impact of kidney transplantation on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Min; Ahn, Seung Won; Bae, Myoung Nam; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we prospectively investigated the impact of kidney transplantation (KT) on the status of hypertension, including circadian rhythm in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and office BP measurement in 48 patients before and 1 year after KT. According to the nocturnal reduction in systolic BP (ΔSBP), the patients were divided into dippers, non-dippers, and reverse dippers. After KT, the mean BP value in office BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring did not change, but the proportion of patients taking anti-hypertensive drugs and the pill number significantly decreased. In contrast, the mean ΔSBP significantly decreased, and the proportion of non-dippers and reverse dippers did not decrease. Decrease in ΔSBP after KT was associated with inferior allograft function during follow-up. Our study suggests that KT improved the overall BP level, but it did not affect abnormal circadian rhythm in ESRD patients. PMID:26051924

  1. Cyst Ablation Using a Mixture of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Iodized Oil in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: the Long-Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Kim, See Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2009-01-01

    Objective We wanted to assess the long-term results of cyst ablation with using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and iodized oil in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and symptomatic cysts. Materials and Methods Cyst ablation using a mixture of NBCA and iodized oil was performed in 99 cysts from 21 patients who had such symptoms as abdominal distension and pain. The collapse or reaccumulation of the ablated cysts after the procedure was assessed during the follow-up period of 36 to 90 months. The treatment effects, including symptom relief, and the clinical data such as the blood pressure and serum creatinine levels were also assessed, together with the complications. Results The procedure was technically successful in all 99 cysts from the 21 patients. Any procedure-related significant complications were not detected. Seventy-seven of 99 cysts (78%) were successfully collapsed on the follow-up CT. Twenty-two cysts showed reaccumulation during long-term follow-up period. The clinical symptoms were relieved in 17 of the 21 patients (76%). Four of 12 patients (33%) with hypertension and two of six patients (33%) with azotemia were improved. End stage renal disease (ESRD) occurred in six of the 21 patients (28%) during the follow-up period. The mean age of ESRD in our patients was 57 years. The mean time interval for the development of ESRD was 19 months. Conclusion Ablation using a mixture of NBCA and iodized oil may be an effective, safe method for obtaining symptom relief in patients with ADPKD. PMID:19568466

  2. KP Index at the Initiation of Dialysis for Patients with End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eui Won; Ji, Suk Bae; Kim, Jin Kuk; Hwang, Seung Duk

    2004-01-01

    Background The time at which renal replacement therapy (RRT) is initiated in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has a great influence on the prognosis of the patient; however, there are currently no accurate guidelines for the initiation of RRT. Traditionally, nephrologists usually initiate RRT on the basis of the observation of the uremic symptoms and changes in the laboratory parameters, such as the serum creatinine concentration and/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). DOQI guidelines suggest a weekly Kt/Vurea < 2.0 or an nPNA < 0.8 g/kg/day as objective indices for the initiation of dialysis. Thus, a KP index was formulated (weekly Kt/Vurea+2.5 × nPNA) ×½ using the above two clinically useful and objective indices to determine the adeguate time to initiate RRT in patients with ESRD. Methods Of 186 patients admitted to the renal unit of Soonchunhyang Bucheon hospital, those with ESRD and a weekly Kt/Vurea below 3.0 were selected. The patients with a weekly Kt/Vurea index between 1.0 and 2.0 were classified into one of two groups; KP index > 2.0 and KP index < 2.0. The groups were compared and analyzed in relation to their renal function, biochemical indices and the numbers of patients per group starting RRT. Further, the correlations between the KP and other indices were analyzed in all the patients. The patients were then further divided into another two groups according to their weekly Kt/Vurea and KP index: group one; between 1.5 and 2.0 and group 2; between 2.0 and 2.5. The numbers of patients per group starting RRT were compared. Results The KP index < 2.0 group showed significantly lower indices for weekly Kt/Vurea, nPNA and %LBM (%) than those of the KP index > 2.0 group, while there were no significant differences between the groups in the serum albumin concentration, serum creatinine concentration, FFEFBM and RRF. Also, there was a statistically significant higher rate of incidence of patients starting RRT in the KP index < 2.0 group than

  3. Uncommon cause of chest pain in a renal transplantation patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L; Neves, M; Machado, S; Sá, H; Macário, F; Alves, R; Mota, A; Campos, M

    2012-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and, because of its intrinsic systemic involvement, its treatment can be a medical and surgical challenge. This condition is often associated with the presence of hepatic cysts and their prevalence generally increases with age. Most patients remain asymptomatic, but some of these will develop complications associated with enlargement and infection of their cysts. Chest pain is a rare manifestation of these complications and, after exclusion of more common cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, should raise the suspicion of an infected hepatic cyst in these patients. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric donor in 1997 (etiology of the ESRD was ADPKD), and was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of chest pain radiating to both shoulders and the interscapular region. An echocardiogram was showed compression of the right atrium by a large liver cyst without associated ventricular dysfunction. Computer tomography-guided drainage of the cyst was performed and an Enterobacter aerogenes sensitive to carbamapenemes was isolated from respective cultures. The patient presented a favorable clinical outcome with prolonged administration of antibiotic therapy according to the antibiotic susceptibility testing. There was no need for surgical intervention. PMID:23026633

  4. Improved incidence of end-stage renal disease of type 1 diabetes in Japan, from a hospital-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Toshika; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Ohashi, Yasuo; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) was lowered over time, and how the baseline characteristics and risk factor management during follow-up were associated with the incident ESRD. Research design and methods An observational cohort study was performed in 1014 patients with T1DM diagnosed from 1961 to 1999, who were admitted to the diabetes center. The incidence of ESRD up to 2010 and the effect of risk factors, including annual mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood pressure, were investigated. Results During a mean follow-up of 19.3 years, with 88.3% follow-up rate, the incidence of ESRD was significantly lower in T1DM diagnosed in 1985–1999 than in 1961–1984 (0.8 vs 5.0 per 1000 person-years, p<0.0001), which was not precluded by preceding death. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that the former group (vs the latter) was associated with a significantly reduced risk of ESRD independent of baseline variables of age, duration and gender (p<0.01). The continuous variable of year of T1DM diagnosis remained significant after adjustment for the above variables plus baseline proteinuria and retinopathy (p=0.02). Time-dependent Cox regression analysis indicated that ESRD was associated with annual mean HbA1c (p<0.01), systolic blood pressure (p<0.001) and baseline proteinuria (p<0.001), followed by continuous variable of year of T1DM diagnosis (p=0.09). Conclusions Our data indicate that incidence of ESRD is decreasing over time, coinciding with enhanced glycemic and blood pressure controls. The incidence of ESRD in recently diagnosed T1DM appears to be much lower than previously reported ESRD incidence. PMID:27110369

  5. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Takure, A O; Jinadu, Y O; Adebayo, S A; Shittu, O B; Salako, B L; Kadiri, S

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is well established in the USA, Europe, India, and South Africa. However, it is still in its infancy in Nigeria. The objective of our study is to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplant among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the factors which are responsible for the low level of transplantation in Ibadan, Nigeria. A 15-item pilot-tested questionnaire was administered to willing patients with ESRD seen at the medical outpatient clinic of the University Teaching Hospital, from January to December 2011. There was 81% participation rate of the respondents. Exactly 90.1% had formal education and 44% earned <50,000 naira per month. Seventy-nine percent of respondents was aware of renal transplantation, 70.4% would recommend it to others, and 66.7% accepted renal transplantation; 77.8% would maintain a close relationship with their donors. About 61.7% considered it very expensive, while 33.3% did not know the cost for transplantation. Of the reason for the low level of kidney transplantation in Nigeria, 39.5% had no idea and in 27.2% of the respondents, the fear of death by potential donors may be responsible. Eleven percent of responded that recipients had no money for kidney transplantation and another 11% thought the potential donors would like to be paid for donating their kidneys. Most of the respondents with ESRD were knowledgeable, aware of, and accepted renal transplantation as the next step to treat chronic renal failure. However, majority of these patients could not afford the cost for renal transplantation. PMID:27424696

  6. Albuminuria and Racial Disparities in the Risk for ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Judd, Suzanne; Muntner, Paul; Kewalramani, Reshma; Cushman, Mary; McClure, Leslie A.; Newsome, Britt B.; Howard, George

    2011-01-01

    The causes of the increased risk for ESRD among African Americans are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether higher levels of urinary albumin excretion among African Americans contributes to this disparity. We analyzed data from 27,911 participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study who had urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated GFR (eGFR) measured at baseline. We identified incident cases of ESRD through linkage with the United States Renal Data System. At baseline, African Americans were less likely to have an eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 but more likely to have an ACR ≥30 mg/g. The incidence rates of ESRD among African Americans and whites were 204 and 58.6 cases per 100,000 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for age and gender, African Americans had a fourfold greater risk for developing ESRD (HR 4.0; 95% CI 2.8 to 5.9) compared with whites. Additional adjustment for either eGFR or ACR reduced the risk associated with African-American race to 2.3-fold (95% CI 1.5 to 3.3) or 1.8-fold (95% CI 1.2 to 2.7), respectively. Adjustment for both ACR and eGFR reduced the race-associated risk to 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 2.4). Finally, in a model that further adjusted for both eGFR and ACR, hypertension, diabetes, family income, and educational status, African-American race associated with a nonsignificant 1.4-fold (95% CI 0.9 to 2.3) higher risk for ESRD. In conclusion, the increased prevalence of albuminuria may be an important contributor to the higher risk for ESRD experienced by African Americans. PMID:21868498

  7. An update of the effect of far infrared therapy on arteriovenous access in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Fan; Yang, Wu-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ching

    2016-07-12

    The life qualities of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients rely largely on adequate dialysis, and a well-functioning vascular access is indispensable for high quality hemodialysis. Despite the advancement of surgical skills and the optimal maintenance of arteriovenous fistula (AVF), malfunction of AVF is still frequently encountered and has great impact on the life of ESRD patients. Several medical, mechanical and genetic prognostic factors are documented to affect the patency of AVF and arteriovenous graft (AVG). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of the genetic factors reported to play a role in cardiovascular disease and the patency of vascular access. Far infrared (FIR), a novel therapeutic modality, can not only conduct heat energy to AVF but also stimulate the non-thermal reactions mediated by HO-1. The use of FIR therapy significantly enhances the primary patency rate and maturation of AVF with fewer unfavorable adverse effects, and also achieves higher post-angioplasty patency rate for AVG. The only limitation in proving the effectiveness of FIR therapy in enhancing patency of AVF is that all the studies were conducted in Chinese people in Taiwan and thus, there is a lack of evidence and experience in people of other ethnicities. PMID:27312759

  8. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., payment to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171... to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form...

  9. Role of advanced glycation endproducts and potential therapeutic interventions in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K; He, John C; Uribarri, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    It has been nearly 100 years since the first published report of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by the French chemist Maillard. Since then, our understanding of AGEs in diseased states has dramatically changed. Especially in the last 25 years, AGEs have been implicated in complications related to aging, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Although AGE formation has been well characterized by both in vitro and in vivo studies, few prospective human studies exist demonstrating the role of AGEs in patients on chronic renal replacement therapy. As the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States rises, it is essential to identify therapeutic strategies that either delay progression to ESRD or improve morbidity and mortality in this population. This article reviews the role of AGEs, especially those of dietary origin, in ESRD patients as well as potential therapeutic anti-AGE strategies in this population. PMID:22548330

  10. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  11. Association between Genotype and Phenotype in Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Jonathan L.; Piret, Sian E.; Lhotta, Karl; Kitzler, Thomas M.; Tashman, Adam P.; Velez, Erin; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by uromodulin (UMOD) gene mutations. This study explored genotype-phenotype correlations by examining the relationship between the type of UMOD mutation and the age at onset of ESRD. Design, setting, participants & measurements Extensive bibliographic research was used to ascertain patient-level data of all patients with UAKD published up to October 2011. Data included sex; ages at onset of hyperuricemia, gout, and ESRD; and UMOD genotype. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards models fitted with shared gamma frailty terms to adjust for within-family correlations were used to model time to event. Results Thirty-one peer-reviewed publications reporting on 202 patients from 74 families with 59 different UMOD mutations were included. Median ages at onset of hyperuricemia, gout, and ESRD were 24, 40, and 56 years, respectively. Men developed gout and ESRD significantly earlier than did women (age at ESRD was 50 years for men and 60 for women; P=0.04, shared frailty model). Median ages at ESRD development were lowest with Cys77Tyr (37.5 years) and highest with Gln316Pro (65.5 years) UMOD mutations. Onset of ESRD was significantly earlier with UMOD mutations located within the epidermal growth factor domains 2 and 3 (range, 45–52 years; P<0.01 and 0.04, respectively) compared with the cysteine-rich domains (range, 60–65 years; by shared frailty model). Conclusions The UMOD genotype is related to the clinical phenotype of UAKD. This finding may assist in counseling of patients. PMID:23723338

  12. Effect of End-Stage Renal Disease on Rate of Progression of Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Darae; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cho, In Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate the progression of mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and determine its metabolic and hemodynamic contributors and clinical outcomes. A total of 74 patients with ESRD (50 men, age 72 ± 11 years) with mild-to-moderate AS were compared with 79 age- and gender-matched controls with normal kidney function. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic features and clinical outcomes including aortic valve (AV) intervention, hospitalization due to heart failure, and cardiovascular death were analyzed. Patients with ESRD were divided into 2 subgroups according to their rate of AV area changes (group 1 [n = 28], rapid progression; and group 2 [n = 46], slow progression). Progression in the degree of AS was noted in 38% of patients with ESRD and 18% of controls (p <0.01) during comparable echocardiographic follow-up durations (29 ± 15 vs 27 ± 24 months, respectively, p = 0.57). In ESRD, patients in group 1 were older (p <0.01) with higher baseline log parathyroid hormone (p <0.01) and larger stroke volume (p = 0.03) than those in group 2. During clinical follow-up (48 ± 23 months), patients in group 1 showed poorer clinical outcomes than those in group 2 and controls (log-rank p <0.01). Age, left atrial volume index ≥42 ml/m(2), and annual increases of peak pressure gradient across the AV (mm Hg/year) demonstrated additive predictive values for prognosis. AS in ESRD progresses in an accelerated manner along with higher metabolic and hemodynamic loads on AV compared with those with normal kidney function. Accelerated progression of mild-to-moderate AS in ESRD results in poor prognosis. PMID:27138183

  13. Evaluating the Contribution of the Cause of Kidney Disease to Prognosis in CKD: Results From the Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP)

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Richard; Staplin, Natalie; Emberson, Jonathan; G. Herrington, William; Tomson, Charles; Agodoa, Lawrence; Tesar, Vladimir; Levin, Adeera; Lewis, David; Reith, Christina; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The relevance of the cause of kidney disease to prognosis among patients with chronic kidney disease is uncertain. Study Design Observational study. Settings & Participants 6,245 nondialysis participants in the Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP). Predictor Baseline cause of kidney disease was categorized into 4 groups: cystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, glomerulonephritis, and other recorded diagnoses. Outcomes End-stage renal disease (ESRD; dialysis or transplantation) and death. Results During an average 4.7 years' follow-up, 2,080 participants progressed to ESRD, including 454 with cystic kidney disease (23% per year), 378 with glomerulonephritis (10% per year), 309 with diabetic nephropathy (12% per year), and 939 with other recorded diagnoses (8% per year). By comparison with patients with cystic kidney disease, other disease groups had substantially lower adjusted risks of ESRD (relative risks of 0.28 [95% CI, 0.24-0.32], 0.40 [95% CI, 0.34-0.47], and 0.29 [95% CI, 0.25-0.32] for glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other recorded diagnoses, respectively). Albuminuria and baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate were associated more weakly with risk of ESRD in patients with cystic kidney disease than the 3 other diagnostic categories (P for interaction, <0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Death before ESRD was uncommon in patients with cystic kidney disease, but was a major competing risk for participants with diabetic nephropathy, whose adjusted risk of death was 2-fold higher than that of the cystic kidney disease group (relative risk, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.73-3.18]). Limitations Exclusion of patients with prior myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization. Conclusions The cause of kidney disease has substantial prognostic implications. Other things being equal, patients with cystic kidney disease are at much higher risk of ESRD (and much lower risk of death before ESRD) than other patients. Patients with diabetic

  14. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  15. Risk of human papillomavirus-related cancers among kidney transplant recipients and patients receiving chronic dialysis - an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have excess risk of various cancer types. However, the total burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers remains unknown. Methods We performed a nationwide observational cohort study during 1994–2010. For each person with ESRD, we sampled 19 population controls (without ESRD) matched on age, gender and municipality. Participants were followed until first diagnosis of human papillomavirus-related cancer, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010, whichever came first. Human papillomavirus-related cancers were extracted from Danish medical administrative databases. We considered cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and subsets of head and neck cancers as human papillomavirus-related. We calculated incidence rates of human papillomavirus-related cancer and used Poisson regression to identify risk factors for human papillomavirus-related cancer. Results Among 12,293 persons with ESRD and 229,524 population controls we identified 62 and 798 human papillomavirus-related cancers, respectively. Incidence rates of human papillomavirus-related- cancer were 102 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]; 79.5-131) among persons with ESRD and 40.8 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI; 38.1-43.7) among population controls. ESRD patients had 4.54 (95% CI, 2.48-8.31) fold increased risk of anal cancer and 5.81 fold (95% CI; 3.36-10.1) increased risk of vulvovaginal cancer. Adjusted for age, comorbidity, and sex, ESRD patients had 2.41 (95% CI; 1.83-3.16) fold increased risk of any human papillomavirus-related cancer compared with population controls. Compared with dialysis patients renal transplant recipients had an age-adjusted non-significant 1.53 (95% CI, 0.91-2.58) fold higher risk of human papillomavirus-related cancer. Conclusions Persons with ESRD have excess risk of potentially vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus-related cancers. PMID:23834996

  16. Pro and con arguments in using alternative dialysis regimens in the frail and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Charles; Farrington, Ken; Nistor, Ionut; Van Biesen, Wim; Joosten, Hanneke; Teta, Daniel; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of patients over 75 years of age are starting renal replacement therapy. Frailty is highly prevalent in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the context of the increased prevalence of some ESRD-associated conditions: protein-energy wasting, inflammation, anaemia, acidosis or hormonal disturbances. There are currently no hard data to support guidance on the optimal duration of dialysis for frail/elderly ESRD patients. The current debate is not about starting dialysis or managing conservatory frail ESRD patients, but whether a more intensive regimen once dialysis is initiated (for whatever reasons and circumstances) would improve patients' outcome. The most important issue is that all studies performed with extended/alternative dialysis regimens do not specifically address this particular type of patients and therefore all the inferences are derived from the general ESRD population. Care planning should be responsive to end-of-life needs whatever the treatment modality. Care in this setting should focus on symptom control and quality of life rather than life extension. We conclude that, similar to the general dialysed population, extensive application of more intensive dialysis schedules is not based on solid evidence. However, after a thorough clinical evaluation, a limited period of a trial of intensive dialysis could be prescribed in more problematic patients. PMID:26377489

  17. The Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease in the Diabetic (Compared to the Non-Diabetic) Population: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Narres, Maria; Claessen, Heiner; Droste, Sigrid; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Koch, Michael; Kuss, Oliver; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetes is a life threatening complication resulting in a poor prognosis for patients as well as high medical costs. The aims of this systematic review were (1) to evaluate the incidence of ESRD due to all causes and due to diabetic nephropathy in the diabetic population and differences between incidences of ESRD with respect to sex, ethnicity, age and regions, (2) to compare incidence rates in the diabetic and non-diabetic population, and (3) to investigate time trends. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA group guidelines by performing systematic literature searches in the biomedical databases until January 3rd 2015; thirty-two studies were included. Among patients with incident type 1 diabetes the 30-year cumulative incidence ranged from 3.3% to 7.8%. Among patients with prevalent diabetes, incidence rates of ESRD due to all causes ranged from 132.0 to 167.0 per 100,000 person-years, whereas incidence rates of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy varied from 38.4 to 804.0 per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of ESRD in the diabetic population was higher compared to the non-diabetic population, and relative risks varied from 6.2 in the white population to 62.0 among Native Americans. The results regarding time trends were inconsistent. The review conducted demonstrates the considerable variation of incidences of ESRD among the diabetic population. Consistent findings included an excess risk when comparing the diabetic to the non-diabetic population and ethnic differences. We recommend that newly designed studies should use standardized methods for the determination of ESRD and population at risk. PMID:26812415

  18. The Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease in the Diabetic (Compared to the Non-Diabetic) Population: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Narres, Maria; Claessen, Heiner; Droste, Sigrid; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Koch, Michael; Kuss, Oliver; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetes is a life threatening complication resulting in a poor prognosis for patients as well as high medical costs. The aims of this systematic review were (1) to evaluate the incidence of ESRD due to all causes and due to diabetic nephropathy in the diabetic population and differences between incidences of ESRD with respect to sex, ethnicity, age and regions, (2) to compare incidence rates in the diabetic and non-diabetic population, and (3) to investigate time trends. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA group guidelines by performing systematic literature searches in the biomedical databases until January 3rd 2015; thirty-two studies were included. Among patients with incident type 1 diabetes the 30-year cumulative incidence ranged from 3.3% to 7.8%. Among patients with prevalent diabetes, incidence rates of ESRD due to all causes ranged from 132.0 to 167.0 per 100,000 person-years, whereas incidence rates of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy varied from 38.4 to 804.0 per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of ESRD in the diabetic population was higher compared to the non-diabetic population, and relative risks varied from 6.2 in the white population to 62.0 among Native Americans. The results regarding time trends were inconsistent. The review conducted demonstrates the considerable variation of incidences of ESRD among the diabetic population. Consistent findings included an excess risk when comparing the diabetic to the non-diabetic population and ethnic differences. We recommend that newly designed studies should use standardized methods for the determination of ESRD and population at risk. PMID:26812415

  19. Metachronous urothelial carcinoma of whole urinary tract in a dialysis-dependent patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YIMIN; JIN, BAIYE; YAO, XIAOLIN

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported an association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and malignancy. The predominant malignant tumor that occurs in patients with ESRD in Asian countries is urothelial carcinoma (UC). According to recent research, cases of UC in dialysis-dependent patients are associated with higher recurrence rates and more aggressive biological behavior compared with patients without ESRD. The necessity of 1-step total urinary tract exenteration for dialysis-dependent patients with UC is advocated by certain studies. The current study reports a case of metachronous bladder cancer and bilateral upper urinary tract tumor in a dialysis-dependent patient. Three separate surgeries were performed to remove the bladder, and left and right urinary tract, respectively. The question of whether the stepwise strategy or the 1-step surgery should be selected for such special cases remains in debate. PMID:27313734

  20. Race and kidney disease: role of social and environmental factors.

    PubMed Central

    Nzerue, Chike M.; Demissochew, Haliu; Tucker, J. Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the presence of racial disparities among Americans in health outcomes with respect to cardiovascular disease, infant mortality, cancer, and kidney disease. With regard to kidney diseases, these disparities are more dramatic. African, Hispanic, and Native Americans have the highest risks of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The incidence of ESRD is four times higher in African Americans than in whites. Diseases causing chronic kidney failure, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, systemic lupus erythematosus, and human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, are particularly prevalent among African-American patients. In addition to the higher prevalence, the morbidity associated with kidney complications of these diseases appears worse in African-American patients. African Americans also have worse outcomes and a relatively reduced access to kidney transplantation--the best therapy for ESRD. It is highly likely that social and environmental factors play a very significant role in the persistence of these disparities. A detailed understanding of these socioeconomic and environmental factors will be critical in formulating rational public health strategies to redress these disparities. This paper reviews the social, economic and environmental factors that impact on the incidence of ESRD in minority groups. PMID:12152910

  1. Contribution of GSTM1, GSTT1, and MTHFR polymorphisms to end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology in Mexicans

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, B. E.; Orozco-Castellanos, R.; Ortíz-Orozco, R.; Padilla-Gutiérrez, J.; Valle, Y.; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, N.; García-García, G.; Gallegos-Arreola, M.; Figuera, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in chronic kidney disease, owing to an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidant pathways as well as a state of persistent hyperhomocysteinemia. The enzymes glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) are implicated in the regulation of these pathways. This study investigates the association between polymorphisms in the Glutathione S-transferase Mu 1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1), and MTHFR genes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of unknown etiology in patients in Mexico. A Case-control study included 110 ESRD patients and 125 healthy individuals. GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes were determined using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The MTHFR C677T polymorphism was studied using a PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism method. In ESRD patients, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype frequencies were 61% and 7% respectively. GSTM1 genotype frequencies differed significantly between groups, showing that homozygous deletion of the GSTM1 gene was associated with susceptibility to ESRD of unknown etiology (P = 0.007, odds ratios = 2.05, 95% confidence interval 1.21-3.45). The MTHFR C677T polymorphism genotype and allele distributions were similar in both groups (P > 0.05), and the CT genotype was the most common genotype in both groups (45.5% and 46.6%). Our findings suggest that the GSTM1 null polymorphism appears to be associated with the ESRD of unknown etiology in patients in Mexico. PMID:24339523

  2. eNOS Glu298Asp Polymorphism and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with and without End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Nevin; Ateş, Kadir; İlhan, Necip; Kaman, Dilara; Çeliker, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases are known to influence nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), though the exact mechanism is still poorly understood. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to examine eNOS Glu298Asp gene polymorphism, plasma NOx and ADMA concentration in subjects with and without End-stage Renal Disease. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: In this study, genotype distributions of Glu-298Asp in exon 7 of the eNOS gene polymorphisms in 130 hemodialysis and 64 peritoneal dialysis patients were compared with 92 controls. NOx was measured by using the Griess reaction while arginine, ADMA and SDMA measurements were performed by HPLC. Genotyping for eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism was detected with the polymerase chain reaction and/or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Results: When the genotype frequencies of TT and GT genes were compared between both groups, there was no detected statistically important difference, even-though a TT genotype frequency was 27 (20.8%) versus 17 (26.6%), GT heterozygote genotype frequency was 52 (40%) versus 22 (34.4%), and GG homozygote genotype frequency was 51 (39.2%) versus 25 (39.1%), respectively (p>0.05). NOx, SDMA and ADMA concentrations were significantly elevated in subjects with hemodialysis patients as compared to their corresponding controls. Whereas nitrite was found to be significantly decreased in the patient with peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion: Not observed any connection between the Glu298Asp polymorphism in the eNOS gene and end-stage Renal Diseases in our study population under different dialysis treatments. However, higher ADMA and SDMA concentrations in subjects with ESRD support the existing hypothesis that NOx overproduction affects endothelial dysfunction. Thus, the reduction of ADMA and SDMA concentrations might play a protective role in ESRD patients. PMID:27403380

  3. Risk-benefit ratio of angiotensin antagonists versus ACE inhibitors in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, D A; Gehr, T W; Fernandez, A

    2000-05-01

    The effective treatment of hypertension is an extremely important consideration in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Virtually any drug class--with the possible exception of diuretics--can be used to treat hypertension in the patient with ESRD. Despite there being such a wide range of treatment options, drugs which interrupt the renin-angiotensin axis are generally suggested as agents of choice in this population, even though the evidence in support of their preferential use is quite scanty. ACE inhibitors, and more recently angiotensin antagonists, are the 2 drug classes most commonly employed to alter renin-angiotensin axis activity and therefore produce blood pressure control. ACE inhibitor use in patients with ESRD can sometimes prove an exacting proposition. ACE inhibitors are variably dialysed, with compounds such as catopril, enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril undergoing substantial cross-dialyser clearance during a standard dialysis session. This phenomenon makes the selection of a dose and the timing of administration for an ACE inhibitor a complex issue in patients with ESRD. Furthermore, ACE inhibitors are recognised as having a range of nonpressor effects that are pertinent to patients with ESRD. Such effects include their ability to decrease thirst drive and to decrease erythropoiesis. In addition, ACE inhibitors have a unique adverse effect profile. As is the case with their use in patients without renal failure, use of ACE inhibitors in patients with ESRD can be accompanied by cough and less frequently by angioneurotic oedema. In the ESRD population, ACE inhibitor use is also accompanied by so-called anaphylactoid dialyser reactions. Angiotensin antagonists are similar to ACE inhibitors in their mechanism of blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin antagonists are not dialysable and therefore can be distinguished from a number of the ACE inhibitors. In addition, the adverse effect profile for angiotensin antagonists is remarkably bland

  4. Carbamylation of Serum Albumin as a Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Anders H.; Drechsler, Christiane; Wenger, Julia; Buccafusca, Roberto; Hod, Tammy; Kalim, Sahir; Ramma, Wenda; Parikh, Samir M.; Steen, Hanno; Friedman, David J.; Danziger, John; Wanner, Christoph; Thadhani, Ravi; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2013-01-01

    Urea, the toxic end-product of protein catabolism, is elevated in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), although it is unclear whether or how it contributes to disease. Urea can promote the carbamylation of proteins on multiple lysine side chains, including human albumin, which has a predominant carbamylation site on lysine 549. The proportion of serum albumin carbamylated on Lys-549 (%C-Alb) correlated with time-averaged blood urea concentrations and was twice as high in ESRD patients than in non-uremic subjects (0.90% vs. 0.42%, P<0.0001). Baseline %C-Alb was higher in ESRD subjects who died within 1-year than in those who survived longer than 1 year (1.01% vs. 0.77%, P<0.001) and was associated with an increased risk of death within 1 year (HR of 3.76, 95% CI: 2.20–6.43, P<0.0001). These findings were validated in an independent cohort of diabetic ESRD subjects (HR 3.73, 95% CI: 2.00–6.96, P<0.001). Decreased concentrations of serum amino acids correlated with higher %C-Alb in ESRD patients, and mice with diet-induced amino acid deficiencies exhibited greater susceptibility to albumin carbamylation than did chow-fed mice. In vitro studies showed that amino acids such as cysteine, histidine, arginine, lysine, as well as other nucleophiles such as taurine, inhibited cyanate-induced C-Alb formation at physiologic pH and temperature. Together, these results suggest that chronically elevated urea promotes carbamylation of proteins in ESRD, and that serum amino acid concentrations may modulate this protein modification. In summary, we have identified serum %C-Alb as a risk factor for mortality in patients with ESRD and propose that this risk factor may be modifiable with supplemental amino acid therapy. PMID:23467560

  5. Association of E-selectin with hematological, hormonal levels and plasma proteins in children with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Shafiei, Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Taheri, Shahram; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypercoagulable state is a common serious problem in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD patients are in a condition of chronic inflammation. An increased level of E-selectin, “a key adhesion molecule that regulates leukocyte bindings to endothelium at damaged sites,” accompanies the higher risk of inflammation in ESRD patients. We aimed to investigate the possible correlation among E-selectin as an adhesion molecule, coagulation factors, and inflammatory factors in children with ESRD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five child patients with ESRD who had been on regular dialysis treatment were registered in our study. Nighteen sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were used as the control group. Laboratory tests were requested for the evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters, and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and for coagulation state; fibrinogen, protein C, and protein S were measured. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Biomerica, CA, and IDS, UK). for serum E-selectin assay was provided by R and D Systems (Abingdon, UK). Results: Hemoglubolin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, calcium, PTH, triglyceride (TG) concentrations in serum as well as E-selectin showed significant difference between the two study groups, as indeed was expected. Serum E-selectin was significantly higher (P value = 0.033) in dialysis patients than in healthy subjects. E-selectin was positively correlated only with phosphorus in ESRD children (r = 0.398, P = 0.018). No association was found for other parameters. Conclusion: Although in our study circulating E-selectin concentration “as an inflammatory maker” is independently positively associated with limited blood markers, for better evaluation, well-designed cohort studies should be examined in ESRD children. PMID:27563628

  6. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C with Simeprevir, Sofosbuvir, and Ribavirin in an HIV Coinfected Liver Transplant Patient with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Anna; Hussaini, Trana; Partovi, Nilufar; Erb, Siegfried R.; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Zalunardo, Nadia; Hull, Mark; Yoshida, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Although major advances have occurred in treating patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the development of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), treatment of liver transplant recipients with HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection, and renal disease is challenging due to the lack of efficacy and safety data in this population. We report a case of successful HCV therapy in a postliver transplant HIV coinfected patient, with stage 4 chronic kidney disease, using an all-oral regimen of simeprevir, sofosbuvir, and ribavirin. The 51-year-old male achieved SVR24, and no specific HIV-related or transplant-related adverse events were documented during the treatment period. The new DAAs show promise for HIV coinfected patients and those with severe to end-stage renal disease (ESRD); however, robust clinical trials or large cohort studies will need to be conducted to confirm the efficacy and safety of these newer agents in this setting. PMID:27366182

  7. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis: A single-dose, open-label, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Marion; Halabi, Atef; Canadi, Jasna; Tsubouchi, Chiaki; Machineni, Surendra; Pang, Yinuo

    2016-04-01

    Serelaxin, a recombinant human relaxin-2 hormone, is in clinical development for treating acute heart failure. This open-label, parallel-group study investigated serelaxin pharmacokinetics (PK) after a single 4-hour intravenous infusion (10 µg/kg) in patients with severe renal impairment (n = 6) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis (PK on the day of dialysis [n = 6] or during dialysis-free interval [n = 6]), compared with matched healthy subjects (n = 18). In all participants, serum serelaxin concentration peaked at the end of infusion and subsequently declined with mean terminal elimination half-life of 6.5-8.8 hours. Compared with healthy subjects, a moderate decrease in serelaxin systemic clearance (37%-52%) and increase in its exposure (30%-115%) were observed in all patients. During the 4-hour hemodialysis in ESRD patients, 30% serelaxin was removed, with hemodialysis clearance constituting approximately 52% of total systemic clearance. Serelaxin was well tolerated with no deaths, serious adverse events (AE), or AE-related discontinuations. Antiserelaxin antibodies were not detected in any participant. Given the shallow dose-response relationship observed with serelaxin in clinical studies and its wide therapeutic window, the observed PK differences in patients with severe renal impairment compared with healthy subjects are unlikely to pose a safety risk and do not warrant a predefined dosage adjustment in such patients. PMID:26239266

  8. Effect of Treatment With Tabalumab, a B Cell-Activating Factor Inhibitor, on Highly Sensitized Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Awaiting Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, M A; Komocsar, W J; Nantz, E; Samaniego, M D; Henson, S L; Hague, J A; Lobashevsky, A L; Higgins, N G; Czader, M; Book, B K; Anderson, M D; Pescovitz, M D; Taber, T E

    2016-04-01

    B cell-activation factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell maturation. Inhibition of BAFF represents an appealing target for desensitization of sensitized end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a Phase 2a, single-arm, open-label exploratory study investigating the effect of tabalumab (BAFF inhibitor) in patients with ESRD and calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRAs) >50%. The treatment period duration was 24 weeks. Eighteen patients received tabalumab, at doses of 240-mg subcutaneous (SC) at Week 0 followed by 120-mg SC monthly for 5 additional months. Patients were followed for an additional 52 weeks. Immunopharmacologic effects were characterized through analysis of blood for HLA antibodies, BAFF concentrations, immunoglobulins, T and B cell subsets, as well as pre- and posttreatment tonsil and bone marrow biopsies. Significant reductions in cPRAs were observed at Weeks 16 (p = 0.043) and 36 (p = 0.004); however, absolute reductions were small (<5%). Expected pharmacologic changes in B cell subsets and immunoglobulin reductions were observed. Two tabalumab-related serious adverse events occurred (pneumonia, worsening of peripheral neuropathy), while the most common other adverse events were injection-site pain and hypotension. Three patients received matched deceased donor transplants during follow-up. Treatment with a BAFF inhibitor resulted in statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful reduction in the cPRA from baseline (NCT01200290, Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26780484

  9. Clinical Predictors of Decline in Nutritional Parameters over Time in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    den Hoedt, Claire H.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grooteman, Muriel P.C.; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; Penne, E. Lars; Mazairac, Albert H.A.; Levesque, Renée; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Nubé, Menso J.; ter Wee, Piet M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Inflammation and malnutrition are important features in patients with ESRD; however, data on changes in these parameters over time are scarce. This study aimed to gain insight into changes over time in serum albumin, body mass index, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and IL-6 in patients with ESRD and aimed to identify clinical risk factors for deterioration of these parameters. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were analyzed from the Convective Transport Study, a randomized controlled trial conducted from June 2004 to January 2011, in which 714 patients with chronic ESRD were randomized to either online hemodiafiltration or low-flux hemodialysis. Albumin and body mass index were measured up to 6 years and predialysis C-reactive protein and IL-6 were measured up to 3 years in a subset of 405 participants. Rates of change in these parameters over time were estimated across strata of predefined risk factors with linear mixed-effects models. Results Albumin and body mass index decreased and C-reactive protein and IL-6 increased over time. For every incremental year of age at baseline, the yearly excess decline in albumin was 0.003 g/dl (−0.004 to −0.002; P<0.001) and the excess decline in body mass index was 0.02 kg/m2 per year (−0.02 to −0.01; P<0.001). In patients with diabetes mellitus, there was a yearly excess decline of 0.05 g/dl in albumin (−0.09 to −0.02; P=0.002). Compared with women, men had an excess decline of 0.03 g/dl per year in albumin (−0.06 to −0.001; P=0.05) and an excess increase of 11.6% per year in IL-6 (0.63%–23.6%; P=0.04). Conclusions Despite guideline-based care, all inflammatory and nutritional parameters worsened over time. The deterioration of some of these parameters was more pronounced in men, older patients, and patients with diabetes mellitus. Special focus on the nutritional status of at-risk patients by individualizing medical care might improve their prognosis

  10. [Constructing an ACP Simulation-Situation Communication Training Program for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-O; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The aging population and changing lifestyles have lead to the increased general risk of chronic kidney disease. Taiwan currently has the highest incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of any country or region in the world. Hemodialysis patients must endure comorbidities and face the uncertainties of death. The best way to achieve a good death is for patients to sign advance care planning (ACP). However, the key factors contributing to low ACP signature rates have been the lack of communication skills and related training among medical staffs. This article explores the dilemma of ACP using an example of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and proposes a theory-based approach to develop a theoretical framework for an ACP simulation-situation communication training program that integrates the simulation situation model, PREPARED model, and scaffolding theory. Readers may use this framework to design ACP simulation-situation communication training programs that conform to their own conditions and then test the effectiveness and feasibility of these programs in clinical settings. PMID:27250964

  11. Health Care Financing Administration--conditions for coverage of suppliers of ESRD services; revocation of requirements for emergency generator and ground fault interrupters. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-04-10

    These amendments remove the requirements for emergency generators and ground fault interrupters in end-stage renal dialysis (ESRD) facilities. The purpose is to reduce unnecessary and burdensome requirements which are not necessary to the health and safety of patients. PMID:10246083

  12. Assessing the Validity of Surrogate Outcomes for ESRD: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Min; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Woodward, Mark; Perkovic, Vlado; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2015-09-01

    Validation of current and promising surrogate outcomes for ESRD in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been limited. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs to further inform the ability of surrogate outcomes for ESRD to predict the efficacy of various interventions on ESRD. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL (from inception through September 2013) were searched. All RCTs in adults with proteinuria, diabetes, or CKD stages 1-4 or renal transplant recipients reporting ≥10 ESRD events and a surrogate outcome (change in proteinuria or doubling of serum creatinine [DSCR]) for ESRD during a ≥1-year follow-up were included. Two reviewers abstracted trial characteristics and outcome data independently. To assess the correlation between the surrogate outcomes and ESRD, we determined the treatment effect ratio (TER), defined as the ratio of the treatment effects on ESRD and the effects on the change in surrogate outcomes. TERs close to 1 indicate greater agreement between ESRD and the surrogate, and these ratios were pooled across interventions. We identified 27 trials (97,458 participants; 4187 participants with ESRD). Seven trials reported the effects on change in proteinuria and showed consistent effects for proteinuria and ESRD (TER, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 1.16), with minimal heterogeneity. Twenty trials reported on DSCR. Treatment effects on DSCR were consistent with the effects on ESRD (TER, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.14), with moderate heterogeneity. In conclusion, DSCR is generally a good surrogate for ESRD, whereas data on proteinuria were limited. Further assessment of the surrogacy of proteinuria using prospective RCTs is warranted. PMID:25556165

  13. End Stage Renal Disease: Seroprevalence of Hepatitises B and C along with Associated Aetiology and Risk Factors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Alam, Muhammad Tanveer; Salim, Adnan; Hussain, Mehwish; Altaf, Areeba

    2015-01-01

    Background. End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) normally requires dialysis or transplantation for survival. Since ESRD patients are on long term dialysis, infections such as Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) are commonly reported. Methods. This was a retrospective study carried out at a government hospital during a 12-month period from January 2013 to December 2013. The data was collected using a predesigned pro forma to note the etiology, gender, age, and HBsAg and anti-HCV test result of each patient. Results. 444 children suffering from ESRD were included in our analysis. The mean age of sample was 12.7 ± 4.1 years. Sixty percent (n = 262) of the children were boys. The most common etiology of ESRD was kidney stones (n = 44, 29.3%). HBV was positive in 11 children (2.5%) while HCV was positive in 13 (2.9%). Conclusion. This study asserts the need for carrying out further work to confirm these findings and expand our recommendations. It is imperative to reliably determine the burden of HBV and HCV disease and to determine the aetiology of their spread especially in children with ESRD. PMID:26346273

  14. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  15. Nephrology Update: End-Stage Renal Disease and Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niraj; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and increased health care use. Optimal management of patients with ESRD requires close collaboration among primary care physicians, nephrology subspecialists, and other subspecialists. Critical issues for the family physician include helping patients transition from chronic kidney disease to ESRD, recognizing and managing common issues in patients receiving dialysis or after kidney transplantation, and understanding palliative care for patients with ESRD. Dialysis typically is initiated for patients with a glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) if they are symptomatic due to uremia or if medical management of metabolic conditions is unsuccessful. Kidney transplantation is the optimal form of renal replacement therapy in suitable patients. The choice between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis often is based on patient preference and coexisting conditions. Meticulous monitoring of volume status is necessary to achieve and maintain control of blood pressure. Sleep disorders and pruritus are common and can be managed by optimization of metabolic parameters, adequacy of dialysis, and drugs. PMID:27163762

  16. Major changes and improvements of dialysis therapy in Korea: review of end-stage renal disease registry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong Chan

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN) launched a nationwide end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient registry in 1985 called the Insan Prof. Byung-Suk Min Memorial ESRD Patient Registry. KSN members voluntarily participate in this registry, which has been collecting data through the Internet since 2000. The KSN ESRD patient registry data were reviewed to elucidate the major changes and improvements in dialysis therapy in Korea. The data review revealed: a rapid increase in the number of patients with ESRD; an increase in the number of patients with diabetic nephropathy; a decrease in the proportion of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis; an increase in the role of private dialysis clinics; an increase in the number of elderly patients undergoing dialysis and the number of patients undergoing long-term dialysis; a decrease in mean blood pressure and an increase in pulse pressure; improvement in anemia treatment; improvement in dialysis adequacy; and improvement in the survival of patients undergoing dialysis. In conclusion, improvements have been made in blood pressure control, anemia treatment, and dialysis adequacy despite increases in the number of elderly patients, diabetic patients, and patients on long-term dialysis during the last two decades in Korea. PMID:25589829

  17. The Effect of Haemodialysis Access Types on Cardiac Performance and Morbidities in Patients with Symptomatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Min-Kai; Chang, Chin-Hao; Chan, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about whether the arteriovenous type haemodialysis access affects cardiac function and whether it is still advantageous to the uremic patient with symptomatic heart disease. Methods We conducted a retrospective comparative study. Patients with heart disease and end-stage renal disease that had a new chronic access created between January 2007 and December 2008 and met the inclusion criteria were assessed. The endpoint was major adverse event (MAE)-free survivals of arteriovenous access (AVA) and tunneled cuffed double-lumen central venous catheter (CVC) groups. Whether accesses worsened heart failure was also evaluated. Results There were 43 CVC patients and 60 AVA patients. The median follow-up time from access creation was 27.6 months (IQR 34.7, 10.9~45.6). Although CVC patients were older than AVA patients (median age 78.0, IQR 14.0 vs. 67.5, IQR 16.0, respectively, p = .009), they manifested non-inferior MAE-free survival (mean 17.1, 95% CI 10.3~24.0 vs. 12.9, 95% CI 8.5~17.4 months in CVC and AVA patients, respectively, p = .290). During follow-up, more patients in the AVA group than in the CVC group deteriorated in heart failure status (35 of 57 vs. 10 of 42, respectively, odds ratio 5.1, p < .001). Preoperative-postoperative pairwise comparison of echocardiographic scans revealed an increased number of abnormal findings in the AVA group (Z = 3.91, p < .001), but not in the CVC group. Conclusions In patients with both symptomatic heart disease and end stage renal disease (ESRD), CVC patients showed non-inferior MAE-free survival in comparison to those in the AVA group. AV type access could deteriorate heart failure. Accordingly, uremic patients with symptomatic heart disease are not ideal candidates for AV type access creation. PMID:26848850

  18. Information for patients about inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Tanner, A R; Bramble, M G

    1997-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease it is important that patients understand their condition since this helps to improve long-term management of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the information given to patients with inflammatory bowel disease about their condition, its treatment and the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease. Two surveys were performed, using anonymous questionnaires. One was of all association members in north-east England, the other was a sample of patients attending medical outpatients. The surveys showed that more patients heard of the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease from the media than from medical sources. Of patients seen in medical clinics, 75% would welcome more information about their disease. In four of the six participating centres less than half the patients had been told about the existence of a patients' association. There was considerable variation in the instructions on what action to take in the event of a relapse. These findings suggest that the opportunity offered by out-patient clinics to educate and inform patients is often wasted. Clinicians often neglect to mention the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease, especially to patients with long-standing disease. A higher priority should be given to providing patients with appropriate information on inflammatory bowel disease. Three simple audit standards for the organisation of outpatient clinic information are proposed. PMID:9131520

  19. Kidney disease in Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Narva, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the disease burden among American Indians and Alaska Natives (Al/AN) has shifted from acute infectious diseases to chronic illnesses, particularly type 2 diabetes and its complications. AI/ANs experience high rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), mainly driven by the increase in diabetes. The prevalence of ESRD is 3.5 times greater than that in white Americans. The burden of ESRD has become a community-wide problem among many tribes, and significant efforts have gone into establishing dialysis services on reservations. Reservation-based dialysis services have improved the access of patients to renal replacement therapy, but enormous barriers to improving care remain. These include: the rural and frequently isolated locations that make traveling to facilities difficult owing to distance and road conditions; high rates of poverty; difficulty in recruiting and retaining staff in outlying areas; language and cultural differences; and the high numbers of patients with diabetes and extra-renal diabetic complications. Disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation, with AI/ANs waiting longer for organs than their white counterparts. However, once transplanted, they have comparable survival rates to white Americans. An aggressive approach to intervention, which includes prevention and optimal therapy, is required to slow the growth of ESRD amongst AI/ANs. PMID:12152933

  20. Psychotherapeutic Agents in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Rachel F; Unruh, Mark L; Quinn, Davin K; Vilay, Aloun Mary

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are often affected by many comorbid conditions, including mental health disorders. Psychiatric illness among patients with ESRD has been associated with increased risks for nonadherence, hospitalizations, suicide, and all-cause mortality. We reviewed the pharmacokinetic data available with psychotherapeutic agents, focusing on physiologic data rather than specific dosing recommendations. Unfortunately data regarding the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of psychotherapeutic agents in ESRD remain rather limited. Of the agents available, it appears that the most data in this patient group were found with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and benzodiazepines. Given the small number of patients enrolled in many of the studies and the wide inter-individual variability, it was difficult to interpret the significance of results in many instances. A number of agents, such as tricyclic antidepressants, were associated with adverse effects that would be imperative to avoid in patients with ESRD. Psychotherapeutic medications should be started at low doses and titrated carefully, while monitoring the efficacy and safety of each agent. PMID:25857865

  1. 76 FR 627 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... peritoneal dialysis patients, as well as pediatric patients, are excluded from the calculation (75 FR 49185... (DFC), the ESRD Quality Initiative, the ESRD Conditions for Coverage, and CROWNWeb (75 FR 49216-49217... the ``ESRD PPS final rule''), which appeared in the Federal Register on August 12, 2010 (75 FR...

  2. Kawasaki disease in a postpartum patient.

    PubMed Central

    Fason, Janet T.; Fry, Yvonne W.; Smith, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, is a multisystem disease. It usually affects children below the age of five, but it occasionally affects adults. There are less than 50 English-reported adult cases in the literature, and only five reported cases of Kawasaki disease and pregnancy, as of 2003. The cases associated with pregnancy involved patients who had a history of Kawasaki disease during childhood and addressed how the complications of the illness (i.e,. coronary artery aneurysms) were managed during pregnancy and delivery. There are no reported cases of Kawasaki disease in postpartum patients. This article presents a case of Kawasaki disease in a 21-year-old, four-week postpartum patient who initially responded to intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy. This paper will review the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease as well as the multiple outside variables that impact the management of adult postpartum patients with Kawasaki disease. PMID:15586654

  3. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Cheng, Jur-Shan; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Chen-Li; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort). We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3) to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR) derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8), but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8) and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9). But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05). Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended. PMID:26469976

  4. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  5. Impact of Uraemic Pruritus on Quality of Life among End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed K.; Elshahid, Ahmed R.; El Baz, Tarek Z.; Elazab, Raed M.; Elhoseiny, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uraemic pruritus is significant complication in (ESRD) patients and substantially impairs their quality of life (QOL). ESRD is a bothersome problem with attempts being made to increase the survival of patients on dialysis. Aim An attempt was made to compare the QOL of haemodialysis patients and suffering from uraemic pruritus with the QOL of those on haemodialysis but with no presenting uraemic pruritus. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the QOL of haemodialysis patients suffering from uraemic pruritus. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used to assess the QOL. Haemodialysis patients with pruritus who had completed three months of maintenance haemodialysis (n=100) were enrolled into the study and 100 controls (n=100) on haemodialysis but with no pruritus were further enrolled. Results The QOL of haemodialysis patients with pruritus was found to be significantly impaired (p < 0.05) in comparison to those on haemodialysis with no prutitis, particularly with respect to all the four WHOQOL-BREF domains. Conclusion Quality of life of ESRD patients on dialsysis was siginificantly affected by pruritis. PMID:27134981

  6. End-Stage Renal Disease from Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the United States, 1995 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Donal J.; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Foley, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the US are not well described. Methods We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995–2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Results Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001–2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year; and were higher for patients characterized by age 40–64 years (0.6), ≥ 65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). SIRs remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25689876

  7. Reversible Ceftriaxone-Induced Pseudolithiasis in an Adult Patient with Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Aya; Suehiro, Takaichi; Takii, Misaki; Soeda, Hiroyasu; Hirakawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone (CTRX) is a third-generation cephalosporin widely used for the treatment of bacterial infections in patients with renal disease because of its excretion by both renal and hepatic mechanisms. Biliary pseudolithiasis is a known CTRX-associated complication; however, there have been no studies of this adverse event in adult patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Here we report the case of a 79-year-old Japanese woman with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving maintenance hemodialysis who developed CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis. The patient received CTRX for bronchial pneumonia. Fifteen days following CTRX initiation, the patient presented with stomachache. Because of the presence of one gallstone and increased gallbladder wall thickness on computed tomography scans, not detected at the onset of pneumonia, the patient was diagnosed with CTRX-induced gallbladder pseudolithiasis. CTRX was discontinued immediately. At 48 days following CTRX withdrawal, the gallstone and thickening of the gallbladder wall had completely resolved. ESRD may be a risk factor for CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis as hepatic excretion of CTRX is the predominant clearance mechanism in patients with ESRD. More attention should be paid to CTRX-induced pseudolithiasis following the use of CTRX in ESRD patients. PMID:26558252

  8. Improving clinical skills to support the emotional and psychological well-being of patients with end-stage renal disease: a qualitative evaluation of two interventions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Francesca; Combes, Gill; Hare, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) need and want improved emotional and psychological support. Explicit attention to patients' emotional issues during consultations can help, yet renal consultants rarely address emotional problems. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate whether two different low-cost interventions could individually enable consultants to talk with patients about their emotional concerns during routine outpatient consultations. Method One intervention involved patients using a Patient Issues Sheet to identify two to three issues they would like to talk about in their consultation and the second involved consultants asking patients a direct question about their emotional feelings. Consultants were trained to handle any emotional issues raised. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five consultants and 36 ESRD patients from two UK renal units. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. Results Although consultants and patients tended to use the two interventions in different ways, they expressed generally positive views about how helpful the interventions were in promoting discussion of emotional issues. Consultants appreciated the training for facilitating empathetic handling of patients' emotional disclosures and containment of discussion. Most patients who raised emotional concerns were satisfied with their consultant's responses, while others were dissuaded from more explicit discussion by their consultant's concentration on physical considerations. Conclusions These qualitative study findings suggest that both interventions are feasible and acceptable and have the potential to help consultants improve emotional and psychological patient care, providing cognitive and behavioural tools to enable discussion of emotional issues during routine outpatient consultations. PMID:27274842

  9. Updates on the management of diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Leung, Angela M; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Lynch, Katherine E; Brent, Gregory A; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as "Burnt-Out Diabetes," which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7% to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  10. Updates on the Management of Diabetes in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Leung, Angela M.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Lynch, Katherine E.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as “Burnt-Out Diabetes,” which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7 to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  11. 78 FR 48688 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive ESRD Care Initiative; Extension of the Submission Deadlines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Medicare program. We anticipate that the Comprehensive ESRD Care Model would result in improved health... seamless and integrated care for beneficiaries with ESRD, we are developing a comprehensive care delivery... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  12. Red blood cell abnormalities and the pathogenesis of anemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Georgatzakou, Hara T; Antonelou, Marianna H; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2016-08-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic complication in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is ascribed to decreased erythropoietin production, shortened red blood cell (RBC) lifespan, and inflammation. Uremic toxins severely affect RBC lifespan; however, the implicated molecular pathways are poorly understood. Moreover, current management of anemia in ESRD is controversial due to the "anemia paradox" phenomenon, which underlines the need for a more individualized approach to therapy. RBCs imprint the adverse effects of uremic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses in a context of structural and functional deterioration that is associated with RBC removal signaling and morbidity risk. RBCs circulate in hostile plasma by raising elegant homeostatic defenses. Variability in primary defect, co-morbidity, and therapeutic approaches add complexity to the pathophysiological background of the anemic ESRD patient. Several blood components have been suggested as biomarkers of anemia-related morbidity and mortality risk in ESRD. However, a holistic view of blood cell and plasma modifications through integrated omics approaches and high-throughput studies might assist the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that will target the underlying pathophysiologic processes of ESRD anemia. PMID:26948278

  13. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutritional patterns, patient education on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or referral to a diabetes specialist may reduce risk of subsequent hypoglycemia. In certain situations, it is important to recognize the possibility of non-diabetic causes of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and to avoid treating pseudo-hyperglycemia caused by glucose- non-specific glucometers in patients utilizing icodextrin-based solutions for peritoneal dialysis. Adrenal insufficiency, certain medications, malnutrition and/or infection are among the most common causes of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic ESRD patients, and they should be suspected after exclusion of inadvertent use of hypoglycemic agents. The goal of this review article is to summarize approaches and recommendations for the work up and treatment of hypoglycemia in ESRD. PMID:26152404

  14. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction Versus Treatment Switch

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; González, Hans Guerrero; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3–0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0–606) mg/g to 216 (0–2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate. PMID:24556354

  15. Effects of Nutritional Supplementation on Fatigue, and Autonomic and Immune Dysfunction in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Sanae; Koyama, Hidenori; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Hisako; Hirayama, Yoshinobu; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okamura, Mikio; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Okada, Shigeki; Hirata, Sumio; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Kajimoto, Osami; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Inaba, Masaaki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis treatment. We hypothesized that multinutritional support would improve quality of life, fatigue symptoms, and potential quantitative measures including endocrine, immune and autonomic functions in patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis. Methods Two hundred and two hemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to receive active treatment (containing vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin C, carnitine, coenzyme Q10, naïve galacto-oligosaccharide, and zinc) or placebo after each dialysis session for 12 weeks. The patients and attending physicians were blinded to the treatment, and 172 patients (86 in each group) completed the study. Fatigue was evaluated via fatigue questionnaire at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. To assess human herpes virus (HHV) 6 and 7 reactivation, numbers of viral DNA copies were determined in saliva by polymerase chain reaction at weeks 0 and 12. Autonomic function was determined via measurement of beat-to-beat variation by using acceleration plethysmography. Results Clinical characteristics, changes in fatigue, quality of life score, endocrine functions, and laboratory data did not differ significantly between the two groups. Several parameters of heart rate variability significantly increased after nutritional treatment compared to placebo. Nutritional drink for 12 weeks significantly suppressed HHV7 DNA copy numbers. Similarly, HHV6 DNA copy numbers tended to be decreased by treatment but without reaching statistical significance. Conclusions Nutritional supplementation may modulate immune and autonomic dysfunction in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:25746727

  16. Drug therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Marbury, T C

    1984-01-01

    Haemodialysis is utilised therapeutically as supportive treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In conjunction with haemodialysis therapy, ESRD patients frequently receive a large number of drugs to treat a multitude of intercurrent conditions. Because of the impaired renal function in ESRD patients, dosage reduction is often recommended to avoid adverse drug reactions, particularly for drugs and active metabolites with extensive renal excretion. On the other hand, if the removal of a drug by haemodialysis during concomitant drug therapy is significant, a dosage supplement would be required to ensure adequate therapeutic efficacy. Knowledge of the impact of haemodialysis on the elimination of specific drugs is therefore essential to the rational design of the dosage regimen in patients undergoing haemodialysis. This review addresses the clinical pharmacokinetic aspects of drug therapy in haemodialysis patients and considers: (a) the effects of ESRD on the general pharmacokinetics of drugs; (b) dialysis clearance and its impact on drug and metabolite elimination; (c) the definition of dialysability and the criteria for evaluation of drug dialysability; (d) pharmacokinetic parameters which are useful in the prediction of drug dialysability; and (e) the application of pharmacokinetic principles to the adjustment of dosage regimens in haemodialysis patients. Finally, drugs commonly associated with haemodialysis therapy are tabulated with updated pharmacokinetics and dialysability information. PMID:6362952

  17. Persistence of secondary restless legs syndrome in a phantom limb caused by end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Shingo; Hitsumoto, Akiko; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Usui, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Our patient had secondary restless legs syndrome (RLS) in the left lower limb caused by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Severe RLS symptoms persisted even after amputation of the affected limb. Considering that oral administration of a dopamine receptor agonist was effective in treating the RLS in the phantom limb in this case, dysfunction of the central dopaminergic system was thought to be involved in the phantom limb-RLS mechanism. The persistence of RLS symptoms even after amputation of the affected limb suggests that the area responsible for ESRD-related RLS symptoms exists at the spinal level or in the higher central nervous system. PMID:23545682

  18. 76 FR 70227 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System and Quality Incentive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...This final rule updates and makes certain revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2012. We are also finalizing the interim final rule with comment period published on April 6, 2011, regarding the transition budget-neutrality adjustment under the ESRD PPS,. This final rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive......

  19. The Growth Attainment, Hematological, Iron Status and Inflammatory Profile of Guatemalan Juvenile End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro de Almeida, Juliana; Lou-Meda, Randall; Olbert, Marion; Seifert, Markus; Weiss, Günter; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Solomons, Noel W.; Schümann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Stunting, anemia and inflammation are frequently observed in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Objectives To assess anthropometric, hematological and inflammatory data and to study their potential interrelationship in Guatemalan juveniles undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods 54 juveniles 7–20 years of age were recruited in FUNDANIER, Guatemala City: 27 on HD and 27 PD. Hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin, serum transferrin receptor (sTfR), serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and iron-binding capacity, white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as IL-6, IL-1 and TNF-α, weight and height were determined by standard methods. Hepcidin–25 (Hep-25) was assessed by weak cation exchange time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Results 92% and 55% of HD and PD children, respectively, were stunted and 95% and 85% were anemic. Among iron status biomarkers, serum ferritin was massively increased and significantly higher in the HD group compared to the PD group. Hep-25 was also greatly elevated in both groups. 41% of HD patients showed increments in three or more inflammatory biomarkers, while it was 2 or less in all PD subjects. Conclusions The degree of stunting, the prevalence and severity of anemia in Guatemalan juvenile ESRD far exceed the national statistics for this low-income Central American country. Ferritin and Hep-25 concentrations were elevated, with the latter to an extraordinary magnitude. Additional biomarkers of inflammation not directly related to iron status were elevated as well. The role of both disease- and environment-related factors in combination best explains the magnitude of the biomarker abnormalities. PMID:26445018

  20. Antiplatelet Therapy in Hemodialysis Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Summaria, Francesco; Giannico, Maria B.; Talarico, Giovanni P.; Patrizi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Context: Coronary artery disease is highly prevalent among patients with end stage renal disease/hemodialysis (ESRD/HD) and coronary percutaneous interventions (PCI) has been increased by nearly 50% over the past decade. After PCI with stent placement, guidelines recommend dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), but no specifically tailored pharmacotherapy approach is outlined for this frail population, mostly excluded from large randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Evidence Acquisition: We reviewed current evidences on the use of antiplatelet therapy in patients with ESRD/HD undergoing PCI, focusing on the efficacy and safety of specific agents and their indications for detailed clinical settings. Results: Clinical setting in HD patients is the principal determinant of the type, onset, combination and duration of the DAPT. However, irrespective clinical setting, in addition to aspirin, clopidogrel is currently the most used antiplatelet agent even if no information derived from RCTs are available in ESRD. Due to the large experience acquired in routine clinical practice, the awareness of safety is higher for clopidogrel than newer antiplatelet agents. Because of lack of data, the use of prasugrel and ticagrelor is actually not recommended. However, in case of high ischemic and acceptable bleeding risk, they may be selectively used in ESRD/HD. Conclusions: This investigation might contribute to delineate the best treatment options for this high risk population. PMID:26528445

  1. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  2. Hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Indridason, Olafur S; Quarles, L Darryl

    2002-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia occurs universally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) unless efforts are made to prevent positive phosphate balance. Positive phosphate balance results from the loss of renal elimination of phosphate and continued obligatory intestinal absorption of dietary phosphate. Increased efflux of phosphate from bone because of excess parathyroid hormone-mediated bone resorption can also contribute to increased serum phosphate concentrations in the setting of severe hyperparathyroidism. It is important to treat hyperphosphatemia because it contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism, vascular calcifications, and increased cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients. Attaining a neutral phosphate balance, which is the key to the management of hyperphosphatemia in ESRD, is a challenge. Control of phosphorus depends on its removal during dialysis and the limitation of gastrointestinal absorption by dietary phosphate restriction and chelation of phosphate. Knowledge of the quantitative aspects of phosphate balance is useful in optimizing our use of phosphate binders, dialysis frequency, and vitamin D sterols. The development of new phosphate binders and efforts to find new ways to inhibit gastrointestinal absorption of phosphate will lead to improvements in the control of serum phosphate levels in ESRD. PMID:12203200

  3. Genomic structure of the human plasma prekallikrein gene, identification of allelic variants, and analysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Anderson, P J; Freedman, B I; Rich, S S; Bowden, D W

    2000-10-15

    Kallikreins are serine proteases that catalyze the release of kinins and other vasoactive peptides. Previously, we have studied one tissue-specific (H. Yu et al., 1996, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 7: 2559-2564) and one plasma-specific (H. Yu et al., 1998, Hypertension 31: 906-911) human kallikrein gene in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Short sequence repeat polymorphisms for the human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1; previously known as KLK3) on chromosome 4 were associated with ESRD in an African American study population. This study of KLKB1 in ESRD has been extended by determining the genomic structure of KLKB1 and searching for allelic variants that may be associated with ESRD. Exon-spanning PCR primer sets were identified by serial testing of primer pairs designed from KLKB1 cDNA sequence and DNA sequencing of PCR products. Like the rat plasma kallikrein gene and the closely related human factor XI gene, the human KLKB1 gene contains 15 exons and 14 introns. The longest intron, F, is almost 12 kb long. The total length of the gene is approximately 30 kb. Sequence of the 5'-proximal promoter region of KLKB1 was obtained by shotgun cloning of genomic fragments from a bacterial artificial clone containing the KLKB1 gene, followed by screening of the clones using exon 1-specific probes. Primers flanking the exons and 5'-proximal promoter region were used to screen for allelic variants in the genomic DNA from ESRD patients and controls using the single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We identified 12 allelic variants in the 5'-proximal promoter and 7 exons. Of note were a common polymorphism (30% of the population) at position 521 of KLKB1 cDNA, which leads to the replacement of asparagine with a serine at position 124 in the heavy chain of the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, an A716C polymorphism in exon 7 resulting in the amino acid change H189P in the A3 domain of the heavy chain was observed in 5 patients belonging to 3 ESRD families. A third

  4. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ≧30 years, and free of ESRD (n = 31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012. After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile. One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  5. Functional Assessment in End-Stage Renal Disease: Enhancing Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Saby, Adam; Miller, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Why do functional assessments in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) matter? Multiple studies show that new dialysis patients undergo a substantial decline among activities of daily living. Moreover, poor functional status in ESRD patients is associated with early morality. That is why CMS has developed new criteria to assess ESRD patients in regards to their functional, psychologic, and cognitive capabilities. Functional assessments by health providers have been used in field of Rehabilitation Medicine for over 50 years; rehabilitation physicians have found them effective in establishing goals and monitoring improvement. Assessments can provide guidance by identifying the needs and types of intervention most suited for patients. Impairments can be addressed with referrals to physical therapy for gross motor issues, occupational therapy for self-care problems, psychiatry for mental disorders, and neurology for cognitive deficits. The more accurate the assessments over time, the more targeted and effective the therapies become. We believe that the new CMS goals to assess functionality will improve ESRD patient's quality of life, longevity, and long-term healthcare costs. PMID:26756940

  6. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  7. Patients with primary membranous nephropathy are at high risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taewoo; Derebail, Vimal K; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V; Chung, Yunro; Fine, Jason P; Mahoney, Shannon; Poulton, Caroline J; Lionaki, Sophia; Hogan, Susan L; Falk, Ronald J; Cattran, Daniel C; Hladunewich, Michelle; Reich, Heather N; Nachman, Patrick H

    2016-05-01

    Here we conducted a retrospective study to examine the risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs) relative to that of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with primary membranous nephropathy, in a discovery cohort of 404 patients. The cumulative incidence of CVEs was estimated in the setting of the competing risk of ESRD with risk factors for CVEs assessed by multivariable survival analysis. The observed cumulative incidences of CVEs were 4.4%, 5.4%, 8.2%, and 8.8% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years respectively in the primary membranous nephropathy cohort. In the first 2 years after diagnosis, the risk for CVEs was similar to that of ESRD in the entire cohort, but exceeded it among patients with preserved renal function. Accounting for traditional risk factors and renal function, the severity of nephrosis at the time of the event (hazard ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 4.3) was a significant independent risk factor of CVEs. The incidence and risk factors of CVEs were affirmed in an external validation cohort of 557 patients with primary membranous nephropathy. Thus early in the course of disease, patients with primary membranous nephropathy have an increased risk of CVEs commensurate to, or exceeding that of ESRD. Hence, reduction of CVEs should be considered as a therapeutic outcome measure and focus of intervention in primary membranous nephropathy. PMID:26924046

  8. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients & Caregivers Parkinson's Disease Highlights for Patients & ... and progression biomarkers for PD. NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Parkinson's Disease Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through ...

  9. Evaluation of Exercise Tolerance in Dialysis Patients Performing Tai Chi Training: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bulińska, Katarzyna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Ochmann, Bartosz; Pawlaczyk, Weronika; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69.2 ± 8.6 years). A 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and spiroergometry were performed at the beginning and after 6 months of training. Results. After 6 months of Tai Chi, significant improvements were recorded in mean distance in the 6MWT (387.89 versus 436.36 m), rate of perceived exertion (7.4 versus 4.7), and spiroergometry (8.71 versus 10.08 min). Conclusions. In the ESRD patients taking part in Tai Chi training, a definite improvement in exercise tolerance was recorded after the 6-month training. Tai Chi exercises conducted on days without dialysis can be an effective and interesting form of rehabilitation for patients, offering them a chance for a better quality of life and fewer falls and hospitalisations that are the result of it. PMID:27547228

  10. Associations of Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction With Subclinical Ventricular Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Beussink, Lauren; Scherzer, Rebecca; Ganz, Peter; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer high rates of heart failure and cardiovascular mortality, and we lack a thorough understanding of what, if any, modifiable factors contribute to cardiac dysfunction in these high-risk patients. To evaluate endothelial function as a potentially modifiable cause of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, we investigated cross-sectional associations of macro- and microvascular dysfunction with left and right ventricular dysfunction in a well-controlled ESRD cohort. We performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography of the left and right ventricle, in 149 ESRD patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational study. Of these participants, 123 also underwent endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (macrovascular function). Microvascular function was measured as the velocity time integral of hyperemic blood flow after cuff deflation. Impaired flow-mediated dilation was associated with higher left ventricular mass, independently of age and blood pressure: per 2-fold lower flow-mediated dilation, left ventricular mass was 4.1% higher (95% confidence interval, 0.49-7.7; P=0.03). After adjustment for demographics, blood pressure, comorbidities, and medications, a 2-fold lower velocity time integral was associated with 9.5% higher E/e' ratio (95% confidence interval, 1.0-16; P=0.03) and 6.7% lower absolute right ventricular longitudinal strain (95% confidence interval, 2.0-12; P=0.003). Endothelial dysfunction is a major correlate of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, particularly diastolic and right ventricular dysfunction, in patients whose volume status is well controlled. Future investigations are needed to determine whether therapies targeting the vascular endothelium could improve cardiac outcomes in ESRD. PMID:27550915

  11. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  12. Epidemiology and risk factors of chronic kidney disease in the El-Sharkia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghonemy, Tarek A; Farag, Salama E; Soliman, Sameh A; El-okely, Amir; El-hendy, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. Renal replacement therapy and kidney transplantation are increasing the burden on health systems. Various risk factors can lead to this disease. In this work, we tried to study the epidemiology and risk factors of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) in one of the Egyptian areas (El-Sharkia Governorate), and from this study we can get some data about the distribution and most common causes of this disease. A cross-sectional study was conducted at 15 dialysis centers in governmental hospitals in ElSharkia, Egypt. We used a questionnaire and direct interviewing with ESRD patients in addition to using medical records for our data collections. One thousand and four patients were selected randomly from 2136 patients who were known CKD patients on regular hemodialysis. Each week, two to three visits were performed in each center and during each visit, direct interviews were performed for ten to 15 patients, which took about 30 min for each patient. The study sample (n = 1004 patients) consisted of 62.2% males and 37.8% females. The mean age of patients was 52.03 + 14.67 years. The highest percentage of patients (31.9%) was found to be between 50 and 60 years in both males and females. More than half (61.3%) of the ESRD patients were living in villages, while about one-third (38.7%) of the ESRD patients were living in cities. Hypertension and diabetes were the main causes of ESRD. 15.5% of ESRD patients had diabetes mellitus, 31.8% had hypertension, 8.4% had kidney stone, 8.8% had urinary tract infection, 4.6% had congenital abnormality and 3.7% had primary glomerulonephritis. The main risk factors of renal diseases are hypertension and diabetes, while unknown causes represent a high percentage of all causes by 17.7%. Primary glomerulonephritis is the lowest cause of CKD in the El-Sharkia governorate, Egypt. PMID:26787576

  13. HIV and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOR KIDNEY DISEASE? HIV MEDICATIONS AND THE KIDNEYS DIALYSIS AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION THE BOTTOM LINE WHY SHOULD ... disease (ESRD) or kidney failure. This can require dialysis or a kidney transplant. The rate of kidney ...

  14. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model. PMID:23990162

  15. End-Stage Renal Disease in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rasheeda K.; O’Hare, Ann M.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Introduction Demand for nursing home (NH) care by patients with endstage renal disease (ESRD) is likely to increase with growing numbers of older adults initiating chronic dialysis. We completed a systematic review to summarize the literature on NH residents with ESRD. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify articles using the following MESH terms or related key words in the title or abstract: “residential facilities”, “renal dialysis”, “renal replacement therapy”, and “chronic kidney failure”. We selected case control, cohort studies, and clinical trials that included older adults with ESRD (defined as those receiving chronic dialysis or those with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD)) living in residential care facilities. We abstracted information on study design, quality, and results. Results Of 198 unique citations identified by the search strategy, 14 articles met eligibility criteria. The majority of articles were multicenter studies that were conducted in the 1990s. One study focused on patients with Stage 5 CKD, and the remaining thirteen studies focused on chronic dialysis patients of which eight studies included only peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, four studies included both PD and hemodialysis (HD) patients, and one study included only HD patients. All studies were observational, no clinical trials were identified, and study design limitations and heterogeneity within study populations were common. Summarizing results across these studies suggests that NH residents with ESRD have limited survival, particularly early after dialysis initiation. Functional impairment is highly prevalent in this population and independently associated with poor outcomes. Conclusions NH residents with ESRD appear to be a particularly vulnerable population, but current information on their prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes is limited. Further research is needed to provide a better

  16. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: 10-Year Follow-Up of Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ≧30 years, and free of ESRD (n = 31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012.After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile.One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  17. The FTO gene polymorphism is associated with end-stage renal disease: two large independent case–control studies in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Viklicky, Ondrej; Dlouha, Dana; Bloudickova, Silvie; Kubinova, Ruzena; Peasey, Anne; Pikhart, Hynek; Adamkova, Vera; Brabcova, Irena; Pokorna, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies identified the FTO (fat mass and obesity gene) gene as an important determinant of body weight. More recently, the FTO gene was reported to be associated with other outcomes, including major risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated the role of this gene in the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by CKD. Methods. We conducted two large population-based case–control studies of ESRD. Study 1 compared 984 haemodialysed patients with ESRD with 2501 participants in the Czech post-MONICA study; Study 2 compared 1188 patients included in a kidney transplantation programme for ESRD with 6681 participants in the Czech HAPIEE study. The frequencies of the FTO rs17817449 single nucleotide polymorphism genotype were compared between cases and controls. Results. The FTO rs17817449 genotype was significantly associated with CKD in both studies (P-values 0.00004 and 0.006, respectively). In the pooled data, the odds ratios of CKD for GG and GT, versus TT genotype, were 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.20–1.56) and 1.17 (1.05–1.31), respectively (P for trend <0.0001). Among haemodialysed and kidney transplant patients, the onset of ESRD in GG homozygotes was 3.3 (P = 0.012) and 2.5 (P = 0.032) years, respectively, earlier than in TT homozygotes. Conclusions. These two large independent case–control studies in the general population found robust associations between the FTO rs17817449 polymorphism and the ESRD. The results suggest that the morbidities associated with the FTO gene include CKD. PMID:21788373

  18. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Adequacy in Cohort of Iranian Patient with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahdadi, Hosein; Balouchi, Abbas; Sepehri, Zahra; Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Magbri, Awad; Keikhaie, Fereshteh; Shahakzehi, Ahmad; Sarjou, Azizullah Arbabi

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many factors that can affect dialysis adequacy; such as the type of vascular access, filter type, device used, and the dose, and rout of erythropoietin stimulation agents (ESA) used. The aim of this study was investigating factors affecting Hemodialysis adequacy in cohort of Iranian patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 133 Hemodialysis patients referred to two dialysis units in Sistan-Baluchistan province in the cities of Zabol and Iranshahr, Iran. We have looked at, (the effects of the type of vascular access, the filter type, the device used, and the dose, route of delivery, and the type of ESA used) on Hemodialysis adequacy. Dialysis adequacy was calculated using kt/v formula, two-part information questionnaire including demographic data which also including access type, filter type, device used for hemodialysis (HD), type of Eprex injection, route of administration, blood groups and hemoglobin response to ESA were utilized. The data was analyzed using the SPSS v16 statistical software. Descriptive statistical methods, Mann-Whitney statistical test, and multiple regressions were used when applicable. Results: The range of calculated dialysis adequacy is 0.28 to 2.39 (units of adequacy of dialysis). 76.7% of patients are being dialyzed via AVF and 23.3% of patients used central venous catheters (CVC). There was no statistical significant difference between dialysis adequacy, vascular access type, device used for HD (Fresenius and B. Braun), and the filter used for HD (p> 0.05). However, a significant difference was observed between the adequacy of dialysis and Eprex injection and patients’ time of dialysis (p <0.05). Conclusion: Subcutaneous ESA (Eprex) injection and dialysis shift (being dialyzed in the morning) can have positive impact on dialysis adequacy. Patients should be educated on the facts that the type of device used for HD and the vascular access used has no

  19. Hypertension Management in Transition: From CKD to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Valika, Aziz; Peixoto, Aldo J

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is present in ∼90% of patients in late-stage CKD. There are scarce data focusing on the transition period between CKD Stages 4 and 5 (end-stage kidney disease) as it relates to hypertension evaluation and management. Here, we propose that a combination of the principles used in the management of patients with CKD Stages 4 and 5 be applied to patients in this transition. These include the use of out-of-office blood pressure (BP) monitoring (eg, home BP), avoidance of excessively tight BP goals, emphasis of sodium restriction, preferential use of blockers of the renin-angiotensin system and diuretics, and consideration of the use of beta blockers. PMID:27324679

  20. Serologic celiac disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Haghdani, Saeid; Adilipour, Haiedeh; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Minakari, Mohammad; Adibi, Peyman; Ahmadi, Khalil; Emami, Mohammah Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an association of celiac disease (CD) with several gastrointestinal illnesses. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to evaluate the value of the routine serological tests for CD in these patients. Materials and Methods: patients with IBD underwent screening test for CD. The screening test was based on IgA anti-tTG antibody evaluated by ELISA method and IgA EMA (endomysial antibody) measured by the indirect immunofluorescence method. Fisher exact and chi-square and t tests were used for data analysis. Results: the study was conducted on 100 patients, with a mean age of 34.74 ± 12.03 (SD) years. The mean simplified Crohn's disease activity index was 90 ± 17 (SE) and the mean colitis activity index was 3.46± 0.96 (SE). Seventeen patients (17%) had IgA anti-tTG antibody levels above the cutoff point (> 20). Thirty-two patients were positive for IgA EMA. IgA EMA was positive in nine IgA anti-tTG positive patients (three patients with Crohn's Disease and six ones with ulcerative colitis). Then, the prevalence of serologic CD was 9% that was higher than that of general population. A significant correlation was found between the results of IgA EMA and those of IgA anti-tTG (P=0.001) whereas Fisher exact test revealed significant difference between frequency distribution of positive and negative results of IgA EMA and IgA anti-tTG in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (P=0). Conclusion: the prevalence of serologic CD in general population in Iran has been reported to be 0.6–0.96%. Then, its prevalence in our sample size was about ten times more than that in general population. PMID:23264789

  1. Definition of risk factors for death, end stage renal disease, and thromboembolic events in a monocentric cohort of 338 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Manger, K; Manger, B; Repp, R; Geisselbrecht, M; Geiger, A; Pfahlberg, A; Harrer, T; Kalden, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: The survival rate in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved dramatically during the past four decades to 96.6% (five year) in the Erlangen cohort, but it is nearly three times as high as in an age and sex matched control population. Reasons for death are mainly cardiovascular diseases (37%) and infections (29%). Objective: To find risk factors existing at disease onset for a severe outcome in the Erlangen cohort. Patients and methods: By using a database of 338 patients with SLE from a single centre, documented at least one to 15 years and including Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage score data and index (SDI) and an activity score (European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM)), a retrospective search was made for risk factors for a severe outcome like death, end stage renal disease (ESRD), and thromboembolic events (TE) in SLE. For this purpose, multivariable Cox regression models were analysed using the statistical package SPSS 10.0 for Windows. Results: The following were defined as risk factors for death at disease onset: male sex (p<0.001, relative risk (RR)=3.5), age >40 at disease onset (p<0.0001, RR=19.9), nephritis (p<0.05, RR=1.6), a reduction of creatinine clearance (p<0.001, RR=1.8), heart disease (p=0.05, RR=1.5), and central nervous system (CNS) disease (p=0.06, RR=1.6). An increase in the SDI of two or more points from the first to the third year of disease was the worst prognostic factor (p<0.0001, RR=7.7). The existence of Ro or nRNP antibodies, or both, was protective (p<0.05, RR =0.1). A low C3 (p<0.01 RR=3.0) and splenomegaly (p<0.01 RR=2.7) at disease onset turned out to be risk factors for ESRD besides a nephritis. In patients with hypertension (p<0.05) and/or high titres of dsDNA antibodies (>70 U/l) (p<0.01) and/or a mean ECLAM score of 4 (p<0.01) in the course of disease, a prevalence of ESRD was recorded in 9% (p<0.05) and 10% (p

  2. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  3. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis services as defined in § 413.171; and (b) Home dialysis services, support, and equipment as identified...

  4. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis services as defined in § 413.171; and (b) Home dialysis services, support, and equipment as identified...

  5. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis services as defined in § 413.171; and (b) Home dialysis services, support, and equipment as identified...

  6. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis services as defined in § 413.171; and (b) Home dialysis services, support, and equipment as identified...

  7. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis services as defined in § 413.171; and (b) Home dialysis services, support, and equipment as identified...

  8. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G.; Arastu, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough. PMID:27144198

  9. Vaccination recommendations for patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bruno, Claudio; Berardinelli, Angela; Filosto, Massimiliano; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Pegoraro, Elena; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tonin, Paola; Marrosu, Gianni; Minetti, Carlo; Servida, Maura; Fiorillo, Chiara; Conforti, Giorgio; Scapolan, Silvia; Ansaldi, Filippo; Vianello, Andrea; Castaldi, Silvana; Principi, Nicola; Toscano, Antonio; Moggio, Maurizio

    2014-10-14

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) encompass a broad spectrum of conditions. Because infections may be relevant to the final prognosis of most NMDs, vaccination appears to be the simplest and most effective solution for protecting NMD patients from vaccine-preventable infections. However, very few studies have evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of different vaccines in NMD patients; therefore, detailed vaccination recommendations for NMD patients are not available. Here, we present vaccination recommendations from a group of Italian Scientific Societies for optimal disease prevention in NMD patients that maintain high safety levels. We found that NMD patients can be classified into two groups according to immune function: patients with normal immunity and patients who are immunocompromised, including those who intermittently or continuously take immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with normal immunity and do not take immunosuppressive therapy can be vaccinated as healthy subjects. In contrast, immunocompromised patients, including those who take immunosuppressive therapy, should receive all inactivated vaccines as well as influenza and pneumococcal vaccines; these patients should not be administered live attenuated vaccines. In all cases, the efficacy and long-term persistence of immunity from vaccination in NMD patients can be lower than in normal subjects. Household contacts of immunocompromised NMD patients should also be vaccinated appropriately. PMID:25223270

  10. Past Decline Versus Current eGFR and Subsequent ESRD Risk.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Coresh, Josef; Ballew, Shoshana H; Woodward, Mark; Levin, Adeera; Naimark, David M J; Nally, Joseph; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Stengel, Benedicte; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Levey, Andrew S

    2016-08-01

    eGFR is a robust predictor of ESRD risk. However, the prognostic information gained from the past trajectory (slope) beyond that of the current eGFR is unclear. We examined 22 cohorts to determine the association of past slopes and current eGFR level with subsequent ESRD. We modeled hazard ratios as a spline function of slopes, adjusting for demographic variables, eGFR, and comorbidities. We used random effects meta-analyses to combine results across studies stratified by cohort type. We calculated the absolute risk of ESRD at 5 years after the last eGFR using the weighted average baseline risk. Overall, 1,080,223 participants experienced 5163 ESRD events during a mean follow-up of 2.0 years. In CKD cohorts, a slope of -6 versus 0 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year over the previous 3 years (a decline of 18 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) versus no decline) associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of ESRD of 2.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.88 to 2.76). In contrast, a current eGFR of 30 versus 50 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (a difference of 20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of 19.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.6 to 29.1). Past decline contributed more to the absolute risk of ESRD at lower than higher levels of current eGFR. In conclusion, during a follow-up of 2 years, current eGFR associates more strongly with future ESRD risk than the magnitude of past eGFR decline, but both contribute substantially to the risk of ESRD, especially at eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). PMID:26657867

  11. The Effects of Super-Flux (High Performance) Dialyzer on Plasma Glycosylated Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (proBNP) and Glycosylated N-Terminal proBNP in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Nishikimi, Toshio; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Yasuno, Shinji; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Ueshima, Kenji; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Horii, Kazukiyo; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Minamino, Naoto; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma BNP levels are predictive of prognosis in hemodialysis patients. However, recent studies showed that the current BNP immunoassay cross-reacts with glycosylated proBNP, and the NT-proBNP assay underestimates glycosylated NT-proBNP. In addition, the recently developed high performance dialyzer removes medium-sized molecular solutes such as β2-microgloburin. We therefore investigated the effects of high performance dialysis on measured levels of glycosylated proBNP, glycosylated NT-proBNP and other BNP-related peptides in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. Method The relationships between clinical parameters and BNP-related molecule were also investigated. We used our newly developed immunoassay to measure plasma total BNP and proBNP in 105 normal subjects and 36 ESRD patients before and after hemodialysis. Plasma NT-proBNP was measured using Elecsys II after treatment with or without deglycosylating enzymes. We also measured plasma ANP and cGMP using radioimmunoassays. Results All the measured BNP-related peptides were significantly higher in ESRD patients than healthy subjects. Total BNP (−38.9%), proBNP (−29.7%), glycoNT-proBNP (−45.5%), nonglycoNT-proBNP (−53.4%), ANP (−50.4%) and cGMP (−72.1%) were all significantly reduced after hemodialysis, and the magnitude of the reduction appeared molecular weight- dependent. Both the proBNP/total BNP and glycoNT-proBNP/nonglycoNT-proBNP ratios were increased after hemodialysis. The former correlated positively with hemodialysis vintage and negatively with systolic blood pressure, while the latter correlated positively with parathyroid hormone levels. Conclusion These results suggest that hemodialysis using super-flux dialyzer removes BNP-related peptides in a nearly molecular weight-dependent manner. The ProBNP/total BNP and glycoNT-proBNP/nonglycoNT-proBNP ratios appear to be influenced by hemodialysis-related parameters in ESRD patients on hemodialysis. PMID:24667631

  12. Anti-HLA antibody profile of Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karahan, G E; Seyhun, Y; Oguz, F; Kekik, C; Onal, E; Caliskan, Y; Bakkaloglu, H; Yazici, H; Turkmen, A; Aydin, A E; Sever, M S; Eldegez, U; Carin, M N

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) via blood transfusions, pregnancies, and previous transplantations can result in anti-HLA antibody production. The presence of anti-HLA antibodies in recipient sera before transplantation is an important risk factor. To demonstrate the anti-HLA antibody status of Turkish end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 674 patients (mean age, 40.35 +/- 13.15 years; female/male, 328/346) were enrolled into the study. Anti-HLA antibody screening and identification tests were performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The panel-reactive antibody (PRA)-negative group consisted of 564 (83.6%) and the PRA-positive group consisted of 110 (17.3%) patients. Of the 110 (17.3%) PRA-positive patients, 43 (6.4%) were class I (+) and class II (-); 19 (2.8%) were class I (-) and class II (+); 48 (7.1%) were both class I and II (+). The most frequent antibodies were directed against the A2 crossreactive group (CREG) and the A10 CREG with less frequent reactions against the B7 CREG, indicating antibodies to both frequent (members of A2 CREG) and relatively rare (members of A10 CREG and B7 CREG antigens). These data also suggested that some antibodies occur at greater than expected frequency because of shared epitopes. Our findings confirmed the significant correlation between female gender, pregnancy, failed graft history, long dialysis duration, and blood transfusions with PRA positivity (P < .05). PMID:19917361

  13. Alzheimer's disease. Physician-patient communication.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. B.; Molloy, D. W.; Lever, J. A.; Darzins, P.; Ganesan, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The number of cognitively impaired elderly in Canada has increased greatly during the past two decades; nearly all have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The memory problems and changes in language and communication of these patients place tremendous strain on physicians who are searching for a differential diagnosis and are trying to communicate with them. Reviewing the salient language and communication features of AD patients leads to strategies for improving effective physician-patient communication. PMID:8019193

  14. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  15. Be vigilant for patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kate E; Leeds, John S; Sanders, David S

    2009-10-01

    Recent population studies show that coeliac disease affects around 1 in 100 people. The estimated ratio of diagnosed to undiagnosed individuals is 1:8, and the average delay in diagnosis is reported to be 11 years. The contemporary coeliac patient is diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 60, has normal or even high BMI, and subtle symptoms. Patients are often identified in screening groups which would include those with type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, or a first-degree relative with coeliac disease. The presence of relevant symptoms is not essential for a diagnosis of coeliac disease. Additionally, positive serological testing alone is not sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Endomysial antibody (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (TTG) have a combined sensitivity and specificity of > 90% when used in combination in selected populations. However, false positives occur in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmune disease. Conversely antibody-negative disease accounts for around 9% of cases. IgA deficiency is a cause of false negatives and levels should be checked at the same time as EMA and TTG. Patients must consume a gluten-containing diet for six weeks before serological testing and biopsy if necessary. All those with positive serological tests, and those for whom clinical suspicion is high even if seronegative, should be referred to a gastroenterologist for a duodenal biopsy to confirm or exclude coeliac disease. Diagnosis requires the demonstration of villous atrophy in the small bowel which improves when gluten is withdrawn. PMID:19938558

  16. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  17. Male Microchimerism at High Levels in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Women with End Stage Renal Disease before Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M.; Azzouz, Doua F.; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD. PMID:22403639

  18. Ophthalmological findings in patients with Takayasu disease.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, M; Baba, T

    1998-10-01

    We examined 65 (61 female and 4 male) Takayasu patients. Patient age ranged from 17 to 78 years old (mean 50.2); age of onset was from 11 to 60 years old (mean 32.8); and duration from onset to referral ranged from 1 month to 43 years (mean 16.8 years). Routine ophthalmological examinations were performed. Fluorescein angiography, kinetic perimetry by Goldmann perimetry, static perimetry by Octopus 1-2-3, electroretinography (ERG), and measurements of central retinal arterial pressure were also performed, as appropriate. Major causes of impaired visual acuity (less than 16/20) were cataract. A few patients had low visual acuity caused by Takayasu disease itself. On the other hand, although not many complained of visual disturbance, about 35% of patients had subnormal visual functions. Because the visual deterioration may be based on ocular hypoperfusion, which may subsequently lead to more serious changes, regular ophthalmological examination for every Takayasu disease patient is recommended. PMID:9951814

  19. Carotid intima-media thickness in children with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gheissari, A; Sirous, M; Hajzargarbashi, T; Kelishadi, R; Merrikhi, A; Azhir, A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are common in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. There is scarce data on carotid and bulb intima-media thickness (IMT-C and IMT-B) as an early marker of atherosclerosis and related factors in children on hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since we did not have enough information about our patients, this study was carried on all ESRD children (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) in a referral center. Data was collected from 16 ESRD children under 18 years with seven patients on PD and nine on HD. Lab tests and biochemical parameters including serum von Willebrand factor (vWF), homocystein, apo lipoprotein A, apo lipoprotein B and quantitative CRP were measured in fasting patients just before initiating dialysis. IMT-C and IMT-B were measured by gray scale ultrasound using 7.5 MHZ probe. The mean of age was 12.76+/-4.5 years. The mean duration of dialysis in HD and PD patients were not significantly different; 11.88+/-3.25 months and 10.14+/-2.4 months respectively. Mean of systolic blood pressure in HD group was significantly higher than PD group, 135.55+/-25.54 mmHg versus 121.42+/-12.14 mmHg, P<0.05. Significant differences among all following parameters in ESRD patients, with normal laboratory values, were clarified: cholesterol, triglycerides, apo A, apo B, quantitative CRP, VWF, homocystein and IMT-C. However, we could not demonstrate any difference between IMT-B in case and control group. After adjusting for age, partial correlation showed significant correlation between IMT-C and following factors: N-PTH and serum alkaline phosphatase. Longitudinal studies with large size samples are needed to clarify the contributing factors with intima-media thickness in ESRD children. PMID:20535268

  20. Coronary artery disease in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain; White, S; Gill, R; Gray, H H; Rees, P

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death in the UK, and the most common cardiac cause of medical discharge from the Armed Forces. This paper reviews current evidence pertaining to the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease from a military perspective, encompassing stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. Emphasis is placed on the limitations inherent in the management of acute coronary syndromes in the deployed environment. Occupational issues affecting patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. Consideration is also given to the potential for coronary artery disease screening in the military, and the management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, to help decrease the prevalence of coronary artery disease in the military population. PMID:26246347

  1. Association of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T and Natriuretic Peptide With Incident ESRD: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Grams, Morgan; Skali, Hicham; Shah, Amil M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Solomon, Scott D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Coresh, Josef

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological data for cardiac abnormality predating decreased kidney function are sparse. We investigated the associations of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) risk in a community-based cohort. STUDY DESIGN A prospective cohort study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS 10,749 white and black participants at the fourth visit (1996–1998) of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study with follow-up through 2010. PREDICTOR hs-cTnT (3, 6, 9, and 14 ng/L) and NT-proBNP (41.6, 81.0, 142.5, and 272.5 pg/mL) levels were divided into five categories at the same percentiles (32th, 57th, 77th, and 91th; corresponding to ordinary thresholds of hs-cTnT), with the lowest category as a reference. OUTCOMES Incident ESRD defined as initiation of dialysis, transplantation, or death due to kidney disease. MEASUREMENTS Relative risk and risk prediction of ESRD according to hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP based on Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 13.1 years, 235 participants developed ESRD (1.8 cases per 1,000 person-years). hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP were associated with ESRD risk independently of each other and of potential confounders including kidney function and albuminuria (adjusted HR for highest category, 4.43 [95% CI, 2.43–8.09] and 2.28 [95% CI, 1.44–3.60], respectively). For hs-cTnT, the association was significant even at the third category (HR for 6–8 ng/L hs-cTnT, 2.74 [95% CI, 1.54–4.88]). Their associations were largely consistent even among persons without decreased kidney function or history of cardiovascular disease. hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP both significantly improved ESRD prediction (c-statistic differences of 0.0084 [95% CI, 0.0005–0.0164] and 0.0045 [95% CI, 0.0004–0.0087], respectively, from 0.884 with conventional risk factors). LIMITATIONS Relatively small number of ESRD cases and single measurement of hs

  2. Impaired fasting glucose and diabetes as predictors for radial artery calcification in end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Janda, Katarzyna; Krzanowski, Marcin; Gajda, Mariusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Fedak, Danuta; Lis, Grzegorz J; Jaśkowski, Piotr; Litwin, Jan A; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between selected clinical and biochemical parameters of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and arterial calcification. Materials and Methods. The study comprised 59 stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients (36 hemodialyzed and 23 predialysis). The examined parameters included common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT), BMI, incidence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), dyslipidemia, hypertension, and 3-year mortality. Plasma levels asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and osteocalcin (OC) were also measured. Fragments of radial artery obtained during creation of hemodialysis access were stained for calcifications using von Kossa method and alizarin red. Results. Calcification of radial artery was significantly associated with higher prevalence of IFG and diabetes (P = 0.0004) and older age (P = 0.003), as well as higher OPG (P = 0.014) and ADMA concentrations (P = 0.022). Fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/l (IFG and diabetes) significantly predicted vascular calcification in multiple logistic regression. The calcification was also associated with higher CCA-IMT (P = 0.006) and mortality (P = 0.004; OR for death 5.39 [1.20-24.1] after adjustment for dialysis status and age). Conclusion. Combination of renal insufficiency and hyperglycemic conditions exerts a synergistic effect on vascular calcification and increases the risk of death. PMID:24454371

  3. Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes as Predictors for Radial Artery Calcification in End Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Katarzyna; Krzanowski, Marcin; Gajda, Mariusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Fedak, Danuta; Lis, Grzegorz J.; Jaśkowski, Piotr; Litwin, Jan A.; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between selected clinical and biochemical parameters of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and arterial calcification. Materials and Methods. The study comprised 59 stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients (36 hemodialyzed and 23 predialysis). The examined parameters included common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT), BMI, incidence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), dyslipidemia, hypertension, and 3-year mortality. Plasma levels asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and osteocalcin (OC) were also measured. Fragments of radial artery obtained during creation of hemodialysis access were stained for calcifications using von Kossa method and alizarin red. Results. Calcification of radial artery was significantly associated with higher prevalence of IFG and diabetes (P = 0.0004) and older age (P = 0.003), as well as higher OPG (P = 0.014) and ADMA concentrations (P = 0.022). Fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/l (IFG and diabetes) significantly predicted vascular calcification in multiple logistic regression. The calcification was also associated with higher CCA-IMT (P = 0.006) and mortality (P = 0.004; OR for death 5.39 [1.20–24.1] after adjustment for dialysis status and age). Conclusion. Combination of renal insufficiency and hyperglycemic conditions exerts a synergistic effect on vascular calcification and increases the risk of death. PMID:24454371

  4. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated. PMID:9465340

  5. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  6. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: ESRD/RRT.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting, the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cellphone application containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then, the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:27094608

  7. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  8. Surgery in a Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Nagral, Sanjay; Nagral, Aabha

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is often needed in patients with concurrent liver disease. The multiple physiological roles of the liver places these patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Diseases necessitating surgery like gallstones and hernia are more common in patients with cirrhosis. Assessment of severity of liver dysfunction before surgery is important and the risk benefit of the procedure needs to be carefully assessed. The disease severity may vary from mild transaminase rise to decompensated cirrhosis. Surgery should be avoided if possible in the emergency setting, in the setting of acute and alcoholic hepatitis, in a patient of cirrhosis who is child class C or has a MELD score more than 15 or any patient with significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction. In this subset of patients, all possible means to manage these patients conservatively should be attempted. Modified Child–Pugh scores and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores can predict mortality after surgery fairly reliably including nonhepatic abdominal surgery. Pre-operative optimization would include control of ascites, correction of electrolyte imbalance, improving renal dysfunction, cardiorespiratory assessment, and correction of coagulation. Tests of global hemostasis like thromboelastography and thrombin generation time may be more predictive of the risk of bleeding compared with the conventional tests of coagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Correction of international normalized ratio with fresh frozen plasma does not necessarily mean reduction of bleeding risk and may increase the risk of volume overload and lung injury. International normalized ratio liver may better reflect the coagulation status. Recombinant factor VIIa in patients with cirrhosis needing surgery needs further study. Intra-operatively, safe anesthetic agents like isoflurane and propofol with avoidance of hypotension are advised. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) and benzodiazepines should

  9. Monitoring nonresponsive patients who have celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Norbert; Schuppan, Detlef

    2006-04-01

    Because of the wide variations in the clinical presentation of celiac disease and because treatment exists that is effective in most cases, screening of the general population for celiac disease has been considered. There is still no evidence that patients who have symptom-free celiac disease are at increased risk of small intestinal lymphoma or other complications. Prevention of osteoporosis seems to be the strongest indicator for widespread screening today [22]. The major cause of failure to respond to a gluten-free diet is continuing ingestion of gluten, but other underlying diseases must be considered. Many different drugs (eg, anti-tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha) have been used in patients who have RCD [23]. Steroid treatment has been reported to be effective even in patients who have underlying early EATL. Histologic recovery in patients who have celiac disease usually takes several months but can take up to 1 year, even if the patient remains on a strict gluten-free diet. Some patients report celiac-related symptoms for months after a single gluten intake. The definitions for RCD in literature vary. The authors consider the definition give by Daum and colleagues [24] suitable. They defined true RCD as villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and increased IELs persisting for more than 12 months in spite of a strict gluten-free diet. If a patient is not responding well to a gluten-free diet, three considerations are necessary: (1) the initial diagnosis of celiac disease must be reassessed;(2) the patient should be sent to a dietician to check for errors in diet or compliance problems, because problems with the gluten-free diet are the most important cause for persisting symptoms; (3) other reasons for persisting symptoms (eg, pancreatic insufficiency, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, ulcerative jejunitis, protein-losing enteropathy,T-cell lymphoma, fructose intolerance, cavitating lymphadenopathy, and

  10. Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Lotta; Ziegert, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context. PMID:27172515

  11. Helicobacter pylori: Effect of coexisting diseases and update on treatment regimens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The presence of concomitant diseases is an independent predictive factor for non-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) peptic ulcers. Patients contracting concomitant diseases have an increased risk of developing ulcer disease through pathogenic mechanisms distinct from those of H. pylori infections. Factors other than H. pylori seem critical in peptic ulcer recurrence in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cirrhotic patients. However, early H. pylori eradication is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in patients with ESRD and liver cirrhosis. Resistances to triple therapy are currently detected using culture-based and molecular methods. Culture susceptibility testing before first- or second-line therapy is unadvisable. Using highly effective empiric first-line and rescue regimens can yield acceptable results. Sequential therapy has been included in a recent consensus report as a valid first-line option for eradicating H. pylori in geographic regions with high clarithromycin resistance. Two novel eradication regimens, namely concomitant and hybrid therapy, have proven more effective in patients with dual- (clarithromycin- and metronidazole-) resistant H. pylori strains. We aim to review the prevalence of and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection in patients with ESRD and cirrhosis. Moreover, we summarized the updated H. pylori eradication regimens. PMID:26558147

  12. Living Related Donor Renal Transplant in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patient: Case Reports from Tertiary Care Hospital in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  13. Living related donor renal transplant in human immunodeficiency virus infected patient: case reports from tertiary care hospital in Western India.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-07-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  14. Severe Darier's disease in a psychiatric patient*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Lopes, Roberta Simão; Pereira, Medéia Carolina Fernandes; Tebcherani, Antonio Jose; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Darier’s disease is characterized by dense keratotic lesions in the seborrheic areas of the body such as scalp, forehead, nasolabial folds, trunk and inguinal region. It is a rare genodermatosis, an autosomal dominant inherited disease that may be associated with neuropsichiatric disorders. It is caused by ATPA2 gene mutation, presenting cutaneous and dermatologic expressions. Psychiatric symptoms are depression, suicidal attempts, and bipolar affective disorder. We report a case of Darier’s disease in a 48-year-old female patient presenting severe cutaneous and psychiatric manifestations. PMID:26312677

  15. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  16. Biochemical pathways of breath ammonia (NH3) generation in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Laiho, S; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L; Ortiz, F; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H; Lehto, M; Metsälä, M

    2016-01-01

    Breath ammonia (NH3) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in monitoring hemodialysis (HD) adequacy, since a strong correlation between blood urea and mouth-exhaled breath NH3 has been observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD. However, the biochemical pathways for breath NH3 generation from blood urea have not been demonstrated. In this study, we show a strong correlation (r s  =  0.77, p  <  0.001) between blood and salivary urea, indicating that salivary urea levels reflect blood urea levels. Salivary urea is in turn strongly correlated to salivary ammonia ([Formula: see text] + NH3) in most of the patients. This confirms that the hydrolysis of urea by urease generates ammonia in the oral cavity. A further strong correlation between salivary ammonia and breath NH3 indicates that salivary ammonia evaporates into gas phase and turns to breath NH3. Therefore, blood urea is a major biochemical source of breath NH3. Since breath NH3 is generated predominantly in the oral cavity, the levels of breath NH3 are influenced significantly by the patient's oral condition including urease activity and salivary pH. Our results agree with previous studies that have shown a connection between salivary urea and breath NH3. PMID:27516572

  17. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. PMID:24814173

  18. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Treatment Options for Depression and Depressive Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriou, Stefania S.; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental disorder with a high prevalence among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). It is reported that depression afflicts approximately 20-30% of this patient population, being associated, amongst other, with high mortality rate, low adherence to medication and low perceived quality of life. There is a variety of medications known to be effective for the treatment of depression but due to poor adherence to treatment as well as due to the high need for medications addressing other ESRD comorbidities, depression often remains untreated. According to the literature, depression is under-diagnosed and undertreated in the majority of the patients with chronic kidney disease. In the current review the main pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches and research outcomes for the management of depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients are discussed. PMID:26973957

  19. Relationship between Illness Perceptions, Treatment Adherence, And Clinical Outcomes in Patients On Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous data indicate that negative perception of disease and non-adherence to recommended treatment may lead to unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). However, a paucity of research addresses clinical outcomes in the end stage renal disease (ESRD) population as a function of patients’ illness perceptions and their degree of adherence to recommended treatment. The study was conducted to examine illness perceptions and treatment adherence rates in patients on maintenance HD, and to determine if illness perceptions and adherence behaviors influence clinical outcomes. One hundred fifty-one patients completed the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the ESRD-Adherence Questionnaire. Illness perceptions did not independently predict any clinical outcomes in patients on maintenance HD; however, specific adherence behaviors affected clinical outcomes. Therefore, strategies to enhance adherence should be rigorously pursued in this population to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:20629465

  20. Genetic polymorphisms located in genes related to immune and inflammatory processes are associated with end-stage renal disease: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease progression has been linked to pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation. These markers are also elevated in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which constitutes a serious public health problem. Objective To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes related to immune and inflammatory processes, could be associated with ESRD development. Design and methods A retrospective case-control study was carried out on 276 patients with ESRD and 288 control subjects. Forty-eight SNPs were genotyped via SNPlex platform. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between each sigle polymorphism and the development of ESRD. Results Four polymorphisms showed association with ESRD: rs1801275 in the interleukin 4 receptor (IL4R) gene (OR: 0.66 (95%CI = 0.46-0.95); p = 0.025; overdominant model), rs4586 in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) gene (OR: 0.70 (95%CI = 0.54-0.90); p = 0.005; additive model), rs301640 located in an intergenic binding site for signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) (OR: 1.82 (95%CI = 1.17-2.83); p = 0.006; additive model) and rs7830 in the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) gene (OR: 1.31 (95%CI = 1.01-1.71); p = 0.043; additive model). After adjusting for multiple testing, results lost significance. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that four genetic polymorphisms located in genes related to inflammation and immune processes could help to predict the risk of developing ESRD. PMID:22817530

  1. Malnutrition in Dialysis Patients--The Need for Intervention Despite Uncertain Benefits.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    We are in the midst of an epidemic of overnutrition which has resulted in a widespread increase in obesity rates in modern societies. Yet for patients suffering from serious chronic illnesses such as end stage renal disease (ESRD), malnutrition (encompassing both inadequate quantity and quality of nutrient intake) represents a far more significant danger. Protein-energy wasting has been identified as one of the strongest risk factor for adverse outcomes in ESRD patients, and modeling studies have suggested that improving nutrition could result in substantial lowering of mortality rates and other benefits. To date there is ample evidence that various interventions can have a positive impact on the nutritional status of ESRD patients, yet we still lack randomized controlled clinical trials showing that the same interventions could indeed lead to better survival or other clinical benefits. This knowledge gap, which is all too common for clinical problems encountered in nephrology, should not act as a deterrent, but it should rather incentivize us to continue exploring novel interventions aimed at improving malnutrition in ESRD. PMID:26190025

  2. [Teriparatide:benefit and safety for bone disease in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Ei, Isei; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-09-01

    Teriparatide, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, is one of effective treatments for osteoporosis. Teriparatide shows an anabolic effect for bone formation, as a result, increases bone mineral density as well as prevention of fractures in the general population. On the other hand, there are a few report about the effect of teriparatide on increase of bone mineral density in maintenance hemodialysis patients. In addition to CKD-MBD, osteoporosis is also an important pathological change in ESRD patients, therefore its safety and efficacy should be discussed in more detail. PMID:27561345

  3. Dialysis therapy among elderly patients; data from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register, 1981-1991.

    PubMed

    Fenton, S S; Desmeules, M; Jeffery, J R; Corman, J L

    1993-01-01

    Reports of clinical outcomes after commencement of dialysis treatment among elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are not been numerous. This paper describes the demographic and clinical characteristics of the elderly treated for ESRD in Canada using the Canadian Organ Replacement Register data. Comparisons with younger age groups are also presented. Analyses of data for the period 1981-1991 indicated that the elderly (65+) represent an expanding portion of all new ESRD patients in Canada. Distributions of dialysis modalities showed no major differences by age groups (45-54, 55-64, 65-75, 75+). However, the overall usage of intermittent peritoneal dialysis has decreased over time (from 17% of patients in 1981-83 to 7% in 1990-91). Deaths from social causes were slightly more frequent among the elderly (15.9% of all deaths among those aged 65+ vs 10% among those aged 45-64). Moreover, deaths from infections were more common among patients on dialysis for a longer period of time and more common among patients on peritoneal dialysis than among those on hemodialysis. Discontinuations of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) because of the inability to cope increased with age. Patients with comorbid conditions were more likely to receive hemodialysis, and, as expected, the presence of these conditions increased with age and significantly reduced survival. Other determinants of survival included calendar period of registration, renal center size, and treatment modality. This paper illustrates the many changes over time in the elderly population treated for ESRD. Also of importance, however, is the elderly Canadian population with ESRD which is not presently treated. PMID:8105905

  4. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  5. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment. PMID:25920184

  6. Continuous renal replacement therapy outcomes in acute kidney injury and end-stage renal disease: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a widely used but resource-intensive treatment. Despite its broad adoption in intensive care units (ICUs), it remains challenging to identify patients who would be most likely to achieve positive outcomes with this therapy and to provide realistic prognostic information to patients and families. Methods We analyzed a prospective cohort of all 863 ICU patients initiated on CRRT at an academic medical center from 2008 to 2011 with either new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI) or pre-admission end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We examined in-hospital and post-discharge mortality (for all patients), as well as renal recovery (for AKI patients). We identified prognostic factors for both in-hospital and post-discharge mortality separately in patients with AKI or ESRD. Results In-hospital mortality was 61% for AKI and 54% for ESRD. In patients with AKI (n = 725), independent risk factors for mortality included age over 60 (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3, 2.7), serum lactate over 4 mmol/L (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5, 3.1), serum creatinine over 3 mg/dL at time of CRRT initiation (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.43, 0.92) and comorbid liver disease (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.1, 2.9). Among patients with ESRD (n = 138), liver disease was associated with increased mortality (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.1, 11.1) as was admission to a medical (vs surgical) ICU (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.7). Following discharge, advanced age became a predictor of mortality in both groups (AKI: HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2, 3.0; ESRD: HR 4.1, 95% CI 1.5, 10.9). At the end of the study period, only 25% (n = 183) of patients with AKI achieved dialysis-free survival. Conclusions Among patients initiating CRRT, risk factors for mortality differ between patients with underlying ESRD or newly acquired AKI. Long-term dialysis-free survival in AKI is low. Providers should consider these factors when assessing prognosis or appropriateness of CRRT. PMID:23782899

  7. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  8. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  9. Oral status in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sundh, B; Hultén, L

    1982-01-01

    The dental status in a randomly selected group of patients with Crohn's disease was assessed and compared with that in a normal population. The results showed evidence that these patients in spite of an ordinary oral hygiene standard have a high caries frequency and activity, and that dental caries was particularly common in those subjected to extensive small bowel resection. Unusual dietary habits and malabsorption may probably be the main cause of the condition, although neglect of oral hygiene during active phases of the disease might also be important. Increased attention has to be directed towards this problem. A strict oral hygiene should be recommended and the regular use of fluoride treatment appears to be justified in such a high risk group of patients. PMID:7158213

  10. Survival Benefit of Statins in Hemodialysis Patients Awaiting Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Waqas; Gazallo, Juliana; Motabar, Ali; Varadrajan, Padmini; Deedwania, Prakash C; Pai, Ramdas G

    2015-06-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have extraordinarily high cardiovascular risk and mortality, yet the benefit of statins in this population remains unclear based on the randomized trials. We investigated the prognostic value of statins in a large, pure cohort of prospectively recruited patients with ESRD awaiting renal transplantation, and being followed up in a dedicated cardiac clinic. We prospectively collected demographic, clinical, laboratory, and pharmacological data on 423 consecutive ESRD patients on hemodialysis awaiting renal transplantation. Survival analysis was performed as a function of statin therapy. The baseline characteristics were as follows: age 57 ± 11 years, males 64%, diabetes mellitus in 68%, known coronary artery disease in 30%, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 61 ± 11%. Over a mean follow-up of 2 years, there were 43 deaths. Adjusted for age, gender, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, smoking, and treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, β blocker, and antiplatelet medications, statin use was a predictor of lower mortality (hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.79, p = 0.01). This beneficial effect of statin was supported by propensity score analysis (p = 0.02) and was consistent across all clinical subgroups. The benefit of statins seemed to be greater in those with LV hypertrophy and smoking. Statin therapy in hemodialysis patients awaiting renal transplant is independently associated with better survival supporting its use in this high-risk population. PMID:26060381

  11. Infective endocarditis in patients with hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Seminari, E; De Silvestri, A; Ravasio, V; Ludovisi, S; Utili, R; Petrosillo, N; Castelli, F; Bassetti, M; Barbaro, F; Grossi, P; Barzaghi, N; Rizzi, M; Minoli, L

    2016-02-01

    Few data have been published regarding the epidemiology and outcome of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with chronic hepatic disease (CHD). A retrospective analysis of the Studio Endocarditi Italiano (SEI) database was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of CHD+ patients compared with CHD- patients. The diagnosis of IE was defined in accordance with the modified Duke criteria. Echocardiography, diagnosis, and treatment procedures were in accordance with current clinical practice. Among the 1722 observed episodes of IE, 300 (17.4 %) occurred in CHD+ patients. The cause of CHD mainly consisted of chronic viral infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacterial species in CHD+ patients; the frequency of other bacterial species (S. epidermidis, streptococci, and enterococci) were comparable among the two groups. The percentage of patients undergoing surgery for IE was 38.9 in CHD+ patients versus 43.7 in CHD- patients (p = 0.06). Complications were more common among CHD+ patients (77 % versus 65.3 %, p < 0.001); embolization (43.3 % versus 26.1 %, p < 0.001) and congestive heart failure (42 % versus 34.1 %, p = 0.01) were more frequent among CHD+ patients. Mortality was comparable (12.5 % in CHD- and 15 % in CHD+ patients). At multivariable analysis, factors associated with hospital-associated mortality were having an infection sustained by S. aureus, a prosthetic valve, diabetes and a neoplasia, and CHD. Being an intravenous drug user (IVDU) was a protective factor and was associated with a reduced death risk. CHD is a factor worsening the prognosis in patients with IE, in particular in patients for whom cardiac surgery was required. PMID:26690071

  12. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), and higher frequencies of gastrointestinal pain occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, after 2 years of observation, all groups showed a stable clinical disease course with respect to serious clinical events. However, patients under agalsidase-β dose-reduction and switch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used. PMID:26185201

  13. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  14. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Death and Progression to ESRD in Individuals With CKD: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Muntner, Paul; Rizk, Dana V.; McClellan, William M.; Warnock, David G.; Newby, P.K.; Judd, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutrition is strongly linked with health outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have examined relationships between dietary patterns and health outcomes in persons with CKD. Study Design Observational cohort study. Setting & Participants 3,972 participants with CKD (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or an albumin-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g at baseline) from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a prospective cohort study of 30,239 black and white adults at least 45 years of age. Predictors Five empirically derived dietary patterns identified via factor analysis: “Convenience” (Chinese and Mexican foods, pizza, other mixed dishes), “Plant-Based” (fruits, vegetables), “Sweets/Fats” (sugary foods), “Southern” (fried foods, organ meats, sweetened beverages), and “Alcohol/Salads” (alcohol, green-leafy vegetables, salad dressing). Outcomes All-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Results A total of 816 deaths and 141 ESRD events were observed over approximately 6 years of follow-up. There were no statistically significant associations of Convenience, Sweets/Fats or Alcohol/Salads pattern scores with all-cause mortality after multivariable adjustment. In Cox regression models adjusted for sociodemographic factors, energy intake, co-morbidities, and baseline kidney function, higher Plant-Based pattern scores (indicating greater consistency with the pattern) were associated with lower risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.61–0.97) whereas higher Southern pattern scores were associated with greater risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.19–1.92). There were no associations of dietary patterns with incident ESRD in multivariable-adjusted models. Limitations Missing dietary pattern data, potential residual confounding from lifestyle factors. Conclusions A

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome: Associated Risk Factors in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beladi-Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Jafarizade, Mehrian; Shayanpour, Shokouh; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Moosavian, Seyed Mostafa; Houshmand, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) may be associated with increased morbidity and mortality among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients; however, it is a disorder that is neglected in dialysis centers. Objectives: The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical factors associated with RLS among ESRD patients. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on ESRD patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD) in three HD centers in Ahvaz city in Southwest Iran. Blood samples were obtained prior to a dialysis session to check the routine laboratory test results and assess the adequacy of dialysis. The presence of RLS was assessed by using the international RLS study group (IRLSSG) diagnostic criteria. The IRLSSG rating scale was also used to evaluate the severity of the RLS symptoms. Results: Of the 139 HD patients enrolled in this study, 60 were female (43.2%) and 79 were male (56.8%), with a mean age of 51.82 ± 13.31 years. The prevalence of RLS was 15.8% (22 patients), with 50% of them (11 patients) having severe or very severe symptoms. There was a significant relationship between RLS and longer durations of dialysis (P < 0.001). The mean level of serum ferritin was lower in patients without RLS, but it was not significant (P = 0.065). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, dialysis shifts, and hemoglobin (Hb) level among patients with and without RLS. Conclusions: We conclude that a significant percentage of ESRD patients undergoing maintenance HD have severe or very severe RLS symptoms. The presence of RLS is associated to longer durations of dialysis. PMID:26866010

  16. Functional outcome of quadruple amputees with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Garrison, S J; Merritt, B S

    1997-01-01

    A rare but catastrophic complication in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with peripheral vascular disease is amputation of all four limbs secondary to gangrene. We present three patients with ESRD who underwent quadruple amputation. The purpose of this case study is to investigate the functional benefit of inpatient rehabilitation for such amputees. Our large, tertiary acute care hospital admitted 1,469 patients with ESRD during a continuous 63-month period. There were 72 amputation procedures: 57 involving lower limbs, and 15 involving upper limbs. Three patients had all four limbs amputated; these three were subsequently admitted to our acute inpatient rehabilitation center. Their median Functional Independence Measurement (FIM) score on admission was 52 and on discharge was 75. Their median length of stay was 24.5 days, which may be attributed to early postoperative therapy and de-emphasis on prosthetic replacement. At discharge, all three patients were able to perform sliding board transfers and self-propel wheelchairs modified with quad knobs and brake extenders. Each continued hemodialysis three times per week. Two patients were independent with feeding using adaptive equipment, and one required verbal cues. Two patients were able to write using dorsal wrist splints and pencil holders. One patient was able to use a speaker phone and lift lightweight objects with a left below-the-elbow hook-type prosthesis. Our review of these three cases demonstrates that inpatient rehabilitation can improve functional scores in quadruple amputee patients with ESRD. A large multicenter study is warranted to obtain adequate sample size to demonstrate statistical significance. PMID:9207709

  17. Investigating Clinically Adequate Concentrations of Oseltamivir Carboxylate in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis Using a Population Pharmacokinetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kayla Yi Ting; Robson, Richard; Subramoney, Vishak; Clinch, Barry; Rayner, Craig R.; Gibiansky, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) are at heightened risk for influenza, but the optimal oseltamivir dosage regimen for treating or preventing influenza in this high-risk population is still uncertain. Pharmacokinetic data for 24 adults with ESRD were pooled from a single-dose and a multiple-dose study to develop a population pharmacokinetic model using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The final model comprised five compartments, two each to describe the systemic pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir phosphate and its metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), and a delay compartment to describe oseltamivir metabolism. Estimated OC clearance in the model was markedly faster during HD sessions (7.43 liters/min) than at other times (0.19 liter/min). Model simulations showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza treatment, producing trough OC concentrations above the median value achieved with the 75-mg twice-daily regimen in patients with normal renal function and peak concentrations below the highest oseltamivir exposures known to be well tolerated (median exposures after twice-daily dosing of 450 mg). Administration of the first dose following diagnosis of influenza need not wait until after the next HD session: addition of a single 30-mg dose during the 12 h before the next HD session raises OC exposures quickly without posing any safety risk. Further simulation showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every other HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza prophylaxis. PMID:26282419

  18. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  19. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes. PMID:26087735

  20. End-stage renal disease in Canada: prevalence projections to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Schaubel, D E; Morrison, H I; Desmeules, M; Parsons, D A; Fenton, S S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have increased greatly in Canada over the last 2 decades. Because of the high cost of therapy, predicting numbers of patients who will require dialysis and transplantation is necessary for nephrologists and health care planners. METHODS: The authors projected ESRD incidence rates and therapy-specific prevalence by province to the year 2005 using 1981-1996 data obtained from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. The model incorporated Poisson regression to project incidence rates, and a Markov model for patient follow-up. RESULTS: Continued large increases in ESRD incidence and prevalence were projected, particularly among people with diabetes mellitus. As of Dec. 31, 1996, there were 17,807 patients receiving renal replacement therapy in Canada. This number was projected to climb to 32,952 by the end of 2005, for a relative increase of 85% and a mean annual increase of 5.8%. The increased prevalence was projected to be greatest for peritoneal dialysis (6.0% annually), followed by hemodialysis (5.9%) and functioning kidney transplant (5.7%). The projected annual increases in prevalence by province ranged from 4.4%, in Saskatchewan, to 7.5%, in Alberta. INTERPRETATION: The projected increases are plausible when one considers that the incidence of ESRD per million population in the United States and other countries far exceeds that in Canada. The authors predict a continued and increasing short-fall in resources to accommodate the expected increased in ESRD prevalence. PMID:10373996

  1. Association of tibia lead and blood lead with end-stage renal disease: A pilot study of African-Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Muntner, Paul . E-mail: pmuntner@tulane.edu; Menke, Andy; Batuman, Vecihi; Rabito, Felicia A.; He Jiang; Todd, Andrew C.

    2007-07-15

    The association between body lead burden and kidney disease remains controversial. Fifty-five African-American end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cases and 53 age- and sex-matched African-American controls without known renal disease were recruited from Tulane University-affiliated dialysis clinics and out-patient clinics, respectively. Blood lead was measured via atomic absorption spectrophotometry and tibia lead (a measure of body lead) was measured via {sup 109}Cd-based K shell X-ray fluorescence. Median blood lead levels were significantly higher among ESRD cases (6 {mu}g/dL) compared to their control counterparts (3 {mu}g/dL; P<0.001). Although no participants had overt lead poisoning (blood lead {>=}25 {mu}g/dL), seven cases but no controls had blood lead levels above 10 {mu}g/dL (P=0.006). The median tibia lead level was 17 micrograms of lead per gram of bone mineral ({mu}g/g) and 13 {mu}g/g among ESRD cases and their control counterparts, respectively (P=0.134). Four ESRD cases (7%), but no controls, had a tibia lead level above 40 {mu}g/g (P=0.115) while a similar proportion of cases and controls had tibia lead between 20 and 39 {mu}g/g (33% and 32%, respectively; P=0.726). After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios of ESRD associated with a tibia lead {>=}20 {mu}g/g and each four-fold higher tibia lead (e.g., 5-20 {mu}g/g) were 1.55 (95% CI: 0.55, 4.41) and 1.88 (95% CI: 0.53, 6.68), respectively. These findings support the need for prospective cohort studies of body lead burden and renal disease progression.

  2. Coronary artery disease in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Ross; Byrne, Matthew; Sinclair, Hannah; Tang, Eugene; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    Our population is ageing. The prevalence of dementia is increasing as the population ages. Dementia is known to share many common risk factors with coronary artery disease including age, genetics, smoking, the components of the metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Despite the growing ageing population with dementia, there is underutilization of optimal care (pharmacotherapy and interventional procedures) in this cohort. Given common risk factors and potential benefit, patients with cognitive impairment and dementia should be offered contemporary care. However, further research evaluating optimal care in this patient cohort is warranted. PMID:27159265

  3. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  4. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J A

    1982-11-15

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  5. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with end-stage renal disease and the development of high-turnover renal osteodystrophy in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Zhang, P; Wang, H F; Qin, Z W; Wei, K B; Lv, X A

    2016-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; TaqI and ApaI) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene have been identified as risk factors for the progression of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The purpose of our study was to confirm the reported association of these two SNPs with ESRD risk and progression of renal osteodystrophy in a Chinese Han population. A total of 452 ESRD patients and 904 matched-pair controls (based on age, gender, and body mass index) were included. Identification of VDR gene polymorphisms was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method with TaqI and ApaI restriction enzymes. There was no association of the TaqI polymorphism with ESRD risk. However, significant associations were seen between ApaI (rs7975232) polymorphism and ESRD risk in the heterozygote model (AC/ AA; P = 0.002; OR = 1.4, 95%CI = 1.14-1.83), homozygote model (CC/AA; P = 0.007; OR = 1.8, 95%CI = 1.17-2.85) genotypes for rs7975232, allelic model (P < 0.001; OR = 1.4, 95%CI = 1.15-1.64), dominant model (P = 0.001; OR = 1.5, 95%CI = 1.19-1.87), and recessive model (P = 0.046; OR = 0.6, 95%CI = 0.42-1.00) between cases and healthy controls Moreover, we found a significant correlation between the genotype and allele distribution of ApaI and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels, where allele C carriers have increased iPTH levels. The ApaI polymorphism in the VDR gene appears to be a susceptibility locus for ESRD in Chinese individuals, and allele C carriers may have an increased risk of high-turnover renal osteodystrophy. PMID:27323177

  6. What can we learn from the U.S. expanded end-stage renal disease bundle?

    PubMed

    Chambers, James D; Weiner, Daniel E; Bliss, Sarah K; Neumann, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Episode-based payment, commonly referred to as bundled payment, has emerged as a key component of U.S. health care payment reform. Bundled payments are appealing as they share the financial risk of treating patients between payers and providers, encouraging the delivery of cost-effective care. A closely watched example is the U.S. End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System, known as the 'expanded ESRD bundle.' In this paper we consider the expanded ESRD bundle 2 years after its implementation. First, we discuss emerging lessons, including how implementation has changed dialysis care with respect to the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, how implementation has led to an increase in the use of home-based peritoneal dialysis, and how it may have contributed to the market consolidation of dialysis providers. Second, we use the expanded ESRD bundle to illustrate the importance of accounting for stakeholder input and staging policy implementation. Third, we highlight the need to consider system-wide consequences of implementing bundled payment policies. Fourth, we suggest how bundled payments may create research opportunities. Bundled payment policies offer opportunities and challenges. Their success will be determined not only by impacts on cost containment, but also to the extent they encourage high quality care. PMID:23419419

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS. PMID:27312922

  8. Pulmonary disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Trisolini, Rocco; Tura, Sante

    2002-03-01

    Patients with hematologic neoplasms frequently experience pulmonary disease. The possibility of a malignant involvement of the lung parenchyma is a well recognized and not unusual event, secondary spread due to lymphoproliferative disorders being the most common situation. Furthermore, the development and the advances in treatment options such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and/or combined drug regimen use have significantly widened the spectrum of non-neoplastic pulmonary complications that can crop up in these patients. Infections, drug/radiation-induced toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related complications account by now for most pulmonary problems in hematologic patients and represent a difficult challenge both in diagnostic and in therapeutic terms for the clinician. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinicopathologic spectrum of lung diseases which can occur in the setting of hematologic malignancies. A particular emphasis is devoted to the diagnostic approach, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) assuming a key role since different patterns of CT abnormalities are associated with a different yield of the available diagnostic tools and may help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. PMID:12002382

  9. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  10. Serum Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 4 Is a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Hayashi, Manabu; Nishitani, Takahiro; Tanaka, Marenao; Yoshida, Hideaki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4/A-FABP/aP2), a lipid chaperone, is expressed in both adipocytes and macrophages. Recent studies have shown that FABP4 is secreted from adipocytes and that FABP4 level is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the impact of FABP4 concentrations on prognosis. We tested the hypothesis that FABP4 level predicts prognosis of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a group at high risk for atherosclerosis-associated morbidity and mortality. Methods and Results Biochemical markers including FABP4 were determined in 61 ESRD patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD). Serum FABP4 level in females (404.2±30.5 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in males (315.8±30.0 ng/ml), and the levels in ESRD patients were about 20-times higher than those in age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects with normal renal function. FABP4 level was decreased by 57.2% after HD and was positively correlated with blood pressure, BMI, and levels of lipids and insulin. Multiple regression analysis indicated that HD duration, BMI, and triglycerides level were independent determinants for FABP4 level. ESRD patients with high FABP4 levels had higher cardiovascular mortality during the 7-year follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that logarithmically transformed FABP4 level was an independent predictor of cardiovascular death adjusted for age, gender, HD duration, BMI, and triglycerides level (hazard ratio, 7.75; 95% CI, 1.05–25.31). Conclusion These findings suggest that FABP4 level, being related to adiposity and metabolic disorders, is a novel predictor of cardiovascular mortality in ESRD. PMID:22102888

  11. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base...-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011. (a) Data sources. The methodology for determining the per treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment...

  12. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  13. Cough determinants in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Trebbia, Grégoire; Lacombe, Mathieu; Fermanian, Christophe; Falaize, Line; Lejaille, Michèle; Louis, Alain; Devaux, Christian; Raphaël, Jean Claude; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2005-04-15

    Neuromuscular disease leads to cough impairment. Cough augmentation can be achieved by mechanical insufflation (MI) or manually assisted coughing (MAC). Many studies have compared these two methods, but few have evaluated them in combination. In 155 neuromuscular patients, we assessed determinants of peak cough flow (PCF) using stepwise correlation. Maximal inspiratory capacity contributed 44% of the variance (p<0.001), expiratory reserve volume 13%, and maximal expiratory pressure 2%. Thus, augmenting inspiration seems crucial. However, parameters dependent on expiratory muscles independently influence PCF. We measured vital capacity and PCF in 10 neuromuscular patients during cough augmentation by MI, MAC, or both. MI or MAC significantly improved VC and PCF (p<0.01) as compared to the basal condition and VC and PCF were higher during MI plus MAC than during MAC or MI alone (p<0.01). In conclusion, combining MAC and MI is useful for improving cough in neuromuscular patients. PMID:15766917

  14. Hypoglycemia Secondary to Sulfonylurea Ingestion in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease: Results from a 72-Hour Fast.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Alice; Rubin, Mishaela; Accili, Domenico; Bilezikian, John P; Pajvani, Utpal B

    2015-01-01

    Insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide levels increase with sulfonylurea exposure but the acuity of increase has not been described in dialysis patients. We present a case of a dialysis patient who presented with hypoglycemia and was found to have accidental sulfonylurea ingestion. This is a 73-year-old man with ESRD on peritoneal dialysis, without history of diabetes, who presented with hypoglycemia. Past medical history includes multiple myeloma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. At initial presentation, his blood glucose was 47 mg/dL, with concomitant elevations in the following: C-peptide 30.5 (nl: 0.8-3.5 ng/mL), insulin 76 (nl: 3-19 μIU/mL), and proinsulin 83.3 (nl: ≤8.0 pmol/L). During the 72-hour fast, which he completed without hypoglycemia, insulin declined to be within normal limits (to 12 μIU/mL); proinsulin (to 12.1 pmol/L) and C-peptide (to 7.2 ng/mL) levels decreased but remained elevated. The sulfonylurea screen ultimately returned positive for glipizide, clinching the diagnosis. This is the first reported case which characterizes the chronic elevation of proinsulin in a patient with ESRD, as well as its dramatic increase after a presumed solitary exposure to sulfonylurea. The 72-hour fast conducted gives insight into the clearance of insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide after sulfonylurea ingestion in ESRD. PMID:26664768

  15. Risk of end-stage renal disease associated with alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Perneger, T V; Whelton, P K; Puddey, I B; Klag, M J

    1999-12-15

    Alcohol consumption has been linked to kidney disorders in selected patient groups, but whether it contributes to the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the general population is unknown. The authors conducted a population-based case-control study to assess the relation between alcohol consumption and risk of ESRD. The study took place in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, DC, in 1991. Participants were 716 patients who had started treatment for ESRD and 361 control subjects of similar age (20-64 years) selected by random digit dialing. The main risk factor of interest was self-reported consumption of alcoholic beverages (frequency of drinking days and number of drinks consumed per drinking day). In univariate analysis, consumption of alcohol exhibited a J-shaped association with risk of ESRD. The J shape disappeared after exclusion of persons who had ever consumed home-distilled whiskey ("moonshine") and adjustment for age, race, sex, income, history of hypertension, history of diabetes mellitus, use of acetaminophen, use of opiates, and cigarette smoking; however, the odds ratio for ESRD remained significantly increased (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.2, 13.0) among persons who consumed an average of >2 alcoholic drinks per day. The corresponding population attributable risk was 9 percent. Thus, consumption of more than two alcoholic drinks per day, on average, was associated with an increased risk of kidney failure in the general population. A lower intake of alcohol did not appear to be harmful. Because these results are based on self-reports in a case-control study, they should be seen as preliminary. PMID:10604769

  16. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to ESRD beneficiaries who receive a dialysis treatment during a hospital stay, if the hospital has... without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received dialysis...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of...

  17. 78 FR 42778 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive ESRD Care Initiative; Extension of the Submission Deadlines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ...This notice reopens the Letter of Intent submission period for the Comprehensive ESRD Care initiative letters of intent. Letters of Intent are now due on or before July 19, 2013. All potential applicants must submit a Letter of Intent to be eligible to submit an application. The submission deadline for the application has been extended to August 1,...

  18. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to ESRD beneficiaries who receive a dialysis treatment during a hospital stay, if the hospital has... without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received dialysis...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of...

  19. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to ESRD beneficiaries who receive a dialysis treatment during a hospital stay, if the hospital has... without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received dialysis...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of...

  20. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to ESRD beneficiaries who receive a dialysis treatment during a hospital stay, if the hospital has... without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received dialysis...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of...

  1. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rates for ESRD facilities using the following methodology: (1) For dialysis services furnished prior to...) For dialysis services furnished on or after January 1, 2009— (i) The composite rate paid to hospital-based facilities for dialysis services shall be the same as the composite rate paid for such...

  2. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to ESRD beneficiaries who receive a dialysis treatment during a hospital stay, if the hospital has... without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received dialysis...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of...

  3. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  4. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  5. Racial and ethnic differences in trends of end-stage renal disease: United States, 1995 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Li, Yanfeng; Williams, Desmond E

    2008-04-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority populations in the United States, whereas the prevalence of ESRD risk factors such as diabetes continues to increase. Using data from the US Renal Data System, we examined trends in ESRD incidence, including ESRD caused by diabetes or hypertension. We determined the total number of persons in the United States by race/ethnicity who began treatment during 1995 to 2005 for ESRD and for ESRD with diabetes or hypertension as the primary diagnosis. Incidence rates were calculated by using census data and age-adjusted based on the 2000 US standard population. Joinpoint regression was used to analyze trends. Overall, during 1995 to 2005, the age-adjusted ESRD incidence increased from 260.7 per million to 350.9 per million, but the rate of increase slowed from 1998 to 2005. In the 2000s, compared with the 1990s, the age-adjusted ESRD incidence has continued to increase but at a slower rate among whites and blacks and has decreased significantly among Native Americans, Asians, and Hispanics. The disparity gap in ESRD incidence between minority populations and whites narrowed during 1995 to 2005. Continued interventions to reduce the prevalence of ESRD risk factors are needed to decrease ESRD incidence. PMID:18334239

  6. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  7. Functional assessment of chronic illness therapy—the fatigue scale exhibits stronger associations with clinical parameters in chronic dialysis patients compared to other fatigue-assessing instruments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high symptom burden, among which fatigue is highly prevalent. Many fatigue-assessing instruments exist, but comparisons among instruments in this patient population have yet to be investigated. Methods. ESRD patients under chronic hemodialysis were prospectively enrolled and seven types of fatigue instruments were administered: Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT-F), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS), Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Short-Form 36-Vitality (SF36-V). Using these instruments, we investigated the correlation between fatigue severity and clinical/biochemical parameters, including demographic/comorbidity profile, dialysis-related complications, and frailty severity. We used regression analysis with serum albumin and frailty severity as the dependent variables to investigate the independent correlations. Results. A total of 46 ESRD patients were enrolled (average age of 67 ± 11.6 years), and 50% of them had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results from the seven tested instruments showed high correlation with each other. We found that the fatigue severity by FACIT-F was significantly associated with age (p = 0.03), serum albumin (p = 0.003) and creatinine (p = 0.02) levels, while SF36-V scores were also significantly associated with age (p = 0.02) and serum creatinine levels (p = 0.04). However, the fatigue severity measured by the FSS, FSI, FQ, BFI, and LFS did not exhibit these associations. Moreover, regression analysis showed that only FACIT-F scores were independently associated with serum albumin levels and frailty severity in ESRD patients. Conclusion. Among the seven fatigue-assessing instruments, only the FACIT-F yielded results that demonstrated significant and independent associations with important outcome-related features in ESRD patients. PMID:26998414

  8. Exploration of Anaemia as a Progression Factor in African Americans with Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the higher incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) among African Americans, whites in the United States population have a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease. This may be due, in part, to a faster rate of progression to ESRD among African Americans with kidney disease. Anemia i...

  9. The John F. Maher Award Recipient Lecture 2006. The continuum of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease: challenges and opportunities for chronic peritoneal dialysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2007-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing renal replacement therapy have a high mortality rate and suffer from considerable morbidity. Degree of nutritional decline, disordered mineral metabolism, and vascular calcification are some of the abnormalities that predict an adverse outcome for ESRD patients. All these abnormalities begin early during the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD), long before the need for maintenance dialysis. Thus, CKD represents a continuum of metabolic and vascular abnormalities. Treatment of these abnormalities early during the course of CKD and a timely initiation of dialysis have the potential of improving patient outcomes. However, the thesis that successful management of these abnormalities will favorably modify the outcomes of dialysis patients remains untested. The proportion of incident USA ESRD patients starting chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has historically been low. Limited physician training and inadequate predialysis patient education appear to underlie the low CPD take-on in the USA. Furthermore, two key changes have occurred in the USA: steep decline in CPD take-on and progressive increase in the use of automated peritoneal dialysis. The decline in CPD take-on has afflicted virtually every subgroup examined and has occurred, paradoxically, when the CPD outcomes in the country have improved. Understanding the reasons for historically low CPD take-on and recent steep declines in utilization may allow the development of plans to reverse these trends. PMID:17299144

  10. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  11. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings. PMID:25801207

  12. Rationale and design of A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression (ASCEND).

    PubMed

    Hedayati, S Susan; Daniel, Divya M; Cohen, Scott; Comstock, Bryan; Cukor, Daniel; Diaz-Linhart, Yaminette; Dember, Laura M; Dubovsky, Amelia; Greene, Tom; Grote, Nancy; Heagerty, Patrick; Katon, Wayne; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Linke, Lori; Quinn, Davin; Rue, Tessa; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Unruh, Mark; Weisbord, Steven; Young, Bessie A; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-03-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent in patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Despite the high prevalence and robust data demonstrating an independent association between depression and poor clinical and patient-reported outcomes, MDD is under-treated when identified in such patients. This may in part be due to the paucity of evidence confirming the safety and efficacy of treatments for depression in this population. It is also unclear whether HD patients are interested in receiving treatment for depression. ASCEND (Clinical Trials Identifier Number NCT02358343), A Trial of Sertraline vs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for End-stage Renal Disease Patients with Depression, was designed as a multi-center, 12-week, open-label, randomized, controlled trial of prevalent HD patients with comorbid MDD or dysthymia. It will compare (1) a single Engagement Interview vs. a control visit for the probability of initiating treatment for comorbid depression in up to 400 patients; and (2) individual chair-side CBT vs. flexible-dose treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, for improvement of depressive symptoms in 180 of the up to 400 patients. The evolution of depressive symptoms will also be examined in a prospective longitudinal cohort of 90 HD patients who choose not to be treated for depression. We discuss the rationale and design of ASCEND, the first large-scale randomized controlled trial evaluating efficacy of non-pharmacologic vs. pharmacologic treatment of depression in HD patients for patient-centered outcomes. PMID:26621218

  13. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  14. Disease-Related Knowledge and Information Needs Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yang-Sook; Cha, Kyeong-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-related knowledge and information needs of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The 313 patients (Crohn disease: n = 169, colitis: n = 144) presenting to an outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, were scored on their knowledge of Crohn disease and colitis and their information needs were assessed in the questionnaire. Patients with Crohn disease obtained a higher mean knowledge score than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease had significantly higher scores about complications than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease showed significantly higher mean scores relating to the patients' information needs than patients with colitis. The favorite topics of information needed were disease, medication, and diagnosis/operations. The patients with Crohn disease wanted more information than patients with colitis about medications used for treatment, daily life, and pregnancy. The effectiveness of the training and education given to patients can be maximized in this education system when the information about disease and medications for Crohn disease patients or information about disease and diet for colitis patients is primarily provided according to the degree of the patients' need for information. PMID:25159269

  15. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "expert patient" has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  16. Gastrointestinal Symptoms of Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pensabene, Licia; Sestito, Simona; Nicoletti, Angela; Graziano, Francesca; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Concolino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In order to characterize gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of 50 patients with Fabry disease (FD) (22 M; age range: 4–70 y; 35 adults and 15 children), validated questionnaires of GI symptoms were used to diagnose the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) of the patients with GI symptoms (33/50 (66%); 25/35 adults and 8/15 children) according to Rome III criteria. In 16/25 of these adults and 2/8 of these children, the symptoms mimicked FGID. The adult subgroup included patients with unspecified functional bowel disorder (n = 9), functional bloating (n = 7), and IBS (n = 5), and the child subgroup included patients with abdominal migraine (n = 1) and IBS (n = 1). Among the 25 adults, 14 reported feeling full after a regular-size meal, and 12 complained of abdominal bloating/distension. All of the children with GI symptoms complained of low abdominal pain associated with changes in the form of the stool/improvements with defecation. In conclusion, according to Rome III criteria, the most frequent diagnoses of FGID among the adults with FD were unspecified functional bowel disorder, followed by functional bloating and IBS. The most frequent GI symptom in the children in our population was IBS-like abdominal pain, while the adults exhibited a full feeling following a regular-size meal and abdominal bloating/distension. PMID:26880903

  17. Thyroid diseases in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Tarach, Jerzy Stanisław; Kurowska, Maria; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly often involves the presence of different pathologies of the thyroid gland. Long-lasting stimulation of the follicular epithelium by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can cause disorders in thyroid function, an increase in its mass and the development of goitre. Acromegalic patients present most frequently with non-toxic multinodular goitre. Nodules are more prevalent in patients with active acromegaly. It has been suggested that then thyroid size increases and it can be reduced through treatment with somatostatin analogues. The relationship between thyroid volume and the level of IGF-1 and the duration of the disease is unclear. Each acromegalic patient requires a hormonal and imaging evaluation of the thyroid when the diagnosis is made, and an accurate evaluation during further observation and treatment. Although the data concerning the co-occurrence of acromegaly and thyroid cancer still remain controversial, it is particularly important to diagnose the patient early and to rule out thyroid cancer. PMID:25276172

  18. Lessons from 30 years' data of Korean end-stage renal disease registry, 1985-2015.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Chan; Yun, Sung Ro; Lee, Seoung Woo; Han, Sang Woong; Kim, Won; Park, Jongha; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-09-01

    The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN) launched a nationwide official survey program about dialysis therapy in 1985. Nowadays, the accumulated data for 30 years by this "Insan Prof. Min Memorial end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Registry" program have been providing the essential information for dialysis clinical practice, academic nephrology research, and health management policy. We reviewed 30 years of data to identify important changes and implications for the future improvement of dialysis therapy in Korea. Hemodialysis patients, especially diabetics and elderly patients have increased in number very rapidly during recent years in Korea. The Korean prevalence rate of ESRD patients was about 70% of the United States and about 50% of Japan according to the international comparisons in the annual data report of United States Renal Data System. The blood pressure control, anemia control, and dialysis adequacy have continuously improved year by year. The importance of calcium and phosphorus control has also been increasing because of the increase in long-term dialysis patients. In addition, chronic dialysis complications should be closely monitored and dialysis modifications, such as hemodiafiltration therapy, might be considered. Because of the increase of private clinics and nursing hospitals in dialysis practice, the role of dialysis specialists and continuing education are thought to be essential. For strict cost-effective dialysis control of increasing elderly, diabetic, and long-term dialysis patients, the KSN ESRD patient registration should be run by the KSN and health ministry in cooperation, in which the dialysis fee reimbursement should be accompanied. PMID:26484037

  19. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines. PMID:12143429

  20. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  1. Effects of Losartan-based therapy on the incidence of end-stage renal disease and associated costs in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Jiten; Carides, George; Robinson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Background: In the Reduction of Endpoints in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan (RENAAL) study, the primary composite end point was the 2-fold increase in baseline serum creatinine concentration, the development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death. The effects of losartan used for the prevention or delay of progression of diabetic nephropathy to ESRD were compared with those of conventional anti-hypertensive treatment (control) (calcium channel blockers, diuretics, α-blockers, β-blockers, and centrally acting agents), but not angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II antagonists (AIIAs), in 1513 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) and nephropathy. Both treatment groups received conventional antihypertensive therapy (calcium channel blockers, diuretics, α-blockers, β-blockers, and/or centrally acting agents). ACE inhibitors and AIIAs were not allowed during the study period. The relative risk (RR) for composite outcome was 25% less, and the RR for ESRD was 28% less, in the losartantreated group compared with the control group. Objective: The aim of this retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis was to use data from the RENAAL study to determine the survival benefits and lifetime direct medical costs of a losartan-based regimen for the prevention of ESRD in patients with DM-2 and nephropathy in the setting of the UK National Health Service (NHS). Methods: This analysis used life-years saved as the effectiveness measure. The effect of losartan-based treatment on ESRD risk was confined to the trial period (3.5 years). However, survival and the lifetime direct medical costs of managing ESRD were projected beyond the trial period to incorporate the full effects of ESRD on survival and resource use. The effect of altering key variables was examined using 1-way sensitivity analyses. Results: ESRD-related costs were significantly lower in patients receiving losartan-based treatment

  2. Diabetic Kidney Disease– A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    PubMed Central

    Molitch, Mark E.; Adler, Amanda I.; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Nelson, Robert G.; So, Wing-Yee; Wanner, Christoph; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Wheeler, David C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mogensen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continue to grow dramatically throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 DM (T2DM). Although improvements in DM and hypertension management have reduced the proportion of diabetic individuals who develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) and progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the sheer increase in people developing DM will have a major impact on dialysis and transplant needs. This KDIGO conference addressed a number of controversial areas in the management of DM patients with CKD, including aspects of screening for CKD with measurements of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); defining treatment outcomes; glycemic management in both those developing CKD and those with ESRD; hypertension goals and management, including blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; and lipid management. PMID:24786708

  3. Parkinson's disease in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon J; Gangadharan, Sanjay; Padmakumar, Chandrasekhara Pillai

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most commonly encountered neurodegenerative condition in clinical practice and probably offers a significantly greater variety of challenges than the management of Alzheimer's disease. As with most neurodegenerative diseases, age represents the leading risk factor for the development of PD. Current estimates would suggest that PD affects 1-2% of people over the age of 65 years and each decade sees an increasing number of cases. In addition, it is well recognised that most industrialised nations have an increasing proportion of individuals living longer. For example, recent data from Australia indicates that the prevalence of PD is anticipated to rise by 80% over the next 20 years and as such, we must all strive towards improving our clinical management of this common condition. In this article, we will attempt to highlight the issues that should be actively sought out and, where possible, addressed. We hope that an improved level of understanding will lead to better outcomes in older patients with PD. PMID:27481385

  4. The risk of cardiovascular disease in adults who have had childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Brent Lee; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Iragorri, Sandra; Kennedy, Thomas Lyle; Siegel, Norman Joseph

    2004-07-01

    While increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease (CKD), or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is well documented, transient hyperlipidemia or intermittent renal disease as a consequence of relapsing nephrotic syndrome (NS) has not been studied. To investigate this enigma, 62 patients, between 25 and 53 years of age, who had steroid-responsive/dependent NS during childhood, were identified from the records of the Division of Pediatric Nephrology at Yale School of Medicine. Forty patients were located and contacted to ascertain symptoms or occurrences of CVD via a telephone interview. At the time of follow-up, 23-46 years after cessation of NS, none of these patients had ESRD or CKD. Three patients had experienced a myocardial infarction (MI): a 32-year-old male with a family history of CVD; a 41-year-old male with a history of heavy smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and elevated cholesterol; a 31-year-old male after a cocaine overdose. The occurrence of events (8%) and mortality from CVD (none) in this cohort of patients is comparable to patients of a similar age in the general population and is lower than that of patients of the same age who are on dialysis. The data suggest that relapsing NS during childhood does not place patients at increased risk for CVD mortality or morbidity compared with the general population. Consequently, it would appear that factors related to persistent proteinuria or renal insufficiency, rather than transient proteinuria and renal disease, contribute to the CVD documented in patients with CKD or ESRD. PMID:15085419

  5. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  6. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease: past advancements and current innovations.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Over the last century, remarkable advances have been made in the care of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), resulting in improved prognosis. However, for decades after the advent of dialysis, anemia-associated symptoms continued to adversely affect patients' daily lives. The identification, isolation, and eventual cloning of erythropoietin and its receptor led to development of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, revolutionizing anemia management. Continued advancements have paved the way for the discovery of novel erythropoiesis stimulating agents with enhanced properties. This article charts the history of anemia management in patients with ESRD, including the discovery of erythropoietin, and briefly reviews the development, mechanism of action, and select attributes of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. PMID:23469411

  7. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  8. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  9. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. The high cardiovascular death rate in dialysis patients with ADPKD remains a problem. Kidney transplantation ... who develop ESRD receive a transplant before beginning dialysis therapy. Limited organ availability has resulted in longer ...

  10. Noninfectious lung pathology in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary B; Tazelaar, Henry D; Myers, Jeffrey L; Hunninghake, Gary W; Kakar, Sanjay; Kalra, Sanjay X; Ashton, Rendell; Colby, Thomas V

    2003-02-01

    Lung involvement in Crohn's disease is not well characterized. We reviewed our experience with 11 lung biopsies (seven wedge and four transbronchial) from patients with Crohn's disease to study this association further. Negative cultures, special stains for organisms Gomori-methenamine-silver [GMS], acid fast), and polymerase chain reaction for (four cases) were required for inclusion. The group included five women and six men with a mean age of 47 years (range 13-84 years). A diagnosis of Crohn's disease preceded the lung disease in nine patients. In two patients the diagnosis of Crohn's disease followed the diagnosis of their pulmonary disease 1 and 15 months later. Radiologically, eight patients had diffuse infiltrates, two had bilateral nodular infiltrates, and one had a mass. Chronic bronchiolitis with nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in four patients, one of whom was taking mesalamine. Two patients had an acute bronchiolitis associated with a neutrophil-rich bronchopneumonia with suppuration and vague granulomatous features. One patient on mesalamine had cellular interstitial pneumonia with rare giant cells. Four patients demonstrated organizing pneumonia with focal granulomatous features, two of whom were taking mesalamine, and one of these two responded to infliximab (anti-tumor necrosis factor) monoclonal antibody therapy. Noninfectious pulmonary disease in patients with Crohn's disease has variable histologic appearances, including granulomatous inflammation and airway-centered disease resembling that seen in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drugs may contribute to pulmonary disease in some patients. PMID:12548168

  11. Renoprotective Effect of the Combination of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitor and Calcium Channel Blocker in Patients with Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong-Shuang; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Zeng, Xiao-Xi; Kim, Sehee; Fu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and calcium channel blocker (CCB) are widely used in controlling blood pressure (BP) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We carried out a meta-analysis to compare the renoprotective effect of the combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and CCB (i.e., ACEI/ARB + CCB) with ACEI/ARB monotherapy in patients with hypertension and CKD. Methods: Publications were identified from PubMed, Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of BP lowering treatment for patients with hypertension and CKD were considered. The outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular events, BP, urinary protein measures, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and adverse events were extracted. Results: Based on seven RCTs with 628 patients, ACEI/ARB + CCB did not show additional benefit for the incidence of ESRD (risk ratio [RR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52–1.33) and cardiovascular events (RR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.21–1.63) significantly, compared with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. There were no significant differences in change from baseline to the end points in diastolic BP (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −1.28 mmHg; 95% CI: −3.18 to −0.62), proteinuria (standard mean difference = −0.55; 95% CI: −1.41 to −0.30), GFR (WMD = −0.32 ml/min; 95% CI: −1.53 to −0.89), and occurrence of adverse events (RR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.72–1.53). However, ACEI/ARB + CCB showed a greater reduction in systolic BP (WMD = −4.46 mmHg; 95% CI: −6.95 to −1.97), compared with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. Conclusion: ACEI/ARB + CCB had no additional renoprotective benefit beyond than what could be achieved with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. PMID:26904991

  12. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress. PMID:26453922

  13. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Olivier J; O'Donoghue, Donal J; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G; Narva, Andrew S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in many countries, and the costs associated with the care of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are estimated to exceed US$1 trillion globally. The clinical and economic rationale for the design of timely and appropriate health system responses to limit the progression of CKD to ESRD is clear. Clinical care might improve if early-stage CKD with risk of progression to ESRD is differentiated from early-stage CKD that is unlikely to advance. The diagnostic tests that are currently used for CKD exhibit key limitations; therefore, additional research is required to increase awareness of the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach can produce notable benefits on cardiovascular and renal health outcomes. Economic and clinical improvements might, therefore, be possible if CKD is reconceptualized as a part of primary care. This Review discusses which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimum time to provide clinical care, and the most suitable model of care to adopt. PMID:26055354

  14. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency—Prognostic Marker or Mortality Risk Factor in End Stage Renal Disease Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Treated with Hemodialysis—A Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Adalbert; Gadalean, Florica; Schiller, Oana; Timar, Romulus; Bob, Flaviu; Munteanu, Mircea; Stoian, Dana; Mihaescu, Adelina; Timar, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) with diabetes mellitus (DM) have a higher mortality rate and an increase prevalence of vitamin D deficiency compared to those without DM. It is still debated if vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor or a prognostic marker for mortality in these patients. This study investigated the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its impact on all-cause mortality in HD patients with DM. Methods Our prospective non-interventional cohort study included 600 patients on hemodialysis therapy (HD) (median aged 56, interquartile range (19) years, 332 (55.3%) males) recruited from 7 HD centers, from all main geographical regions of Romania. The prevalence of DM was 15.3%. They were then followed regarding: dialysis duration, dialysis efficiency, renal anemia, CKD-MBD, inflammatory status and comorbidities: coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and stroke. The deficiency of 25-OH vitamin D was defined as a value lower than12 ng/mL. Results Patients were followed for 3 years. The overall 3 year mortality was 25.5% (153 individuals), being higher in patients with DM as compared to those without DM (33.7% vs. 24.0%; P = 0.049). The time-related prognosis was also influenced by the presence of DM, at the survival analysis resulting in a HR of 1.52 [1.03 to 2.26] 95% CI, P = 0.037, for death in dialyzed patients with DM. In DM patients, 25-OH vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher (37.0% compared to 24.0%, P = 0.009). Furthermore, in patients with DM we observed a shorter dialysis duration (2 vs. 3 years, P<0.001) and a lower intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) (258.0 pg/ml vs. 441.9 pg/ml, P = 0.002). Regarding the presence of comorbidities at the inclusion in the study, the presence of diabetes in dialyzed patients was associated with increased prevalence of CAD (87.0% vs. 58.1%, P<0.001), PVD (67.4% vs. 17.3%, P<0.001) and history of stroke (29.3% vs. 14.0%, P<0

  16. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  17. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK. PMID:26453039

  18. Oral and salivary changes among renal patients undergoing hemodialysis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, A.; Reddy, S. S.; Umesh, L.; Devi, B. K. Y.; Santana, N.; Rakesh, N.

    2013-01-01

    We wanted to assess oral and salivary changes in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and to understand the correlation of such changes with renal insufficiency. The cross-sectional study was performed among 100 ESRD patients undergoing HD. Among these, 25 patients were randomly selected to assess the salivary changes and compared with 25 apparently healthy individuals who formed the control group. Total duration of the study was 15 months. Oral malodor, dry mouth, taste change, increased caries incidence, calculus formation, and gingival bleeding were the common oral manifestations. The flow rates of both unstimulated as well as stimulated whole saliva were decreased in the study group. The pH and buffer capacity of unstimulated whole saliva was increased in the study group, but stimulated whole saliva did not show any difference. ESRD patients undergoing HD require special considerations during dental treatment because of the various conditions inherent to the disease, their multiple oral manifestations and the treatment side-effects. PMID:23716919

  19. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  20. Dental considerations for the patient with renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, S S; Glick, M

    1996-02-01

    An increasing number of Americans are living with end-stage renal disease. This disease has many implications for dentistry, in terms of oral manifestations and management of afflicted patients. The authors present pertinent information to help dentists treat patients who exhibit the oral and systemic manifestations of renal disease, from the onset of renal impairment through hemodialysis. PMID:8682990

  1. Frailty severity is significantly associated with electrocardiographic QRS duration in chronic dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, the risk of which is presumably related to arrhythmia. Electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters have been found to correlate with arrhythmia and predict cardiovascular outcomes in ESRD patients. Frailty is also a common feature in this population. We investigate whether the severity of dialysis frailty is associated with ECG findings, including PR interval, QRS duration, and QTc interval. Presence and severity of frailty was ascertained using six different self-report questionnaires with proven construct validity. Correlation analysis between frailty severity and ECG was made, and those with significant association entered into multiple regression analysis for confirmation. Among a cohort of chronic hemodialysis patients, we found that frailty severity, assessed by the Edmonton frailty scale, is significantly associated with QRS duration (r = − 0.3, p < 0.05). Dialysis patients with QRS longer than 120 ms had significantly lower severity of frailty than those with QRS less than 120 ms (p = 0.01 for the Edmonton frailty scale and 0.05 for simple FRAIL scale). Regression analysis showed that frailty severity, assessed by the Edmonton frailty scale and simple FRAIL scale, was significantly associated with QRS duration independent of serum electrolyte levels. In conclusion, a significant relationship exists between the severity of frailty and QRS duration in ESRD patients. This might be an under-recognized link between frailty and its adverse cardiovascular impact in these patients. PMID:26528415

  2. Bromocriptine induces regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rodríguez, Oliva; Alvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Vega-Gómez, Helios Eduardo; Belio-Caro, Francisco; Vargas-Espinosa, Juan M; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2005-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) prevalence is very high in end stage renal disease (ESRD). It's a predictor of cardiac death in peritoneal dialysis patients. Noradrenalin, Angiotensin II and aldosterone are involved incardiac hypertrophy. Dopamine, acting at DA2 receptors inhibits norephinephrin release, antagonizes aldosterone and down-regulates AT1 receptor numbers, suggesting that DA2 agonists, like bromocriptine (BEC) could regress LVH. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in left ventricular mass in patients with ESRD in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), by adding BEC to the treatment. An open clinical trial was conducted. Twenty patients were enrolled. Five formed the control group. Fifteen patients in the experimental group received BEC 2.5 mg three times daily over three months. M mode echocardiography and prolactin plasma levels were measured at the beginning and at the end of the study. The statistical analysis was performed using Student t test. The echocardiography reports showed a 24.4% decreased in left ventricular mass index (LVMI); the interventricular septum decreased 11.3%, the ejection fraction was not modified. The control group showed no difference. BEC-mediated decreases in left-ventricular mass in LVH patients on dialysis suggest that Dopaminergic agonists could be useful in caring for patients with ESRD and LVH. PMID:16416676

  3. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  4. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  5. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  6. Evaluation of responses to vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in patients on dialysis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Li, Yan-Chun; Zhao, Su-Mei; Li, Zhong-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D plays a key role in mineral metabolism and its deficiency is often noted in patients on dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We evaluated the efficacy and responses to vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in patients undergoing dialysis for ESRD. Randomized controlled trials or prospective studies comparing vitamin D3 supplementation to placebo in patients with ESRD on dialysis were searched from medical databases using the terms, 'Calcitriol/Cholecalciferol, vitamin D, chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, serum calcium, parathyroid hormones (PTH), phosphorus, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D'. The outcomes analyzed were serum calcium, PTH, phosphorus, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH) 2D levels. Of the 259 records identified, 9 studies with a total of 368 patients were chosen for the current meta-analysis. The number of patients, age, and gender distribution among the groups were comparable. Results reveal a greater increase in both 25(OH)D (Pooled difference in means=0.434, 95% CI 0.174 to 0.694, p=0.001) and 1,25(OH) 2D (Pooled difference in means=0.978, 95% CI 0.615 to 1.34, p<0.001) in the treatment arm, as compared to the placebo. There was no difference in the serum calcium or PTH among the two groups. However, patients in the treatment arm had a significant increase in phosphorus levels (Pooled difference in means=0.434, 95% CI 0.174 to 0.694, p=0.001). Vitamin D supplementation facilitated the maintenance of increased levels of 25(OH) D and 1,25(OH) 2D in patients undergoing dialysis for ESRD. This increase in vitamin D was not associated with hypercalcemia or significant changes in PTH levels. PMID:27076675

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on long-term dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juliana; Szabo, Aniko

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has not been adequately characterized. Using United States Renal Data System data we investigated the epidemiology of GIB in hospitalized patients receiving long-term dialysis. Methods Medicare ESRD patients who began dialysis between 1996 and 2005 were followed from 90 days after starting dialysis to death, transplant, loss of Medicare, or December 31, 2006. GIB events were identified using claims data. Predictors of GIB incidence were analyzed using over-dispersed Poisson regression and Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect on survival. Repeat episodes were modeled using a partially conditional Cox regression model. Results 406,836 patients were followed for 832,131 person-years, during which 133,967 events were identified. The incidence of GIB was stable through year 2000 but steadily increased thereafter. Chronic gastric ulcer and colonic diverticulosis were the commonest defined causes of upper and lower GIB respectively. Age >49 years, female gender, hypertension as the cause of ESRD, and initiation on hemodialysis was associated with a greater risk of GIB. An episode of GIB conferred a increased hazard of death (hazard ratio 1.9, 95 % CI 1.86–1.93). A previous episode of GIB was associated with greater hazard of another episode (hazard ratio 3.93, 95 % CI 3.82–4.05). Conclusions In ESRD patients incident to long-term dialysis the incidence of hospital-associated GIB is increasing, is associated with a greater hazard of death, and carries a great hazard of repeat episodes. PMID:25185727

  8. Immunomodulatory Device Promotes a Shift of Circulating Monocytes to a Less Inflammatory Phenotype in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Szamosfalvi, Balazs; Westover, Angela; Buffington, Deborah; Yevzlin, Alexander; Humes, H David

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on chronic hemodialysis (HD) suffer accelerated morbidity and mortality rates caused by cardiovascular disease and infections. Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in these poor outcomes. The activated monocyte (MO) has become a prime therapeutic target to modulate this inflammatory process. A selective cytopheretic device (SCD) was evaluated to assess its effects on the circulating MO pool. A pilot trial was undertaken in 15 ESRD patients on HD with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels greater than 5 mg/dl. An excellent safety profile was observed with no decline in leukocyte (LE) or platelet counts. The effect of SCD therapy on MO phenotypes in these patients was determined on peripheral blood MO utilizing flow cytometry. SCD therapy promoted a shift in MO phenotype from predominantly CD14 expressing MO at baseline/pre-SCD therapy to CD14 expressing MO post-SCD therapy. A significant shift in MO population phenotype afforded by a single SCD therapy session was observed (p < 0.013). In a subset of patients (n = 7) presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), this persistent decline in MO CD14 expression was sustained as long as 2 weeks posttherapy. These results demonstrate that the SCD therapy has the potential to modulate the chronic proinflammatory state in ESRD patients. PMID:27258222

  9. Coronary artery bypass graft in a patient with Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kanemitsu, Naoki; Kyogoku, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by intracellular accumulation of ceramide trihexoside resulting from alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. While the heart is often involved, coronary artery disease and its management in Fabry's disease patients are extremely rare clinical entities. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with left main disease in Fabry's disease with special consideration of the arterial wall pathology. PMID:27131517

  10. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    MedlinePlus

    ... these patients, without treatment unless they are symptomatic. HYPOTHYROIDISM IN THE OLDER PATIENT Hypothyroidism is very common ... is given. TREATMENT OF THE OLDER PATIENT WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM As with the younger patient, pure synthetic thyroxine ( ...

  11. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  12. Effects of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Progression of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C.; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Wheeler, David C.; Tomson, Charles; Wanner, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Lixin; Hooi, Lai Seong; Levin, Adeera; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gaziano, Mike; Kasiske, Bertram; Walker, Rob; Massy, Ziad A.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Krairittichai, Udom; Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej; Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Tesar, Vladimir; Wiecek, Andrzej; Grobbee, Diederick; de Zeeuw, Dick; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Dasgupta, Tanaji; Lewis, David; Herrington, Will; Mafham, Marion; Majoni, William; Wallendszus, Karl; Grimm, Richard; Pedersen, Terje; Tobert, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baxter, Alex; Bray, Christopher; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Zhengming; Hill, Michael; Knott, Carol; Parish, Sarah; Simpson, David; Sleight, Peter; Young, Alan; Collins, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD. PMID:24790178

  13. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-03-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  14. International Registry for Patients With Castleman Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Castleman Disease; Castleman's Disease; Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; GLNH; Hyperplasia, Giant Lymph Node; Lymph Node Hyperplasia, Giant

  15. Successful Pregnancy in a 31-Year-Old Peritoneal Dialysis Patient with Bilateral Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Ahmed; AlOmar, Osama; Al-Badawi, Ismail A.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of pregnancy among childbearing age women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing long-term periodic dialysis ranges from 1% to 7%. Although pregnancy in dialysis women with ESRD is considered a largely high-risk pregnancy, occurrence of successful pregnancy is not impossible with success rates approaching 70%. Rates of successful pregnancy are greatly impacted by early pregnancy diagnosis and preserved residual renal functions. Herein, to the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of successful pregnancy (despite late diagnosis at 14 weeks of gestation) in a 31-year-old peritoneal dialysis patient with bilateral nephrectomy and no whatsoever preserved residual renal function. Moreover, a literature review on pregnancy in dialysis patients is presented. PMID:24198990

  16. Successful pregnancy in a 31-year-old peritoneal dialysis patient with bilateral nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zaid, Ahmed; Nazer, Ahmed; Alomar, Osama; Al-Badawi, Ismail A

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of pregnancy among childbearing age women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing long-term periodic dialysis ranges from 1% to 7%. Although pregnancy in dialysis women with ESRD is considered a largely high-risk pregnancy, occurrence of successful pregnancy is not impossible with success rates approaching 70%. Rates of successful pregnancy are greatly impacted by early pregnancy diagnosis and preserved residual renal functions. Herein, to the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of successful pregnancy (despite late diagnosis at 14 weeks of gestation) in a 31-year-old peritoneal dialysis patient with bilateral nephrectomy and no whatsoever preserved residual renal function. Moreover, a literature review on pregnancy in dialysis patients is presented. PMID:24198990

  17. Association between human resources and risk of hospitalisation in end-stage renal disease outpatients receiving haemodialysis: a longitudinal cohort study using claim data during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon-Hee; Han, Kyu-Tae; Nam, Chung Mo; Moon, Ki Tae; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective The number of patients requiring haemodialysis has gradually increased in South Korea. Owing to this growth, concerns have been raised regarding haemodialysis quality of care, and healthcare professionals must consider alternatives for appropriate management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, we investigated the association between risk of hospitalisation of outpatients who received haemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the human resources of the haemodialysis unit. Setting We used data from National Health Insurance (NHI) claims during October 2013 to September 2014. Participants These data comprised 40 543 outpatients with ESRD (4 751 047 outpatient cases) who received haemodialysis. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measure We performed Poisson regression analysis using a generalised estimating equation that included both patient and haemodialysis unit characteristics to examine the factors associated with hospitalisation of outpatients with ESRD. Results Among 4 751 047 outpatient cases, 27 997 (0.59%) were hospitalised during the study period. A higher proportion of haemodialysis patient care specialists and a higher number of nurses experienced in haemodialysis were inversely associated with the risk of hospitalisation (per 10% increase in haemodialysis patient care specialists: relative risk (RR)=0.987, 95% CI 0.981 to 0.993; per 10-person increase in nurses who provided haemodialysis: RR=0.876, 95% CI 0.833 to 0.921). In addition, such associations were greater in severe patients. Conclusions Our findings suggest that haemodialysis units with high-quality, haemodialysis-specialised human resources could positively affect the outcomes of outpatients with ESRD. Based on our findings, health policymakers and professionals should implement strategies for the optimal management of patients with CKD. PMID:27534988

  18. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  19. Echocardiographic strain and mortality in Black Americans with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Gregg S; Seetha Rammohan, Harish Raj; Romero-Corral, Abel; Fumo, Peter; Figueredo, Vincent M; Gorcsan, John

    2015-11-15

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presents a significant health burden and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This is particularly true in African Americans who generally have higher rates of cardiovascular mortality. Outcomes in ESRD are related to extent of cardiovascular disease, but markers for outcome are not clearly established. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) has emerged as an important measure of left ventricular systolic function that is additive to traditional ejection fraction (EF). It can be measured on routine digital echocardiography and is reproducible. This study tested the hypothesis that GLS is associated with mortality in black Americans with ESRD and preserved EF. Forty-eight outpatients undergoing hemodialysis, 59.4 ± 13.3 years, with EF ≥50% were prospectively enrolled. GLS, measured by an offline speckle tracking algorithm, ranged from -8.6% to -22.0% with a mean of -13.4%, substantially below normal (-16% or more negative). The prevalence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction, as determined by GLS, was 89%. Patients were followed for an average of 1.9 years; all-cause mortality was 19% (9 deaths). GLS was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.30, p = 0.02), whereas EF was not. After adjustment for multiple potential confounders (age, gender, race, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary disease, heart failure, and EF), GLS remained strongly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.56, p = 0.002). In conclusion, GLS is an important index in patients with ESRD, which is additive to EF as a marker for mortality in this high-risk group. PMID:26410606

  20. Discriminative value of frailty screening instruments in end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Barbara C.; Drost, Diederik; Kalf, Annette; Vogtlander, Nils P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous frailty screening instruments are available, but their applicability for identifying frailty in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of three instruments used for frailty screening in an ESRD population. Methods The study was conducted in 2013 in a teaching hospital in The Netherlands and included patients receiving haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and pre-dialysis care. We determined the sensitivity and specificity of three screening instruments: the Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI), the Identification of Seniors at Risk–Hospitalized Patients (ISAR-HP) and the Veiligheidsmanagementsysteem (VMS), which is a safety management system for vulnerable elderly patients. The Frailty Index was the gold standard used. Results The prevalence of frailty was 37% in a total of 95 participants with ESRD [mean age 65.2 years (SD 12.0), 57% male]. Frailty prevalence in participants ≥65 years of age and <65 years of age was 44% and 28%, respectively (P = 0.11). Sensitivity and specificity for frailty of the GFI were 89% and 57%, respectively; ISAR-HP 83% and 77%, respectively; and VMS 77% and 67%, respectively. Conclusions Although the GFI showed the highest sensitivity, it is not yet possible to propose a firm choice for one of these screening instruments or specific items due to the small scale of the study. Since there is a high prevalence of frailty in ESRD patients, translation and testing of the effectiveness of screening using the GFI in the prognostication and prevention of development or deterioration of frailty in this population should be the next step. PMID:27478606

  1. Sexually, transmitted disease in clinic patients in Salisbury, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, A S

    1981-01-01

    During the three months between December 1979 and February 1980, 2867 patients attended a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. Of the 929 (32.4%) patients examined and interviewed clinical and laboratory finding showed that chancroid was the commonest disease (38.4%) and gonorrhoea almost as common (35.3%) in men. Pelvic inflammatory disease was the commonest disease (47.0%) and gonorrhoea the next commonest (22.7%) in women. PMID:6894561

  2. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction underlies multiple cardiovascular consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and antecedent diabetes or hypertension. Endothelial insults in CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients include uremic toxins, serum uric acid, hyperphosphatemia, reactive oxygen species, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Sevelamer carbonate, a calcium-free intestinally nonabsorbed polymer, is approved for hyperphosphatemic dialysis patients in the US and hyperphosphatemic stage 3–5 CKD patients in many other countries. Sevelamer has been observed investigationally to reduce absorption of AGEs, bacterial toxins, and bile acids, suggesting that it may reduce inflammatory, oxidative, and atherogenic stimuli in addition to its on-label action of lowering serum phosphate. Some studies also suggest that noncalcium binders may contribute less to vascular calcification than calcium-based binders. Exploratory sevelamer carbonate use in patients with stages 2–4 diabetic CKD significantly reduced HbA1c, AGEs, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, and total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol versus calcium carbonate; inflammatory markers decreased and defenses against AGEs increased. Sevelamer has also been observed to reduce circulating FGF-23, potentially reducing risk of left ventricular hypertrophy. Sevelamer but not calcium-based binders in exploratory studies increases flow-mediated vasodilation, a marker of improved endothelial function, in patients with CKD. In contrast, lanthanum carbonate and calcium carbonate effects on FMV did not differ in hemodialysis recipients. The recent INDEPENDENT-CKD randomized trial compared sevelamer versus calcium carbonate in predialysis CKD patients (investigational in the US, on-label in European participants); sevelamer reduced 36-month mortality and the composite endpoint of mortality or dialysis inception. Similarly, INDEPENDENT-HD in incident dialysis patients showed improved survival with 24 months

  3. Association of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression With All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and Hospitalization Among Hurricane Katrina Survivors With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Gamboa, Christopher; Cohen, Andrew; Anderson, Amanda H.; Kutner, Nancy; Kronish, Ian; Mills, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the association of psychiatric symptoms in the year after Hurricane Katrina with subsequent hospitalization and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of ESRD patients (n = 391) treated at 9 hemodialysis centers in the New Orleans, Louisiana, area in the weeks before Hurricane Katrina were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms via telephone interview 9 to 15 months later. Two combined outcomes through August 2009 (maximum 3.5-year follow-up) were analyzed: (1) all-cause and (2) cardiovascular-related hospitalization and mortality. Results. Twenty-four percent of participants screened positive for PTSD and 46% for depression; 158 participants died (79 cardiovascular deaths), and 280 participants were hospitalized (167 for cardiovascular-related causes). Positive depression screening was associated with 33% higher risk of all-cause (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 1.66) and cardiovascular-related hospitalization and mortality (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.76). PTSD was not significantly associated with either outcome. Conclusions. Depression in the year after Hurricane Katrina was associated with increased risk of hospitalization and mortality in ESRD patients, underscoring the long-term consequences of natural disasters for vulnerable populations. PMID:23409901

  4. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10–15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  5. Pharmacologic Treatment of Common Symptoms in Dialysis Patients: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Moledina, Dennis G; Perry Wilson, Francis

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving hemodialysis experience a heavy burden of disease-related symptoms, which lead to reduced quality of life. This review focuses on aspects of ESRD-related pharmacokinetics and on efficacy of drugs for treatment of somatic symptoms. Fatigue, pruritus, insomnia, and cramps are the most common symptoms in ESRD, and studies suggest that they are often undertreated. However, few evidence-based guidelines exist to guide therapy in patients received dialysis. In the context of this review, we examine the role of l-Carnitine in the treatment of fatigue and cramps; human growth hormone analog Norditropin and anabolic steroid Nandrolone for the treatment of fatigue; Gabapentin and other agents for the management of pruritis; Vitamin and creatine supplementation in the management of dialysis-associated cramps, and somnambulates in the treatment of dialysis-related insomnia. Treatment decisions should be made in consultation with patients with a full accounting of the potential risks and benefits of these therapies. PMID:25913502

  6. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  7. Echocardiographic assessment of right ventricular functions in nondiabetic normotensive hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Karavelioğlu, Yusuf; Özkurt, Sultan; Karapinar, Hekim; Arisoy, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Heart is affected structurally and functionally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the data available about adverse effects of ESRD on right ventricle (RV) is scarce. We aimed to evaluate echocardiographic parameters of RV in nondiabetic, normotensive patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Methods A total of 45 (24 women; mean age 52.4 ± 12.4 years) consecutive nondiabetic, normotensive patients with ESRD undergoing HD and 39 healthy age and sex-matched control subjects (22 women; mean age 50.3 ± 6.6 years) were enrolled in the study. M-mode and two dimensional images, color, pulsed and continuous wave Doppler, and tissue Doppler measurements were acquired from all subjects. Echocardiographic evaluation was performed in the days between HD dates of the patients. Results RV fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, tricuspid E velocity, E/A ratio, tricuspid annular E´ velocity, and E´/A´ ratio were lower in patients than controls (p < 0.001, p = 0.003, p = 0.007, p = 0.005, p < 0.001, and p = 0.034, respectively). However, RV diastolic area, RV myocardial performance index, E/E´ ratio, and mean and systolic pulmonary artery pressure were higher in patients than controls (p < 0.001, p = 0.007, p = 0.005, p < 0.001, p = 0.00