Science.gov

Sample records for disease r01 nci

  1. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  2. inteferon Gamma as a Therapeutic to Treat Ocular Diseases | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Eye Institute's Section on Epithelial and Retinal Physiology and Disease (SERPD) is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize therapeutics for ocular diseases caused by accumulation of sub-retinal fluid.

  3. 75 FR 26266 - National Cancer Institute (NCI); National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ...: From Mouse Models to Human Disease and Treatment.'' Dates: September 2-3, 2010. Location: Lister Hill... treating lupus patients. There are numerous mouse models of lupus, but their relevance to the actual... similarities, as well as differences, in mouse models with respect to the disease with the clinicians...

  4. Diabetes, Obesity, and Other Insulin-Related Diseases | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Urologic Oncology Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop small molecule epoxy-guaiane derivative englerin A and related compounds for diseases associated with insulin resistance.

  5. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative research to co-develop a mouse model that shows preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease.

  6. Emergency Preparedness at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Information to help prepare for an emergency. Includes resources for patients and health care providers to continue cancer care, NCI contacts for grantees, and resources to prepare and update NCI employees and contractors.

  7. NCI Grant Resources Room

    Cancer.gov

    If you’re interested in information about NCI grants, visit the Grant Resources Room. You can talk to NCI staff about grant application and review processes, and even schedule a one-on-one consultation.

  8. NCI & Division Obligations

    Cancer.gov

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  9. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  10. NCI at ASCO

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-designated cancer centers are being extensively represented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago this year with a large array of clinical trial results and findings.

  11. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  12. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  13. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  14. Screening of Menkes Disease in Newborns that are likely to Benefit from Copper Treatment | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (NICHD) Molecular Medicine Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, or evaluate on a large-scale, population-based newborn screening for Menkes disease (also known as kinky hair disease).

  15. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  16. Digital Standards for NCI Websites

    Cancer.gov

    The Digital Standards for NCI Websites and Social Media provide developers and content managers guidance on the visual and content standards, as well as policies and procedures, in effect for National Cancer Institute (NCI) digital media – including traditional and mobile websites, as well as social and new media channels.

  17. Citation Impact of NHLBI R01 Grants Funded Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act as Compared to R01 Grants Funded Through a Standard Payline

    PubMed Central

    Danthi, Narasimhan S.; Wu, Colin O.; DiMichele, Donna; Hoots, W. Keith; Lauer, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allowed NHLBI to fund R01 grants that fared less well on peer review than those funded by meeting a payline threshold. It is not clear whether the sudden availability of additional funding enabled research of similar or lesser citation impact than already funded work. Objective To compare the citation impact of ARRA-funded de novo NHLBI R01 grants with concurrent de novo NHLBI R01 grants funded by standard-payline mechanisms. Methods and Results We identified de novo (“Type 1”) R01 grants funded by NHLBI in fiscal year (FY) 2009: these included 458 funded by meeting Institute’s published payline and 165 funded only because of ARRA funding. Compared to payline grants, ARRA grants received fewer total funds (median values $1.03 million versus $1.87 million, P<0.001) for a shorter duration (median values including no-cost extensions 3.0 versus 4.9 years, P<0.001). Through May 2014, the payline R01 grants generated 3895 publications, while the ARRA R01 grants generated 996. Using the InCites database from Thomson-Reuters, we calculated a “normalized citation impact” for each grant by weighting each paper for the number of citations it received normalizing for subject, article type, and year of publication. The ARRA R01 grants had a similar normalized citation impact per $1 million spent as the payline grants (median values[IQR] 2.15[0.73–4.78] versus 2.03[0.75–4.10], P=0.61). The similar impact of the ARRA grants persisted even after accounting for potential confounders. Conclusions Despite shorter durations and lower budgets, ARRA R01 grants had comparable citation outcomes per $million spent to that of contemporaneously funded payline R01 grants. PMID:25722441

  18. A novel genotype c.1228C>G/c.1448C-1498C (L371V/Rec-NciI) in a 3-year-old child with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Nabil A; Muwakkit, Samar A; Ibrahim, Ahmad O; Kayim, Imad M; Habbal, Mohammad-Zohair M; Chamseddine, Nabil M; Musallam, Khaled M; Shamseddine, Ali I

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism, resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, causing an accumulation of the glycolipid glucocerebroside within lysosomes of macrophages in the reticuloendothelial system. Three major clinical forms have been assigned and more than 200 gene mutations have been identified. We herein report a Lebanese boy born with a novel combined mutation L371V/Rec-NciI, who presented with moderate-severe type 1 GD. An overview of the clinical and biomarker improvement following enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase is described in a follow-up of 30 months. Imiglucerase seems to be efficacious in decreasing the severity of the disease associated with this mutation. However, a high dose may be required to achieve optimal growth, platelet count, and hemoglobin level. PMID:19029690

  19. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees.

  20. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  1. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  2. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  3. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand.  Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  4. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Program, in which researchers will examine tumor tissue from patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphomas that have stopped responding to treatment

  5. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  6. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  7. NCI at AACR 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) will be participating at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 16-20, 2016, in New Orleans at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Sessions Featuring NCI Staff An overview of the NCI-sponsored sessions and NCI experts presenting at AACR. |

  8. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  9. Dinutuximab (Unituxin™) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, NCI entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with United Therapeutics Corp., under which the company assumed responsibility for manufacturing dinutuximab and moving it through the steps required for regulatory approval.

  10. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  11. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  12. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  13. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  14. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Cancer.gov

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  15. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  16. NCI-MATCH Trial Draws Strong Interest.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    After 800 cancer patients enrolled during the first 3 months of the NCI-MATCH trial, organizers have extended a temporary halt in enrollment to gear up for the next phase. The basket study, which matches patients to approved or experimental drugs based on specific genetic mutations in their tumors, is expected to resume in April or May. PMID:26896095

  17. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry.

  18. NCI/DCCPS R21 Program Announcements

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  19. NCI/DCCPS R03 Program Announcements

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  20. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits.

  1. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  2. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  3. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  4. A Quantitative Linguistic Analysis of National Institutes of Health R01 Application Critiques from Investigators at One Institution

    PubMed Central

    Kaatz, Anna; Magua, Wairimu; Zimmerman, David R.; Carnes, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Career advancement in academic medicine often hinges on the ability to garner research funds, and the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) R01 award is the “gold standard” of an independent research program. Studies show inconsistencies in R01 reviewers’ scoring and in award outcomes for certain applicant groups. Consistent with the NIH recommendation to examine potential bias in R01 peer review, the authors performed a text analysis of R01 reviewers’ critiques. Method The authors collected 454 critiques (262 from 91 unfunded and 192 from 67 funded applications) from 67 of 76 (88%) R01 investigators at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with initially unfunded applications subsequently funded between December 2007 and May 2009. To analyze critiques the authors developed positive and negative grant application evaluation word categories and selected 5 existing categories relevant to grant review. The authors analyzed results with linear mixed effects models for differences due to applicant and application characteristics. Results Critiques of funded applications contained more positive descriptors and superlatives and fewer negative evaluation words than critiques of unfunded applications. Experienced investigators’ critiques contained more references to competence. Critiques showed differences due to applicant sex despite similar application scores or funding outcomes: more praise for applications from female investigators; greater reference to competence/ability for funded applications from female experienced investigators; and more negative evaluation words for applications from male investigators (Ps < .05). Conclusions Results suggest that text analysis is a promising tool for assessing consistency in R01 reviewers’ judgments and gender stereotypes may operate in R01 review. PMID:25140529

  5. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  6. The NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Johnston; Daly; Liu

    1999-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recently decided to embark on an international partnership with the developing cancer programs on the Island of Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) in an attempt to further improve the quality and range of cancer services available for patients. This Transatlantic Partnership called the All Ireland-NCI Cancer Consortium offers exciting opportunities in cancer treatment, education and research as the cancer-caring communities from both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland prepare to join with the U.S. NCI in this major endeavor. The inaugural event of the partnership will be the NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference to be held in Belfast, October 3-6, 1999. (See www.allirelandcancer.com, for information on the conference.) Cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity on the Island of Ireland. There are approximately 28,000 new cases and approximately 11,000 deaths from cancer each year. Therefore, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have among the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the Western World. In recent years there has been a major restructuring of cancer services in both parts of the Island. This is the result of several government reports such as the Campbell Report in Northern Ireland and the National Strategy Document for Cancer in the Republic of Ireland. The National Strategy Document proposes that cancer treatment services should be centered around primary care services, regional services, supra-regional centers and a national coordinating structure whereby the supra-regional centers deliver specialist surgery, medical and radiation oncology, rehabilitation and specialist palliative care. Three supra-regional cancer centers are being established in the cities of Dublin, Cork and Galway and a National Cancer Forum, which has served as a multidisciplinary advisory board to the Government, has pushed the development and implementation of this plan. This has

  7. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  8. Anticancer mechanisms of YC-1 in human lung cancer cell line, NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Huang, Li-Jiau; Yamori, Takao; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lee, Fang-Yu; Teng, Che-Ming; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2008-01-15

    As part of a continuing search for potential anticancer drug candidates, 1-benzyl-3-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furyl)indazole (YC-1) was evaluated in the Japanese Cancer Institute's (JCI) in vitro disease-oriented anticancer screen. The results indicated that YC-1 showed impressive selective toxicity against the NCI-H226 cell line. Therefore, the molecular mechanism by which YC-1 affects NCI-H226 cell growth was studied. YC-1 inhibited NCI-H226 cell growth in a time- and a concentration-dependent manner. YC-1 suppressed the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and cdc25A, up-regulated p16, p21 and p53, increased the number of NCI-H226 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Long exposure to YC-1 induced apoptosis by mitochondrial-dependent pathway. In addition, YC-1 inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein activities to abolish tumor cells metastasis. These findings suggest a mechanism of cytotoxic action of YC-1 and indicate that YC-1 may be a promising chemotherapy agent against lung cancer. PMID:17880926

  9. Halaven® - eribulin mesylate (analog of halichondrin B) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Under a CRADA with NCI, Eisai Co. provided eribulin for NCI's preclinical development activities and to support NCI's Phase I clinical trials. Eisai ultimately took the product, Halaven®, to licensure.

  10. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making such a discovery, NCI researchers should immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention and consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Specialist about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form.

  11. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  12. Percentile Ranking and Citation Impact of a Large Cohort of NHLBI-funded Cardiovascular R01 Grants

    PubMed Central

    Danthi, Narasimhan; Wu, Colin O.; Shi, Peibei; Lauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Funding decisions for cardiovascular R01 grant applications at NHLBI largely hinge on percentile rankings. It is not known whether this approach enables the highest impact science. Objective To conduct an observational analysis of percentile rankings and bibliometric outcomes for a contemporary set of funded NHLBI cardiovascular R01 grants. Methods and results We identified 1492 investigator-initiated de novo R01 grant applications that were funded between 2001 and 2008, and followed their progress for linked publications and citations to those publications. Our co-primary endpoints were citations received per million dollars of funding, citations obtained within 2-years of publication, and 2-year citations for each grant’s maximally cited paper. In 7654 grant-years of funding that generated $3004 million of total NIH awards, the portfolio yielded 16,793 publications that appeared between 2001 and 2012 (median per grant 8, 25th and 75th percentiles 4 and 14, range 0 – 123), which received 2,224,255 citations (median per grant 1048, 25th and 75th percentiles 492 and 1,932, range 0 – 16,295). We found no association between percentile ranking and citation metrics; the absence of association persisted even after accounting for calendar time, grant duration, number of grants acknowledged per paper, number of authors per paper, early investigator status, human versus non-human focus, and institutional funding. An exploratory machine-learning analysis suggested that grants with the very best percentile rankings did yield more maximally cited papers. Conclusions In a large cohort of NHLBI-funded cardiovascular R01 grants, we were unable to find a monotonic association between better percentile ranking and higher scientific impact as assessed by citation metrics. PMID:24406983

  13. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  15. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  16. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  17. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  18. NCI Director Also to Be Interim FDA Commissioner

    Cancer.gov

    Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., director of the NCI, was asked by President Bush on Friday, September 23, 2005, to assume the additional role of interim Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  19. Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI coordina actividades de investigación y trabaja con socios nacionales e internacionales para comprender y enfrentar la carga que representa el cáncer a nivel mundial.

  20. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  1. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  2. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  3. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  4. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  5. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  6. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Cancer.gov

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  7. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  8. Micatu Tissue Arrayer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI researcher recognized a critical need to create a low-cost, easy-to-use tissue microarrayer (TMA), an instrument used by researchers and pathologists to accurately examine tissue samples from patients.

  9. Líneas Vitales: Programas y servicios del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Artículos y videos sobre los programas y servicios del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer de la serie educativa Líneas Vitales del NCI, la cual está dirigida especialmente a poblaciones multiculturales.

  10. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  11. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken. PMID:21672889

  12. DNA Fingerprinting of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Philip L.; Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A.; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J.; Weinstein, John N.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Since many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also demonstrate that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes. PMID:19372543

  13. DNA fingerprinting of the NCI-60 cell line panel.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J; Weinstein, John N

    2009-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute's NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Because many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also show that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes. PMID:19372543

  14. An overview of the NCI precision medicine trials-NCI MATCH and MPACT.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Chen, Alice P

    2015-09-01

    The concept of oncogene addiction was first proposed by Weinstein in 2002, postulating that tumors rely on a single dominant mutation, the oncogenic "driver", for growth and survival. We have since come to realize that the genomic landscape of tumors is heterogeneous and more complex than previously thought. Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics over the past decade have shifted treatment paradigms with regard to the development of molecular targeted therapeutics to identify and target the presumptive dominant lesion. As such, the decision of choosing targeted treatment strategies has become increasingly more reliant on the reporting of genomic screens of patients' tumor tissue. Whether this change in treatment paradigm will translate into improved clinical benefit, remains to be seen. To this end, the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched precision-based medicine trials to address this question. NCI Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH), a genomic pre-screening study, was designed to explore the efficacy of using targeted agents to target specific molecular aberrations and whether these same therapies have comparable activity across different tumor subtypes. Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (MPACT), is a smaller, provocative trial designed to address whether targeting an oncogenic "driver" would be more efficacious than one not. The Exceptional Responders' initiative further aims to evaluate patients who have derived an unexpected durable benefit to these therapies, with retrospective analysis of their tumors to delineate potential predictive biomarkers which could predict response. The results of these trials will serve to help guide the field of precision medicine and personalized care. PMID:26408298

  15. Auditing the NCI Thesaurus with Semantic Web Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed. PMID:18999265

  16. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  17. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... this publication. Proposed Collection: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology...

  18. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports,...

  19. Novel Method Of Preparing Vaccines | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    This invention from the NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program describes methods to prepare vaccines for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods of preparing vaccines.

  20. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  1. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  2. Centros oncológicos designados por el NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El programa de centros oncológicos designados por el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) reconoce a los centros de todo el país que cumplen con rigurosos criterios para participar en proyectos avanzados de primer nivel para la investigación multidisciplinaria del cáncer.

  3. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  4. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  5. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.”  As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  6. Dilute Aperture Visible Nulling Coronagraph Imaging (DAViNCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele R.; Harvey, K.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.; Tolls, V.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on instrument and mission overview, science case, Team X study, and technology status. Topics include DAViNCI study milestones, number of targets versus inner working angle, planet orbit and IWA, combiner/nuller instrument, DAViNCI Team X costs, technology status and near future plans, and deep laser null 1.23 x 10(exp -7) suppression. Summary points are: dilute aperture concept advantages, lower cost than a comparable 7-8m coronagraph working at 2 lambda/D, technology progress prior to 2008 was seriously limited by available funding but showed 1e-y suppression (2006) of laser light needed for 1e-9 to approximately 1e-10 contrast, and current technology effort is off to a fast date with a demonstration of less than 100pm wavefront measurement in Nov 08.

  7. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  8. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  9. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  10. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  11. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  12. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  13. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  14. 78 FR 75928 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Partnerships for Biodefense (R01). Date: January 7, 2014. Time: 9:30 a.m... Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Partnerships for Biodefense (R01)....

  15. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  16. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  17. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  18. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  19. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  20. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance... memorandum. This study seeks to assess the efficacy of the SmokefreeTXT program, a text message smoking... text- messaging service and a series of web-based surveys. All web-based survey data will be...

  1. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute ... were as easy to find as a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone ...

  2. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  3. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  4. Association of percentile ranking with citation impact and productivity in a large cohort of de novo NIMH-funded R01 grants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J M; Quinn, K; Bodenstein, Y A; Wu, C O; Danthi, N; Lauer, M S

    2015-09-01

    Previous reports from National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation have suggested that peer review scores of funded grants bear no association with grant citation impact and productivity. This lack of association, if true, may be particularly concerning during times of increasing competition for increasingly limited funds. We analyzed the citation impact and productivity for 1755 de novo investigator-initiated R01 grants funded for at least 2 years by National Institute of Mental Health between 2000 and 2009. Consistent with previous reports, we found no association between grant percentile ranking and subsequent productivity and citation impact, even after accounting for subject categories, years of publication, duration and amounts of funding, as well as a number of investigator-specific measures. Prior investigator funding and academic productivity were moderately strong predictors of grant citation impact. PMID:26033238

  5. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR),...

  6. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  7. NCI/EPA AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY (AHS): DEVELOPMENT OF THE BIOMARKER QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ind the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have planned a long-term prospective epidemiologic study of men, women, and dependent children in agricultural areas to identify and...

  8. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  9. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  10. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  11. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  12. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  13. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of NCI-H1666 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sponring, Andreas; Filipiak, Wojciech; Ager, Clemens; Schubert, Jochen; Miekisch, Wolfram; Amann, Anton; Troppmair, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) provides an elegant approach for cancer screening and disease monitoring, whose use is currently limited by a lack of validated cancer-derived metabolites, which may serve as biomarkers. The aim of the experiments presented here was to investigate the release and consumption of VOCs from the non small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H1666, which was originally derived from a bronchoalveolar carcinoma.Following detachment by trypsinization suspended cells were incubated in a sealed fermenter for 21 hours. 200 ml of headspace from the cell culture were sampled, diluted with dry, highly purified air and preconcentrated by adsorption on three different solid sorbents with increasing adsorption strength. VOC-analysis was performed by thermodesorption-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). In contrast to our previous studies experiments with NCI-H1666 cells only confirmed the consumption of several aldehydes, n-butyl acetate and the ethers methyl tert-butyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether, but no unequivocal release of VOCs was observed. Together with our previously published work these data indicate that the consumption of certain VOCs is commonly observed while their release shows cell line-restricted patterns, whose underlying causes are unknown. PMID:21263191

  14. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  15. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  16. Drugs Approved for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gestational trophoblastic disease. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Relative prognostic value of the Dukes and the Jass systems in rectal cancer. Findings from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Projects (Protocol R-01)

    PubMed

    Fisher, E R; Robinsky, B; Sass, R; Fisher, B

    1989-11-01

    A comparison of the prognostic values of the Dukes and Jass systems were performed with 722 patients with rectal cancer enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Projects, protocol R-01. The Jass system revealed four prognostic groups when all patients or only Dukes' B and C cases were examined; however, the magnitude of differences between groups I and II and III and IV were small. Dukes' classification, as defined in this study, revealed five prognostic groups. A statistically strong association between the Jass and Dukes systems was observed. Although histologic grade permitted further prognostic discrimination of all Dukes stages except A, only the Jass system allowed for the subdivision of C cases with up to four nodes positive for metastases. Those in that group had survival rates comparable to B cases (no nodal involvement) when scores of I and II were found. The distributions of the patients in the extremes of the Jass and Dukes systems (C2 as defined) were almost similar. The findings indicate that the Jass system is a valid prognostic method for patients with rectal carcinoma. In this material, however, it basically allowed for only two major prognostic groups whereas five were noted by the Dukes method. These results, as well as the more objective nature of Dukes' classification, warrant its continued use for prognosis and therapeutic decisions for patients with rectal cancer. PMID:2478350

  18. Oncofertility Resources at NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers

    PubMed Central

    Clayman, Marla L.; Harper, Maya M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provide information about the institution’s FP resources. A semi-structured interview guide was used and responses were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 30 of the 39 CCCs that see adult patients (77%). The remaining institutions included 4 nonresponders, 3 that referred the interviewers to childhood cancer survivorship clinics, 1 that refused, and 1 that could not identify any FP resources. Participants were primarily affiliated with reproductive endocrinology (n=15) or hematology/oncology divisions (n=10). Institutional policies regarding consistent provision of FP information were rare (n=4), although most sites (n=20) either had some services on-site or had referral programs (n=8). However, only 13 had some experimental services, such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Respondents reported barriers to provision of FP, including oncologists’ identification of patients at risk, low referral rates, and perceptions of patient prognosis. Only 8 (27%) sites had staff with time dedicated to FP. CCCs vary widely in implementing FP-recommended practice to their patients. CCCs are positioned to provide exemplary oncofertility care, but most need to better integrate FP information and referral into practice. PMID:24335685

  19. Sensitivity of NCI-H292 human lung mucoepidermoid cells for respiratory and other human viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Castells, E; Banks, G G; Bryan, J A; McEwen, C T

    1993-01-01

    NCI-H292 mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells from human lungs were shown in an earlier report to be a fully adequate substitute for primary rhesus monkey kidney (MK) cells for the isolation and propagation of the human paramyxoviruses. Although sensitivity for ortho- and paramyxoviruses was the principal reason for using MK cells, the cells were also sensitive to many other viruses, which constituted another important value of MK cells. That MK cells supported the initial isolation and growth of so many respiratory viruses made it a mandatory cell type for any clinical laboratory. We therefore felt it was imperative to evaluate the virus spectrum of NCI-H292 cells, which are being used as a substitute for MK cells in many laboratories. In the present report, we show that NCI-H292 cells are sensitive for vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, adenoviruses, BK polyomavirus, reoviruses, measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, some strains of influenza virus type A, most enteroviruses, and rhinoviruses, in addition to the parainfluenza and mumps viruses originally reported. Furthermore, these viruses replicate in NCI-H292 cells to the same virus and antigen titers and at the same speed of replication as they do in their usually preferred cells. The NCI-H292 cells are therefore an excellent substitute for MK cells in terms of laboratory safety, ease of availability, paramyxovirus isolation, and broad virus spectrum but cannot substitute for MK cells for the isolation of influenza viruses. Images PMID:8314992

  20. 75 FR 20606 - The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men and Women in Agriculture (NCI); Correction Notice The Federal Register notice published on March 3, 2010 (75 FR 9902) announcing the proposed collection and comment... Other Disease Among Men and Women in Agriculture (NCI)'' was submitted with errors. The burden table...

  1. Cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines of modified flavonoids from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Yenjai, Chavi; Wanich, Suchana

    2010-05-01

    Flavones 1-4 isolated from Kaempferia parviflora were used for structural modification. Sixteen flavonoid derivatives, including four new derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines. Flavanones 2a-4a demonstrated higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compounds. Cytotoxicity against KB cell line of oxime 1c was about 7 times higher than the ellipticine standard. Interestingly, oximes 1c and 2c exhibited highly potent cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 0.014 and 0.23 microM, respectively. Oximes 4c and 5c showed strong cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 4.04 and 2.32 microM, respectively. PMID:20362442

  2. Analysis of hydrogen-bond interaction potentials from the electron density: Integration of NCI regions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-García, Julia; Yang, Weitao; Johnson, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are of crucial relevance to many problems in chemistry biology and materials science. The recently-developed NCI (Non-Covalent Interactions) index enables real-space visualization of both attractive (van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding) and repulsive (steric) interactions based on properties of the electron density It is thus an optimal index to describe the interplay of stabilizing and de-stabilizing contributions that determine stable minima on hydrogen-bonding potential-energy surfaces (PESs). In the framework of density-functional theory energetics are completely determined by the electron density Consequently NCI will be shown to allow quantitative treatment of hydrogen-bond energetics. The evolution of NCI regions along a PES follows a well-behaved pattern which, upon integration of the electron density is capable of mimicking conventional hydrogen-bond interatomic potentials. PMID:21786796

  3. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  4. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  5. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  6. Control del cáncer y salud mundial: noticia del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI)

    Cancer.gov

    En combinación con una reunión de alto nivel de las Naciones Unidas sobre enfermedades no transmisibles en países en vías de desarrollo, el doctor Harold Varmus, director del NCI, y el doctor Ted L. Trimble, del NCI, han publicado un comentario en Science

  7. 78 FR 69426 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... more information on the proposed project contact: CAPT Michael Montello, Pharm. D., MBA, Cancer Therapy... National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health, may not conduct or sponsor, and the.../31/2014, Revision, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Need and...

  8. Antitumor activity of gambogic acid on NCI-H1993 xenografts via MET signaling pathway downregulation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DONGLEI; YANG, HUIWEI; LI, RUNPU; WANG, YANLI; WANG, WEIJUN; LI, DONGJIE; MA, SHAOLIN; ZHANG, XUYU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor mechanisms of gambogic acid (GA) on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo. Non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H1993 cells, which harbor a MET gene amplification, were subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. The mice were randomly assigned to treatment with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg GA for 3 weeks. At the end of the efficacy study, all the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were subjected to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. GA inhibited NCI-H1993 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated (p)-MET and its downstream signaling molecules p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were significantly inhibited by GA. IHC analysis of Ki-67 expression demonstrated that GA treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. GA exerted antitumor effects on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo by direct regulation of the MET signaling pathway. Theses antitumor effects were primarily a result of its anti-proliferation function. PMID:26722245

  9. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  10. Representing the NCI Thesaurus in OWL DL: Modeling tools help modeling languages

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Natalya F.; de Coronado, Sherri; Solbrig, Harold; Fragoso, Gilberto; Hartel, Frank W.; Musen, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Thesaurus is a biomedical reference ontology. The NCI Thesaurus is represented using Description Logic, more specifically Ontylog, a Description logic implemented by Apelon, Inc. We are exploring the use of the DL species of the Web Ontology Language (OWL DL)—a W3C recommended standard for ontology representation—instead of Ontylog for representing the NCI Thesaurus. We have studied the requirements for knowledge representation of the NCI Thesaurus, and considered how OWL DL (and its implementation in Protégé-OWL) satisfies these requirements. In this paper, we discuss the areas where OWL DL was sufficient for representing required components, where tool support that would hide some of the complexity and extra levels of indirection would be required, and where language expressiveness is not sufficient given the representation requirements. Because many of the knowledge-representation issues that we encountered are very similar to the issues in representing other biomedical terminologies and ontologies in general, we believe that the lessons that we learned and the approaches that we developed will prove useful and informative for other researchers. PMID:19789731

  11. HIV Conference to Be Held on October 21 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program Conference on “Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together” will be held at NCI at Frederick on October 21, 2014, from 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. in the Conference Center auditorium, Building 549.

  12. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  13. Se lanza Red Nacional de Estudios Clínicos del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) puso en marcha una nueva red de investigación de estudios clínicos con el objetivo de mejorar el tratamiento de más de 1,6 millones de estadounidenses que reciben un diagnóstico de cáncer cada año.

  14. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  15. Reducing Friction: An Update on the NCIP Open Development Initiative - NCI BioMedical Informatics Blog

    Cancer.gov

    NCIP has migrated 132 repositories from the NCI subversion repository to our public NCIP GitHub channel with the goal of facilitating third party contributions to the existing code base. Within the GitHub environment, we are advocating use of the GitHub “fork and pull” model.

  16. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  17. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... while CTRP is not directly related to the conduct of a clinical trial, the NCI hopes to use the... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials... purpose and safety of clinical trials conducted outside of the United States. An e-mail response was...

  18. 76 FR 22714 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  19. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written......

  20. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells. PMID:26986492

  1. Factors Influencing Patient Pathways for Receipt of Cancer Care at an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez, Elisa M.; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G.; Miller, Austin; Erwin, Deborah O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the field of oncology, increasing access to high quality care has been identified as a priority to reduce cancer disparities. Previous research reveals that the facilities where patients receive their cancer care have implications for cancer outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how patients decide where to seek cancer care. This study examined the factors that shape patients’ pathways to seek their cancer care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center (NCI-CCC), and differences in these factors by race, income and education. Methods In-depth interviews and survey questionnaires were administered to a random sample of 124 patients at one NCI-CCC in the Northeast US. In-depth interview data was first analyzed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns in patients’ pathways to receive their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Logistic Regression was used to examine if these pathways varied by patient race, income, and education. Results Two themes emerged: following the recommendation of a physician and following advice from social network members. Quantitative data analysis shows that patient pathways to care at an NCI-CCC varied by education and income. Patients with lower income and education most commonly sought their cancer care at an NCI-CCC due to the recommendation of a physician. Patients with higher income and education most commonly cited referral by a specialist physician or the advice of a social network member. There were no statistically significant differences in pathways to care by race. Conclusions Our findings show that most patients relied on physician recommendations or advice from a social network member in deciding to seek their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Due to the role of physicians in shaping patients’ pathways to the NCI-CCC, initiatives that strengthen partnerships between NCI-CCCs and community physicians who serve underserved communities may improve access to NCI-CCCs. PMID

  2. 2007 EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting: Molecular Markers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lukan, C

    2008-01-01

    The recent EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting on ‘Molecular Markers in Cancer’ was held on 15–17 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. It was the largest meeting to date and marked the first year in which the American Association of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) joined in the efforts of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in organizing this annual event. More than 300 clinicians, pathologists, laboratory scientists and representatives from regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry came together for three days of intense discussion, debate and reflection on the latest biomarker therapeutic discoveries, strategies and clinical applications. The poster discussion sessions featured 79 research abstracts. The three most outstanding abstracts, all authored by young female researchers, were selected for presentation during the main meeting sessions. Highlights of each scientific session are presented. PMID:22275966

  3. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table ... Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute What if the tools you need to quit smoking were as ...

  4. Methods for Selection of Cancer Patients and Predicting Efficacy of Combination Therapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung Cancer Biomarkers Group of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop methods for selecting cancer patients for combination therapy.

  5. The Exomes of the NCI-60 Panel: a Genomic Resource for Cancer Biology and Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Abaan, Ogan D.; Polley, Eric C.; Davis, Sean R.; Zhu, Yuelin J.; Bilke, Sven; Walker, Robert L.; Pineda, Marbin; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Jiang, Yuan; Reinhold, William C.; Holbeck, Susan L.; Simon, Richard M.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. This panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. In addition, these cell lines have been intensely investigated, providing a unique platform for hypothesis driven research focused on enhancing our understanding of tumor biology. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of coding variants in the NCI-60 panel of cell lines identified by whole exome sequencing (WES), providing a list of possible cancer specific variants for the community. Furthermore, we identify pharmacogenomic correlations between specific variants in genes like TP53, BRAF, ERBBs and ATAD5 and anti-cancer agents such as nutlin, vemurafenib, erlotinib and bleomycin demonstrating one of many ways the data could be utilized to validate and generate novel hypotheses for further investigation. As new cancer genes are identified through large-scale sequencing studies, the data presented here for the NCI-60 will be an invaluable resource for identifying cell lines with mutations in such genes for hypothesis driven research. To enhance the utility of the data for the greater research community, the genomic variants are freely available in different formats and from multiple sources including the CellMiner and Ingenuity websites. PMID:23856246

  6. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care. PMID:20552623

  7. The exomes of the NCI-60 panel: a genomic resource for cancer biology and systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Abaan, Ogan D; Polley, Eric C; Davis, Sean R; Zhu, Yuelin J; Bilke, Sven; Walker, Robert L; Pineda, Marbin; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Jiang, Yuan; Reinhold, William C; Holbeck, Susan L; Simon, Richard M; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-07-15

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. This panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. In addition, these cell lines have been intensely investigated, providing a unique platform for hypothesis-driven research focused on enhancing our understanding of tumor biology. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of coding variants in the NCI-60 panel of cell lines identified by whole exome sequencing, providing a list of possible cancer specific variants for the community. Furthermore, we identify pharmacogenomic correlations between specific variants in genes such as TP53, BRAF, ERBBs, and ATAD5 and anticancer agents such as nutlin, vemurafenib, erlotinib, and bleomycin showing one of many ways the data could be used to validate and generate novel hypotheses for further investigation. As new cancer genes are identified through large-scale sequencing studies, the data presented here for the NCI-60 will be an invaluable resource for identifying cell lines with mutations in such genes for hypothesis-driven research. To enhance the utility of the data for the greater research community, the genomic variants are freely available in different formats and from multiple sources including the CellMiner and Ingenuity websites. PMID:23856246

  8. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  9. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored PLCO Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care.

  10. 76 FR 54240 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Partnerships for Biodefense (R01). Date: September 26, 2011. Time...: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Partnerships for Biodefense... Emphasis Panel, Partnerships for Biodefense (R01). Date: October 4, 2011. Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m....

  11. Microsoft Office 365 Deployment Continues through June at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The latest Microsoft suite, Office 365 (O365), is being deployed to all NCI at Frederick computers during the months of May and June to comply with federal mandates. The suite includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Skype for Business, along with cloud-based capabilities. These cloud-based capabilities will help meet the federal mandates that require all Health and Human Services operating divisions to migrate e-mail to the cloud by the end of 2016.

  12. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  13. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  14. 78 FR 58325 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Bariatric Surgery-- Related Ancillary Studies (R01s). Date... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Regulatory Mechanisms in Intestinal Motility...

  15. NCI Awards 18 Grants to Continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarkers Effort | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has awarded 18 grants to continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), a national infrastructure that supports the integrated development, validation, and clinical application of biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. The awards fund 7 Biomarker Developmental Laboratories, 8 Clinical Validation Centers, 2 Biomarker Reference Laboratories, and a Data Management and Coordinating Center (DMCC). |

  16. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... was previously published in the Federal Register on March 15, 2011 (76 FR 14034) and allowed 60-days... Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: Under the provisions of... Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer....

  17. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million.   Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  18. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  19. Shotgun Lipidomic Profiling of the NCI60 Cell Line Panel Using Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Lovrics, Anna; Sessler, Judit; McKenzie, James S; Bodai, Zsolt; Doria, M Luisa; Kucsma, Nora; Szakacs, Gergely; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-08-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was used for the rapid mass spectrometric profiling of cancer cell lines. Spectral reproducibility was assessed for three different cell lines, and the extent of interclass differences and intraclass variance was found to allow the identification of these cell lines based on the REIMS data. Subsequently, the NCI60 cell line panel was subjected to REIMS analysis, and the resulting data set was investigated for its distinction of individual cell lines and different tissue types of origin. Information content of REIMS spectral profiles of cell lines were found to be similar to those obtained from mammalian tissues although pronounced differences in relative lipid intensity were observed. Ultimately, REIMS was shown to detect changes in lipid content of cell lines due to mycoplasma infection. The data show that REIMS is an attractive means to study cell lines involving minimal sample preparation and analysis times in the range of seconds. PMID:27377867

  20. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  1. Perioperative outcomes after radical cystectomy at NCI-designated centres: Are they any better?

    PubMed Central

    Roghmann, Florian; Ravi, Praful; Hanske, Julian; Meyer, Christian P.; Preston, Mark A.; Noldus, Joachim; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In 1971, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) introduced a network of NCI-designated Cancer Centers (CC), which underwent a comprehensive approval process relying on research, education and prevention activities. In this study, we examine the effect of CC status on perioperative outcomes after radical cystectomy (RC). Methods: Within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we focused on RC performed from 2006 to 2010. As all recognized centres were residency teaching institutions, we stratified according to teaching and CC-teaching status. We examined the rates of in-hospital mortality, intra- and postoperative complications, prolonged length of hospital stay, as well as blood transfusion. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were further adjusted for confounding factors. Results: Overall, 22 840 RC patients (5451 at non-teaching, 10 857 at residency teaching, 6532 at CC-teaching institutions) were identified. Patients treated at residency teaching and CC-teaching institutions were younger, had less comorbidities, and more likely to have private insurance. In multivariable analyses, patients treated at residency and CC-teaching institutions were less likely to experience postoperative complications (odds ratio [OR] 0.73 and 0.66, respectively) and blood transfusions (OR 0.77 and 0.53, respectively) relative to patients treated at non-teaching institutions. In addition, CC patients were also less likely to experience in-hospital mortality (OR 0.61, all p < 0.001) as compared to non-teaching institutions. Conclusions: On average, patients treated at residency and CC-teaching institutions are less likely to experience unfavourable outcomes after RC. Moreover, patients treated at CC fared better than patients treated at residency teaching institutions. Our findings acknowledge the quality of RC care at accredited centres. PMID:26225174

  2. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  3. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine’s anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:26379863

  4. Analysis of FDA-Approved Anti-Cancer Agents in the NCI60 Panel of Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, Susan L.; Collins, Jerry M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990's the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anti-cancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here results of screening current FDA-approved anti-cancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We have analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we have also performed hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anti-cancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP web site (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anti-cancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use. PMID:20442306

  5. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine's anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:26379863

  6. Organometallic Iridium(III) Anticancer Complexes with New Mechanisms of Action: NCI-60 Screening, Mitochondrial Targeting, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (IrIII) complexes [Ir(Cpx)(XY)Cl]+/0 (Cpx = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cpx ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cpx = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these IrIII complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic IrIII complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  7. Organometallic Iridium(III) anticancer complexes with new mechanisms of action: NCI-60 screening, mitochondrial targeting, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Qamar, Bushra; Liu, Zhe; Hands-Portman, Ian; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (Ir(III)) complexes [Ir(Cp(x))(XY)Cl](+/0) (Cp(x) = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cp(x) ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cp(x) = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these Ir(III) complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic Ir(III) complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  8. Extracellular matrix components induce endocrine differentiation in vitro in NCI-H716 cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Bruïne, A. P.; Dinjens, W. N.; van der Linden, E. P.; Pijls, M. M.; Moerkerk, P. T.; Bosman, F. T.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine cells occur in +/- 30% of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The significance of this phenomenon in terms of tumor behavior is still controversial. Endocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer cell lines is almost confined to tumor xenografts in vivo, suggesting that endocrine differentiation might be regulated by epithelial-stromal interactions. This hypothesis was studied in the cecal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line NCI-H716 by comparing the expression of chromogranin A protein and messenger RNA in vivo and in vitro and by attempts to induce differentiation in vitro. We found that chromogranin A expression, which was strongest in vivo, could be significantly enhanced in vitro by culturing tumor cells in the presence of native extracellular matrix, on fibroblast feeder layers, and in a defined medium with basic fibroblast growth factor. The results suggest that the extracellular matrix induces endocrine differentiation through factors (e.g., basic fibroblast-growth factor) that may be produced by stromal cells and after secretion bind to the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8456938

  9. Unravelling Protein-DNA Interactions at Molecular Level: A DFT and NCI Study.

    PubMed

    González, J; Baños, I; León, I; Contreras-García, J; Cocinero, E J; Lesarri, A; Fernández, J A; Millán, J

    2016-02-01

    Histone-DNA interactions were probed computationally at a molecular level, by characterizing the bimolecular clusters constituted by selected amino acid derivatives with polar (asparagine and glutamine), nonpolar (alanine, valine, and isoleucine), and charged (arginine) side chains and methylated pyrimidinic (1-methylcytosine and 1-methylthymine) and puric (9-methyladenine and 9-methylguanine) DNA bases. The computational approach combined different methodologies: a molecular mechanics (MMFFs forced field) conformational search and structural and vibrational density-functional calculations (M06-2X with double and triple-ζ Pople's basis sets). To dissect the interactions, intermolecular forces were analyzed with the Non-Covalent Interactions (NCI) analysis. The results for the 24 different clusters studied show a noticeable correlation between the calculated binding energies and the propensities for protein-DNA base interactions found in the literature. Such correlation holded even for the interaction of the selected amino acid derivatives with Watson and Crick pairs. Therefore, the balance between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (specially stacking) in the control of the final shape of the investigated amino acid-DNA base pairs seems to be well reproduced in dispersion-corrected DFT molecular models, reinforcing the idea that the specificity between the amino acids and the DNA bases play an important role in the regulation of DNA. PMID:26765058

  10. In memoriam: an appreciation for the NCI R25T cancer education and career development program.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    On September 7, 2013, the NCI R25T award mechanism ended its final "receipt/review/award cycle" after more than two decades shaping the cancer prevention and control workforce. Created in 1991 to respond to a national shortage of cancer prevention and control researchers, the R25T supported innovative institutional programs with specialized curricula preparing individuals for careers as independent scientists for the field. Required elements ensured developing transdisciplinary sensibilities and skills highly suited to team science, including conducting collaborative research with mentors of complementary expertise. R25Ts provided trainee stipends, research, education, and travel funds at levels far higher than T32 National Service Research Awards to attract individuals from diverse disciplines. Graduates are faculty at all academic ranks, and hold leadership positions such as associate directors of cancer prevention and control. Beyond its trainees, R25Ts also recruited into the field other students exposed through courses in specialized prevention curricula, as well as course instructors and trainee mentors, who did not initially consider their work to be relevant to cancer prevention. Although advances are being achieved, prevention efforts are not yet fully realized, and currently unknown is the impact on the workforce of terminating the R25T, including whether it is another barrier to preventing cancer. PMID:24895444

  11. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. PMID:26547926

  12. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  13. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of the NCI-60 integrated with drug activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; D’Andrade, Petula; Fulmer-Smentek, Stephanie; Lorenzi, Philip; Kohn, Kurt W.; Weinstein, John N.; Pommier, Yves; Reinhold, William C.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Spotlight on Molecular Profiling series, we present here new profiling studies of mRNA and microRNA expression for the 60 cell lines of the NCI DTP drug screen (NCI-60) using the 41,000-probe Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray and the 15,000-feature Agilent Human microRNA Microarray V2. The expression levels of ~21,000 genes and 723 human microRNAs were measured. These profiling studies include quadruplicate technical replicates for six and eight cell lines for mRNA and microRNA, respectively, and duplicates for the remaining cell lines. The resulting data sets are freely available and searchable online in our CellMiner database. The result indicates high reproducibility for both platforms and an essential biological similarity across the various cell types. The mRNA and microRNA expression levels were integrated with our previously published 1,429-compound database of anticancer activity obtained from the NCI DTP drug screen. Large blocks of both mRNAs and microRNAs were identified with predominately unidirectional correlations to ~1,300 drugs including 121 drugs with known mechanisms of action. The data sets presented here will facilitate the identification of groups of mRNAs, microRNAs and drugs that potentially affect and interact with one another. PMID:20442302

  14. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. PMID:23948249

  15. Concordance of Gene Expression and Functional Correlation Patterns across the NCI-60 Cell Lines and the Cancer Genome Atlas Glioblastoma Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeeberg, Barry R.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Kahn, Ari; Larionov, Vladimir; Weinstein, John N.; Reinhold, William; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background The NCI-60 is a panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines used by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. We recently clustered genes based on correlation of expression profiles across the NCI-60. Many of the resulting clusters were characterized by cancer-associated biological functions. The set of curated glioblastoma (GBM) gene expression data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) initiative has recently become available. Thus, we are now able to determine which of the processes are robustly shared by both the immortalized cell lines and clinical cancers. Results Our central observation is that some sets of highly correlated genes in the NCI-60 expression data are also highly correlated in the GBM expression data. Furthermore, a “double fishing” strategy identified many sets of genes that show Pearson correlation ≥0.60 in both the NCI-60 and the GBM data sets relative to a given “bait” gene. The number of such gene sets far exceeds the number expected by chance. Conclusion Many of the gene-gene correlations found in the NCI-60 do not reflect just the conditions of cell lines in culture; rather, they reflect processes and gene networks that also function in vivo. A number of gene network correlations co-occur in the NCI-60 and GBM data sets, but there are others that occur only in NCI-60 or only in GBM. In sum, this analysis provides an additional perspective on both the utility and the limitations of the NCI-60 in furthering our understanding of cancers in vivo. PMID:22848369

  16. CXCL14 enhances proliferation and migration of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells overexpressing the glycoproteins containing heparan sulfate or sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Cho Rong; You, Dong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Cheolju; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Curie; Seong, Jae Young; Hwang, Jong-Ik

    2013-05-01

    CXCL14 is a chemokine family member that is involved in various cellular responses in addition to immune cell activation. Although constitutive CXCL14 expression in normal epithelial cells may help protect against infection by activating immune systems, its expression in cancer cells has raised controversy regarding its possible role in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms for this disparity remain unknown. Investigation of cellular CXCL14 binding properties might increase our understanding of the peptide's roles in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we found that CXCL14 binds to various cell types. Interestingly, binding to NCI-H460 cells was prevented by heparan sulfate and N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Next, we examined effect of CXCL14 binding in NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. CXCL14 enhanced proliferation and migration in NCI-H460 but had no effect on NCI-H23. A reporter gene assay with various transcription factor response elements revealed that only nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling was activated by CXCL14 in NCI-H460 cells, which was blocked by BAPTA-AM, TPCA-1, and brefeldin A. Exogenous expression of some glycoproteins such as syndecan-4, podoplanin, and CD43 in these cells enhanced CXCL14 binding and NF-κB activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CXCL14 binding to glycoproteins harboring heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acids leads proliferation and migration of some cancer cells. PMID:23161284

  17. Mechanochemical endovenous Ablation versus RADiOfrequeNcy Ablation in the treatment of primary great saphenous vein incompetence (MARADONA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is associated with an excellent outcome in the treatment of great saphenous vein (GSV) incompetence. The use of thermal energy as a treatment source requires the instillation of tumescence anesthesia. Mechanochemical endovenous ablation (MOCA) combines mechanical endothelial damage, using a rotating wire, with the infusion of a liquid sclerosant. Tumescence anesthesia is not required. Preliminary experiences with MOCA showed good results and low post-procedural pain. Methods/Design The MARADONA (Mechanochemical endovenous Ablation versus RADiOfrequeNcy Ablation) trial is a multicenter randomized controlled trial in which 460 patients will be randomly allocated to MOCA or RFA. All patients with primary GSV incompetence who meet the eligibility criteria will be invited to participate in this trial. The primary endpoints are anatomic and clinical success at a one-year follow-up, and post-procedural pain. The secondary endpoints are technical success, complications, operation time, procedural pain, disease-specific quality of life, time taken to return to daily activities and/or work, and cost-efficiency analyses after RFA or MOCA. Both groups will be evaluated on an intention to treat base. Discussion The MARADONA trial is designed to show equal results in anatomic and clinical success after one year, comparing MOCA with RFA. In our hypothesis MOCA has an equal anatomic and clinical success compared with RFA, with less post-procedural pain. Trial registration Clinicaltrials NCT01936168 PMID:24726004

  18. Recommendations from the iSBTc-SITC/FDA/NCI Workshop on Immunotherapy Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Britten, Cedrik M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Håkansson, Leif; Janetzki, Sylvia; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kleen, Thomas-Oliver; Lee, Peter P.; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T.; Maino, Vernon C.; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Pawelec, Graham; Potter, Douglas M.; Rivoltini, Licia; Salazar, Lupe G.; Schendel, Dolores J.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Song, Wenru; Stroncek, David F.; Tahara, Hideaki; Thurin, Magdalena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Marincola, Francesco; Khleif, Samir; Fox, Bernard A.; Disis, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate development of innovative immunotherapy approaches, especially for treatment concepts exploiting the potential benefits of personalized therapy, there is a need to develop and validate tools to identify patients who can benefit from immunotherapy. Despite substantial effort, we do not yet know which parameters of anti-tumor immunity to measure and which assays are optimal for those measurements. Experimental Design The iSBTc-SITC, FDA and NCI partnered to address these issues for immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we review the major challenges, give examples of approaches and solutions and present our recommendations. Results and Conclusions While specific immune parameters and assays are not yet validated, we recommend following standardized (accurate, precise and reproducible) protocols and use of functional assays for the primary immunologic readouts of a trial; consideration of central laboratories for immune monitoring of large, multi-institutional trials; and standardized testing of several phenotypic and functional potential potency assays specific to any cellular product. When reporting results, the full QA/QC performed, selected examples of truly representative raw data and assay performance characteristics should be included. Lastly, to promote broader analysis of multiple aspects of immunity, and gather data on variability, we recommend that in addition to cells and serum, that RNA and DNA samples be banked (under standardized conditions) for later testing. We also recommend that sufficient blood be drawn to allow for planned testing of the primary hypothesis being addressed in the trial, and that additional baseline and post-treatment blood is banked for testing novel hypotheses (or generating new hypotheses) that arise in the field. PMID:21558394

  19. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  20. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will

  1. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  2. NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing and Pharmacological CellMiner Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D.; Davis, Sean R.; Reinhold, Spencer W.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, “Genetic variant versus drug visualization”, provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, “Genetic variant summation” allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based Cell

  3. Silencing of tripartite motif (TRIM) 29 inhibits proliferation and invasion and increases chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxiao; Huang, Xiaoxi; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background TRIM29 belongs to the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family. It has been reported to be a tumor suppressor or have oncogenic function in many cancer types. The aim of this study was to investigate whether downregulation of TRIM29 by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) could inhibit cell proliferation and invasion and increase chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells in vitro. Methods We transformed TRIM29 siRNA into NCI-H520 cells. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting assay were employed to determine TRIM29 messenger (m)RNA and protein expressions. MTT assay was used to determine the cell proliferation. Transwell invasion assay was used to determine the cell invasion. An Annexin V-propidium iodide (AnnV/PI) staining apoptosis test was used for detecting apoptosis. Results TRIM29 siRNA could specifically and efficiently suppress TRIM29 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the TRIM29 by siRNA in NCI-H520 cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. TRIM29 knockdown resulted in chemosensitivity enhancement in NCI-H520 cells. Conclusion Downregulation of TRIM29 can lead to potent antitumor activity and chemosensitizing effect in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells. PMID:26273332

  4. FGFR2 Is Amplified in the NCI-H716 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line and Is Required for Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Anjili; Ware, Christopher; Davis, Lenora; Gazdar, Adi; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Lutterbach, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant kinase activation resulting from mutation, amplification, or translocation can drive growth and survival in a subset of human cancer. FGFR2 is amplified in breast and gastric cancer, and we report here the first characterization of FGFR2 gene amplification in colorectal cancer in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line. FGFR2 is highly expressed and activated in NCI-H716 cells, and FGFR selective small molecule inhibitors or FGFR2 shRNA strongly inhibited cell viability in vitro, indicating “addiction” of NCI-H716 cells to FGFR2. NCI-H716 growth in a xenograft model was also inhibited by an FGFR small molecule inhibitor. FGFR2 was required for activation of multiple downstream signaling proteins including AKT, ERK, S6RP and NFKB. Inhibition of downstream kinases such as AKT or ERK alone had modest effects on proliferation, whereas combined inhibition of AKT and ERK signaling resulted in a loss of viability similar to FGFR2 inhibition. We identified elevated FGFR2 expression in a small subset of primary colorectal cancer, however FGFR2 amplification was not observed. Although FGFR2 amplification is not common in primary colon cancer or lymph node and liver metastases, other subsets of colorectal cancer such as ascites, from which the NCI-H716 cell line was derived, have yet to be tested. These results suggest that emerging FGFR inhibitor therapeutics may have efficacy in a subset of colon cancer driven by FGFR2 amplification. PMID:24968263

  5. Comparison of the ISU, NCI, MSM, and SPADE Methods for Estimating Usual Intake: A Simulation Study of Nutrients Consumed Daily

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, Greice H. C.; Torman, Vanessa B. L.; Crispim, Sandra P.; Dekkers, Arnold L. M.; Camey, Suzi A.

    2016-01-01

    Various methods are available for estimating usual dietary intake distributions. Hence, there is a need for simulation studies to compare them. The methods Iowa State University (ISU), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Multiple Source Method (MSM) and Statistical Program to Assess Dietary Exposure (SPADE) were previously compared in another study, but some results were inconclusive due to the small number of replications used in the simulation. Seeking to overcome this limitation, the present study used 1000 simulated samples for 12 different scenarios to compare the accuracy of estimates yielded by the aforementioned methods. The focus is on scenarios that exhibited the most uncertainty in the conclusions of the mentioned study above, i.e., scenarios with small sample sizes, skewed intake distributions, and large ratios of the between- and within-person variances. Bias was used as a measure of accuracy. For scenarios with small sample sizes (n=150), the ISU, MSM and SPADE methods generally achieved more accurate estimates than the NCI method, particularly for the 10th and 90th percentiles. The differences between methods became smaller with larger sample sizes (n = 300 and n = 500). With few exceptions, the methods were found to perform similarly. PMID:26999193

  6. Cooperativity of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in microsolvated DMSO and DMF clusters: a DFT, AIM, and NCI analysis.

    PubMed

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to study the hydrogen-bonding in the DMSO-water and DMF-water complexes. Quantitative molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis are applied to quantify the relative complexation of DMSO and DMF with water molecules. The interaction energy of DMSO with water molecules was higher than in DMF-water complexes. The existence of cooperativity effect helps in the strong complex formation. A linear dependence was observed between the hydrogen bond energies EHB, and the total electron densities in the BCP's of microsolvated complexes which supports the existence of cooperativity effect for the complexation process. Due to the stronger DMSO/DMF and water interaction, the water molecules in the formed complexes have a different structure than the isolated water clusters. NCI analysis shows that the steric area is more pronounced in DMF-water complex than the DMSO-water complex which accounts for the low stability of DMF-water complexes compared to the DMSO-water complex. Graphical abstract NCI analysis shows that the steric area is more pronounced in DMF-water complex than the DMSO-water complex which accounts for the low stability of DMF-water complexes compared to the DMSO-water complex. PMID:27278055

  7. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, WEI; XIE, LI; ZHAO, LONG; ZHAO, YUEHUAN

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4×44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY™ LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  8. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Xie, Li; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 x 44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY(™) LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  9. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). The CCK-8 proliferation assay and the scratch healing experiment revealed significantly inhibited NCI-H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). The transwell chamber test showed a statistically significant decrease in the invasive ability of NCI-H226 cells in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Therefore, Cx43 gene transfection could inhibit the migration of human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. PMID:26535624

  10. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro. PMID:24639390

  11. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-06-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26585176

  12. Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Khadka, Bijendra; Akter, Arzuba; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Sultana, Razia

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera. PMID:25172449

  13. NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

    Cancer.gov

    Extremely obese people have increased risks of dying from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three

  14. NCI adopta el sendero científico para lograr las metas de la Misión contra el Cáncer

    Cancer.gov

    El director interino del NCI, doctor Douglas Lowy, aceptó hoy las recomendaciones de un Panel Listón Azul para 10 planteamientos científicos que en cinco años lograrán un progreso contra el cáncer equivalente a una década de trabajo.

  15. Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI anuncia becas de investigación para tecnologías portátiles

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI (CGH) anunció el otorgamiento de subvenciones que apoyarán el desarrollo y la validación de tecnologías portátiles y de bajo costo para mejorar la detección temprana, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento del cáncer.

  16. Estudio del NCI revela que la obesidad extrema puede acortar la esperanza de vida hasta en 14 años

    Cancer.gov

    Los adultos con obesidad extrema tienen mayor riesgo de morir a edad más joven por cáncer y muchas otras causas entre ellas, enfermedades cardíacas, accidentes cerebrovasculares, diabetes y enfermedades del hígado y los riñones, según estudio del NCI.

  17. Demethoxycurcumin-induced DNA Damage Decreases DNA Repair-associated Protein Expression Levels in NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) is a key component of Chinese medicine (Turmeric) and has been proven effective in killing various cancer cells. Its role in inducing cytotoxic effects in many cancer cells has been reported, but its role regarding DNA damage on lung cancer cells has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we demonstrated DMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using the Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively. Western blotting indicated that DMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DNA damage response), DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and p53 (tumor suppressor protein). DMC activated phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser systems microscopy to examine the protein translocation. The results showed that DMC promotes the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X from the cytosol to the nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, DMC induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. PMID:25964547

  18. NCI adopta el sendero científico para lograr las metas de la Misión Nacional contra el Cáncer

    Cancer.gov

    El director interino del NCI, doctor Douglas Lowy, aceptó hoy las recomendaciones de un Panel Listón Azul para 10 planteamientos científicos que en cinco años lograrán un progreso contra el cáncer equivalente a una década de trabajo.

  19. NCI en el congreso de ASCO: Breve reseña de los resultados de investigaciones de cánceres en mujeres

    Cancer.gov

    En el congreso anual de la Sociedad Americana de Oncología Clínica (ASCO) 2014 celebrado en junio en Chicago, se destacaron los resultados de varios estudios clínicos patrocinados por el NCI sobre cánceres en la mujer.

  20. El NCI inicia un estudio para evaluar la utilidad de la secuenciación genética para mejorar los resu

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) lanzará este mes un estudio clínico piloto denominado M-PACT con la finalidad de evaluar si el tratamiento asignado según mutaciones genéticas específicas puede brindar beneficios a pacientes con tumores sólidos meta

  1. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential. PMID:27164073

  2. Using CellMiner 1.6 for Systems Pharmacology and Genomic Analysis of the NCI-60.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Sunshine, Margot; Varma, Sudhir; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The NCI-60 cancer cell line panel provides a premier model for data integration, and systems pharmacology being the largest publicly available database of anticancer drug activity, genomic, molecular, and phenotypic data. It comprises gene expression (25,722 transcripts), microRNAs (360 miRNAs), whole-genome DNA copy number (23,413 genes), whole-exome sequencing (variants for 16,568 genes), protein levels (94 genes), and cytotoxic activity (20,861 compounds). Included are 158 FDA-approved drugs and 79 that are in clinical trials. To improve data accessibility to bioinformaticists and non-bioinformaticists alike, we have developed the CellMiner web-based tools. Here, we describe the newest CellMiner version, including integration of novel databases and tools associated with whole-exome sequencing and protein expression, and review the tools. Included are (i) "Cell line signature" for DNA, RNA, protein, and drugs; (ii) "Cross correlations" for up to 150 input genes, microRNAs, and compounds in a single query; (iii) "Pattern comparison" to identify connections among drugs, gene expression, genomic variants, microRNA, and protein expressions; (iv) "Genetic variation versus drug visualization" to identify potential new drug:gene DNA variant relationships; and (v) "Genetic variant summation" designed to provide a synopsis of mutational burden on any pathway or gene group for up to 150 genes. Together, these tools allow users to flexibly query the NCI-60 data for potential relationships between genomic, molecular, and pharmacologic parameters in a manner specific to the user's area of expertise. Examples for both gain- (RAS) and loss-of-function (PTEN) alterations are provided. PMID:26048278

  3. Transport, metabolism, cytotoxicity and effects of novel taxanes on the cell cycle in MDA-MB-435 and NCI/ADR-RES cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrlichová, Marie; Ojima, Iwao; Chen, Jin; Václavíková, Radka; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Vobořilová, Jana; Simek, Petr; Horský, Stanislav; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan; Brabec, Marek; Gut, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Resistance of tumours to taxanes causes chemotherapy failure in numerous patients. Resistance is partly due to the low tumour uptake of taxanes and their rapid metabolism. Structural modifications of taxanes can reduce their P-glycoprotein-related efflux or decrease metabolism and consequently increase taxane efficiency. This study compared cytotoxicity and effects of the cell cycle, transport and metabolism of novel taxanes SB-T-1102, SB-T-1103, SB-T-1214 and SB-T-1216, fluorinated SB-T-12851, SB-T-12852, SB-T-12853, SB-T-12854 and IDN5109 with paclitaxel in paclitaxel-sensitive (MDA-MB-435) and paclitaxel-resistant (NCI/ADR-RES) human cancer cells. We have shown before that NCI/ADR-RES cells were 1,000-fold less sensitive to paclitaxel than MDA-MB-435 cells in correspondence to P-glycoprotein overexpression and up to 20-fold lower uptake of the drug in the resistant cells. The uptake of novel taxanes was 1.2 to 3.8 times lower than that of paclitaxel in the MDA-MB-435 cells, but 1.5 to 6.5 times higher in NCI/ADR-RES cells. NCI/ADR-RES cells were correspondingly only 2- to 6.6-fold less sensitive than the MDA-MB-435 cells to novel taxanes. Both cell lines showed minimal metabolism of the novel taxanes which was therefore not responsible for their different sensitivity, the observed differences in their individual efficiency and higher effects than paclitaxel. All novel taxanes caused G(2)/M block of the cell cycle similar to paclitaxel, but lower at concentrations by order of magnitude. Thus, structural modifications of taxanes resulting in their decreased P-glycoprotein-related transport probably caused their higher efficiency than paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES tumour cells. PMID:22855252

  4. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care. |

  5. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  6. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S; Jaffray, D; Chetty, I; Benedict, S

    2014-06-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  7. Grant R01CA169398 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA182284 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01CA185301 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R01CA134620 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant R01CA155301 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R01CA164782 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01CA128134 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Grant R01CA148817 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA155297 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01CA179511 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA132951 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R01CA098286 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant R01CA154489 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R01CA170549 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA107408 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA190092 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Grant R01CA163293 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01CA196200 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R01CA179949 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA172576 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01CA133050 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA169175 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01CA179992 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R01CA164574 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant R01CA172517 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R01AG041869 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01AT008108 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Grant R01AI093723 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA161534 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01CA157469 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA140605 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R01NS046606 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant R01CA151304 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R01CA138800 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA148966 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA163103 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Grant R01AT005295 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01NR014068 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R01CA140561 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA087546 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01EB019337 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA152799 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01CA200423 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R01CA188038 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant R01CA177995 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R01CA174683 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01CA177562 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Grant R01CA190776 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA193522 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01AT006860 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA190610 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R01CA183296 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant R01CA190710 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R01CA195708 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA184926 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA196639 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Grant R01CA166011 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01CA166590 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R01CA182076 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA163683 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01CA180949 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA172444 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01AT006885 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R01CA180087 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant R01CA192124 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R01CA160880 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01CA196854 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Grant R01CA168292 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA163803 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01CA195723 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA182969 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R01CA132927 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant R01CA194617 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R01CA182905 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA137178 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA187027 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Grant R01CA158319 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01CA166710 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R01CA124481 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA162139 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01CA151494 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA184027 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01CA158668 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R01CA026582 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant R01CA084233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R01CA184820 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01CA120933 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Grant R01AT007429 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA094076 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01CA105266 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA196692 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R01CA172627 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant R01CA187160 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R01CA159976 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA165309 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA183869 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Grant R01CA181242 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01AT007003 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R01CA166557 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA080946 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01CA162401 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. TBMS1 exerts its cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells through nucleolar stress-induced p53/MDM2-dependent mechanism, a quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingying; Xie, Guobin; Xia, Ji; Su, Dan; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Fuquan; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) exerts its anticancer effects by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism of its anti-tumor effects has not been fully elucidated, especially the signaling pathways involved in the early stage of TBMS1 stimulation. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics approach and identified 439 proteins that exhibit significant differential expressions in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells upon exposure to TBMS1. Gene ontology and network analysis using DAVID and STRING on-line tools revealed that several nucleolar stress (ribosomal biogenesis) response proteins were differentially regulated by TBMS1. Functional validation demonstrated that TBMS1-induced NCI-H460 cell cytotoxicity involved nucleolar stress-induced p53/murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:26549658

  9. Complex modes of bonding: NCI/ELI-D vs. DORI surface analyses of hapticities and hydrogen-hydrogen contacts in zincocene related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebs, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topology is prone to wrong/ambiguous bond assignments (lacking bond critical points) in areas of low electron densities (ED), e.g. for hydrogen-hydrogen contacts, and flat density gradients, e.g. for metal-ring contacts (hapticities), both in experimental and computed ED. Within this study, two ED-derived bonding indicators are applied to a set of zincocene related compounds: non-covalent interactions (NCI) surfaces are combined with electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) surfaces and compared to density overlap regions indicator (DORI) surfaces. Both methods (NCI/ELI-D, DORI) result in spatial deconvolution of covalent and non-covalent interactions and unravel weak interactions not observed in the AIM topology.

  10. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  11. Improved Method for Preparing Cisplatin-Dendrimer Nanocomplex and Its Behavior Against NCI-H460 Lung Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang; Nguyen, Ngoc Hoa; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa

    2015-06-01

    The effect of anticancer drugs could be significantly enhanced if it is encapsulated in drug delivery vehicles such as liposomes, polymers, dendrimers and other materials. For some conventional cisplatin encapsulating methods, however, suffers from low loading efficiency. Therefore, in order to overcome this limitation, in our study, sonication was used in preparation of the nanocomplex of a species of aquated cisplatin and carboxylated PAMAM dendrimer G3.5 to evaluate loading capacity as well as plantinum release behavior using FT-IR, UV-Vis, NMR, ICP-AES, and TEM. The results show that 25.20 and 27.83 wt/wt% of cisplatin were loaded under stirring and sonication respectively, a remarkably improvement in loading efficiency compared to that of conventional method that used of cisplatin. In vitro study showed that this drug-nanocarrier complex also help reduce cisplatin's cytotoxicity but can still keep sufficient antiproliferative activity against lung cancer cell, NCI-H460, with IC50 at 0.985 ± 0.01 μM. PMID:26369018

  12. Nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics--promise and challenge--lessons learned through the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Dorothy; Ptak, Krzysztof; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2011-02-01

    The new generation of nanotechnology-based drug formulations is challenging the accepted ways of cancer treatment. Multi-functional nanomaterial constructs have the capability to be delivered directly to the tumor site and eradicate cancer cells selectively, while sparing healthy cells. Tailoring of the nano-construct design can result in enhanced drug efficacy at lower doses as compared to free drug treatment, wider therapeutic window, and lower side effects. Nanoparticle carriers can also address several drug delivery problems which could not be effectively solved in the past and include reduction of multi-drug resistance effects, delivery of siRNA, and penetration of the blood-brain-barrier. Although challenges in understanding toxicity, biodistribution, and paving an effective regulatory path must be met, nanoscale devices carry a formidable promise to change ways cancer is diagnosed and treated. This article summarizes current developments in nanotechnology-based drug delivery and discusses path forward in this field. The discussion is done in context of research and development occurring within the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program. PMID:20814720

  13. Molecular Characterization of TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion in the NCI-H660 Prostate Cancer Cell Line: A New Perspective for an Old Model1*

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Kirsten D.; Setlur, Sunita R.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Demichelis, Francesca; Perner, Sven; Tomlins, Scott; Tchinda, Joëlle; Laxman, Bharathi; Vessella, Robert L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lee, Charles; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have established that a significant fraction of prostate cancers harbor a signature gene fusion between the 5′ region of androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 and an ETS family transcription factor, most commonly ERG. Studies on the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of this important chromosomal rearrangement are currently limited to the VCaP cell line derived from a vertebral bone metastasis of a hormone-refractory prostate tumor. Here we report on the NCI-H660 cell line, derived from a metastatic site of an extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma arising from the prostate. NCI-H660 harbors TMPRSS2-ERG fusion with a homozygous intronic deletion between TMPRSS2 and ERG. We demonstrate this by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, a two-stage dual-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay testing for TMPRSS2 and ERG break-aparts, and single-nucleotide polymorphism oligonucleotide arrays. The deletion is consistent with the common intronic deletion found on chromosome 21q22.2-3 in human prostate cancer samples. We demonstrate the physical juxtaposition of TMPRSS2 and ERG on the DNA level by fiber FISH. The androgen receptor-negative NCI-H660 cell line expresses ERG in an androgen-independent fashion. This in vitro model system has the potential to provide important pathobiologic insights into TMPRSS2-ERG fusion prostate cancer. PMID:17401460

  14. Role of autophagy in apoptosis induction by methylene chloride extracts of Mori cortex in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Eom, Hyun Sup; Kim, Gi-Young; Hyun, Jin Won; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-06-01

    The root of Mori cortex has traditionally been used in Korea for the treatment of cutaneous inflammation, pulmonary asthma, and congestion for thousands of years. The present study was designed to validate the anticancer effects of methylene chloride extracts of the M. cortex root (MEMC) in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells. Exposure to MEMC was found to result in growth inhibition by the induction of caspase‑dependent apoptosis in NCI-H460 cells, which correlated with upregulated expression of death receptor (DR)4, DR5 and FasL, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression, cleavage of Bid, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, autophagosomes, a characteristic finding of autophagy, and markers of autophagy, conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II and increased beclin-1 accumulation, were observed in MEMC-treated NCI-H460 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or LC3B small interfering (siRNA) resulted in enhanced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that MEMC-induced autophagy functions as a suppressor of apoptosis. MEMC-induced autophagy was also blocked by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and catalase, indicating that H2O2 can regulate autophagy. Our data demonstrate that MEMC triggers both ROS-mediated autophagy and caspase-dependent apoptosis, and that autophagy plays a protective role against apoptotic cell death. PMID:22367066

  15. Impact of the 2010 Consensus Recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lesley; Groshen, Susan; Rosner, Gary L; Sullivan, Daniel M; Spriggs, David R; Reeves, Steven; Gravell, Amy; Ivy, S Percy; Ratain, Mark J

    2015-11-15

    Oncology phase III trials have a high failure rate, leading to high development costs. The Clinical Trials Design Task Force of the Investigational Drug Steering Committee of the NCI Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program developed Recommendations regarding the design of phase II trials. We report here on the results of a Concordance Group review charged with documenting whether concordance rates improved after the publication of the Recommendations. One hundred and fifty-five trials were reviewed. Letter of Intents (LOI) from the post-Recommendation period were more likely to be randomized (44% vs. 34%) and biomarker selected (19% vs. 10%). Single-arm studies using time-to-event endpoints (benchmarked against historical data) were similar, as was the type of tumor. There was a significant improvement in the rate of concordance, with 74% of LOIs scored as concordant compared with 58% before the Recommendations (P = 0.042). This included a marked decrease in the use of single-arm designs to evaluate the activity of drug combinations (19% vs. 5%, P = 0.009). There were areas for which clarification was warranted, including the need for protocols to include further development plans, the use of realistic benchmarks, the careful evaluation of historical controls, and the use of a standard treatment option as a control. Ongoing critical evaluation of current trial design methodology and the development of new Guidelines when appropriate will continue to improve drug development ensuring that safe and effective cancer therapeutics are made available to our patients as quickly and efficiently as possible. PMID:26567365

  16. 78 FR 50428 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK Ancillary R01 Studies on Liver Diseases PAR-12-265. Date..., begumn@niddk.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  17. 76 FR 14676 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Study (R01). Date: April 1, 2011. Time: 3:30 p.m. to 5... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Cognitive Function in Chronic...

  18. Five NCI-designated Cancer Centers’ Data Collection on Racial/Ethnic Minority Participation in Therapeutic Trials – A Current View and Opportunities for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, ET; Habermann, EB; Ford, JG; Wenzel, J; Brahmer, JR; Chen, MS; Jones, LA; Hurd, TC; Rogers, LM; Nguyen, LH; Ahluwalia, JS; Fouad, M; Vickers, SM

    2015-01-01

    Background To insure that NIH-funded research is relevant to the population’s needs, specific emphasis on proportional representation of minority/gender groups into National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) cancer centers’ clinical research programs is reported to the NCI. Methods EMPaCT investigators at five regionally-diverse comprehensive cancer centers compared data reported to the NCI for their most recent Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG) competitive renewal to assess and compare the centers’ catchment area designations, data definitions, data elements, collection processes, reporting, and performance regarding proportional representation of race/ethnicity and gender subsets. Results Cancer centers’ catchment area definitions differed widely in terms of their cancer patient vs. general population specificity, levels of specificity, and geographic coverage. Racial/ethnic categories were similar, yet defined differently across institutions. Patients’ socioeconomic status (SES) and insurance status were inconsistently captured across the five centers. Conclusions/Recommendations Catchment area definitions and the collection of patient-level demographic factors vary widely across the five comprehensive cancer centers. This challenged the assessment of success by cancer centers in accruing representative populations into the cancer research enterprise. . Accrual of minorities was less than desired for at least one racial/ethnic subcategory at four of the five centers. Institutions should clearly and consistently declare their primary catchment area and the rationale; and should report how race/ethnicity and gender are defined, determined, collected, and reported. More standardized, frequent, consistent collection, reporting, and review of these data are recommended, as is a commitment to collecting socioeconomic data, given that SES is a primary driver of cancer disparities in the U.S.. PMID:24643649

  19. A Whole-Genome SNP Association Study of NCI60 Cell Line Panel Indicates a Role of Ca2+ Signaling in Selenium Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Briollais, Laurent; Ibrahim-zada, Irada; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Choi, Yun Hee; Musquera, Mireia; Fleshner, Neil; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between selenium intake and protection from a variety of cancer. Considering this clinical importance of selenium, we aimed to identify the genes associated with resistance to selenium treatment. We have applied a previous methodology developed by our group, which is based on the genetic and pharmacological data publicly available for the NCI60 cancer cell line panel. In short, we have categorized the NCI60 cell lines as selenium resistant and sensitive based on their growth inhibition (GI50) data. Then, we have utilized the Affymetrix 125K SNP chip data available and carried out a genome-wide case-control association study for the selenium sensitive and resistant NCI60 cell lines. Our results showed statistically significant association of four SNPs in 5q33–34, 10q11.2, 10q22.3 and 14q13.1 with selenium resistance. These SNPs were located in introns of the genes encoding for a kinase-scaffolding protein (AKAP6), a membrane protein (SGCD), a channel protein (KCNMA1), and a protein kinase (PRKG1). The knock-down of KCNMA1 by siRNA showed increased sensitivity to selenium in both LNCaP and PC3 cell lines. Furthermore, SNP-SNP interaction (epistasis) analysis indicated the interactions of the SNPs in AKAP6 with SGCD as well as SNPs in AKAP6 with KCNMA1 with each other, assuming additive genetic model. These genes were also all involved in the Ca2+ signaling, which has a direct role in induction of apoptosis and induction of apoptosis in tumor cells is consistent with the chemopreventive action of selenium. Once our findings are further validated, this knowledge can be translated into clinics where individuals who can benefit from the chemopreventive characteristics of the selenium supplementation will be easily identified using a simple DNA analysis. PMID:20830292

  20. NCI60 Cancer Cell Line Panel Data and RNAi Analysis Help Identify EAF2 as a Modulator of Simvastatin and Lovastatin Response in HCT-116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Azorsa, David O.; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Gonzales, Irma M.; Arora, Shilpi; Henderson, Meredith C.; Choi, Yun Hee; Briollais, Laurent; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Tuzmen, Sukru

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin and lovastatin are statins traditionally used for lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, there exists evidence indicating their potential chemotherapeutic characteristics in cancer. In this study, we used bioinformatic analysis of publicly available data in order to systematically identify the genes involved in resistance to cytotoxic effects of these two drugs in the NCI60 cell line panel. We used the pharmacological data available for all the NCI60 cell lines to classify simvastatin or lovastatin resistant and sensitive cell lines, respectively. Next, we performed whole-genome single marker case-control association tests for the lovastatin and simvastatin resistant and sensitive cells using their publicly available Affymetrix 125K SNP genomic data. The results were then evaluated using RNAi methodology. After correction of the p-values for multiple testing using False Discovery Rate, our results identified three genes (NRP1, COL13A1, MRPS31) and six genes (EAF2, ANK2, AKAP7, STEAP2, LPIN2, PARVB) associated with resistance to simvastatin and lovastatin, respectively. Functional validation using RNAi confirmed that silencing of EAF2 expression modulated the response of HCT-116 colon cancer cells to both statins. In summary, we have successfully utilized the publicly available data on the NCI60 cell lines to perform whole-genome association studies for simvastatin and lovastatin. Our results indicated genes involved in the cellular response to these statins and siRNA studies confirmed the role of the EAF2 in response to these drugs in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. PMID:21483694

  1. The NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform to Support the Analysis of Petascale Environmental Data Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Pugh, T.; Wyborn, L. A.; Porter, D.; Allen, C.; Smillie, J.; Antony, J.; Trenham, C.; Evans, B. J.; Beckett, D.; Erwin, T.; King, E.; Hodge, J.; Woodcock, R.; Fraser, R.; Lescinsky, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has co-located a priority set of national data assets within a HPC research platform. This powerful in-situ computational platform has been created to help serve and analyse the massive amounts of data across the spectrum of environmental collections - in particular the climate, observational data and geoscientific domains. This paper examines the infrastructure, innovation and opportunity for this significant research platform. NCI currently manages nationally significant data collections (10+ PB) categorised as 1) earth system sciences, climate and weather model data assets and products, 2) earth and marine observations and products, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystem, 5) water management and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social science and biosciences. The data is largely sourced from the NCI partners (who include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. By co-locating these large valuable data assets, new opportunities have arisen by harmonising the data collections, making a powerful transdisciplinary research platformThe data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. New scientific software, cloud-scale techniques, server-side visualisation and data services have been harnessed and integrated into the platform, so that analysis is performed seamlessly across the traditional boundaries of the underlying data domains. Characterisation of the techniques along with performance profiling ensures scalability of each software component, all of which can either be enhanced or replaced through future improvements. A Development-to-Operations (DevOps) framework has also been implemented to manage the scale of the software complexity alone. This ensures that

  2. Inactivated Tianjin strain, a novel genotype of Sendai virus, induces apoptosis in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep3B cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUN; HAN, HAN; WANG, BIN; SHI, LIYING

    2016-01-01

    The Sendai virus strain Tianjin is a novel genotype of the Sendai virus. In previous studies, ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) demonstrated antitumor effects on human breast cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antitumor effects of UV-Tianjin on the human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cell lines, and the possible underlying mechanisms of these antitumor effects. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment inhibited the proliferation of HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hoechst and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining indicated that UV-Tianjin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in all three cell lines with the most significant effect observed in the HeLa cell line. In the HeLa cell line, UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis was further confirmed by the disruption of the mitochondria membrane potential and the activation of caspases, as demonstrated by fluorescent cationic dye and colorimetric assays, respectively. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in significant upregulation of cytochrome c, apoptosis protease activating factor-1, Fas, Fas ligand and Fas-associated protein with death domain, and activated caspase-9, −8 and −3 in HeLa cells. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that UV-Tianjin exhibits anticancer activity in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cell lines via the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that in the HeLa cell line, intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways may be involved in UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis. PMID:27347098

  3. Bufalin Inhibits NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cell Metastasis In Vitro by Inhibiting MAPKs, MMPs, and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Yu, Fu-Shun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Bufalin, a component of Chan Su (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been known to have antitumor effects for thousands of years. In this study, we investigated its anti-metastasis effects on NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Under sub-lethal concentrations (from 25 up to 100 nM), bufalin significantly inhibits the invasion and migration nature of NCI-H460 cells that were measured by Matrigel Cell Migration Assay and Invasion System. Bufalin also suppressed the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which was examined by gelatin zymography methods. Western blotting revealed that bufalin depressed several key metastasis-related proteins, such as NF-κB, MMP-2, MMP-9, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), phosphorylated Akt, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated p38, and phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). As evidenced by immunostaining and the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), bufalin induced not only a decreased cytoplasmic NF-κB production, but also decreased its nuclear translocation. Several metastasis-related genes, including Rho-associated (Rho A), coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), were down-regulated after bufalin treatment. In conclusion, bufalin is effective in inhibiting the metastatic nature of NCI-H460 cells in low, sub-lethal concentrations. Such an effect involves many mechanisms including MMPs, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF-κB systems. Bufalin has a potential to evolve into an anti-metastasis drug for human lung cancer in the future. PMID:26446205

  4. Disease Ontology: a backbone for disease semantic integration

    PubMed Central

    Schriml, Lynn Marie; Arze, Cesar; Nadendla, Suvarna; Chang, Yu-Wei Wayne; Mazaitis, Mark; Felix, Victor; Feng, Gang; Kibbe, Warren Alden

    2012-01-01

    The Disease Ontology (DO) database (http://disease-ontology.org) represents a comprehensive knowledge base of 8043 inherited, developmental and acquired human diseases (DO version 3, revision 2510). The DO web browser has been designed for speed, efficiency and robustness through the use of a graph database. Full-text contextual searching functionality using Lucene allows the querying of name, synonym, definition, DOID and cross-reference (xrefs) with complex Boolean search strings. The DO semantically integrates disease and medical vocabularies through extensive cross mapping and integration of MeSH, ICD, NCI's thesaurus, SNOMED CT and OMIM disease-specific terms and identifiers. The DO is utilized for disease annotation by major biomedical databases (e.g. Array Express, NIF, IEDB), as a standard representation of human disease in biomedical ontologies (e.g. IDO, Cell line ontology, NIFSTD ontology, Experimental Factor Ontology, Influenza Ontology), and as an ontological cross mappings resource between DO, MeSH and OMIM (e.g. GeneWiki). The DO project (http://diseaseontology.sf.net) has been incorporated into open source tools (e.g. Gene Answers, FunDO) to connect gene and disease biomedical data through the lens of human disease. The next iteration of the DO web browser will integrate DO's extended relations and logical definition representation along with these biomedical resource cross-mappings. PMID:22080554

  5. Low inter-rater reliability in grading of rectal bleeding using NCI CTC and RTOG toxicity scales: a survey of radiation oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong; Zhang, Zhe; Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Rectal bleeding is one of the most common toxicities following prostate radiotherapy (RT), and both NCI CTC and RTOG grading scales are frequently used to report outcomes. We measured concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using these scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials From 6/2013–1/2014, a web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes where patients received RT and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked if they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1–2 vs. high grades 3–4) was also assessed, using kappa statistic for multiple respondents. Results Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC=0.52, 95% CI 0.47–0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC=0.28, 95% CI 0.20–0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (p<0.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (kappa=0.42, 95% CI 0.40–0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (kappa=0.19, 95% CI 0.17–0.21). Conclusion Low inter-rater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using two common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability

  6. The effects of HIF-1alpha on gene expression profiles of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene targeted therapy refers to any therapy focused on one of the many biological features of the tumor. Such features are mediated by specific genes that are involved in tumor metastasis, recurrence, poor response to chemotherapy and others. Hypoxia is an important pathognomonic feature of many malignant tumors including SCLC (small cell lung cancer). HIF-1alpha, which is induced by hypoxia, is the most important regulatory factor of many specific genes that can influence the biological features of tumors. Methods In this study, we tried to elucidate the changes in gene expression profiles of SCLC NCI-H446 cells mediated by HIF-1alpha. According to different treatments of cells, three experimental pairwise comparisons were designed: hypoxia group vs. control group, Ad5-HIF-1alpha group vs. Ad5 group, and Ad5-siHIF-1 alpha group Vs Ad5 group. Results Results from the analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that there were 65 genes upregulated and 28 genes downregulated more than two-fold in all three experimental pairwise comparisons. These genes were involved in transport, signal-transduction, cell adhesion/motility, growth factor/cytokines, transcription, inflammatory response, metabolic process, in addition to others. SOCS1, IGFBP5, IL-6 and STAT3 were also upregulated at protein level. SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells but HIF-1alpha could induce growth and suppress apoptosis. Conclusions Through this research, we are trying to find novel functional genes that are mediated by HIF-1alpha and provide the theoretical basis for new therapeutic targets. HIF-1 alpha maybe upregulate the expression of SOCS1 through mediation of STAT3 and IL-6. In addition, SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells. This was contrary to HIF-1alpha and it indicated that there might be an antagonism effect between HIF-1alpha and SOCS1 on regulating growth and apoptosis of NCI-H446

  7. AACR-NCI-EORTC - 27th International Symposium - Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics (November 5-9, 2015 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Carceller, V

    2015-11-01

    The 27th joint meeting of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute and the American Association of Cancer Research (EORTC-NCI-AACR) International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics was held this year in Boston. Approximately 3,000 international academics, scientists and pharmaceutical industry representatives discussed new discoveries in the field of molecular biology of cancer and presented the latest information on drug discovery, preclinical research, clinical research and target selection in oncology. This report summarizes data on advances in cancer drug discovery. PMID:26744742

  8. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    , Wheeler DC. 2015. Analysis of environmental chemical mixtures and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:965–970; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408630 PMID:25748701

  9. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  10. Research Advocacy at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    The patient perspective research advocates brings into NCI’s research enterprise helps to inform research focus and support the dissemination of results that lead to new and better cancer prevention, detection, and treatment methods.

  11. NCI SRK Award

    Cancer.gov

    The SRK Fellowship is a highly competitive, unpaid, and annual, one-year program that provides additional mentoring opportunities, networking, seminars, and workshops to help prepare NCI’s female postdoctoral fellows for the competitive nature of the job market and help them remain in a biomedical research career.

  12. Demethoxycurcumin alters gene expression associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Su-Tso; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and new lung cancer cases are continuously emerging around the globe; however, treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) has been shown to exert cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells via induction of apoptosis. However, the effects of DMC on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions have not been yet elucidated. Human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells were incubated with or without 35 μM of DMC for 24 h and total RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis labeling and microarray hybridization, followed by fluor-labeled cDNA hybridization on chip. Expression Console software with default Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) parameters were used for detecting and quantitating the localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules. The GeneGo software was used for investigating key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. Genes associated with DNA damage and repair, cell-cycle check point and apoptosis could be altered by DMC; in particular, 144 genes were found up-regulated and 179 genes down-regulated in NCI-H460 cells after exposure to DMC. In general, DMC-altered genes may offer information to understand the cytotoxic mechanism of this agent at the genetic level since gene alterations can be useful biomarkers or targets for the diagnosis and treatment of human lung cancer in the future. PMID:25600535

  13. Estimation of the Mechanism of Adrenal Action of Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Using a Computational Model of Adrenal Steroidogenesis in NCI-H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ryuta; Terasaki, Natsuko; Yamazaki, Makoto; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal toxicity is one of the major concerns in drug development. To quantitatively understand the effect of endocrine-active compounds on adrenal steroidogenesis and to assess the human adrenal toxicity of novel pharmaceutical drugs, we developed a mathematical model of steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical carcinoma NCI-H295R cells. The model includes cellular proliferation, intracellular cholesterol translocation, diffusional transport of steroids, and metabolic pathways of adrenal steroidogenesis, which serially involve steroidogenic proteins and enzymes such as StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, CYP21A2, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, HSD17B3, and CYP19A1. It was reconstructed in an experimental dynamics of cholesterol and 14 steroids from an in vitro steroidogenesis assay using NCI-H295R cells. Results of dynamic sensitivity analysis suggested that HSD3B2 plays the most important role in the metabolic balance of adrenal steroidogenesis. Based on differential metabolic profiling of 12 steroid hormones and 11 adrenal toxic compounds, we could estimate which steroidogenic enzymes were affected in this mathematical model. In terms of adrenal steroidogenic inhibitors, the predicted action sites were approximately matched to reported target enzymes. Thus, our computer-aided system based on systems biological approach may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of endocrine-active compounds and to assess the human adrenal toxicity of novel pharmaceutical drugs. PMID:27057163

  14. NCI in vitro and in silico anticancer screen, cell cycle pertubation and apoptosis-inducing potential of new acylated, benzylidene and isopropylidene derivatives of andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Wong, Charng Choon; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Sumon, Shariful Hasan; Sidik, Shiran Mohamad; Phillips, Roger; Lajis, Nordin H; Stanslas, Johnson

    2014-09-01

    Andrographolide (AGP) is the main bioactive constituent isolated from the traditional medicinal, Andrographis paniculata which contributes towards its various biological activities, including anticancer property. In this study, a series of new AGP derivatives were semi-synthesised and screened against the NCI in vitro 60 cell lines. From the screening results, we had identified SRS07 as the most potent AGP derivative, against breast and colon cancer cell lines. Subsequently, SRS07 was tested for its capability to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT116 cancer cells. SRS07 effectively induced G1 cell cycle arrest in both cell lines and ultimately apoptosis by inducing DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by SRS07 was confirmed via FITC Annexin-V double staining. Western blot analysis of SRS07-treated HCT116 cells revealed that the compound induced apoptosis be activating caspase 8 which in turn cleaved Bid to t-Bid to initiate cell death cascade. Prediction of the possible mode of action of SRS07 by utilising NCI COMPARE analysis failed to reveal a distinct mechanism category. Hence, it is speculated that SRS07 possesses novel mechanism of action. In conclusion, SRS07 demonstrated superior in vitro anticancer profiles and emerged as a potential lead anticancer candidate. PMID:25168151

  15. Determination of betamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide by GC-NCI-MS in excreta of treated animals and development of a fast oxidation procedure for derivatisation of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Courtheyn, D; Vercammen, J; Logghe, M; Seghers, H; De Wasch, K; De Brabander, H

    1998-12-01

    The use of corticosteroids in combination with other hormonal substances has long been known to result in increased mass gain with bovines. Practice has demonstrated, however, that even the single use of a glucocorticoid may result in growth promoting effects. In addition to the popular dexamethasone, more recently other corticosteroids have also been misused for fattening purposes. The first part of this study deals with the detection of two of them, namely betamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide. Betamethasone was administered orally to a cow at a dose of 50 mg d-1 for 5 d, then later the same cow was injected intramuscularly with a dose of 50 mg of betamethasone dipropionate. Excretion in urine and faeces was followed with both HPLC-enzyme immunoassay and a previously described method based on negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS) after oxidation. For the triamcinolone acetonide study a cow was treated with 50 mg d-1 of the drug during a 7 d period. Excretion in faeces was followed with GC-NCI-MS. As triamcinolone acetonide is resistant to the previously described oxidation procedure, however, a hydrolysis step had to be introduced prior to oxidation. In addition to this specific modification necessary for triamcinolone acetonide, in a subsequent part of this study the original oxidation procedure with pyridinium chlorochromate was re-investigated especially to shorten the procedure. With the introduction of potassium dichromate the reaction time could be decreased from 3 h to 10 min. PMID:10435270

  16. From mice and men to earth and space: joint NASA-NCI workshop on lung cancer risk resulting from space and terrestrial radiation.

    PubMed

    Shay, Jerry W; Cucinotta, Francis A; Sulzman, Frank M; Coleman, C Norman; Minna, John D

    2011-11-15

    On June 27-28, 2011, scientists from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), NASA, and academia met in Bethesda to discuss major lung cancer issues confronting each organization. For NASA, available data suggest that lung cancer is the largest potential cancer risk from space travel for both men and women and quantitative risk assessment information for mission planning is needed. In space, the radiation risk is from high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei (such as Fe) and high-energy protons from solar flares and not from gamma radiation. In contrast, the NCI is endeavoring to estimate the increased lung cancer risk from the potential widespread implementation of computed tomographic (CT) screening in individuals at high risk for developing lung cancer based on the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST). For the latter, exposure will be X-rays from CT scans from the screening (which uses "low-dose" CT scans) and also from follow-up scans used to evaluate abnormalities found during initial screening. Topics discussed included the risk of lung cancer arising after HZE particle, proton, and low-dose exposure to Earth's radiation. The workshop examined preclinical models, epidemiology, molecular markers, "omics" technology, radiobiology issues, and lung stem cells that relate to the development of lung cancer. PMID:21900398

  17. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure-activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:26954881

  18. 75 FR 69685 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis Panel for R01 Applications. Date: December 10..., guox@extra.niddk.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  19. Long non-coding RNA expression profiling in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using high-throughput RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Lefever, Steve; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a new class of RNA molecules implicated in various aspects of protein coding gene expression regulation. To study lncRNAs in cancer, we generated expression profiles for 1707 human lncRNAs in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using a high-throughput nanowell RT-qPCR platform. We describe how qPCR assays were designed and validated and provide processed and normalized expression data for further analysis. Data quality is demonstrated by matching the lncRNA expression profiles with phenotypic and genomic characteristics of the cancer cell lines. This data set can be integrated with publicly available omics and pharmacological data sets to uncover novel associations between lncRNA expression and mRNA expression, miRNA expression, DNA copy number, protein coding gene mutation status or drug response PMID:27377824

  20. Long non-coding RNA expression profiling in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using high-throughput RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Lefever, Steve; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a new class of RNA molecules implicated in various aspects of protein coding gene expression regulation. To study lncRNAs in cancer, we generated expression profiles for 1707 human lncRNAs in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using a high-throughput nanowell RT-qPCR platform. We describe how qPCR assays were designed and validated and provide processed and normalized expression data for further analysis. Data quality is demonstrated by matching the lncRNA expression profiles with phenotypic and genomic characteristics of the cancer cell lines. This data set can be integrated with publicly available omics and pharmacological data sets to uncover novel associations between lncRNA expression and mRNA expression, miRNA expression, DNA copy number, protein coding gene mutation status or drug response. PMID:27377824

  1. A Novel Use of Gentamicin in the ROS-Mediated Sensitization of NCI-H460 Lung Cancer Cells to Various Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cuccarese, Michael F.; Singh, Amit; Amiji, Mansoor; O’Doherty, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibiotics that are used for the treatment of severe Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections. While bactericidal effects of aminoglycosides are due to binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, aminoglycosides can affect protein synthesis, intracellular calcium levels and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in eukaryotic cells. While aminoglycosides can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower doses, gentamicin can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for the NSCLC cell line NCI-H460, increasing the efficacy of camptothecin, digitoxin and vinblastine in vitro. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the ROS response generated by gentamicin. PMID:24093441

  2. Calyxin Y induces hydrogen peroxide-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-bing; Wang, Jun-song; Geng, Ya-di; Yang, Chang-shui; Kong, Ling-yi

    2013-10-28

    Calyxin Y has been recently isolated from Alpinia katsumadai which has a folk use as an anti-tumor medicine. Calyxin Y induced caspase-dependent cell death in NCI-H460 cells, and concomitantly, provoked cytoprotective autophagy with the upregulation of critical Atg proteins. The cleavage of Atg proteins by caspases acted as a switch between autophagy and apoptosis induced by calyxin Y. Intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was triggered upon exposure to calyxin Y via the induction of autophagy and apoptosis. We provided evidence that activated JNK was upstream effectors controlling both autophagy and apoptosis in response to elevated H2O2. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that calyxin Y serves multiple roles as a promising chemotherapeutic agent that induces H2O2-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation. PMID:23811287

  3. Efonidipine, a Ca(2+)-channel blocker, enhances the production of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keiichi; Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Steroid biosynthesis is initiated with transportation of cholesterol along with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) into the mitchondria and is achieved with several steroidogenic enzymes. It has been reported that Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), such as azelnidipine, efonidipine and nifedipine, suppress the biosynthesis of aldosterone and cortisol, but the overall effects of CCBs on steroid biosynthesis remain to be clarified. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of CCBs on the expression of steroidogenic enzymes and the production of adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) that has anti-atherosclerotic actions. NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells and HepG2 human hepatoma cells were cultured for 24 hours with or without a CCB (amlodipine, efonidipine, nifedipine, azelnidipine R(-)-efonidipine, verapamil or diltiazem). HepG2 hepatoma cells were used to confirm the effects of CCBs on the expression of StAR. In fact, efonidipine and nifedipine increased the expression of StAR in HepG2 cells. Efonidipine and nifedipine, but not other examined CCBs, also increased the N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP)-induced StAR mRNA, which reflects the action of adrenocorticotropic hormone, and efonidipine and R(-)-efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production in NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Therefore, efonidipine and nifedipine might increase the expression of StAR and, in turn, efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production, independent of Ca(2+) channel blockade. These results indicate that such effects are not associated with Ca(2+) influx. Moreover, only efonidipine enhanced the angiotensin II-induced expression of StAR mRNA (P < 0.01 vs. angiotensin II alone). In conclusion, efonidipine might exert an additional action beyond anti-hypertensive actions. PMID:21757861

  4. Antiproliferative Mechanisms of Action of the Flavin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Diphenylene Iodonium and Di-2-thienyliodonium Based on Molecular Profiling of the NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Panel

    PubMed Central

    Doroshow, James H.; Juhasz, Agnes; Ge, Yun; Holbeck, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Jiang, Guojian; Roy, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    Flavoprotein-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cytokine-mediated signal transduction in normal tissues and tumor cells. The flavoenzyme inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI) have been used to inhibit membrane-bound, flavoprotein-containing NADPH oxidases, including epithelial and leukocyte NADPH oxidases (Nox1-5 and Duox 1 and 2). Recent evidence suggests that DPI can decrease tumor cell proliferation; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. To explore the mechanisms underlying DPI- and DTI-related tumor cell growth delay, we examined growth inhibition patterns produced by both agents in the NCI-60 tumor panel, and determined expression levels of Nox gene family members across these cell lines. Possible molecular targets were predicted using the COMPARE program. DPI was more potent than DTI (GI50: 10 nM versus 10 μM); DPI and DTI exposure produced unique patterns of growth inhibition when evaluated against the small molecule anticancer database of the National Cancer Institute. Growth inhibition profiling of DPI revealed a modest positive correlation with Nox1 levels; novel mechanisms of DPI and DTI action, including alterations in Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt pathways, were inferred by correlation with NCI-60 Affymetrix® array data. Exposure of HT-29 colon cancer cells, which express Nox1, to DPI and DTI confirmed their inhibitory effects on steady state ROS levels, and demonstrated decreased Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt signaling mediated by IL-4, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-22, possibly due to a concomitant increase in tumor cell phosphatase activity. These findings suggest that DPI and DTI may act therapeutically by altering ROS-related signal transduction. PMID:22305747

  5. A Micro-Grid Simulator Tool (SGridSim) using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) Models

    SciTech Connect

    Udhay Ravishankar; Milos manic

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a micro-grid simulator tool useful for implementing and testing multi-agent controllers (SGridSim). As a common engineering practice it is important to have a tool that simplifies the modeling of the salient features of a desired system. In electric micro-grids, these salient features are the voltage and power distributions within the micro-grid. Current simplified electric power grid simulator tools such as PowerWorld, PowerSim, Gridlab, etc, model only the power distribution features of a desired micro-grid. Other power grid simulators such as Simulink, Modelica, etc, use detailed modeling to accommodate the voltage distribution features. This paper presents a SGridSim micro-grid simulator tool that simplifies the modeling of both the voltage and power distribution features in a desired micro-grid. The SGridSim tool accomplishes this simplified modeling by using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) models of components that typically make-up a micro-grid. The term EN2NCI models means that the impedance based components of a micro-grid are modeled as single impedances tied between their respective voltage nodes on the micro-grid. Hence the benefit of the presented SGridSim tool are 1) simulation of a micro-grid is performed strictly in the complex-domain; 2) faster simulation of a micro-grid by avoiding the simulation of detailed transients. An example micro-grid model was built using the SGridSim tool and tested to simulate both the voltage and power distribution features with a total absolute relative error of less than 6%.

  6. 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) isolated from Actinidia chinensis Radix inhibits NCI-H460 cell proliferation by decreasing NF-κB expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi-Lai; Li, Hong-Liang; Huang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Yi-Jian; Liu, Ta-Si

    2015-10-01

    A natural ursolic compound, 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) was isolated from the root of Actinidia chinensis Planch (A. chinensis Radix). Since a large number of triterpenoid compound has marked anticancer effects toward various types of cancer cell lines in vitro, this study was carried out to investigate the anticancer effect of TUA in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs) and the underlying apoptotic mechanism of TUA was examined in NCI-H460 cell lines. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle were measured using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The activity of transcription factor NF-κB was determined by EMSA method. The expression of apoptosis- and proliferation-related proteins was determined by western blotting. The effect of TUA on NF-κB mRNA expression in NCI-H460 cells was detected by RT-PCR. TUA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 cells. Also, TUA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 cells. Such an effect was accompanied by p65 (NF-κB subunit) inactivation by an inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, and by inhibition of p65 mRNA expressions. Consistently Overall, our findings suggest that TUA induces apoptosis via inhibition of NF-κB (p65) expression level and activation of IκBα in NCI-H460 cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26134000

  7. Bibliometric Assessment of European and Sub-Saharan African Research Output on Poverty-Related and Neglected Infectious Diseases from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Karen A.; Mgone, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) is a partnership of European and sub-Saharan African countries that aims to accelerate the development of medical interventions against poverty-related diseases (PRDs). A bibliometric analysis was conducted to 1) measure research output from European and African researchers on PRDs, 2) describe collaboration patterns, and 3) assess the citation impact of clinical research funded by EDCTP. Methodology/Principal Findings Disease-specific research publications were identified in Thomson Reuters Web of Science using search terms in titles, abstracts and keywords. Publication data, including citation counts, were extracted for 2003–2011. Analyses including output, share of global papers, normalised citation impact (NCI), and geographical distribution are presented. Data are presented as five-year moving averages. European EDCTP member countries accounted for ~33% of global research output in PRDs and sub-Saharan African countries for ~10% (2007–2011). Both regions contributed more to the global research output in malaria (43.4% and 22.2%, respectively). The overall number of PRD papers from sub-Saharan Africa increased markedly (>47%) since 2003, particularly for HIV/AIDS (102%) and tuberculosis (TB) (81%), and principally involving Southern and East Africa. For 2007–2011, European and sub-Saharan African research collaboration on PRDs was highly cited compared with the world average (NCI in brackets): HIV/AIDS 1.62 (NCI: 1.16), TB 2.11 (NCI: 1.06), malaria 1.81 (NCI: 1.22), and neglected infectious diseases 1.34 (NCI: 0.97). The NCI of EDCTP-funded papers for 2003–2011 was exceptionally high for HIV/AIDS (3.24), TB (4.08) and HIV/TB co-infection (5.10) compared with global research benchmarks (1.14, 1.05 and 1.35, respectively). Conclusions The volume and citation impact of papers from sub-Saharan Africa has increased since 2003, as has collaborative research between Europe and

  8. Molecular analysis of Gaucher disease: screening of patients in the Montreal/Quebec region.

    PubMed

    Choy, F Y; Woo, M; Der Kaloustian, V M

    1991-12-15

    Gaucher disease, the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease, is an autosomal recessive sphingolipidosis resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. Genomic DNA of the structural gene of glucocerebrosidase from normal individuals and fifteen unrelated patients with the three clinical forms of Gaucher disease from the Montreal/Quebec region were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Allele-specific oligonucleotide dot blot hybridization and restriction fragment length polymorphism were used to screen for five of the mutations [mutations 120, 370, 415, 444 (Nci), and 463] in exons 5, 9, and 10 of glucocerebrosidase gene. It was noted that all of the patients had at least one of the known mutant alleles. However, 9 patients (9/15 = 60%) had an unknown allele. Mutation 370 in exon 9 was present in the heteroallelic form in eight out of the nine patients with type 1 Gaucher disease, but was present in none of the six patients with type 2 or type 3 Gaucher disease. The Nci mutation in exon 10 was present in the heteroallelic form in three patients with type 1 Gaucher disease and in either the heteroallelic or homoallelic form in all of the six patients with type 2 or type 3 Gaucher disease. The 415/Nci mutations were found in a mildly affected 29-year-old patient with type 1 Gaucher disease, as well as in an infant with the type 2 form. These findings demonstrate the clinical and molecular genetic heterogeneities of Gaucher disease, the presence of unknown Gaucher allele(s) in most (60%) of the patients surveyed, and the occasional inexplicable lack of phenotype-genotype correlation among some patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1776640

  9. Improved Methods for the Clinical Manufacture of Proteins Used In Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is an immune system modulating protein (cytokine) that stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of T- lymphocytes.  In the clinical context, IL-15 is being investigated for use in the treatment of diseases such as cancer.  Manufacture of IL-15 for clinical use can be problematic. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to co-develop or license methods that facilitate pharmaceutical purification and processing of Interleukin-15 (IL-15).

  10. Regulation of cytochrome b5 gene transcription by Sp3, GATA-6, and steroidogenic factor 1 in human adrenal NCI-H295A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningwu; Dardis, Andrea; Miller, Walter L

    2005-08-01

    Sex steroid synthesis requires the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17, which is enhanced by cytochrome b5, acting as an allosteric factor to promote association of P450c17 with its electron donor, P450 oxidoreductase. Cytochrome b5 is preferentially expressed in the fetal adrenal and postadrenarchal adrenal zona reticularis; the basis of this tissue-specific, developmentally regulated transcription of the b5 gene is unknown. We found b5 expression in all cell lines tested, including human adrenal NCI-H295A cells, where its mRNA is reduced by cAMP and phorbol ester. Multiple sites, between -83 and -122 bp upstream from the first ATG, initiate transcription. Deletional mutagenesis localized all detectable promoter activity within -327/+15, and deoxyribonuclease I footprinting identified protein binding at -72/-107 and -157/-197. DNA segments -65/-40, -114/-70 and -270/-245 fused to TK32/Luc yielded significant activity, and mutations in their Sp sites abolished that activity; electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that Sp3, but not Sp1, binds to these Sp sites. Nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) and GATA-6, but not GATA-4 bind to the NF-1 and GATA sites in -157/-197. In Drosophila S2 cells, Sp3 increased -327/Luc activity 58-fold, but Sp1 and NF-1 isoforms were inactive. Mutating the three Sp sites ablated activity without or with cotransfection of Sp1/Sp3. In NCI-H295A cells, mutating the three Sp sites reduced activity to 39%; mutating the Sp, GATA, and NF-1 sites abolished activity. In JEG-3 cells, GATA-4 was inactive, GATA-6 augmented -327/Luc activity to 231% over the control, and steroidogenic factor 1 augmented activity to 655% over the control; these activities required the Sp and NF-1 sites. Transcription of cytochrome b5 shares many features with the regulation of P450c17, whose activity it enhances. PMID:15831526

  11. Relationships among Internet health information use, patient behavior and self efficacy in newly diagnosed cancer patients who contact the National Cancer Institute's NCI Atlantic Region Cancer Information Service (CIS).

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Linda; Bass, Sarah; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; McKeown-Conn, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This NCI funded study examined the relationship between the use of Internet health information by people newly diagnosed with cancer (N=500), with patient task behavior and perceived self efficacy. Study variables were compared among Direct users of Internet health information (people using the Internet themselves), Indirect users of Internet health information (people receiving Internet health information from friends or family members), and Non-users of Internet health information (people not using the Internet or receiving health information from the Internet). The subjects were recruited from persons who called the Atlantic Region of the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS), located at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. Follow up phone interviews were done with participants six weeks after initial contact to assess impact of the use of the Internet on perceived patient task behavior and self efficacy. Results show significant relationships between Internet use and all study variables. PMID:12463827

  12. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yong; Yang Lisong; Feng Chao; Wen Longping . E-mail: lpwen@ustc.edu.cn

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  13. Virtual Screening of Specific Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Inhibitors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Database

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cong; Huang, Yan-Xin; Bao, Yong-Li; Sun, Lu-Guo; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhen-Bo; Zheng, Li-Hua; Sun, Ying; Wang, Guan-Nan; Li, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is an attractive drug target for cancer therapy and research on IGF1R inhibitors has had success in clinical trials. A particular challenge in the development of specific IGF1R inhibitors is interference from insulin receptor (IR), which has a nearly identical sequence. A few potent inhibitors that are selective for IGF1R have been discovered experimentally with the aid of computational methods. However, studies on the rapid identification of IGF1R-selective inhibitors using virtual screening and confidence-level inspections of ligands that show different interactions with IGF1R and IR in docking analysis are rare. In this study, we established virtual screening and binding-mode prediction workflows based on benchmark results of IGF1R and several kinase receptors with IGF1R-like structures. We used comprehensive analysis of the known complexes of IGF1R and IR with their binding ligands to screen specific IGF1R inhibitors. Using these workflows, 17 of 139,735 compounds in the NCI (National Cancer Institute) database were identified as potential specific inhibitors of IGF1R. Calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) with GROMACS were further conducted for three of the identified compounds to assess their binding affinity differences towards IGF1R and IR. PMID:23242155

  14. Aquated cisplatin and heparin-pluronic nanocomplexes exhibiting sustainable release of active platinum compound and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell antiproliferation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Nhat-Anh N; Nguyen, Thi Phuong; Cuu Khoa, Nguyen; Tran, Ngoc Quyen

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, platinum compounds have been many contributions in medicine. Development of new drugs from the active platinum compounds as well as nanocarriers for targeted delivery and reducing side effects of the drugs has paid much attention. In the study, nanocomplexes were prepared from aquated species of cisplatin and pluronic-conjugated heparin which distributed in the range of 80-100 nm by Transmission Electron Microscopy and 134 nm by Dynamic light scattering (DLS). Formation of the complex was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. The nanocomplexes exhibited high drug-loading capacity (approximately 42.5% wt/wt at 37 °C and 37.5% wt/wt at 25 °C). In vitro, drug-loaded nanogels showed much slower release profiles of cisplatin CDDP in pH 7.4 (physiological pH) compared with pH 5.5 condition at 37 °C. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay results also indicated that Hep-F127 was cytocompatible; meanwhile, CDDP-loaded nanocomplex was able to reduce the cytotoxic ability of free CDDP (IC50 = 5.68 ± 0.73 μg/ml), which still maintain a significantly antiproliferative activity on NCI-H460 lung cancer cell. The in vitro preliminarily obtained results indicate that the nanocomplex is a candidate for CDDP delivery which can be studied further in cancer therapy. PMID:26886825

  15. A ZO-1/α5β1-Integrin Complex Regulates Cytokinesis Downstream of PKCε in NCI-H460 Cells Plated on Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    de Franceschi, Nicola; Saari, Markku; Ivarsson, Ylva; Zimmermann, Pascale; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald; Ivaska, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that integrin adhesion to the extracellular matrix at the cleavage furrow is essential for cytokinesis of adherent cells. Here, we report that tight junction protein ZO-1 (Zonula Occludens-1) is required for successful cytokinesis in NCI-H460 cells plated on fibronectin. This function of ZO-1 involves interaction with the cytoplasmic domain of α5-integrin to facilitate recruitment of active fibronectin-binding integrins to the base of the cleavage furrow. In the absence of ZO-1, or a functional ZO-1/α5β1-integrin complex, proper actin-dependent constriction between daughter cells is impaired and cells fail cytokinesis. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that in ZO-1 depleted cells the furrow becomes delocalized from the matrix. We also show that PKCε-dependent phosphorylation at Serine168 is required for ZO-1 localization to the furrow and successful cell division. Altogether, our results identify a novel regulatory pathway involving the interplay between ZO-1, α5-integrin and PKCε in the late stages of mammalian cell division. PMID:23967087

  16. Design of Phase I Combination Trials: Recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee

    PubMed Central

    Paller, Channing J.; Bradbury, Penelope A.; Ivy, S. Percy; Seymour, Lesley; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Huang, Erich; Collyar, Deborah; Groshen, Susan; Reeves, Steven; Ellis, Lee M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Rosner, Gary L.; LeBlanc, Michael L.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are combined in an effort to treat a heterogeneous tumor or to maximize the pharmacodynamic effect. The development of combination regimens, while desirable, poses unique challenges. These include the selection of agents for combination therapy that may lead to improved efficacy while maintaining acceptable toxicity, the design of clinical trials that provide informative results for individual agents and combinations, and logistical and regulatory challenges. The phase 1 trial is often the initial step in the clinical evaluation of a combination regimen. In view of the importance of combination regimens and the challenges associated with developing them, the Clinical Trial Design (CTD) Task Force of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee developed a set of recommendations for the phase 1 development of a combination regimen. The first two recommendations focus on the scientific rationale and development plans for the combination regimen; subsequent recommendations encompass clinical design aspects. The CTD Task Force recommends that selection of the proposed regimens be based on a biological or pharmacological rationale supported by clinical and/or robust and validated preclinical evidence, and accompanied by a plan for subsequent development of the combination. The design of the phase 1 clinical trial should take into consideration the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as overlapping toxicity. Depending on the specific hypothesized interaction, the primary endpoint may be dose optimization, pharmacokinetics, and/or pharmacodynamic (i.e., biomarker). PMID:25125258

  17. Quantitative trait loci predicting circulating sex steroid hormones in men from the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald L.; Ardanaz, Eva; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Diver, W. Ryan; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loïc; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Hunter, David J.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17β-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 × 10−21), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 × 10−15), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 × 10−6) and SRD5A2 with 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 × 10−6). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones. PMID:19574343

  18. Simple Physics in Diseases and Embryonic Development of the Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirinifard, Abbas

    2011-03-01

    While molecular-level regulation within cells during embryonic development is highly complex, the physical mechanisms which translate this intracellular information into multicellular physical structure at the tissue level are often surprisingly simple. I will discuss an example where regulation of cell-cell contact energies is primarily responsible for robust and evolvable regular patterns, the organization of the ommatidia and supporting cells into the regular tiling characteristic of the Drosophila eye and another example where adhesion failures in the human retina result in choroidal neovascularization leading to blindness. In both cases, simulations based on materials-science techniques can help us understand the patterning mechanisms and the reasons for their robustness and failures. Such simulations are easy to extend to other developmental phenomena and to development-related diseases like cancer. EPA grant ``The Texas-Indiana Virtual STAR Center'' and NIH grants R01 GM76692 and R01 GM077138.

  19. Oxidative stress and hippocampal synaptic protein levels in elderly cognitively intact individuals with Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Stephen W; Ansari, Mubeen A; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-06-01

    Neuritic amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are major components used for the clinical diagnosis of this disorder. However, many individuals with no cognitive impairment (NCI) also present at autopsy with high levels of these AD pathologic hallmarks. In this study, we evaluated 15 autopsy cases from NCI individuals with high levels of AD-like pathology (high pathology no cognitive impairment) and compared them to age- and postmortem-matched cohorts of individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and NCI cases with low AD-like pathology (low pathology no cognitive impairment [LPNCI]). Individuals classified as high pathology no cognitive impairment or amnestic mild cognitive impairment had a significant loss of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in the hippocampus compared with those in the LPNCI cohort. In addition, these 2 groups had a significant increase in 3 different markers of oxidative stress compared with that in the LPNCI group. The changes in levels of synaptic proteins are strongly associated with levels of oxidative stress. These data suggest that cognitively older subjects without dementia but with increased levels of AD-like pathology may represent a very early preclinical stage of AD. PMID:27143416

  20. Accumulation of TAR DNA Binding Protein-43 (TDP-43) in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Schneider, Julie; Bennett, David A.; Calon, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) plays a central role in the neuropathology of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the relationship between TDP-43 abnormalities and Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear. To determine whether TDP-43 can serve as a neuropathological marker of AD, we performed biochemical characterization and quantification of TDP-43 in homogenates from parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NCI, n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 12), or AD (n = 12). Immunoblots revealed increased detergent-insoluble TDP-43 in the cortex of 0/12, 3/12 and 6/12 individuals with NCI, MCI or AD, respectively. Detergent-insoluble TDP-43 was positively correlated with the accumulation of soluble Aβ42, amyloid plaques and paired helical filament tau. In contrast, phospho-TDP-43 was decreased in the cytosolic fraction and detergent-soluble membrane/nuclear fraction from AD patients and correlated with antemortem cognitive function. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that the frequencies of individuals with TPD-43 or phospo-TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions were higher in AD than in NCI, with MCI at an intermediate level. These data indicate that abnormalities of TDP-43 occur in an important subset of MCI and AD patients and that they correlate with the clinical and neuropathological features of AD. PMID:21865887

  1. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mansky, Patrick J.; Sannes, Timothy S.; Johnson, Laura Lee; Blackman, Marc R.; Grem, Jean L.; Swain, Sandra M.; Monahan, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts (mistletoe) are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM) and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC) evaluated: (1) safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery, (3) formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab), (4) cytokine plasma concentrations, (5) clinical response, and (6) pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were grade (G) 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone. PMID:24285980

  2. Voxel-based meta-analysis of gray matter volume reductions associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaqian; Yang, Jing; Hu, Xinyu; Shang, Huifang

    2016-06-01

    Brain gray matter volume (GMV) reduction has been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and in PD patients with dementia (PDD) with cumulative evidence using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). However, the findings of these studies have not been entirely concordant. Whole-brain VBM studies comparing PD-MCI with PD patients without cognitive impairment (PD-NCI) and comparing PDD with PD patients without dementia (PDND) were systematically searched in PubMed and EMBASE databases from January 1995 to December 2015. Coordinates with significant differences were extracted from each cluster. Meta-analysis was performed using AES-SDM to quantitatively evaluate the GMV changes. Five studies comparing 92 PD-MCI with 192 PD-NCI patients were included in the PD-MCI vs. PD-NCI meta-analysis. Ten studies with 168 PDD and 233 PDND patients were included in the PDD vs. PDND meta-analysis. Compared with PD-NCI, GMV reductions were observed in left superior temporal lobe, left insula and left superior frontal lobe in PD-MCI patients. Significant GMV reduction were found in bilateral superior temporal lobe extending to hippocampus, and left superior frontal lobe in PDD patients comparing with PDND. Meta-regression of PDD studies showed that disease duration was negatively correlated with GMV in the left superior frontal lobe. GMV reductions in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions were main features of cognitive decline in PD. Unilateral-to-bilateral development of GMV reduction in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions is a possible indicator for PD-MCI to PDD progression, whereas significant hippocampal GMV reduction may not be a marker for early cognitive decline in PD. PMID:27113603

  3. Computational analysis of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric steroid profiling in NCI H295R cells following angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Mangelis, Anastasios; Dieterich, Peter; Peitzsch, Mirko; Richter, Susan; Jühlen, Ramona; Hübner, Angela; Willenberg, Holger S; Deussen, Andreas; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones, which regulate a plethora of physiological functions, are produced via tightly controlled pathways. Investigations of these pathways, based on experimental data, can be facilitated by computational modeling for calculations of metabolic rate alterations. We therefore used a model system, based on mass balance and mass reaction equations, to kinetically evaluate adrenal steroidogenesis in human adrenal cortex-derived NCI H295R cells. For this purpose a panel of 10 steroids was measured by liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry. Time-dependent changes in cell incubate concentrations of steroids - including cortisol, aldosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their precursors - were measured after incubation with angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone. Model parameters were estimated based on experimental data using weighted least square fitting. Time-dependent angiotensin II- and forskolin-induced changes were observed for incubate concentrations of precursor steroids with peaks that preceded maximal increases in aldosterone and cortisol. Inhibition of 17-alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase with abiraterone resulted in increases in upstream precursor steroids and decreases in downstream products. Derived model parameters, including rate constants of enzymatic processes, appropriately quantified observed and expected changes in metabolic pathways at multiple conversion steps. Our data demonstrate limitations of single time point measurements and the importance of assessing pathway dynamics in studies of adrenal cortical cell line steroidogenesis. Our analysis provides a framework for evaluation of steroidogenesis in adrenal cortical cell culture systems and demonstrates that computational modeling-derived estimates of kinetic parameters are an effective tool for describing perturbations in associated metabolic pathways. PMID:26435452

  4. Investigation by microarray analysis of effects of cigarette design characteristics on gene expression in human lung mucoepidermoid cancer cells NCI-H292 exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Fukano, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tobacco leaf types and the presence or absence of charcoal in the cigarette filters on gene expression were investigated using cigarette prototypes made of either flue-cured (FC) leaf or burley (BLY) leaf and Kentucky Reference 2R4F as a representative blend cigarette with cellulose acetate filters or charcoal filters. NCI-H292, human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line, was exposed to the total particulate matter (TPM) and gas/vapor phase (GVP) from each prototype for 8h and then the changes in gene expression from microarray data were analyzed. A number of genes associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and xenobiotic response were modified by the two fractions, TPM and GVP, from the three prototypes with cellulose acetate filters. Both TPM and GVP fractions strongly enhanced the gene expression of HMOX1, which is encoding the limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of oxidative stress and inflammatory process. Comparing the effects of TPM and GVP fraction, TPM strongly activated Nrf2 pathway-mediated anti-oxidative stress reaction, whereas GVP caused notable DNA damage response. In comparison of FC and BLY, TPM from FC more strongly induced the expression of histone family proteins than that from BLY. GVP from FC markedly induced gene expression associated with HSP70-mediated inflammation relative to that from BLY. Charcoal included in the filter strongly reduced the effects of GVP from each cigarette on gene expression. However, charcoal did not modified the effects of TPM. As a whole, charcoal is a useful material for reducing the biological effects of GVP. PMID:25497788

  5. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  6. The UF/NCI family of hybrid computational phantoms representing the current US population of male and female children, adolescents, and adults—application to CT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Amy M.; O'Reilly, Shannon; Lee, Choonsik; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2014-09-01

    Substantial increases in pediatric and adult obesity in the US have prompted a major revision to the current UF/NCI (University of Florida/National Cancer Institute) family of hybrid computational phantoms to more accurately reflect current trends in larger body morphometry. A decision was made to construct the new library in a gridded fashion by height/weight without further reference to age-dependent weight/height percentiles as these become quickly outdated. At each height/weight combination, circumferential parameters were defined and used for phantom construction. All morphometric data for the new library were taken from the CDC NHANES survey data over the time period 1999-2006, the most recent reported survey period. A subset of the phantom library was then used in a CT organ dose sensitivity study to examine the degree to which body morphometry influences the magnitude of organ doses for patients that are underweight to morbidly obese in body size. Using primary and secondary morphometric parameters, grids containing 100 adult male height/weight bins, 93 adult female height/weight bins, 85 pediatric male height/weight bins and 73 pediatric female height/weight bins were constructed. These grids served as the blueprints for construction of a comprehensive library of patient-dependent phantoms containing 351 computational phantoms. At a given phantom standing height, normalized CT organ doses were shown to linearly decrease with increasing phantom BMI for pediatric males, while curvilinear decreases in organ dose were shown with increasing phantom BMI for adult females. These results suggest that one very useful application of the phantom library would be the construction of a pre-computed dose library for CT imaging as needed for patient dose-tracking.

  7. The ROS-induced cytotoxicity of ascorbate is attenuated by hypoxia and HIF-1alpha in the NCI60 cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Noor, Seema; Venturelli, Sascha; Berger, Alexander; Schuler, Paul; Garbe, Claus; Busch, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate is used in complementary palliative medicine to treat cancer patients. Pharmacological doses of ascorbate in the mM range induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely hydrogen peroxide and ascorbyl radicals. However, little is known about intrinsic or extrinsic factors modulating this ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Under normoxia and hypoxia, ascorbate IC50 values were determined on the NCI60 cancer cells. The cell cycle, the influence of cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression (a pro-survival HIF-1α-downstream-target) were analysed after ascorbate exposure under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The amount of ascorbyl radicals increased with rising serum concentrations. Hypoxia (0.1% O2 ) globally increased the IC50 of ascorbate in the 60 cancer cell lines from 4.5 ± 3.6 mM to 10.1 ± 5.9 mM (2.2-fold increase, P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney t-test), thus inducing cellular resistance towards ascorbate. This ascorbate resistance depended on HIF-1α-signalling, but did not correlate with cell line-specific expression of the ascorbate transporter GLUT-1. However, under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, ascorbate treatment at the individual IC50 reduced the expression of GLUT-1 in the cancer cells. Our data show a ROS-induced, HIF-1α- and O2 -dependent cytotoxicity of ascorbate on 60 different cancer cells. This suggests that for clinical application, cancer patients should additionally be oxygenized to increase the cytotoxic efficacy of ascorbate. PMID:24330097

  8. Depletion of Bcl-2 by an antisense oligonucleotide induces apoptosis accompanied by oxidation and externalization of phosphatidylserine in NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koty, Patrick P; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Li, Shang-Xi; Kagan, Valerian E

    2002-01-01

    Oxidant-induced apoptosis involves oxidation of many different and essential molecules including phospholipids. As a result of this non-specific oxidation, any signaling role of a particular phospholipid-class of molecules is difficult to elucidate. To determine whether preferential oxidation of phosphatidylserine (PS) is an early event in apoptotic signaling related to PS externalization and is independent of direct oxidant exposure, we chose a genetic-based induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced in the lung cancer cell line NCI-H226 by decreasing the amount of Bcl-2 protein expression by preventing the translation of bcl-2 mRNA using an antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide. Peroxidation of phospholipids was assayed using a fluorescent technique based on metabolic integration of an oxidation-sensitive and fluorescent fatty acid, cis-parinaric acid (PnA), into cellular phospholipids and subsequent HPLC separation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids. We found a decrease in Bcl-2 was associated with a selective oxidation of PS in a sub-population of the cells with externalized PS. No significant difference in oxidation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids was observed in cells treated with medium alone or a nonsense oligonucleotide. Treatment with either nonsensc or antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotides was not associated with changes in the pattern of individual phospholipid classes as determined by HPTLC. These metabolic and topographical changes in PS arrangement in plasma membrane appear to be early responses to antisense bcl-2 exposure that trigger a PS-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway. This observed externalization of PS may facilitate the 'labeling' of apoptotic cells for recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors and subsequent phagocytic clearance. PMID:12162425

  9. The ROS-induced cytotoxicity of ascorbate is attenuated by hypoxia and HIF-1alpha in the NCI60 cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Noor, Seema; Venturelli, Sascha; Berger, Alexander; Schuler, Paul; Garbe, Claus; Busch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate is used in complementary palliative medicine to treat cancer patients. Pharmacological doses of ascorbate in the mM range induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely hydrogen peroxide and ascorbyl radicals. However, little is known about intrinsic or extrinsic factors modulating this ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Under normoxia and hypoxia, ascorbate IC50 values were determined on the NCI60 cancer cells. The cell cycle, the influence of cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression (a pro-survival HIF-1α-downstream-target) were analysed after ascorbate exposure under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The amount of ascorbyl radicals increased with rising serum concentrations. Hypoxia (0.1% O2) globally increased the IC50 of ascorbate in the 60 cancer cell lines from 4.5 ± 3.6 mM to 10.1 ± 5.9 mM (2.2-fold increase, P < 0.001, Mann–Whitney t-test), thus inducing cellular resistance towards ascorbate. This ascorbate resistance depended on HIF-1α-signalling, but did not correlate with cell line-specific expression of the ascorbate transporter GLUT-1. However, under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, ascorbate treatment at the individual IC50 reduced the expression of GLUT-1 in the cancer cells. Our data show a ROS-induced, HIF-1α-and O2-dependent cytotoxicity of ascorbate on 60 different cancer cells. This suggests that for clinical application, cancer patients should additionally be oxygenized to increase the cytotoxic efficacy of ascorbate. PMID:24330097

  10. Downregulation of HIF-1α inhibits the proliferation and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H157 cells

    PubMed Central

    QIAN, JIALIN; BAI, HAO; GAO, ZHIQIANG; DONG, YU; PEI, JUN; MA, MEILI; HAN, BAOHUI

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, specifically non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. In previous years, almost no significant advancements have been made towards the molecular characterization of NSCLC, which highlights the requirement for novel target genes. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known to be essential in tumorigenesis, as it regulates the expression of numerous factors that are involved in angiogenesis, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. However, no direct association between HIF-1α and NSCLC treatment has previously been established. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of HIF-1α on NSCLC and to explore the possible mechanism. Additionally, HIF-1α small interfering (si)RNA and diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) were used in combination to explore the combined effects on NSCLC cells. Lung carcinoma NCI-H157 cells were treated with HIF-1α small interfering (si)RNA, 5 µg/ml DDP or a combination of the two, and the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion ability of the cells were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and a Transwell assay, respectively. In addition, the protein levels of caspase-3/9, anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphorylated (p-)PI3K, protein kinase B (AKT), p-AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p-ERK were detected using western blot analysis. Similar to DPP treatment, HIF-1α siRNA treatment may reduce cell proliferation and the invasiveness of tumor cells while promoting apoptosis. Additionally, HIF-1α siRNA may increase the levels of the apoptotic proteins caspases 3 and 9 and inhibit the expression of Bcl-2. These anti-tumor effects may be acting through the VEGF/PEDF, PI3K/AKT and Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK signaling pathways. The effects

  11. The NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway is associated with tumor cell resistance to arsenic trioxide across the NCI-60 panel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is associated with increased risk for different types of cancer. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide can also be used to induce remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a success rate of approximately 80%. A comprehensive study examining the mechanisms and potential signaling pathways contributing to the anti-tumor properties of arsenic trioxide has not been carried out. Methods Here we applied a systems biology approach to identify gene biomarkers that underlie tumor cell responses to arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. The baseline gene expression levels of 14,500 well characterized human genes were associated with the GI50 data of the NCI-60 tumor cell line panel from the developmental therapeutics program (DTP) database. Selected biomarkers were tested in vitro for the ability to influence tumor susceptibility to arsenic trioxide. Results A significant association was found between the baseline expression levels of 209 human genes and the sensitivity of the tumor cell line panel upon exposure to arsenic trioxide. These genes were overlayed onto protein-protein network maps to identify transcriptional networks that modulate tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. The analysis revealed a significant enrichment for the oxidative stress response pathway mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) with high expression in arsenic resistant tumor cell lines. The role of the NRF2 pathway in protecting cells against arsenic-induced cell killing was validated in tumor cells using shRNA-mediated knock-down. Conclusions In this study, we show that the expression level of genes in the NRF2 pathway serve as potential gene biomarkers of tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. Importantly, we demonstrate that tumor cells that are deficient for NRF2 display increased sensitivity to arsenic trioxide. The results of our study will be useful in understanding the mechanism of

  12. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  13. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  14. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  15. Step 4: NCI Funding Determinations

    Cancer.gov

    Funding determinations are made around Oct. 1 each federal fiscal year. These decisions take into account several factors, including Congressional mandates, new scientific opportunities and program priorities when deciding which grants receive funding.

  16. NCI R25T Award

    Cancer.gov

    Institutional award for predoctoral or postdoctoral candidates or mentored junior faculty who are pursuing careers in cancer prevention, control, behavioral, and population sciences or transdisciplinary sciences.

  17. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  18. NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms

    Cancer.gov

    A dictionary of more than 150 genetics-related terms written for healthcare professionals, developed to support the comprehensive, evidence-based, peer-reviewed PDQ cancer genetics information summaries.

  19. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  20. Novel electrospun gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers as a suitable platform for lung disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Švachová, Veronika; Vojtová, Lucy; Pavliňák, David; Vojtek, Libor; Sedláková, Veronika; Hyršl, Pavel; Alberti, Milan; Jaroš, Josef; Hampl, Aleš; Jančář, Josef

    2016-10-01

    Novel hydrolytically stable gelatin nanofibers modified with sodium or calcium salt of oxycellulose were prepared by electrospinning method. The unique inhibitory effect of these nanofibers against Escherichia coli bacteria was examined by luminometric method. Biocompatibility of these gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers with eukaryotic cells was tested using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line NCI-H441. Cells firmly adhered to nanofiber surface, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, and no signs of cell dying were detected by fluorescent live/dead assay. We propose that the newly developed gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers could be used as promising scaffold for lung disease modeling and anti-cancer drug testing. PMID:27287147

  1. Systems analysis of human brain gene expression: mechanisms for HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and common pathways with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV) infection frequently results in neurocognitive impairment. While the cause remains unclear, recent gene expression studies have identified genes whose transcription is dysregulated in individuals with HIV-association neurocognitive disorder (HAND). However, the methods for interpretation of such data have lagged behind the technical advances allowing the decoding genetic material. Here, we employ systems biology methods novel to the field of NeuroAIDS to further interrogate extant transcriptome data derived from brains of HIV + patients in order to further elucidate the neuropathogenesis of HAND. Additionally, we compare these data to those derived from brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in order to identify common pathways of neuropathogenesis. Methods In Study 1, using data from three brain regions in 6 HIV-seronegative and 15 HIV + cases, we first employed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to further explore transcriptome networks specific to HAND with HIV-encephalitis (HIVE) and HAND without HIVE. We then used a symptomatic approach, employing standard expression analysis and WGCNA to identify networks associated with neurocognitive impairment (NCI), regardless of HIVE or HAND diagnosis. Finally, we examined the association between the CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) of antiretroviral regimens and brain transcriptome. In Study 2, we identified common gene networks associated with NCI in both HIV and AD by correlating gene expression with pre-mortem neurocognitive functioning. Results Study 1: WGCNA largely corroborated findings from standard differential gene expression analyses, but also identified possible meta-networks composed of multiple gene ontology categories and oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Differential expression analysis identified hub genes highly correlated with NCI, including genes implicated in gliosis, inflammation, and dopaminergic tone. Enrichment

  2. Genomic and proteomic analysis of the inhibition of synthesis and secretion of aldosterone hormone induced by quinocetone in NCI-H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Bai, Yijie; Cheng, Guyue; Ihsan, Awais; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yulian; Tao, Yanfei; Chen, Dongmei; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhengli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-03-28

    Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides (QdNOs) are widely used as a kind of antibacterial growth promoter in animal husbandry. The adrenal cortex was found to be one of the main toxic targets of QdNOs, accompanied by a decreased aldosterone level. However, the way in which QdNOs decrease production of the hormone aldosterone is far from clear. To illustrate the mechanism by which QdNOs damage the adrenal cortex and decrease aldosterone hormone levels, the QdNOs were screened to choose the drug with most toxic effects on aldosterone production, and then to reveal the mechanism between the gene and protein profiles in human adrenocortical cells (NCI-H295R cells). The results found that quinocetone (QCT) showed the highest adrenal toxic effect among QdNOs. After exposing H295R cells to 10 and 20μM QCT for 24h, compared with blank cells, the gene and protein expression profiles obtained were analyzed by microarray and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. The results of microarray analysis suggested that ABCG1 and SREBF1, which were involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic and metabolic processes, and CYP17A1, NR4A2 and G6PD, which were related to aldosterone biosynthesis, were important molecular targets. It has been speculated that PKC and ERK pathways might be involved in the reduction of aldosterone production caused by QCT, through enhanced mRNA expression of CYP17A1. Additionally, JNK and p38MAPK signal transduction pathways might participate in apoptosis induced by QCT. Twenty-nine and 32 protein spots were successfully identified when cells were treated with 10 and 20μM QCT, respectively. These identified proteins mainly included material synthesis and energy metabolism-related proteins, transcription/translation processing-related proteins, signal transduction proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones, proteins related to response to stress, and transport proteins. Further investigations suggested that oxidative stress caused by QCT was exacerbated

  3. COATING ALTERNATIVES GUIDE (CAGE) USER'S GUIDE (EPA/600/R-01/030)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Coating Alternatives GuidE (CAGE) software program, version 1.0. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). CAGE...

  4. Secondary Analysis of the NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing Data Indicates Significant Presence of Propionibacterium acnes Genomic Material in Leukemia (RPMI-8226) and Central Nervous System (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Mark; Golovko, Georgiy; Khanipov, Kamil; Albayrak, Levent; Chumakov, Sergei; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Strongin, Alex Y.; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel has been used in a broad range of cancer research over the last two decades. A landmark 2013 whole exome sequencing study of this panel added an exceptional new resource for cancer biologists. The complementary analysis of the sequencing data produced by this study suggests the presence of Propionibacterium acnes genomic sequences in almost half of the datasets, with the highest abundance in the leukemia (RPMI-8226) and central nervous system (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) cell lines. While the origin of these contaminating bacterial sequences remains to be determined, observed results suggest that computational control for the presence of microbial genomic material is a necessary step in the analysis of the high throughput sequencing (HTS) data. PMID:26039084

  5. Secondary Analysis of the NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing Data Indicates Significant Presence of Propionibacterium acnes Genomic Material in Leukemia (RPMI-8226) and Central Nervous System (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mark; Golovko, Georgiy; Khanipov, Kamil; Albayrak, Levent; Chumakov, Sergei; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Strongin, Alex Y; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel has been used in a broad range of cancer research over the last two decades. A landmark 2013 whole exome sequencing study of this panel added an exceptional new resource for cancer biologists. The complementary analysis of the sequencing data produced by this study suggests the presence of Propionibacterium acnes genomic sequences in almost half of the datasets, with the highest abundance in the leukemia (RPMI-8226) and central nervous system (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) cell lines. While the origin of these contaminating bacterial sequences remains to be determined, observed results suggest that computational control for the presence of microbial genomic material is a necessary step in the analysis of the high throughput sequencing (HTS) data. PMID:26039084

  6. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  7. Increased PEA3/E1AF and decreased Net/Elk-3, both ETS proteins, characterize human NSCLC progression and regulate caveolin-1 transcription in Calu-1 and NCI-H23 NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Karin A; Marquez, Hector A; Li, Jun; Cao, Yuxia; Hinds, Anne; O'Hara, Carl J; Kathuria, Satinder; Ramirez, Maria I; Williams, Mary C; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2009-08-01

    Caveolin-1 protein has been called a 'conditional tumor suppressor' because it can either suppress or enhance tumor progression depending on cellular context. Caveolin-1 levels are dynamic in non-small-cell lung cancer, with increased levels in metastatic tumor cells. We have shown previously that transactivation of an erythroblastosis virus-transforming sequence (ETS) cis-element enhances caveolin-1 expression in a murine lung epithelial cell line. Based on high sequence homology between the murine and human caveolin-1 promoters, we proposed that ETS proteins might regulate caveolin-1 expression in human lung tumorigenesis. We confirm that caveolin-1 is not detected in well-differentiated primary lung tumors. Polyoma virus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3), a pro-metastatic ETS protein in breast cancer, is expressed at low levels in well-differentiated tumors and high levels in poorly differentiated tumors. Conversely, Net, a known ETS repressor, is expressed at high levels in the nucleus of well-differentiated primary tumor cells. In tumor cells in metastatic lymph node sites, caveolin-1 and PEA3 are highly expressed, whereas Net is now expressed in the cytoplasm. We studied transcriptional regulation of caveolin-1 in two human lung cancer cell lines, Calu-1 (high caveolin-1 expressing) and NCI-H23 (low caveolin-1 expressing). Chromatin immunoprecipitation-binding assays and small interfering RNA experiments show that PEA3 is a transcriptional activator in Calu-1 cells and that Net is a transcriptional repressor in NCI-H23 cells. These results suggest that Net may suppress caveolin-1 transcription in primary lung tumors and that PEA3 may activate caveolin-1 transcription in metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:19483189

  8. Molecular and cellular pathophysiology of preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mufson, Elliott J; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Counts, Scott E; Perez, Sylvia E; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Scheff, Stephen W; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2016-09-15

    Although the two pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), senile plaques composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau, have been studied extensively in postmortem AD and relevant animal and cellular models, the pathogenesis of AD remains unknown, particularly in the early stages of the disease where therapies presumably would be most effective. We and others have demonstrated that Aβ plaques and NFTs are present in varying degrees before the onset and throughout the progression of dementia. In this regard, aged people with no cognitive impairment (NCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, a presumed prodromal AD transitional state, and AD all present at autopsy with varying levels of pathological hallmarks. Cognitive decline, a requisite for the clinical diagnosis of dementia associated with AD, generally correlates better with NFTs than Aβ plaques. However, correlations are even higher between cognitive decline and synaptic loss. In this review, we illustrate relevant clinical pathological research in preclinical AD and throughout the progression of dementia in several areas including Aβ and tau pathobiology, single population expression profiling of vulnerable hippocampal and basal forebrain neurons, neuroplasticity, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker studies and their correlation with antemortem cognitive endpoints. In each of these areas, we provide evidence for the importance of studying the pathological hallmarks of AD not in isolation, but rather in conjunction with other molecular, cellular, and imaging markers to provide a more systematic and comprehensive assessment of the multiple changes that occur during the transition from NCI to MCI to frank AD. PMID:27185734

  9. Amyloid-aβ Peptide in olfactory mucosa and mesenchymal stromal cells of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda; Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Abrante, Ligia; Vargas, Leslie; Cardier, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) might develop olfactory dysfunction that correlates with progression of disease. Alteration of olfactory neuroepithelium associated with MCI may be useful as predictor of cognitive decline. Biomarkers with higher sensitivity and specificity would allow to understand the biological progression of the pathology in association with the clinical course of the disease. In this study, magnetic resonance images, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) load, Olfactory Connecticut test and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) indices were obtained from noncognitive impaired (NCI), MCI and AD patients. We established a culture of patient-derived olfactory stromal cells from biopsies of olfactory mucosa (OM) to test whether biological properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are concurrent with MCI and AD psychophysical pathology. We determined the expression of amyloid Aβ peptides in the neuroepithelium of tissue sections from MCI and AD, as well as in cultured cells of OM. Reduced migration and proliferation of stromal (CD90(+) ) cells in MCI and AD with respect to NCI patients was determined. A higher proportion of anosmic MCI and AD cases were concurrent with the ApoE ε4 allele. In summary, dysmetabolism of amyloid was concurrent with migration and proliferation impairment of patient-derived stem cells. PMID:25040401

  10. Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, S.T. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic analysis of Kawasaki disease; Late onset valvular dysfunction in Kawasaki disease; ischemic heart disease in Kawasaki disease; Evaluation of evidence related to streptococci in the etiology of Kawasaki disease; and Immune complexes and cytotoxicity.

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Cinnamomum verum Component Cuminaldehyde Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Cell Death in Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma NCI-H520 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-mei; Tsai, Kuen-daw; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Cherng, Jonathan; Hsu, Kwang-Ching; Ang, Yao-Uh; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum is used to make the spice cinnamon and has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. We evaluated the effects and the molecular mechanisms of cuminaldehyde (CuA), a constituent of the bark of Cinnamomum verum, on human lung squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520 cells. Specifically, cell viability was evaluated by colorimetric assay; cytotoxicity by LDH release; apoptosis was determined by Western blotting, and morphological analysis with, acridine orange and neutral red stainings and comet assay; topoisomerase I activity was assessed using assay based upon DNA relaxation and topoisomerase II by DNA relaxation plus decatentation of kinetoplast DNA; lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments (VAC) were evaluated with neutral red staining. The results show that CuA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by an up-regulation of pro-apoptotic bax and bak genes and a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 and bcl-XL genes, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 3 and 9, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis, including blebbing of the plasma membrane, nuclear condensation, fragmentation, apoptotic body formation, and comet with elevated tail intensity and moment. In addition, CuA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased VAC, cytotoxicity, as well as suppressions of both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study revealed the growth-inhibitory effect of CuA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of CuA against NCI-H520 cells is accompanied by downregulations of proliferative control involving apoptosis and both topoisomerase I and II activities, and upregulation of lysosomal with increased VAC and cytotoxicity. Similar effects were found in other cell lines, including human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 (results not

  12. Hair analysis for delta(9)-THC, delta(9)-THC-COOH, CBN and CBD, by GC/MS-EI. Comparison with GC/MS-NCI for delta(9)-THC-COOH.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Maria João; Monsanto, Paula Verâncio; Pinho Marques, Estela Gouveia; Bermejo, Ana; Avila, Sofia; Castanheira, Alice Martelo; Margalho, Cláudia; Barroso, Mário; Vieira, Duarte Nuno

    2002-08-14

    A sensitive analytical method was developed for quantitative analysis of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta(9)-THC), 11-nor-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid (delta(9)-THC-COOH), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in human hair. The identification of delta(9)-THC-COOH in hair would document Cannabis use more effectively than the detection of parent drug (delta(9)-THC) which might have come from environmental exposure. Ketamine was added to hair samples as internal standard for CBN and CBD. Ketoprofen was added to hair samples as internal standard for the other compounds. Samples were hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase for 2h at 40 degrees C. After cooling, samples were extracted with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (with chloroform/isopropyl alcohol, after alkalinization, and n-hexane/ethyl acetate, after acidification), which was developed in our laboratory. The extracts were analysed before and after derivatization with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH) using a Hewlett Packard gas chromatographer/mass spectrometer detector, in electron impact mode (GC/MS-EI). Derivatized delta(9)-THC-COOH was also analysed using a Hewlett Packard gas chromatographer/mass spectrometer detector, in negative ion chemical ionization mode (GC/MS-NCI) using methane as the reagent gas. Responses were linear ranging from 0.10 to 5.00 ng/mg hair for delta(9)-THC and CBN, 0.10-10.00 ng/mg hair for CBD, 0.01-5.00 ng/mg for delta(9)-THC-COOH (r(2)>0.99). The intra-assay precisions ranged from <0.01 to 12.40%. Extraction recoveries ranged from 80.9 to 104.0% for delta(9)-THC, 85.9-100.0% for delta(9)-THC-COOH, 76.7-95.8% for CBN and 71.0-94.0% for CBD. The analytical method was applied to 87 human hair samples, obtained from individuals who testified in court of having committed drug related crimes. Quantification of delta(9)-THC-COOH using GC/MS-NCI was found to be more convenient than GC/MS-EI. The latter may give rise

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Cinnamomum verum Component Cuminaldehyde Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Cell Death in Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma NCI-H520 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Mei; Tsai, Kuen-Daw; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Cherng, Jonathan; Hsu, Kwang-Ching; Ang, Yao-Uh; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum is used to make the spice cinnamon and has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. We evaluated the effects and the molecular mechanisms of cuminaldehyde (CuA), a constituent of the bark of Cinnamomum verum, on human lung squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520 cells. Specifically, cell viability was evaluated by colorimetric assay; cytotoxicity by LDH release; apoptosis was determined by Western blotting, and morphological analysis with, acridine orange and neutral red stainings and comet assay; topoisomerase I activity was assessed using assay based upon DNA relaxation and topoisomerase II by DNA relaxation plus decatentation of kinetoplast DNA; lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments (VAC) were evaluated with neutral red staining. The results show that CuA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by an up-regulation of pro-apoptotic bax and bak genes and a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 and bcl-XL genes, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 3 and 9, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis, including blebbing of the plasma membrane, nuclear condensation, fragmentation, apoptotic body formation, and comet with elevated tail intensity and moment. In addition, CuA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased VAC, cytotoxicity, as well as suppressions of both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study revealed the growth-inhibitory effect of CuA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of CuA against NCI-H520 cells is accompanied by downregulations of proliferative control involving apoptosis and both topoisomerase I and II activities, and upregulation of lysosomal with increased VAC and cytotoxicity. Similar effects were found in other cell lines, including human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 (results not

  14. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  15. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Disease Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  17. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parvovirus B19 and Fifth Disease Note: Javascript is disabled or ... this page: About CDC.gov . Parvovirus Home About Parvovirus B19 Fifth Disease Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Photos of ...

  18. Hookworm Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parasitic Roundworm Diseases Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus World Health Organization ​​ Hookworm Disease Skip Content Marketing Share this: JavaScript is disabled in your browser. ...

  19. Farber's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Ceramidase Deficiency Table of Contents ( ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Farber's Disease? Farber’s disease, also known as Farber's lipogranulomatosis, describes ...

  20. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share External Link Disclaimer Digestive Diseases Wilson Disease Alternate Versions Wilson Disease (444 KB) You can also ... things psychosis—when a person loses contact with reality Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms ...

  1. Hodgkin Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... far the disease has spread. It often includes radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The earlier the disease is diagnosed, the more effective the treatment. In most cases, Hodgkin disease can be cured. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  2. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kawasaki disease is a rare childhood disease. It makes the walls of the blood vessels in the ... veins, and capillaries. No one knows what causes Kawasaki disease. Symptoms include High fever that lasts longer ...

  3. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Digestive System X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal ... Bowel Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Your Digestive System Irritable Bowel Syndrome Upper GI (Video) Inflammatory Bowel Disease Digestive System ...

  4. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  5. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  6. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  7. Creation of an NCI comparative brain tumor consortium: informing the translation of new knowledge from canine to human brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Mazcko, Christina; Brown, Diane E; Koehler, Jennifer W; Miller, Andrew D; Miller, C Ryan; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Breen, Matthew; Boudreau, C Elizabeth; Levine, Jonathan M; Simpson, R Mark; Halsey, Charles; Kisseberth, William; Rossmeisl, John H; Dickinson, Peter J; Fan, Timothy M; Corps, Kara; Aldape, Kenneth; Puduvalli, Vinay; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Gilbert, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    On September 14-15, 2015, a meeting of clinicians and investigators in the fields of veterinary and human neuro-oncology, clinical trials, neuropathology, and drug development was convened at the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland. This meeting served as the inaugural event launching a new consortium focused on improving the knowledge, development of, and access to naturally occurring canine brain cancer, specifically glioma, as a model for human disease. Within the meeting, a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) assessment was undertaken to critically evaluate the role that naturally occurring canine brain tumors could have in advancing this aspect of comparative oncology aimed at improving outcomes for dogs and human beings. A summary of this meeting and subsequent discussion are provided to inform the scientific and clinical community of the potential for this initiative. Canine and human comparisons represent an unprecedented opportunity to complement conventional brain tumor research paradigms, addressing a devastating disease for which innovative diagnostic and treatment strategies are clearly needed. PMID:27179361

  8. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  9. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... As a result, some children who have Kawasaki disease may develop serious heart problems. Overview The cause of Kawasaki disease ... Early treatment helps reduce the risk of Kawasaki disease affecting the coronary arteries and causing serious problems. Outlook Kawasaki disease can't be prevented. ...

  10. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  11. Newcastle disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND), referred to as Exotic Newcastle disease (END) in the U. S., is an acute viral disease of domestic poultry and many other bird species and a recognized worldwide problem. Occurrence of END is due to an infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and is a ...

  12. NCI, NHLBI First International Consensus Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Etiology and Pathogenesis of Late Effects after HCT performed in Childhood – Methodological Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita; Davies, Stella M.; Baker, K. Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Hansen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is now a curative option for certain categories of patients with hematological malignancies and other life-threatening illnesses. Technical and supportive care has resulted in survival rates that exceed 70% for those who survive the first two years after HSCT. However, long-term survivors carry a high burden of morbidity, including endocrinopathies, musculoskeletal disorders, cardiopulmonary compromise, and subsequent malignancies. Understanding the etiologic pathways that lead to specific post-HCT morbidities is critical to developing targeted prevention and intervention strategies. Understanding the molecular underpinnings associated with graft vs. host disease (GvHD), organ toxicity, relapse, opportunistic infection and other long-term complications now recognized as health care concerns will have significant impact on translational research aimed at developing novel targeted therapies for controlling chronic GvHD, facilitating tolerance and immune reconstitution, reducing risk of relapse and secondary malignancies, minimizing chronic metabolic disorders and improving quality of life. However, several methodological challenges exist in achieving these goals; these issues are discussed in detail in this article. PMID:21763253

  13. Neuronal LR11 expression does not differentiate between clinically-defined Alzheimer's disease and control brains.

    PubMed

    Sager, Kristen L; Wuu, Joanne; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Mufson, Elliott J; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Because the pathological changes underlying this disease can begin decades prior to the onset of cognitive impairment, identifying the earliest events in the AD pathological cascade has critical implications for both the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We previously reported that compared to autopsy confirmed healthy control brain, expression of LR11 (or SorLA) is markedly reduced in AD brain as well as in a subset of people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a prodromal clinical stage of AD. Recent studies of the LR11 gene SORL1 have suggested that the association between SORL1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and AD risk may not be universal. Therefore, we sought to confirm our earlier findings in a population chosen solely based on clinical criteria, as in most genetic studies. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to measure LR11 expression in 43 cases from the Religious Orders Study that were chosen based on a final pre-mortem clinical diagnosis of MCI, mild/moderate AD or no cognitive impairment (NCI). LR11 expression was highly variable in all three diagnostic groups, with no significant group differences. Low LR11 cases were identified using the lowest tertile of LR11 expression observed across all cases as a threshold. Contrary to previous reports, low LR11 expression was found in only 29% of AD cases. A similar proportion of both the MCI and NCI cases also displayed low LR11 expression. AD-associated lesions were present in the majority of cases regardless of diagnostic group, although we found no association between LR11 levels and pathological variables. These findings suggest that the relationship between LR11 expression and the development of AD may be more complicated than originally believed. PMID:22927900

  14. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy approaches to Menkes disease. 3 1. Kaler, SG. The neurology of STPAT copper transporter disease: emerging ... Reviews Neurology , 2001:7:15-19.. 2. Kaler SG, et al. Neonatal Diagnosis and Treatment of Menkes ...

  15. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... Bones can also develop cancer and infections Other bone diseases, which are caused by poor nutrition, genetics, or ...

  16. Sandhoff Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sandhoff Disease? Sandhoff disease is a rare, inherited lipid storage disorder that progressively destroys nerve cells in ... results in the harmful accumulation of certain fats (lipids) in the brain and other organs of the ...

  17. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one of the inherited metabolic disorders known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids are fatty materials that include oils, fatty acids, ... research to find ways to treat and prevent lipid storage disorders such as Gaucher disease. For example, ...

  18. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  19. Legionnaire disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Legionnaire disease is an infection of the lungs and airways. It is caused by Legionella bacteria. Causes The bacteria that cause Legionnaire disease have ...

  20. Chagas disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kirchhoff LV. Chagas' disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 355. Kirchhoff LV. Trypanosoma species (American trypanosomiasis, Chagas' disease): Biology ...

  1. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting it. A blood test can tell you if have the HD gene and will develop the disease. Genetic counseling can ...

  2. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National Institutes of Health, conducts research into the genomic basis of Behcet's disease. This research is aimed ...

  3. Digestive diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007447.htm Digestive diseases To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Digestive diseases are disorders of the digestive tract, which ...

  4. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  5. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  6. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ... together over several days. Some people with Meniere's disease have "drop attacks" during which the dizziness is ...

  7. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  8. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  10. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  11. Raynaud's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  12. Addison Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  13. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  14. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  15. Fifth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  16. Tickborne Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... for tickborne diseases ranges from studying the basic biology of the microbes that cause these diseases to ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  17. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. ​ Additional Links Hashimoto's Disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests Find a Specialist ... everyone who receives radioactive iodine treatment eventually develops hypothyroidism, which occurs when the thyroid does not make ...

  18. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  19. Gilbert disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000301.htm Gilbert disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gilbert disease is a common disorder passed down through ...

  20. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  1. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumococcal disease. Quick Facts About Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccination According to WHO, pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis are ... of antibiotic treatment. (9, 10, 11) Conjugate pneumococcal vaccination is safe and effective for preventing severe childhood ...

  2. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... having celiac disease? Yes, you can have gluten sensitivity without the immune system attack on the small ... gluten causes in celiac disease. Symptoms of gluten sensitivity are generally milder than those seen in celiac ...

  3. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  4. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  5. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder in which you do not have enough of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. ... It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  6. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  7. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  8. Binswanger's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Information What is Binswanger's Disease? Binswanger's disease (BD), also called subcortical vascular dementia , is a type ... and brain tissue dies. A characteristic pattern of BD-damaged brain tissue can be seen with modern ...

  9. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You ... extra copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  10. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  11. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the liver ...

  12. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  13. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is spread through the bite of one of several types of ... Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi ( B burgdorferi ). Blacklegged ticks and other species of ticks ...

  14. Kennedy's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent, treat, and cure them. NIH Patient Recruitment for Kennedy's Disease Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Kennedy's Disease Association P.O. Box ...

  15. Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    American Parkinson Disease Association. Parkinson's Disease Handbook: A Guide for Patients and Their Families. Revised 2009. Available at: www.apdaparkinson.org/uploads/files/MP51919AmParkinsonHBK-vaU.pdf . Accessed September 15, ...

  16. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  17. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Behçet’s disease keep their joints strong and flexible. What Is the Prognosis for a Person With Behçet’s Disease? Most people with Behçet’s disease can lead productive lives and control symptoms with proper medicine, rest, and exercise. Doctors ...

  18. Meniere's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schessel, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

  19. Crinkle Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crinkle disease of hop was first described in Europe in 1930, and subsequent reports of the disease appear in literature published in the 1960s and 1970s. The disease appears to be of little importance in most regions of hop production. A fastidious rickettsia-like organism (RLO) is thought to cau...

  20. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Celiac disease is an immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Gluten ...

  1. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  2. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) is one form of dementia. It affects ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely to ...

  3. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included. PMID:27243427

  4. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prostate Diseases Basic Facts & Information What are Prostate Diseases? The prostate—one of the components of ... out anything serious. The Most Common Types of Prostate Diseases Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) Prostatitis Prostate cancer ...

  5. Comparison of the effects of the oral anticancer platinum(IV) complexes oxoplatin and metabolite cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) on global gene expression of NCI-H526 cells

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ulsperger, Ernst; Geissler, Klaus; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum(IV) coordination complexes like oxoplatin (cis,cis,trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum[IV]) show high stability and therefore can be utilized orally for outpatient care. Although oxoplatin is capable of binding directly to DNA after prolonged incubation, platinum(IV) agents are considered to be largely inert prodrugs that are converted to highly cytotoxic platinum(II) compounds by reducing substances, enzymes, or microenviron-mental conditions. Reaction of oxoplatin with 0.1 M hydrogen chloride mimicking gastric acid yields cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) (DATCP[IV]), which exhibits two-fold increased activity. The presence of chlorides as ligands in the axial position results in a high reduction potential that favors transformation to platinum(II) complexes. In this study, the intracellular effect of the highly reactive tetrachlorido derivative was investigated in comparison with an equipotent dose of cisplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes and concerned cellular pathways between DATCP(IV) and cisplatin. Application of DATCP(IV) resulted in extensive downregulation of protein and ATP synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and glycolysis, in contrast to cisplatin, which preferentially targeted glutathione conjugation, pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, and the metabolism of amino acids and a range of carbohydrates. Thus, the oxoplatin metabolite DATCP(IV) constitutes a potent cytotoxic derivative that may be produced by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in larger solid tumors, depending on the respective pharmaceutical formulation of oxoplatin. Furthermore, DATCP(IV) exhibits intracellular effects that are clearly different from the expected reduced product cisplatin(II). In conclusion, activation of the platinum(IV) complex oxoplatin seems to involve the generation of a cytotoxic

  6. Molecular structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns and topological analysis (QTAIM and NCI) of 5-methoxy-2-nitroaniline and 5-methoxy-2-nitroaniline with 2-amino-5-nitropyridine (1:1) co-crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Paredes, Javier; Carrillo-Torres, Roberto C.; López-Zavala, Alonso A.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Hernández-Negrete, Ofelia; Ramírez, José Zeferino; Alvarez-Ramos, Mario E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report an analysis of the molecular structure and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in the crystal structures of 5-methoxy-2-nitroaniline (1) and 5-methoxy-2-nitroaniline with 2-amino-5-nitropyridine (1:1) co-crystal (2). X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments were carried out to analyse the intermolecular forces in terms of geometrical criteria. These intermolecular interactions were also investigated through topological analysis of the electron density (ρ) employing QTAIM and NCI methods. Additionally, Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyse the vibrational characteristics of the entitled materials. The supramolecular structure of (1) is produced by crosslinked chains, which are primarily dominated by N-H···O hydrogen bonds. However, C-H···O interactions reinforce this connectivity. Furthermore, the molecules in (1) are connected through two-centre instead of the three-centre hydrogen-bonding interactions between the -NH2 and -NO2 groups commonly observed in nitroanilines. The asymmetric unit of (2) contains two symmetry-independent molecules of 5-methoxy-2-nitroaniline (5M2NA) and two symmetry-independent molecules of 2-amino-5-nitropyridine (2A5NP). The supramolecular structure of (2) is developed not only for N-H···O but also N-H···N and supportive C-H···O hydrogen bonds. The two symmetry-independent 2A5NP molecules bound to each other through two-centre hydrogen bonds between the -NH2 and -NO2 groups forming C22(16) chains. 5M2NA molecules bound to these chains forming R22 9 and R22(8) synthons. Experimental and theoretical results obtained in this work suggest that C-H···O interactions play an important role in the stabilization of these supramolecular structures.

  7. Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents an update on the clinical aspects of human prion disease, including the wide spectrum of their presentations. Recent Findings Prion diseases, a group of disorders caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions, occur in sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease), genetic (genetic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia), and acquired (kuru, variant Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, and iatrogenic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease) forms. This article presents updated information on the clinical features and diagnostic methods for human prion diseases. New antemortem potential diagnostic tests based on amplifying prions in order to detect them are showing very high specificity. Understanding of the diversity of possible presentations of human prion diseases continues to evolve, with some genetic forms progressing slowly over decades, beginning with dysautonomia and neuropathy and progressing to a frontal-executive dementia with pathology of combined prionopathy and tauopathy. Unfortunately, to date, all human prion disease clinical trials have failed to show survival benefit. A very rare polymorphism in the prion protein gene recently has been identified that appears to protect against prion disease; this finding, in addition to providing greater understanding of the prionlike mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, might lead to potential treatments. Summary Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease is the most common form of human prion disease. Genetic prion diseases, resulting from mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathologic features and can be difficult to diagnose because of their varied presentations. Perhaps most relevant to this Continuum issue on neuroinfectious diseases, acquired prion diseases are caused by accidental transmission to humans, but fortunately, they are the least common form and

  8. Glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2011-08-01

    Glomerular diseases are a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in dogs but seem to be less common in cats. Glomerular diseases are diverse, and a renal biopsy is needed to determine the specific glomerular disease that is present in any animal. Familial glomerulopathies occur in many breeds of dogs. However, most dogs with glomerular disease have acquired glomerular injury that is either immune-complex mediated or due to systemic factors, both of which are believed to be the result of a disease process elsewhere in the body (i.e., neoplastic, infectious, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders). A thorough clinical evaluation is indicated in all dogs suspected of having glomerular disease and should include an extensive evaluation for potential predisposing disorders. Nonspecific management of dogs with glomerular disease can be divided into 3 major categories: (1) treatment of potential predisposing disorders, (2) management of proteinuria, and (3) management of uremia and other complications of glomerular disease and chronic kidney disease. Specific management of specific glomerular diseases has not been fully studied in dogs. However, it may be reasonable to consider immunosuppressive therapy in dogs that have developed a form of glomerulonephritis secondary to a steroid-responsive disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus) or have immune-mediated lesions that have been documented in renal biopsy specimens. Appropriate patient monitoring during therapy is important for maximizing patient care. The prognosis for dogs and cats with glomerular disease is variable and probably dependent on a combination of factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the general diagnosis and management of dogs with glomerular disease. PMID:21782143

  9. [Social diseases, civilization diseases or lifestyle diseases?].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stansław

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of civilization is viewed as a positive step for the well-being of the human species, leading to an increased duration and quality of life. The accelerated progress of civilization (mainly industrialization, urbanization and nutrition) has lead to new possibilities for adverse effects on human health. In former high civilization--like old Egypt, Greece, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Maya civilizations--the "modem civilization diseases" were unknown. Modem science through improved sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics as well as improved social and economical conditions, has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. In the years after World War II the social, economic and health conditions changed. Most deaths have resulted from heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases as a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment and changed lifestyle. Lifestyle diseases are different from other diseases because they are potentially preventable and can be lowered with changes in diet, lifestyle and environment. PMID:18350729

  10. Borna disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hatalski, C. G.; Lewis, A. J.; Lipkin, W. I.

    1997-01-01

    Borna disease virus, a newly classified nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus with international distribution, infects a broad range of warm-blooded animals from birds to primates. Infection causes movement and behavioral disturbances reminiscent of some neuropsychiatric syndromes. The virus has not been clearly linked to any human disease; however, an association between infection with the virus and selected neuropsychiatric disorders has been suggested. We reviewed recent advances in Borna disease virus research, focusing on evidence of infection in humans. PMID:9204293

  11. Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test–the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  12. [Moyamoya disease].

    PubMed

    Esin, R G; Isayeva, Yu N; Gorobets, E A; Tokareva, N V; Esin, O R

    2016-01-01

    Moya-moya is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by the progressive occlusion of cerebral vessels with partial switching off the circle of Willis and arteries that feed it. The article provides a review of literature, modern diagnostic criteria and a description of a single clinical case. The onset of the disease in this patient was characterized by headache and speech disorders.An analysis of speech disorders showed that they were systemic. They were registered at all language levels (phonetic, lexical,morphological, syntactic). A long diagnostic search may be explained by clinical manifestations that are atypical for other cerebrovascular diseases and by the rarity of the disease. PMID:27386589

  13. Coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Jabri, Bana

    2003-08-01

    Coeliac disease is a genetically-determined chronic inflammatory intestinal disease induced by an environmental precipitant, gluten. Patients with the disease might have mainly non-gastrointestinal symptoms, and as a result patients present to various medical practitioners. Epidemiological studies have shown that coeliac disease is very common and affects about one in 250 people. The disease is associated with an increased rate of osteoporosis, infertility, autoimmune diseases, and malignant disease, especially lymphomas. The mechanism of the intestinal immune-mediated response is not completely clear, but involves an HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 restricted T-cell immune reaction in the lamina propria as well as an immune reaction in the intestinal epithelium. An important component of the disease is the intraepithelial lymphocyte that might become clonally expanded in refractory sprue and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Study of the mechanism of the immune response in coeliac disease could provide insight into the mechanism of inflammatory and autoimmune responses and lead to innovations in treatment. PMID:12907013

  14. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Caspary, Wolfgang F

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen); often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years. PMID:16722573

  15. Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by uncontrolled excessive motor movements and cognitive and emotional deficits. The mutation responsible for HD leads to an abnormally long polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein, which confers one or more toxic functions to mutant Htt leading to neurodegeneration. The polyQ expansion makes Htt prone to aggregate and accumulate, and manipulations that mitigate protein misfolding or facilitate the clearance of misfolded proteins tend to slow disease progression in HD models. This article will focus on HD and the evidence that it is a conformational disease. PMID:21441583

  16. Whipworm Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Whipworm Disease Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical ...

  17. Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, M.; Howlett, D. C.; Saks, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular condition of uncertain aetiology commonly affecting young persons. The disease is mainly seen in Japanese patients. We report two cases of moyamoya disease in Caucasian women and review the postulated aetiological factors and associated conditions as well as the spectrum of invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease, with particular reference to the developing role of magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9373593

  18. Differential Regulation of Human 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 for Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis by Starvation and Cyclic Amp Stimulation: Studies in the Human Adrenal NCI-H295R Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Gaby; Mullis, Primus E.; Flück, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Human steroid biosynthesis depends on a specifically regulated cascade of enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD3Bs). Type 2 HSD3B catalyzes the conversion of pregnenolone, 17α-hydroxypregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone to progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione in the human adrenal cortex and the gonads but the exact regulation of this enzyme is unknown. Therefore, specific downregulation of HSD3B2 at adrenarche around age 6–8 years and characteristic upregulation of HSD3B2 in the ovaries of women suffering from the polycystic ovary syndrome remain unexplained prompting us to study the regulation of HSD3B2 in adrenal NCI-H295R cells. Our studies confirm that the HSD3B2 promoter is regulated by transcription factors GATA, Nur77 and SF1/LRH1 in concert and that the NBRE/Nur77 site is crucial for hormonal stimulation with cAMP. In fact, these three transcription factors together were able to transactivate the HSD3B2 promoter in placental JEG3 cells which normally do not express HSD3B2. By contrast, epigenetic mechanisms such as methylation and acetylation seem not involved in controlling HSD3B2 expression. Cyclic AMP was found to exert differential effects on HSD3B2 when comparing short (acute) versus long-term (chronic) stimulation. Short cAMP stimulation inhibited HSD3B2 activity directly possibly due to regulation at co-factor or substrate level or posttranslational modification of the protein. Long cAMP stimulation attenuated HSD3B2 inhibition and increased HSD3B2 expression through transcriptional regulation. Although PKA and MAPK pathways are obvious candidates for possibly transmitting the cAMP signal to HSD3B2, our studies using PKA and MEK1/2 inhibitors revealed no such downstream signaling of cAMP. However, both signaling pathways were clearly regulating HSD3B2 expression. PMID:23874725

  19. Alpers' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by mutation in the gene for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase POLG. The disease occurs in about one in 100,000 persons. ... typically occur months before tissue samples show the mitochondrial DNA depletion, so ... with Alpers' disease develop symptoms in the first two years of ...

  20. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tests How do I know if my child's heel pain is caused by Sever's disease? In Sever's disease, heel pain can be in one or both heels. It ... cut down or stop any activity that causes heel pain. Apply ice to the injured heel for 20 ...

  1. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  2. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  3. Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease affects your body’s adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are part of the endocrine system. The endocrine ... your moods, growth, metabolism, and tissue function. The adrenal glands are located just above your kidneys. They produce ...

  4. Disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborne pathogens that cause root diseases spend most of their life cycle in or on the soil. Soil management decisions will influence the survival, growth of these pathogens and severity of disease. Many of the cultural methods that growers have relied on in the past to reduce the impact of the...

  5. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  6. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see whether the disease has affected your intestines and heart. Medicines can kill the parasite, especially early on. You can also treat related problems. For example, a pacemaker helps with certain heart ... practice food safety. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  7. Whipple's disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Complete blood count ( CBC ) Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to check for the bacteria that cause the disease Small bowel biopsy Upper GI endoscopy (viewing the intestines with a flexible, lighted tube in a process called enteroscopy ) This disease may ...

  8. Prion Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases comprise a set of rare fatal neurological diseases found in humans and other mammals. A prion is a protein capable of converting a normal cellular protein (PrPC) into a prion and thereby propagating an infection. A prion and PrPC differ solely in their conformation. There are differen...

  9. NCL Partnerships - NCI - Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    The activities within the NCL represent a formal scientific interaction of three Federal agencies: National Cancer Institute and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the Department of Health and Human Services, and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the Department of Commerce.

  10. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  11. Lowy Named Acting NCI Director April 2015

    Cancer.gov

    Douglas Lowy, M.D., today was officially named the National Cancer Institute’s Acting Director. Dr. Lowy, a cancer researcher for more than 40 years, received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama in 2014 for his research th

  12. NCI Repository News – Last Call —

    Cancer.gov

    The following strains will be maintained as live colonies until the end of January 2014. After this date, they will be supplied as cryopreserved embryos. If you foresee using one of these strains in the near future, order now! Please be aware that all necessary paperwork (order form, MTA, etc.) needs to be completed and received by the Repository before January 31, 2014 in order to receive live mice.

  13. Provocative Questions in Cancer: NCI Seminar

    Cancer.gov

    science writers' seminar to discuss various aspects of one of NCI’s signature efforts -- the Provocative Questions project. Discussion will focus on the scientific research that surrounds some of these questions.

  14. Red Cooperativa de Tejido Humano del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Bioespecímenes de calidad son un recurso de investigación oncológica. Uno de los programas de bioespecímenes que han operado por más tiempo es la Red Cooperativa de Tejido Humano, ara descubrimientos básicos e investigación inicial de transferencia.

  15. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more.

  16. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program: Jianwen Fang

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  17. NCI launches smoking cessation support for teens

    Cancer.gov

    A new effort to help teens quit smoking will use one of today’s teen’s most constant companions—the mobile phone. Developed by smoking cessation experts, SmokefreeTXT is a free text message cessation service that provides 24/7 encouragement, advice, and

  18. Patents | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Timely reporting of discoveries is critical, because patent protection may be lost if an invention is publicly disclosed prior to filing a patent application. A public disclosure may include Talks, presentations, posters; Publications, including titles and abstracts posted on websites; Internet postings; Graduate student theses, job interviews; andDiscussions with non-NIH personnel without a Confidential Disclosure Agreement (CDA) in place.

  19. Success Stories | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Some of our partnerships have resulted in the commercialization of therapeutics, vaccines, diagnostics, medical devices and research tools that benefit patients worldwide. TTC is proud to share a few examples of our successful partnerships.

  20. Women of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Editor’s note: This article has been updated since it was originally posted on August 22, 2013 Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges a group of women for their great achievements and contributions towards the mission of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick.  Details of their achievements and unique personalities were on display in Building 549 in March, and we present a brief summary of each below: