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Sample records for disease neuroimaging initiative

  1. Worldwide Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria C; Bain, Lisa J; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Weiner, Michael W

    2012-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was launched in 2003 to speed drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1) set a new standard for data sharing without embargo. In addition, it has been extended to 2017 by additional funding (North American-ADNI Grand Opportunities and ADNI 2) as well as multiple projects around the world, collectively known as Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). The goal of WW-ADNI is to harmonize projects and results across different geographical sites and to encourage and harmonize data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects are currently underway in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, Taiwan, and Argentina, with a nascent program in China and a possible future program in Brazil. PMID:22748939

  2. The Worldwide Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: An update.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, James A; Finger, Brad; Weiner, Michael W; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Rowe, Christopher C; Kim, Seong Yoon; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), launched in 2004, has worked to accelerate drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the initiative has set a new standard for data sharing without embargo and for the use of biomarkers in dementia research. The ADNI effort in North America is not the only such effort in the world. The Alzheimer's Association recognized these global efforts and formed Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). By creating a platform for international collaboration and cooperation, WW-ADNI's goals are to harmonize projects and results across geographical regions and to facilitate data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects include those based in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, and Argentina. PMID:26194318

  3. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Informatics Core: A Decade in Review

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Informatics Core of the Alzheimer’s Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has coordinated data integration and dissemination for a continually growing and complex dataset in which both data contributors and recipients span institutions, scientific disciplines and geographic boundaries. This article provides an update on the accomplishments and future plans. PMID:26194316

  4. Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative biomarkers as quantitative phenotypes: Genetics core aims, progress, and plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Swaminathan, Shanker; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Nho, Kwangsik; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Moore, Jason H.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Green, Robert C.; Bertram, Lars; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Genetics Core is to facilitate the investigation of genetic influences on disease onset and trajectory as reflected in structural, functional, and molecular imaging changes; fluid biomarkers; and cognitive status. Major goals include (1) blood sample processing, genotyping, and dissemination, (2) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal phenotypic data, and (3) providing a central resource, point of contact and planning group for genetics within Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Genome-wide array data have been publicly released and updated, and several neuroimaging GWAS have recently been reported examining baseline magnetic resonance imaging measures as quantitative phenotypes. Other preliminary investigations include copy number variation in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease and GWAS of baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and longitudinal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Blood collection for RNA studies is a new direction. Genetic studies of longitudinal phenotypes hold promise for elucidating disease mechanisms and risk, development of therapeutic strategies, and refining selection criteria for clinical trials. PMID:20451875

  5. Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: progress and plans.

    PubMed

    Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Donohue, Michael C; Gamst, Anthony; Raman, Rema; Thomas, Ronald G; Walter, Sarah; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Beckett, Laurel A; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John C; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-05-01

    The Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has provided clinical, operational, and data management support to ADNI since its inception. This article reviews the activities and accomplishments of the core in support of ADNI aims. These include the enrollment and follow-up of more than 800 subjects in the three original cohorts: healthy controls, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (now referred to as late MCI, or LMCI), and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1), with baseline longitudinal, clinical, and cognitive assessments. These data, when combined with genetic, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid measures, have provided important insights into the neurobiology of the AD spectrum. Furthermore, these data have facilitated the development of novel clinical trial designs. ADNI has recently been extended with funding from an NIH Grand Opportunities (GO) award, and the new ADNI GO phase has been launched; this includes the enrollment of a new cohort, called early MCI, with milder episodic memory impairment than the LMCI group. An application for a further 5 years of ADNI funding (ADNI 2) was recently submitted. This funding would support ongoing follow-up of the original ADNI 1 and ADNI GO cohorts, as well as additional recruitment into all categories. The resulting data would provide valuable data on the earliest stages of AD, and support the development of interventions in these critically important populations. PMID:20451872

  6. Impact of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, 2004 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Donohue, Michael C.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shaw, Leslie; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was established in 2004 to facilitate the development of effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by validating biomarkers for AD clinical trials. Methods We searched for ADNI publications using established methods. Results ADNI has (1) developed standardized biomarkers for use in clinical trial subject selection and as surrogate outcome measures; (2) standardized protocols for use across multiple centers; (3) initiated worldwide ADNI; (4) inspired initiatives investigating traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder in military populations, and depression, respectively, as an AD risk factor; (5) acted as a data-sharing model; (6) generated data used in over 600 publications, leading to the identification of novel AD risk alleles, and an understanding of the relationship between biomarkers and AD progression; and (7) inspired other public-private partnerships developing biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. Discussion ADNI has made myriad impacts in its first decade. A competitive renewal of the project in 2015 would see the use of newly developed tau imaging ligands, and the continued development of recruitment strategies and outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:26194320

  7. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Progress report and future plans

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John C.; Cairns, Nigel; Beckett, Laurel A.; Toga, Arthur; Green, Robert; Walter, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Snyder, Peter; Siemers, Eric; Potter, William; Cole, Patricia E.; Schmidt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) beginning in October 2004, is a 6-year re-search project that studies changes of cognition, function, brain structure and function, and biomarkers in elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A major goal is to determine and validate MRI, PET images, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood biomarkers as predictors and outcomes for use in clinical trials of AD treatments. Structural MRI, FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) PET, CSF measurements of amyloid β (Aβ) and species of tau, with clinical/cognitive measurements were performed on elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with AD. Structural MRI shows high rates of brain atrophy, and has high statistical power for determining treatment effects. FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B PET, and CSF measurements of Aβ and tau were significant predictors of cognitive decline and brain atrophy. All data are available at UCLA/LONI/ADNI, without embargo. ADNI-like projects started in Australia, Europe, Japan, and Korea. ADNI provides significant new information concerning the progression of AD. PMID:20451868

  8. Intrinsic Functional Component Analysis via Sparse Representation on Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Database

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia (accounting for 60% to 80%) and is the fifth leading cause of death for those people who are 65 or older. By 2050, one new case of AD in United States is expected to develop every 33 sec. Unfortunately, there is no available effective treatment that can stop or slow the death of neurons that causes AD symptoms. On the other hand, it is widely believed that AD starts before development of the associated symptoms, so its prestages, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or even significant memory concern (SMC), have received increasing attention, not only because of their potential as a precursor of AD, but also as a possible predictor of conversion to other neurodegenerative diseases. Although these prestages have been defined clinically, accurate/efficient diagnosis is still challenging. Moreover, brain functional abnormalities behind those alterations and conversions are still unclear. In this article, by developing novel sparse representations of whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals and by using the most updated Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we successfully identified multiple functional components simultaneously, and which potentially represent those intrinsic functional networks involved in the resting-state activities. Interestingly, these identified functional components contain all the resting-state networks obtained from traditional independent-component analysis. Moreover, by using the features derived from those functional components, it yields high classification accuracy for both AD (94%) and MCI (92%) versus normal controls. Even for SMC we can still have 92% accuracy. PMID:24846640

  9. Neuroimaging of neurocutaneous diseases.

    PubMed

    Nandigam, Kaveer; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2014-02-01

    An in-depth knowledge of the imaging characteristics of the common neurocutaneous diseases (NCD) described in this article will help neurologists understand the screening imaging modalities in these patients. The future of neuroimaging is geared towards developing and refining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The detection of tumors in NCD has greatly improved with availability of high-field strength 3T MRI machines. Neuroimaging will remain at the heart and soul of the multidisciplinary care of such complex diagnoses to guide early detection and monitor treatment. PMID:24287389

  10. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD and 200 normal controls and $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors including the National Institutes on Aging, thirteen pharmaceutical companies and two Foundations that provided support through the Foundation for NIH (FNIH). This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February, 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been 1) the development of standardized methods for clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multi-center setting; 2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control, MCI and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β amyloid (Aβ) cascade [1] and tau mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD while brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; 3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities including MRI, FDG-PET, CSF biomarkers and clinical tests; 4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, Aβ42 and tau as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly or even non-symptomatic subjects and are leading candidates for the detection of AD in its preclinical stages; 5) the improvement of clinical trial efficiency through the identification of subjects most

  11. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Li; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD, and 200 normal control subjects; $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors, including the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies, and 2 foundations that provided support through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimers Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, β-amyloid 42 and tau, as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly symptomatic or even nonsymptomatic subjects, and are leading candidates

  12. Perspective: The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and the role and contributions of the Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB).

    PubMed

    Liu, Enchi; Luthman, Johan; Cedarbaum, Jesse M; Schmidt, Mark E; Cole, Patricia E; Hendrix, James; Carrillo, Maria C; Jones-Davis, Dorothy; Tarver, Erika; Novak, Gerald; De Santi, Susan; Soares, Holly D; Potter, William Z; Siemers, Eric; Schwarz, Adam J

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB) is comprised of representatives of private, for-profit entities (including pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostics, imaging companies, and imaging contract research organizations), and nonprofit organizations that provide financial and scientific support to ADNI through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. The PPSB serves as an independent, open, and precompetitive forum in which all private sector and not-for-profit partners in ADNI can collaborate, share information, and offer scientific and private-sector perspectives and expertise on issues relating to the ADNI project. In this article, we review and highlight the role, activities, and contributions of the PPSB within the ADNI project, and provide a perspective on remaining unmet needs and future directions. PMID:26194317

  13. Higher homocysteine associated with thinner cortical gray matter in 803 participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sarah K; Rajagopalan, Priya; Joshi, Shantanu H; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    A significant portion of our risk for dementia in old age is associated with lifestyle factors (diet, exercise, and cardiovascular health) that are modifiable, at least in principle. One such risk factor, high-homocysteine levels in the blood, is known to increase risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular disorders. Here, we set out to understand how homocysteine levels relate to 3D surface-based maps of cortical gray matter distribution (thickness, volume, and surface area) computed from brain magnetic resonance imaging in 803 elderly subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set. Individuals with higher plasma levels of homocysteine had lower gray matter thickness in bilateral frontal, parietal, occipital, and right temporal regions and lower gray matter volumes in left frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital regions, after controlling for diagnosis, age, and sex and after correcting for multiple comparisons. No significant within-group associations were found in cognitively healthy people, patients with mild cognitive impairment, or patients with Alzheimer's disease. These regional differences in gray matter structure may be useful biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of interventions, such as vitamin B supplements, that aim to prevent homocysteine-related brain atrophy by normalizing homocysteine levels. PMID:25444607

  14. Cognitive reserve and Aβ1-42 in mild cognitive impairment (Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paula; Fernandez Suarez, Marcos; Surace, Ezequiel I; Chrem Méndez, Patricio; Martín, María Eugenia; Clarens, María Florencia; Tapajóz, Fernanda; Russo, Maria Julieta; Campos, Jorge; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive reserve and concentration of Aβ1-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with Alzheimer’s disease, and in control subjects. Methods Thirty-three participants from the Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database completed a cognitive battery, the Cognitive Reserve Questionnaire (CRQ), and an Argentinian accentuation reading test (TAP-BA) as a measure of premorbid intelligence, and underwent lumbar puncture for CSF biomarker quantification. Results The CRQ significantly correlated with TAP-BA, education, and Aβ1-42. When considering Aβ1-42 levels, significant differences were found in CRQ scores; higher levels of CSF Aβ1-42 were associated with higher CRQ scores. Conclusion Reduced Aβ1-42 in CSF is considered as evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain. Previous results suggest that individuals with higher education, higher occupational attainment, and participation in leisure activities (cognitive reserve) have a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our results support the notion that enhanced neural activity has a protective role in mild cognitive impairment, as evidenced by higher CSF Aβ1-42 levels in individuals with more cognitive reserve. PMID:26504392

  15. Disease progression model for Clinical Dementia Rating–Sum of Boxes in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Samtani, Mahesh N; Raghavan, Nandini; Novak, Gerald; Nandy, Partha; Narayan, Vaibhav A

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to develop a nonlinear disease progression model, using an expanded set of covariates that captures the longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale–Sum of Boxes (CDR–SB) scores. These were derived from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative ADNI-1 study, of 301 Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment patients who were followed for 2–3 years. Methods The model describes progression rate and baseline disease score as a function of covariates. The covariates that were tested fell into five groups: a) hippocampal volume; b) serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers; c) demographics and apolipoprotein Epsilon 4 (ApoE4) allele status; d) baseline cognitive tests; and e) disease state and comedications. Results Covariates associated with baseline disease severity were disease state, hippocampal volume, and comedication use. Disease progression rate was influenced by baseline CSF biomarkers, Trail-Making Test part A score, delayed logical memory test score, and current level of impairment as measured by CDR–SB. The rate of disease progression was dependent on disease severity, with intermediate scores around the inflection point score of 10 exhibiting high disease progression rate. The CDR–SB disease progression rate in a typical patient, with late mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease, was estimated to be approximately 0.5 and 1.4 points/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, this model describes disease progression in terms of CDR–SB changes in patients and its dependency on novel covariates. The CSF biomarkers included in the model discriminate mild cognitive impairment subjects as progressors and nonprogressors. Therefore, the model may be utilized for optimizing study designs, through patient population enrichment and clinical trial simulations. PMID:24926196

  16. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  17. Low plasma ApoE levels are associated with smaller hippocampal size in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Edmond; Chow, Nicole; Hwang, Kristy S.; Thompson, Paul M.; Gylys, Karen H.; Cole, Gregory M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Soares, Holly D.; Weiner, Michael W.; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2014-01-01

    Apoliproprotein E (APOE) genotype is the strongest known genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the utility of plasma ApoE levels for assessing the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes remains uncertain. Here we examined cross-sectional associations between plasma ApoE levels and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices of the hippocampus from 541 participants [57 with normal cognition (NC), 375 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 109 with mild AD] who were enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Across the NC and MCI groups, lower plasma ApoE levels were significantly correlated with smaller hippocampal size, as measured by either hippocampal volume or hippocampal radial distance. These associations were driven primarily by findings from carriers of an APOE ε4 allele, and are consistent with prior reports that lower plasma ApoE levels correlate with greater global cortical Pittsburgh Compound B retention. In this high-risk group, plasma ApoE levels may represent a peripheral marker of underlying AD neuropathology in nondemented elderly individuals. PMID:25547651

  18. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    PubMed

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. PMID:25964057

  19. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Nigel J.; Perrin, Richard J.; Franklin, Erin E.; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M.; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (8), Australia (3), UK (1), and Germany (2). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving 9 participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform, and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final ‘gold standard’ neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. PMID:25964057

  20. Atypical neuroimaging in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harshal K; Storz, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a rare metabolic disease involving copper metabolism. Neuroimaging plays an important part in evaluation of patients with a neuropsychiatric presentation. We present a case of a 14-year-old girl with atypical confluent white matter disease and cystic degeneration on MRI, with a rapidly progressive course, who succumbed to complications despite treatment with trientine. Wilson's disease should be considered as a differential for leucoencephalopathy in young patients with progressive neurological disease for its early recognition and optimum outcome. PMID:24907221

  1. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  2. Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

    2014-06-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  3. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Lisa; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik-Sobanska, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging is being increasingly used to complement clinical assessments in the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and metabolic positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are the most clinically used and promising modalities to detect brain abnormalities in individuals who might be at risk for AD but who have not yet developed symptoms. The knowledge of established risk factors for AD enabled investigators to develop enrichment strategies for longitudinal imaging studies to reduce the sample sizes and study duration. The present review focuses on the results obtained by MRI and FDG-PET studies that examined the preclinical AD stages in several at risk populations: (1) individuals from families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (FAD), (2) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), particularly in memory, who are at very high risk for declining to AD with an estimated decline rate of 10-30% per year, (3) normal young and middle-age subjects carriers of known susceptibility genes for late-onset AD such as the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) E4 allele, and (4) as age is the main risk factor for AD, normal elderly individuals followed to the onset of MCI and AD. Overall, these studies show that the use of imaging for the early detection of AD is successful even in the earlier stages of disease when clinical symptoms are not fully expressed and the regional brain damage may be limited. PMID:16839732

  4. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer’s disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W.; Friedl, Karl E.; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid bio-markers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  5. A review of neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tinu; Sheelakumari, R; James, Jija S; Mathuranath, PS

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging biomarkers have potential role in the early diagnosis as well as periodic follow-up of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Structural imaging biomarkers can be used to predict those who are at risk or in preclinical stages of AD. It could possibly be useful even in predicting the conversion of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) an early stage of AD to AD. In addition there has been a lot of progress in molecular imaging in AD. This article presents a review of recent progress in selected imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis, classification, and progression, of AD. A comprehensive integrative strategy initiated early in the cognitive decline is perhaps the most effective method of controlling progression to Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25431627

  6. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  7. Mechanisms underlying sporadic cerebral small vessel disease: insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, JM; Smith, C; Dichgans, M

    2013-01-01

    The term “cerebral small vessel disease” (SVD) describes a range of neuroimaging, pathological and associated clinical features. The latter range from none, to discrete focal neurological symptoms (stroke), to insidious global neurological dysfunction and dementia. The public health burden is considerable. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. Although associated with vascular risk factors, and generally considered to result from an intrinsic cerebral arteriolar occlusive disease, the pathological processes leading to the arteriolar disease, how these result in brain disease, how SVD lesions contribute to neurological or cognitive symptoms and the relationship to risk factors, have been the subject of much speculation. Pathology often reflects end-stage disease making determination of the earliest stages difficult. Neuroimaging provides considerable insights: the small vessels are not easily seen themselves, but the effects of their malfunction on the brain can be tracked on detailed brain imaging. We review the growing evidence for the most likely mechanisms. PMID:23602162

  8. A review of β-amyloid neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Adlard, Paul A.; Tran, Bob A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Egan, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. As advancing age is the greatest risk factor for developing AD, the number of those afflicted is expected to increase markedly with the aging of the world's population. The inability to definitively diagnose AD until autopsy remains an impediment to establishing effective targeted treatments. Neuroimaging has enabled in vivo visualization of pathological changes in the brain associated with the disease, providing a greater understanding of its pathophysiological development and progression. However, neuroimaging biomarkers do not yet offer clear advantages over current clinical diagnostic criteria for them to be accepted into routine clinical use. Nonetheless, current insights from neuroimaging combined with the elucidation of biochemical and molecular processes in AD are informing the ongoing development of new imaging techniques and their application. Much of this research has been greatly assisted by the availability of transgenic mouse models of AD. In this review we summarize the main efforts of neuroimaging in AD in humans and in mouse models, with a specific focus on β-amyloid, and discuss the potential of new applications and novel approaches. PMID:25400539

  9. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease: preclinical challenges toward clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Derek; Hall, Benjamin M; Annapragada, Ananth; Pautler, Robia G

    2016-09-01

    The scope of this review focuses on recent applications in preclinical and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward accomplishing the goals of early detection and responses to therapy in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Driven by the outstanding efforts of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a truly invaluable resource, the initial use of MRI in AD imaging has been to assess changes in brain anatomy, specifically assessing brain shrinkage and regional changes in white matter tractography using diffusion tensor imaging. However, advances in MRI have led to multiple efforts toward imaging amyloid beta plaques first without and then with the use of MRI contrast agents. These technological advancements have met with limited success and are not yet appropriate for the clinic. Recent developments in molecular imaging inclusive of high-power liposomal-based MRI contrast agents as well as fluorine 19 ((19)F) MRI and manganese enhanced MRI have begun to propel promising advances toward not only plaque imaging but also using MRI to detect perturbations in subcellular processes occurring within the neuron. This review concludes with a discussion about the necessity for the development of novel preclinical models of AD that better recapitulate human AD for the imaging to truly be meaningful and for substantive progress to be made toward understanding and effectively treating AD. Furthermore, the continued support of outstanding programs such as ADNI as well as the development of novel molecular imaging agents and MRI fast scanning sequences will also be requisite to effectively translate preclinical findings to the clinic. PMID:27033146

  10. Neuroimaging findings in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C; Siddiqui, A

    2014-01-01

    At least 25% of individuals with sickle cell disease will have a neurological complication over their lifetime, often as early as in childhood. Neuroradiological findings in patients with sickle cell disease are common and include acute territorial infarction, silent ischaemia and intracranial haemorrhage. Imaging abnormalities are typically, but not always, manifestations of the underlying vasculopathy. Coexisting acute and chronic pathology may pose challenges to interpretation. PMID:24847772

  11. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis in Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Feng, Dagan D.

    2016-01-01

    The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD), is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC) to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed nine types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI, and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging. PMID:26941639

  12. The use of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Seth D; Shaw, Dennis W W; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L; Saneto, Russell P

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation of symptoms is suggestive of mitochondrial disease, neuroimaging features may be diagnostic and suggestive, can help direct further workup, and can help to further characterize the underlying brain abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging changes may be nonspecific, such as atrophy (both general and involving specific structures, such as cerebellum), more suggestive of particular disorders such as focal and often bilateral lesions confined to deep brain nuclei, or clearly characteristic of a given disorder such as stroke-like lesions that do not respect vascular boundaries in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS). White matter hyperintensities with or without associated gray matter involvement may also be observed. Across patients and discrete disease subtypes (e.g., MELAS, Leigh syndrome, etc.), patterns of these features are helpful for diagnosis. However, it is also true that marked variability in expression occurs in all mitochondrial disease subtypes, illustrative of the complexity of the disease process. The present review summarizes the role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis and characterization of patients with suspected mitochondrial disease. PMID:20818727

  13. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  14. Structural neuroimaging in Altheimer's disease: do white matter hyperintensities matter?

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Muraskin, Jordan; Zimmerman, Molly E

    2009-01-01

    The targeted brain dysfunction that accompanies aging can have a devastating effect on cognitive and intellectual abilities. A significant proportion of older adults experience precipitous cognitive decline that negatively impacts functional activities. Such individuals meet clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia, which is commonly attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has contributed significantly to our understanding of the morphological and pathology-related changes that may underlie normal and disease-associated cognitive change in aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are distributed patches of increased hyperintense signal on T2-weighted MRI, are among the most common structural neuroimaging findings in older adults. In recent years, WMH have emerged as robust radiological correlates of cognitive decline. Studies suggest that WMH distributed in anterior brain regions are related to decline in executive abilities that is typical of normal aging, whereas WMH distributed in more posterior brain regions are common in AD. Although epidemiological, observational, and pathological studies suggest that WMH may be ischemic in origin and caused by consistent or variable hypoperfusion, there is emerging evidence that they may also reflect vascular deposition of beta-amyloid, particularly when they are distributed in posterior areas and are present in patients with AD. Findings from the literature highlight the potential contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease to the pathogenesis of AD, and suggest a mechanistic interaction, but future longitudinal studies using multiple imaging modalities are required to fully understand the complex role of WMH in AD. PMID:19585953

  15. Structural Neuroimaging Markers of Cognitive Decline in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Monchi, Oury

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a major challenge since it has been established that 25 to 40% of patients will develop cognitive impairment early in the disease. Furthermore, it has been reported that up to 80% of Parkinsonian patients will eventually develop dementia. Thus, it is important to improve the diagnosing procedures in order to detect cognitive impairment at early stages of development and to delay as much as possible the developing of dementia. One major challenge is that patients with mild cognitive impairment exhibit measurable cognitive deficits according to recently established criteria, yet those deficits are not severe enough to interfere with daily living, hence being avoided by patients, and might be overseen by clinicians. Recent advances in neuroimaging brain analysis allowed the establishment of several anatomical markers that have the potential to be considered for early detection of cognitive impairment in Parkinsonian patients. This review aims to outline the neuroimaging possibilities in diagnosing cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease and to take into consideration the near-future possibilities of their implementation into clinical practice. PMID:27190672

  16. Neuroimaging studies of striatum in cognition part II: Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been established, from a classical akinetic-rigid movement disorder to a multi-system neurodegenerative disease. While the pathophysiology of PD is complex and goes much beyond the nigro-striatal degeneration, the striatum has been shown to be responsible for many cognitive functions. Patients with PD develop impairments in multiple cognitive domains and the PD model is probably the most extensively studied regarding striatum dysfunction and its influence on cognition. Up to 40% of PD patients present cognitive impairment even in the early stages of disease development. Thus, understanding the key patterns of striatum and connecting regions' influence on cognition will help develop more specific approaches to alleviate cognitive impairment and slow down its decline. This review focuses on the contribution of neuroimaging studies in understanding how striatum impairment affects cognition in PD. PMID:26500512

  17. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains chapters on neuroimaging. Included are the following chapters: diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke, position emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: clinical applications, and neuroradiologic work-up of brain tumors.

  18. Neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease: facts and fantasy.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Joel S; Norris, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    In this grand rounds, we focus on development, validation, and application of neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD). We cover whether such biomarkers can be used to identify presymptomatic individuals (probably yes), provide a measure of PD severity (in a limited fashion, but frequently done poorly), investigate pathophysiology of parkinsonian disorders (yes, if done carefully), play a role in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism (not well), and investigate pathology underlying cognitive impairment (yes, in conjunction with postmortem data). Along the way, we clarify several issues about definitions of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints. The goal of this lecture is to provide a basis for interpreting current literature and newly proposed clinical tools in PD. In the end, one should be able to critically distinguish fact from fantasy. PMID:25363872

  19. Multiple Effect of APOE Genotype on Clinical and Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across Alzheimer's Disease Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Liu, Yong; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    The apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) allele is the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for it remain controversial. We used the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database to examine the influence of APOE ε4 dose on clinical and neuroimaging biomarkers across the AD spectrum (from cognitive normal to AD patients with severe cognitive impairment). A total of 1718 participants from the ADNI cohort were selected, and we evaluated the impact of ε4 dose on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels' Abeta1-42 (Aβ1-42), tau, and phosphorylated-tau (p-tau); cortical amyloid deposition (Florbetapir-PET-AV45); brain atrophy (MRI); brain metabolism (FDG-PET); hippocampal metabolism; and cognitive declines, through different cognitive subgroups. We found that (1) ε4 was associated with decreased CSF beta-amyloid (Aβ1-42) and increased cerebral Aβ deposition across the AD spectrum; (2) increased CSF tau, P-tau and cerebral hypometabolism, hippocampal atrophy, and cognition decline were all associated with APOE ε4 in prodromal AD stage; (3) increased CSF tau, P-tau and cerebral hypometabolism appear to begin earlier than hippocampal atrophy and cognitive decline. We hypothesized that APOE ε4 increases cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in all the stages of AD development, and also influences Aβ-initiated cascade of downstream neurodegenerative effects, thereby increasing the risk of AD. PMID:26298664

  20. Current neuroimaging techniques in Alzheimer's disease and applications in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linda; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Chu, Leung-Wing; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung

    2012-01-01

    With Alzheimer’s disease (AD) quickly becoming the most costly disease to society, and with no disease-modifying treatment currently, prevention and early detection have become key points in AD research. Important features within this research focus on understanding disease pathology, as well as finding biomarkers that can act as early indicators and trackers of disease progression or potential treatment. With the advances in neuroimaging technology and the development of new imaging techniques, the search for cheap, noninvasive, sensitive biomarkers becomes more accessible. Modern neuroimaging techniques are able to cover most aspects of disease pathology, including visualization of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, cortical atrophy, neuronal loss, vascular damage, and changes in brain biochemistry. These methods can provide complementary information, resulting in an overall picture of AD. Additionally, applying neuroimaging to animal models of AD could bring about greater understanding in disease etiology and experimental treatments whilst remaining in vivo. In this review, we present the current neuroimaging techniques used in AD research in both their human and animal applications, and discuss how this fits in to the overall goal of understanding AD. PMID:23133824

  1. Neuroimaging and Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Addiction-Related Degenerative Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we describe how multimodal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  2. Relationships between cognitive performance, neuroimaging, and vascular disease: the DHS-Mind Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Raffield, Laura M.; Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Cox, Amanda; Xu, Jianzhao; Carr, J. Jeffery; Freedman, Barry I.; Maldjian, Joseph A.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases risk for cognitive decline and dementia; elevated burdens of vascular disease are hypothesized to contribute to this risk. These relationships were examined in the Diabetes Heart Study-Mind using a battery of cognitive tests, neuroimaging measures, and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden assessed by coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC). We hypothesized that CAC would attenuate the association between neuroimaging measures and cognition performance. Methods Associations were examined using marginal models in this family-based cohort of 572 European Americans from 263 families. All models were adjusted for age, gender, education, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension, with some neuroimaging measures additionally adjusted for intracranial volume. Results Higher total brain volume (TBV) was associated with better performance on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST) and Semantic Fluency (both p≤7.0 x 10−4). Higher gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with better performance on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and Semantic Fluency (both p≤9.0 x 10−4). Adjusting for CAC caused minimal changes to the results. Conclusions Relationships exist between neuroimaging measures and cognitive performance in a type 2 diabetes-enriched European American cohort. Associations were minimally attenuated after adjusting for subclinical CVD. Additional work is needed to understand how subclinical CVD burden interacts with other factors and impacts relationships between neuroimaging and cognitive testing measures. PMID:26185004

  3. A review of neuroimaging findings of apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Theleritis, Christos; Politis, Antonios; Siarkos, Kostas; Lyketsos, Costantine G

    2014-01-01

    Background Apathy is one of the most frequent ‘behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia’ (BPSD) encountered in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). There is a growing interest in the early diagnosis of apathetic elderly patients in the community since apathy has been associated with reduced daily functioning, caregiver distress, and poor outcome. The generalization of neuroimaging techniques might be able to offer help in this domain. Methods Within this context we conducted an extensive electronic search from the databases included in the National Library of Medicine as well as PsychInfo and Google Scholar for neuroimaging findings of apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease. Results Neuroimaging findings lend support to the notion that frontal-subcortical networks are involved in the occurrence of apathy in AD. Conclusions Longitudinal studies comparing patients and normal individuals might allow us to infer on the association between apathy and neurodegenerative diseases and what can brain imaging markers tell us about the characterization of this association, thus revealing disease patterns, helping to distinguish clinically distinct cognitive syndromes, and allowing predictions. PMID:24135083

  4. Aging, Neurodegenerative Disease, and Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25192426

  5. The Use of Neuroimaging in the Diagnosis of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Seth D.; Shaw, Dennis W. W.; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L.; Saneto, Russell P.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation…

  6. Correlations of clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features in Hirayama disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hong-Shiu; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chu, Chun-Che; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Lyu, Rong-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hirayama disease (HD) is characterized by development of asymmetric forearm muscle atrophy during adolescence with or without focal cervical spinal cord atrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation of clinical symptoms, disease progression, and electrophysiological findings with cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The medical records, cervical spine MRIs, and electrophysiological findings of 44 HD patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Denervation changes in any single C5 to C7 root-innervated muscle (deltoid, biceps, triceps, or extensor digitorum communis) occurred more frequently in the 25 patients with cord atrophy than the 19 patients without cord atrophy (88% vs 53%, P = 0.02). Onset age, duration of disease progression, neurological examinations, nerve conduction study, and electromyographic findings from individual muscles were similar between patient groups. Compared with HD patients without cord atrophy, HD patients with cord atrophy experience a more severe denervation change in C5 to C7 root-innervated muscles. PMID:27428223

  7. Effect of HMGCR genetic variation on neuroimaging biomarkers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become a considerable public health issue. The mechanisms underlying AD onset and progression remain largely unclear. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) is a strong functional AD candidate gene because it encodes part of the statin-binding domain of the enzyme, which serves as the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis in all mammalian cells. Here, we evaluated the potential role of HMGCR (rs3846662) in AD-related pathology by assessing neuroimaging biomarkers. We enrolled in 812 subjects from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. In general, it is possible that HMGCR (rs3846662) could be involved in preventing the atrophy of right entorhinal (P=0.03385) and left hippocampus (P=0.01839) in the follow-up research of two years. What's more, it lowered the drop rate of glucose metabolism in right temporal. We then further validated them in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. All the results in the MCI groups confirmed the association. The results of our study indicated that HMGCR (rs3846662) plays a vital role in AD pathology mainly by influencing brain structure and glucose metabolism during AD progression. PMID:26950278

  8. Multivariate and univariate neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Habeck, Christian; Foster, Norman L.; Perneczky, Robert; Kurz, Alexander; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Koeppe, Robert A.; Drzezga, Alexander; Stern, Yaakov

    2008-01-01

    We performed univariate and multivariate discriminant analysis of FDG-PET scans to evaluate their ability to identify Alzheimer’s disease (AD). FDG-PET scans came from two sources: 17 AD patients and 33 healthy elderly controls were scanned at the University of Michigan; 102 early AD patients and 20 healthy elderly controls were scanned at the Technical University of Munich, Germany. We selected a derivation sample of 20 AD patients and 20 healthy controls matched on age with the remainder divided into 5 replication samples. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic AD-markers and threshold criteria from the derivation sample were determined in the replication samples. Although both univariate and multivariate analyses produced markers with high classification accuracy in the derivation sample, the multivariate marker’s diagnostic performance in the replication samples was superior. Further, supplementary analysis showed its performance to be unaffected by the loss of key regions. Multivariate measures of AD utilize the covariance structure of imaging data and provide complementary, clinically relevant information that may be superior to univariate measures. PMID:18343688

  9. Structural neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, P H

    2001-06-01

    This paper reviews the use of imaging techniques to aid in the clinical diagnosis of dementia. Two approaches are distinguished. One is the exclusionary approach in which imaging is used to rule out diseases that would mimic or cause dementia; based on the literature, this approach yields very little, if any, information that was not identified clinically. The more positive approach uses imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify changes specific for causes of dementia; any assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will result in a reasonably high positive likelihood ratio distinguishing AD patients from non-demented individuals, but fails to distinguish AD patients from patients with other dementias. For a diagnosis of vascular dementia imaging is necessary, although not all vascular changes fulfill requirements of being relevant to dementia. Potentially of more importance, given the higher prevalence of AD, is the identification of concomitant vascular changes in AD that may be amenable to therapy, and may be used to identify subgroups. Structural and functional MRI techniques have great potential in identifying patients at risk for AD, which will allow for a very early treatment with drugs that slow or even halt progression. PMID:11442302

  10. Structural and functional neuroimaging in patients with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop various non-motor symptoms (NMS) during the course of the illness and psychosis is one of the common NMS of PD. Visual hallucinations (VH) are the most common manifestation of psychosis in PD. The exact pathogenesis of VH in patients with PD is not clearly understood. Presence of VH has been described to be associated with rapid cognitive decline and increased nursing home placements in PD patients. A large number of structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to understand the cerebral basis of VH in PD. Structural imaging studies (Voxel Based Morphometry) have reported grey matter atrophy in multiple regions of the brain such as primary visual cortex, visual association cortex, limbic regions, cholinergic structures such as pedunculopontine nucleus and substantia innominata, which conclude possible alterations of brain regions associated with functions such as visuospatial-perception, attention control and memory. Most functional neuroimaging studies (functional MRI, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computerized tomography) have reported altered activation, blood flow, or reduced metabolism in both dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which probably indicates an alteration in the normal bottom-top visual processing and the presence of an aberrant top-down visual processing. This review critically analyzes the published studies on the structural and functional neuroimaging in PD patients with VH. PMID:25920541

  11. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD. PMID:26402622

  12. Applied Neuroimaging to the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Multicriteria Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanini, Isabelle; de Castro, Ana Karoline; Pinheiro, Plácido Rogério; Pinheiro, Mirian Calíope Dantas

    In the last few years, Alzheimer's disease has been the most frequent cause of dementia and it is responsible, alone or in association with other diseases, for 50% of the cases in western countries. Dementias are syndromes characterized by a decline in memory and other neuropsychological changes, especially occurring in elderly people and increasing exponentially along the aging process. The main focus of this work is to develop a multicriteria model for aiding in decision making on the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by using the Aranau Tool, structured on the Verbal Decision Analysis. In this work, the modeling and evaluation processes were conducted with the aid of a medical expert, bibliographic sources and questionnaires. The questionnaires taken into account were based mainly on patients' neuroimaging tests, and we analyzed wheter or not there were problems in the patients' brain that could be relevant to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Diagnosis-Guided Method For Identifying Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Biomarkers Associated With Genetic Risk Factors In Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  14. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  15. Association between α-synuclein blood transcripts and early, neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Locascio, Joseph J; Eberly, Shirley; Liao, Zhixiang; Liu, Ganqiang; Hoesing, Ashley N; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Dhima, Kaltra; Hung, Albert Y; Flaherty, Alice W; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Hayes, Michael T; Wills, Anne-Marie; Shivraj Sohur, U; Mejia, Nicte I; Selkoe, Dennis J; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Dong, Xianjun; Marek, Ken; Zheng, Bin; Ivinson, Adrian; Hyman, Bradley T; Growdon, John H; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Ravina, Bernard; Scherzer, Clemens R

    2015-09-01

    There are no cures for neurodegenerative diseases and this is partially due to the difficulty of monitoring pathogenic molecules in patients during life. The Parkinson's disease gene α-synuclein (SNCA) is selectively expressed in blood cells and neurons. Here we show that SNCA transcripts in circulating blood cells are paradoxically reduced in early stage, untreated and dopamine transporter neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease in three independent regional, national, and international populations representing 500 cases and 363 controls and on three analogue and digital platforms with P < 0.0001 in meta-analysis. Individuals with SNCA transcripts in the lowest quartile of counts had an odds ratio for Parkinson's disease of 2.45 compared to individuals in the highest quartile. Disease-relevant transcript isoforms were low even near disease onset. Importantly, low SNCA transcript abundance predicted cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease during up to 5 years of longitudinal follow-up. This study reveals a consistent association of reduced SNCA transcripts in accessible peripheral blood and early-stage Parkinson's disease in 863 participants and suggests a clinical role as potential predictor of cognitive decline. Moreover, the three independent biobank cohorts provide a generally useful platform for rapidly validating any biological marker of this common disease. PMID:26220939

  16. Bilateral occipital calcification, epilepsy and coeliac disease: clinical and neuroimaging features of a new syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Magaudda, A; Dalla Bernardina, B; De Marco, P; Sfaello, Z; Longo, M; Colamaria, V; Daniele, O; Tortorella, G; Tata, M A; Di Perri, R

    1993-01-01

    Twenty patients affected by bilateral occipital cortical-subcortical calcification (BOC) are described, 19 (95%) had epilepsy. In 8 of 16 cases studied, intestinal biopsy revealed coeliac disease. Fourteen patients had occipital partial epilepsy with a relatively benign outcome, while 4 patients were affected by a severe form of epilepsy, with very frequent, drug-resistant, generalised and partial seizures with mental deterioration. One patient had a single episode of convulsive status epilepticus at four months of age. The neurological examination was normal in all patients. CT showed flocculo-nodular, cortico-subcortical BOC, without enhancement and without lobar or hemispheric atrophy. MRI was normal. The clinical and neuroimaging features of these patients are different therefore from those with the Sturge-Weber Syndrome. The study confirms a high prevalence of coliac disease in patients with BOC, but the relationship between these two pathologies still needs to be clarified. Images PMID:8350105

  17. Contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo; Pascual, Belén

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review, summarize and analyze recent findings relevant to the contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide accurate demonstration of the location and rate of progression of atrophic changes affecting the brain in AD and the different types of vascular lesions observed in mixed dementias and in pure VaD. Quantification of cortical thickness allows early diagnosis and rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. White matter involvement can also be quantified with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional methods including fMRI, functional connectivity, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Isotope-based techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) allow measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism using (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Cerebral blood flow can be measured using PET with H(2)(15)O or with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with technetium ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) or, more recently, arterial spin label (ASL) imaging. There are isotope markers for amyloid-beta ((11)O-PIB, (18)F-florbetapir), tau ((18)FDDNP) and activated microglia ((11)C-PK11195). Neuroimaging markers are particularly useful at the early symptomatic and preclinical asymptomatic phases of AD, as well as serving as endpoints in clinical trials. PMID:23142262

  18. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Perry, David C; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Scheltens, Nienke M E; Vogel, Jacob W; Kramer, Joel H; van der Vlies, Annelies E; La Joie, Renaud; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Grinberg, Lea T; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Huang, Eric J; van Berckel, Bart N M; Miller, Bruce L; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-09-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59

  19. Depression, anxiety, and apathy in Parkinson's disease: insights from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Wen, M-C; Chan, L L; Tan, L C S; Tan, E K

    2016-06-01

    Depression, anxiety and apathy are common mood disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) but their pathophysiology is unclear. Advanced neuroimaging has been increasingly used to unravel neural substrates linked to these disturbances. A systematic review is provided of neuroimaging findings in depression, anxiety and apathy in PD. A PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE search of peer-reviewed original research articles on these mood disturbances in PD identified 38 studies on depression, eight on anxiety and 14 on apathy in PD. Most of the imaging studies used either position emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography techniques. These studies generally suggest increased neural activity in the prefrontal regions and decreased functional connectivity between the prefrontal-limbic networks in depressed patients. Functional imaging studies revealed an inverse correlation between dopaminergic density in the caudate and putamen with the severity of anxiety in PD. There was no consistent correlation between dopaminergic density of thalamus and anxiety. Studies demonstrated both positive and inverse correlations between apathy and metabolism or activity in the striatum, amygdalar, prefrontal, temporal and parietal regions. The clinical variability of study subjects and differences in image pre-processing and analytical strategies may contribute to discrepant findings in these studies. Both nigrostriatal and extra-nigrostriatal pathways (in particular the frontal region and its connecting areas) are affected in mood disorders in PD. Identifying the relative contributions of these neural pathways in PD patients with overlapping motor and mood symptoms could provide new pathophysiological clues for the development of better therapeutic targets for affected patients. PMID:27141858

  20. Looking for Neuroimaging Markers in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Clinical Trials: A Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis Study in Granulin Disease.

    PubMed

    Premi, Enrico; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso; Diano, Matteo; Gazzina, Stefano; Gualeni, Vera; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Magoni, Mauro; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In light of future pharmacological interventions, neuroimaging markers able to assess the response to treatment would be crucial. In Granulin (GRN) disease, preclinical data will prompt pharmacological trials in the future. Two main points need to be assessed: (1) to identify target regions in different disease stages and (2) to determine the most accurate functional and structural neuroimaging index to be used. To this aim, we have taken advantage of the multivariate approach of multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to explore the information of brain activity patterns in a cohort of GRN Thr272fs carriers at different disease stages (14 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients and 17 asymptomatic carriers) and a group of 33 healthy controls. We studied structural changes by voxel-based morphometry (VBM), functional connectivity by assessing salience, default mode, fronto-parietal, dorsal attentional, executive networks, and local connectivity by regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF), fractional ALFF (fALFF), degree centrality, and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity. In FTD patients with GRN mutation, the most predictive measure was VBM structural analysis, while in asymptomatic carriers the best predictor marker was the local connectivity measure (fALFF). Altogether, all indexes demonstrated fronto-temporo-parietal damage in GRN pathology, with widespread structural damage of fronto-parietal and temporal regions when disease is overt. MVPA could be of aid in identifying the most accurate neuroimaging marker for clinical trials. This approach was able to identify both the target region and the best neuroimaging approach, which would be specific in the different disease stages. Further studies are needed to simultaneously integrate multimodal indexes in a classifier able to trace the disease progression moving from preclinical to clinical stage of the disease. PMID:26836150

  1. Examining the relationship between head trauma and neurodegenerative disease: A review of epidemiology, pathology and neuroimaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sundman, Mark H; Hall, Eric E; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are induced by sudden acceleration-deceleration and/or rotational forces acting on the brain. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) has been identified as one of the chief underlying causes of morbidity and mortality in head trauma incidents. DAIs refer to microscopic white matter (WM) injuries as a result of shearing forces that induce pathological and anatomical changes within the brain, which potentially contribute to significant impairments later in life. These microscopic injuries are often unidentifiable by the conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scans employed by emergency departments to initially assess head trauma patients and, as a result, TBIs are incredibly difficult to diagnose. The impairments associated with TBI may be caused by secondary mechanisms that are initiated at the moment of injury, but often have delayed clinical presentations that are difficult to assess due to the initial misdiagnosis. As a result, the true consequences of these head injuries may go unnoticed at the time of injury and for many years thereafter. The purpose of this review is to investigate these consequences of TBI and their potential link to neurodegenerative disease (ND). This review will summarize the current epidemiological findings, the pathological similarities, and new neuroimaging techniques that may help delineate the relationship between TBI and ND. Lastly, this review will discuss future directions and propose new methods to overcome the limitations that are currently impeding research progress. It is imperative that improved techniques are developed to adequately and retrospectively assess TBI history in patients that may have been previously undiagnosed in order to increase the validity and reliability across future epidemiological studies. The authors introduce a new surveillance tool (Retrospective Screening of Traumatic Brain Injury Questionnaire, RESTBI) to address this concern. PMID:25324979

  2. Initial treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    Initial treatment of early idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) begins with diagnosis based on clinical evaluation supplemented by laboratory studies and brain imaging to exclude causes of secondary parkinsonism. In most cases, testing is normal and the diagnosis of PD rests on clinical criteria. In patients with mild symptoms and signs, the diagnosis of PD may not initially be apparent, and follow-up evaluation is needed to arrive at a diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made, pharmacologic treatment may not be the first step. First, patient education is essential, especially because PD is a high-profile disease for which information and misinformation are readily available to patients and families. Counseling concerning prognosis, future symptoms, future disability, and treatment must be provided. Questions from patients concerning diet, lifestyle, and exercise are especially common at this point. The decision of when to initiate treatment is the next major consideration. Much controversy but relatively little light has been brought to bear on this issue. L-dopa was the first major antiparkinson medication to be introduced and remains the "gold standard" of treatment. Next in efficacy are the dopamine agonists (DAs). A debate has raged concerning whether initial dopaminergic treatment should be with L-dopa or DAs. Physicians have been concerned about forestalling the appearance of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations, whereas patients have incorrectly understood that L-dopa and possibly other antiparkinson drugs have a finite duration of usefulness, making it important to defer treatment for as long as possible. This has created "L-dopa phobia," which may stand in the way of useful treatment. In spite of this controversy, there is uniform agreement that the appropriate time to treat is when the patient is beginning to be disabled. This varies from patient to patient and depends on age, employment status, nature of job, level of physical activity, concern about

  3. Pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a mimicker of Lhermitte-Duclos disease in children: does neuroimaging help to differentiate them?

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Steinlin, Maja; Toelle, Sandra P; Beck, Jürgen; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings of children with pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis (PTHC) and Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) may be very similar. The differentiation between these entities, however, is important because their management and prognosis are different. We report on three children with PTHC. For all three children, in the acute situation, the differentiation between PTHC and LDD was challenging. A review of the literature shows that a detailed evaluation of conventional and neuroimaging data may help to differentiate between these two entities. A striated folial pattern, brainstem involvement, and prominent veins surrounding the thickened cerebellar foliae on susceptibility weighted imaging favor LDD, while post-contrast enhancement and an increased choline peak on (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest PTHC. PMID:26649682

  4. Clinical and neuroimaging differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease patients at an early disease stage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guoping; Wang, Jianqin; Feng, Zhan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yafei; He, Fangping; Chen, Zhongqin; Zhao, Kui; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinical and neuroimaging characteristics between posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (tAD) patients at an early disease stage, 16 PCA and 13 age-matched tAD patients were enrolled. Compared with tAD patients, PCA patients showed higher mean recognition and recall test scores, and lower mean calculation, spatial attention, shape discrimination, and writing test scores. Mean right hippocampal volume was larger in PCA patients compared with tAD patients, while cortical gray matter (GM) volume of bilateral parietal and occipital lobes was smaller in PCA patients. Further, when compared with tAD patients, significant hypometabolism was observed in bilateral parietal and occipital lobes, particularly the right occipitotemporal junction in PCA patients. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations in recognition and recall scores with hippocampal volumes. In PCA patients, calculation and visuospatial ability scores are positively associated with GM volume of parietal and occipital lobes. And only spatial attention and shape discrimination scores are positively associated with regional glucose metabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. Therefore, PCA patients display better recognition and recall scores, which are associated with larger hippocampal volumes and poorer performance in visual spatial tasks because of marked GM atrophy and hypometabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. PMID:27377199

  5. [Initial symptomatology of Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Fuhr, P; Maritz, D; Bernatik, J; Steck, A J

    1995-01-01

    The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (idiopathic parkinsonism) is important for two reasons. Some never drugs possibly have a neuroprotective effect, which can be utilized maximally only with early onset of treatment. Moreover, diagnostic mistakes may occur early in the course of the disease. Although the hallmark of Parkinson's disease is a syndrome of movement disorders, slight cognitive deficits, depression, or pain with or without paresthesias can be present at an early stage. Therefore, symptoms at the time of the first diagnosis and at the beginning of the first clinical manifestation of Parkinson's disease are often not identical. The diagnosis can be made only clinically, since no biological marker is available up to now. However, in unclear cases pharmacological tests constitute a valuable extension of the clinical examination. PMID:8533059

  6. Neuroimaging of scoliosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kim, F M; Poussaint, T Y; Barnes, P D

    1999-02-01

    A curvature abnormality may be the initial or major presenting feature in a child with disease of the spinal column or spinal neuraxis. A simplified classification of common spinal curvature abnormalities of childhood include idiopathic, congenital/dysraphic, skeletal dysplasia, neurofibromatosis, and painful. The great majority of childhood scoliosis falls into the idiopathic category. Atypical clinical or radiographic features in a presumed idiopathic scoliosis may indicate an otherwise occult tumor or hydrosyringomyelia, or may be a consequence of increasing curvature with disk protrusion, nerve impingement, or cord attenuation. Neuroimaging beyond plain films is commonly necessary for atypical idiopathic scoliosis and for the other categories of scoliosis listed. PMID:9974506

  7. The clinical value of large neuroimaging data sets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toga, Arthur W

    2012-02-01

    Rapid advances in neuroimaging and cyberinfrastructure technologies have brought explosive growth in the Web-based warehousing, availability, and accessibility of imaging data on a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders and conditions. There has been a prolific development and emergence of complex computational infrastructures that serve as repositories of databases and provide critical functionalities such as sophisticated image analysis algorithm pipelines and powerful three-dimensional visualization and statistical tools. The statistical and operational advantages of collaborative, distributed team science in the form of multisite consortia push this approach in a diverse range of population-based investigations. PMID:22284737

  8. Tensor-Based Morphometry as a Neuroimaging Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease: An MRI Study of 676 AD, MCI, and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D.; Parikshak, Neelroop; Lee, Suh; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    In one of the largest brain MRI studies to date, we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to create 3D maps of structural atrophy in 676 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly controls, scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Using inverse-consistent 3D non-linear elastic image registration, we warped 676 individual brain MRI volumes to a population mean geometric template. Jacobian determinant maps were created, revealing the 3D profile of local volumetric expansion and compression. We compared the anatomical distribution of atrophy in 165 AD patients (age: 75.6 ± 7.6 years), 330 MCI subjects (74.8 ± 7.5), and 181 controls (75.9 ± 5.1). Brain atrophy in selected regions-of-interest was correlated with clinical measurements - the sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR-SB), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the logical memory test scores - at voxel level followed by correction for multiple comparisons. Baseline temporal lobe atrophy correlated with current cognitive performance, future cognitive decline, and conversion from MCI to AD over the following year; it predicted future decline even in healthy subjects. Over half of the AD and MCI subjects carried the ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene, which increases risk for AD; they showed greater hippocampal and temporal lobe deficits than non-carriers. ApoE2 gene carriers - 1/6 of the normal group - showed reduced ventricular expansion, suggesting a protective effect. As an automated image analysis technique, TBM reveals 3D correlations between neuroimaging markers, genes, and future clinical changes, and is highly efficient for large-scale MRI studies. PMID:18691658

  9. The importance of combining MRI and large-scale digital histology in neuroimaging studies of brain connectivity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Annese, Jacopo

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues hindering a comprehensive connectivity model for the human brain is the difficulty in linking Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurements to anatomical evidence produced by histological methods. In vivo and postmortem neuroimaging methodologies are still largely incompatible in terms of sample size, scale, and resolution. To help bridge the hiatus between different approaches we have established a program that characterizes the brain of individual subjects, combining MRI with postmortem neuroanatomy. The direct correlation of MRI and histological features is possible, because registered images from different modalities represent the same regions in the same brain. Comparisons are also facilitated by large-scale, digital microscopy techniques that afford images of the whole-brain sections at cellular resolution. The goal is to create a neuroimaging catalog representative of discrete age groups and specific neurological conditions. Individually, the datasets allow for investigating the relationship between different modalities; combined, they provide sufficient predictive power to inform analyses and interpretations made in the context of non-invasive studies of brain connectivity and disease. PMID:22536182

  10. Effect of CLU genetic variants on cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging markers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease cohorts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The Clusterin (CLU) gene, also known as apolipoprotein J (ApoJ), is currently the third most associated late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) risk gene. However, little was known about the possible effect of CLU genetic variants on AD pathology in brain. Here, we evaluated the interaction between 7 CLU SNPs (covering 95% of genetic variations) and the role of CLU in β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, AD-related structure atrophy, abnormal glucose metabolism on neuroimaging and CSF markers to clarify the possible approach by that CLU impacts AD. Finally, four loci (rs11136000, rs1532278, rs2279590, rs7982) showed significant associations with the Aβ deposition at the baseline level while genotypes of rs9331888 (P = 0.042) increased Aβ deposition. Besides, rs9331888 was significantly associated with baseline volume of left hippocampus (P = 0.014). We then further validated the association with Aβ deposition in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. The results in sub-groups confirmed the association between CLU genotypes and Aβ deposition further. Our findings revealed that CLU genotypes could probably modulate the cerebral the Aβ loads on imaging and volume of hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that the biological effects of CLU may be relatively confined to neuroimaging trait and hence may offer clues to AD. PMID:27229352

  11. Prognostic serum miRNA biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease shows concordance with neuropsychological and neuroimaging assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Doecke, J D; Sharples, R A; Villemagne, V L; Fowler, C J; Rembach, A; Martins, R N; Rowe, C C; Macaulay, S L; Masters, C L; Hill, A F

    2015-10-01

    There is no consensus for a blood-based test for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Expression profiling of small non-coding RNA's, microRNA (miRNA), has revealed diagnostic potential in human diseases. Circulating miRNA are found in small vesicles known as exosomes within biological fluids such as human serum. The aim of this work was to determine a set of differential exosomal miRNA biomarkers between healthy and AD patients, which may aid in diagnosis. Using next-generation deep sequencing, we profiled exosomal miRNA from serum (N=49) collected from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study (AIBL). Sequencing results were validated using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; N=60), with predictions performed using the Random Forest method. Additional risk factors collected during the 4.5-year AIBL Study including clinical, medical and cognitive assessments, and amyloid neuroimaging with positron emission tomography were assessed. An AD-specific 16-miRNA signature was selected and adding established risk factors including age, sex and apolipoprotein ɛ4 (APOE ɛ4) allele status to the panel of deregulated miRNA resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 77%, respectively, for predicting AD. Furthermore, amyloid neuroimaging information for those healthy control subjects incorrectly classified with AD-suggested progression in these participants towards AD. These data suggest that an exosomal miRNA signature may have potential to be developed as a suitable peripheral screening tool for AD. PMID:25349172

  12. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    PubMed Central

    Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Breeze, Janis L.; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Hanke, Michael; Haselgrove, Christian; Helmer, Karl G.; Keator, David B.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Schwartz, Yannick; Ashburner, John; Kennedy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture (EDC) methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging. PMID:22493576

  13. Predicting beneficial effects of atomoxetine and citalopram on response inhibition in Parkinson's disease with clinical and neuroimaging measures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng; Rae, Charlotte L; Nombela, Cristina; Ham, Timothy; Rittman, Timothy; Jones, Peter Simon; Rodríguez, Patricia Vázquez; Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian; Regenthal, Ralf; Altena, Ellemarije; Housden, Charlotte R; Maxwell, Helen; Sahakian, Barbara J; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that selective noradrenergic (atomoxetine) and serotonergic (citalopram) reuptake inhibitors may improve response inhibition in selected patients with Parkinson's disease, restoring behavioral performance and brain activity. We reassessed the behavioral efficacy of these drugs in a larger cohort and developed predictive models to identify patient responders. We used a double-blind randomized three-way crossover design to investigate stopping efficiency in 34 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease after 40 mg atomoxetine, 30 mg citalopram, or placebo. Diffusion-weighted and functional imaging measured microstructural properties and regional brain activations, respectively. We confirmed that Parkinson's disease impairs response inhibition. Overall, drug effects on response inhibition varied substantially across patients at both behavioral and brain activity levels. We therefore built binary classifiers with leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) to predict patients' responses in terms of improved stopping efficiency. We identified two optimal models: (1) a "clinical" model that predicted the response of an individual patient with 77-79% accuracy for atomoxetine and citalopram, using clinically available information including age, cognitive status, and levodopa equivalent dose, and a simple diffusion-weighted imaging scan; and (2) a "mechanistic" model that explained the behavioral response with 85% accuracy for each drug, using drug-induced changes of brain activations in the striatum and presupplementary motor area from functional imaging. These data support growing evidence for the role of noradrenaline and serotonin in inhibitory control. Although noradrenergic and serotonergic drugs have highly variable effects in patients with Parkinson's disease, the individual patient's response to each drug can be predicted using a pattern of clinical and neuroimaging features. PMID:26757216

  14. Predicting beneficial effects of atomoxetine and citalopram on response inhibition in Parkinson's disease with clinical and neuroimaging measures

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Rae, Charlotte L.; Nombela, Cristina; Ham, Timothy; Rittman, Timothy; Jones, Peter Simon; Rodríguez, Patricia Vázquez; Coyle‐Gilchrist, Ian; Regenthal, Ralf; Altena, Ellemarije; Housden, Charlotte R.; Maxwell, Helen; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that selective noradrenergic (atomoxetine) and serotonergic (citalopram) reuptake inhibitors may improve response inhibition in selected patients with Parkinson's disease, restoring behavioral performance and brain activity. We reassessed the behavioral efficacy of these drugs in a larger cohort and developed predictive models to identify patient responders. We used a double‐blind randomized three‐way crossover design to investigate stopping efficiency in 34 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease after 40 mg atomoxetine, 30 mg citalopram, or placebo. Diffusion‐weighted and functional imaging measured microstructural properties and regional brain activations, respectively. We confirmed that Parkinson's disease impairs response inhibition. Overall, drug effects on response inhibition varied substantially across patients at both behavioral and brain activity levels. We therefore built binary classifiers with leave‐one‐out cross‐validation (LOOCV) to predict patients’ responses in terms of improved stopping efficiency. We identified two optimal models: (1) a “clinical” model that predicted the response of an individual patient with 77–79% accuracy for atomoxetine and citalopram, using clinically available information including age, cognitive status, and levodopa equivalent dose, and a simple diffusion‐weighted imaging scan; and (2) a “mechanistic” model that explained the behavioral response with 85% accuracy for each drug, using drug‐induced changes of brain activations in the striatum and presupplementary motor area from functional imaging. These data support growing evidence for the role of noradrenaline and serotonin in inhibitory control. Although noradrenergic and serotonergic drugs have highly variable effects in patients with Parkinson's disease, the individual patient's response to each drug can be predicted using a pattern of clinical and neuroimaging features. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1026–1037

  15. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:26012881

  16. Identification of disease-related spatial covariance patterns using neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Spetsieris, Phoebe; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Ko, Ji Hyun; Dhawan, Vijay; Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David

    2013-01-01

    The scaled subprofile model (SSM)(1-4) is a multivariate PCA-based algorithm that identifies major sources of variation in patient and control group brain image data while rejecting lesser components (Figure 1). Applied directly to voxel-by-voxel covariance data of steady-state multimodality images, an entire group image set can be reduced to a few significant linearly independent covariance patterns and corresponding subject scores. Each pattern, termed a group invariant subprofile (GIS), is an orthogonal principal component that represents a spatially distributed network of functionally interrelated brain regions. Large global mean scalar effects that can obscure smaller network-specific contributions are removed by the inherent logarithmic conversion and mean centering of the data(2,5,6). Subjects express each of these patterns to a variable degree represented by a simple scalar score that can correlate with independent clinical or psychometric descriptors(7,8). Using logistic regression analysis of subject scores (i.e. pattern expression values), linear coefficients can be derived to combine multiple principal components into single disease-related spatial covariance patterns, i.e. composite networks with improved discrimination of patients from healthy control subjects(5,6). Cross-validation within the derivation set can be performed using bootstrap resampling techniques(9). Forward validation is easily confirmed by direct score evaluation of the derived patterns in prospective datasets(10). Once validated, disease-related patterns can be used to score individual patients with respect to a fixed reference sample, often the set of healthy subjects that was used (with the disease group) in the original pattern derivation(11). These standardized values can in turn be used to assist in differential diagnosis(12,13) and to assess disease progression and treatment effects at the network level(7,14-16). We present an example of the application of this methodology to

  17. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  18. Evaluation of multi-modal, multi-site neuroimaging measures in Huntington's disease: Baseline results from the PADDINGTON study☆

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Nicola Z.; Cole, James H.; Farmer, Ruth E.; Rees, Elin M.; Crawford, Helen E.; Malone, Ian B.; Roos, Raymund A.C.; Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Durr, Alexandra; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Scahill, Rachael I.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Frost, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background Macro- and micro-structural neuroimaging measures provide valuable information on the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD) and are proposed as biomarkers. Despite theoretical advantages of microstructural measures in terms of sensitivity to pathology, there is little evidence directly comparing the two. Methods 40 controls and 61 early HD subjects underwent 3 T MRI (T1- and diffusion-weighted), as part of the PADDINGTON study. Macrostructural volumetrics were obtained for the whole brain, caudate, putamen, corpus callosum (CC) and ventricles. Microstructural diffusion metrics of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean-, radial- and axial-diffusivity (MD, RD, AD) were computed for white matter (WM), CC, caudate and putamen. Group differences were examined adjusting for age, gender and site. A formal comparison of effect sizes determined which modality and metrics provided a statistically significant advantage over others. Results Macrostructural measures showed decreased regional and global volume in HD (p < 0.001); except the ventricles which were enlarged (p < 0.01). In HD, FA was increased in the deep grey-matter structures (p < 0.001), and decreased in the WM (CC, p = 0.035; WM, p = 0.053); diffusivity metrics (MD, RD, AD) were increased for all brain regions (p < 0.001). The largest effect sizes were for putamen volume, caudate volume and putamen diffusivity (AD, RD and MD); each was significantly larger than those for all other metrics (p < 0.05). Conclusion The highest performing macro- and micro-structural metrics had similar sensitivity to HD pathology quantified via effect sizes. Region-of-interest may be more important than imaging modality, with deep grey-matter regions outperforming the CC and global measures, for both volume and diffusivity. FA appears to be relatively insensitive to disease effects. PMID:24179770

  19. A Pilot Study on Clinical and Neuroimaging Characteristics of Chinese Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Comparison with Typical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhihong; Cai, Li; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Shuling; Han, Tong; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yuying; Wang, Xinping; Gao, Shuo; Ji, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant impairment of higher visual functions. Neuroimaging and neuropathological studies show that PCA is probably an atypical presentation of Alzheimer’s disease. However, in China PCA has rarely been studied and remains largely unknown. Our study therefore aimed to analyze the clinical manifestations and patterns of cerebral atrophy, amyloid beta deposition and regional glucose metabolism in Chinese PCA patients, comparing them directly with those of typical Alzheimer’s disease (TAD). Seven PCA patients, 6 TAD patients and 5 controls underwent neuropsychological assessment, MRI scan, 11C-PIB PET scan and 18F-FDG PET scan. Cerebral atrophy including ventricular enlargement, posterior atrophy and medial temporal lobe atrophy were evaluated with MRI. The uptake of 11C-PIB was quantified at the voxel level using the standardized uptake value ratio. Comparisons of regional cerebral glucose metabolism were calculated with statistical parametric mapping. PCA patients showed significant impairment on visuospatial function in neuropsychological assessment. And PCA patients showed more severe posterior atrophy and less severe left medial temporal lobe atrophy compared with TAD patients. The data from 11C-PIB PET scanning showed that amyloid beta deposition in PCA was comparable to TAD. Moreover, in PCA the results from 18F-FDG PET scanning revealed significant hypometabolism in the temporoparietooccipital region and identified specific hypometabolism in the right occipital lobe, compared with TAD. Our study thus provides a preliminary view of PCA in Chinese patients. A further study with a larger number of subjects would be recommended to confirm these findings. PMID:26267071

  20. Clinical and neuroimaging features as diagnostic guides in neonatal neurology diseases with cerebellar involvement.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jessica L; Lemmon, Monica E; Northington, Frances J; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar abnormalities are encountered in a high number of neurological diseases that present in the neonatal period. These disorders can be categorized broadly as inherited (e.g. malformations, inborn errors of metabolism) or acquired (e.g. hemorrhages, infections, stroke). In some disorders such as Dandy-Walker malformation or Joubert syndrome, the main abnormalities are located within the cerebellum and brainstem. In other disorders such as Krabbe disease or sulfite oxidase deficiency, the main abnormalities are found within the supratentorial brain, but the cerebellar involvement may be helpful for diagnostic purposes. In In this article, we review neurological disorders with onset in the neonatal period and cerebellar involvement with a focus on how characterization of cerebellar involvement can facilitate accurate diagnosis and improved accuracy of neuro-functional prognosis. PMID:26770813

  1. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium. PMID:25111282

  2. Homocysteine and cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a biochemical, neuroimaging, and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Lage, Pablo Martínez; Sanchez-Mut, Jose; Lamet, Isabel; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Toledo, Jon B; García-Garcia, David; Clavero, Pedro; Samaranch, Lluis; Irurzun, Cecilia; Matsubara, Juan M; Irigoien, Jaione; Bescos, Emilia; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Obeso, Jose A

    2009-07-30

    The role of the plasma level of homocysteine (Hcy), as a primary outcome, and the effect of silent cerebrovascular lesions and genetic variants related to Hcy metabolism, as secondary outcomes, in the cognitive decline and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied. This case-control study focused on 89 PD patients of minimum 10 years of evolution and older than 60 years, who were neuropsychologically classified either as cognitively normal (n = 37), having mild cognitive impairment (Petersen criteria) (n = 22), or suffering from dementia (DSM-IV) (n = 30), compared with cognitively normal age-matched control subjects (n = 30). Plasma levels of Hcy, vitamins B12 and B6, folic acid, polymorphisms in genes related to Hcy metabolism (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, and CBS) and silent cerebrovascular events were analyzed. Plasma levels of Hcy were increased in PD patients (P = 0.0001). There were no differences between the groups of patients. The brain vascular burden was similar among PD groups. There was no association between polymorphisms in the studied genes and the Hcy plasma levels or cognitive status in PD patients. We found no evidence for a direct relationship between Hcy plasma levels and cognitive impairment and dementia in PD. No indirect effect through cerebrovascular disease or genetic background was found either. PMID:19452554

  3. Chagas disease: Central American initiative launched.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    An initiative to interrupt the transmission of Chagas disease in Central America was launched at a meeting held October 22-24, 1997, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Sponsored by the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), the meeting was attended by government delegates from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. The initiative was launched within the framework of Resolution 13 of the Meeting of Ministers of Health of the Central American Countries, held in Belize in September 1997. Detailed plans of activities were prepared for each country for the period 1998-2001, for approval by the various ministries of health, while operational, epidemiological, and entomological research priorities were also agreed upon. Research projects to help improve disease control will be sponsored by TDR. The first meeting of the Technical Intergovernment Commission established to meet annually to assess progress in control activities will occur in October 1998 in Guatemala. Vector and infection rate data are briefly presented on each country represented at the meeting. PMID:12348564

  4. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  5. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  6. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Dyster, Timothy G.; Mikell, Charles B.; Sheth, Sameer A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field’s history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  7. Clinical and neuroimaging differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical amnestic Alzheimer’s disease patients at an early disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guoping; Wang, Jianqin; Feng, Zhan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yafei; He, Fangping; Chen, Zhongqin; Zhao, Kui; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinical and neuroimaging characteristics between posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and typical amnestic Alzheimer’s disease (tAD) patients at an early disease stage, 16 PCA and 13 age-matched tAD patients were enrolled. Compared with tAD patients, PCA patients showed higher mean recognition and recall test scores, and lower mean calculation, spatial attention, shape discrimination, and writing test scores. Mean right hippocampal volume was larger in PCA patients compared with tAD patients, while cortical gray matter (GM) volume of bilateral parietal and occipital lobes was smaller in PCA patients. Further, when compared with tAD patients, significant hypometabolism was observed in bilateral parietal and occipital lobes, particularly the right occipitotemporal junction in PCA patients. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations in recognition and recall scores with hippocampal volumes. In PCA patients, calculation and visuospatial ability scores are positively associated with GM volume of parietal and occipital lobes. And only spatial attention and shape discrimination scores are positively associated with regional glucose metabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. Therefore, PCA patients display better recognition and recall scores, which are associated with larger hippocampal volumes and poorer performance in visual spatial tasks because of marked GM atrophy and hypometabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. PMID:27377199

  8. Advances in neuroimaging in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elizabeth; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and neuroanatomically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying genetic and pathological causes. Whilst initial neuroimaging studies highlighted the presence of frontal and temporal lobe atrophy or hypometabolism as the unifying feature in patients with FTD, more detailed studies have revealed diverse patterns across individuals, with variable frontal or temporal predominance, differing degrees of asymmetry, and the involvement of other cortical areas including the insula and cingulate, as well as subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus. Recent advances in novel imaging modalities including diffusion tensor imaging, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and molecular positron emission tomography imaging allow the possibility of investigating alterations in structural and functional connectivity and the visualisation of pathological protein deposition. This review will cover the major imaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, focusing on the key insights they have provided into FTD, including the onset and evolution of pathological changes and also importantly their utility as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. Validating neuroimaging biomarkers that are able to accomplish these tasks will be crucial for the ultimate goal of powering upcoming clinical trials by correctly stratifying patient enrolment and providing sensitive markers for evaluating the effects and efficacy of disease-modifying therapies. This review describes the key insights provided by research into the major neuroimaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, including what they tell us about the onset and evolution of FTD and how they may be used as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. This article is

  9. Initial Staging of Hodgkin’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin’s disease (HD). Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard. No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor). Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients. PMID:25121354

  10. Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Forell, Wibke; Kahaly, George J

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) plays an important role in the differential diagnosis and interdisciplinary management of patients with GO. Orbital imaging is required in unclear or asymmetric proptosis, in suspected optic neuropathy and prior to decompression surgery. Especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging show the actual objective morphological findings, quantitative MR imaging giving additional information concerning the acuteness or chronicity of the disease. Major morphological diagnostic criteria include a spindle like spreading of the rectus muscles without involvement of the tendon, a compression of the optic nerve in the orbital apex (crowded orbital apex syndrome) and the absence of any space occupying intraorbital process. A longer lasting course of the disease may lead to a corresponding impression of the lamina papyracae, the normally parallel configured medial wall of the orbit, similar to a spontaneous decompression. PMID:22632363

  11. Effect of CLU genetic variants on cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging markers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Morris, John C.; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Love, Marissa Natelson; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Wong, Terence Z.; Coleman, Edward; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Varma, Pradeep; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachisky, Irina; Trost, Dick; Kertesz, Andrew; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Weintraub, Sandra; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Kerwin, Diana; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Fletcher, Evan; Maillard, Pauline; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T -Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Burke, Anna; Trncic, Nadira; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Lin, Michael; Ravdin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Fargher, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    The Clusterin (CLU) gene, also known as apolipoprotein J (ApoJ), is currently the third most associated late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) risk gene. However, little was known about the possible effect of CLU genetic variants on AD pathology in brain. Here, we evaluated the interaction between 7 CLU SNPs (covering 95% of genetic variations) and the role of CLU in β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, AD-related structure atrophy, abnormal glucose metabolism on neuroimaging and CSF markers to clarify the possible approach by that CLU impacts AD. Finally, four loci (rs11136000, rs1532278, rs2279590, rs7982) showed significant associations with the Aβ deposition at the baseline level while genotypes of rs9331888 (P = 0.042) increased Aβ deposition. Besides, rs9331888 was significantly associated with baseline volume of left hippocampus (P = 0.014). We then further validated the association with Aβ deposition in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. The results in sub-groups confirmed the association between CLU genotypes and Aβ deposition further. Our findings revealed that CLU genotypes could probably modulate the cerebral the Aβ loads on imaging and volume of hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that the biological effects of CLU may be relatively confined to neuroimaging trait and hence may offer clues to AD. PMID:27229352

  12. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Designed for practicing neurologists and neurosurgeons, this reference focuses on the newest techniques in computed assisted tomography. Text material covers basic principles of computed tomography, as well as the clinical advantages and disadvantages of each modality. The anatomical and/or physiological processes measured by XCT, PET, SPECT and MRI are first discussed in terms of the normal patient, and then applied to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological disease (primarily of the brain). Emphasis is placed on areas of difficult diagnosis, such as differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis, early diagnosis of dementia, selection of patients for extracranial-intracranial bypass procedures, and localization of epileptic foci.

  13. Parkinson's disease: initial treatment of motor disorders.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterised by three main symptoms: slowness and paucity of movements, rigidity, and resting tremor. Rapid improvement in these symptoms after levodopa administration supports the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. It is important to inform the patient tactfully, allowing him or her to control the pace at which information on the diagnosis, symptoms and prognosis is conveyed. Patients with minimal discomfort or mild disability derive little benefit from drug therapy. Physiotherapy and physical exercises are sometimes useful. Previously untreated patients with marked functional impairment should receive medication. The choice is essentially between levodopa and ropinirole, and mainly depends on the patient's age. PMID:26417634

  14. Recurrent Kawasaki disease resistant to initial treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) is a disease of unknown etiology characterized by vasculitis which may affect the coronary arteries. Young children are most commonly affected although the disease has been described in adults. Kawasaki disease (KD) was first described by Dr Tomisaku Kawasaki in 1967. Since then, more cases have been reported worldwide, the majority being from Japan. We report on a 6-year-old child with recurrent attacks of Kawasaki disease which was initially resistant to the conventional treatment.

  15. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  16. Throat clicking as the initial symptom of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sanjay S; Morgan, John C; Glover, Andrea L; Sethi, Kapil D

    2005-10-01

    The presenting manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are variable, but a majority of patients note tremor as the initial symptom. Others complain of slowing of movements, loss of dexterity, fatigue, or changes in handwriting as initial symptoms. We describe a patient who developed an unusual clicking sound emanating from his throat as the initial manifestation of PD. PMID:16001408

  17. Neuroimaging of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Elliott, Mark A.; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Calkins, Monica E.; Hopson, Ryan; Jackson, Chad; Keefe, Jack; Riley, Marisa; Mensh, Frank D.; Sleiman, Patrick; Verma, Ragini; Davatzikos, Christos; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale, NIMH funded initiative to understand how brain maturation mediates cognitive development and vulnerability to psychiatric illness, and understand how genetics impacts this process. As part of this study, 1,445 adolescents ages 8–21 at enrollment underwent multimodal neuroimaging. Here, we highlight the conceptual basis for the effort, the study design, and measures available in the dataset. We focus on neuroimaging measures obtained, including T1-weighted structural neuroimaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling, functional imaging tasks of working memory and emotion identification, and resting state imaging of functional connectivity. Furthermore, we provide characteristics regarding the final sample acquired. Finally, we describe mechanisms in place for data sharing that will allow the PNC to become a freely available public resource to advance our understanding of normal and pathological brain development. PMID:23921101

  18. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  19. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient’s symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers. PMID:27547534

  20. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rui; Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Solsona, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient's symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers. PMID:27547534

  1. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  2. [Network analyses in neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Yamada, Makiko

    2013-06-01

    Neurons are anatomically and physiologically connected to each other, and these connections are involved in various neuronal functions. Multiple important neural networks involved in neurodegenerative diseases can be detected using network analyses in functional neuroimaging. First, the basic methods and theories of voxel-based network analyses, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and seed-based analysis, are described. Disease- and symptom-specific brain networks have been identified using glucose metabolism images in patients with Parkinson's disease. These networks enable us to objectively evaluate individual patients and serve as diagnostic tools as well as biomarkers for therapeutic interventions. Many functional MRI studies have shown that "hub" brain regions, such as the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, are deactivated by externally driven cognitive tasks; such brain regions form the "default mode network." Recent studies have shown that this default mode network is disrupted from the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with amyloid deposition in the brain. Some recent studies have shown that the default mode network is also impaired in Parkinson's disease, whereas other studies have shown inconsistent results. These incongruent results could be due to the heterogeneous pharmacological status, differences in mesocortical dopaminergic impairment status, and concomitant amyloid deposition. Future neuroimaging network analysis studies will reveal novel and interesting findings that will uncover the pathomechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23735528

  3. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  4. The Receiver Operational Characteristic for Binary Classification with Multiple Indices and Its Application to the Neuroimaging Study of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Li, Juan; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Protas, Hillary; Jagust, William; Fleisher, Adam; Reiman, Eric; Yao, Li; Chen, Kewei

    2014-01-01

    Given a single index, the receiver operational characteristic (ROC) curve analysis is routinely utilized for characterizing performances in distinguishing two conditions/groups in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Given the availability of multiple data sources (referred to as multi-indices), such as multimodal neuroimaging data sets, cognitive tests, and clinical ratings and genomic data in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies, the single-index-based ROC underutilizes all available information. For a long time, a number of algorithmic/analytic approaches combining multiple indices have been widely used to simultaneously incorporate multiple sources. In this study, we propose an alternative for combining multiple indices using logical operations, such as “AND,” “OR,” and “at least n” (where n is an integer), to construct multivariate ROC (multiV-ROC) and characterize the sensitivity and specificity statistically associated with the use of multiple indices. With and without the “leave-one-out” cross-validation, we used two data sets from AD studies to showcase the potentially increased sensitivity/specificity of the multiV-ROC in comparison to the single-index ROC and linear discriminant analysis (an analytic way of combining multi-indices). We conclude that, for the data sets we investigated, the proposed multiV-ROC approach is capable of providing a natural and practical alternative with improved classification accuracy as compared to univariate ROC and linear discriminant analysis. PMID:23702553

  5. PET neuroimaging studies of [(18)F]CABS13 in a double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Steven H; Holland, Jason P; Stephenson, Nickeisha A; Kassenbrock, Alina; Rotstein, Benjamin H; Daignault, Cory P; Lewis, Rebecca; Collier, Lee; Hooker, Jacob M; Vasdev, Neil

    2015-04-15

    Fluorine-18 labeled 2-fluoro-8-hydroxyquinoline ([(18)F]CABS13) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical based on a metal chelator developed to probe the "metal hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease". Herein, a practical radiosynthesis of [(18)F]CABS13 was achieved by radiofluorination followed by deprotection of an O-benzyloxymethyl group. Automated production and formulation of [(18)F]CABS13 resulted in 19 ± 5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to starting [(18)F]fluoride, with ≥95% chemical and radiochemical purities, and high specific activity (>2.5 Ci/μmol) within 80 min. Temporal PET neuroimaging studies were carried out in female transgenic B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN 1dE9)85Dbo/J (APP/PS1) and age-matched wild-type (WT) B6C3F1/J control mice at 3, 7, and 10 months of age. [(18)F]CABS13 showed an overall higher uptake and retention of radioactivity in the central nervous system of APP/PS1 mice versus WT mice with increasing age. However, PET/magnetic resonance imaging in normal nonhuman primates revealed that the tracer had low uptake in the brain and rapid formation of a hydrophilic radiometabolite. Identification of more metabolically stable (18)F-hydroxyquinolines that can be readily accessed by the radiochemical strategy presented herein is underway. PMID:25776827

  6. A review of neuroimaging studies of stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity: Emerging evidence for a brain-body pathway to coronary heart disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Gianaros, Peter J.; Sheu, Lei K.

    2009-01-01

    An individual's tendency to show exaggerated or otherwise dysregulated cardiovascular reactions to acute stressors has long been associated with increased risk for clinical and preclinical endpoints of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the ‘brain-body’ pathways that link stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactions to CHD risk remain uncertain. This review summarizes emerging neuroimaging research indicating that individual differences in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity (a particular form of cardiovascular reactivity) are associated with activation patterns in corticolimbic brain areas that are jointly involved in processing stressors and regulating the cardiovascular system. As supported empirically by activation likelihood estimates derived from a meta-analysis, these corticolimbic areas include divisions of the cingulate cortex, insula, and amygdala—as well as networked cortical and subcortical areas involved in mobilizing hemodynamic and metabolic support for stress-related behavioral responding. Contextually, the research reviewed here illustrates how behavioral medicine and health neuroscience methods can be integrated to help characterize the ‘brain-body’ pathways that mechanistically link stressful experiences with CHD risk. PMID:19410652

  7. Miniaturized optical neuroimaging in unrestrained animals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Senarathna, Janaka; Tyler, Betty M; Thakor, Nitish V; Pathak, Arvind P

    2015-06-01

    The confluence of technological advances in optics, miniaturized electronic components and the availability of ever increasing and affordable computational power have ushered in a new era in functional neuroimaging, namely, an era in which neuroimaging of cortical function in unrestrained and unanesthetized rodents has become a reality. Traditional optical neuroimaging required animals to be anesthetized and restrained. This greatly limited the kinds of experiments that could be performed in vivo. Now one can assess blood flow and oxygenation changes resulting from functional activity and image functional response in disease models such as stroke and seizure, and even conduct long-term imaging of tumor physiology, all without the confounding effects of anesthetics or animal restraints. These advances are shedding new light on mammalian brain organization and function, and helping to elucidate loss of this organization or 'dysfunction' in a wide array of central nervous system disease models. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the fabrication, characterization and application of miniaturized head-mounted optical neuroimaging systems pioneered by innovative investigators from a wide array of disciplines. We broadly classify these systems into those based on exogenous contrast agents, such as single- and two-photon microscopy systems; and those based on endogenous contrast mechanisms, such as multispectral or laser speckle contrast imaging systems. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches along with a perspective on the future of this exciting new frontier in neuroimaging. PMID:25791782

  8. [Textural research on the initiator of "new contracted warm disease"].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiang

    2011-05-01

    Most scholars of the contemporary age thought that WANG Ji was the initiator of "new contracted warm disease". But no evidence was found in Shang Han Xuan Lu to support the viewpoint. New contracted warm disease was not mentioned in the book, even without significant narratives. It is the wrong quotation of Shang Han Xuan Lu by HE Lianchen in his book Chong Ding Guang Wen Re Lun, which is the root cause of the incorrect viewpoint. Therefore, the wrong statement spread among scholars. Actually, GUO Yong had proposed the theory of "new contracted warm disease" in the Southern Song Dynasty. This wrong statement should be corrected. PMID:21781546

  9. The Relationship Between Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor: Review of Clinical, Epidemiologic, Genetic, Neuroimaging and Neuropathological Data, and Data on the Presence of Cardinal Signs of Parkinsonism in Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The possible relationship between essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been controversial since the first description of PD. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting an overlap between these two disorders. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between PD and ET, focusing on clinical, epidemiologic, genetic, neuroimaging, and neuropathological data, and the presence of cardinal parkinsonism symptoms in ET. Methods We conducted a PubMed search for articles published between 1966 and November 2011 regarding the relationship between ET and PD and the presence of postural tremor in PD patients; the presence of rest tremor, rigidity, and slowed movements in ET patients is reviewed. Results Clinical series, follow-up studies of ET patients, and case–control and genetic epidemiological studies indicate that ET is associated with increased risk for PD. Some neuroimaging studies and neuropathological reports suggest an association between the two diseases. ET patients show high prevalence of rest tremor, and at least seven studies described slowed movements (possibly related to cerebellar dysfunction and/or bradykinesia) in patients with ET. Discussion There is reasonable epidemiological and clinical evidence to support a link between ET and PD, although it is not clear what factors predict ET patient risk for developing PD or, more rarely, of PD patients developing ET. Future multicentric and multidisciplinary studies including epidemiological, clinical, neuroimaging, genetic, and neuropathological assessments are required to understand these associations. PMID:23439992

  10. The Road Ahead to Cure Alzheimer’s Disease: Development of Biological Markers and Neuroimaging Methods for Prevention Trials Across all Stages and Target Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cavedo, E.; Lista, S.; Khachaturian, Z.; Aisen, P.; Amouyel, P.; Herholz, K.; Jack, C.R.; Sperling, R.; Cummings, J.; Blennow, K.; O’Bryant, S.; Frisoni, G.B.; Khachaturian, A.; Kivipelto, M.; Klunk, W.; Broich, K.; Andrieu, S.; de Schotten, M. Thiebaut; Mangin, J.-F.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Johnson, K.; Teipel, S.; Drzezga, A.; Bokde, A.; Colliot, O.; Bakardjian, H.; Zetterberg, H.; Dubois, B.; Vellas, B.; Schneider, L.S.; Hampel, H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a slowly progressing non-linear dynamic brain disease in which pathophysiological abnormalities, detectable in vivo by biological markers, precede overt clinical symptoms by many years to decades. Use of these biomarkers for the detection of early and preclinical AD has become of central importance following publication of two international expert working group’s revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD, prodromal AD and preclinical AD. As a consequence of matured research evidence six AD biomarkers are sufficiently validated and partly qualified to be incorporated into operationalized clinical diagnostic criteria and use in primary and secondary prevention trials. These biomarkers fall into two molecular categories: biomarkers of amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation as well as of tau-protein related hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Three of the six gold-standard (“core feasible) biomarkers are neuroimaging measures and three are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes. CSF Aβ1-42 (Aβ1-42), also expressed as Aβ1-42 : Aβ1-40 ratio, T-tau, and P-tau Thr181 & Thr231 proteins have proven diagnostic accuracy and risk enhancement in prodromal MCI and AD dementia. Conversely, having all three biomarkers in the normal range rules out AD. Intermediate conditions require further patient follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at increasing field strength and resolution allows detecting the evolution of distinct types of structural and functional abnormality pattern throughout early to late AD stages. Anatomical or volumetric MRI is the most widely used technique and provides local and global measures of atrophy. The revised diagnostic criteria for “prodromal AD” and “mild cognitive impairment due to AD” include hippocampal atrophy (as the fourth validated biomarker), which is considered an indicator of regional neuronal injury. Advanced image analysis

  11. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  12. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  13. Introduction to neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    The author focuses on neuroradiology with emphasis on the current imaging modalities. There are chapters on angiography, myelography, nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The other chapters are dedicated to the spine, skull, head and neck, and pediatric neuroimaging.

  14. Neuroimaging and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Pliszka, Steve R.

    2005-01-01

    This review presents the most recent research concerning neuroimaging in developmental disabilities. Changes in structure and activation have been found in children with ADHD and learning disabilities, following intervention. For the children with learning disabilities changes in activation have been found following intensive behavioral and…

  15. Why we should study gait initiation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Tard, C; Defebvre, L

    2014-01-01

    The gait initiation process is of particular interest in Parkinson's disease because it combines motor and cognitive components of movement preparation (referred to as anticipatory postural adjustments) and movement execution (the step by itself). Moreover, gait initiation in Parkinson's disease is often affected by motor blocks (a subtype of the "freezing of gait" phenomenon). Gait initiation disturbances in Parkinson's disease include delayed release of anticipatory postural adjustments, hypokinetic anticipatory postural adjustments (reduced scaling) and bradykinetic anticipatory postural adjustments (abnormal timing). The most extreme form is freezing of gait with sometimes the absence of anticipatory postural adjustments. Other phenomena can be also described in some freezing patients (such as multiple anticipatory postural adjustments, described clinically as "knee trembling"). The fact that emotion, attention, external triggers and dopaminergic drugs can all modify this motor program suggests the existence of a complex pathophysiological mechanism that involves not only locomotor networks but also cortical areas and the basal ganglia system. Abnormal coupling between standing posture and anticipatory postural adjustments and between the latter and step execution appears to be a crucial part of the pathophysiological mechanism. Although external cueing appears to be of interest, few studies have provided evidence of the efficacy of various rehabilitation methods in routine care. PMID:24502907

  16. Tobacco-Related Disease Burden and Preventive Initiatives in China

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Bolin

    2011-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases in global health is a surging area of research. The Global Health Initiative at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute brings together investigators from developing countries with those from the developed world to study these diseases. In China, approximately 83 percent of all deaths in 2000 were attributed to chronic illnesses, which are the research focuses of the Chinese center of the Global Health Initiative. Tobacco use as well as passive smoking are modifiable risk factors in a large number of such chronic conditions. The prevalence of smoking in China is extensive and has inseparable ties to the economy, with tobacco taxes making up a large portion of government revenue in poorer provinces. Methods of smoking prevention have been piloted in some Chinese schools, which have mitigated the increase in smoking rate but have not resulted in a primary preventive effect. Efforts by the Yale Global Health Initiative and the Yale-China Association are bringing researchers together to address chronic disease in China as Yale School of Medicine enters its 200th year. PMID:21698050

  17. Structural neuroimaging correlates of cognitive status in older adults: A person-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B

    2016-08-01

    Person-oriented approaches to clinical research aim to uncover subgroups of patients with different patterns of clinically relevant variables. Such approaches, however, are not yet widely employed in clinical neuroimaging research. This paper demonstrates an accessible approach to person-oriented research using model-based clustering in high-dimensional structural neuroimaging data. Cortical thickness measurements for 369 older adults (182 women, 187 men) were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Model-based cluster analysis was performed on these imaging variables and then validated using variables that were not used in the clustering process. Variable selection identified two specific regions that contributed to cluster formation: the left and right entorhinal cortices. Two subgroups were uncovered: a "typical" cluster with higher entorhinal thickness (M=3.59mm, 95% confidence interval=3.57, 3.62), and an "atypical" cluster with relatively lower thickness (M=2.84mm, 95% confidence interval=2.75, 2.92). Members of the atypical cluster also had lower hippocampal volumes, memory scores, and executive function scores, and were also more likely to be clinically classified as cognitively impaired. These findings demonstrate the utility of model-based clustering of structural neuroimaging data in studies of ageing. The role of the entorhinal cortices in cluster formation is consistent with the known pathological substrate of Alzheimer's disease. The entorhinal cortices are implicated in the early genesis of the disease and atrophy of these regions is strongly associated with the cognitive phenotype. Overall, this approach can be readily applied to future neuroimaging investigations. PMID:27056675

  18. Smoking and Neuroimaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Hedy; DeLeone, Cameron M.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant public health concern, often resulting in nicotine dependence, a chronic-relapsing psychiatric diagnosis that is responsible for up to 10% of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Due to its significantly deleterious effects on health, much research has been dedicated to elucidating the underlying neurobiology of smoking. This brief article is intended to provide a digestible synopsis of the considerable research being conducted on the underlying neural bases of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence, especially for cardiologists who are often at the front lines of treating nicotine dependence. To this end, we first review some of the most common neuroimaging methodologies used in the study of smoking, as well as the most recent findings from this exciting area of research. Then, we focus on several fundamental topics including the acute pharmacological effects, acute neurocognitive effects, and the long-term neurobiological effects associated with smoking. We finally review recent findings regarding the neuropsychological processes associated with smoking cessation, including cue-induced craving and regulation of craving. Research in this field beginning to uncover how some of these neuropsychological processes are similar across clinical disorders which cardiologists also encounter frequently, such as craving for food resulting in overeating. We conclude with recommendations for future neuroimaging work on these topics. PMID:24432182

  19. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  20. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18-48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  1. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: a review of initiators and protective factors.

    PubMed

    Ellulu, Mohammed S; Patimah, Ismail; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Rahmat, Asmah; Abed, Yehia; Ali, Faisal

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a collective term comprising of a group of disorders of the heart and blood vessels. These diseases are the largest cause of morbidity and premature death worldwide. Coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease (stroke) are the most frequently occurring diseases. The two major initiators involved in the development of atherosclerotic CVD are vascular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid oxidation. In atherosclerosis development, ROS is associated with rapid loss of anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activities of the endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO(·)) resulting in endothelial dysfunction. In part involving activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, ROS have been involved in signaling cascades leading to vascular pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic gene expression. ROS is also a potent activator of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which indicate plaque destabilization and rupture. The second initiator involved in atherosclerotic CVD is the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Oxidation of LDL in vessel wall leads to an inflammatory cascade that activates atherogenic pathway leading to foam cell formation. The accumulation of foam cells leads to fatty streak formation, which is the earliest visible atherosclerotic lesion. In contrast, the cardiac sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) and hepatic apolipoprotein E (apoE) expression can improve cardiovascular function. SERCA2a regulates the cardiac contractile function by lowering cytoplasmic calcium levels during relaxation, and affecting NO(·) action in vascular cells, while apoE is a critical ligand in the plasma clearance of triglyceride- and cholesterol-rich lipoproteins. PMID:26750181

  2. [Functional neuroimaging of addiction].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography studies investigating dopamine release by drug or reward demonstrated blunted dopamine release in relation to addiction to psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. However, recent studies reported that nicotine and gambling addiction showed opposite results. Several factors such as illness stage or neurotoxicity of substances could be considered for this discrepancy. Behavioral addiction such as gambling disorder is a good target of neuroimaging because it is free from overt neurotoxicity. However, even in gambling disorder, the results of fMRI studies investigating neural response to reward are mixed. Neuroimaging together with taking the various backgrounds of patients into account should contribute not only to a better understanding of the neurobiology of addiction but also to the development of more effective and individually tailored treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:26394506

  3. Neuroimaging Study Designs, Computational Analyses and Data Provenance Using the LONI Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo; Lozev, Kamen; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Pierce, Jonathan; Zamanyan, Alen; Chakrapani, Shruthi; Van Horn, John; Parker, D. Stott; Magsipoc, Rico; Leung, Kelvin; Gutman, Boris; Woods, Roger; Toga, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Modern computational neuroscience employs diverse software tools and multidisciplinary expertise to analyze heterogeneous brain data. The classical problems of gathering meaningful data, fitting specific models, and discovering appropriate analysis and visualization tools give way to a new class of computational challenges—management of large and incongruous data, integration and interoperability of computational resources, and data provenance. We designed, implemented and validated a new paradigm for addressing these challenges in the neuroimaging field. Our solution is based on the LONI Pipeline environment [3], [4], a graphical workflow environment for constructing and executing complex data processing protocols. We developed study-design, database and visual language programming functionalities within the LONI Pipeline that enable the construction of complete, elaborate and robust graphical workflows for analyzing neuroimaging and other data. These workflows facilitate open sharing and communication of data and metadata, concrete processing protocols, result validation, and study replication among different investigators and research groups. The LONI Pipeline features include distributed grid-enabled infrastructure, virtualized execution environment, efficient integration, data provenance, validation and distribution of new computational tools, automated data format conversion, and an intuitive graphical user interface. We demonstrate the new LONI Pipeline features using large scale neuroimaging studies based on data from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping [5] and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [6]. User guides, forums, instructions and downloads of the LONI Pipeline environment are available at http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu. PMID:20927408

  4. Neuroimaging biomarkers for early drug development in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tregellas, Jason R

    2014-07-15

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits, and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rationale for the focus of this review, are that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks and they have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  5. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Early Drug Development in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tregellas, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rational for the focus of this review, is that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks, and have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  6. Psychiatric Symptoms in the Initial Motor Stage of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stanković, Iva; Stefanova, Elka; Tomić, Aleksandra; Lukić, Milica Ječmenica; Stojković, Tanja; Marković, Vladana; Stojmenović, Gorana Mandić; Kresojević, Nikola; Svetel, Marina; Kostić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to estimate the correlates of NPS in patients with PD in the initial motor stage of the disease (hemiparkinsonism). A total of 111 patients with PD and 105 healthy control participants were assessed. Patients with PD experienced apathy, depression, and anxiety more frequently compared with healthy controls. Sleep disturbances occurred commonly in early PD patients. Patients with PD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) had depression and anxiety more frequently, but not apathy, compared with patients with PD without MCI. The results of this study confirm a high burden of NPS even in the earliest motor stage of PD. PMID:26900739

  7. Systematic Redaction for Neuroimage Data

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matt; Schimke, Nakeisha; Kong, Liang; Macke, Stephen; Hale, John

    2013-01-01

    In neuroscience, collaboration and data sharing are undermined by concerns over the management of protected health information (PHI) and personal identifying information (PII) in neuroimage datasets. The HIPAA Privacy Rule mandates measures for the preservation of subject privacy in neuroimaging studies. Unfortunately for the researcher, the management of information privacy is a burdensome task. Wide scale data sharing of neuroimages is challenging for three primary reasons: (i) A dearth of tools to systematically expunge PHI/PII from neuroimage data sets, (ii) a facility for tracking patient identities in redacted datasets has not been produced, and (iii) a sanitization workflow remains conspicuously absent. This article describes the XNAT Redaction Toolkit—an integrated redaction workflow which extends a popular neuroimage data management toolkit to remove PHI/PII from neuroimages. Quickshear defacing is also presented as a complementary technique for deidentifying the image data itself. Together, these tools improve subject privacy through systematic removal of PII/PHI. PMID:24179597

  8. Neuroimaging of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly that based upon functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), has become a dominant tool in cognitive neuroscience. This review provides a personal and selective perspective on its past, present, and future. Two trends currently characterize the field that broadly reflect a pursuit of “where”- and “how”-type questions. The latter addresses basic mechanisms related to the expression of task-induced neural activity and is likely to be an increasingly important theme in the future. This trend entails an enhanced symbiosis among investigators pursuing similar questions in fields such as computational and theoretical neuroscience as well as through the detailed analysis of microcircuitry. PMID:18995825

  9. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  10. Acute Warfarin Toxicity as Initial Manifestation of Metastatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Nihar; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Near complete infiltration of the liver secondary to metastasis from the head and neck cancer is a rare occurrence. The prognosis of liver failure associated with malignant infiltration is extremely poor; the survival time of patients is extremely low. We present a case of acute warfarin toxicity as initial manifestation of metastatic liver disease. Our patient is a 64-year-old woman presenting with epigastric pain and discomfort, found to have unrecordable International Normalized Ratio. She rapidly deteriorated with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, profound shock requiring high dose vasopressor infusion, severe coagulopathy, worsening liver enzymes with worsening of lactic acidosis and severe metabolic abnormalities, and refractory to aggressive supportive care and died in less than 48 hours. Autopsy revealed that >90% of the liver was replaced by tumor masses. PMID:27042361

  11. [Neuroimaging of psychiatric and pedopsychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mana, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, imaging techniques have allowed to establish the cerebral neurophysiologic correlates of psychiatric disorders and have highlighted the impact of psychopathologic events, therapeutic drugs, addictions, on the growth and plasticity of brain. In this review, we intend to illustrate how neuroimaging has improved our knowledge of such alterations in brain maturation (schizophrenia, autistic disorders), fronto-limbic (depressive syndromes) or fronto-striatal (compulsive disorders) regions in psychiatric illnesses, but also in psychopharmacology, or pedopsychiatry. Statistically significant alterations in the structure and/or function of brain are detected in all psychiatric disorders and these are often detectable already during childhood or teenage. Furthermore, neuroimaging has allowed to underline the importance of cerebral networks specific to each disorder, but also to uncover those which are common to different diseases provided that they share common clinical or cognitive features. Besides their value in basic research, neuroimaging findings have been key in changing the perception that society has of these diseases which contributed to their therapeutic approach. PMID:21718649

  12. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  13. Provenance in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Van Horn, John D; Woods, Roger P; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2008-08-01

    Provenance, the description of the history of a set of data, has grown more important with the proliferation of research consortia-related efforts in neuroimaging. Knowledge about the origin and history of an image is crucial for establishing data and results quality; detailed information about how it was processed, including the specific software routines and operating systems that were used, is necessary for proper interpretation, high fidelity replication and re-use. We have drafted a mechanism for describing provenance in a simple and easy to use environment, alleviating the burden of documentation from the user while still providing a rich description of an image's provenance. This combination of ease of use and highly descriptive metadata should greatly facilitate the collection of provenance and subsequent sharing of data. PMID:18519166

  14. Neuroimaging in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, James D.; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Gelman, Rachel; Lee, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past three decades, there have been countless advances in imaging modalities that have revolutionized evaluation, management, and treatment of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Non-invasive approaches for early detection and monitoring of treatments have decreased morbidity and mortality. Understanding of basic methods of imaging techniques and choice of imaging modalities in cases encountered in neuro-ophthalmology clinic is critical for proper evaluation of patients. Two main imaging modalities that are often used are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, variations of these modalities and appropriate location of imaging must be considered in each clinical scenario. In this article, we review and summarize the best neuroimaging studies for specific neuro-ophthalmic indications and the diagnostic radiographic findings for important clinical entities. PMID:23961025

  15. STGP: Spatio-temporal Gaussian process models for longitudinal neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jung Won; Li, Yimei; Huang, Chao; Styner, Martin; Lin, Weili; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-07-01

    Longitudinal neuroimaging data plays an important role in mapping the neural developmental profile of major neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and normal brain. The development of such developmental maps is critical for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of many brain-related diseases. The aim of this paper is to develop a spatio-temporal Gaussian process (STGP) framework to accurately delineate the developmental trajectories of brain structure and function, while achieving better prediction by explicitly incorporating the spatial and temporal features of longitudinal neuroimaging data. Our STGP integrates a functional principal component model (FPCA) and a partition parametric space-time covariance model to capture the medium-to-large and small-to-medium spatio-temporal dependence structures, respectively. We develop a three-stage efficient estimation procedure as well as a predictive method based on a kriging technique. Two key novelties of STGP are that it can efficiently use a small number of parameters to capture complex non-stationary and non-separable spatio-temporal dependence structures and that it can accurately predict spatio-temporal changes. We illustrate STGP using simulated data sets and two real data analyses including longitudinal positron emission tomography data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and longitudinal lateral ventricle surface data from a longitudinal study of early brain development. PMID:27103140

  16. Schizophrenia, neuroimaging and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Zalesky, Andrew; Pantelis, Christos; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently characterized as a disorder of brain connectivity. Neuroimaging has played a central role in supporting this view, with nearly two decades of research providing abundant evidence of structural and functional connectivity abnormalities in the disorder. In recent years, our understanding of how schizophrenia affects brain networks has been greatly advanced by attempts to map the complete set of inter-regional interactions comprising the brain's intricate web of connectivity; i.e., the human connectome. Imaging connectomics refers to the use of neuroimaging techniques to generate these maps which, combined with the application of graph theoretic methods, has enabled relatively comprehensive mapping of brain network connectivity and topology in unprecedented detail. Here, we review the application of these techniques to the study of schizophrenia, focusing principally on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research, while drawing attention to key methodological issues in the field. The published findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a widespread and possibly context-independent functional connectivity deficit, upon which are superimposed more circumscribed, context-dependent alterations associated with transient states of hyper- and/or hypo-connectivity. In some cases, these changes in inter-regional functional coupling dynamics can be related to measures of intra-regional dysfunction. Topological disturbances of functional brain networks in schizophrenia point to reduced local network connectivity and modular structure, as well as increased global integration and network robustness. Some, but not all, of these functional abnormalities appear to have an anatomical basis, though the relationship between the two is complex. By comprehensively mapping connectomic disturbances in patients with schizophrenia across the entire brain, this work has provided important insights into the highly distributed character of neural

  17. International union against tuberculosis and lung disease (IUATLD): initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease.

    PubMed

    Becklake, M R

    1995-12-01

    IUATLD initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease developed in the late 1970s, coincident with improving tuberculosis control, and have targeted acute respiratory infections in children and chronic airways disease in adults and in children. The focus has been on methodology and the tools required to document the distribution and determinants of disease, and is illustrated in data gathered in African populations. Instruments developed include a simplified method of measuring bronchial hyper-reactivity and an asthma questionnaire Non-standard methods of questionnaire administration have also been validated, methods which are appropriate for use in the burgeoning urban communities and workforces of sub-Saharan Africa made up of rural migrants from different tribes and language groups. In addition, a review of reference values available for interpreting lung function in sub-Saharan African populations indicates a need to take into account a secular trend over the last two decades towards higher spirometric values. In the published data from Africa, not inconsiderable between-country differences are evident in the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults and of asthma in children. In addition, rates for childhood asthma were consistently higher in urban vs rural communities, with environmental factors playing an important role as well as being locally specific. Not only does the burden of morbidity attributable to both the chronic airway diseases reviewed justify past IUATLD initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease, but it also argues that future initiatives should focus on investigating between- and within-country differences using a standardized methodology, with a view to identifying local environmental determinants susceptible to intervention and control. Curbing tobacco use is clearly important, not only to benefit the health of adult smokers for whom the ill-health consequences have long been recognized, but, and more important, to protect the health of

  18. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury. PMID:23964217

  19. Recent Advances in Neuroimaging Biomarkers in Geriatric Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Khandai, Abhisek C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging, both structural and functional, serve as useful adjuncts to clinical assessment, and can provide objective, reliable means of assessing disease presence and process in the aging population. In the following review we briefly explain current imaging methodologies. Then, we analyze recent developments in developing neuroimaging biomarkers for two highly prevalent disorders in the elderly population- Alzheimer's disease (AD) and late-life depression (LLD). In AD, efforts are focused on early diagnosis through in vivo visualization of disease pathophysiology. In LLD, recent imaging evidence supports the role of white matter ischemic changes in the pathogenesis of depression in the elderly, the “vascular hypothesis.” Finally, we discuss potential roles for neuroimaging biomarkers in geriatric psychiatry in the future. PMID:23636984

  20. Human Neuroimaging as a “Big Data” Science

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has lead to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of “big data”. A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a mutifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociologial and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, “big data” can become “big” brain science. PMID:24113873

  1. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  2. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Fredrikson, Mats; Faria, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to evaluate neurofunctional and neurochemical alterations related to the generation and control of affect in patients with anxiety disorders are reviewed. We performed a meta-analysis of symptom provocation studies, where neural activity was measured using fMRI, PET or SPECT to test the hypothesis that prefrontal regions modulate amygdala activity. Data revealed that reactivity in the amygdala was enhanced in patients with phobia as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex was activated in concert with the amygdala, both in PTSD and in phobic states, suggesting a role in fear expression, rather than emotional control. Activity in emotion-regulating areas in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex including the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex was compromised in the symptomatic state in PTSD and phobic disorders, respectively. Increased amygdala reactivity was restored with psychological treatment. Treatment effects across different modalities including pharmacological and psychological interventions as well as with placebo regimens support that reduction of neural activity in the amygdala may be a final common pathway for successful therapeutic interventions irrespective of method, thereby linking neurotransmission to plasticity in a pivotal node of the core fear network of the brain. PMID:25225017

  3. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  4. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, FOA DP 13-001, initial review. In accordance with Section 10(a)(2... meeting will include the initial review, discussion, and evaluation of applications received in response to ``Prevalence and Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, FOA DP 13-001, initial review.''...

  5. PET neuroimaging studies of [18F]CABS13 in a double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Steven H.; Holland, Jason P.; Stephenson, Nickeisha A.; Kassenbrock, Alina; Rotstein, Benjamin H.; Daignault, Cory P.; Lewis, Rebecca; Collier, Lee; Hooker, Jacob M.; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labeled 2-fluoro-8-hydroxyquinoline ([18F]CABS13) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical based on a metal chelator developed to probe the “metal hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease”. Herein, a practical radiosynthesis of [18F]CABS13 was achieved by radiofluorination followed by deprotection of an O-benzyloxymethyl group. Automated production and formulation of [18F]CABS13 resulted in 19 ± 5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to starting [18F]fluoride, with ≥95% chemical and radiochemical purities, and high specific activity (>2.5 Ci/μmol) within 80 minutes. Temporal PET neuroimaging studies were carried out in female transgenic B6C3- Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J (APP/PS1) and age-matched wild-type (WT) B6C3F1/J control mice at 3, 7 and 10 months of age. [18F]CABS13 showed an overall higher uptake and retention of radioactivity in the central nervous system of APP/PS1 mice versus WT mice with increasing age. However, PET/magnetic resonance imaging in normal non-human primates revealed that the tracer had low uptake in the brain and rapid formation of a hydrophilic radiometabolite. Identification of more metabolically stable 18F-hydroxyquinolines that can be readily accessed by the radiochemical strategy presented herein is underway. PMID:25776827

  6. Hybrid MR-PET in Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Lá Fougere, C; Ernemann, U

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (MR-PET) is a novel technology with advantages over sequential MR and PET imaging, allowing maintain full individual diagnostic performance with negligible mutual interference between the two hardware settings. Obvious synergies between MR and PET in acquisition of anatomical, functional, and molecular information for neurological diseases into one single image pave the way for establishing clear clinical indications for hybrid MR-PET as well as addressing unmet neuroimaging needs in future clinics and research. Further developments in attenuation correction, quantification, workflow, and effective MR-PET data management might unfold the full potential of integrated multimodality imaging. PMID:26227618

  7. 78 FR 17412 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Diseases in Africa, FOA GH13-002, initial review. In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... and Evaluation of Programs for the Elimination and Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases in...

  8. 78 FR 24751 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Continuing Prospective Birth Cohort Study Involving Environmental Uranium Exposure in the Navajo Nation,...

  9. 77 FR 61756 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  10. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  11. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  12. 78 FR 37542 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  13. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  14. 77 FR 36544 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  15. 78 FR 60875 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  16. 78 FR 60877 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns...

  17. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Times and...

  18. 78 FR 57391 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Times and...

  19. Efficient, Distributed and Interactive Neuroimaging Data Analysis Using the LONI Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Van Horn, John D; Lozev, Kamen M; Magsipoc, Rico; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Mackenzie-Graham, Allan; Eggert, Paul; Parker, Douglas S; Toga, Arthur W

    2009-01-01

    The LONI Pipeline is a graphical environment for construction, validation and execution of advanced neuroimaging data analysis protocols (Rex et al., 2003). It enables automated data format conversion, allows Grid utilization, facilitates data provenance, and provides a significant library of computational tools. There are two main advantages of the LONI Pipeline over other graphical analysis workflow architectures. It is built as a distributed Grid computing environment and permits efficient tool integration, protocol validation and broad resource distribution. To integrate existing data and computational tools within the LONI Pipeline environment, no modification of the resources themselves is required. The LONI Pipeline provides several types of process submissions based on the underlying server hardware infrastructure. Only workflow instructions and references to data, executable scripts and binary instructions are stored within the LONI Pipeline environment. This makes it portable, computationally efficient, distributed and independent of the individual binary processes involved in pipeline data-analysis workflows. We have expanded the LONI Pipeline (V.4.2) to include server-to-server (peer-to-peer) communication and a 3-tier failover infrastructure (Grid hardware, Sun Grid Engine/Distributed Resource Management Application API middleware, and the Pipeline server). Additionally, the LONI Pipeline provides three layers of background-server executions for all users/sites/systems. These new LONI Pipeline features facilitate resource-interoperability, decentralized computing, construction and validation of efficient and robust neuroimaging data-analysis workflows. Using brain imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Mueller et al., 2005), we demonstrate integration of disparate resources, graphical construction of complex neuroimaging analysis protocols and distributed parallel computing. The LONI Pipeline, its features, specifications

  20. Efficient, Distributed and Interactive Neuroimaging Data Analysis Using the LONI Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Van Horn, John D.; Lozev, Kamen M.; Magsipoc, Rico; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Eggert, Paul; Parker, Douglas S.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    The LONI Pipeline is a graphical environment for construction, validation and execution of advanced neuroimaging data analysis protocols (Rex et al., 2003). It enables automated data format conversion, allows Grid utilization, facilitates data provenance, and provides a significant library of computational tools. There are two main advantages of the LONI Pipeline over other graphical analysis workflow architectures. It is built as a distributed Grid computing environment and permits efficient tool integration, protocol validation and broad resource distribution. To integrate existing data and computational tools within the LONI Pipeline environment, no modification of the resources themselves is required. The LONI Pipeline provides several types of process submissions based on the underlying server hardware infrastructure. Only workflow instructions and references to data, executable scripts and binary instructions are stored within the LONI Pipeline environment. This makes it portable, computationally efficient, distributed and independent of the individual binary processes involved in pipeline data-analysis workflows. We have expanded the LONI Pipeline (V.4.2) to include server-to-server (peer-to-peer) communication and a 3-tier failover infrastructure (Grid hardware, Sun Grid Engine/Distributed Resource Management Application API middleware, and the Pipeline server). Additionally, the LONI Pipeline provides three layers of background-server executions for all users/sites/systems. These new LONI Pipeline features facilitate resource-interoperability, decentralized computing, construction and validation of efficient and robust neuroimaging data-analysis workflows. Using brain imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Mueller et al., 2005), we demonstrate integration of disparate resources, graphical construction of complex neuroimaging analysis protocols and distributed parallel computing. The LONI Pipeline, its features, specifications

  1. High-dose thiamine as initial treatment for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Compagnoni, Laura; Colangeli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a systemic disease with motor and non-motor deficits. We recruited three patients with newly diagnosed PD. They were not under anti-Parkinson's therapy. Plasmatic thiamine was within healthy reference range. We performed the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and started a parenteral therapy with high doses of thiamine. The therapy led to a considerable improvement in the motor part of the UPDRS ranging from 31.3% to 77.3%. From this clinical observation, it is reasonable to infer that a focal, severe thiamine deficiency due to a dysfunction of thiamine metabolism could cause a selective neuronal damage in the centres that are typically hit in this disease. Injection of high doses of thiamine was effective in reversing the symptoms, suggesting that the abnormalities in thiamine-dependent processes could be overcome by diffusion-mediated transport at supranormal thiamine concentrations. PMID:23986125

  2. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  3. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. PMID:23933381

  4. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: A survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers, whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one’s career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training. PMID:24215451

  5. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine. PMID:19535562

  6. Dracunculiasis (Guinea Worm Disease) and the Eradication Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, Sandy; Muller, Ralph; Zagaria, Nevio

    2002-01-01

    Dracunculiasis, also known as guinea worm disease, is caused by the large female of the nematode Dracunculus medinensis, which emerges painfully and slowly from the skin, usually on the lower limbs. The disease can infect animals, and sustainable animal cycles occur in North America and Central Asia but do not act as reservoirs of human infection. The disease is endemic across the Sahel belt of Africa from Mauritania to Ethiopia, having been eliminated from Asia and some African countries. It has a significant socioeconomic impact because of the temporary disability that it causes. Dracunculiasis is exclusively caught from drinking water, usually from ponds. A campaign to eradicate the disease was launched in the 1980s and has made significant progress. The strategy of the campaign is discussed, including water supply, health education, case management, and vector control. Current issues including the integration of the campaign into primary health care and the mapping of cases by using geographic information systems are also considered. Finally, some lessons for other disease control and eradication programs are outlined. PMID:11932231

  7. [What happens in the brain of my patients? Neuroimaging and neurogenetics as ethical challenges in medicine].

    PubMed

    Synofzik, M

    2007-12-01

    Precise diagnosis of many neurological or psychiatric diseases has for long been one of the main problems in medicine. New diagnostic procedures like neuroimaging or neurogenetics seem now able to change thi situation but evoke new ethical questions. How should we cope with the fact that we may be able to diagnose and even predict diseases like schizophrenia or Alzheimer's Disease? How should we deal with incidental findings in neuroimaging? Can and should we use neuroimaging or neurogenetic procedures to detect certain behavioral dispositions? A new interdisciplinary research programme, called "neuroethics", can provide an ethical orientation for such questions. PMID:18050032

  8. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ..., initial review, published in the Federal Register on October 2, 2013 (FR Volume 78, Number 191, Page 60877... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This notice...

  9. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohns, Thomas J.; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Llewellyn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992–93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991–1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997–1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25–50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35–1.66) and 1.09 (0.76–1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20–1.19) and 1.12 (0.79–1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84–4.54) and 0.73 (0.47–1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with

  10. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Littlejohns, Thomas J; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E; Lang, Iain A; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H M; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Kuller, Lewis H; Langa, Kenneth M; Lopez, Oscar L; Llewellyn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992-93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991-1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997-1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25-50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35-1.66) and 1.09 (0.76-1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20-1.19) and 1.12 (0.79-1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84-4.54) and 0.73 (0.47-1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with the development of

  11. Initial studies on "six months disease" in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pyakural, S; Singh, N B

    1976-01-17

    Enterotoxaemia in sheep due to Clostridium welchii type D was indicated by field and laboratory investigations in Nepal. Morphological, cultural, biochemical, biological and toxin-producing characteristics observed were used to type the isolates. In anaerobic meat medium, all isolates produced pinkish discoloration of meat. All the strains fermented lactose, maltose, dextrose and sucrose whereas, salicine was fermented only by 17 strains. All but five strains were MR negative. Out of 200 isolated, 166 produced both alpha and epsilon toxins and the remaining 34 non-toxogenic strains are likely to be variants which have lost their toxogenicity. Epidemiologically the local name "Six months disease" and enterotoxaemia are considered to be identical diseases. PMID:176766

  12. 78 FR 60878 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Health Promotion... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Times And Dates 8...

  13. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Medicaid... 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  14. 77 FR 25485 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research Grants...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: DATES:...

  15. [Schizophrenia, cognition and neuroimaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Fakra, E; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2011-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex illness whose mechanisms are still largely unknown. Functional brain imaging, by making the link between psyche and brain, has recently become an indispensable tool to study in vivo the neural bases underlying cognitive dysfunction in this disease. But despite the proliferation of data coming from this approach, the exact impact of functional imaging on our understanding of the disease remains blurry. In general, studies of the brain functioning of patients with schizophrenia found activation abnormalities which vary in nature and localization depending of the cognitive paradigm used. However, it appears that neurofunctional abnormalities observed in patients cannot be reduced to a simple well-localized deficit. It would be rather an alteration of the dynamics of the interactions between different brain regions that underlie the cognitive disturbances encountered in the disease. Functional brain imaging now offers new perspectives to clarify the dynamics of the brain networks, and particularly those involved in high-level cognitive functions, such as cognitive control or social cognition which seem to play a crucial role in the disease. The characterization of these features is an important issue not only to develop new hypotheses on the pathophysiology of the disorder, but also more pragmatically to identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22212841

  16. Ileoileal intussusception as initial manifestation of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Tomassetti Fernández, E. M.; Lorenzo Rocha, N.; Arteaga González, I.; Carrillo Pallarés, A

    2006-01-01

    Intussusception is usually considered a childhood condition, but it may also be present in adults, where it is more often associated with an underlying pathology. There is no agreement upon the correct treatment of adult intussusception, although surgical intervention is considered necessary. Resection without prior reduction has been the traditional treatment of choice due to the significant risk for malignancy found in most series. We describe an unusual case of intestinal necrosis secondary to ileoileal intussusception caused by Crohn’s disease. A long intestinal resection was necessary and the patient was discharged without major complications. Based on the details of this case, the authors emphasize the potential importance of considering individualized treatment of adult intussusception. The practical benefit for reduction of viable bowel in Crohn′s patients is the preservation of bowel length. PMID:19529808

  17. The Role of Air Pollutants in Initiating Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Won; Park, Surim; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent episodes of severe air pollution in eastern Asia have been reported in the scientific literature and news media. Therefore, there is growing concern about the systemic effects of air pollution on human health. Along with the other well-known harmful effects of air pollution, recently, several animal models have provided strong evidence that air pollutants can induce liver toxicity and act to accelerate liver inflammation and steatosis. This review briefly describes examples where exposure to air pollutants was involved in liver toxicity, focusing on how particulate matter (PM) or carbon black (CB) may be translocated from lung to liver and what liver diseases are closely associated with these air pollutants. PMID:25071914

  18. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance. PMID:27021906

  19. Nanoparticles for neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, F.; Moresco, R.; Masserini, M.

    2012-02-01

    The advent of nanotechnology has introduced a variety of novel exciting possibilities into the medical and clinical field. Nanoparticles, ultra-small object sized between 100 and 1 nm, are promising diagnostic tools for various diseases among other devices, thanks to the possibility of their functionalization allowing the selective targeting of organs, tissues and cells and to facilitate their transport to primary target organs. However, brain targeting represents a still unresolved challenge due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells that prevents unwanted substances entering the central nervous system. We review a range of nanoparticles suitable for in vivo diagnostic imaging of neurodegenerative diseases and brain disorders, highlighting the possibility to potentially increase their efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting. We also review a range of imaging techniques with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities, their current status and future potential.

  20. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: Current trends

    PubMed Central

    WEINGARTEN, CAROL P.; STRAUMAN, TIMOTHY J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. Method We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. Results We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. Conclusions The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research. PMID:24527694

  1. Neuroimaging in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Stein, Joel; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Leukemias are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that results from uncontrolled neoplastic proliferation of undifferentiated or partially differentiated hematopoietic cells. Patients with acute leukemia can have a variety of craniocerebral complications, which can result from direct leukemic involvement, secondary to cerebrovascular or infectious complications of leukemia, or can be treatment related. Imaging plays a central role in evaluating the central nervous system during treatment in patients with leukemia. CT scan is usually considered an effective initial imaging modality to evaluate for cerebrovascular complications. MRI is considered the imaging modality of choice due to its versatility. PMID:27443999

  2. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Bradley R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques—such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy—allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development. PMID:23917850

  3. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:27154611

  4. Testing for association with multiple traits in generalized estimation equations, with application to neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Xu, Zhiyuan; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing need to develop and apply powerful statistical tests to detect multiple traits-single locus associations, as arising from neuroimaging genetics and other studies. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), in addition to genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), thousands of neuroimaging and neuropsychological phenotypes as intermediate phenotypes for Alzheimer's disease, have been collected. Although some classic methods like MANOVA and newly proposed methods may be applied, they have their own limitations. For example, MANOVA cannot be applied to binary and other discrete traits. In addition, the relationships among these methods are not well understood. Importantly, since these tests are not data adaptive, depending on the unknown association patterns among multiple traits and between multiple traits and a locus, these tests may or may not be powerful. In this paper we propose a class of data-adaptive weights and the corresponding weighted tests in the general framework of generalized estimation equations (GEE). A highly adaptive test is proposed to select the most powerful one from this class of the weighted tests so that it can maintain high power across a wide range of situations. Our proposed tests are applicable to various types of traits with or without covariates. Importantly, we also analytically show relationships among some existing and our proposed tests, indicating that many existing tests are special cases of our proposed tests. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare and contrast the power properties of various existing and our new methods. Finally, we applied the methods to an ADNI dataset to illustrate the performance of the methods. We conclude with the recommendation for the use of the GEE-based Score test and our proposed adaptive test for their high and complementary performance. PMID:24704269

  5. Impact of Common Variations in PLD3 on Neuroimaging Phenotypes in Non-demented Elders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Teng; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    Rare variants of phospholipase D3 (PLD3) have been identified as Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility loci, whereas little is known about the potential role of common variants in the progression of AD. To examine the impact of genetic variations in PLD3 on neuroimaging phenotypes in a large non-demented population. A total of 261 normal cognition (NC) and 456 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database are included in our analysis. Multiple linear regression models were applied to examine the association between four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs7249146, rs4490097, rs12151243, and rs10407447) with the florbetapir retention on florbetapir 18F amyloid positron emission tomography (AV45-PET), the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET), and regional volume on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and in the cohort study. We did not detect any significant associations of PLD3 SNPs with florbetapir retention on AV45-PET. In the analysis of FDG-PET, rs10407447 was associated with the CMRgl in the left angular gyrus and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex in the MCI group. Regarding the MRI analysis, rs10407447 was also associated with bilateral inferior lateral ventricle and lateral ventricle volume in MCI group. The main findings of our study provide evidence that support the possible role of PLD3 common variants in influencing AD-related neuroimaging phenotypes. Nevertheless, further work is necessary to explain the functional mechanisms of differences and confirm the causal variants. PMID:26232066

  6. 78 FR 15015 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ..., Prevention and Treatment of Influenza and other Respiratory Infections in Panama and Central America Region... Activities for Avian Influenza and other Zoonotic Diseases, FOA CK13-002, initial review. Correction:...

  7. Mechanisms of Cognitive Impairment in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Multimodal MRI Results from the St George's Cognition and Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew J.; Patel, Bhavini; Morris, Robin G.; MacKinnon, Andrew D.; Rich, Philip M.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115), and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50). On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD. PMID:23613774

  8. A transformation similarity constraint for groupwise nonlinear registration in longitudinal neuroimaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Greg M.; Gutman, Boris A.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Thompson, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders often show a similar spatial distribution of volume change throughout the brain over time, but this information is not yet used in registration algorithms to refine the quantification of change. Here, we develop a mathematical basis to incorporate that prior information into a longitudinal structural neuroimaging study. We modify the canonical minimization problem for non-linear registration to include a term that couples a collection of registrations together to enforce group similarity. More specifically, throughout the computation we maintain a group-level representation of the transformations and constrain updates to individual transformations to be similar to this representation. The derivations necessary to produce the Euler-Lagrange equations for the coupling term are presented and a gradient descent algorithm based on the formulation was implemented. We demonstrate using 57 longitudinal image pairs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) that longitudinal registration with such a groupwise coupling prior is more robust to noise in estimating change, suggesting such change maps may have several important applications.

  9. Neuroimaging in Animal Seizure Models with 18FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2011-01-01

    Small animal neuroimaging has become increasingly available to researchers, expanding the breadth of questions studied with these methods. Applying these noninvasive techniques to the open questions underlying epileptogenesis is no exception. A major advantage of small animal neuroimaging is its translational appeal. Studies can be well controlled and manipulated, examining the living brain in the animal before, during, and after the disease onset or disease treatment. The results can also be compared to data collected on human patients. Over the past decade, we and others have explored metabolic patterns in animal models of epilepsy to gain insight into the circuitry underlying development of the disease. In this paper, we provide technical details on how metabolic imaging that uses 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) is performed and explain the strengths and limitations of these studies. We will also highlight recent advances toward understanding epileptogenesis through small animal imaging. PMID:22937232

  10. 77 FR 29351 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns National HIV Behavioral Surveillance For Young Men...

  12. 76 FR 28790 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review.

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review. The meeting announced below concerns Affordable Care Act (ACA): Childhood Obesity...

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  16. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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  17. 77 FR 22326 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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  18. 76 FR 28790 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Health...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: A notice was published in...

  1. 78 FR 35035 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Identifying Modifiable Protective Factors for...

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  9. 77 FR 31358 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Special Interest Project (SIP): Evaluation of School...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity Building Assistance for High Impact...

  16. The Human Connectome Project's neuroimaging approach.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Matthew F; Smith, Stephen M; Marcus, Daniel S; Andersson, Jesper L R; Auerbach, Edward J; Behrens, Timothy E J; Coalson, Timothy S; Harms, Michael P; Jenkinson, Mark; Moeller, Steen; Robinson, Emma C; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David C

    2016-08-26

    Noninvasive human neuroimaging has yielded many discoveries about the brain. Numerous methodological advances have also occurred, though inertia has slowed their adoption. This paper presents an integrated approach to data acquisition, analysis and sharing that builds upon recent advances, particularly from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 'HCP-style' paradigm has seven core tenets: (i) collect multimodal imaging data from many subjects; (ii) acquire data at high spatial and temporal resolution; (iii) preprocess data to minimize distortions, blurring and temporal artifacts; (iv) represent data using the natural geometry of cortical and subcortical structures; (v) accurately align corresponding brain areas across subjects and studies; (vi) analyze data using neurobiologically accurate brain parcellations; and (vii) share published data via user-friendly databases. We illustrate the HCP-style paradigm using existing HCP data sets and provide guidance for future research. Widespread adoption of this paradigm should accelerate progress in understanding the brain in health and disease. PMID:27571196

  17. Nutrient intake and brain biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in at-risk cognitively normal individuals: a cross-sectional neuroimaging pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Lisa; Murray, John; Davies, Michelle; Williams, Schantel; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Spector, Nicole; Tsui, Wai H; Li, Yi; Butler, Tracy; Osorio, Ricardo S; Glodzik, Lidia; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; McHugh, Pauline; Marmar, Charles R; de Leon, Mony J

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence to suggest that diet, one of the most important modifiable environmental factors, may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examines the relationship between dietary nutrients and brain biomarkers of AD in cognitively normal individuals (NL) with and without AD risk factors. Design As part of an ongoing brain imaging study, participants received clinical and laboratory examinations, a neurocognitive test battery, positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB; a measure of amyloid-β (Aβ) load) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG; a proxy of neuronal activity), and completed semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Setting Research centre affiliated with the Alzheimer's disease Core Center at New York University School of Medicine. Participants 49 NL individuals (age 25–72 years, 69% women) with dietary information, 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET scans were examined. Results Controlling for age and total caloric intake, higher intake of vitamin B12, vitamin D and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) was associated with lower Aβ load in AD regions on PiB-PET, while higher intake of β-carotene and folate was associated with higher glucose metabolism on FDG-PET. β-carotene and folate were associated with reduced glucose metabolism for women, apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE4) carriers and participants with positive AD family history, but not for their risk-free counterparts. The associations of vitamin B12, vitamin D and ω-3 PUFA with PiB retention were independent of gender, APOE and family history. The identified nutrient combination was associated with higher intake of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fish and legumes, and lower intake of high-fat dairies, meat and sweets. Conclusions Our data provide a potential pathophysiological mechanism for epidemiological findings showing that dietary interventions may play a role in the prevention

  18. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  19. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE. PMID:25904047

  20. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB. PMID:24401535

  1. Neuroimaging Week: A Novel, Engaging, and Effective Curriculum for Teaching Neuroimaging to Junior Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downar, Jonathan; Krizova, Adriana; Ghaffar, Omar; Zaretsky, Ari

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neuroimaging techniques are increasingly important in psychiatric research and clinical practice, but few postgraduate psychiatry programs offer formal training in neuroimaging. To address this need, the authors developed a course to prepare psychiatric residents to use neuroimaging techniques effectively in independent practice.…

  2. Tinnitus: perspectives from human neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Langguth, Berthold; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of phantom sound in the absence of a corresponding external source. It is a highly prevalent disorder, and most cases are caused by cochlear injury that leads to peripheral deafferentation, which results in adaptive changes in the CNS. In this article we critically assess the recent neuroimaging studies in individuals with tinnitus that suggest that the disorder is accompanied by functional and structural brain abnormalities in distributed auditory and non-auditory brain regions. Moreover, we consider how the identification of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the different forms of tinnitus would benefit from larger studies, replication and comprehensive clinical assessment of patients. PMID:26373470

  3. [Relevance of neuroimaging findings for diagnoses and treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Konrad, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with a marked loss of brain volumes during the acute stage of the disease. Due to the advances in neuroimaging methods during the last years our understanding of the consequences of starvation and the etiology of eating disorders has increased considerably, however, still the clinical relevance of these findings is limited. Thus, some future perspectives of neuroimaging findings for diagnoses and treatment of anorexia nervosa are summarized in the current review. PMID:25594269

  4. A simple tool for neuroimaging data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Haselgrove, Christian; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kennedy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming increasingly common, but despite encouragement and facilitation by funding agencies, journals, and some research efforts, most neuroimaging data acquired today is still not shared due to political, financial, social, and technical barriers to sharing data that remain. In particular, technical solutions are few for researchers that are not a part of larger efforts with dedicated sharing infrastructures, and social barriers such as the time commitment required to share can keep data from becoming publicly available. We present a system for sharing neuroimaging data, designed to be simple to use and to provide benefit to the data provider. The system consists of a server at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and user tools for uploading data to the server. The primary design principle for the user tools is ease of use: the user identifies a directory containing Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data, provides their INCF Portal authentication, and provides identifiers for the subject and imaging session. The user tool anonymizes the data and sends it to the server. The server then runs quality control routines on the data, and the data and the quality control reports are made public. The user retains control of the data and may change the sharing policy as they need. The result is that in a few minutes of the user’s time, DICOM data can be anonymized and made publicly available, and an initial quality control assessment can be performed on the data. The system is currently functional, and user tools and access to the public image database are available at http://xnat.incf.org/. PMID:24904398

  5. Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Pope, Whitney B; Djoukhadar, Ibrahim; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is integral to the management of patients with brain tumors. Conventional structural imaging provides exquisite anatomic detail but remains limited in the evaluation of molecular characteristics of intracranial neoplasms. Quantitative and physiologic biomarkers derived from advanced imaging techniques have been increasingly utilized as problem-solving tools to identify glioma grade and assess response to therapy. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used in the clinical assessment of patients with gliomas and describes how novel imaging biomarkers have the potential to improve patient management. PMID:26948347

  6. The down syndrome biomarker initiative (DSBI) pilot: proof of concept for deep phenotyping of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers in down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Michael S.; Wishnek, Hannah; Brewer, James B.; Donohue, Michael C.; Ness, Seth; Mobley, William C.; Aisen, Paul S.; Rissman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    To gain further knowledge on the preclinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we sought to characterize cognitive performance, neuroimaging and plasma-based AD biomarkers in a cohort of non-demented adults with down syndrome (DS). The goal of the down syndrome biomarker Initiative (DSBI) pilot is to test feasibility of this approach for future multicenter studies. We enrolled 12 non-demented participants with DS between the ages of 30–60 years old. Participants underwent extensive cognitive testing, volumetric MRI, amyloid positron emission tomography (PET; 18F-florbetapir), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and retinal amyloid imaging. In addition, plasma beta-amyloid (Aβ) species were measured and Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping was performed. Results from our multimodal analysis suggest greater hippocampal atrophy with amyloid load. Additionally, we identified an inverse relationship between amyloid load and regional glucose metabolism. Cognitive and functional measures did not correlate with amyloid load in DS but did correlate with regional FDG PET measures. Biomarkers of AD can be readily studied in adults with DS as in other preclinical AD populations. Importantly, all subjects in this feasibility study were able to complete all test procedures. The data indicate that a large, multicenter longitudinal study is feasible to better understand the trajectories of AD biomarkers in this enriched population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02141971. PMID:26441570

  7. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  8. What's new in neuroimaging methods?

    PubMed Central

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid advancement of neuroimaging methodology and availability has transformed neuroscience research. The answers to many questions that we ask about how the brain is organized depend on the quality of data that we are able to obtain about the locations, dynamics, fluctuations, magnitudes, and types of brain activity and structural changes. In this review, an attempt is made to take a snapshot of the cutting edge of a small component of the very rapidly evolving field of neuroimaging. For each area covered, a brief context is provided along with a summary of a few of the current developments and issues. Then, several outstanding papers, published in the past year or so, are described, providing an example of the directions in which each area is progressing. The areas covered include functional MRI (fMRI), voxel based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), optical imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET). More detail is included on fMRI, as subsections include: functional MRI interpretation, new functional MRI contrasts, MRI technology, MRI paradigms and processing, and endogenous oscillations in functional MRI. PMID:19338512

  9. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report. PMID:25031630

  10. Neuroimaging and plasticity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent and highly heritable brain disorder that typically manifests around or after puberty and has a fluctuating course. Multiple lines of evidence point to a neurodevelopmental origin of the illness and suggest that its (post) pubertal manifestation is related to genetic and environmental risk factors that interfere with the structural and functional reorganization of neural networks at this time. Longitudinal structural neuroimaging studies point to a progressive reduction in gray matter volume in many brain regions in schizophrenia. It has been proposed that these neuroimaging observations reflect an enduring disturbance of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity arising from developmental abnormalities in key neural circuits implicated in schizophrenia, including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal formation. Recent work has identified genetic variants linked to neural plasticity that are associated with changes in these circuits. Furthermore, non-invasive interventions such as transcranial magnetic stimulation have been shown to impact some of these systems-level intermediate phenotypes, suggesting a modifiability of these core pathophysiological processes of schizophrenia that may be exploited by therapy. PMID:23902983

  11. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Presenting Initially as Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sameer; Lu, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare necrotizing vasculitis that can be progressive and fatal, and its initial presenting symptom may be leg claudication due to peripheral vascular ischemia. To date, there have been fewer than ten case reports of polyarteritis nodosa presenting as peripheral vascular disease. We report a case of a 38-year-old man initially diagnosed to have premature peripheral vascular disease who presented 1 year later with symptoms consistent with giant cell arteritis and subsequently developed bowel ischemia leading to a fatal outcome. Based on the autopsy and the patient’s clinical course, the final diagnosis was polyarteritis nodosa. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing polyarteritis nodosa and the importance of considering vasculitis in young patients presenting with atypical presentations of diseases such as peripheral vascular disease or giant cell arteritis. PMID:18560943

  12. Neuroimaging of Cognitive Load in Instructional Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature on cognitive load measurement in learning and neuroimaging, and describes a mapping between the main elements of cognitive load theory and findings in functional neuroanatomy. It is argued that these findings may lead to the improved measurement of cognitive load using neuroimaging. The paper describes how…

  13. Neuroimaging and Research into Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabourin, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques are becoming not only more and more sophisticated but are also coming to be increasingly accessible to researchers. One thing that one should take note of is the potential of neuroimaging research within second language acquisition (SLA) to contribute to issues pertaining to the plasticity of the adult brain and to general…

  14. Gene Interactions and Structural Brain Change in Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subjects Using the Pipeline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Zamanyan, Alen; Shi, Ran; Genco, Alex; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article investigates subjects aged 55 to 65 from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database to broaden our understanding of early-onset (EO) cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers. Methods Nine of the subjects had EO-AD (Alzheimer's disease) and 27 had EO-MCI (mild cognitive impairment). The 15 most important neuroimaging markers were extracted with the Global Shape Analysis (GSA) Pipeline workflow. The 20 most significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were chosen and were associated with specific neuroimaging biomarkers. Results We identified associations between the neuroimaging phenotypes and genotypes for a total of 36 subjects. Our results for all the subjects taken together showed the most significant associations between rs7718456 and L_hippocampus (volume), and between rs7718456 and R_hippocampus (volume). For the 27 MCI subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs6446443 and R_superior_frontal_gyrus (volume), and between rs17029131 and L_Precuneus (volume). For the nine AD subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs16964473 and L_rectus gyrus (surface area), and between rs12972537 and L_rectus_gyrus (surface area). Conclusion We observed significant correlations between the SNPs and the neuroimaging phenotypes in the 36 EO subjects in terms of neuroimaging genetics. However, larger sample sizes are needed to ensure that the effects will be detectable for a reasonable false-positive error rate using the GSA and Plink Pipeline workflows. PMID:25670955

  15. Persistence and compliance with newly initiated antihypertensive drug treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Viet Thanh; Moisan, Jocelyne; Kröger, Edeltraut; Langlois, Serge; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease initiating an antihypertensive drug (AH) treatment must persist and comply with it to slow disease progression and benefit from the reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objectives This study evaluates the persistence and compliance with AH treatment and identifies the associated factors among chronic kidney disease patients who initiated AH treatment. Methods A population-based cohort study using Quebec administrative data was conducted. Patients who still take any AH 1 year after initiation were considered persistent. Of these patients, those who had ≥80% of days covered with an AH in the year after initiation were considered compliant. Factors associated with persistence and compliance were identified using a modified Poisson regression. Results Of the 7,119 eligible patients, 78.8% were persistent, 87.7% of whom were compliant with their AH treatment. Compared with patients on diuretic monotherapy, those who initially used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor monotherapy, angiotensin II receptor blocker monotherapy, calcium channel blocker monotherapy, β-blocker monotherapy, or multidrug therapy were more likely to be persistent. In contrast, individuals who visited their physicians ≥17 times were less likely to be persistent than those who visited between 0 and 8 times. The patients who were more likely to be compliant had initially used an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, β-blocker, calcium channel blocker, or multitherapy as opposed to a diuretic. Conclusion A year after initiating AH treatment, nearly a third of chronic kidney disease patients were either not taking an AH or had not been compliant. Factors associated with persistence and compliance could help identify patients who need help in managing their AH treatment. PMID:27382260

  16. Bayesian Generalized Low Rank Regression Models for Neuroimaging Phenotypes and Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Khondker, Zakaria; Lu, Zhaohua; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Bayesian generalized low rank regression model (GLRR) for the analysis of both high-dimensional responses and covariates. This development is motivated by performing searches for associations between genetic variants and brain imaging phenotypes. GLRR integrates a low rank matrix to approximate the high-dimensional regression coefficient matrix of GLRR and a dynamic factor model to model the high-dimensional covariance matrix of brain imaging phenotypes. Local hypothesis testing is developed to identify significant covariates on high-dimensional responses. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. A simulation study is performed to evaluate the finite sample performance of GLRR and its comparison with several competing approaches. We apply GLRR to investigate the impact of 1,071 SNPs on top 40 genes reported by AlzGene database on the volumes of 93 regions of interest (ROI) obtained from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). PMID:25349462

  17. Failure-free survival after initial systemic treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Mary E. D.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Aki, Sahika Z.; Carpenter, Paul A.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Storer, Barry E.; Martin, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize failure-free survival (FFS) as a novel end point for clinical trials of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The study cohort included 400 consecutive patients who received initial systemic treatment of chronic GVHD at our center. FFS was defined by the absence of second-line treatment, nonrelapse mortality, and recurrent malignancy during initial treatment. The FFS rate was 68% at 6 months and 54% at 12 months after initial treatment. Multivariate analysis identified 4 risk factors associated with treatment failure: time interval <12 months from transplantation to initial treatment, patient age ≥60 years, severe involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, or lungs, and Karnofsky score <80% at initial treatment. Initial steroid doses and the type of initial treatment were not associated with risk of treatment failure. Lower steroid doses after 12 months of initial treatment were associated with long-term success in withdrawing all systemic treatment. FFS offers a potentially useful basis for interpreting results of initial treatment of chronic GVHD. Incorporation of steroid doses at 12 months would increase clinical benefit associated with the end point. Studies using FFS as the primary end point should measure changes in GVHD-related symptoms, activity, damage, and disability as secondary end points. PMID:24876566

  18. How can neuroimaging facilitate the diagnosis and stratification of patients with psychosis?

    PubMed Central

    Kempton, Matthew J.; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychosis are associated with improved outcome in terms of future functioning, symptoms and treatment response. Identifying neuroimaging biomarkers for illness onset and treatment response would lead to immediate clinical benefits. In this review we discuss if neuroimaging may be utilised to diagnose patients with psychosis, predict those who will develop the illness in those at high risk, and stratify patients. State-of-the-art developments in the field are critically examined including multicentre studies, longitudinal designs, multimodal imaging and machine learning as well as some of the challenges in utilising future neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical trials. As many of these developments are already being applied in neuroimaging studies of Alzheimer׳s disease, we discuss what lessons have been learned from this field and how they may be applied to research in psychosis. PMID:25092428

  19. CATI: A Large Distributed Infrastructure for the Neuroimaging of Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Operto, Grégory; Chupin, Marie; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Habert, Marie-Odile; Colliot, Olivier; Benali, Habib; Poupon, Cyril; Champseix, Catherine; Delmaire, Christine; Marie, Sullivan; Rivière, Denis; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Trebossen, Régine; Bottlaender, Michel; Frouin, Vincent; Grigis, Antoine; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Dary, Hugo; Fillon, Ludovic; Azouani, Chabha; Bouyahia, Ali; Fischer, Clara; Edward, Lydie; Bouin, Mathilde; Thoprakarn, Urielle; Li, Jinpeng; Makkaoui, Leila; Poret, Sylvain; Dufouil, Carole; Bouteloup, Vincent; Chételat, Gaël; Dubois, Bruno; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Mangin, Jean-François; Cointepas, Yann

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of CATI, a platform dedicated to multicenter neuroimaging. Initiated by the French Alzheimer's plan (2008-2012), CATI is a research project called on to provide service to other projects like an industrial partner. Its core mission is to support the neuroimaging of large populations, providing concrete solutions to the increasing complexity involved in such projects by bringing together a service infrastructure, the know-how of its expert academic teams and a large-scale, harmonized network of imaging facilities. CATI aims to make data sharing across studies easier and promotes sharing as much as possible. In the last 4 years, CATI has assisted the clinical community by taking charge of 35 projects so far and has emerged as a recognized actor at the national and international levels. PMID:27066973

  20. Dietary patterns are associated with disease risk among participants in the women's health initiative observational study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women. A nested case-control study tested whether dietary patterns predicted CHD events among 1224 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative-Observational Study (WHI-OS) with centrally confirmed CHD, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infar...

  1. 78 FR 9055 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ..., Prevention and Treatment of Influenza and other Respiratory Infections in Panama and Central America Region... Activities for Avian Influenza and other Zoonotic Diseases, FOA CK13-002, initial review. In accordance with... received in response to ``Epidemiology, Prevention and Treatment of Influenza and other...

  2. Functional neuroimaging of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Roberto; St Jacques, Peggy

    2007-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of autobiographical memory have grown dramatically in recent years. These studies are important because they can investigate the neural correlates of processes that are difficult to study using laboratory stimuli, including: (i) complex constructive processes, (ii) recollective qualities of emotion and vividness, and (iii) remote memory retrieval. Constructing autobiographical memories involves search, monitoring and self-referential processes that are associated with activity in separable prefrontal regions. The contributions of emotion and vividness have been linked to the amygdala and visual cortex respectively. Finally, there is evidence that recent and remote autobiographical memories might activate the hippocampus equally, which has implications for memory-consolidation theories. The rapid development of innovative methods for eliciting personal memories in the scanner provides the opportunity to delve into the functional neuroanatomy of our personal past. PMID:17382578

  3. Analysis of residual disease following preoperative radiotherapy versus initial surgery in endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.A.; Nahhas, W.A.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.

    1982-02-01

    A clinicopathologic study of residual disease following pre-operative radiotherapy (RT) in 67 patients and initial surgery in 40 patients with early invasive endometrial carcinoma is presented. In 10%, extrauterine spread was found at operation. In 10% of patients, the histologic type, and in 19% the grade of tumor, differed between the curettage and hysterectomy specimens. Pre-op RT altered the depth of myometrial invasion and frequency of vascular invasion, but there was no evidence that irradiation itself affected the histologic type or grade of tumor. The patients with residual tumor after pre-op RT had significantly more cancer-related deaths than those without residual disease. The high risk factors were deep myometrial invasion and residual disease outside the uterus. Vascular invasion did not affect the prognosis in this series. The importance of surgical-pathologic staging by initial surgery is discussed.

  4. Neuroimaging studies of word reading

    PubMed Central

    Fiez, Julie A.; Petersen, Steven E.

    1998-01-01

    This review discusses how neuroimaging can contribute to our understanding of a fundamental aspect of skilled reading: the ability to pronounce a visually presented word. One contribution of neuroimaging is that it provides a tool for localizing brain regions that are active during word reading. To assess the extent to which similar results are obtained across studies, a quantitative review of nine neuroimaging investigations of word reading was conducted. Across these studies, the results converge to reveal a set of areas active during word reading, including left-lateralized regions in occipital and occipitotemporal cortex, the left frontal operculum, bilateral regions within the cerebellum, primary motor cortex, and the superior and middle temporal cortex, and medial regions in the supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate. Beyond localization, the challenge is to use neuroimaging as a tool for understanding how reading is accomplished. Central to this challenge will be the integration of neuroimaging results with information from other methodologies. To illustrate this point, this review will highlight the importance of spelling-to-sound consistency in the transformation from orthographic (word form) to phonological (word sound) representations, and then explore results from three neuroimaging studies in which the spelling-to-sound consistency of the stimuli was deliberately varied. Emphasis is placed on the pattern of activation observed within the left frontal cortex, because the results provide an example of the issues and benefits involved in relating neuroimaging results to behavioral results in normal and brain damaged subjects, and to theoretical models of reading. PMID:9448259

  5. Visual Attention and the Neuroimage Bias

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D. A.; Schweitzer, N. J.; Risko, Evan F.; Ware, Jillian M.

    2013-01-01

    Several highly-cited experiments have presented evidence suggesting that neuroimages may unduly bias laypeople’s judgments of scientific research. This finding has been especially worrisome to the legal community in which neuroimage techniques may be used to produce evidence of a person’s mental state. However, a more recent body of work that has looked directly at the independent impact of neuroimages on layperson decision-making (both in legal and more general arenas), and has failed to find evidence of bias. To help resolve these conflicting findings, this research uses eye tracking technology to provide a measure of attention to different visual representations of neuroscientific data. Finding an effect of neuroimages on the distribution of attention would provide a potential mechanism for the influence of neuroimages on higher-level decisions. In the present experiment, a sample of laypeople viewed a vignette that briefly described a court case in which the defendant’s actions might have been explained by a neurological defect. Accompanying these vignettes was either an MRI image of the defendant’s brain, or a bar graph depicting levels of brain activity–two competing visualizations that have been the focus of much of the previous research on the neuroimage bias. We found that, while laypeople differentially attended to neuroimagery relative to the bar graph, this did not translate into differential judgments in a way that would support the idea of a neuroimage bias. PMID:24040251

  6. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  7. Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative model of drug development for neglected diseases: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ioset, Jean-Robert; Chang, Shing

    2011-09-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a patients' needs-driven organization committed to the development of new treatments for neglected diseases. Created in 2003, DNDi has delivered four improved treatments for malaria, sleeping sickness and visceral leishmaniasis. A main DNDi challenge is to build a solid R&D portfolio for neglected diseases and to deliver preclinical candidates in a timely manner using an original model based on partnership. To address this challenge DNDi has remodeled its discovery activities from a project-based academic-bound network to a fully integrated process-oriented platform in close collaboration with pharmaceutical companies. This discovery platform relies on dedicated screening capacity and lead-optimization consortia supported by a pragmatic, structured and pharmaceutical-focused compound sourcing strategy. PMID:21879842

  8. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27443108

  9. Defining the neurocircuitry of borderline personality disorder: functional neuroimaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Gary R; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David A

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging recently has been used to localize brain dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Initial studies have examined baseline activity or emotional reactivity, and our group has investigated what we consider to be a crucial interaction between negative emotion and behavioral (dys)control. This research is beginning to identify abnormal frontolimbic circuitry likely underlying core clinical features of this condition. We review the evidence for dysfunction in specific frontolimbic regions, leading to a mechanistic model of symptom formation in BPD. In addition, we offer an integration of these neuroimaging findings with developmental perspectives on the emergence of borderline psychopathology, focusing on the ways in which early psychosocial experience may interact with developing brain systems. We also consider possible mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change at the neural systems level in BPD. Finally, we propose that future neuroimaging studies of BPD should integrate multiple levels of observation (structural, functional, neurochemical, genetic, and clinical) in a model-driven fashion to further understand the dynamic relationship between biological and psychological factors in the development and treatment of this difficult condition. PMID:16613437

  10. Visual Systems for Interactive Exploration and Mining of Large-Scale Neuroimaging Data Archives

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Van Horn, John D.

    2012-01-01

    While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the populating of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do and these archives grow in size, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information that these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the informatics visualization for neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework for the graphical rendering of, and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, detail its development, and demonstrate its usage in examining a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining. PMID:22536181

  11. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  12. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to “yes” or “no” answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Methods/Design Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients’ interests, and we

  13. A neonatal case of chronic granulomatous disease, initially presented with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Sachiko; Oda, Arata; Kasai, Masashi; Minami, Kisei; Nagumo, Haruo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-03-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) often presents with infectious illness, such as repeating bacterial and fungal infections, due to the inability to generate superoxide, which would destroy certain infectious pathogens, and is usually diagnosed in childhood. We describe a CGD case diagnosed in neonatal period, who initially presented with invasive aspergillosis. Neonatal invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is very rare and, to the best of our knowledge, this might be the youngest case in Japan. PMID:24674387

  14. Developments in functional neuroimaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    A recent review of neuroimaging techniques indicates that new developments have primarily occurred in the area of data acquisition hardware/software technology. For example, new pulse sequences on standard clinical imagers and high-powered, rapidly oscillating magnetic field gradients used in echo planar imaging (EPI) have advanced MRI into the functional imaging arena. Significant developments in tomograph design have also been achieved for monitoring the distribution of positron-emitting radioactive tracers in the body (PET). Detector sizes, which pose a limit on spatial resolution, have become smaller (e.g., 3--5 mm wide) and a new emphasis on volumetric imaging has emerged which affords greater sensitivity for determining locations of positron annihilations and permits smaller doses to be utilized. Electromagnetic techniques have also witnessed growth in the ability to acquire data from the whole head simultaneously. EEG techniques have increased their electrode coverage (e.g., 128 channels rather than 16 or 32) and new whole-head systems are now in use for MEG. But the real challenge now is in the design and implementation of more sophisticated analyses to effectively handle the tremendous amount of physiological/anatomical data that can be acquired. Furthermore, such analyses will be necessary for integrating data across techniques in order to provide a truly comprehensive understanding of the functional organization of the human brain.

  15. [Treatment and outcome of Crohn's disease without initial complications. Results of a retrospective, multicenter Tunisian study].

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Imed; Ben Ammar, Ahmed; Essid, Mejda; Azzouz, Messadak; Ettahri, Nabil; Krichene, Mohamed; Bouzaidi, Slim; Ennajar, Taoufik

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and achieve the factors that have an influence on the evolution of the Chron's disease. This study was done in 124 patients reaching the diagnosis of Chron's disease between 1988 and 1997. The evolution of this disease was achieved in 87 patients. The Chron's disease was inactive among 31 patients (35-6%)--with discontinous evolution in 42 patients (48.3%) and active chronic in 14 patients (16-1%). The active chronic form of Chron's disease was twice more frequent among the smokers and the patients with age above 40 years--but this difference has no statistical significance. The indication of surgical treatment was realised in 21 patients and it takes place as result of failure of medical treatment in 16 patients (76-2%)--an abcess in 2 patents (9-5%) and iatrogenic perforation in 1 patient (4-8%). The age-sexe-smoke--the intensity of the initial attack and the nature of the treatment had no influence in the need of the surgical interfference. The Chron's disease showed the less severe evolution in this study--the age above 40 years and the consumption of smoke increased the frequency of active chronic form. PMID:12416354

  16. Practical approach to evaluate asymptomatic coronary artery disease in end-stage renal disease patients at the initiation of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akihito; Sakakibara, Masaki; Asada, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ishii, Hideki; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-04-01

    The high prevalence of significant asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been reported in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the initiation of dialysis. However, the approach to evaluate asymptomatic CAD for these patients has not been established. The aim of this study is to assess the applicability of our practical approach at the initiation of dialysis. We prospectively enrolled 182 consecutive ESRD patients who initiated dialysis. After echocardiography as primary screening, pharmacologic stress thallium-201 scintigraphy and/or coronary angiography (CAG) were performed to diagnose CAD. The patients were classified into two groups: those with coronary artery stenosis by CAG (CAD+ group), those without coronary artery stenosis by CAG or with negative scintigraphy examination (CAD- group). Of the eligible 93 patients without the history of CAD, 22 patients were allocated to the CAD+ group (18 of 26 patients with abnormal echocardiography and 4 of 13 patients with positive scintigraphy examination) and 71 patients to the CAD- group. Patients were followed up for an average of 520 ± 304 days. The event-free survival rate of major adverse cardiac events was significantly lower in the CAD+ group than in the CAD- group (P < 0.001). There was no cardiovascular event including major adverse cardiac events, unstable angina, coronary revascularization or stroke in the CAD- group during the first year of dialysis. Patients without CAD diagnosed by our approach had favorable clinical outcomes. Our approach may be useful for screening of occult CAD in ESRD patients at the initiation of dialysis. PMID:24720408

  17. The Influence of Movement Initiation Deficits on the Quantification of Retention in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pendt, Lisa K.; Maurer, Heiko; Müller, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    In patients with an impaired motor system, like Parkinson’s disease (PD), deficits in motor learning are expected and results of various studies seem to confirm these expectations. However, most studies in this regard are behaviorally based and quantify learning by performance changes between at least two points in time, e.g., baseline and retention. But, performance in a retention test is also dependent on other factors than learning. Especially in patients, the functional capacity of the control system might be altered unspecific to a certain task and learning episode. The aim of the study is to test whether characteristic temporal deficits exist in PD patients that affect retention performance. We tested the confounding effects of typical PD motor control deficits, here movement initiation deficits, on retention performance in the motor learning process. 12 PD patients and 16 healthy control participants practiced a virtual throwing task over 3 days with 24 h rest between sessions. Retention was tested comparing performance before rest with performance after rest. Movement initiation deficits were quantified by the timing of throwing release that should be affected by impairments in movement initiation. To scrutinize the influence of the initiation deficits on retention performance we gave participants a specific initiation intervention prior to practice on one of the three practice days. We found that only for the PD patients, post-rest performance as well as release timing was better with intervention as compared to without intervention. Their performance could be enhanced through a tuning of release initiation. Thus, we suggest that in PD patients, performance decline after rest that might be easily interpreted as learning deficits could rather result from disease-related deficiencies in motor control. PMID:22870067

  18. Quantitative Neuroimaging Software for Clinical Assessment of Hippocampal Volumes on MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahdidan, Jamila; Raji, Cyrus A.; DeYoe, Edgar A.; Mathis, Jedidiah; Noe, Karsten Ø.; Rimestad, Jens; Kjeldsen, Thomas K.; Mosegaard, Jesper; Becker, James T.; Lopez, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mesial temporal sclerosis, and mild traumatic brain injury manifest with volume loss on brain MRI. Subtle volume loss is particularly seen early in AD. While prior research has demonstrated the value of this additional information from quantitative neuroimaging, very few applications have been approved for clinical use. Here we describe a US FDA cleared software program, NeuroreaderTM, for assessment of clinical hippocampal volume on brain MRI. Objective: To present the validation of hippocampal volumetrics on a clinical software program. Method: Subjects were drawn (n = 99) from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. Volumetric brain MR imaging was acquired in both 1.5 T (n = 59) and 3.0 T (n = 40) scanners in participants with manual hippocampal segmentation. Fully automated hippocampal segmentation and measurement was done using a multiple atlas approach. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) measured the level of spatial overlap between NeuroreaderTM and gold standard manual segmentation from 0 to 1 with 0 denoting no overlap and 1 representing complete agreement. DSC comparisons between 1.5 T and 3.0 T scanners were done using standard independent samples T-tests. Results: In the bilateral hippocampus, mean DSC was 0.87 with a range of 0.78–0.91 (right hippocampus) and 0.76–0.91 (left hippocampus). Automated segmentation agreement with manual segmentation was essentially equivalent at 1.5 T (DSC = 0.879) versus 3.0 T (DSC = 0.872). Conclusion: This work provides a description and validation of a software program that can be applied in measuring hippocampal volume, a biomarker that is frequently abnormal in AD and other neurological disorders. PMID:26484924

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Early versus Conventional Timing of Dialysis Initiation in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Deidra C.; Scialla, Julia J.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Nally, Joseph V.; Liu, Xiaobo; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse D.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Michels, Wieneke M.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Tangri, Navdeep; Shafi, Tariq; Wu, Albert W.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous observational studies examining outcomes associated with the timing of dialysis initiation in the US have often been limited by lead time and survivor bias. Study Design Retrospective cohort study comparing the effectiveness of early versus later (conventional) dialysis initiation in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). The analysis employed inverse probability weighting to account for an individual’s contribution to different exposure groups over time in a pooled logistic regression model. Patients contributed risk to both exposure categories (early and later initiation) until there was a clear treatment strategy [i.e. dialysis was initiated early, or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fell below 10 ml/min per 1.73 m2]. Setting & Participants CKD patients who had at least one face-to-face outpatient encounter with a Cleveland Clinic health care provider as of January 1, 2005 and at least two estimated eGFRs in the range of 20 to 30 ml/min per 1.73m2 measured at least 180 days apart. Predictors Timing of dialysis initiation as determined using model-based interpolation of eGFR trajectories over time. Timing was defined as early (interpolated eGFR at dialysis initiation ≥10 ml/min per 1.73m2) or later (eGFR < 10), and was time-varying. Outcomes Death from any cause occurring from the time that eGFR was equal to 20 ml/min per 1.73m2 through September 15, 2009. Results The study population consisted of 652 patients meeting inclusion criteria. The majority of the study population (71.3%) did not initiate dialysis during follow up. Patients who did not initiate dialysis (n=465) were older, more likely to be Caucasian, and had more favorable laboratory profiles than those who initiated. Overall, 146 initiated early, and 80 had eGFR fall below 10 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Many participants (n=426) were censored prior to attaining a clear treatment strategy and were considered undeclared. There was no statistically significant survival

  20. Non-infectious environmental antigens as a trigger for the initiation of an autoimmune skin disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ye; Culton, Donna A; Jeong, Joseph S; Trupiano, Nicole; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Diaz, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus represents a group of organ specific autoimmune blistering disorders of the skin mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies with well-defined antigenic targets. While most of these diseases are sporadic, endemic forms of disease do exist. The endemic form of pemphigus foliaceus (also known as fogo selvagem, FS) exhibits epidemiological features that suggest exposure to hematophagous insect bites are a possible precipitating factor of this autoimmune disease, and provides a unique opportunity to study how environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. FS patients and healthy individuals from endemic regions show an autoreactive IgM response that starts in early childhood and becomes restricted to IgG4 autoantibodies in FS patients. In searching for triggering environmental antigens, we have found that IgG4 and IgE autoantibodies from FS patients cross-react with a salivary antigen from sand flies. The presence of these cross-reactive antibodies and antibody genetic analysis confirming that these antibodies evolve from the same naïve B cells provides compelling evidence that this non-infectious environmental antigen could be the initial target of the autoantibody response in FS. Consequently, FS serves as an ideal model to study the impact of environmental antigens in the development of autoimmune disease. PMID:27396816

  1. Absence of alphavbeta6 integrin is linked to initiation and progression of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Ghannad, Farzin; Nica, Daniela; Fulle, Maria I Garcia; Grenier, Daniel; Putnins, Edward E; Johnston, Sarah; Eslami, Ameneh; Koivisto, Leeni; Jiang, Guoqiao; McKee, Marc D; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2008-05-01

    Integrin alphavbeta6 is generally not expressed in adult epithelia but is induced in wound healing, cancer, and certain fibrotic disorders. Despite this generalized absence, we observed that alphavbeta6 integrin is constitutively expressed in the healthy junctional epithelium linking the gingiva to tooth enamel. Moreover, expression of alphavbeta6 integrin was down-regulated in human periodontal disease, a common medical condition causing tooth loss and also contributing to the development of cardiovascular diseases by increasing the total systemic inflammatory burden. Remarkably, integrin beta6 knockout mice developed classic signs of spontaneous, chronic periodontal disease with characteristic inflammation, epithelial down-growth, pocket formation, and bone loss around the teeth. Integrin alphavbeta6 acts as a major activator of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a key anti-inflammatory regulator in the immune system. Co-expression of TGF-beta1 and alphavbeta6 integrin was observed in the healthy junctional epithelium. Moreover, an antibody that blocks alphavbeta6 integrin-mediated activation of TGF-beta1 initiated inflammatory periodontal disease in a rat model of gingival inflammation. Thus, alphavbeta6 integrin is constitutively expressed in the epithelium sealing the gingiva to the tooth and plays a central role in protection against inflammatory periodontal disease through activation of TGF-beta1. PMID:18385522

  2. Autopsy-confirmed hippocampal-sparing Alzheimer's disease with delusional jealousy as initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Iritani, Shuji; Hattori, Miho; Sekiguchi, Hirotaka; Matsunaga, Shinji; Habuchi, Chikako; Torii, Youta; Umeda, Kentaro; Ozaki, Norio; Yoshida, Mari; Fujita, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clinically characterized by gradual onset over years with worsening of cognition. The initial and most prominent cognitive deficit is commonly memory dysfunction. However, a subset of AD cases has less hippocampal atrophy than would be expected relative to the predominance of cortical atrophy. These hippocampal-sparing cases have distinctive clinical features, including the presence of focal cortical clinical syndromes. Given that previous studies have indicated that severe hippocampal atrophy corresponds to prominent loss of episodic memory, it is likely that memory impairment is initially absent in hippocampal-sparing AD cases. Here, we report on a patient with an 8-year history of delusional jealousy with insidious onset who was clinically diagnosed as possible AD and pathologically confirmed to have AD with relatively preserved neurons in the hippocampus. This patient had delusional jealousy with a long pre-dementia stage, which initially was characterized by lack of memory impairment. Head magnetic resonance imaging findings showed preserved hippocampal volume with bilateral enlarged ventricles and mild-to-moderate cortical atrophy. Head single-photon emission computed tomography revealed severely decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the right temporal lobe. The resolution of the delusion was attributed to pharmacotherapy by an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suggesting that the occurrence of delusional jealousy was due to the disease process of AD. Although the neural basis of delusional jealousy remains unclear, this hippocampal-sparing AD case may be classified as an atypical presentation of AD. PMID:25737011

  3. Multiplex method for initial complex testing of antibodies to blood transmitted diseases agents.

    PubMed

    Poltavchenko, Alexander G; Nechitaylo, Oleg V; Filatov, Pavel V; Ersh, Anna V; Gureyev, Vadim N

    2016-10-01

    Initial screening of donors and population at high risk of infection with blood transmitted diseases involves a number of analyses using monospesific diagnostic systems, and therefore is expensive labor- and time-consuming process. The goal of this work is to construct a multiplex test enabling to carry out rapid initial complex testing at a low price. The paper describes a kit making it possible to detect simultaneously antibodies to six agents of the most significant blood transmitted diseases: HIV virus, hepatitis B and C viruses, cytomegalovirus, T. pallidum and T. gondii in blood products. The kit comprises multiplex dot-immunoassay based on plane protein arrays (immune chips) using colloidal gold conjugates and silver development. It provides an opportunity to carry out complex analysis within 70min at room temperature, and there is no need of well-qualified personnel. We compared laboratory findings of the kit with monospecific kits for ELISA produced by two Russian commercial companies. Dot-assay results correlate well with data obtained using commercial kits for ELISA. Furthermore, multiplex analysis is quicker and cheaper in comparison with ELISA and can be carried out in non-laboratory conditions. The kit for multiplex dot-immunoassay of antibodies to blood transmitted agents can significantly simplify initial complex testing. PMID:27497868

  4. Osteoarthritis disease progression model using six year follow-up data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    PubMed

    Passey, Chaitali; Kimko, Holly; Nandy, Partha; Kagan, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to develop a quantitative model of disease progression of knee osteoarthritis over 6 years using the total WOMAC score from patients enrolled into the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) study. The analysis was performed using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. The time course of the total WOMAC score of patients enrolled into the progression cohort was characterized using non-linear mixed effect modeling in NONMEM. The effect of covariates on the status of the disease and the progression rate was investigated. The final model provided a good description of the experimental data using a linear progression model with a common baseline (19 units of the total WOMAC score). The WOMAC score decreased by 1.77 units/year in 89% of the population or increased by 1.74 units/year in 11% of the population. Multiple covariates were found to affect the baseline and the rate of progression, including BMI, sex, race, the use of pain medications, and the limitation in activity due to symptoms. A mathematical model to describe the disease progression of osteoarthritis in the studied population was developed. The model identified two sub-populations with increasing or decreasing total WOMAC score over time, and the effect of important covariates was quantified. PMID:25212288

  5. Neuroimaging in the Diagnostic Evaluation of Eye Pain.

    PubMed

    Szatmáry, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Ocular or eye pain is a frequent complaint encountered not only by eye care providers but neurologists. Isolated eye pain is non-specific and non-localizing; therefore, it poses significant differential diagnostic problems. A wide range of neurologic and ophthalmic disorders may cause pain in, around, or behind the eye. These include ocular and orbital diseases and primary and secondary headaches. In patients presenting with an isolated and chronic eye pain, neuroimaging is usually normal. However, at the beginning of a disease process or in low-grade disease, the eye may appear "quiet," misleading a provider lacking familiarity with underlying disorders and high index of clinical suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of some neuro-ophthalmic causes of eye pain could result in significant neurologic and ophthalmic morbidity, conceivably even mortality. This article reviews some recent advances in imaging of the eye, the orbit, and the brain, as well as research in which neuroimaging has advanced the discovery of the underlying pathophysiology and the complex differential diagnosis of eye pain. PMID:27474094

  6. Effect of Three Cueing Devices for People with Parkinson’s disease with Gait Initiation Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    McCandless, Paula J.; Evans, Brenda J.; Janssen, Jessie; Selfe, James; Churchill, Andrew; Richards, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Background Freezing of gait (FOG) remains one of the most common debilitating aspects of Parkinson’s disease and has been linked to injuries, falls and reduced quality of life. Although commercially available portable cueing devices exist claiming to assist with overcoming freezing; their immediate effectiveness in overcoming gait initiation failure currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of three different types of cueing device in people with Parkinson’s disease who experience freezing. Methods Twenty participants with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease who experienced freezing during gait but who were able to walk short distances indoors independently were recruited. At least three attempts at gait initiation were recorded using a ten camera Qualisys motion analysis system and four force platforms. Test conditions were: laser cane, sound metronome, vibrating metronome, walking stick and no intervention. Results During testing 12 of the 20 participants had freezing episodes, from these participants 100 freezing and 91 non-freezing trials were recorded. Clear differences in the movement patterns were seen between freezing and non-freezing episodes. The laser cane was most effective cueing device at improving the forwards/backwards and side to side movement and had the least number of freezing episodes. The walking stick also showed significant improvements compared to the other conditions. The vibration metronome appeared to disrupt movement compared to the sound metronome at the same beat frequency. Conclusion This study identified differences in the movement patterns between freezing episodes and non-freezing episodes, and identified immediate improvements during gait initiation when using the laser cane over the other interventions. PMID:27004625

  7. Autoantigens as Partners in Initiation and Propagation of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-05-20

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by specific targeting of a limited group of ubiquitously expressed autoantigens by the immune system. This review examines the mechanisms underlying their selection as immune targets. Initiation of autoimmune responses likely reflects the presentation of antigens with a distinct structure not previously encountered by the immune system, in a proimmune context (injury, malignancy, or infection). Causes of modified structure include somatic mutation and posttranslational modifications (including citrullination and proteolysis). Many autoantigens are components of multimolecular complexes, and some of the other components may provide adjuvant activity. Propagation of autoimmune responses appears to reflect a bidirectional interaction between the immune response and the target tissues in a mutually reinforcing cycle: Immune effector pathways generate additional autoantigen, which feeds further immune response. We propose that this resonance may be a critical principle underlying disease propagation, with specific autoantigens functioning as the hubs around which amplification occurs. PMID:26907212

  8. Moving Forward with Prisms: Sensory-Motor Adaptation Improves Gait Initiation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bultitude, Janet H.; Rafal, Robert D.; Tinker, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    It is postulated that the decreased walking speed; small, shuffling steps; and “freezing” shown by patients with Parkinson’s disease could stem from an inability to tilt the body forward enough to provide sufficient forward propulsion. In two repeated-measures studies we examined whether adaptation to upward-shifting prisms, resulting in a downward after-effect, could improve gait initiation in healthy participants and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Faster forward stepping followed a brief (5 min) exposure period for patients, and a longer (20 min) exposure period for age-matched controls. Backward stepping was unchanged, and adaptation to downward-shifting prisms with control participants showed no effect on forward or backward stepping. These results suggest that adaptation of arm proprioception in the vertical plane may generalize to anterior-posterior postural control, presenting new possibilities for the treatment of gait disturbance in basal ganglia disorders. PMID:23060852

  9. Matriptase initiates epidermal prokallikrein activation and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L.; Rasmussen, Amber; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome. The principal morbidities of the disease are stratum corneum detachment and chronic inflammation. We show that the membrane protease, matriptase, initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein-related cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory and stratum corneum detachment-associated pro-kallikrein-related peptidases was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented stratum corneum detachment, and improved epidermal barrier function. The study uncovers a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could be operative in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  10. Pulmonary Nodules as an Initial Manifestation of Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Malekmohammad, M.; Emamifar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculopathy, characterized by recurrent oral aphthae, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Although vascular involvement, including venous and arteries of any size, is a usual manifestation, cases with pulmonary thrombosis as the initial symptom are not common in the absence of pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA). This report describes a 36-year-old man with recurrent fever, nonmassive hemoptysis, and persistent cough with lung nodules in CT scan who had undergone open lung biopsy. On the basis of morphological findings, BD was suggested and more precise evaluation confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:25436168

  11. Methodological Approaches in Developmental Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Beatriz; Velanova, Katerina; Geier, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric neuroimaging is increasingly providing insights into the neural basis of cognitive development. Indeed, we have now arrived at a stage where we can begin to identify optimal methodological and statistical approaches to the acquisition and analysis of developmental imaging data. In this article, we describe a number of these approaches and how their selection impacts the ability to examine and interpret developmental effects. We describe preferred approaches to task selection, definition of age groups, selection of fMRI designs, definition of regions of interest (ROI), optimal baseline measures, and treatment of timecourse data. Consideration of these aspects of developmental neuroimaging reveals that unlike single-group neuroimaging studies, developmental studies pose unique challenges that impact study planning, task design, data analysis, and the interpretation of findings. PMID:20496377

  12. Neuroimaging Coordination Dynamics in the Sport Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Jantzen, Kelly J.; Oullier, Olivier; Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Key methodological issues for designing, analyzing, and interpreting neuroimaging experiments are presented from the perspective of the framework of Coordination Dynamics. To this end, a brief overview of Coordination Dynamics is introduced, including the main concepts of control parameters and collective variables, theoretical modeling, novel experimental paradigms, and cardinal empirical findings. Basic conceptual and methodological issues for the design and implementation of coordination experiments in the context of neuroimaging are discussed. The paper concludes with a presentation of neuroimaging findings central to understanding the neural basis of coordination and addresses their relevance for the sport sciences. The latter include but are not restricted to learning and practice-related issues, the role of mental imagery, and the recovery of function following brain injury. PMID:18602998

  13. Neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kristen R; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Walitt, Brian; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To summarize and synthesize current literature on neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A database search for relevant literature was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Embase in February 2015. Date filters were applied from the year 2009 and onward, and studies were limited to those written in the English language and those performed upon human subjects. The initial search yielded 797 articles, out of which 38 were pulled for full text review and 27 were included for study analysis. Investigations were reviewed to determine study design, methodology and results, and data points were placed in tabular format to facilitate analysis of study findings across disparate investigations. RESULTS: Analysis of study data resulted in the abstraction of four key themes: Neurohormonal differences, anatomic measurements of brain structure and connectivity, differences in functional responsiveness of the brain during rectal distention, and confounding/correlating patient factors. Studies in this review noted alterations of glutamate in the left hippocampus (HIPP), commonalities across IBS subjects in terms of brain oscillation patterns, cortical thickness/gray matter volume differences, and neuroanatomical regions with increased activation in patients with IBS: Anterior cingulate cortex, mid cingulate cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, posterior insula and prefrontal cortex. A striking finding among interventions was the substantial influence that patient variables (e.g., sex, psychological and disease related factors) had upon the identification of neuroanatomical differences in structure and connectivity. CONCLUSION: The field of neuroimaging can provide insight into underlying physiological differences that distinguish patients with IBS from a healthy population. PMID:27158548

  14. Are gait initiation parameters early markers of Huntington's disease in pre-manifest mutation carriers?

    PubMed

    Delval, Arnaud; Bleuse, Séverine; Simonin, Clémence; Delliaux, Marie; Rolland, Benjamin; Destee, Alain; Defebvre, Luc; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Dujardin, Kathy

    2011-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) pre-manifest mutation carriers (PMCs) present early-onset gait disturbances. Gait initiation encompasses the preparation and execution of the first step. By using paradigms with and without external cues, a gait initiation analysis can highlight the interaction between motor and cognitive aspects of movement preparation and execution. Hence, gait initiation disorders may constitute particularly interesting early markers of HD. The objective of the present study was to quantify gait initiation in PMCs. In a case-control study, 17 PMCs (median age: 36.5) were compared with a group of 25 healthy controls (HCs, median age: 36) for gait initiation and a group of 57 HCs (median age: 38) for gait. Presymptomatic mutation carriers displayed a shorter first step duration and lower-amplitude postural adjustments. For the first step duration and speed, these impairments were more pronounced under self-triggered (ST) conditions. The PMCs displayed a lower gait speed, cadence and stride length and higher stride-to-stride variability. The latter parameter seemed capable of differentiating between PMCs and HCs with adequate sensitivity (0.81) and specificity (0.87). We confirmed the early-onset impairment of gait in general and first step execution in particular in PMCs (particularly under ST conditions). The temporal parameters of step execution (e.g. duration) and spatial parameters of postural adjustment (e.g. a backward shift in the centre of pressure) may be worth investigating as early markers of HD. However, two such parameters (stride-to-stride variability and first step duration under ST conditions) already appear to be sufficiently reliable diagnostic tools for differentiating between PMCs and HCs. PMID:21616667

  15. An expanded role for neuroimaging in the evaluation of memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Rafii, Michael S.; Brewer, James B.; Hess, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects millions of people worldwide. The neuropathologic process underlying AD begins years, if not decades, before the onset of memory decline. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest that it is now possible to detect AD-associated neuropathological changes well before dementia onset. Here, we evaluate the role of recently developed in vivo biomarkers in the clinical evaluation of AD. We discuss how assessment strategies might incorporate neuroimaging markers to better inform patients, families and clinicians when memory impairment prompts a search for diagnosis and management options. PMID:23764728

  16. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    PubMed

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  17. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  18. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H.; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K.; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  19. Using GIS to profile health-care costs of VA Quality-Enhancement Research Initiative diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Cowper, Diane; Berger, Magdalena; Kuebeler, Mark; Kubal, Joe; Manheim, Larry

    2004-06-01

    The Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Service at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System launched a Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) in 1998. This study estimated health-care costs of nine diseases under the QUERI project and analyzed geographic differences in health-care costs and utilization across 22 VA Integrated Service Networks (VISNs), using a geographic information system (GIS). Patients with these diseases were identified from diagnoses recorded between October 1999 and September 2000. Annual health-care costs for each disease were estimated in four categories: inpatient medical or surgical, other inpatient, outpatient, and outpatient pharmacy. Geographic differences of costs and health-care utilization across the 22 VISNs for chronic heart failure, diabetes, and spinal-cord injury were mapped using a GIS package. Average costs and patterns of health-care utilization varied substantially across the 22 VISNs. The observed differences in health-care utilization across geographic regions raised questions for further investigation. PMID:15446617

  20. Clinical use of amyloid-positron emission tomography neuroimaging: Practical and bioethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Witte, Michael M; Foster, Norman L; Fleisher, Adam S; Williams, Monique M; Quaid, Kimberly; Wasserman, Michael; Hunt, Gail; Roberts, J Scott; Rabinovici, Gil D; Levenson, James L; Hake, Ann Marie; Hunter, Craig A; Van Campen, Luann E; Pontecorvo, Michael J; Hochstetler, Helen M; Tabas, Linda B; Trzepacz, Paula T

    2015-09-01

    Until recently, estimation of β-amyloid plaque density as a key element for identifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as the cause of cognitive impairment was only possible at autopsy. Now with amyloid-positron emission tomography (amyloid-PET) neuroimaging, this AD hallmark can be detected antemortem. Practitioners and patients need to better understand potential diagnostic benefits and limitations of amyloid-PET and the complex practical, ethical, and social implications surrounding this new technology. To complement the practical considerations, Eli Lilly and Company sponsored a Bioethics Advisory Board to discuss ethical issues that might arise from clinical use of amyloid-PET neuroimaging with patients being evaluated for causes of cognitive decline. To best address the multifaceted issues associated with amyloid-PET neuroimaging, we recommend this technology be used only by experienced imaging and treating physicians in appropriately selected patients and only in the context of a comprehensive clinical evaluation with adequate explanations before and after the scan. PMID:27239516

  1. Mind-Body Practices and the Adolescent Brain: Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Newberg, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Background Mind-Body practices constitute a large and diverse group of practices that can substantially affect neurophysiology in both healthy individuals and those with various psychiatric disorders. In spite of the growing literature on the clinical and physiological effects of mind-body practices, very little is known about their impact on central nervous system (CNS) structure and function in adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Method This overview highlights findings in a select group of mind-body practices including yoga postures, yoga breathing techniques and meditation practices. Results Mind-body practices offer novel therapeutic approaches for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Findings from these studies provide insights into the design and implementation of neuroimaging studies for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Clinical neuroimaging studies will be critical in understanding how different practices affect disease pathogenesis and symptomatology in adolescents. Neuroimaging of mind-body practices on adolescents with psychiatric disorders will certainly be an open and exciting area of investigation. PMID:27347478

  2. Functional and clinical insights from neuroimaging studies in childhood-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Anna E; Sastry, Nevin V; Gogtay, Nitin

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia is a rare pediatric onset psychiatric disorder continuous with and typically more severe than its adult counterpart. Neuroimaging research conducted on this population has revealed similarly severe neural abnormalities. When taken as a whole, neuroimaging research in this population shows generally decreased cortical gray matter coupled with white matter connectivity abnormalities, suggesting an anatomical basis for deficits in executive function. Subcortical abnormalities are pronounced in limbic structures, where volumetric deficits are likely related to social skill deficits, and cerebellar deficits that have been correlated to cognitive abnormalities. Structures relevant to motor processing also show a significant alteration, with volumetric increase in basal ganglia structures likely due to antipsychotic administration. Neuroimaging of this disorder shows an important clinical image of exaggerated cortical loss, altered white matter connectivity, and differences in structural development of subcortical areas during the course of development and provides important background to the disease state. PMID:26234702

  3. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2013-07-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. PMID:23700196

  4. Functional neuroimaging: technical, logical, and social perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists have long sought to study the dynamic activity of the human brain-what's happening in the brain, that is, while people are thinking, feeling, and acting. Ideally, an inside look at brain function would simultaneously and continuously measure the biochemical state of every cell in the central nervous system. While such a miraculous method is science fiction, a century of progress in neuroimaging technologies has made such simultaneous and continuous measurement a plausible fiction. Despite this progress, practitioners of modern neuroimaging struggle with two kinds of limitations: those that attend the particular neuroimaging methods we have today and those that would limit any method of imaging neural activity, no matter how powerful. In this essay, I consider the liabilities and potential of techniques that measure human brain activity. I am concerned here only with methods that measure relevant physiologic states of the central nervous system and relate those measures to particular mental states. I will consider in particular the preeminent method of functional neuroimaging: BOLD fMRI. While there are several practical limits on the biological information that current technologies can measure, these limits-as important as they are-are minor in comparison to the fundamental logical restraints on the conclusions that can be drawn from brain imaging studies. PMID:24634086

  5. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    PubMed Central

    van der Werff, S. J. A.; van den Berg, S. M.; Pannekoek, J. N.; Elzinga, B. M.; van der Wee, N. J. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience. PMID:23675330

  6. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Written Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, David

    2004-01-01

    Sentences convey relationships between the meanings of words, such as who is accomplishing an action or receiving it. Functional neuroimaging based on positron-emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to identify areas of the brain involved in structuring sentences and determining aspects of meaning associated…

  7. Neuroimaging studies of social cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Yassin, Walid; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-05-01

    Impaired social cognition is considered a core contributor to unfavorable psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. Rather than being a unitary process, social cognition is a collection of multifaceted processes that recruit multiple brain structures, thus structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are ideal methodologies for revealing the underlying pathophysiology of impaired social cognition. Many neuroimaging studies have suggested that in addition to white-matter deficits, schizophrenia is associated with decreased gray-matter volume in multiple brain areas, especially fronto-temporal and limbic regions. However, few schizophrenia studies have examined associations between brain abnormalities and social cognitive disabilities. During the last decade, we have investigated structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, and our findings have been confirmed by us and others. By assessing different types of social cognitive abilities, structural abnormalities in multiple brain regions have been found to be associated with disabilities in social cognition, such as recognition of facial emotion, theory of mind, and empathy. These structural deficits have also been associated with alexithymia and quality of life in ways that are closely related to the social cognitive disabilities found in schizophrenia. Here, we overview a series of neuroimaging studies from our laboratory that exemplify current research into this topic, and discuss how it can be further tackled using recent advances in neuroimaging technology. PMID:25418865

  8. From molecular variant to disease: initial steps in evaluating the association of transthyretin M119 with disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ii, S; Sobell, J L; Sommer, S S

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally, clinical research has sought to determine the molecular basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Increasingly, the traditional process will be reversed, as many structural protein variants are elucidated as a result of powerful PCR-based methods. Herein we describe a variant of transthyretin (TTR) found by direct genomic sequencing and illustrate the utility of PASA (PCR amplification of specific alleles) in the initial characterization of such variants. TTR is an intriguing protein of unknown function, but deposition of mutant TTR produces familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). We identify a carrier of a variant TTR in which threonine119 is changed to methionine (T119----M). T119 is invariant in five mammalian species, suggesting that this residue is important for normal protein function. To determine the frequency of the M119 variant, individuals of northern- and western-European descent were rapidly screened by generating a PASA assay for the sequence change. Four additional individuals were found to be heterozygous for the mutation, for a total of five M119 alleles in 1,666 genes (1/333). Clinical records, initial clinical interviews, and family history of these patients hint at a high frequency of early-onset venous insufficiency and perhaps mild renal dysfunction. Haplotype analysis on the heterozygotes could be performed, despite the absence of samples from relatives, by performing "double PASA." The haplotype data suggest that the M119 variant derives from a common ancestor. The putative functional deficiency caused by TTR M119 should be most marked in the homozygotes, who can be calculated to occur in 1/100,000 conceptions. If viable, these individuals may provide important clues about the physiological role of TTR. Although the nature (if any) of disease caused by TTR M119 remains to be defined, the genetic and clinical data indicate that this mutation does not cause FAP. Future family studies can determine whether the heterozygous state

  9. Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Neuroimaging Findings in Children and Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Kathryn A.; Detre, John A.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herrington, John D.; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J.; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD. PMID:23723341

  10. Systematic review of structural and functional neuroimaging findings in children and adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Moodalbail, Divya G; Reiser, Kathryn A; Detre, John A; Schultz, Robert T; Herrington, John D; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD. PMID:23723341

  11. Is tree loss associated with cardiovascular-disease risk in the Women's Health Initiative? A natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Geoffrey H; Michael, Yvonne L; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Prestemon, Jeffrey P; Whitsel, Eric A

    2015-11-01

    Data from the Women's Health Initiative were used to quantify the relationship between the loss of trees to an invasive forest pest-the emerald ash borer-and cardiovascular disease. We estimated a semi-parametric Cox proportional hazards model of time to cardiovascular disease, adjusting for confounders. We defined the incidence of cardiovascular disease as acute myocardial infarction requiring overnight hospitalization, silent MI determined from serial electrocardiograms, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, or death from coronary heart disease. Women living in a county infested with emerald ash borer had an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (HR=1.25, 95% CI: 1.20-1.31). PMID:26335885

  12. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  13. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  14. Clinical trial designs for rare diseases: Studies developed and discussed by the International Rare Cancers Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bogaerts, Jan; Sydes, Matthew R.; Keat, Nicola; McConnell, Andrea; Benson, Al; Ho, Alan; Roth, Arnaud; Fortpied, Catherine; Eng, Cathy; Peckitt, Clare; Coens, Corneel; Pettaway, Curtis; Arnold, Dirk; Hall, Emma; Marshall, Ernie; Sclafani, Francesco; Hatcher, Helen; Earl, Helena; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Paul, James; Blay, Jean-Yves; Whelan, Jeremy; Panageas, Kathy; Wheatley, Keith; Harrington, Kevin; Licitra, Lisa; Billingham, Lucinda; Hensley, Martee; McCabe, Martin; Patel, Poulam M.; Carvajal, Richard; Wilson, Richard; Glynne-Jones, Rob; McWilliams, Rob; Leyvraz, Serge; Rao, Sheela; Nicholson, Steve; Filiaci, Virginia; Negrouk, Anastassia; Lacombe, Denis; Dupont, Elisabeth; Pauporté, Iris; Welch, John J.; Law, Kate; Trimble, Ted; Seymour, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background The past three decades have seen rapid improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of most cancers and the most important contributor has been research. Progress in rare cancers has been slower, not least because of the challenges of undertaking research. Settings The International Rare Cancers Initiative (IRCI) is a partnership which aims to stimulate and facilitate the development of international clinical trials for patients with rare cancers. It is focused on interventional – usually randomised – clinical trials with the clear goal of improving outcomes for patients. The key challenges are organisational and methodological. A multi-disciplinary workshop to review the methods used in ICRI portfolio trials was held in Amsterdam in September 2013. Other as-yet unrealised methods were also discussed. Results The IRCI trials are each presented to exemplify possible approaches to designing credible trials in rare cancers. Researchers may consider these for use in future trials and understand the choices made for each design. Interpretation Trials can be designed using a wide array of possibilities. There is no ‘one size fits all’ solution. In order to make progress in the rare diseases, decisions to change practice will have to be based on less direct evidence from clinical trials than in more common diseases. PMID:25542058

  15. C9orf72 nucleotide repeat structures initiate molecular cascades of disease.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Aaron R; Donnelly, Christopher J; Periz, Goran; Simko, Eric A J; Shaw, Patrick G; Kim, Min-Sik; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Troncoso, Juan C; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wang, Jiou

    2014-03-13

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE), (GGGGCC)n, in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here we identify a molecular mechanism by which structural polymorphism of the HRE leads to ALS/FTD pathology and defects. The HRE forms DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes with distinct structures and promotes RNA•DNA hybrids (R-loops). The structural polymorphism causes a repeat-length-dependent accumulation of transcripts aborted in the HRE region. These transcribed repeats bind to ribonucleoproteins in a conformation-dependent manner. Specifically, nucleolin, an essential nucleolar protein, preferentially binds the HRE G-quadruplex, and patient cells show evidence of nucleolar stress. Our results demonstrate that distinct C9orf72 HRE structural polymorphism at both DNA and RNA levels initiates molecular cascades leading to ALS/FTD pathologies, and provide the basis for a mechanistic model for repeat-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24598541

  16. KP Index at the Initiation of Dialysis for Patients with End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eui Won; Ji, Suk Bae; Kim, Jin Kuk; Hwang, Seung Duk

    2004-01-01

    Background The time at which renal replacement therapy (RRT) is initiated in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has a great influence on the prognosis of the patient; however, there are currently no accurate guidelines for the initiation of RRT. Traditionally, nephrologists usually initiate RRT on the basis of the observation of the uremic symptoms and changes in the laboratory parameters, such as the serum creatinine concentration and/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). DOQI guidelines suggest a weekly Kt/Vurea < 2.0 or an nPNA < 0.8 g/kg/day as objective indices for the initiation of dialysis. Thus, a KP index was formulated (weekly Kt/Vurea+2.5 × nPNA) ×½ using the above two clinically useful and objective indices to determine the adeguate time to initiate RRT in patients with ESRD. Methods Of 186 patients admitted to the renal unit of Soonchunhyang Bucheon hospital, those with ESRD and a weekly Kt/Vurea below 3.0 were selected. The patients with a weekly Kt/Vurea index between 1.0 and 2.0 were classified into one of two groups; KP index > 2.0 and KP index < 2.0. The groups were compared and analyzed in relation to their renal function, biochemical indices and the numbers of patients per group starting RRT. Further, the correlations between the KP and other indices were analyzed in all the patients. The patients were then further divided into another two groups according to their weekly Kt/Vurea and KP index: group one; between 1.5 and 2.0 and group 2; between 2.0 and 2.5. The numbers of patients per group starting RRT were compared. Results The KP index < 2.0 group showed significantly lower indices for weekly Kt/Vurea, nPNA and %LBM (%) than those of the KP index > 2.0 group, while there were no significant differences between the groups in the serum albumin concentration, serum creatinine concentration, FFEFBM and RRF. Also, there was a statistically significant higher rate of incidence of patients starting RRT in the KP index < 2.0 group than

  17. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business.

    PubMed

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S

    2010-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released - when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  18. The current situation of meningococcal disease in Latin America and updated Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio P; O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela Bravo, Maria Teresa; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C; Gorla, Maria Cecília O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Gabriela; Vazquez, Julio A; López, Eduardo L; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Borrow, Ray

    2015-11-27

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) was established in 2009 and comprises an international team of scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with expertise in meningococcal disease (MD). Its primary goal is to promote global prevention of MD through education, research, international cooperation, and developing recommendations that include decreasing the burden of severe disease. The group held its first roundtable meeting with experts from Latin American countries in 2011, and subsequently proposed several recommendations to reduce the regional burden of MD. A second roundtable meeting was convened with Latin American representatives in June 2013 to reassess MD epidemiology, vaccination strategies, and unmet needs in the region, as well as to update the earlier recommendations. Special emphasis was placed on the emergence and spread of serogroup W disease in Argentina and Chile, and the control measures put in place in Chile were a particular focus of discussions. The impact of routine meningococcal vaccination programs, notably in Brazil, was also evaluated. There have been considerable improvements in MD surveillance systems and diagnostic techniques in some countries (e.g., Brazil and Chile), but the lack of adequate infrastructure, trained personnel, and equipment/reagents remains a major barrier to progress in resource-poor countries. The Pan American Health Organization's Revolving Fund is likely to play an important role in improving access to meningococcal vaccines in Latin America. Additional innovative approaches are needed to redress the imbalance in expertise and resources between countries, and thereby improve the control of MD. In Latin America, the GMI recommends establishment of a detailed and comprehensive national/regional surveillance system, standardization of laboratory procedures, adoption of a uniform MD case definition, maintaining laboratory-based surveillance, replacement of polysaccharide vaccines with conjugate

  19. Role of neuroimaging in multidisciplinary approach towards Non-Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Patro, Satya Narayana; Glikstein, Rafael; Hanagandi, Prasad; Chakraborty, Santanu

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is defined as chronic deterioration of intellectual function and cognitive skills significant enough to interfere with the ability to perform daily activities. Recent advances in the treatment of dementia have renewed interest in the use of various neuroimaging techniques that can assist in the diagnosis and differentiation of various subtypes. Neuroimaging and computational techniques have helped the radiological community to monitor disease progression of various neurodegenerative conditions presenting with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multisystem atrophy-cerebellar variant (MSA-C), and their response to newer therapies. Prompt identification of treatable or reversible forms of dementia, such as tumours, subdural haemorrhage and intracranial dAVF, is crucial for the effective management of these conditions. It is also prudent to recognize the imaging spectrum of metabolic, infective and autoimmune diseases with rapidly progressing dementia, such as methanol toxicity, central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), delayed post hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL), HIV, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Sjogren's syndrome, multiple sclerosis (MS), radiation necrosis and Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), which are difficult to treat and often require palliative care. This pictorial review emphasizes various non-Alzheimer's dementia entities and discusses their imaging highlights. Teaching Points • Non Alzheimer's dementia constitutes a broad spectrum of conditions. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in differentiating treatable from irreversible dementia. • Neuroimaging is often non-specific in early stages of neurodegenerative conditions with dementia. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in the multimodal approach towards management of dementia. PMID:26206249

  20. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities

    PubMed Central

    Honce, Justin M.; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  1. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities.

    PubMed

    Honce, Justin M; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  2. Neuroimaging studies of alexithymia: physical, affective, and social perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alexithymia refers to difficulty in identifying and expressing one’s emotions, and it is related to disturbed emotional regulation. It was originally proposed as a personality trait that plays a central role in psychosomatic diseases. This review of neuroimaging studies on alexithymia suggests that alexithymia is associated with reduced neural responses to emotional stimuli from the external environment, as well as with reduced activity during imagery, in the limbic and paralimbic areas (i.e., amygdala, insula, anterior/posterior cingulate cortex). In contrast, alexithymia is also known to be associated with enhanced neural activity in somatosensory and sensorimotor regions, including the insula. Moreover, neural activity in the medial, prefrontal, and insula cortex was lowered when people with alexithymia were involved in social tasks. Because most neuroimaging studies have been based on sampling by self-reported questionnaires, the contrasted features of neural activities in response to internal and external emotional stimuli need to be elucidated. The social and emotional responses of people with alexithymia are discussed and recommendations for future research are presented. PMID:23537323

  3. Gene X Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Houenou, Josselin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar disorder (BD) are considered as severe multifactorial diseases, stemming from genetic and environmental influences. Growing evidence supports gene x environment (GxE) interactions in these disorders and neuroimaging studies can help us to understand how those factors mechanistically interact. No reviews synthesized the existing data of neuroimaging studies in these issues. Methods: We conduct a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies exploring GxE interactions relative to SZ or BD in PubMed. Results: First results of the influence of genetic and environmental risks on brain structures came from monozygotic twin pairs concordant and discordant for SZ or BD. Few structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) studies have explored the GxE interactions. No other imaging methods were found. Two main GxE interactions on brain volumes have arisen. First, an interaction between genetic liability to SZ and obstetric complications on gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampal volumes. Second, cannabis use and genetic liability interaction effects on cortical thickness and white matter volumes. Conclusion: Combining GxE interactions and neuroimaging domains is a promising approach. Genetic risk and environmental exposures such as cannabis or obstetrical complications seem to interact leading to specific neuroimaging cerebral alterations in SZ. They are suggestive of GxE interactions that confer phenotypic abnormalities in SZ and possibly BD. We need further, larger neuroimaging studies of GxE interactions for which we may propose a framework focusing on GxE interactions data already known to have a clinical effect such as infections, early stress, urbanicity, and substance abuse. PMID:24133464

  4. 78 FR 56236 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Elaine L....

  5. Risk Factors in the Initial Presentation of Specific Cardiovascular Disease Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-03

    Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina; Chronic Stable Angina; Ischemic Stroke; Cerebrovascular Accident; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Sudden Coronary Death; Ventricular Arrhythmia; Sudden Death; Cardiac Arrest; Heart Failure

  6. Initial staging of Hodgkin's disease: role of contrast-enhanced 18F FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin's disease (HD).Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard.No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor).Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients. PMID:25121354

  7. About the J-GRID (Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases).

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Since infectious diseases heed no national borders, international research collaboration across borders must be enhanced. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan launched the J-GRID program in the fiscal year (FY) 2005, which consists of the two elements; (1) the construction of collaboration centers in Asian and African countries on a reciprocal basis between a Japanese university/institution and an overseas partner university/institution and (2) the networking of those collaboration centers and setting up its headquarters at RIKEN. J-GRID initiated with 5 collaboration centers in 3 Asian countries has expanded to include 13 centers in 8 countries (6 in Asia and 2 in Africa). The aims of J-GRID include conducting high quality research on infectious diseases of regional and global importance, advancing relevant technologies and developing human resources in the field. In this way, J-GRID is expected to contribute to the public health of the host countries, Japan and the rest of the world. After the completion of the first start-up phase, Term I (2005-2009), J-GRID has stepped up its activity for the second step-up phase, Term II (2010-2014). While the first term was just like an incubation period, the second term should be the exponential growth phase, maximizing its research activities. Indeed, J-GRID is now generating remarkable research outcomes with an increasing number of publications. The mid-term evaluation made by the MEXT in FY2012 commended J-GRID as an ideal model to demonstrate Japan's leadership, in science and technology, and strongly recommended its extension in years to come after Term II terminates in FY 2014. PMID:25425950

  8. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  9. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Hjelm, Devon R.; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A.; Bockholt, Henry J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  10. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Recent Neuroimaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eileen M; Migliorini, Robyn; Infante, M Alejandra; Riley, Edward P

    2014-09-01

    Since the identification of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome over 40 years ago, much has been learned about the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain. This review highlights recent neuroimaging studies, within the context of previous work. Structural magnetic resonance imaging has described morphological differences in the brain and their relationships to cognitive deficits and measures of facial dysmorphology. Diffusion tensor imaging has elaborated on the relationship between white matter microstructure and behavior. Atypical neuromaturation across childhood and adolescence has been observed in longitudinal neuroimaging studies. Functional imaging has revealed differences in neural activation patterns underlying sensory processing, cognition and behavioral deficits. A recent functional connectivity analysis demonstrates reductions in global network efficiency. Despite this progress much remains unknown about the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on the brain, and continued research efforts are essential. PMID:25346882

  11. 76 FR 28437 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Study of Chlamydia and Infertility among Women Assessed for Tubal Disease or Treated by Assisted... Infertility among Women Assessed for Tubal Disease or Treated by Assisted Reproductive Technology,...

  12. Neuroimaging of the Vulnerable Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Mendes-Pereira, Vitor; Garibotto, Valentina; Assal, Frédéric; Willi, Jean-Pierre; Stztajzel, Roman; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Plaque vulnerability due to inflammation has been shown to be a participating factor in the degenerative process in the arterial wall that contributes to stenosis and embolism. This is believed to have an important role to play also in the genesis of stroke or cerebrovascular diseases. In order to appropriately screen patients for treatment, there is an absolute need to directly or indirectly visualize both the normal carotid and the suspected plaque. This can be done with a variety of techniques ranging from ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition to angiographic techniques, direct imaging of the plaque can be done either by ultrasound or by the so-called molecular imaging techniques, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET). These findings, together with other clinical and paraclinical parameters should finally guide the therapeutic choice. PMID:24188487

  13. Neuroimaging in human MDMA (Ecstasy) users.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Ronald L; Roberts, Deanne M; Joers, James M

    2008-10-01

    MDMA (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine) has been used by millions of people worldwide as a recreational drug. The terms "MDMA" and "Ecstasy" are often used synonymously, but it is important to note that the purity of Ecstasy sold as MDMA is not certain. MDMA use is of public health concern, not so much because MDMA produces a common or severe dependence syndrome, but rather because rodent and nonhuman primate studies have indicated that MDMA (when administered at certain dosages and intervals) can cause long-lasting reductions in markers of brain serotonin (5-HT) that appear specific to fine-diameter axons arising largely from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Given the popularity of MDMA, the potential for the drug to produce long-lasting or permanent 5-HT axon damage or loss, and the widespread role of 5-HT function in the brain, there is a great need for a better understanding of brain function in human users of this drug. To this end, neuropsychological, neuroendocrine, and neuroimaging studies have all suggested that human MDMA users may have long-lasting changes in brain function consistent with 5-HT toxicity. Data from animal models leads to testable hypotheses regarding MDMA's effects on the human brain. Because neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings have focused on the neocortex, a cortical model is developed to provide a context for designing and interpreting neuroimaging studies in MDMA users. Aspects of the model are supported by the available neuroimaging data, but there are controversial findings in some areas and most findings have not been replicated across different laboratories and using different modalities. This paper reviews existing findings in the context of a cortical model and suggests directions for future research. PMID:18991874

  14. Initial experience in the treatment of inherited mitochondrial disease with EPI-743.

    PubMed

    Enns, Gregory M; Kinsman, Stephen L; Perlman, Susan L; Spicer, Kenneth M; Abdenur, Jose E; Cohen, Bruce H; Amagata, Akiko; Barnes, Adam; Kheifets, Viktoria; Shrader, William D; Thoolen, Martin; Blankenberg, Francis; Miller, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Inherited mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are progressive, life-threatening conditions for which there are limited supportive treatment options and no approved drugs. Because of this unmet medical need, as well as the implication of mitochondrial dysfunction as a contributor to more common age-related and neurodegenerative disorders, mitochondrial diseases represent an important therapeutic target. Thirteen children and one adult with genetically-confirmed mitochondrial disease (polymerase γ deficiency, n=4; Leigh syndrome, n=4; MELAS, n=3; mtDNA deletion syndrome, n=2; Friedreich ataxia, n=1) at risk for progressing to end-of-life care within 90 days were treated with EPI-743, a novel para-benzoquinone therapeutic, in a subject controlled, open-label study. Serial measures of safety and efficacy were obtained that included biochemical, neurological, quality-of-life, and brain redox assessments using technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide imaging. Twelve patients treated with EPI-743 have survived; one polymerase γ deficiency patient died after developing pneumonia and one patient with Surf-1 deficiency died after completion of the protocol. Of the 12 survivors, 11 demonstrated clinical improvement, with 3 showing partial relapse, and 10 of the survivors also had an improvement in quality-of-life scores at the end of the 13-week emergency treatment protocol. HMPAO SPECT scans correlated with clinical response; increased regional and whole brain HMPAO uptake was noted in the clinical responders and the one subject who did not respond clinically had decreased regional and whole brain HMPAO uptake. EPI-743 has modified disease progression in >90% of patients in this open-label study as assessed by clinical, quality-of-life, and non-invasive brain imaging parameters. Data obtained herein suggest that EPI-743 may represent a new drug for the treatment of inherited mitochondrial

  15. Testable Hypotheses for Unbalanced Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    McFarquhar, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Unbalanced group-level models are common in neuroimaging. Typically, data for these models come from factorial experiments. As such, analyses typically take the form of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) within the framework of the general linear model (GLM). Although ANOVA theory is well established for the balanced case, in unbalanced designs there are multiple ways of decomposing the sums-of-squares of the data. This leads to several methods of forming test statistics when the model contains multiple factors and interactions. Although the Type I–III sums of squares have a long history of debate in the statistical literature, there has seemingly been no consideration of this aspect of the GLM in neuroimaging. In this paper we present an exposition of these different forms of hypotheses for the neuroimaging researcher, discussing their derivation as estimable functions of ANOVA models, and discussing the relative merits of each. Finally, we demonstrate how the different hypothesis tests can be implemented using contrasts in analysis software, presenting examples in SPM and FSL. PMID:27378839

  16. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    PubMed

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing. PMID:24634082

  17. Advanced Neuroimaging in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging have occurred at a rapid pace over the past two decades. Novel techniques for measuring cerebral blood flow, metabolism, white matter connectivity, and neural network activation have great potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), while also providing biomarkers to guide the development of new therapies. Several of these advanced imaging modalities are currently being implemented into clinical practice, whereas others require further development and validation. Ultimately, for advanced neuroimaging techniques to reach their full potential and improve clinical care for the many civilians and military personnel affected by TBI, it is critical for clinicians to understand the applications and methodological limitations of each technique. In this review, we examine recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging and the potential applications of these techniques to the clinical care of patients with TBI. We also discuss pitfalls and confounders that should be considered when interpreting data from each technique. Finally, given the vast amounts of advanced imaging data that will soon be available to clinicians, we discuss strategies for optimizing data integration, visualization and interpretation. PMID:23361483

  18. Initial trial of argon ion laser endarterectomy for peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, J.; Ott, R.A.; Baribeau, Y.; McColgan, S.J.; Berns, M.W.; Mason, G.R. )

    1990-08-01

    In the initial of open laser endarterectomy, 16 patients underwent 18 reconstructions for claudication (13 patients), rest pain (3 patients), and gangrene (2 patients). The mean (+/- SD) preoperative ankle arm index was 0.53 +/- 0.18. The laser endarterectomies were aorto-bi-iliac (1 patient), iliac (1 patient), superficial femoral (7 patients), profunda femoral (7 patients), and popliteal-posterior tibial (2 patients). All operations included surgical exposure, vascular control, administration of heparin, and an arteriotomy. Atheromas were dissected from arteries with argon ion laser radiation (power, 1.0 W). End points were welded with laser light. Arteries were closed primarily. The laser endarterectomies were 6 to 60 cm long and required 168 J to 2447.5 J. All patients had symptomatic relief, with a postoperative ankle arm index of 0.97 +/- 0.10. There were no arterial perforations from laser radiation. Surgical complications included early thrombosis requiring thrombectomy (3 patients) and hematoma requiring evacuation (1 patient). The laser endarterectomies have an 88% patency at 1 year. Open endarterectomy can be performed with laser radiation. A larger clinical trial is necessary to define the indications for laser endarterectomy in peripheral vascular disease.

  19. A Novel Chemically Modified Curcumin Reduces Severity of Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats: Initial Observations

    PubMed Central

    Elburki, Muna S.; Rossa, Carlos; Guimaraes, Morgana R.; Goodenough, Mark; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Curylofo, Fabiana A.; Zhang, Yu; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M.

    2014-01-01

    Tetracycline-based matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) inhibitors are currently approved for two inflammatory diseases, periodontitis and rosacea. The current study addresses the therapeutic potential of a novel pleiotropic MMP-inhibitor not based on an antibiotic. To induce experimental periodontitis, endotoxin (LPS) was repeatedly injected into the gingiva of rats on one side of the maxilla; the contralateral (control) side received saline injections. Two groups of rats were treated by daily oral intubation with a chemically modified curcumin, CMC 2.24, for two weeks; the control groups received vehicle alone. After sacrifice, gingiva, blood, and maxilla were collected, the jaws were defleshed, and periodontal (alveolar) bone loss was quantified morphometrically and by μ-CT scan. The gingivae were pooled per experimental group, extracted, and analyzed for MMPs (gelatin zymography; western blot) and for cytokines (e.g., IL-1β; ELISA); serum and plasma samples were analyzed for cytokines and MMP-8. The LPS-induced pathologically excessive bone loss was reduced to normal levels based on either morphometric (P = 0.003) or μ-CT (P = 0.008) analysis. A similar response was seen for MMPs and cytokines in the gingiva and blood. This initial study, on a novel triketonic zinc-binding CMC, indicates potential efficacy on inflammatory mediators and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis and warrants future therapeutic and pharmacokinetic investigations. PMID:25104884

  20. A novel chemically modified curcumin reduces severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats: initial observations.

    PubMed

    Elburki, Muna S; Rossa, Carlos; Guimaraes, Morgana R; Goodenough, Mark; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Curylofo, Fabiana A; Zhang, Yu; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M

    2014-01-01

    Tetracycline-based matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) inhibitors are currently approved for two inflammatory diseases, periodontitis and rosacea. The current study addresses the therapeutic potential of a novel pleiotropic MMP-inhibitor not based on an antibiotic. To induce experimental periodontitis, endotoxin (LPS) was repeatedly injected into the gingiva of rats on one side of the maxilla; the contralateral (control) side received saline injections. Two groups of rats were treated by daily oral intubation with a chemically modified curcumin, CMC 2.24, for two weeks; the control groups received vehicle alone. After sacrifice, gingiva, blood, and maxilla were collected, the jaws were defleshed, and periodontal (alveolar) bone loss was quantified morphometrically and by μ-CT scan. The gingivae were pooled per experimental group, extracted, and analyzed for MMPs (gelatin zymography; western blot) and for cytokines (e.g., IL-1β; ELISA); serum and plasma samples were analyzed for cytokines and MMP-8. The LPS-induced pathologically excessive bone loss was reduced to normal levels based on either morphometric (P = 0.003) or μ-CT (P = 0.008) analysis. A similar response was seen for MMPs and cytokines in the gingiva and blood. This initial study, on a novel triketonic zinc-binding CMC, indicates potential efficacy on inflammatory mediators and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis and warrants future therapeutic and pharmacokinetic investigations. PMID:25104884

  1. 76 FR 56461 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  2. 76 FR 67458 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and..., for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. ] Dated: October 25, 2011. Elaine L. Baker, Director, Management Analysis and...

  3. 76 FR 78263 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 8 a.m.-5 p.m., January... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: December...

  4. 76 FR 45575 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ..., Extramural Programs, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, CDC... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for...

  5. 76 FR 32213 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP); Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ..., Hepatitis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop E-60, Atlanta... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease...

  6. Preclinical PET Neuroimaging of [11C]Bexarotene.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Benjamin H; Placzek, Michael S; Krishnan, Hema S; Pekošak, Aleksandra; Collier, Thomas Lee; Wang, Changning; Liang, Steven H; Burstein, Ethan S; Hooker, Jacob M; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Activation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs) has been proposed as a therapeutic mechanism for the treatment of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We previously reported radiolabeling of a Food and Drug Administration-approved RXR agonist, bexarotene, by copper-mediated [(11)C]CO2 fixation and preliminary positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging that demonstrated brain permeability in nonhuman primate with regional binding distribution consistent with RXRs. In this study, the brain uptake and saturability of [(11)C]bexarotene were studied in rats and nonhuman primates by PET imaging under baseline and greater target occupancy conditions. [(11)C]Bexarotene displays a high proportion of nonsaturable uptake in the brain and is unsuitable for RXR occupancy measurements in the central nervous system. PMID:27553293

  7. Neuropsychiatric deep brain stimulation for translational neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Höflich, Anna; Savli, Markus; Comasco, Erika; Moser, Ulrike; Novak, Klaus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2013-10-01

    From a neuroimaging point of view, deep brain stimulation (DBS) in psychiatric disorders represents a unique source of information to probe results gained in functional, structural and molecular neuroimaging studies in vivo. However, the implementation has, up to now, been restricted by the heterogeneity of the data reported in DBS studies. The aim of the present study was therefore to provide a comprehensive and standardized database of currently used DBS targets in selected psychiatric disorders (obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), treatment-resistant depression (TRD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS)) to enable topological comparisons between neuroimaging results and stimulation areas. A systematic literature research was performed and all peer-reviewed publications until the year 2012 were included. Literature research yielded a total of 84 peer-reviewed studies including about 296 psychiatric patients. The individual stimulation data of 37 of these studies meeting the inclusion criteria which included a total of 202 patients (63 OCD, 89 TRD, 50 GTS) was translated into MNI stereotactic space with respect to AC origin in order to identify key targets. The created database can be used to compare DBS target areas in MNI stereotactic coordinates with: 1) activation patterns in functional brain imaging (fMRI, phfMRI, PET, MET, EEG); 2) brain connectivity data (e.g., MR-based DTI/tractography, functional and effective connectivity); 3) quantitative molecular distribution data (e.g., neuroreceptor PET, post-mortem neuroreceptor mapping); 4) structural data (e.g., VBM for neuroplastic changes). Vice versa, the structural, functional and molecular data may provide a rationale to define new DBS targets and adjust/fine-tune currently used targets in DBS based on this overview in stereotactic coordinates. Furthermore, the availability of DBS data in stereotactic space may facilitate the investigation and interpretation of treatment effects and side effect of DBS by

  8. Global cardiovascular disease prevention: a call to action for nursing: community-based and public health prevention initiatives.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Barbara J; Himmelfarb, Cheryl Dennison; Lira, Maria Teresa; Meininger, Janet C; Pradhan, Sala Ray; Sikkema, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Policy changes are necessary to promote cardiovascular disease prevention. These will involve community-based and public health initiatives for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In this article, we discuss such interventions, community-based participatory research that has been conducted in this area, and implications for capacity building in genetics research. Finally, areas for future research in this area will be identified. PMID:21659811

  9. Integration of Network Topological and Connectivity Properties for Neuroimaging Classification

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Biao; Gao, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wee, Chong-Yaw

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in neuroimaging techniques have provided an efficient and noninvasive way for exploring the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain. Quantitative measurement of abnormality of brain connectivity in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), have also been widely reported, especially at a group level. Recently, machine learning techniques have been applied to the study of AD and MCI, i.e., to identify the individuals with AD/MCI from the healthy controls (HCs). However, most existing methods focus on using only a single property of a connectivity network, although multiple network properties, such as local connectivity and global topological properties, can potentially be used. In this paper, by employing multikernel based approach, we propose a novel connectivity based framework to integrate multiple properties of connectivity network for improving the classification performance. Specifically, two different types of kernels (i.e., vector-based kernel and graph kernel) are used to quantify two different yet complementary properties of the network, i.e., local connectivity and global topological properties. Then, multikernel learning (MKL) technique is adopted to fuse these heterogeneous kernels for neuroimaging classification. We test the performance of our proposed method on two different data sets. First, we test it on the functional connectivity networks of 12 MCI and 25 HC subjects. The results show that our method achieves significant performance improvement over those using only one type of network property. Specifically, our method achieves a classification accuracy of 91.9%, which is 10.8% better than those by single network-property-based methods. Then, we test our method for gender classification on a large set of functional connectivity networks with 133 infants scanned at birth, 1 year, and 2 years, also demonstrating very promising results. PMID

  10. The neuroimaging of Leigh syndrome: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Eliana; Koenig, Mary Kay; Adejumo, Rahmat B; Perinjelil, Vinu; Riascos, Roy F

    2016-04-01

    Leigh syndrome by definition is (1) a neurodegenerative disease with variable symptoms, (2) caused by mitochondrial dysfunction from a hereditary genetic defect and (3) accompanied by bilateral central nervous system lesions. A genetic etiology is confirmed in approximately 50% of patients, with more than 60 identified mutations in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here we review the clinical features and imaging studies of Leigh syndrome and describe the neuroimaging findings in a cohort of 17 children with genetically confirmed Leigh syndrome. MR findings include lesions in the brainstem in 9 children (53%), basal ganglia in 13 (76%), thalami in 4 (24%) and dentate nuclei in 2 (12%), and global atrophy in 2 (12%). The brainstem lesions were most frequent in the midbrain and medulla oblongata. With follow-up an increased number of lesions from baseline was observed in 7 of 13 children, evolution of the initial lesion was seen in 6, and complete regression of the lesions was seen in 3. No cerebral white matter lesions were found in any of the 17 children. In concordance with the literature, we found that Leigh syndrome follows a similar pattern of bilateral, symmetrical basal ganglia or brainstem changes. Lesions in Leigh syndrome evolve over time and a lack of visible lesions does not exclude the diagnosis. Reversibility of lesions is seen in some patients, making the continued search for treatment and prevention a priority for clinicians and researchers. PMID:26739140

  11. 76 FR 18766 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Research and Surveillance in Epilepsy, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DP11- 003, initial review. In... received in response to ``Epidemiologic Research and Surveillance in Epilepsy FOA DP11-003, initial...

  12. 76 FR 28437 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... of Self-Reported Sleep Surveillance Measures, SIP11-047, Panel E,'' initial review. In accordance...-Reported Sleep Surveillance Measures, SIP11-047, Panel E,'' initial review. Contact Person for...

  13. 78 FR 6329 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Treatments and Services Provided to People with ] Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), FOA DD13-002, initial... with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), FOA DD13-002, initial review.'' Contact Person for...

  14. Integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic data with application to cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Shabnam; Hobbs, Brian P; Ma, Liangsuo; Nielsen, David A; Moeller, F Gerard; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging and genetic studies provide distinct and complementary information about the structural and biological aspects of a disease. Integrating the two sources of data facilitates the investigation of the links between genetic variability and brain mechanisms among different individuals for various medical disorders. This article presents a general statistical framework for integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic (iBANG) data, which is motivated by a neuroimaging-genetic study in cocaine dependence. Statistical inference necessitated the integration of spatially dependent voxel-level measurements with various patient-level genetic and demographic characteristics under an appropriate probability model to account for the multiple inherent sources of variation. Our framework uses Bayesian model averaging to integrate genetic information into the analysis of voxel-wise neuroimaging data, accounting for spatial correlations in the voxels. Using multiplicity controls based on the false discovery rate, we delineate voxels associated with genetic and demographic features that may impact diffusion as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from DTI images. We demonstrate the benefits of accounting for model uncertainties in both model fit and prediction. Our results suggest that cocaine consumption is associated with FA reduction in most white matter regions of interest in the brain. Additionally, gene polymorphisms associated with GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitters and receptors were associated with FA. PMID:26484829

  15. 78 FR 732 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ..., Surveillance, and Control of Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in Uganda, Funding Opportunity... Control of Vector- Borne and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in Uganda, FOA CK13-001.'' Contact Person...

  16. Social Deprivation and Initial Presentation of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases: a CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-03

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Corronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  17. 78 FR 19489 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...-067; and Feasibility Study of the New Clinical Measure of Colorectal Cancer Screening for Federally... the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and...

  18. Dietary Patterns Predict Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Risk In Postmenopausal Women : The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Cohort Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence suggests that dietary patterns predispose to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship between dietary patterns and CHD risk was assessed in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods: Case-co...

  19. REX: response exploration for neuroimaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Duff, Eugene P; Cunnington, Ross; Egan, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies produce large and complex datasets. The challenge of comprehensively analysing the recorded dynamics remains an important field of research. The whole-brain linear modelling of hypothesised response dynamics and experimental effects must utilise simple basis sets, which may not detect unexpected or complex signal effects. These unmodelled effects can influence statistical mapping results, and provide important additional clues to the underlying neural dynamics. They can be detected via exploration of the raw signal, however this can be difficult. Specialised visualisation tools are required to manage the huge number of voxels, events and scans. Many effects can be occluded by noise in individual voxel time-series. This paper describes a visualisation framework developed for the assessment of entire neuroimaging datasets. While currently available tools tend to be tied to a specific model of experimental effects, this framework includes a novel metadata schema that enables the rapid selection and processing of responses based on easily-adjusted classifications of scans, brain regions, and events. Flexible event-related averaging and process pipelining capabilities enable users to investigate the effects of preprocessing algorithms and to visualise power spectra and other transformations of the data. The framework has been implemented as a MATLAB package, REX (Response Exploration), which has been utilised within our lab and is now publicly available for download. Its interface enables the real-time control of data selection and processing, for very rapid visualisation. The concepts outlined in this paper have general applicability, and could provide significant further functionality to neuroimaging databasing and process pipeline environments. PMID:17985253

  20. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories.

    PubMed

    Neu, Scott C; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  1. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Scott C.; Crawford, Karen L.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  2. The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit: an informatics platform for managing, exploring, and sharing neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel S; Olsen, Timothy R; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Buckner, Randy L

    2007-01-01

    The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) is a software platform designed to facilitate common management and productivity tasks for neuroimaging and associated data. In particular, XNAT enables qualitycontrol procedures and provides secure access to and storage of data. XNAT follows a threetiered architecture that includes a data archive, user interface, and middleware engine. Data can be entered into the archive as XML or through data entry forms. Newly added data are stored in a virtual quarantine until an authorized user has validated it. XNAT subsequently maintains a history profile to track all changes made to the managed data. User access to the archive is provided by a secure web application. The web application provides a number of quality control and productivity features, including data entry forms, data-type-specific searches, searches that combine across data types, detailed reports, and listings of experimental data, upload/download tools, access to standard laboratory workflows, and administration and security tools. XNAT also includes an online image viewer that supports a number of common neuroimaging formats, including DICOM and Analyze. The viewer can be extended to support additional formats and to generate custom displays. By managing data with XNAT, laboratories are prepared to better maintain the long-term integrity of their data, to explore emergent relations across data types, and to share their data with the broader neuroimaging community. PMID:17426351

  3. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. PMID:26362835

  4. Computational neuroimaging and population receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Wandell, Brian A; Winawer, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) noninvasively measures human brain activity at millimeter resolution. Scientists use different approaches to take advantage of the remarkable opportunities presented by fMRI. Here, we describe progress using the computational neuroimaging approach in human visual cortex, which aims to build models that predict the neural responses from the stimulus and task. We focus on a particularly active area of research, the use of population receptive field (pRF) models to characterize human visual cortex responses to a range of stimuli, in a variety of tasks and different subject populations. PMID:25850730

  5. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Lee, Bonmyong

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome. PMID:26425383

  6. 77 FR 19018 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Public Health Research in South Africa, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) GH12- 004, initial review... applications received in response to ``Conducting Public Health Research in South Africa, FOA...

  7. 76 FR 18555 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... of Vaccines and Immunization Policies, Programs, and Practices, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA... Immunization Policies, Programs, and Practices, FOA IP11-007, initial review.'' Contact Person for...

  8. 78 FR 52535 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in Cambodia, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) CK14-001, initial... evaluation of applications received in response to ``Impact of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in...

  9. 77 FR 25180 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Research on Moderate Acute Malnutrition in Humanitarian Emergencies, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA... Malnutrition in Humanitarian Emergencies, FOA GH12-006, initial review.'' Contact Person for More...

  10. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L.; Gracely, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and non-painful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging “signature” cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of “central sensitivity syndromes” is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a “central sensitization” mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  11. Initiation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFα) antagonists and risk of fractures in patients with selected rheumatic and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Vivian K.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Delzell, Elizabeth; Chen, Lang; Ouellet-Hellstrom, Rita; Herrinton, Lisa; Liu, Liyan; Mitchell, Edward F.; Stein, C. Michael; Griffin, Marie R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We tested the hypothesis that initiation of TNFα antagonists reduced the risk of fractures compared to nonbiologic comparator in patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Using four large administrative databases, we assembled retrospective cohorts of patients with autoimmune diseases who initiated either a TNFα antagonist or a nonbiologic medication. We identified 3 mutually exclusive disease groups: rheumatoid arthritis (RA); inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); and psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis (PsO-PsA-AS). We used baseline covariate data to calculate propensity scores (PS) for each disease group and used Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). We compared the risk of combined hip, radius/ulna, humerus, or pelvic fractures between PS-matched cohorts of new users of TNFα antagonists and nonbiologic comparator. Results We identified 9,020, 2,014 and 2,663 new PS matched episodes of TNFα antagonist and nonbiologic comparator use in RA, IBD and PsO-PsA-AS cohorts, respectively. The risk of combined fractures was similar between new users of TNFα antagonists and nonbiologic comparators for each disease (HR: 1.17, 95%CI [0.91, 1.51]; HR: 1.49, 95%CI [0.72, 3.11]; and HR: 0.92, 95%CI [0.47, 1.82] for RA, IBD and PsO-PsA-AS, respectively). In RA, the risk of combined fractures was associated with an average daily dose of prednisone equivalents >10 mg/day at baseline compared with no glucocorticoid (HR: 1.54, 95%CI [1.03, 2.30]). Conclusions The risk of fractures did not differ between initiators of a biologic and a nonbiologic comparator for any disease studied. Among RA patients, use of >10mg/day of prednisone equivalents at baseline increased the fracture risk. PMID:23281339

  12. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, S.; Rose, N.; Masita, A.; Dhaliwal, J. S.; Puvanarajah, S. D.; Rafia, M. H.; Muda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  13. Multiple sclerosis in malaysia: demographics, clinical features, and neuroimaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Rose, N; Masita, A; Dhaliwal, J S; Puvanarajah, S D; Rafia, M H; Muda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  14. Understanding the Role of Autoimmune Disorders on the Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Stroke; Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Venous Thrombosis; Transient Ischemic Attack; Stable Angina Pectoris; Unstable Angina; Heart Failure; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

  15. 77 FR 30292 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... Barriers to Receiving Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Muslim Women Living in the United States... initial review, discussion, and evaluation of ``Identifying Barriers to Receiving Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Muslim Women Living in the United Sates, SIP12-052, Panel B, initial...

  16. Biomarkers for Microglial Activation in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lautner, Ronald; Mattsson, Niklas; Schöll, Michael; Augutis, Kristin; Blennow, Kaj; Olsson, Bob; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research over the last decades has provided increasing evidence for neuroinflammation as an integral part in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS) are initiated by activated microglia, representing the first line of the innate immune defence of the brain. Therefore, biochemical markers of microglial activation may help us understand the underlying mechanisms of neuroinflammation in AD as well as the double-sided qualities of microglia, namely, neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. In this paper we summarize candidate biomarkers of microglial activation in AD along with a survey of recent neuroimaging techniques. PMID:22114747

  17. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jeremy I.; Dunkle, Ashley; Akiteng, Ann R.; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Kagimu, Richard; Mondo, Charles K.; Mutungi, Gerald; Rabin, Tracy L.; Skonieczny, Michael; Sykes, Jamila; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Methods Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW) training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. Results In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD), a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Discussion Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda. PMID:25563451

  18. Integrated feature extraction and selection for neuroimage classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yong; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Feature extraction and selection are of great importance in neuroimage classification for identifying informative features and reducing feature dimensionality, which are generally implemented as two separate steps. This paper presents an integrated feature extraction and selection algorithm with two iterative steps: constrained subspace learning based feature extraction and support vector machine (SVM) based feature selection. The subspace learning based feature extraction focuses on the brain regions with higher possibility of being affected by the disease under study, while the possibility of brain regions being affected by disease is estimated by the SVM based feature selection, in conjunction with SVM classification. This algorithm can not only take into account the inter-correlation among different brain regions, but also overcome the limitation of traditional subspace learning based feature extraction methods. To achieve robust performance and optimal selection of parameters involved in feature extraction, selection, and classification, a bootstrapping strategy is used to generate multiple versions of training and testing sets for parameter optimization, according to the classification performance measured by the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve. The integrated feature extraction and selection method is applied to a structural MR image based Alzheimer's disease (AD) study with 98 non-demented and 100 demented subjects. Cross-validation results indicate that the proposed algorithm can improve performance of the traditional subspace learning based classification.

  19. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems

    PubMed Central

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B.; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed. PMID:25964757

  20. The structural neuroimaging of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Emsell, Louise; McDonald, Colm

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing body of literature fuelled by advances in high-resolution structural MRI acquisition and image processing techniques which implicates subtle neuroanatomical abnormalities in the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder. This account reviews the main findings from structural neuroimaging research into regional brain abnormalities, the impact of genetic liability and mood stabilizing medication on brain structure in bipolar disorder, and the overlapping structural deviations found in the allied disorders of schizophrenia and depression. The manifold challenges extant within neuroimaging research are highlighted with accompanying recommendations for future studies. The most consistent findings include preservation of total cerebral volume with regional grey and white matter structural changes in prefrontal, midline and anterior limbic networks, non-contingent ventriculomegaly and increased rates of white matter hyperintensities, with more pronounced deficits in juveniles suffering from the illness. There is increasing evidence that medication has observable effects on brain structure, whereby lithium status is associated with volumetric increase in the medial temporal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus. However, research continues to be confounded by the use of highly heterogeneous methodology and clinical populations, in studies employing small scale, low-powered, cross-sectional designs. Future work should investigate larger, clinically homogenous groups of patients and unaffected relatives, combining both categorical and dimensional approaches to illness classification in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs in order to elucidate trait versus state mechanisms, genetic effects and medication/illness progression effects over time. PMID:20374145

  1. 76 FR 71568 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Behavioral Surveillance For Young Men Who Have Sex With Men, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), PS11... Young Men Who Have Sex With Men, FOA PS11-0010201SUPP12.'' Contact Person for More Information: Amy...

  2. 78 FR 20319 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Malaria Control and Elimination Activities, FOA GH13-005; and Research and Technical Assistance for Public... Surveillance for Japanese Encephalitis in India, FOA GH13-004; Monitoring and Evaluation of Malaria Control and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention...

  3. Boosting brain connectome classification accuracy in Alzheimer's disease using higher-order singular value decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Liu, Yashu; Wang, Yalin; Zhou, Jiayu; Jahanshad, Neda; Ye, Jieping; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disease. Accurate detection of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), are crucial. There is also a growing interest in identifying brain imaging biomarkers that help to automatically differentiate stages of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we focused on brain structural networks computed from diffusion MRI and proposed a new feature extraction and classification framework based on higher order singular value decomposition and sparse logistic regression. In tests on publicly available data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, our proposed framework showed promise in detecting brain network differences that help in classifying different stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26257601

  4. Can Emotional and Behavioral Dysregulation in Youth Be Decoded from Functional Neuroimaging?

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Liana C. L.; Rosa, Maria João; Rao, Anil; Bebko, Genna; Bertocci, Michele A.; Hinze, Amanda K.; Bonar, Lisa; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Perlman, Susan B.; Versace, Amelia; Schirda, Claudiu; Travis, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Demeter, Christine; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Ciuffetelli, Gary; Rodriguez, Eric; Forbes, Erika E.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Holland, Scott K.; Kowatch, Robert A.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Arnold, Eugene L.; Fristad, Mary A.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Pereira, Mirtes; Oliveira, Leticia; Phillips, Mary L.; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High comorbidity among pediatric disorders characterized by behavioral and emotional dysregulation poses problems for diagnosis and treatment, and suggests that these disorders may be better conceptualized as dimensions of abnormal behaviors. Furthermore, identifying neuroimaging biomarkers related to dimensional measures of behavior may provide targets to guide individualized treatment. We aimed to use functional neuroimaging and pattern regression techniques to determine whether patterns of brain activity could accurately decode individual-level severity on a dimensional scale measuring behavioural and emotional dysregulation at two different time points. Methods A sample of fifty-seven youth (mean age: 14.5 years; 32 males) was selected from a multi-site study of youth with parent-reported behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Participants performed a block-design reward paradigm during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Pattern regression analyses consisted of Relevance Vector Regression (RVR) and two cross-validation strategies implemented in the Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging toolbox (PRoNTo). Medication was treated as a binary confounding variable. Decoded and actual clinical scores were compared using Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) and mean squared error (MSE) to evaluate the models. Permutation test was applied to estimate significance levels. Results Relevance Vector Regression identified patterns of neural activity associated with symptoms of behavioral and emotional dysregulation at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. The correlation and the mean squared error between actual and decoded symptoms were significant at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. However, after controlling for potential medication effects, results remained significant only for decoding symptoms at the initial study screen. Neural regions with the highest contribution to the pattern

  5. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  6. Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: Insights from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogtay, Nitin; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of longitudinal neuroimaging to study the developmental perspectives of brain pathology in children with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is described. Structural neuroimaging is capable of providing evidence of neurobiological specificity of COS to distinguish it from other brain abnormalities seen in neuropsychiatric illnesses like…

  7. Functional neuroimaging can support causal claims about brain function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Matthew J.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientists habitually deny that functional neuroimaging can furnish causal information about the relationship between brain events and behavior. However, imaging studies do provide causal information about those relationships—though not causal certainty. Although popular portrayals of functional neuroimaging tend to attribute too much inferential power to the technique, we should restrain ourselves from ascribing it too little. PMID:20201629

  8. Neuroimaging in Communication Sciences and Disorders: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article introduces papers that present examples of neuroimaging applications in the field of communication sciences and disorders. It notes that neuroimaging studies were usually an outgrowth of earlier behavioral research or clinical observations with knowledge of the disorder's behavioral characteristic critical to development…

  9. Cognitive Neuroimaging: Cognitive Science out of the Armchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zubicaray, Greig I.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive scientists were not quick to embrace the functional neuroimaging technologies that emerged during the late 20th century. In this new century, cognitive scientists continue to question, not unreasonably, the relevance of functional neuroimaging investigations that fail to address questions of interest to cognitive science. However, some…

  10. Harnessing the Power of Integrated Mitochondrial Biology and Physiology: A Special Report on the NHLBI Mitochondria in Heart Diseases Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ping, Peipei; Gustafsson, Åsa B; Bers, Don M; Blatter, Lothar A; Cai, Hua; Jahangir, Arshad; Kelly, Daniel; Muoio, Deborah; O'Rourke, Brian; Rabinovitch, Peter; Trayanova, Natalia; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Weiss, James N; Wong, Renee; Schwartz Longacre, Lisa

    2015-07-17

    Mitochondrial biology is the sum of diverse phenomena from molecular profiles to physiological functions. A mechanistic understanding of mitochondria in disease development, and hence the future prospect of clinical translations, relies on a systems-level integration of expertise from multiple fields of investigation. Upon the successful conclusion of a recent National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute initiative on integrative mitochondrial biology in cardiovascular diseases, we reflect on the accomplishments made possible by this unique interdisciplinary collaboration effort and exciting new fronts on the study of these remarkable organelles. PMID:26185209

  11. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Man, Mei Yen; Ong, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Sulong, Ghazali; Yunus, Jasmy; Che Harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  12. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business

    PubMed Central

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing — neuromarketing — has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released — when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  13. Colorful brains: 14 years of display practice in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Christen, Markus; Vitacco, Deborah A; Huber, Lara; Harboe, Julie; Fabrikant, Sara I; Brugger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Neuroimaging results are typically graphically rendered and color-coded, which influences the process of knowledge generation within neuroscience as well as the public perception of brain research. Analyzing these issues requires empirical information on the display practice in neuroimaging. In our study we evaluated more than 9000 functional images (fMRI and PET) published between 1996 and 2009 with respect to the use of color, image structure, image production software and other factors that may determine the display practice. We demonstrate a variety of display styles despite a remarkable dominance of few image production sites and software systems, outline some tendencies of standardization, and identify shortcomings with respect to color scale explication in neuroimages. We discuss the importance of the finding for knowledge production in neuroimaging, and we make suggestions to improve the display practice in neuroimaging, especially on regimes of color coding. PMID:23403183

  14. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    MAN, Mei Yen; ONG, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; DERIS, Safaai; SULONG, Ghazali; YUNUS, Jasmy; CHE HARUN, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  15. Advances in neuroimaging research of schizophrenia in China

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Dengtang; XU, Yifeng; JIANG, Kaida

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since Hounsfield’s first report about X-ray computed tomography (CT) in 1972, there has been substantial progress in the application of neuroimaging techniques to study the structure, function, and biochemistry of the brain. This review provides a summary of recent research in structural and functional neuroimaging of schizophrenia in China and four tables describing all of the relevant studies from mainland China. The first research report using neuroimaging techniques in China dates back to 1983, a study that reported encephalatrophy in 30% of individuals with schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging research in China emerged in the 1990s and has undergone rapid development since. Recently, structural and functional brain networks has become a hot topic among China’s neuroimaging researchers. PMID:25317005

  16. 78 FR 6329 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Birth Defects... received in response to ``Birth Defects Study to Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS), FOA...

  17. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Incentive- based Smoking Cessation for Pregnant Women, FOA DP 13-003, initial review. In accordance with... applications received in response to ``Cost-Benefit of Incentive-based Smoking Cessation for Pregnant...

  18. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... Dementia and Co- occurring Chronic Conditions among Older Adults, SIP13-072, Panel E, initial review. In... Measures for Public Health Practice, SIP13-071; and Expanding Information about Dementia and...

  19. 76 FR 49771 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Special Interest Project (SIP), Systematic Review of Effective Community-based Interventions of Clinical Preventive... review, discussion, and evaluation of ``Systematic Review of Effective Community-based Interventions...

  20. MULTI-SOURCE FEATURE LEARNING FOR JOINT ANALYSIS OF INCOMPLETE MULTIPLE HETEROGENEOUS NEUROIMAGING DATA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Yalin; Thompson, Paul M.; Narayan, Vaibhav A.; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of incomplete data is a big challenge when integrating large-scale brain imaging datasets from different imaging modalities. In the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), for example, over half of the subjects lack cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements; an independent half of the subjects do not have fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans; many lack proteomics measurements. Traditionally, subjects with missing measures are discarded, resulting in a severe loss of available information. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing an incomplete Multi-Source Feature (iMSF) learning method where all the samples (with at least one available data source) can be used. To illustrate the proposed approach, we classify patients from the ADNI study into groups with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal controls, based on the multi-modality data. At baseline, ADNI’s 780 participants (172 AD, 397 MCI, 211 NC), have at least one of four data types: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), FDG-PET, CSF and proteomics. These data are used to test our algorithm. Depending on the problem being solved, we divide our samples according to the availability of data sources, and we learn shared sets of features with state-of-the-art sparse learning methods. To build a practical and robust system, we construct a classifier ensemble by combining our method with four other methods for missing value estimation. Comprehensive experiments with various parameters show that our proposed iMSF method and the ensemble model yield stable and promising results. PMID:22498655

  1. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  2. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  3. Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Ben Abdelghani, Kawther; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

  4. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed. PMID:25957358

  5. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  6. Common Data Elements for Neuroimaging of Traumatic Brain Injury: Pediatric Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Holshouser, Barbara; Hunter, Jill V.; Tong, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract As part of the Traumatic Brain Injury Common Data Elements project, a large-scale effort to define common data elements across a variety of domains, including neuroimaging, special considerations for pediatric patients were introduced. This article is an extension of that initial work, in which pediatric-specific pathoanatomical entities, technical considerations, interpretation paradigms, and safety considerations were reviewed. The goal of this review was to outline differences and specific information relevant to optimal performance and proper interpretation of neuroimaging in pediatric patients with traumatic brain injury. The long-range goal of this project is to facilitate data sharing as well as to provide critical infrastructure for potential clinical trials in this major public health area. PMID:21671798

  7. Widespread Structural and Functional Connectivity Changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Insights from Advanced Neuroimaging Research

    PubMed Central

    Trojsi, Francesca; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease principally affecting motor neurons. Besides motor symptoms, a subset of patients develop cognitive disturbances or even frontotemporal dementia (FTD), indicating that ALS may also involve extramotor brain regions. Both neuropathological and neuroimaging findings have provided further insight on the widespread effect of the neurodegeneration on brain connectivity and the underlying neurobiology of motor neurons degeneration. However, associated effects on motor and extramotor brain networks are largely unknown. Particularly, neuropathological findings suggest that ALS not only affects the frontotemporal network but rather is part of a wide clinicopathological spectrum of brain disorders known as TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the neuropsychological and neuropathological sequelae of TDP-43 proteinopathies, with special focus on the neuroimaging findings associated with cognitive change in ALS. PMID:22720174

  8. Spinal Cord Lesions in Congenital Toxoplasmosis Demonstrated with Neuroimaging, Including Their Successful Treatment in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, Delilah; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Sautter, Mari; Heydemann, Peter; Rabiah, Peter; Lee, Daniel; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies for persons in the National Collaborative Chicago-Based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) with symptoms and signs referable to the spinal cord were reviewed. Three infants had symptomatic spinal cord lesions, another infant a Chiari malformation, and another infant a symptomatic peri-spinal cord lipoma. One patient had an unusual history of prolonged spinal cord symptoms presenting in middle age. Neuroimaging was used to establish her diagnosis and response to treatment. This 43 year-old woman with congenital toxoplasmosis developed progressive leg spasticity, weakness, numbness, difficulty walking, and decreased visual acuity and color vision without documented re-activation of her chorioretinal disease. At 52 years of age, spinal cord lesions in locations correlating with her symptoms and optic atrophy were diagnosed with 3 Tesla MRI scan. Treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine decreased her neurologic symptoms, improved her neurologic examination, and resolved her enhancing spinal cord lesions seen on MRI. PMID:23487348

  9. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Manifestation, Neuroimaging Correlates, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Geisseler, Olivia; Nyffeler, Thomas; Linnebank, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is found in up to 70% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Once thought of as a variant of subcortical dementia with a characteristic set of deficits, we now know that MS-related cognitive impairment can have many faces. This conceptual change in neuropsychology is embedded in a paradigm shift in the neuroscientific understanding of MS over the past 25 years: Partly based on modern neuroimaging techniques, the classical view of MS as an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the white matter of the central nervous system has been extended. In particular, many studies have shown that the MS pathology also includes neurodegeneration, and that gray matter structures such as the cerebral cortex can also show focal lesions, atrophy, or both. The authors present an updated summary of the clinical manifestation and neuroimaging correlates of cognitive impairment in MS, and discuss the relatively few treatment options available to date. PMID:27116727

  10. Neuroimaging in basal ganglia disorders: perspectives for transcranial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Becker, G; Berg, D

    2001-01-01

    Transcranial sonography is a new diagnostic tool, allowing not only the evaluation of cerebral arteries but also the two-dimensional display of the brain parenchyma. In this review we will summarize basics of the application, the ultrasound anatomy of the brain and sonographic findings in some movement disorders. While in normal adults basal ganglia nuclei are hypoechogenic, they are hyperechogenic in certain basal ganglia disorders. In Parkinson's disease, for example, the substantia nigra can be depicted as a distinctly echogenic area. An elevated echogenicity of the lentiform nuclei was noticed in patients with primary adult-onset dystonia. In both disorders the altered echogenicity may arise from higher heavy metal tissue content (i.e. iron in Parkinson's disease and copper in primary dystonia). Our findings converge to the hypothesis that transcranial ultrasound sensitively detects pathological metal accumulation not identified by other neuroimaging techniques (CT and MRI) and therefore provides new insights in the diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the pathogenesis and its usefulness for the early diagnosis of movement disorders are outlined. PMID:11215589

  11. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors. PMID:22117165

  12. The experience of art: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The experience of art is a complex one. It emerges from the interaction of multiple cognitive and affective processes. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies are revealing the broadly distributed network of brain regions upon which it relies. This network can be divided into three functional components: (i) prefrontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions support evaluative judgment, attentional processing, and memory retrieval; (ii) the reward circuit, including cortical, subcortical regions, and some of its regulators, is involved in the generation of pleasurable feelings and emotions, and the valuation and anticipation of reward; and (iii) attentional modulation of activity in low-, mid-, and high-level cortical sensory regions enhances the perceptual processing of certain features, relations, locations, or objects. Understanding how these regions act in concert to produce unique and moving art experiences and determining the impact of personal and cultural meaning and context on this network the biological foundation of the experience of art--remain future challenges. PMID:24041322

  13. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Parvaz M. A.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik,P.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-10-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

  14. Freesurfer-initialized large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping with application to Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyun; Palmer, Samantha J.; Khan, Ali R.; Mckeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza Faial

    2009-02-01

    We apply a recently developed automated brain segmentation method, FS+LDDMM, to brain MRI scans from Parkinson's Disease (PD) subjects, and normal age-matched controls and compare the results to manual segmentation done by trained neuroscientists. The data set consisted of 14 PD subjects and 12 age-matched control subjects without neurologic disease and comparison was done on six subcortical brain structures (left and right caudate, putamen and thalamus). Comparison between automatic and manual segmentation was based on Dice Similarity Coefficient (Overlap Percentage), L1 Error, Symmetrized Hausdorff Distance and Symmetrized Mean Surface Distance. Results suggest that FS+LDDMM is well-suited for subcortical structure segmentation and further shape analysis in Parkinson's Disease. The asymmetry of the Dice Similarity Coefficient over shape change is also discussed based on the observation and measurement of FS+LDDMM segmentation results.

  15. Neuroimaging of child abuse: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Heledd; Rubia, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment is a stressor that can lead to the development of behavior problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, working memory, attention, response inhibition and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, gray and white matter of several regions, most prominently the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex but also hippocampus, amygdala, and corpus callosum (CC). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show evidence for deficits in structural interregional connectivity between these areas, suggesting neural network abnormalities. Functional imaging studies support this evidence by reporting atypical activation in the same brain regions during response inhibition, working memory, and emotion processing. There are, however, several limitations of the abuse research literature which are discussed, most prominently the lack of control for co-morbid psychiatric disorders, which make it difficult to disentangle which of the above effects are due to maltreatment, the associated psychiatric conditions or a combination or interaction between both. Overall, the better controlled studies that show a direct correlation between childhood abuse and brain measures suggest that the most prominent deficits associated with early childhood abuse are in the function and structure of lateral and ventromedial fronto-limbic brain areas and networks that mediate behavioral and affect control. Future, large scale multimodal neuroimaging studies in medication-naïve subjects, however, are needed that control for psychiatric co-morbidities in order to elucidate the structural and functional brain sequelae that are associated with early environmental adversity

  16. Extracellular α-synuclein--a possible initiator of inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen-qing; Tian, Zeng-min; Yin, Feng; Sun, Jun-zhao; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving the loss of dopamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies which contain high levels of α-synuclein. Although the causative factors of PD remain unclear, the progression of PD is accompanied by a highly localized inflammatory response mediated by reactive microglia. Recently, attention has focused on the relationship between α-synuclein and microglial activation. This review examines the role of α-synuclein on microglia in PD pathogenesis and progression, we also discuss the way of α-synuclein induced microglial activation. PMID:27004367

  17. Oral Campylobacter species: Initiators of a subgroup of inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies detected a significantly higher prevalence of Campylobacter species such as Campylobacter concisus (C. concisus) in intestinal biopsies and fecal samples collected from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to controls. Most of these Campylobacter species are not of zoonotic origin but are human oral Campylobacter species. Bacterial species usually cause diseases in the location where they colonize. However, C. concisus and other oral Campylobacter species are associated with IBD occurring at the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that these Campylobacter species may have unique virulence factors that are expressed in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26309350

  18. 77 FR 27460 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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  1. 78 FR 22268 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13-006, initial review... Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13-006. Matters To Be... Assistance for Public Health Interventions in Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera...

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  3. A Group Intervention Model for Speech and Communication Skills in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Initial Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor, Yael; Posen, Jennie; Amir, Ofer; Dori, Nechama; Giladi, Nir

    2005-01-01

    Various speech and voice disorders affect 70% to 85% of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Speech treatment is generally conducted on an individual basis, with family member involvement. Clinical experience indicates that many patients do not practice treatments at home or apply the learned techniques in everyday situations. An…

  4. 77 FR 291 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

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  19. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J B; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R G; Clark, M L; Farthing, M J; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1993-01-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four weeks, or 0.75 mg prednisolone/kg/day for two weeks and subsequent reducing doses. Nine of 22 (41%) patients assigned to nutritional treatment were intolerant of the diet. Thirty patients completed four weeks treatment. Disease activity decreased on elemental diet from mean (SEM) 4.8 (0.9) to 1.7 (0.6), p < 0.05, and on prednisolone from 5.3 (0.5) to 1.9 (0.6), p < 0.05. For each treatment, nourished and malnourished patients responded similarly. Patients with longstanding disease responded as well as newly diagnosed patients. The probability of maintaining remission at six months was 0.67 after prednisolone, 0.28 after elemental diet, and at one year was 0.35 after prednisolone and 0.09 after elemental diet, p < 0.05. When tolerated, elemental diet is as effective in the short term as prednisolone in newly and previously diagnosed Crohn's disease, and its benefit is independent of nutritional state. The subsequent relapse rate after elemental diet induced remission, however, is greater than after treatment with prednisolone. PMID:8406153

  20. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J B; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R G; Clark, M L; Farthing, M J; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1993-09-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four weeks, or 0.75 mg prednisolone/kg/day for two weeks and subsequent reducing doses. Nine of 22 (41%) patients assigned to nutritional treatment were intolerant of the diet. Thirty patients completed four weeks treatment. Disease activity decreased on elemental diet from mean (SEM) 4.8 (0.9) to 1.7 (0.6), p < 0.05, and on prednisolone from 5.3 (0.5) to 1.9 (0.6), p < 0.05. For each treatment, nourished and malnourished patients responded similarly. Patients with longstanding disease responded as well as newly diagnosed patients. The probability of maintaining remission at six months was 0.67 after prednisolone, 0.28 after elemental diet, and at one year was 0.35 after prednisolone and 0.09 after elemental diet, p < 0.05. When tolerated, elemental diet is as effective in the short term as prednisolone in newly and previously diagnosed Crohn's disease, and its benefit is independent of nutritional state. The subsequent relapse rate after elemental diet induced remission, however, is greater than after treatment with prednisolone. PMID:8406153

  1. Neuroimaging for Pediatric Head Trauma: Do Patient and Hospital Characteristics Influence Who Gets Imaged?

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Bourgeois, Florence T.; Schutzman, Sara A.; Bernstein, Ari; Lee, Lois K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To identify patient, provider, and hospital characteristics associated with the use of neuroimaging in the evaluation of head trauma in children. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of children (≤19 years of age) with head injuries from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. NHAMCS collects data on approximately 25,000 visits annually to 600 randomly selected hospital emergency and outpatient departments. This study examined visits to U.S. emergency departments between 2002 and 2006. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze characteristics associated with neuroimaging in children with head injuries. Results: There were 50,835 pediatric visits in the 5 year sample, of which 1,256 (2.5%, 95% CI = 2.2% to 2.7%) were for head injury. Among these, 39% (95% CI = 34% to 43%) underwent evaluation with neuroimaging. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with neuroimaging included white race (odds ratio [OR] 1.5, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.1), older age (OR 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.5), presentation to a general hospital (vs. a pediatric hospital, OR 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.3), more emergent triage status (OR 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.8), admission or transfer (OR 2.7, 95% CI = 1.4 to 5.3), and treatment by an attending physician (OR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1 to 3.7). The effect of race was mitigated at the pediatric hospitals compared to at the general hospitals (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, patient race, age, and hospital-specific characteristics were associated with the frequency of neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with closed head injuries. Based on these results, focusing quality improvement initiatives on physicians at general hospitals may be an effective approach to decreasing rates of neuroimaging after pediatric head trauma. PMID:20653582

  2. 7-T MRI in Cerebrovascular Diseases: Challenges to Overcome and Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Anita A; van der Kolk, Anja G; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Luijten, Peter R; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the investigation of cerebrovascular diseases. Compared with computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), its advantages in diagnosing cerebrovascular pathology include its superior tissue contrast, its ability to visualize blood vessels without the use of a contrast agent, and its use of magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses instead of ionizing radiation. In recent years, ultrahigh field MRI at 7 tesla (7 T) has shown promise in the diagnosis of many cerebrovascular diseases. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; 2.3x and 4.7x increase compared with 3 and 1.5 T, respectively) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at this higher field strength can be exploited to obtain a higher spatial resolution and higher lesion conspicuousness, enabling assessment of smaller brain structures and lesions. Cerebrovascular diseases can be assessed at different tissue levels; for instance, changes of the arteries feeding the brain can be visualized to determine the cause of ischemic stroke, regional changes in brain perfusion can be mapped to predict outcome after revascularization, and tissue damage, including old and recent ischemic infarcts, can be evaluated as a marker of ischemic burden. For the purpose of this review, we will discriminate 3 levels of assessment of cerebrovascular diseases using MRI: Pipes, Perfusion, and Parenchyma (3 Ps). The term Pipes refers to the brain-feeding arteries from the heart and aortic arch, upwards to the carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and smaller intracranial arterial branches. Perfusion is the amount of blood arriving at the brain tissue level, and includes the vascular reserve and perfusion territories. Parenchyma refers to the acute and chronic burden of brain tissue damage, which includes larger infarcts, smaller microinfarcts, and small vessel disease manifestations such as white matter lesions, lacunar infarcts, and microbleeds

  3. Functional neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Katherine C; Shin, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem that can affect individuals who have been exposed to a traumatic event or events, such as combat, violent crime or childhood abuse. Over the past several years, neuroimaging studies of PTSD have focused on elucidating the brain circuits that mediate this disorder. In this article, we will briefly introduce some of the methods used in functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD. We will then review functional neuroimaging studies that have reported significant findings in the amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and insula. Finally, we will suggest future directions for research. PMID:21306214

  4. International Dermatology Outcome Measures Initiative as Applied to Psoriatic Disease Outcomes: An Update.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph F; Armstrong, April W; Saraiya, Ami; Latella, John; Garg, Amit; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2016-05-01

    Previous publications have described the International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) group, comprising patients, physicians, health economists, participating pharmaceutical industry partners, payers, and regulatory agencies. The goal of IDEOM is to create patient-centered, validated measures of dermatologic disease progression and treatment efficacy for use in both clinical trials and clinical practice. We provide an update of IDEOM activities as of our 2015 IDEOM meeting in Washington, DC, USA. PMID:27134269

  5. Functional neuroimaging and schizophrenia: a view towards effective connectivity modeling and polygenic risk

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Rebecca; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    We review critical trends in imaging genetics as applied to schizophrenia research, and then discuss some future directions of the field. A plethora of imaging genetics studies have investigated the impact of genetic variation on brain function, since the paradigm of a neuroimaging intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia first emerged. It was initially posited that the effects of schizophrenia susceptibility genes would be more penetrant at the level of biologically based neuroimaging intermediate phenotypes than at the level of a complex and phenotypically heterogeneous psychiatric syndrome. The results of many studies support this assumption, most of which show single genetic variants to be associated with changes in activity of localized brain regions, as determined by select cognitive controlled tasks. From these basic studies, functional neuroimaging analysis of intermediate phenotypes has progressed to more complex and realistic models of brain dysfunction, incorporating models of functional and effective connectivity, including the modalities of psycho-physiological interaction, dynamic causal modeling, and graph theory metrics. The genetic association approaches applied to imaging genetics have also progressed to more sophisticated multivariate effects, including incorporation of two-way and three-way epistatic interactions, and most recently polygenic risk models. Imaging genetics is a unique and powerful strategy for understanding the neural mechanisms of genetic risk for complex CNS disorders at the human brain level. PMID:24174900

  6. Functional neuroimaging and schizophrenia: a view towards effective connectivity modeling and polygenic risk.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Rebecca; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    We review critical trends in imaging genetics as applied to schizophrenia research, and then discuss some future directions of the field. A plethora of imaging genetics studies have investigated the impact of genetic variation on brain function, since the paradigm of a neuroimaging intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia first emerged. It was initially posited that the effects of schizophrenia susceptibility genes would be more penetrant at the level of biologically based neuroimaging intermediate phenotypes than at the level of a complex and phenotypically heterogeneous psychiatric syndrome. The results of many studies support this assumption, most of which show single genetic variants to be associated with changes in activity of localized brain regions, as determined by select cognitive controlled tasks. From these basic studies, functional neuroimaging analysis of intermediate phenotypes has progressed to more complex and realistic models of brain dysfunction, incorporating models of functional and effective connectivity, including the modalities of psycho-physiological interaction, dynamic causal modeling, and graph theory metrics. The genetic association approaches applied to imaging genetics have also progressed to more sophisticated multivariate effects, including incorporation of two-way and three-way epistatic interactions, and most recently polygenic risk models. Imaging genetics is a unique and powerful strategy for understanding the neural mechanisms of genetic risk for complex CNS disorders at the human brain level. PMID:24174900

  7. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  8. The Current Impact of Incidental Findings Found during Neuroimaging on Neurologists’ Workloads

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Thomas C.; Boyd-Ellison, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neuroimaging is an important diagnostic tool in the assessment of neurological disease, but often unmasks Incidental Findings (IFs). The negative impacts of IFs, such as ‘patient’ anxiety, present neurologists with management dilemmas, largely due to the limited knowledge base surrounding the medical significance of these IFs. In particular, the lack of evidence-based clinical trials investigating the efficacy of treatments for subclinical IFs makes management protocols challenging. The objective was to determine the impact IFs may have on neurologists’ workloads and healthcare budgets and to examine neurologists’ concerns regarding the clinical management of these ‘patients’. Methods Qualitative research based on constructivist grounded theory. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews of purposively sampled neurologists, coded, and concurrent comparative analysis performed. A substantive theory of the ‘IF impacts’ was developed after concept saturation. Results Neurologists managed the escalating workload caused by an increased number of referrals of ‘patients’ with IFs found during neuroimaging; however it was unclear whether this was sustainable in the future. Neurologists experienced IF management dilemmas and spent more time with ‘patients’ affected by anxiety. The lack of information provided to those undergoing neuroimaging by the referring clinician regarding the possibility of discovering IFs was highlighted. Conclusion The impact of IFs upon the neurologist, ‘patient’ and the health institution appeared considerable. Further research determining the natural history of subclinical IFs and the efficacy of intervention will help to alleviate these issues. PMID:25723558

  9. Genetic Testing and Neuroimaging: Trading off Benefit and Risk for Youth with Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Borgelt, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. The first onset of mental illness usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Neuroimaging and genetic testing have been invaluable in research on behavioral and intentional disorders, particularly with their potential to lead to improved diagnostic and predictive capabilities and to decrease the associated burdens of disease. The present study focused specifically the perspectives of mental health providers on the role of neuroimaging and genetic testing in clinical practice with children and adolescents. We interviewed 38 psychiatrists, psychologists, and allied mental health professionals who work primarily with youth about their receptivity towards either the use of neuroimaging or genetic testing. Interviews probed the role they foresee for these modalities for prediction, diagnosis, and treatment planning, and the benefits and risks they anticipate. Practitioners anticipated three major benefits associated with clinical introduction of imaging and genetic testing in the mental health care for youth: (1) improved understanding of illness, (2) more accurate diagnosis than available through conventional clinical examination, and (3) validation of treatment plans. They also perceived three major risks: (1) potential adverse impacts on employment and insurance as adolescents reach adulthood, (2) misuse or misinterpretation of the imaging or genetic data, and (3) infringements on self-esteem or self-motivation. Movement of brain imaging and genetic testing into clinical care will require a delicate balance of biology and respect for autonomy in the still-evolving cognitive and affective world of young individuals. PMID:26949737

  10. Methylmalonic Acidemia: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings of This Neurometabolic Disorder (An Iranian Pediatric Case Series)

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; JAFARI, Narjes; AHMAD ABADI, Farzad; JABBEDARI, Sayena; TAGHDIRI, Mohammad-Mahdi; NEMATI, Hamid; SAKET, Sasan; SHARIATMADARI, Seyed-fakhreddin; ALAEE, Mohammad-Reza; GHOFRANI, Mohammad; TONEKABONI, Seyed Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Methylmalonic acidemia is one of the inborn errors of metabolism resulting in the accumulation of acylcarnitine in blood and increased urinary methylmalonic acid excretion. This disorder can have symptoms, such as neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations, lethargy, and anorexia. Materials & Methods The patients who were diagnosed as methylmalonic acidemia in the Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran, between 2002 and 2012 were included in our study. The disorder was confirmed by clinical findings, neuroimaging findings, and neurometabolic and genetic assessment in reference laboratory in Germany. We assessed the age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical manifestations, and neuroimaging findings of 20 patients with methylmalonic acidemia. Results Eighty percent of the patients were offspring of consanguineous marriages. Half of the patients had Failure to thrive (FTT) due to anorexia; 85% had history of developmental delay or regression, and 20% had refractory seizure, which all of them were controlled. The patients with methylmalonic acidemia were followed for approximately 5 years and the follow-up showed that the patients with early diagnosis had a more favorable clinical response in growth index, refractory seizure, anorexia, and neurodevelopmental delay. Neuroimaging findings included brain atrophy, basal ganglia involvement (often in putamen), and periventricular leukomalacia. Conclusion According to the results of this study, we suggest that early assessment and diagnosis have an important role in the prevention of disease progression and clinical signs. PMID:24665309

  11. Biochemical and neuroimaging studies in subjective cognitive decline: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Ching-Po; Han, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Neurodegeneration due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) can progress over decades before dementia becomes apparent. Indeed, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. In most cases, MCI is preceded by subjective cognitive decline (SCD), which is applied to individuals who have self-reported memory-related complaints and has been associated with a higher risk of future cognitive decline and conversion to dementia. Based on the schema of a well-received model of biomarker dynamics in AD pathogenesis, it has been postulated that SCD symptoms may result from compensatory changes in response to β-amyloid accumulation and neurodegeneration. Although SCD is considered a prodromal stage of MCI, it is also a common manifestation in old age, independent of AD, and the predictive value of SCD for AD pathology remains controversial. Here, we provide a review focused on the contributions of cross-sectional and longitudinal analogical studies of biomarkers and neuroimaging evidence in disentangling under what conditions SCD may be attributable to AD pathology. In conclusion, there is promising evidence indicating that clinicians should be able to differentiate pre-AD SCD based on the presence of pathophysiological biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging. However, this neuroimaging approach is still at an immature stage without an established rubric of standards. A substantial amount of work remains in terms of replicating recent findings and validating the clinical utility of identifying SCD. PMID:25864576

  12. [Integrative neuroimaging for schizophrenia targeting early intervention and prevention (IN-STEP)].

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kiyoto

    2010-11-01

    The editorial of the new-year issue of Nature 2010 features "A decade for psychiatric disorders". The DALY estimation clearly shows that psychiatric disorders are the top source for burden of diseases to the individual life and society. Schizophrenia is a most devastating psychiatric disorder in which the onset is usually at youth and the cognitive dysfunction persists for life-long in some patients. Schizophrenia is associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities. It has been unknown whether post-onset progressive pathology is also present in schizophrenia until the recent sophistication of in vivo neuroimaging techniques. Longitudinal neuroimaging studies on first-episode schizophrenia have shown a progressive deterioration of structure and function of neocortical regions in the early stage of the disorder. Insult to dendritic spines through glutamatergic dysfunction may underlie this process, which may in turn be a promising molecular target for intervention to improve the functional outcome of schizophrenia. More recently, the question of whether early intervention can be targeted at prodromal stage of schizophrenia has called special attention in psychiatry. In University of Tokyo, the integrative neuroimaging studies for schizophrenia targeting early intervention and prevention (IN-STEP) is ongoing. Through these efforts, we would like to contribute to the establishment of "youth mental health", where every youth in the community can know, prevent, and have easy access to needs- and value-based services, and pursue mental well-being and recovery. PMID:21921453

  13. Effect of mind on brain activity: evidence from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy and placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Mentalistic variables must be considered to reach a correct understanding of the neurophysiological basis of behavior in humans. Confusion regarding the relative importance of neurophysiological and mentalistic variables can lead to important misconceptions about causes and effects in the study of human behavior. In this article, we review neuroimaging studies of the effect of psychotherapy in patients suffering from diverse forms of psychopathology (obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, unipolar major depressive disorder, spider phobia). We also review neuroimaging studies of the placebo effect in healthy individuals (placebo analgesia, psychostimulant expectation) and patients with Parkinson's disease or unipolar major depressive disorder. Mental functions and processes involved in diverse forms of psychotherapy exert a significant influence on brain activity. With regard to the placebo effect, beliefs and expectations can markedly modulate neurophysiological and neurochemical activity in brain regions involved in perception, movement, pain and various aspects of emotion processing. The findings of the neuroimaging studies reviewed here strongly support the view that the subjective nature and the intentional content of mental processes significantly influence the various levels of brain functioning (e.g. molecular, cellular, neural circuit) and brain plasticity. PMID:19023697

  14. Early-initiated zidovudine therapy prevents disease but not low levels of persistent retrovirus in mice.

    PubMed

    Morrey, J D; Okleberry, K M; Sidwell, R W

    1991-01-01

    An F1 hybrid mouse strain containing the Rfv-3r/s genotype was inoculated with Friend virus complex (FV) and treated with zidovudine (ZDV) intraperitoneally three times daily for 20 days beginning as early as 10 min after initial viral exposure. This strain of mice develops FV-specific neutralizing antibodies that aid in reducing viremia and splenic virus titers but do not prevent splenomegaly and eventual FV-associated death. The virally exposed mice treated with ZDV did not develop splenomegaly or have detectable viremia after the last drug treatment. On day 21, a single animal had demonstrable virus in the spleen as determined by a focal immunoenzyme assay; 57% had detectable virus at 5 weeks, but non displayed splenic virus after 35 weeks. None of the animals died after the 35-week holding period, compared to 38% dying in placebo-treated mice. To detect low levels of the virus, or potentially latent virus, splenocytes were cocultivated with a cell line known to readily propagate FV, and the cells were subsequently passaged four times to amplify replication of the virus. After amplification, a significant increase was seen in the number of mice testing positive for virus. Thus, ZDV treatment initiated early after virus exposure was effective in preventing FV-induced splenomegaly and death, but did not prevent low levels of persistent retrovirus in the mice. PMID:2016687

  15. Role of Neuroimaging in the Presurgical Evaluation of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Hans

    2008-01-01

    A significant minority of patients with focal epilepsy are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the presurgical evaluation of theses patients. The most frequent etiologies of pharmacoresistant epilepsy in the adult population are mesial temporal sclerosis, malformations of cortical development, cavernous angiomas, and low-grade neoplasms. High-resolution multiplanar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with sequences providing T1 and T2 contrast is the initial imaging study of choice to detect these epileptogenic lesions. The epilepsy MRI protocol can be individually tailored when considering the patient's clinical and electrophysiological data. Metabolic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. These techniques may have localizing value in patients with a normal MRI scan. Functional MRI is helpful in non-invasively identifying areas of eloquent cortex. Developments in imaging technology and digital postprocessing may increase the yield for imaging studies to detect the epileptogenic lesion and to characterize its connectivity within the epileptic brain. PMID:19513318

  16. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  17. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers.

    PubMed

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings. PMID:26229677

  18. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed. PMID:24095880

  19. Risk factors for initial respiratory disease in United States' feedlots based on producer-collected daily morbidity counts.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Michael W; Dargatz, David A; Wagner, Bruce A

    2008-04-01

    The incidence of initial respiratory disease was followed for 12 weeks in 122 pens of feedlot cattle, based on producer-collected daily morbidity counts. Weekly incidence density was calculated based on the number of new cases and the population at risk. Incidence density was greatest in the 1st week after arrival and decreased in following weeks. Weekly incidence rate varied between pens and over time from 0 to 27.7 cases per 100 animal weeks at risk. A negative binomial model controlling for multiple events within pens and over time was used to model effects on the number of new cases. Mixed gender groups, cattle from multiple sources and increasing distance shipped were associated with increased risk for initial respiratory morbidity. Heavier entry weight was associated with decreased morbidity risk. These factors may be useful in categorizing groups of calves into risk groups for targeted purchase and management decision making. PMID:18481546

  20. The human secretome atlas initiative: Implications in health and disease conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Pillai, Dinesh K; Sankoorikal, Binu-John; Formolo, Catherine A; Mac, Jenny; Edwards, Nathan J.; Rose, Mary C; Hathout, Yetrib

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of human body fluids is highly challenging, therefore many researchers are redirecting efforts towards secretome profiling. The goal is to define potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the secretome that can be traced back in accessible human body fluids. However, currently there is a lack of secretome profiles of normal human primary cells making it difficult to assess the biological meaning of current findings. In this study we sought to establish secretome profiles of human primary cells obtained from healthy donors with the goal of building a human secretome atlas. Such an atlas can be used as a reference for discovery of potential disease associated biomarkers and eventually novel therapeutic targets. As a preliminary study, secretome profiles were established for six different types of human primary cell cultures and checked for overlaps with the three major human body fluids including plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. About 67% of the 1054 identified proteins in the secretome of these primary cells occurred in at least one body fluid. Furthermore, comparison of the secretome profiles of two human glioblastoma cell lines to this new human secretome atlas enabled unambiguous identification of potential brain tumor biomarkers. These biomarkers can be easily monitored in different body fluids using stable isotope labeled standard proteins. The long term goal of this study is to establish a comprehensive online human secretome atlas for future use as a reference for any disease related secretome study. PMID:23603790

  1. Functional Neuroimaging Abnormalities in Psychosis Spectrum Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Calkins, Monica E.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Hopson, Ryan D.; Jackson, Chad; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Bilker, Warren B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The continuum view of the psychosis spectrum (PS) implies that in population-based samples, PS symptoms should be associated with neural abnormalities similar to those found in help-seeking clinical-risk individuals and in schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging has not previously been applied in large population-based PS samples, and can help understand the neural architecture of psychosis more broadly, and identify brain phenotypes beyond symptomatology that are associated with the extended psychosis phenotype. Objective To examine the categorical and dimensional relationships of PS symptoms to prefrontal hypoactivation during working memory and to amygdala hyperactivation during threat emotion processing. Design The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a genotyped prospectively accrued population-based sample of nearly 10,000 youths, who received a structured psychiatric evaluation and a computerized neurocognitive battery. A subsample of 1,445 subjects underwent neuroimaging including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks examined here. Setting The PNC is a collaboration between The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Participants Youths ages 11–22 years identified through structured interview as having psychosis-spectrum features (PS, n=260), and typically developing comparison subjects without significant psychopathology (TD, n=220). Main Outcomes and Measures Two fMRI paradigms were utilized, a fractal n-back working memory task probing executive system function, and an emotion identification task probing amygdala responses to threatening faces. Results In the n-back task, PS showed reduced activation in executive control circuitry, which correlated with cognitive deficits. During emotion identification, PS demonstrated elevated amygdala responses to threatening facial expressions, which correlated with positive symptom severity. Conclusions and Relevance The pattern of

  2. Neuroimaging with magnetoencephalography: A dynamic view of brain pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Proskovec, Amy L; McDermott, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive, silent, and totally passive neurophysiological imaging method with excellent temporal resolution (∼1 ms) and good spatial precision (∼3-5 mm). In a typical experiment, MEG data are acquired as healthy controls or patients with neurologic or psychiatric disorders perform a specific cognitive task, or receive sensory stimulation. The resulting data are generally analyzed using standard electrophysiological methods, coupled with advanced image reconstruction algorithms. To date, the total number of MEG instruments and associated users is significantly smaller than comparable human neuroimaging techniques, although this is likely to change in the near future with advances in the technology. Despite this small base, MEG research has made a significant impact on several areas of translational neuroscience, largely through its unique capacity to quantify the oscillatory dynamics of activated brain circuits in humans. This review focuses on the clinical areas where MEG imaging has arguably had the greatest impact in regard to the identification of aberrant neural dynamics at the regional and network level, monitoring of disease progression, determining how efficacious pharmacologic and behavioral interventions modulate neural systems, and the development of neural markers of disease. Specifically, this review covers recent advances in understanding the abnormal neural oscillatory dynamics that underlie Parkinson's disease, autism spectrum disorders, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders, cerebral palsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, cognitive aging, and post-traumatic stress disorder. MEG imaging has had a major impact on how clinical neuroscientists understand the brain basis of these disorders, and its translational influence is rapidly expanding with new discoveries and applications emerging continuously. PMID:26874219

  3. The Evolution of Neuroimaging Research and Developmental Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Angela B.; Foundas, Anne L.; Leonard, Christiana M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews current neuroimaging literature, including computer tomography, positron emission tomography, single photon emission spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging, on individuals with developmental language disorders. The review suggests a complicated relationship between cortical morphometry and language development that is…

  4. Terminology development towards harmonizing multiple clinical neuroimaging research repositories

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica A.; Pasquerello, Danielle; Turner, Matthew D.; Keator, David B.; Alpert, Kathryn; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Tallis, Marcelo; Ambite, Jose Luis; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Data sharing and mediation across disparate neuroimaging repositories requires extensive effort to ensure that the different domains of data types are referred to by commonly agreed upon terms. Within the SchizConnect project, which enables querying across decentralized databases of neuroimaging, clinical, and cognitive data from various studies of schizophrenia, we developed a model for each data domain, identified common usable terms that could be agreed upon across the repositories, and linked them to standard ontological terms where possible. We had the goal of facilitating both the current user experience in querying and future automated computations and reasoning regarding the data. We found that existing terminologies are incomplete for these purposes, even with the history of neuroimaging data sharing in the field; and we provide a model for efforts focused on querying multiple clinical neuroimaging repositories. PMID:26688838

  5. Auditory Neuroimaging with fMRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Talavage, Thomas M.; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Scott, Sophie K.

    2013-01-01

    For much of the past 30 years, investigations of auditory perception and language have been enhanced or even driven by the use of functional neuroimaging techniques that specialize in localization of central responses. Beginning with investigations using positron emission tomography (PET) and gradually shifting primarily to usage of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), auditory neuroimaging has greatly advanced our understanding of the organization and response properties of brain regions critical to the perception of and communication with the acoustic world in which we live. As the complexity of the questions being addressed has increased, the techniques, experiments and analyses applied have also become more nuanced and specialized. A brief review of the history of these investigations sets the stage for an overview and analysis of how these neuroimaging modalities are becoming ever more effective tools for understanding the auditory brain. We conclude with a brief discussion of open methodological issues as well as potential clinical applications for auditory neuroimaging. PMID:24076424

  6. Pregnancy related breast diseases in a developing African country: Initial Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji-Sofoluwe, Adenike Temitayo; Obajimi, Gbolahan Oladele; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi

    2015-01-01

    Benign diseases are more common than malignant diseases in pregnant and lactating women. Fibroadenomas are the most commonly identified benign breast tumour in pregnant and lactating women. Pregnancy related breast cancer is defined as breast cancer that occurs during pregnancy or within 1 year of delivery. Its incidence is estimated at 1 in 3000 to 1 in 10 000 pregnancies. Several reproductive factors like age at menarche, age at menopause, age at full-term pregnancy, parity, age at any birth and spacing of pregnancies, breast feeding, characteristics of the menstrual cycle, infertility, spontaneous and induced abortions, characteristics of the menstrual cycle and infertility are some of the factors that have been incriminated as risk factors for breast cancer. We sought to describe the predominant breast pattern, sonographic array of pregnancy related breast diseases in women referred to the breast imaging unit in the department of Radiology at the University College Hospital, Ibadan south west Nigeria. Socio-demographic characteristics in these women were also evaluated. Archived images were reviewed and documented and data was analysed with SPSS version 17 and presented with descriptives. In this descriptive study, we retrospectively retrieved the sonomammographic records of 21 women (pregnant or lactating) referred to and imaged in the department of radiology, University college hospital Ibadan, between 2006 and 2013. Diagnostic breast sonograms performed by MO and ATS; Consultant radiologists with 7-10 years’ experience utilized a 7-10 MHz transducer of the General electric GE Logiq P5 machine for the scans. Twenty-one women with ages between 22-42 years (Mean 31.4 ±5.4 SD) pregnant or lactating were referred to the radiology department for sonomammographic evaluation. Majority of the women were in the 3rd decade. Referral was mainly (11) by family Physicians from the general outpatient clinic, 5 were self-referred, 2 from radiotherapy department, 2 from

  7. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  8. Choroid plexus calcification: clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological correlations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Ileana; Udriştoiu, I; Marinescu, D

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is recognized as a psychiatric disorder that causes the most pronounced disturbances of cognition and social integration. In the etiopathogenesis of the disease, genetic, neurobiological and vascular factors are involved. Functional integrity of the brain can be correlated with the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the dysfunction of this barrier is an indicator that suggests neurodevelopmental abnormalities, injuries of various etiologies and dysfunctions within the small vessels of the brain that disrupt the calcium homeostasis. Neuroimaging shows that in patients with poor evolution, cognitive dysfunction and therapeutic resistance, the presence of choroid plexus calcification associated with hippocampal, frontal, temporoparietal and cerebellar atrophies. Antipsychotics with high capacity to block D2 dopamine receptors (haloperidol model) can aggravate apoptotic mechanisms of the brain areas involved in cognition and disrupts the functional integrity of the BBB due to decreased of choroid plexus blood flow because of the narrowing of cerebral small vessels. Choroid plexus calcification may be a predictive indicator of poor evolution or of a neurodegenerative type. PMID:23771083

  9. Associations between Verbal Learning Slope and Neuroimaging Markers across the Cognitive Aging Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Katherine A; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Samuels, Lauren R; Lane, Elizabeth M; Bell, Susan P; Liu, Dandan; Hohman, Timothy J; Romano, Raymond R; Fritzsche, Laura R; Lu, Zengqi; Jefferson, Angela L

    2015-07-01

    A symptom of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a flat learning profile. Learning slope calculation methods vary, and the optimal method for capturing neuroanatomical changes associated with MCI and early AD pathology is unclear. This study cross-sectionally compared four different learning slope measures from the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (simple slope, regression-based slope, two-slope method, peak slope) to structural neuroimaging markers of early AD neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume, cortical thickness in parahippocampal gyrus, precuneus, and lateral prefrontal cortex) across the cognitive aging spectrum [normal control (NC); (n=198; age=76±5), MCI (n=370; age=75±7), and AD (n=171; age=76±7)] in ADNI. Within diagnostic group, general linear models related slope methods individually to neuroimaging variables, adjusting for age, sex, education, and APOE4 status. Among MCI, better learning performance on simple slope, regression-based slope, and late slope (Trial 2-5) from the two-slope method related to larger parahippocampal thickness (all p-values<.01) and hippocampal volume (p<.01). Better regression-based slope (p<.01) and late slope (p<.01) were related to larger ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in MCI. No significant associations emerged between any slope and neuroimaging variables for NC (p-values ≥.05) or AD (p-values ≥.02). Better learning performances related to larger medial temporal lobe (i.e., hippocampal volume, parahippocampal gyrus thickness) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in MCI only. Regression-based and late slope were most highly correlated with neuroimaging markers and explained more variance above and beyond other common memory indices, such as total learning. Simple slope may offer an acceptable alternative given its ease of calculation. PMID:26219209

  10. Detecting neuroimaging biomarkers for schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of multivariate pattern recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Kambeitz, Joseph; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana; Leucht, Stefan; Wood, Stephen; Davatzikos, Christos; Malchow, Berend; Falkai, Peter; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Multivariate pattern recognition approaches have recently facilitated the search for reliable neuroimaging-based biomarkers in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. By taking into account the multivariate nature of brain functional and structural changes as well as their distributed localization across the whole brain, they overcome drawbacks of traditional univariate approaches. To evaluate the overall reliability of neuroimaging-based biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive literature search to identify all studies that used multivariate pattern recognition to identify patterns of brain alterations that differentiate patients with schizophrenia from healthy controls. A bivariate random-effects meta-analytic model was implemented to investigate the sensitivity and specificity across studies as well as to assess the robustness to potentially confounding variables. In the total sample of n=38 studies (1602 patients and 1637 healthy controls), patients were differentiated from controls with a sensitivity of 80.3% (95% CI: 76.7-83.5%) and a specificity of 80.3% (95% CI: 76.9-83.3%). Analysis of neuroimaging modality indicated higher sensitivity (84.46%, 95% CI: 79.9-88.2%) and similar specificity (76.9%, 95% CI: 71.3-81.6%) of rsfMRI studies as compared with structural MRI studies (sensitivity: 76.4%, 95% CI: 71.9-80.4%, specificity of 79.0%, 95% CI: 74.6-82.8%). Moderator analysis identified significant effects of age (p=0.029), imaging modality (p=0.019), and disease stage (p=0.025) on sensitivity as well as of positive-to-negative symptom ratio (p=0.022) and antipsychotic medication (p=0.016) on specificity. Our results underline the utility of multivariate pattern recognition approaches for the identification of reliable neuroimaging-based biomarkers. Despite the clinical heterogeneity of the schizophrenia phenotype, brain functional and structural alterations differentiate schizophrenic patients from healthy controls with 80% sensitivity and specificity

  11. [Neuroimaging findings in cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego Alberto; Vargas, Sergio Alberto; Montoya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts is a rare condition characterized by brain, retinal and bone anomalies, as well as a predisposition to gastrointestinal bleeding. There are few reported cases of this condition in adults, among whom the incidence is low. Neuroimaging findings are characteristic, with bilateral calcifications, leukoencephalopathy and intracranial cysts. The purpose of this article was to do a literature survey and illustrate two cases diagnosed with the aid of neuroimaging. PMID:24967922

  12. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced understanding biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Methods Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). Results 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Conclusion Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. PMID:25684554

  13. Orbital Pseudotumor: Uncommon Initial Presentation of IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Teresa; Azêdo Montes, Ricardo; Andrade, Beatriz; Lanzieri, Pedro; Mocarzel, Luis

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) encompasses a group of fibroinflammatory conditions recognized in recent times. The main clinical features include variable degrees of tissue fibrosis, tumorlike expansions, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells, and elevated serum IgG4. A case has been reported of an elderly patient with an unexplained unilateral exophthalmia; biopsy was performed and revealed lymphocytic infiltration, suggesting IgG4-RD. High serum levels of IgG4, in association with a good response to steroid therapy and to the exclusion of other diagnoses, confirmed the hypothesis of orbital pseudotumor by IgG4-RD. PMID:25838962

  14. Initial use of fast switched dual energy CT for coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlicek, William; Panse, Prasad; Hara, Amy; Boltz, Thomas; Paden, Robert; Yamak, Didem; Licato, Paul; Chandra, Naveen; Okerlund, Darin; Dutta, Sandeep; Bhotika, Rahul; Langan, David

    2010-04-01

    Coronary CT Angiography (CTA) is limited in patients with calcified plaque and stents. CTA is unable to confidently differentiate fibrous from lipid plaque. Fast switched dual energy CTA offers certain advantages. Dual energy CTA removes calcium thereby improving visualization of the lumen and potentially providing a more accurate measure of stenosis. Dual energy CTA directly measures calcium burden (calcium hydroxyapatite) thereby eliminating a separate non-contrast series for Agatston Scoring. Using material basis pairs, the differentiation of fibrous and lipid plaques is also possible. Patency of a previously stented coronary artery is difficult to visualize with CTA due to resolution constraints and localized beam hardening artifacts. Monochromatic 70 keV or Iodine images coupled with Virtual Non-stent images lessen beam hardening artifact and blooming. Virtual removal of stainless steel stents improves assessment of in-stent re-stenosis. A beating heart phantom with 'cholesterol' and 'fibrous' phantom coronary plaques were imaged with dual energy CTA. Statistical classification methods (SVM, kNN, and LDA) distinguished 'cholesterol' from 'fibrous' phantom plaque tissue. Applying this classification method to 16 human soft plaques, a lipid 'burden' may be useful for characterizing risk of coronary disease. We also found that dual energy CTA is more sensitive to iodine contrast than conventional CTA which could improve the differentiation of myocardial infarct and ischemia on delayed acquisitions. These phantom and patient acquisitions show advantages with using fast switched dual energy CTA for coronary imaging and potentially extends the use of CT for addressing problem areas of non-invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease.

  15. A practical review of the neuropathology and neuroimaging of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul M; Roncaroli, Frederico; Waldman, Adam; Sormani, Maria Pia; De Stefano, Nicola; Giovannoni, Gavin; Reynolds, Richard

    2016-08-01

    The variability in the severity and clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) has as its basis an extreme heterogeneity in the location, nature and extent of pathology in the brain and spinal cord. Understanding the underlying neuropathology and associated pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease helps to communicate the rationale for treatment and disease monitoring to patients. Neuroimaging is an important tool for this: it allows clinicians to relate neuropathological changes to clinical presentations and to monitor the course of their disease. Here, we review MS neuropathology and its imaging correlates to provide a practical guide for using MRI to assess disease severity and treatment responses. This provides a foundation for optimal management of patients based on the principle that they show 'no evidence of disease activity'. PMID:27009310

  16. Neuroimaging supports central pathology in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Hilz, Max J; Berlin, Dena; Yau, Po Lai; Javier, David; Sweat, Victoria; Bruehl, Hannah; Convit, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a hereditary peripheral and central nervous system disorder with poorly defined central neuropathology. This prospective pilot study aimed to determine if MRI would provide objective parameters of central neuropathology. There were 14 study subjects, seven FD individuals (18.6 +/- 4.2 years, 3 female) and seven controls (19.1 +/- 5.8 years, 3 female). All subjects had standardized brain MRI evaluation including quantitative regional volume measurements, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of white matter (WM) microstructural integrity by calculation of fractional anisotropy (FA), and proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to assess neuronal health. The FD patients had significantly decreased FA in optic radiation (p = 0.009) and middle cerebellar peduncle (p = 0.004). Voxel-wise analysis identified both GM and WM microstructural damage among FD subjects as there were nine clusters of WM FA reductions and 16 clusters of GM apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) elevations. Their WM proportion was significantly decreased (p = 0.003) as was the WM proportion in the frontal region (p = 0.007). (1)H MRS showed no significant abnormalities. The findings of WM abnormalities and decreased optic radiation and middle cerebellar peduncle FA in the FD study group, suggest compromised myelination and WM micro-structural integrity in FD brains. These neuroimaging results are consistent with clinical visual abnormalities and gait disturbance. Furthermore the frontal lobe atrophy is consistent with previously reported neuropsychological deficits. PMID:19705052

  17. Sleep Neuroimaging and Models of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Behrens, Marion; Laufs, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli, and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses toward spontaneous (or “resting state”) activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory, and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages. PMID:23717291

  18. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  19. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    PubMed

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function. PMID:26766406

  20. Initial evaluation of hepatic T1 relaxation time as an imaging marker of liver disease associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Erokwu, Bernadette O; DeSantis, David A; Croniger, Colleen M; Schur, Rebecca M; Lu, Lan; Mariappuram, Jose; Dell, Katherine M; Flask, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a potentially lethal multi-organ disease affecting both the kidneys and the liver. Unfortunately, there are currently no non-invasive methods to monitor liver disease progression in ARPKD patients, limiting the study of potential therapeutic interventions. Herein, we perform an initial investigation of T1 relaxation time as a potential imaging biomarker to quantitatively assess the two primary pathologic hallmarks of ARPKD liver disease: biliary dilatation and periportal fibrosis in the PCK rat model of ARPKD. T1 relaxation time results were obtained for five PCK rats at 3 months of age using a Look-Locker acquisition on a Bruker BioSpec 7.0 T MRI scanner. Six three-month-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were also scanned as controls. All animals were euthanized after the three-month scans for histological and biochemical assessments of bile duct dilatation and hepatic fibrosis for comparison. PCK rats exhibited significantly increased liver T1 values (mean ± standard deviation = 935 ± 39 ms) compared with age-matched SD control rats (847 ± 26 ms, p = 0.01). One PCK rat exhibited severe cholangitis (mean T1  = 1413 ms), which occurs periodically in ARPKD patients. The observed increase in the in vivo liver T1 relaxation time correlated significantly with three histological and biochemical indicators of biliary dilatation and fibrosis: bile duct area percent (R = 0.85, p = 0.002), periportal fibrosis area percent (R = 0.82, p = 0.004), and hydroxyproline content (R = 0.76, p = 0.01). These results suggest that hepatic T1 relaxation time may provide a sensitive and non-invasive imaging biomarker to monitor ARPKD liver disease. PMID:26608869

  1. Viral Genome-Linked Protein (VPg) Is Essential for Translation Initiation of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Binbin; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), the causative agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease, is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, limiting the study of the pathogenesis of RHDV. In addition, the mechanisms underlying RHDV translation and replication are largely unknown compared with other caliciviridae viruses. The RHDV replicon recently constructed in our laboratory provides an appropriate model to study the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon, we demonstrated that the viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for RHDV translation in RK-13 cells for the first time. In addition, we showed that VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in vivo and in vitro and that eIF4E silencing inhibits RHDV translation, suggesting the interaction between VPg and eIF4E is involved in RHDV translation. Our results support the hypothesis that VPg serves as a novel cap substitute during the initiation of RHDV translation. PMID:26599265

  2. Viral Genome-Linked Protein (VPg) Is Essential for Translation Initiation of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Binbin; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), the causative agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease, is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, limiting the study of the pathogenesis of RHDV. In addition, the mechanisms underlying RHDV translation and replication are largely unknown compared with other caliciviridae viruses. The RHDV replicon recently constructed in our laboratory provides an appropriate model to study the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon, we demonstrated that the viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for RHDV translation in RK-13 cells for the first time. In addition, we showed that VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in vivo and in vitro and that eIF4E silencing inhibits RHDV translation, suggesting the interaction between VPg and eIF4E is involved in RHDV translation. Our results support the hypothesis that VPg serves as a novel cap substitute during the initiation of RHDV translation. PMID:26599265

  3. Depression Screening in Chronic Disease Management: A Worksite Health Promotion Initiative.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elizabeth; Dumas, Bonnie P; Edlund, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    This pilot project aimed to improve depression symptoms and quality-of-life measures for individuals in a worksite disease management program. Two hundred forty-three individuals were invited to participate, out of which 69 enrolled. The participants had a history of diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, and demonstrated depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The project consisted of counseling sessions provided every 2 to 4 weeks by a family nurse practitioner. PHQ-9 scores and those of an instrument that measures quality of life, the Veteran's Rand-12 (VR-12), were compared pre-intervention and post-intervention to evaluate the effectiveness of the project. PHQ-9 and VR-12 Mental Health Component (MHC) scores improved significantly after 3 months of nurse practitioner-led individual counseling sessions. This project demonstrated that depression screening and therapeutic management, facilitated by a nurse practitioner, can improve depression and perceived quality of life in individuals with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or type 2 diabetes. PMID:26458410

  4. Nitric oxide as an initiator of brain lesions during the development of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Palacios, Hector H; Lipsitt, Amanda E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Lamb, Bruce T; Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis; Gasimov, Eldar; Bragin, Valentin

    2009-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule for the host defense that plays a fundamental role in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. NO is synthesized through the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which is found in three isoforms classified as neuronal (nNOS), inducible (iNOS), and endothelial (eNOS). Recent evidence supports the theory that this bioactive molecule has an influential role in the disruption of normal brain and vascular homeostasis, a condition known to elucidate chronic hypoperfusion which ultimately causes the development of brain lesions and the pathology that typify Alzheimer disease (AD). In addition, vascular NO activity appears to be a major contributor to this pathology before any overexpression of NOS isoforms is observed in the neuron, glia, and microglia of the brain tree, where the overexpression the NOS isoforms causes the formation of a large amount of NO. We hypothesize that since an imbalance between the NOS isoforms and endothelin-1 (ET-1), a human gene that encodes for blood vessel constriction, can cause antioxidant system insufficiency; by using pharmacological intervention with NO donors and/or NO suppressors, the brain lesions and the downstream progression of brain pathology and dementia in AD should be delayed or minimized. PMID:19526276

  5. [A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with arm levitation as an initial symptom].

    PubMed

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Ninomiya, Satoko; Okuda, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yushi; Tomita, Hitomi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old, right handed man, developed insidiously with levitation and clumsiness of the right upper limb. His right arm tended to levitate spontaneously, when he was examined. He could put the elevated arm down on command, while the arm resumed to antigravity posture when his attention was diverted. His right arm also exhibited unwilled elevation when performing complex finger movements on the right side. He had a feeling of strangeness of the elevated limb, especially with the eyes closed. In addition to asymmetric limb-kinetic apraxia, combined sensations such as stereognosis were disturbed on the right side. Brain MRI showed high signal lesions predominantly in the left cerebral cortices and basal ganglia. SPECT with (123)I-IMP revealed asymmetric hypoperfusion, predominantly in the left medial frontal and parietal regions. Two months after the onset, levitation of the arm gradually disappeared, with the development of rapidly progressive dementia, frontal signs, dystonia and generalized myoclonus. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was made based on the clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. The early manifestation of the patient mimicked corticobasal degeneration which presents with arm levitation or alien hand syndrome. It is suggested that CJD can represent involuntary movements with higher brain dysfunction resembling corticobasal degeneration at the early stage of the illness. Although the underlying mechanism of arm levitation is still unknown, frontal disinhibition and parietal cortical sensory disturbance may contribute to the development of involuntary arm levitation in our patient. PMID:25342014

  6. European protocols for the diagnosis and initial treatment of interstitial lung disease in children.

    PubMed

    Bush, Andrew; Cunningham, Steve; de Blic, Jacques; Barbato, Angelo; Clement, Annick; Epaud, Ralph; Hengst, Meike; Kiper, Nural; Nicholson, Andrew G; Wetzke, Martin; Snijders, Deborah; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Griese, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial lung disease in children (chILD) is rare, and most centres will only see a few cases/year. There are numerous possible underlying diagnoses, with specific and non-specific treatment possibilities. The chILD-EU collaboration has brought together centres from across Europe to advance understanding of these considerations, and as part of this process, has created standard operating procedures and protocols for the investigation of chILD. Where established consensus documents exist already, for example, for the performance of bronchoalveolar lavage and processing of lung biopsies, these have been adopted. This manuscript reports our proposals for a staged investigation of chILD, starting from when the condition is suspected to defining the diagnosis, using pathways dependent on the clinical condition and the degree of illness of the child. These include the performance of genetic testing, echocardiography, high-resolution CT, bronchoscopy when appropriate and the definitive investigation of lung biopsy, in order to establish a precise diagnosis. Since no randomised controlled trials of treatment have ever been performed, we also report a Delphi consensus process to try to harmonise treatment protocols such as the use of intravenous and oral corticosteroids, and add-on therapies such as hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. The aim is not to dictate to clinicians when a therapeutic trial should be performed, but to offer the possibility to collaborators of having a unified approach when a decision to treat has been made. PMID:26135832

  7. Cause and Consequence: Mitochondrial Dysfunction Initiates and Propagates Neuronal Dysfunction, Neuronal Death and Behavioral Abnormalities in Age Associated Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Starkov, Anatoly; Blass, John P.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and accumulation of abnormal proteins. Within the cell, the mitochondria appears to be a dominant site for initiation and propagation of disease processes. Shifts in metabolism in response to mild metabolic perturbations may decrease the threshold for irreversible injury in response to ordinarily sub lethal metabolic insults. Mild impairment of metabolism accrue from and lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS change cell signaling via post transcriptional and transcriptional changes. The cause and consequences of mild impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is one focus of this review. Many experiments in tissues from humans support the notion that oxidative modification of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) compromises neuronal energy metabolism and enhance ROS production in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These data suggest that cognitive decline in AD derives from the selective tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle abnormalities. By contrast in Huntington’s Disease (HD), a movement disorder with cognitive features distinct form AD, complex II + III abnormalities may dominate. These distinct mitochondrial abnormalities culminate in oxidative stress, energy dysfunction, and aberrant homeostasis of cytosolic calcium. Cytosolic calcium, elevations even only transiently, leads to hyperactivity of a number of enzymes. One calcium activated enzyme with demonstrated pathophysiological import in HD and AD is transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is a cross linking enzymes that can modulate transcrption, inactivate metabolic enzymes, and cause aggregation of critical proteins. Recent data indicate that TGase can silence expression of genes involved in compensating for metabolic stress. Altogether, our results suggest that increasing KGDHC via inhibition of TGase or via a host of other strategies to be described would be effective therapeutic

  8. Effective Oral Favipiravir (T-705) Therapy Initiated after the Onset of Clinical Disease in a Model of Arenavirus Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michelle; Russell, Andrew; Smee, Donald F.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Skirpstunas, Ramona; Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa and Junín viruses are the most prominent members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever syndromes Lassa fever and Argentine hemorrhagic fever, respectively. At present, ribavirin is the only antiviral drug indicated for use in treatment of these diseases, but because of its limited efficacy in advanced cases of disease and its toxicity, safer and more effective antivirals are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we used a model of acute arenaviral infection in outbred guinea pigs based on challenge with an adapted strain of Pichindé virus (PICV) to further preclinical development of T-705 (Favipiravir), a promising broad-spectrum inhibitor of RNA virus infections. The guinea pig-adapted passage 19 PICV was uniformly lethal with an LD50 of ∼5 plaque-forming units and disease was associated with fever, weight loss, thrombocytopenia, coagulation defects, increases in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations, and pantropic viral infection. Favipiravir (300 mg/kg/day, twice daily orally for 14 days) was highly effective, as all animals recovered fully from PICV-induced disease even when therapy was initiated one week after virus challenge when animals were already significantly ill with marked fevers and thrombocytopenia. Antiviral activity and reduced disease severity was evidenced by dramatic reductions in peak serum virus titers and AST concentrations in favipiravir-treated animals. Moreover, a sharp decrease in body temperature was observed shortly after the start of treatment. Oral ribavirin was also evaluated, and although effective, the slower rate of recovery may be a sign of the drug's known toxicity. Conclusions/Significance Our findings support further development of favipiravir for the treatment of severe arenaviral infections. The optimization of the experimental favipiravir treatment regimen in the PICV guinea pig model will inform critical future studies in the same species based

  9. Analysis of a Parent-Initiated Social Media Campaign for Hirschsprung’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wittmeier, Kristy; Holland, Cindy; Hobbs-Murison, Kendall; Crawford, Elizabeth; Beauchamp, Chad; Milne, Brodie; Morris, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Social media can be particularly useful for patients or families affected by rare conditions by allowing individuals to form online communities across the world. Objective Our aim in this study was to conduct a descriptive and quantitative analysis of the use of a social media community for Hirschsprung’s Disease (HD). Methods In July 2011, a mother of a child with HD launched the “Shit Happens” campaign. The campaign uses social media (blogs, Twitter, and Facebook) to engage other families affected by HD. Internet analytics including Google Analytics and Facebook Insights were used to evaluate the reach and responsiveness of this campaign. Results On the day the HD campaign was launched, 387 people viewed the blog “Roo’s Journey”. Blog views have now exceeded 5400 views from 37 countries. The Facebook page extends to 46 countries, has an average post reach of 298 users, 1414 “likes”, and an overall reach of 131,032 users. The campaign has 135 Twitter followers and 344 tweets at the time of writing. The most common question posted on the Facebook page is related to treatment for extreme diaper rash. Responsiveness assessment demonstrated that within 2 hours of posting, a question could receive 143 views and 20 responses, increasing to 30 responses after 5 hours. Conclusions Social media networks are well suited to discussion, support, and advocacy for health-related conditions and can be especially important in connecting families affected by rare conditions. The HD campaign demonstrates the reach and responsiveness of a community that primarily relies on social media to connect families affected by HD. Although responsive, this community is currently lacking consistent access to evidence-based guidance for their common concerns. We will explore innovative consumer-researcher partnerships to offer a solution in future research. PMID:25499427

  10. The Cellie Coping Kit for Sickle Cell Disease: Initial acceptability and feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Klingbeil, Olivia G.; Hildenbrand, Aimee K.; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and its treatment can place physical and psychosocial strain on children and their families, underlining the need for behavioral and emotional support. Much of SCD is often managed at home, which may prevent children from obtaining supportive services from medical and psychosocial teams. Children with SCD report a restricted number of coping strategies specific to managing SCD and may benefit from education on adaptive coping. To address this unmet need, a coping tool for children with cancer (Cellie Cancer Coping Kit) was adapted for children with SCD. The Cellie Coping Kit for SCD (Cellie Coping Kit) includes a stuffed “Cellie” toy, coping cards for children, and a book for caregivers. This study sought to assess the acceptability and feasibility of an intervention utilizing the Cellie Coping Kit. Fifteen children with SCD (ages 6-14) and their caregivers participated in a baseline assessment including semi-structured interviews to examine SCD-related stressors and coping strategies. Next, families received a brief introduction to the Cellie Coping Kit and were provided with a kit to use independently over the next four weeks before completing a follow-up assessment. Results indicated strong intervention acceptability overall. While families reported using and learning information and skills from the Cellie Coping Kit, several challenges were identified (e.g., child's living situation, busy schedules). The Cellie Coping Kit is a promising tool to support children with SCD and their families. Future research should examine whether use of the Cellie Coping Kit impacts behavioral change and improved health outcomes. PMID:25664228

  11. The human parental brain: In vivo neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interacting parenting thoughts and behaviors, supported by key brain circuits, critically shape human infants’ current and future behavior. Indeed, the parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social environment, forming templates for what they can expect from others, how to interact with them and ultimately how they go on to themselves to be parents. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments of the human parent brain, which link brain physiology with parental thoughts and behaviors. After reviewing brain imaging techniques, certain social cognitive and affective concepts are reviewed, including empathy and trust—likely critical to parenting. Following that is a thorough study-by-study review of the state-of-the-art with respect to human neuroimaging studies of the parental brain—from parent brain responses to salient infant stimuli, including emotionally charged baby cries and brief visual stimuli to the latest structural brain studies. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support parental brain responses to infants, including circuits for limbic emotion response and regulation. Thus, a model is presented in which infant stimuli activate sensory analysis brain regions, affect corticolimbic limbic circuits that regulate emotional response, motivation and reward related to their infant, ultimately organizing parenting impulses, thoughts and emotions into coordinated behaviors as a map for future studies. Finally, future directions towards integrated understanding of the brain basis of human parenting are outlined with profound implications for understanding and contributing to long term parent and infant mental health. PMID:21036196

  12. Analyzing neuroimaging data with subclasses: A shrinkage approach.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Johannes; Bartz, Daniel; Hebart, Martin N; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods used to analyze neuroimaging data, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is commonly applied for binary classification problems. LDAs popularity derives from its simplicity and its competitive classification performance, which has been reported for various types of neuroimaging data. Yet the standard LDA approach proves less than optimal for binary classification problems when additional label information (i.e. subclass labels) is present. Subclass labels allow to model structure in the data, which can be used to facilitate the classification task. In this paper, we illustrate how neuroimaging data exhibit subclass labels that may contain valuable information. We also show that the standard LDA classifier is unable to exploit subclass labels. We introduce a novel method that allows subclass labels to be incorporated efficiently into the classifier. The novel method, which we call Relevance Subclass LDA (RSLDA), computes an individual classification hyperplane for each subclass. It is based on regularized estimators of the subclass mean and uses other subclasses as regularization targets. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of our method on data drawn from two different neuroimaging modalities: (I) EEG data from brain-computer interfacing with event-related potentials, and (II) fMRI data in response to different levels of visual motion. We show that RSLDA outperforms the standard LDA approach for both types of datasets. These findings illustrate the benefits of exploiting subclass structure in neuroimaging data. Finally, we show that our classifier also outputs regularization profiles, enabling researchers to interpret the subclass structure in a meaningful way. RSLDA therefore yields increased classification accuracy as well as a better interpretation of neuroimaging data. Since both results are highly favorable, we suggest to apply RSLDA for various classification problems within neuroimaging and beyond. PMID:26407815

  13. A Randomized Study of Extended Dosing Regimens for Initiation of Epoetin Alfa Treatment for Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spinowitz, Bruce; Germain, Michael; Benz, Robert; Wolfson, Marsha; McGowan, Tracy; Tang, K. Linda; Kamin, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Although epoetin alfa is commonly initiated weekly (QW) in anemic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, recent evidence indicates that it can be initiated every 2 wk (Q2W) and used in maintenance therapy every 4 wk (Q4W). This study examined the feasibility of initiating epoetin alfa Q4W in anemic CKD patients not receiving dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This open-label study randomized subjects (1:2:2:2) to treatment with epoetin alfa 10,000 IU QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, or 40,000 IU Q4W for 16 wk. Subjects were ≥18 yr, had hemoglobin <11 g/dl, a glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and had not received erythropoietic therapy within 8 wk. The primary analysis was a noninferiority comparison of the 40,000 IU Q4W to the 20,000 IU Q2W group in the per-protocol population with respect to hemoglobin change from baseline to the end of study. Results: Of 262 subjects randomized, 229 comprised the per-protocol population. Mean hemoglobin change from baseline for the 40,000 IU Q4W group (1.24 g/dl) was not inferior to the 20,000 IU Q2W group (1.11 g/dl) with the lower limit of 95% CI, −0.21 g/dl. In the QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, and 40,000 IU Q4W groups, 90%, 87%, 75%, and 86% of subjects, respectively, achieved a hemoglobin increase ≥1 g/dl. Serious adverse events were similar across all groups. Conclusions: Epoetin alfa can be initiated Q4W in anemic CKD subjects. PMID:18400964

  14. Neuroimaging of pediatric intracranial infection--part 1: techniques and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Joshua P; Richner, Beat; Santy, Ky; Lequin, Maarten H; Poretti, Andrea; Filippi, Christopher G; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2012-04-01

    Conventional and advanced neuroimaging have become central to the diagnosis of infectious diseases of the pediatric central nervous system. Imaging modalities used by (pediatric) neuroradiologists include cranial ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, including advanced techniques such as diffusion weighted or tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In this first of a two part review, imaging techniques in general and the imaging findings of bacterial infections of the intracranial compartment including epidural empyema, subdural empyema, meningitis, cerebritis, cerebral abscess, and pyogenic intraventricular empyema (ventriculitis) are discussed. PMID:22304299

  15. Neurodevelopmental Precursors and Consequences of Substance Use during Adolescence: Promises and Pitfalls of Longitudinal Neuroimaging Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Diana H.; Rose, Emma J.; Darcey, Valerie L.; Belcher, Annabelle M.; VanMeter, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive and emotional regulatory deficits in substance users are often attributed to misuse; however most studies do not include a substance-naïve baseline to justify that conclusion. The etiological literature suggests that pre-existing deficits may contribute to the onset and escalation of use that are then exacerbated by subsequent use. To address this, there is burgeoning interest in conducting prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies to isolate neurodevelopmental precursors and consequences of adolescent substance misuse, as reflected in recent initiatives such as the NIH-led Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment (NCANDA). To distinguish neurodevelopmental precursors from the consequences of adolescent substance use specifically, prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies with substance-naïve pre-adolescents are needed. The exemplar described in this article—i.e., the ongoing Adolescent Development Study (ADS)—used a targeted recruitment strategy to bolster the numbers of pre-adolescent individuals who were at increased risk of substance use (i.e., “high-risk”) in a sample that was relatively small for longitudinal studies of similar phenomena, but historically large for neuroimaging (i.e., N = 135; 11–13 years of age). At baseline participants underwent MRI testing and a large complement of cognitive and behavioral assessments along with genetics, stress physiology and interviews. The study methods include repeating these measures at three time points (i.e., baseline/Wave 1, Wave 2 and Wave 3), 18 months apart. In this article, rather than outlining specific study outcomes, we describe the breadth of the numerous complexities and challenges involved in conducting this type of prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging study and “lessons learned” for subsequent efforts are discussed. While these types of large longitudinal neuroimaging studies present a

  16. Neurodevelopmental Precursors and Consequences of Substance Use during Adolescence: Promises and Pitfalls of Longitudinal Neuroimaging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Diana H; Rose, Emma J; Darcey, Valerie L; Belcher, Annabelle M; VanMeter, John W

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive and emotional regulatory deficits in substance users are often attributed to misuse; however most studies do not include a substance-naïve baseline to justify that conclusion. The etiological literature suggests that pre-existing deficits may contribute to the onset and escalation of use that are then exacerbated by subsequent use. To address this, there is burgeoning interest in conducting prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies to isolate neurodevelopmental precursors and consequences of adolescent substance misuse, as reflected in recent initiatives such as the NIH-led Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment (NCANDA). To distinguish neurodevelopmental precursors from the consequences of adolescent substance use specifically, prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies with substance-naïve pre-adolescents are needed. The exemplar described in this article-i.e., the ongoing Adolescent Development Study (ADS)-used a targeted recruitment strategy to bolster the numbers of pre-adolescent individuals who were at increased risk of substance use (i.e., "high-risk") in a sample that was relatively small for longitudinal studies of similar phenomena, but historically large for neuroimaging (i.e., N = 135; 11-13 years of age). At baseline participants underwent MRI testing and a large complement of cognitive and behavioral assessments along with genetics, stress physiology and interviews. The study methods include repeating these measures at three time points (i.e., baseline/Wave 1, Wave 2 and Wave 3), 18 months apart. In this article, rather than outlining specific study outcomes, we describe the breadth of the numerous complexities and challenges involved in conducting this type of prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging study and "lessons learned" for subsequent efforts are discussed. While these types of large longitudinal neuroimaging studies present a number of

  17. Perceived Utility of the RE-AIM Framework for Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Initiatives for Older Adults: A Case Study from the U.S. Evidence-Based Disease Prevention Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Helduser, Janet; Zhang, Chen; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) frameworks are increasingly being promoted in public health research. However, less is known about their uptake in the field, especially for diverse sets of programs. Limited questionnaires exist to assess the ways that frameworks can be utilized in program planning and evaluation. We present a case study from the United States that describes the implementation of the RE-AIM framework by state aging services providers and public health partners and a questionnaire that can be used to assess the utility of such frameworks in practice. An online questionnaire was developed to capture community perspectives about the utility of the RE-AIM framework. Distributed to project leads in 27 funded states in an evidence-based disease prevention initiative for older adults, 40 key stakeholders responded representing a 100% state-participation rate among the 27 funded states. Findings suggest that there is perceived utility in using the RE-AIM framework when evaluating grand-scale initiatives for older adults. The RE-AIM framework was seen as useful for planning, implementation, and evaluation with relevance for evaluators, providers, community leaders, and policy makers. Yet, the uptake was not universal, and some respondents reported difficulties in use, especially adopting the framework as a whole. This questionnaire can serve as the basis to assess ways the RE-AIM framework can be utilized by practitioners in state-wide D&I efforts. Maximal benefit can be derived from examining the assessment of RE-AIM-related knowledge and confidence as part of a continual quality assurance process. We recommend such an assessment be performed before the implementation of new funding initiatives and throughout their course to assess RE-AIM uptake and to identify areas for technical assistance. PMID:25964897

  18. Perceived Utility of the RE-AIM Framework for Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Initiatives for Older Adults: A Case Study from the U.S. Evidence-Based Disease Prevention Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Marcia G.; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Helduser, Janet; Zhang, Chen; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) frameworks are increasingly being promoted in public health research. However, less is known about their uptake in the field, especially for diverse sets of programs. Limited questionnaires exist to assess the ways that frameworks can be utilized in program planning and evaluation. We present a case study from the United States that describes the implementation of the RE-AIM framework by state aging services providers and public health partners and a questionnaire that can be used to assess the utility of such frameworks in practice. An online questionnaire was developed to capture community perspectives about the utility of the RE-AIM framework. Distributed to project leads in 27 funded states in an evidence-based disease prevention initiative for older adults, 40 key stakeholders responded representing a 100% state-participation rate among the 27 funded states. Findings suggest that there is perceived utility in using the RE-AIM framework when evaluating grand-scale initiatives for older adults. The RE-AIM framework was seen as useful for planning, implementation, and evaluation with relevance for evaluators, providers, community leaders, and policy makers. Yet, the uptake was not universal, and some respondents reported difficulties in use, especially adopting the framework as a whole. This questionnaire can serve as the basis to assess ways the RE-AIM framework can be utilized by practitioners in state-wide D&I efforts. Maximal benefit can be derived from examining the assessment of RE-AIM-related knowledge and confidence as part of a continual quality assurance process. We recommend such an assessment be performed before the implementation of new funding initiatives and throughout their course to assess RE-AIM uptake and to identify areas for technical assistance. PMID:25964897

  19. A hybrid manifold learning algorithm for the diagnosis and prognostication of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peng; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Bauer, Michael; Borrie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires a variety of medical tests, which leads to huge amounts of multivariate heterogeneous data. Such data are difficult to compare, visualize, and analyze due to the heterogeneous nature of medical tests. We present a hybrid manifold learning framework, which embeds the feature vectors in a subspace preserving the underlying pairwise similarity structure, i.e. similar/dissimilar pairs. Evaluation tests are carried out using the neuroimaging and biological data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in a three-class (normal, mild cognitive impairment, and AD) classification task using support vector machine (SVM). Furthermore, we make extensive comparison with standard manifold learning algorithms, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multidimensional Scaling (MDS), and isometric feature mapping (Isomap). Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm yields an overall accuracy of 85.33% in the three-class task. PMID:26958180

  20. A hybrid manifold learning algorithm for the diagnosis and prognostication of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Peng; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Bauer, Michael; Borrie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) requires a variety of medical tests, which leads to huge amounts of multivariate heterogeneous data. Such data are difficult to compare, visualize, and analyze due to the heterogeneous nature of medical tests. We present a hybrid manifold learning framework, which embeds the feature vectors in a subspace preserving the underlying pairwise similarity structure, i.e. similar/dissimilar pairs. Evaluation tests are carried out using the neuroimaging and biological data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in a three-class (normal, mild cognitive impairment, and AD) classification task using support vector machine (SVM). Furthermore, we make extensive comparison with standard manifold learning algorithms, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multidimensional Scaling (MDS), and isometric feature mapping (Isomap). Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm yields an overall accuracy of 85.33% in the three-class task. PMID:26958180

  1. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie; Driscoll, Maura; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Doherty, Rose; Wittke, Chris; Prachand, Nikhil; Benbow, Nanette; Melville, Sharon; Pannala, Praveen; Yeager, Richard; Sayegh, Aaron; Dyer, Jim; Sheu, Shane; Novoa, Alicia; Thrun, Mark; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Wilmoth, Ralph; Higgins, Emily; Griffin, Vivian; Mokotoff, Eve; MacMaster, Karen; Wolverton, Marcia; Risser, Jan; Rehman, Hafeez; Padgett, Paige; Bingham, Trista; Sey, Ekow Kwa; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa; Forrest, David; Beck, Dano; Cardenas, Gabriel; Nemeth, Chris; Anderson, Bridget J.; Watson, Carol-Ann; Smith, Lou; Robinson, William T.; Gruber, DeAnn; Barak, Narquis; Murrill, Chris; Neaigus, Alan; Jenness, Samuel; Hagan, Holly; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Wendel, Travis; Cross, Helene; Bolden, Barbara; D'Errico, Sally; Wogayehu, Afework; Godette, Henry; Brady, Kathleen A.; Kirkland, Althea; Sifferman, Andrea; Miguelino-Keasling, Vanessa; Velasco, Al; Tovar, Veronica; Raymond, H. Fisher; De León, Sandra Miranda; Rolón-Colón, Yadira; Marzan, Melissa; Courogen, Maria; Jaenicke, Tom; Thiede, Hanne; Burt, Richard; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Sansone, Marie; West, Tiffany; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects. PMID:25352589

  2. Matriptase initiates activation of epidermal pro-kallikrein and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L; Rasmussen, Amber L; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A; Bugge, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome, which causes detachment of the stratum corneum and chronic inflammation. Here we show that the membrane protease matriptase initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory pro-kallikrein-related peptidases that are associated with stratum corneum detachment was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented detachment of the stratum corneum, and improved the barrier function of the epidermis. These results uncover a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could operate in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  3. Genetic Variation of North American Triatomines (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae): Initial Divergence between Species and Populations of Chagas Disease Vector

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Bertha; Martínez-Ibarra, Jose Alejandro; Villalobos, Guiehdani; De La Torre, Patricia; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The triatomines vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi are principal factors in acquiring Chagas disease. For this reason, increased knowledge of domestic transmission of T. cruzi and control of its insect vectors is necessary. To contribute to genetic knowledge of North America Triatominae species, we studied genetic variations and conducted phylogenetic analysis of different triatomines species of epidemiologic importance. Our analysis showed high genetic variations between different geographic populations of Triatoma mexicana, Meccus longipennis, M. mazzottii, M. picturatus, and T. dimidiata species, suggested initial divergence, hybridation, or classifications problems. In contrast, T. gerstaeckeri, T. bolivari, and M. pallidipennis populations showed few genetics variations. Analysis using cytochrome B and internal transcribed spacer 2 gene sequences indicated that T. bolivari is closely related to the Rubrofasciata complex and not to T. dimidiata. Triatoma brailovskyi and T. gerstaeckeri showed a close relationship with Dimidiata and Phyllosoma complexes. PMID:23249692

  4. A new nursing model for the care of patients with chronic kidney disease: the UNC Kidney Center Nephrology Nursing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Neyhart, Clara D; McCoy, Lynn; Rodegast, Beverly; Gilet, Constance A; Roberts, Cynthia; Downes, Kelley

    2010-01-01

    Nurses at the University of North Carolina Kidney Center at Chapel Hill have developed a systematic approach to the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is an organized nephrology nursing structure that manages efficiency of patient flow and provides patient education throughout the continuum of CKD to improve patient outcomes. Patients are guided through a nurse-directed system at all points of care. The authors have created this structure using a continuous quality improvement (CQI) model to identify barriers to effective and efficient patient care, and then develop strategies to address the barriers. This article describes the development and implementation of the UNC Kidney Center Nephrology Nurse Initiative. This model of care highlights roles for nephrology nurses that are challenging, interesting, and valuable in creating an environment for efficient and high-quality care of patients with CKD. PMID:20462072

  5. Functional neuroimaging of traumatic brain injury: advances and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Van Horn, John Darrell

    2015-01-01

    Functional deficits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have significant and enduring consequences upon patients’ life quality and expectancy. Although functional neuroimaging is essential for understanding TBI pathophysiology, an insufficient amount of effort has been dedicated to the task of translating functional neuroimaging findings into information with clinical utility. The purpose of this review is to summarize the use of functional neuroimaging techniques – especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography – for advancing current knowledge of TBI-related brain dysfunction and for improving the rehabilitation of TBI patients. We focus on seven core areas of functional deficits, namely consciousness, motor function, attention, memory, higher cognition, personality, and affect, and, for each of these, we summarize recent findings from neuroimaging studies which have provided substantial insight into brain function changes due to TBI. Recommendations are also provided to aid in setting the direction of future neuroimaging research and for understanding brain function changes after TBI. PMID:26396520

  6. Neuroimaging in mental health care: voices in translation

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Emily L.; Buchman, Daniel Z.; Illes, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Images of brain function, popularly called “neuroimages,” have become a mainstay of contemporary communication about neuroscience and mental health. Paralleling media coverage of neuroimaging research and the high visibility of clinics selling scans is pressure from sponsors to move basic research about brain function along the translational pathway. Indeed, neuroimaging may offer benefits to mental health care: early or tailored intervention, opportunities for education and planning, and access to resources afforded by objectification of disorder. However, risks of premature technology transfer, such as misinterpretation, misrepresentation, and increased stigmatization, could compromise patient care. The insights of stakeholder groups about neuroimaging for mental health care are a largely untapped resource of information and guidance for translational efforts. We argue that the insights of key stakeholders—including researchers, healthcare providers, patients, and families—have an essential role to play upstream in professional, critical, and ethical discourse surrounding neuroimaging in mental health. Here we integrate previously orthogonal lines of inquiry involving stakeholder research to describe the translational landscape as well as challenges on its horizon. PMID:23097640

  7. Electrocardiographic Repolarization‐Related Variables as Predictors of Coronary Heart Disease Death in the Women's Health Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rautaharju, Pentti M.; Zhang, Zhu‐Ming; Vitolins, Mara; Perez, Marco; Allison, Matthew A.; Greenland, Philip; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated 25 repolarization‐related ECG variables for the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) death in 52 994 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative study. Methods and Results Hazard ratios from Cox regression were computed for subgroups of women with and without cardiovascular disease (CVD). During the average follow‐up of 16.9 years, 941 CHD deaths occurred. Based on electrophysiological considerations, 2 sets of ECG variables with low correlations were considered as candidates for independent predictors of CHD death: Set 1, Ѳ(Tp|Tref), the spatial angle between T peak (Tp) and normal T reference (Tref) vectors; Ѳ(Tinit|Tterm), the angle between the initial and terminal T vectors; STJ depression in V6 and rate‐adjusted QTp interval (QTpa); and Set 2, TaVR and TV1 amplitudes, heart rate, and QRS duration. Strong independent predictors with over 2‐fold increased risk for CHD death in women with and without CVD were Ѳ(Tp|Tref) >42° from Set 1 and TaVR amplitude >−100 μV from Set 2. The risk for these CHD death predictors remained significant after multivariable adjustment for demographic/clinical factors. Other significant predictors for CHD death in fully adjusted risk models were Ѳ(Tinit|Tterm) >30°, TV1 >175 μV, and QRS duration >100 ms. Conclusions Ѳ(Tp|Tref) angle and TaVR amplitude are associated with CHD mortality in postmenopausal women. The use of these measures to identify high‐risk women for further diagnostic evaluation or more intense preventive intervention warrants further study. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000611. PMID:25074699

  8. Human neutrophil Fcγ receptors initiate and play specialized nonredundant roles in antibody-mediated inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Asano, Kenichi; Lauterbach, Michael; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antibody-antigen complex mediated inflammation is integral to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Mice deficient in the γ-chain of Fc-receptors are protected in IgG-mediated glomerulonephritis and the Arthus reaction and FcR-bearing mast cells and macrophages have been assigned primary roles in these processes. Here we demonstrate that neutrophil selective transgenic expression of the two uniquely human activating FcγRs, FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB was sufficient to restore susceptibility to progressive anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and the cutaneous Reverse Passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in γ-chain deficient mice. Both FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB mediated robust neutrophil accumulation in tissues suggesting direct roles for these human receptors in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment, while FcγRIIA alone mediated organ injury. In an acute model of anti-GBM nephritis, both FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA promoted initial neutrophil recruitment to glomerular immune-complexes (ICs) accessible to circulating cells, while FcγRIIA further sustained accumulation. In a model of soluble ICs deposited strictly within the post-capillary venules of the cremaster muscle, FcγRIIIB was solely responsible for converting initial selectin-dependent tethers to slow rolling and adhesion. However, in the cremaster RPA reaction, dependent on vascular and tissue accumulation of soluble ICs, FcγRIIA predominated in neutrophil recruitment that was dependent on G-protein coupled receptor activation. Thus, human FcγRs on neutrophils serve as the primary molecular links between ICs and immunological disease with FcγRIIA promoting tissue injury, and FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA displaying specialized context-dependent functions in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment. PMID:18538590

  9. Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score versus Simplified Acute Physiology score to analyze multiple organ dysfunction in infectious diseases in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Remyasri; Bhandary, Nithish M.; D’Souza, Ashton D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who were diagnosed with infectious disease, as an indicator of multiple organ dysfunction and to examine if initial SOFA score is a better mortality predictor compared to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). Materials and Methods: Hospital-based study done in medical ICU, from June to September 2014 with a sample size of 48. Patients aged 18 years and above, diagnosed with infectious disease were included. Patients with history of chronic illness (renal/hepatic/pulmonary/  cardiovascular), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, those on immunosuppressive therapy/chemoradiotherapy for malignancy and patients in immunocompromised state were excluded. Blood investigations were obtained. Six organ dysfunctions were assessed using initial SOFA score and graded from 0 to 4. SAPS was calculated as the sum of points assigned to each of the 17 variables (12 physiological, age, type of admission, and three underlying diseases). The outcome measure was survival status at ICU discharge. Results: We categorized infectious diseases into dengue fever, leptospirosis, malaria, respiratory tract infections, and others which included undiagnosed febrile illness, meningitis, urinary tract infection and gastroenteritis. Initial SOFA score was both sensitive and specific; SAPS lacked sensitivity. We found no significant association between age and survival status. Both SAPS and initial SOFA score were found to be statistically significant as mortality predictors. There is significant association of initial SOFA score in analyzing organ dysfunction in infectious diseases (P < 0.001). SAPS showed no statistical significance. There was statistically significant (P = 0.015) percentage of nonsurvivors with moderate and severe dysfunction, based on SOFA score. Nonsurvivors had higher SAPS but was not statistically significant (P

  10. Neuroimaging, a new tool for investigating the effects of early diet on cognitive and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition is crucial to the initial development of the central nervous system (CNS), and then to its maintenance, because both depend on dietary intake to supply the elements required to develop and fuel the system. Diet in early life is often seen in the context of “programming” where a stimulus occurring during a vulnerable period can have long-lasting or even lifetime effects on some aspect of the organism's structure or function. Nutrition was first shown to be a programming stimulus for growth, and then for cognitive behavior, in animal studies that were able to employ methods that allowed the demonstration of neural effects of early nutrition. Such research raised the question of whether nutrition could also programme cognition/brain structure in humans. Initial studies of cognitive effects were observational, usually conducted in developing countries where the presence of confounding factors made it difficult to interpret the role of nutrition in the cognitive deficits that were seen. Attributing causality to nutrition required randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and these, often in developed countries, started to appear around 30 years ago. Most demonstrated convincingly that early nutrition could affect subsequent cognition. Until the advent of neuroimaging techniques that allowed in vivo examination of the brain, however, we could determine very little about the neural effects of early diet in humans. The combination of well-designed trials with neuroimaging tools means that we are now able to pose and answer questions that would have seemed impossible only recently. This review discusses various neuroimaging methods that are suitable for use in nutrition studies, while pointing out some of the limitations that they may have. The existing literature is small, but examples of studies that have used these methods are presented. Finally, some considerations that have arisen from previous studies, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed

  11. The child with a cephalocele: etiology, neuroimaging, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Poza, M; Sola, J; Soler, C L; Montalvo, C G; Domingo, R; Puche, A; Ramón, F H; Azorín, P; Lasso, R

    1996-09-01

    We report a series of 46 children who were treated for one of the diverse forms of cranium bifidum during a period of 22 years. The purpose of the survey was to investigate pathogenetic factors involved in the development of cranial dysraphism and to analyze clinical and pathological factors that influence the patients' outcome. We also investigated the existence of associated intracranial anomalies, in a systematic way, using modern methods of neuroimaging, and related the findings to the patients' final results. The lesions were classified as encephalocele (n = 15), cranial meningocele (n = 3), atretic cephalocele (n = 26), cranium bifidum occultum (n = 1), and exencephaly (n = 1). There was an excess of the atretic form of cephaloceles in our series, a fact that probably reflects geographical variations described for cephaloceles in general. The location of the lesions was occipital in 29 children, parietal in 16, and temporal and frontobasal in one case each. In seven cases there was parental consanguinity. A familial history of malformations of the central nervous system was encountered in eight instances. Associated systemic abnormalities were present in 23 patients, while central nervous system anomalies were found in 36 children. Cephalocele repair was undertaken on 35 occasions. There were no surgical fatalities in the series. The mean follow-up time was of 7 years. Overall mortality for the whole group was of 17/46 or 36%. Twenty of the 29 survivors had no neurological sequelae, but only 18 children exhibited a competitive intelligence level. A good outcome was found to correlate well with: an average head size at birth, a normal initial neurological condition, operability of the lesions, and an absence of disorders of the neuronal migration. Neurological outcome depended also on the occurrence or not of hydrocephalus, while the intelligence level was mainly related to the absence of cerebral tissue within the sac of the malformation. PMID:8906370

  12. Economic evaluation of participation in a voluntary Johne's disease prevention and control program from a farmer's perspective--The Alberta Johne's Disease Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R; Clement, F; Barkema, H W; Orsel, K

    2014-05-01

    The Alberta Johne's Disease Initiative (AJDI) is a Johne's disease (JD) control program with the goal of reducing the spread of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through implementation of best management practices. The objective was to estimate the economic benefit of participation in the AJDI. A decision tree was constructed in which disease prevalence, test characteristics, and probabilities for implementation of best management practices suggested by herd veterinarians were implemented. Analysis was performed using a Markov analysis, and input data were assigned using estimates from the AJDI and published data. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed and the net benefit of participation (from the perspective of a dairy farmer) in the AJDI compared with no participation was calculated. A series of 1-way sensitivity analyses were used to control for uncertainty. Farms participating in the AJDI were estimated to have a net benefit of Can$74 per cow over the course of 10 yr. If project costs were covered by the participating farm, the net benefit was Can$27. In addition to the effects on MAP infection, a reduction in calf diarrhea was modeled for farms that improved their calf management through the use of pasteurizers. In that case, the additional costs outweighed additional revenues compared with the baseline analysis, resulting in a reduced net benefit of Can$19. Participation would not be cost effective if cows in early stages of MAP infection did not have decreased production and if prevalence of MAP infection did not increase on farms with poor management. A limitation of the study, despite high uncertainty in some input parameters, was the lack of knowledge regarding changes in prevalence on farms with various management strategies. In conclusion, participation in the AJDI was cost effective for the average Alberta dairy farm. PMID:24582447

  13. Levodopa alone compared with levodopa-sparing therapy as initial treatment for Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-long; Zhang, Yun-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yi-He; Pa, Jia-Lin; Lin, Shi-Yi; Lin, Hua-Zhen; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2015-08-01

    To assess the long-term use of L-dopa alone vs L-dopa-sparing therapy, as initial treatment, provides the most efficient long-term control of symptoms and best quality of life for people with early Parkinson's disease (PD). PubMed; Google scholar; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Web of Science were searched for randomised, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) on L-dopa alone and L-dopa sparing as initial treatment in early PD patients. We used a random effects model rather than a fixed effects model because of this takes into account heterogeneity between multi-studies. Eleven RCTs were included. The results showed that L-dopa alone could evidently improve the UPDRS part I (p = 0.005), part II (p < 0.0001), part III (p < 0.0001) and UPDRS total score (p = 0.004) compared with L-dopa-sparing therapy in PD patients. Meanwhile, a reduced risk of dyskinesia (p < 0.0001, RR = 1.88, 95 % CI 1. 37-2.59) and wearing-off phenomenon (p < 0.00001, RR = 1.36, 95 % CI 1. 20-1.55) in patients treated initially with L-dopa-sparing therapy compared to L-dopa has been consistently reported. What is more, we found more patients on aL-dopa-sparing therapy were more than triple as likely to discontinue treatment prematurely due to adverse events than L-dopa treatment patients (43.7 vs 15.8 %). L-Dopa alone is the most effective medication available for treating the motor symptoms of PD patients, despite the greater incidence of involuntary movements. Meanwhile, more patients on dopamine agonists or MAOBI were more likely to discontinue treatment prematurely than L-dopa alone treatment patients within the long follow-up period. PMID:25981231

  14. A phase II study of bortezomib plus prednisone for initial therapy of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alex F; Kim, Haesook T; Bindra, Bhavjot; Jones, Kyle T; Alyea, Edwin P; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Blazar, Bruce R; Ritz, Jerome; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Koreth, John

    2014-11-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induces significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Corticosteroids are standard initial therapy, despite limited efficacy and long-term toxicity. Based on our experience using bortezomib as effective acute GVHD prophylaxis, we hypothesized that proteasome-inhibition would complement the immunomodulatory effects of corticosteroids to improve outcomes in chronic GVHD (cGVHD). We undertook a single-arm phase II trial of bortezomib plus prednisone for initial therapy of cGVHD. Bortezomib was administered at 1.3 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 35-day cycle for 3 cycles (15 weeks). Prednisone was dosed at .5 to 1 mg/kg/day, with a suggested taper after cycle 1. All 22 enrolled participants were evaluable for toxicity; 20 were evaluable for response. Bortezomib plus prednisone therapy was well tolerated, with 1 occurrence of grade 3 sensory peripheral neuropathy possibly related to bortezomib. The overall response rate at week 15 in evaluable participants was 80%, including 2 (10%) complete and 14 (70%) partial responses. The organ-specific complete response rate was 73% for skin, 53% for liver, 75% for gastrointestinal tract, and 33% for joint, muscle, or fascia involvement. The median prednisone dose decreased from 50 mg/day to 20 mg/day at week 15 (P < .001). The combination of bortezomib and prednisone for initial treatment of cGVHD is feasible and well tolerated. We observed a high response rate to combined bortezomib and prednisone therapy; however, in this single-arm study, we could not directly measure the impact of bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition may offer benefit in the treatment of cGVHD and should be further evaluated. PMID:25017765

  15. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Comasco, Erika; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women's brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in several cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  16. Contributions and complexities from the use of in vivo animal models to improve understanding of human neuroimaging signals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Many of the major advances in our understanding of how functional brain imaging signals relate to neuronal activity over the previous two decades have arisen from physiological research studies involving experimental animal models. This approach has been successful partly because it provides opportunities to measure both the hemodynamic changes that underpin many human functional brain imaging techniques and the neuronal activity about which we wish to make inferences. Although research into the coupling of neuronal and hemodynamic responses using animal models has provided a general validation of the correspondence of neuroimaging signals to specific types of neuronal activity, it is also highlighting the key complexities and uncertainties in estimating neural signals from hemodynamic markers. This review will detail how research in animal models is contributing to our rapidly evolving understanding of what human neuroimaging techniques tell us about neuronal activity. It will highlight emerging issues in the interpretation of neuroimaging data that arise from in vivo research studies, for example spatial and temporal constraints to neuroimaging signal interpretation, or the effects of disease and modulatory neurotransmitters upon neurovascular coupling. We will also give critical consideration to the limitations and possible complexities of translating data acquired in the typical animals models used in this area to the arena of human fMRI. These include the commonplace use of anesthesia in animal research studies and the fact that many neuropsychological questions that are being actively explored in humans have limited homologs within current animal models for neuroimaging research. Finally we will highlighting approaches, both in experimental animals models (e.g. imaging in conscious, behaving animals) and human studies (e.g. combined fMRI-EEG), that mitigate against these challenges. PMID:25191214

  17. Neurodevelopment and brain growth in classic Menkes disease is influenced by age and symptomatology at initiation of copper treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Stephen G

    2014-10-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder of brain copper metabolism caused by mutations in an essential mammalian copper transport gene, ATP7A. Untreated affected individuals suffer failure to thrive and neurodevelopmental delays that usually commence at 6-8 weeks of age. Death by age three years is typical. While provision of working copies of ATP7A to the brain by viral vectors is a promising strategy under development, the only treatment currently available is subcutaneous copper injections. These can normalize circulating blood levels and may replete brain copper depending on the molecular context, e.g., the severity of ATP7A mutation and potential presence of mosaicism. In this paper, we summarize somatic growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes for 60 subjects enrolled in a recently concluded phase I/II clinical trial of copper histidine for Menkes disease (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001262). Primary outcomes indicate highly statistically significant improvements in gross motor, fine motor/adaptive, personal-social, and language neurodevelopment in the cohort of subjects who received early treatment prior to onset of symptoms (n=35). Correlating with these findings, quantitative parameters of somatic growth indicated statistically significant greater growth in head circumference for the initially asymptomatic group, whereas weight and height/length at age three years (or at time of death) did not differ significantly. Mortality at age 3 was higher (50%) in subjects older and symptomatic when treatment commenced compared to the asymptomatic group (28.6%). We conclude that early copper histidine for Menkes disease is safe and efficacious, with treatment outcomes influenced by the timing of intervention, and ATP7A mutation. PMID:25281031

  18. Preliminary report of improved sleep quality in patients with dry eye disease after initiation of topical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Toda, Ikuko; Tachi, Naoko; Negishi, Kazuno; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dry eye disease (DED) is potentially associated with sleep and mood disorders. This study evaluated sleep quality in patients with DED using a questionnaire-based survey before and after topical eyedrop treatment. The effectiveness of sleep and ophthalmic services in assisting with sleep problems in patients with eye disease was also assessed. Methods Seventy-one consecutive patients with DED visiting eight general eye clinics in various locations answered a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Photophobia and chronotype (morningness/eveningness) were also evaluated with two representative questions from established questionnaires (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 and Morningness/Eveningness questionnaire). Follow-up evaluation was conducted by interview or mail 3–10 months after the initial evaluation. A sleep service was established in two eye clinics to identify possible ocular diseases related to sleep and mood disorders; it comprised a questionnaire, sleep diary, actigram, medical interviews, visual field testing, retinal ganglion cell layer thickness measurement, and DED examination. Results Patients with newly diagnosed DED exhibited a greater improvement in sleep after DED treatment compared with patients with established DED. Improvement in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was significant (P<0.05) and strongly correlated with improvement in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (P<0.05) for new patients, but not for patients with established DED. Ten eye clinic patients visited the sleep service and nine of them had DED. They were successfully treated with eyedrops and sleep services, which included blue-light-shield eyewear and wearable blue-light therapy lamps according to their problem. Conclusion Sleep quality improved in patients with DED after topical treatment with or without the sleep service. Psychiatric treatment focusing on sleep disorders could be

  19. Outcomes associated with initiation of tiotropium or fluticasone/salmeterol in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Rachel; Baker, Christine L; Su, Jun; Woodruff, Kimberly B; Paulose-Ram, Ryne; Porter, Victoria; Shah, Hemal

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence to long-acting bronchodilator therapy for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical clinical and cost issue. Low adherence is associated with relatively higher exacerbation rates and illness burden. Purpose: To compare adherence between patients with COPD initiating therapy on tiotropium or fluticasone/salmeterol and examine the association between adherence and respiratory-related costs. Patients and methods: This retrospective claims data analysis evaluated patients initiating tiotropium or combination fluticasone/salmeterol from December 1, 2004 to December 31, 2005. Patients had ≥1 COPD diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] 491.xx, 492.x, 496) and were observed during 6-month pre-index and variable (12–18-month) post-index periods. Outcomes were adherence to and discontinuation of therapy, and respiratory-related inpatient, medical, and total health care costs. Adherence was medication possession ratio ≥0.80. Discontinuation, adherence, and costs were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards regression, logistic regression, and generalized linear model regressions, respectively. Regressions controlled for demographic, sociodemographic, and health status factors. Results: The study population comprised 1561 tiotropium and 2976 fluticasone/salmeterol patients. In unadjusted comparisons: 19.5% and 8.5% of tiotropium and fluticasone/salmeterol patients, respectively, were adherent (P < 0.001); tiotropium patients versus fluticasone/salmeterol patients had higher mean respiratory-related pharmacy costs (US$1080 versus US$974, P = 0.002) and health care costs (US$3751 versus US$2932, P = 0.031). Regression analysis showed tiotropium patients were 31.6% less likely to discontinue therapy (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64–0.73) and had 2.25 times higher odds of adherence (CI: 1.85–2.73) versus fluticasone/salmeterol patients. The associations

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Incidence of Twelve Initial Presentations of Cardiovascular Disease: A Population Record-Linkage Cohort Study in England

    PubMed Central

    Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Duyx, Bram; Thomas, Sara L.; Stogiannis, Dimitris; Rahman, Anisur; Smeeth, Liam; Hemingway, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While rheumatoid arthritis is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), our knowledge of how the pattern of risk varies for different cardiovascular phenotypes is incomplete. The association between rheumatoid arthritis and the initial presentation of 12 types of CVDs were examined in a contemporary population of men and women of a wide age range. Methods CALIBER data, which links primary care, hospital and mortality data in England, was analysed. A cohort of people aged ≥18 years and without history of CVD was assembled and included all patients with prospectively recorded rheumatoid arthritis from January 1997, until March 2010, matched with up to ten people without rheumatoid arthritis by age, sex and general practice. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis and the initial presentation of 12 types of CVDs were estimated using multivariable random effects Poisson regression models. Results The analysis included 12,120 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 121,191 comparators. Of these, 2,525 patients with and 18,146 without rheumatoid arthritis developed CVDs during a median of 4.2 years of follow-up. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had higher rates of myocardial infarction (adjusted incidence ratio [IRR] = 1.43, 95%CI 1.21–1.70), unheralded coronary death (IRR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.18–2.18), heart failure (IRR = 1.61, 95%CI 1.43–1.83), cardiac arrest (HR = 2.26, 95%CI 1.69–3.02) and peripheral arterial disease (HR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.14–1.62); and lower rates of stable angina (HR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.73–0.95). There was no evidence of association with cerebrovascular diseases, abdominal aortic aneurysm or unstable angina, or of interactions with sex or age. Conclusions The observed associations with some but not all types of CVDs inform both clinical practice and the selection of cardiovascular endpoints for trials and for the development of prognostic models for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26978266