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Sample records for disease-a pilot study

  1. Handwriting Rehabilitation in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziliotto, Adriana; Micheli, Federico E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of handwriting rehabilitation (HR) in Parkinson disease (PD) patients who experienced difficulties with handwriting and signing. Methods Sixty PD patients were prospectively studied with graphological evaluations. Thirty PD patients were assigned to HR for 9 weeks. At the end of this training, all patients were evaluated again and results of basal vs. final evaluations were compared. Results At final evaluation, the group assigned to HR showed significantly larger amplitude of the first 'e' in the phrase, larger signature surface area, and superior margin. A trend of increase in letter size was also observed. Handwriting with progressively decreasing size of letters and ascending direction with respect to the horizontal were prominent findings in both groups of patients and they did not change after HR. Conclusion Rehabilitation programs for handwriting problems in PD patients are likely to be helpful. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26361595

  2. Plasma metabolomics in human pulmonary tuberculosis disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frediani, Jennifer K; Jones, Dean P; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I; Kempker, Russell R; Kurani, Shaheen S; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  3. Panax ginseng therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical trial protocol and pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Panax ginseng (Ren shen) has been used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article aims to present a study protocol and pilot trial comparing P. ginseng with placebo for treating moderate to very severe COPD. Methods COPD was diagnosed spirometrically, with participants having a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of between 20% and 79% and FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio of less than 70%. Outcome measures included exacerbation rate, St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test and Short-form Health Survey (SF-36). Other outcome measures included the six-minute walk test, FEV1, FVC, relief medication use, use of COPD-specific medical resources, and adverse events. The study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. The method of this pilot trial was based on a planned full-scale trial except that participants were enrolled for ten weeks compared to 52 weeks. In the pilot trial, 14 participants (57–73 years old) with moderate to very severe COPD were recruited from a community health program at a public Chinese medicine hospital in Guangdong Province, China. After a 2-week run-in period, 10 participants were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either P. ginseng group (n = 5) (200 mg twice daily for four weeks) or placebo group (n = 5), and then followed-up for an additional 4 weeks for a total of 10 weeks. Results Nine participants completed the trial and one dropped out. The exacerbation rate could not be evaluated because there were no exacerbations. One participant in P. ginseng group reported events of sore throat, cough and fever. Trial investigators did not consider these events as COPD exacerbations or adverse events. Conclusions Participant recruitment, study design, data collection and outcome measurement have been tested in a pilot trial. A full-scale trial is warranted. PMID:25161696

  4. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation in Crohn's disease: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonaz, B; Sinniger, V; Hoffmann, D; Clarençon, D; Mathieu, N; Dantzer, C; Vercueil, L; Picq, C; Trocmé, C; Faure, P; Cracowski, J-L; Pellissier, S

    2016-06-01

    The vagus nerve (VN) is a link between the brain and the gut. The VN is a mixed nerve with anti-inflammatory properties through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by its afferents and by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway through its efferents. We have previously shown that VN stimulation (VNS) improves colitis in rats and that the vagal tone is blunted in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We thus performed a pilot study of chronic VNS in patients with active CD. Seven patients under VNS were followed up for 6 months with a primary endpoint to induce clinical remission and a secondary endpoint to induce biological (CRP and/or fecal calprotectin) and endoscopic remission and to restore vagal tone (heart rate variability). Vagus nerve stimulation was feasible and well-tolerated in all patients. Among the seven patients, two were removed from the study at 3 months for clinical worsening and five evolved toward clinical, biological, and endoscopic remission with a restored vagal tone. These results provide the first evidence that VNS is feasible and appears as an effective tool in the treatment of active CD. PMID:26920654

  5. Jugular venous reflux and white matter abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Ping; Beggs, Clive; Wang, Pei-Ning; Bergsland, Niels; Shepherd, Simon; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Ramasamy, Deepa P; Dwyer, Michael G; Hu, Han-Hwa; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether jugular venous reflux (JVR) is associated with cerebral white matter changes (WMCs) in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied 12 AD patients 24 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and 17 elderly age- and gender-matched controls. Duplex ultrasonography and 1.5T MRI scanning was applied to quantify cerebral WMCs [T2 white matter (WM) lesion and dirty-appearing-white-matter (DAWM)]. Subjects with severe JVR had more frequently hypertension (p = 0.044), more severe WMC, including increased total (p = 0.047) and periventricular DAWM volumes (p = 0.008), and a trend for increased cerebrospinal fluid volumes (p = 0.067) compared with the other groups. A significantly decreased (65.8%) periventricular DAWM volume (p = 0.01) in the JVR-positive AD individuals compared with their JVR-negative counterparts was detected. There was a trend for increased periventricular and subcortical T2 WMC lesion volumes in the JVR-positive AD individuals compared with their JVR-negative counterparts (p = 0.073). This phenomenon was not observed in either the control or MCI groups. In multiple regression analysis, the increased periventricular WMC lesion volume and decreased DAWM volume resulted in 85.7% sensitivity and 80% specificity for distinguishing between JVR-positive and JVR-negative AD patients. These JVR-WMC association patterns were not seen in the control and MCI groups. Therefore, this pilot study suggests that there may be an association between JVR and WMCs in AD patients, implying that cerebral venous outflow impairment might play a role in the dynamics of WMCs formation in AD patients, particularly in the periventricular regions. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm and validate our findings. PMID:24217278

  6. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  7. Robot-assisted arm training in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing diffusion of robotic devices in neurorehabilitation, no previous study investigated the effects of robotic training on arm impairment due to Parkinson’s disease. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether robot-assisted arm training might improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Findings Ten patients with Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.5-3) received ten, 45-minute, treatment sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Robot-assisted arm training was performed with the Bi-Manu-Track (Reha-Stim, Berlin, Germany) that provides a computer-controlled, repetitive, bilateral, mirror-like practice of forearm pronation/supination and wrist extension/flexion. Patients were trained according to the following modalities: passive-passive (both arms moved by the machine) and active-active (both arms actively moving against resistance). The dominant upper limb was evaluated before and immediately after treatment as well as at two weeks of follow-up. Outcomes were the nine-hole peg test, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (upper limb section) and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. After treatment, a significant improvement was found in the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007) as well as in the upper limb section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment (P = 0.012). Findings were confirmed at the 2-week follow-up evaluation only for the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007). No significant improvement was found in the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale at both post-treatment and follow-up evaluations. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that robot-assisted arm training might be a promising tool in order to improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24597524

  8. Feasibility and efficacy of cognitive telerehabilitation in early Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jelcic, Nela; Agostini, Michela; Meneghello, Francesca; Bussè, Cinzia; Parise, Sara; Galano, Antonietta; Tonin, Paolo; Dam, Mauro; Cagnin, Annachiara

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study compared the effects of lexical-semantic stimulation through telecommunication technology (LSS-tele) with in-person LSS (LSS-direct) and unstructured cognitive treatment (UCS) in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Methods Twenty-seven patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the very early stage (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] >26/30) were divided into three groups: seven patients received LSS-tele treatment, ten received standard LSS-direct intervention, and ten participants underwent UCS as control condition. Intervention treatments consisted of two weekly sessions of LSS (through teleconference or face to face depending on group assignment) or UCS exercises administered to small groups throughout a 3-month period. The main outcome measures were changes of global cognitive performance, language abilities, and memory function. Secondary outcome measures were changes in attention, working memory, executive functions, and visual-spatial abilities tests. Results The mean MMSE score improved significantly in LSS-tele and LSS-direct treatments; LSS-tele improved language abilities, both phonemic and semantic, and stabilized delayed verbal episodic memory with respect to an improved performance after the LSS-direct intervention and to a memory decline observed in the control group. Improvement was not achieved in any neuropsychological test score after UCS. Conclusion Clinical application of telecommunication technology to cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with neurodegenerative cognitive impairment is feasible and may improve global cognitive performance. Technical aspects to ameliorate efficacy of delivery may further improve its impact on domain-specific cognitive abilities. PMID:25284993

  9. Postural Sway as a Marker of Progression in Parkinson's disease: a Pilot Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Zampieri, Cris; Nutt, John G.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective measures of postural control that are sensitive to Parkinson's Disease (PD) progression would improve patient care and accelerate clinical trials. Although measures of postural sway during quiet stance in untreated PD have been shown to differ from age-matched control subjects, it is not known if sway measures change with disease progression in early PD. In this pilot study, we asked whether accelerometer-based metrics of sway could provide a practical tool for monitoring progression of postural dyscontrol in people with untreated or newly treated PD. We examined 13 subjects with PD and 12 healthy, age-matched control subjects. The PD subjects had been recently diagnosed and had not started any antiparkinsonian medications at the baseline session. All subjects were tested 3-to-6 months and 12 months after the baseline session. Subjects were asked to stand quietly for two minutes while wearing an inertial sensor on their posterior trunk that measured trunk linear acceleration. Our results suggested that objective sway measures deteriorated over one year despite minimal changes in UPDRS motor scores. Medio-lateral (ML) sway measures were more sensitive than antero-posterior sway measures in detecting progression. The ML JERK was larger in the PD group than the control group across all three testing sessions. The ML sway dispersion and ML sway velocity were also significantly higher in PD compared to control subjects by the 12-month evaluation. It is feasible to measure progression of PD prior to onset of treatment using accelerometer-based measures of quiet standing. PMID:22750016

  10. Sirolimus therapy for patients with adult polycystic kidney disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A R; Ismail, E; Zamil, S; Lotfy, A

    2009-11-01

    A pilot study was performed on adult polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) patients to examine the effects of the anti-proliferative mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor sirolimus on the growth of renal cysts. Eight consecutive PCKD patients were given sirolimus (1 mg/d PO) for 6 consecutive months, in addition to an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), namely telmisartan. Another 8 PCKD patients served as a control group given only telmisartan. All PCKD patients had a serum creatinine value <2 mg/dL with a negative urine culture before enrollment. All patients were diagnosed by renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure renal volumes. After a 6-month follow-up, patients were rescanned to remeasure the MRI volumes. Renal function was stable in 5/8 subjects in the sirolimus group, improved in 2 cases, and worsened in 1 with an increase of serum creatinine to >2 mg/dL resulting in his withdrawal after 5 months of follow-up. In contrast, the serum creatinine value was stable in 3 control group subjects, worsen in 3, and improved in 2. Four patients in the sirolimus group experienced infectious complications, namely, urinary tract infections (UTI) in 2 which were treated with antibiotics, and monilial pharyngitis in 2, who were treated and cured with a topical antifungal. In the control group, only 2 developed and were treated for UTIs. Hematologic tests were normal in all patients. There was an insignificant rise in kidney volume as measured by MRI in the sirolimus group (2845 vs 3221 mL after 6 months; P = NS) compared with a significant increase in the control group (2667 vs 3590 mL after 6 months; P < .05). We concluded that sirolimus, in addition to an ARB, might be beneficial for PCKD patients who present early in their illness. PMID:19917358

  11. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson's Disease - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Anna A; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  12. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  13. Treadmill Training Improves Overground Walking Economy in Parkinson’s Disease: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Jose Andres; Bello, Olalla; Lopez-Alonso, Virginia; Márquez, Gonzalo; Morenilla, Luis; Castro, Xabier; Giraldez, Manolo; Santos-García, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Gait disturbances are one of the principal and most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, walking economy is impaired in PD patients and could contribute to excess fatigue in this population. An important number of studies have shown that treadmill training can improve kinematic parameters in PD patients. However, the effects of treadmill and overground walking on the walking economy remain unknown. The goal of this study was to explore the walking economy changes in response to a treadmill and an overground training program, as well as the differences in the walking economy during treadmill and overground walking. Twenty-two mild PD patients were randomly assigned to a treadmill or overground training group. The training program consisted of 5 weeks (3 sessions/week). We evaluated the energy expenditure of overground walking, before and after each of the training programs. The energy expenditure of treadmill walking (before the program) was also evaluated. The treadmill, but not the overground training program, lead to an improvement in the walking economy (the rate of oxygen consumed per distance during overground walking at a preferred speed) in PD patients. In addition, walking on a treadmill required more energy expenditure compared with overground walking at the same speed. This study provides evidence that in mild PD patients, treadmill training is more beneficial compared with that of walking overground, leading to a greater improvement in the walking economy. This finding is of clinical importance for the therapeutic administration of exercise in PD. PMID:25309510

  14. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2), and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria). Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP). Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned. PMID:20003224

  15. Respiratory motor training and neuromuscular plasticity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, Alexander V; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Ovechkina, Elena N; Aslan, Sevda C; Pitts, Teresa; Folz, Rodney J

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a full-scale investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of COPD-induced respiratory neuromuscular control deficits. Characterization of respiratory single- and multi-muscle activation patterns using surface electromyography (sEMG) were assessed along with functional measures at baseline and following 21±2 (mean±SD) sessions of respiratory motor training (RMT) performed during a one-month period in four patients with GOLD stage II or III COPD. Pre-training, the individuals with COPD showed significantly increased (p<0.05) overall respiratory muscle activity and disorganized multi-muscle activation patterns in association with lowered spirometrical measures and decreased fast- and slow-twitch fiber activity as compared to healthy controls (N=4). Following RMT, functional and respiratory sEMG activation outcomes during quite breathing and forced expiratory efforts were improved suggesting that functional improvements, induced by task-specific RMT, are evidence respiratory neuromuscular networks re-organization. PMID:27137413

  16. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Laura; Clarke, Carl E.; Sackley, Cath

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Parkinson's disease can produce a range of speech-language pathologies, which may require intervention. While evaluations of speech-language therapy have been undertaken, no work has been undertaken to capture patients' experiences of therapy. This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson's disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy. Participants' responses were analysed in accordance with Thematic Network Analysis. Results. Four themes emerged: emotional reactions (frustration, embarrassment, lack of confidence, disappointment, and anxiety); physical impact (fatigue, breathing and swallowing, and word production); practical aspects (cost of treatment, waiting times, and the actual clinical experience); and expectations about treatment (met versus unmet). Conclusions. While many benefits of speech-language therapy were reported, several negative issues emerged which could impact adversely on rehabilitation. Parkinson's disease is associated with a range of psychological and physical sequelae, such as fatigue and depression; recognising any individual experiences which could exacerbate the existing condition and incorporating these into treatment planning may improve rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:26236508

  17. Religious/Spiritual coping in adolescents with sickle cell disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Sian; Grossoehme, Daniel; Rosenthal, Susan L; McGrady, Meghan E; Roberts, Yvonne Humenay; Hines, Janelle; Yi, Michael S; Tsevat, Joel

    2009-05-01

    Religious/spiritual (R/S) coping has been associated with health outcomes in chronically ill adults; however, little is known about how adolescents use R/S to cope with a chronic illness such as sickle cell disease (SCD). Using a mixed method approach (quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews), we examined R/S coping, spirituality, and health-related quality of life in 48 adolescents with SCD and 42 parents of adolescents with SCD. Adolescents reported high rates of religious attendance and belief in God, prayed often, and had high levels of spirituality (eg, finding meaning/peace in their lives and deriving comfort from faith). Thirty-five percent of adolescents reported praying once or more a day for symptom management. The most common positive R/S coping strategies used by adolescents were: "Asked forgiveness for my sins" (73% of surveys) and "Sought God's love and care" (73% of surveys). Most parents used R/S coping strategies to cope with their child's illness. R/S coping was not significantly associated with HRQOL (P=NS). R/S coping, particularly prayer, was relevant for adolescents with SCD and their parents. Future studies should assess adolescents' preferences for discussing R/S in the medical setting and whether R/S coping is related to HRQOL in larger samples. PMID:19415008

  18. Flaxseed supplementation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot randomized, open labeled, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yari, Zahra; Rahimlou, Mehran; Eslamparast, Tannaz; Ebrahimi-Daryani, Naser; Poustchi, Hossein; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2016-06-01

    A two-arm randomized open labeled controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Participants were assigned to take either a lifestyle modification (LM), or LM +30 g/day brown milled flaxseed for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, body weight, liver enzymes, insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis and steatosis decreased significantly in both groups (p< 0.05); however, this reduction was significantly greater in those who took flaxseed supplementation (p < 0.05). The significant mean differences were reached in hepatic markers between flaxseed and control group, respectively: ALT [-11.12 compared with -3.7 U/L; P< 0.001], AST [-8.29 compared with -4 U/L; p < 0.001], GGT [-15.7 compared with -2.62 U/L; p < 0.001], fibrosis score [-1.26 compared with -0.77 kPa; p = 0.013] and steatosis score [-47 compared with -15.45 dB/m; p = 0.022]. In conclusion, flaxseed supplementation plus lifestyle modification is more effective than lifestyle modification alone for NAFLD management. PMID:26983396

  19. Health related quality of life of chronic patients with immune system diseases: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Claudia Campos; Silveira, Augusta; Silva, Isabel; Ribeiro, Catarina; Gestal, Juan; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Health related quality of life (HRQL) and survival are two important outcome measures in chronic diseases. This study aimed to compared HRQL in patients with different chronic diseases of immune system and normative data from the general Portuguese Population. It was selected 103 out-patients, by convenience, to complete SF-36v2. The lowest scores were found among measures for general health (41.0), vitality (47.5), bodily pain (51.0), mental health (56.4); women, except for role-physical, and patients with auto-immune diseases have had the worse scores on all assessed dimension of subjective health, when compared with normative data. Highest scores were obtained in the following scales: physical functioning (69.1), social functioning (66.9), role-emotional (64.9). Living with chronic immune disease have impact on HRQL and it can be expected that the Portuguese version of SF-36v2 provide valid and reliable HRQL data. PMID:23032336

  20. Rapid Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, YanHong; Koay, Way Inn; Yeo, Leonard Leong Litt; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Xu, Jing; Seet, Raymond Chee Seong; Lim, Erle Chuen Hian

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This study sought to establish the discriminant validity of a rapid cognitive screen, that is, the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke-Canadian Stroke Network (NINDS-CSN) 5-minute protocol, and compare its discriminant validity to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) in detecting cognitive impairment (CI) in PD patients. Methods. One hundred and one PD patients were recruited from a movement disorders clinic in Singapore and they received the NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol, MoCA, and MMSE. No cognitive impairment (NCI) was defined as Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) = 0 and CI was defined as CDR ≥ 0.5. Results. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol was statistically equivalent to MoCA and larger than MMSE (0.86 versus 0.90, P = 0.07; 0.86 versus 0.76, P = 0.03). The sensitivity of NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol (<9) was statistically equivalent to MoCA (<22) (0.77 versus 0.85, P = 0.13) and superior to MMSE (<24) (0.77 versus 0.52, P < 0.01) in detecting CI, while the specificity of NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol (<9) was statistically equivalent to MoCA (<22) and MMSE (<24) (0.78 versus 0.88, P = 0.34). Conclusion. The NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol is time expeditious while remaining statistically equivalent to MoCA and superior to MMSE and therefore is suitable for rapid cognitive screening of CI in PD patients. PMID:26713170

  1. 'Kitchen and cooking,' a serious game for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Manera, Valeria; Petit, Pierre-David; Derreumaux, Alexandre; Orvieto, Ivan; Romagnoli, Matteo; Lyttle, Graham; David, Renaud; Robert, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in employing serious games (SGs) for the assessment and rehabilitation of elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and related disorders. In the present study we examined the acceptability of 'Kitchen and cooking' - a SG developed in the context of the EU project VERVE (http://www.verveconsortium.eu/) - in these populations. In this game a cooking plot is employed to assess and stimulate executive functions (such as planning abilities) and praxis. The game is installed on a tablet, to be flexibly employed at home and in nursing homes. Twenty one elderly participants (9 MCI and 12 AD, including 14 outpatients and 7 patients living in nursing homes, as well as 11 apathetic and 10 non-apathetic) took part in a 1-month trail, including a clinical and neuropsychological assessment, and 4-week training where the participants were free to play as long as they wanted on a personal tablet. During the training, participants met once a week with a clinician in order to fill in self-report questionnaires assessing their overall game experience (including acceptability, motivation, and perceived emotions). The results of the self reports and of the data concerning game performance (e.g., time spent playing, number of errors, etc) confirm the overall acceptability of Kitchen and cooking for both patients with MCI and patients with AD and related disorders, and the utility to employ it for training purposes. Interestingly, the results confirm that the game is adapted also to apathetic patients. PMID:25852542

  2. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease. PMID:26615374

  3. Remote Assessment of Cognitive Function in Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Batten disease): A Pilot Study of Feasibility and Reliability.

    PubMed

    Ragbeer, Shayne N; Augustine, Erika F; Mink, Jonathan W; Thatcher, Alyssa R; Vierhile, Amy E; Adams, Heather R

    2016-03-01

    Remote technology provides an opportunity to extend the reach of clinical care and research for pediatric rare disease. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility and reliability of neuropsychological evaluation, using remote audiovisual technology, in the assessment of children with juvenile Batten disease. Three children with Batten disease and 1 healthy sibling completed a standardized cognitive assessment. Results indicated high agreement between an in-person and a remote evaluator when comparing the subjects' cognitive test scores. This initial test of remote cognitive assessment suggests it is feasible and reliable in children with pediatric neurodegenerative disease, for whom disease burden may limit travel and access to expert care and/or clinical trials. PMID:26336202

  4. A walking intervention to reduce inflammation in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial/artery disease: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study, we sought to determine whether walking reduces inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Methods: We obtained blood samples from patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Intervention participants were advised to walk for 50 min 3 days per week for 6 months. Participants completed assessments of comorbidities and walking ability. Difference-in-difference analyses were used to assess the relationship between group assignment and each biomarker over time. Results: We randomized 55 participants (control = 25 and intervention = 30). At 6 months and based on p values of <0.20, vascular cellular adhesion molecule, beta-2 microglobulin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides demonstrated a greater decrease among participants randomized to the intervention compared to the control. Conclusions: Walking may reduce inflammation in persons with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Further research is needed to determine the impact of walking on inflammation in persons with vascular disease. PMID:26770683

  5. An old dietary regimen as a new lifestyle change for Gastro esophageal reflux disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Mahfouz, Salah Al-Din Mahmoud; Selim, Noor Ahmed; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is becoming a challenge for medical profession. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly recommended but many disadvantages of these drugs are being reported, particularly when used for long term. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of acid reflux. Gastric distention in upper stomach is the strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In an earlier cases report, two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between was suggested as a remedy for GERD. Present pilot study was conducted on 20 patients with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis (Los Angles Grade a, b or c), who followed our advice to take meal twice a day with consumption of only soft drinks (fruit juices, tea, coffee, water, etc) in between and no medication for two weeks. On 14th day 15 patients (75%) were free of reflux symptoms, 2 (10%) had partial improvement and 3 (15%) reported no difference. It is concluded that two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between, whenever the patient feels hungry or thirsty, is a useful dietary regimen for the management of GERD. Further investigations are needed to confirm the benefits of this physiological lifestyle change. PMID:26408867

  6. Effect of natural polyphenols (Pycnogenol) on oxidative stress markers in children suffering from Crohn's disease--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koláček, M; Muchová, J; Dvořáková, M; Paduchová, Z; Žitňanová, I; Čierna, I; Országhová, Z; Székyová, D; Jajcaiová-Zedníčková, N; Kovács, L; Ďuračková, Z

    2013-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a nonspecific, chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. It is supposed that in etiopathogenesis oxidative stress (OS) plays a role. However, its precise role in the active and non-active states of disease is not known yet. We conducted a pilot study focusing on the relationship between OS of CD in remission and the possibility to influence clinical parameters and markers of OS by polyphenolic extract, Pycnogenol® (Pyc). Compared to 15 healthy controls 15 pediatric CD patients (all were in remission according to their disease activity index - PCDAI) had reduced the activity of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and increased the oxidative damage to proteins. We found negative correlations between markers of inflammation (calprotectin, CRP) as well as between PCDAI and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Activities of antioxidant enzymes, SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) negatively correlated with calprotectin and PCDAI. Pyc (2 mg/kg) positively influenced the parameters of OS in CD patients after 10 weeks of administration. PMID:23710677

  7. Metabolomic analysis of breath volatile organic compounds reveals unique breathprints in children with inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nisha; Alkhouri, Naim; Eng, Katharine; Cikach, Frank; Mahajan, Lori; Yan, Chen; Grove, David; Rome, Ellen S.; Lopez, Rocio; Dweik, Raed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breath testing is becoming an important diagnostic method to evaluate many disease states. In light of rising healthcare costs, is important to develop a simple non-invasive tool to potentially identify pediatric patients who need endoscopy for suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim The primary aim of this study was to analyze exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to evaluate for the presence of a unique breath pattern to differentiate pediatric patients with (IBD) from healthy controls. Methods A cross-sectional, single-center study included pediatric IBD patients and healthy controls (age range, 5-21 years). The diagnosis of IBD was confirmed by endoscopic, histologic, and radiographic data. Exhaled breath was collected and analyzed using a selective ion flow tube mass spectroscopy (SIFT-MS) to identify new markers or patterns of IBD. Results 117 patients (62 with IBD and 55 healthy controls) were included in the study. Linear discriminant analysis and principle component analysis of mass scanning ion peak data demonstrated 21 pre-selected VOCs correctly classify patients with IBD or as healthy controls; p < 0.0001. Multivariable logistic regression analysis further showed 3 specific VOCs (1-octene, 1-decene, (E)-2-nonene) had excellent accuracy for predicting the presence of IBD with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.96 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.99). No significant difference in VOCs was found between patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and no significant correlation was seen with disease activity. Conclusion This pilot data supports the hypothesis that a unique breathprint potentially exists for pediatric IBD in the exhaled metabolome. PMID:25041596

  8. Pre-emptive therapy of acute graft-versus-host disease: a pilot study with antithymocyte globulin (ATG).

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Oneto, R; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Romagnani, C; Bruno, B; Van Lint, M T; Frassoni, F

    2001-12-01

    We have previously shown that patients at high risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and transplant-related mortality (TRM) can be identified on day +7 following an allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), based on serum bilirubin and blood urea nitrogen levels. One possible approach to reduce the risk of GVHD and TRM, is pre-emptive treatment with T cell antibodies. We report a pilot study testing the feasibility of this approach in 18 high risk patients, with a median age of 41, 83% of whom had advanced disease, undergoing an alternative donor BMT (family mismatched in five and unrelated in 13). The patients received three doses of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) (Thymoglobuline; Sangstat) 1.25 mg/kg on alternate days, starting at a median interval of 11 days (range 7-13) after BMT. Controls were 20 historical unrelated donor transplants (median age 35, 63% with advanced disease), with a high score from our original publication in 1999. The actuarial 1 year TRM of the ATG-treated patients was 40% compared to 60% for untreated controls (P = 0.06). Severe grade III-IV aGVHD developed in 27% of the ATG-treated patients, and in 55% of the controls (P = 0.08). This study indicates that early pre-emptive treatment of aGVHD in day +7 high risk patients is feasible and may lead to a reduction of aGVHD and TRM. This approach is being tested in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:11803348

  9. Effect of zoledronic acid on bone mineral density in patients of celiac disease: A prospective, randomized, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukul; Rastogi, Ashu; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Bhansali, Anil; Vaiphei, Kim; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: The symptoms of celiac disease (CD) are varied and metabolic bone disease (MBD) is less recognized amongst all manifestations in CD patients. Bone disease in CD is attributed to secondary hyperparathyroidism, which in turn is associated with increased bone remodelling. Improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) with gluten free diet (GFD) is known, but the data on efficacy of bisphosphonates in CD patients are limited. Bisphosphonates being a potent inhibitor of bone resorption may be useful in patients with CD having low BMD. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of zoledronic acid on BMD in CD patients. Methods: A total of 28 CD patients were randomized to receive GFD, calcium and cholecalciferol (group A), and zoledronic acid (group B). Baseline biochemical tests and T-score by dual energy x-ray absorptiometer were done and repeated after 12 months. Results: The T-score showed improvement in the control arm (group A) from -3.31 ± 1.46 to -2.12 ± 1.44, a gain of 35.9 per cent (P<0.05) and in drug arm (group B) -2.82 ± 1.27 to -1.06 ± 1.84, registering a gain of 62.4 per cent (P<0.001). However, there was no difference in improvement of T-score in zoledronic acid group as compared to the control group. Interpretation & conclusions: Administration of zoledronic acid was not found to be better than GFD alone in increasing BMD in CD patients with low BMD in this pilot study. PMID:24521630

  10. The association between dental and periodontal diseases and sickle cell disease. A pilot case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Haidar; Al-Jawad, Abdulfatah; Al-Shayeb, Mahdi; Al-Ali, Ali; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa

    2014-01-01

    Objective This is a pilot case-control study conducted to investigate the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease and examine the possible association between oral health deterioration and SCD severity in a sample of Saudi SCD patients residing in the city of Al-Qatif, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods Dental examination to determine the Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth index (DMFT), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and plaque index system were recorded for 33 SCD patients and 33 age and sex-matched controls in the Al-Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia. Self-administered surveys used to assess socio-economic status; oral health behaviors for both SCD patients and controls were recorded. In addition, the disease severity index was established for all patients with SCD. SPSS data analysis software package version 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. Numerical variables were described as mean with a standard deviation. Results Decayed teeth were significantly more in individuals with ages ranging from 18 to 38 years with SCD compared to the control group (p = 0.036) due to oral hygiene negligence. The mean number of filled teeth was significantly lower in individuals with SCD when compared to the control group (p = 0.015) due to the lack of appropriate and timely treatment reflected in the survey responses of SCD patients as 15.2% only taking oral care during hospitalization. There were differences between the cases and controls in the known caries risk factors such as income level, flossing, and brushing habit. The DMFT, CPI, and plaque index systems did not differ significantly between the SCD patients and the control group. Conclusion Data suggest that patients with SCD have increased susceptibility to dental caries, with a higher prevalence of tooth decay and lower prevalence of filled teeth. Known caries risk factors influenced oral health more markedly than did factors related to SCD. PMID:25544813

  11. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Intravenous Zoledronic Acid in Malignant Pleural Disease: A Proof of Principle Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Clive, Amelia O.; Hooper, Clare E.; Edey, Anthony J.; Morley, Anna J.; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Hall, David; Lyburn, Iain; White, Paul; Braybrooke, Jeremy P.; Sequeiros, Iara; Lyen, Stephen M.; Milton, Tim; Kahan, Brennan C.; Maskell, Nick A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal studies have shown Zoledronic Acid (ZA) may diminish pleural fluid accumulation and tumour bulk in malignant pleural disease (MPD). We performed a pilot study to evaluate its effects in humans. Methods We undertook a single centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with MPD. Patients were randomised (1:1) to receive 2 doses of intravenous ZA or placebo, 3 weeks apart and were followed-up for 6 weeks. The co-primary outcomes were change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score measured breathlessness during trial follow-up and change in the initial area under the curve (iAUC) on thoracic Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) from randomisation to week 5. Multiple secondary endpoints were also evaluated. Results Between January 2010 and May 2013, 30 patients were enrolled, 24 randomised and 4 withdrew after randomisation (1 withdrew consent; 3 had a clinical decline). At baseline, the ZA group were more breathless, had more advanced disease on radiology and worse quality of life than the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regards change in breathlessness (Adjusted mean difference (AMD) 4.16 (95%CI −4.7 to 13.0)) or change in DCE-MRI iAUC (AMD −15.4 (95%CI −58.1 to 27.3). Two of nine (22%) in the ZA arm had a >10% improvement by modified RECIST (vs 0/11 who received placebo). There was no significant difference in quality of life measured by the QLQ-C30 score (global QOL: AMD -4.1 (-13.0 to 4.9)), side effects or serious adverse event rates. Conclusions This is the first human study to evaluate ZA in MPD. The study is limited by small numbers and imbalanced baseline characteristics. Although no convincing treatment effect was identified, potential benefits for specific subgroups of patients cannot be excluded. This study provides important information regarding the feasibility of future trials to evaluate the effects of ZA further. Trial Registration UK Clinical

  12. Short-term effects of the DASH diet in adults with moderate chronic kidney disease: a pilot feeding study

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Crystal C.; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Corsino, Leonor; Batch, Bryan C.; Allen, Jenifer; Sapp, Shelly; Barnhart, Huiman; Nwankwo, Chinazo; Burroughs, Jasmine; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet lowers blood pressure (BP) for adults with normal kidney function, evidence is lacking regarding its safety and efficacy in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to test the effects of the DASH diet on serum electrolytes and BP in adults with moderate CKD. Methods In a prospective before–after feeding study, 11 adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2 and medication-treated hypertension were provided a reduced-sodium, run-in diet for 1 week followed by a reduced-sodium, DASH diet for 2 weeks. Changes in serum electrolytes and BP were compared pre–post DASH. Results Eleven participants underwent feeding; 1 completed 1 week and 10 completed 2 weeks of DASH. Compared with baseline, DASH modestly increased serum potassium at 1 week (mean ± standard deviation, +0.28 ± 0.4 mg/dL; P = 0.043) but had no significant effect on potassium at 2 weeks (+0.15 ± 0.28 mg/dL; P = 0.13). Serum bicarbonate was reduced (−2.5 ± 3.0 mg/dL; P = 0.03) at 2 weeks. Neither incident hyperkalemia nor new onset metabolic acidosis was observed. Clinic BP and mean 24-h ambulatory BP was unchanged. DASH significantly reduced mean nighttime BP (−5.3 ± 5.8 mmHg; P = 0.018), and enhanced percent declines in both nocturnal systolic BP (−2.1% to −5.1%; P = 0.004) and diastolic BP (−3.7% to −10.0%; P = 0.008). Conclusions These pilot data suggest that a reduced-sodium DASH dietary pattern does not cause acute metabolic events in adults with moderate CKD and may improve nocturnal BP. Definitive studies are needed to determine long-term effects of DASH in CKD. PMID:27478603

  13. Text Messaging to Motivate Exercise Among Latino Adults at Risk for Vascular Disease: A Pilot Study, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Frank; Ablah, Elizabeth; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Cupertino, Paula; Rogers, Nicole; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, we administered a 15-item survey to determine the extent of text message usage among Latino adults in Kansas; for a subset of the survey participants, we also conducted a 6-week pilot trial to determine the effect of text messaging on exercise behaviors. Among the 82 survey participants, 78% had unlimited text messaging. At baseline, all trial participants were at the stage of contemplation; at 6 weeks, one (9%) trial participant remained at the contemplation stage and the other 10 (91%) participants progressed to the action/maintenance/termination stage. Use of text messaging to motivate exercise is feasible and potentially efficacious among Latinos. PMID:25357260

  14. Pilot Training Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, William E.

    The purpose of the Pilot Training Study is to produce tools with which to analyze the pilot training process of the Air Force in terms of the resources required to train pilots and the cost of pilot training. These tools allow examination of the training courses themselves, and also of the policy factors which drive the need for pilots. The tools…

  15. BEMER Therapy Combined with Physiotherapy in Patients with Musculoskeletal Diseases: A Randomised, Controlled Double Blind Follow-Up Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gyulai, Franciska; Rába, Katalin; Baranyai, Ildikó; Berkes, Enikő; Bender, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study evaluates the effect of adjuvant BEMER therapy in patients with knee arthrosis and chronic low back pain in a randomized double blind design. Methods. A total of 50 patients with chronic low back pain and 50 patients with osteoarthritis of knee took part in this study and were randomized into 4 groups. Hospitalized patients received a standardized physiotherapy package for 3 weeks followed by BEMER therapy or placebo. Results. In patients with low back pain, the comparison of the results obtained at the first and second visit showed a significant improvement in resting VAS scores and Fatigue Scale scores. The Oswestry scores and Quality of Life Scale scores showed no change. In patients with knee arthrosis, the comparison of the first and second measurements showed no significant improvement in the abovementioned parameters, while the comparison of the first and third scores revealed a significant improvement in the Fatigue Scale scores and in the vitality test on the Quality of Life Scale. Conclusions. Our study showed that BEMER physical vascular therapy reduced pain and fatigue in the short term in patients with chronic low back pain, while long-term therapy appears to be beneficial in patients with osteoarthritis of knee. PMID:26078768

  16. BEMER Therapy Combined with Physiotherapy in Patients with Musculoskeletal Diseases: A Randomised, Controlled Double Blind Follow-Up Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gyulai, Franciska; Rába, Katalin; Baranyai, Ildikó; Berkes, Enikő; Bender, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study evaluates the effect of adjuvant BEMER therapy in patients with knee arthrosis and chronic low back pain in a randomized double blind design. Methods. A total of 50 patients with chronic low back pain and 50 patients with osteoarthritis of knee took part in this study and were randomized into 4 groups. Hospitalized patients received a standardized physiotherapy package for 3 weeks followed by BEMER therapy or placebo. Results. In patients with low back pain, the comparison of the results obtained at the first and second visit showed a significant improvement in resting VAS scores and Fatigue Scale scores. The Oswestry scores and Quality of Life Scale scores showed no change. In patients with knee arthrosis, the comparison of the first and second measurements showed no significant improvement in the abovementioned parameters, while the comparison of the first and third scores revealed a significant improvement in the Fatigue Scale scores and in the vitality test on the Quality of Life Scale. Conclusions. Our study showed that BEMER physical vascular therapy reduced pain and fatigue in the short term in patients with chronic low back pain, while long-term therapy appears to be beneficial in patients with osteoarthritis of knee. PMID:26078768

  17. Ginger Supplementation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahimlou, Mehran; Yari, Zahra; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Keshavarz, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver diseases worldwide. The pathogenesis of this disease is closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Ginger can have hypolipidemic and antioxidant effects, and act as an insulinsensitizer. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ginger supplementation in NAFLD management. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 44 patients with NAFLD were assigned to take either two grams per day of a ginger supplement or the identical placebo, for 12 weeks. In both groups, patients were advised to follow a modified diet and physical activity program. The metabolic parameters and indicators of liver damage were measured at study baseline and after the 12 week intervention. Results: Ginger supplementation resulted in a significant reduction in alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transferase, inflammatory cytokines, as well as the insulin resistance index and hepatic steatosis grade in comparison to the placebo. We did not find any significant effect of taking ginger supplements on hepatic fibrosis and aspartate aminotransferase. Conclusions: Twelve weeks of two grams of ginger supplementation showed beneficial effects on some NAFLD characteristics. Further studies are recommended to assess the long-term supplementation effects. PMID:27110262

  18. Evaluation of inflammation-related genes polymorphisms in Mexican with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Toral-Rios, Danira; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar; Mena-Barranco, Francisco; Carvajal-García, Rosa; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid peptide is able to promote the activation of microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and this stimulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inflammation contributes to the process of neurodegeneration and therefore is a key factor in the development of AD. Some of the most important proteins involved in AD inflammation are: clusterin (CLU), complement receptor 1 (CR1), C reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), the interleukins 1α (IL-1α), 6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). In particular, COX-2 is encoded by the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 gene (PTGS2). Since variations in the genes that encode these proteins may modify gene expression or function, it is important to investigate whether these variations may change the developing AD. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of polymorphisms in the genes encoding the aforementioned proteins is associated in Mexican patients with AD. Fourteen polymorphisms were genotyped in 96 subjects with AD and 100 controls; the differences in allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were analyzed. Additionally, an ancestry analysis was conducted to exclude differences in genetic ancestry among groups as a confounding factor in the study. Significant differences in frequencies between AD and controls were found for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs20417 within the PTGS2 gene. Ancestry analysis revealed no significant differences in the ancestry of the compared groups, and the association was significant even after adjustment for ancestry and correction for multiple testing, which strengthens the validity of the results. We conclude that this polymorphism plays an important role in the development of the AD pathology and further studies are required, including their proteins. PMID:26041990

  19. Efficacy of focal mechanic vibration treatment on balance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Camerota, F; Germanotta, M; Di Sipio, E; Celletti, C; Padua, L

    2016-07-01

    Patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease experience an impaired balance. Although the causes of the postural instability are not fully understood, somatosensory system seems to play a key role. Mechanical vibration seems to act on the somatosensory system and to improve its function. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of focal mechanical vibration (fMV) on the balance of CMT 1A patients. We enrolled 14 genetically confirmed CMT 1A patients (8 female and 6 male, mean age 492 years, range 32-74, mean duration of disease: 13 years, range 1-30). Patients underwent a 3-day fMV treatment on quadriceps and triceps surae and were evaluated before the treatment as well as 1 week and 1 month after the end of the treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the secondary were the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 6 Min Walking Test (6MWT), the muscular strength of lower limbs, the Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the stabilometric variables. The statistical analysis showed a significant modification of the BBS due to the effect of treatment (p < 0.05). A significant modification was also found in the DGI (p < 0.05). Concerning the stabilometric variables we found significant changes only for the eyes closed condition; in particular, a significant decrease was found in VelocityML (p < 0.05) and Sway path length (p < 0.05). The fMV treatment applied on lower limbs of CMT 1A patients determined an improvement of balance as detected by the BBS. The concurrent improvement of stabilometric variables in the eyes closed condition only suggests that fMV acts mostly on somatosensory afferences. Further studies are needed to confirm these data on a larger sample of CMT patients. PMID:27177999

  20. Effects of a formal exercise program on Parkinson’s disease: A pilot study using a delayed start design

    PubMed Central

    Park, A.; Zid, D.; Russell, J.; Malone, A.; Rendon, A.; Wehr, A.; Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Increasing evidence shows that physical exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor symptoms of PD, and animal models suggest that it may help slow progression of disease. Methods Using a randomized delayed-start design, 31 patients were randomized to an early start group (ESG) or a delayed start group (DSG) exercise program. The ESG underwent a rigorous formal group exercise program for 1 h, three days/week, for 48 weeks (November 2011–October 2012). The DSG participated in this identical exercise program from weeks 24–48. Outcome measures included the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Walking Test (get-up-and-go), Tinetti Mobility Test, PDQ-39 Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Results There was minimal attrition in this study, with only one patient dropping out. Results did not show improvement in total UPDRS scores with early exercise. At week 48, the mean change from baseline total UPDRS score was 6.33 in the ESG versus 5.13 in the DSG (p = 0.58). However, patients randomized to the ESG scored significantly better on the Beck Depression Inventory, with a mean improvement of 1.07 points relative to those in the DSG (p = 0.04). Conclusions The findings demonstrate that long-term, group exercise programs are feasible in the Parkinson’s disease population, with excellent adherence and minimal drop out. While the outcome measures used in our study did not provide strong evidence that exercise has a neuroprotective effect on motor function, earlier participation in a group exercise program had a significant effect on symptoms of depression. PMID:24209458

  1. Memantine for axial signs in Parkinson's disease: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Caroline; Delval, Arnaud; Tiffreau, Vincent; Defebvre, Luc; Dujardin, Kathy; Duhamel, Alain; Petyt, Gregory; Hossein-Foucher, Claude; Blum, David; Sablonnière, Bernard; Schraen, Susanna; Allorge, Delphine; Destée, Alain; Bordet, Régis; Devos, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that memantine is thought to decrease N-methyl-D-aspartic-acid-related (NMDA) glutamatergic hyperactivity and improve locomotion in rats, we sought to assess the drug's impact on axial symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods We performed a 90-day, randomised, double-blind, study with two parallel arms: 20 mg/day memantine versus placebo (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01108029). The main inclusion criterion was the presence of a severe gait disorder and an abnormal, forward-leaning stance. The following parameters were analysed under standardised conditions before and after acute administration of L-dopa: gait (stride length as primary criterion), the United-Parkinson's-Disease-Rating-Scale (UPDRS) motor score and its axial subscore, the hypertonia and strength of the axial extensors and flexors (isokinetic dynamometer), the Dyskinesia Rating Scale score (DRS) and its axial subscore. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The memantine and placebo group did not differ significantly in terms of stride length. However, in the memantine group, we observed significantly better results (vs placebo) for the overall UPDRS score (F(1,21)=4.9; p=0.039(−1)) and its axial subscore (F(1,21)=7.2; p=0.014(−1.1)), axial hypertonia, the axial and overall DRS and axial strength. Conclusions Memantine treatment was associated with lower axial motor symptom and dyskinesia scores but did not improve gait. These benefits must be confirmed in a broader population of patients. PMID:23077087

  2. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  3. Corneal Epithelial Immune Dendritic Cell Alterations in Subtypes of Dry Eye Disease: A Pilot In Vivo Confocal Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Rahimi Darabad, Raheleh; Cruzat, Andrea; Hajrasouliha, Amir Reza; Witkin, Deborah; Wong, Nadia; Dana, Reza; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate density and morphology of corneal epithelial immune dendritic cells (DCs) in different subtypes of dry eye disease (DED) using in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods This retrospective study included 59 eyes of 37 patients with DED and 40 eyes of 20 age-matched healthy controls. Based on clinical tests, eyes with DED were categorized into two subtypes: aqueous-deficient (n = 35) and evaporative (n = 24). For all subjects, images of laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the central cornea were analyzed for DC density and DC morphology (DC size, number of dendrites, and DC field). These DC parameters were compared among all dry eye and control groups. Results Compared with the controls, patients with DED had significantly higher DC density, larger DC size, higher number of dendrites, and larger DC field (all P < 0.001). Comparison between aqueous-deficient and evaporative subtypes demonstrated that DC density was significantly higher in aqueous-deficient subtype (189.8 ± 36.9 vs. 58.9 ± 9.4 cells/mm2, P = 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in morphologic parameters between DED subtypes. When aqueous-deficient DED with underlying systemic immune disease (Sjögren's syndrome and graft versus host disease) were compared with nonimmune conditions, the immunologic subgroup showed significantly higher DC density, DC size, and number of dendrites (all P < 0.05). Conclusions Corneal IVCM demonstrated differential changes in DC density and morphologic DC parameters between subtypes of DED. These changes, which reflect the degree of immune activation and inflammation in DED, can be used for clinical practice and endpoints in clinical trials. PMID:26540656

  4. Association of tibia lead and blood lead with end-stage renal disease: A pilot study of African-Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Muntner, Paul . E-mail: pmuntner@tulane.edu; Menke, Andy; Batuman, Vecihi; Rabito, Felicia A.; He Jiang; Todd, Andrew C.

    2007-07-15

    The association between body lead burden and kidney disease remains controversial. Fifty-five African-American end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cases and 53 age- and sex-matched African-American controls without known renal disease were recruited from Tulane University-affiliated dialysis clinics and out-patient clinics, respectively. Blood lead was measured via atomic absorption spectrophotometry and tibia lead (a measure of body lead) was measured via {sup 109}Cd-based K shell X-ray fluorescence. Median blood lead levels were significantly higher among ESRD cases (6 {mu}g/dL) compared to their control counterparts (3 {mu}g/dL; P<0.001). Although no participants had overt lead poisoning (blood lead {>=}25 {mu}g/dL), seven cases but no controls had blood lead levels above 10 {mu}g/dL (P=0.006). The median tibia lead level was 17 micrograms of lead per gram of bone mineral ({mu}g/g) and 13 {mu}g/g among ESRD cases and their control counterparts, respectively (P=0.134). Four ESRD cases (7%), but no controls, had a tibia lead level above 40 {mu}g/g (P=0.115) while a similar proportion of cases and controls had tibia lead between 20 and 39 {mu}g/g (33% and 32%, respectively; P=0.726). After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios of ESRD associated with a tibia lead {>=}20 {mu}g/g and each four-fold higher tibia lead (e.g., 5-20 {mu}g/g) were 1.55 (95% CI: 0.55, 4.41) and 1.88 (95% CI: 0.53, 6.68), respectively. These findings support the need for prospective cohort studies of body lead burden and renal disease progression.

  5. Effects of Metformin, Pioglitazone, and Silymarin Treatment on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghamohammadi, Ali Akbar; Ziaee, Amir; Oveisi, Sonia; Masroor, Homa

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common reasons of enzyme increase in liver. In About 10 percent of patients with NAFLD, the disease progresses toward Non Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) and about one third of them may progress toward cirrhosis, liver dysfunction, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Objectives According to high prevalence of NAFLD and the fact that there is no consensus on treatment of this disease, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of metformin, pioglitazone, and silymarin on treatment of NAFLD. Patients and Methods Sixty six patients with NAFLD who were presented in the Endocrinology and Metabolism clinic of Boo’ali Hospital, Qazvin, Iran, were assigned randomly into three groups (n = 22). First group was treated by pioglitazone 15 mg/d, second group by metformin 500 mg/d, and third group by silymarin 140 mg/d. All patients underwent clinical and biochemical evaluations including weight, fasting blood sugar (FBS), lipid profiles, body mass index (BMI), aspartate aminotransferase (AST ), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and serum insulin levels in pre- and post-intervention after eight-week follow up. Results Before the treatment there was no significant difference between three groups with respect to average age, BMI and gender, FBS, lipid profile, AST, ALT, serum insulin level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index for insulin resistance. After the intervention, a significant reduction was observed in average amount of FBS, lipid profile, ALT, AST, serum insulin level and HOMA index in three groups (P < 0.01). The most reduction in average FBS, TG, serum insulin level, and HOMA index was observed in pioglitazone group, the most reduction in average amount of cholesterol was seen in metformin group, and the most decrease in average amount of AST and ALT occurred in silymarin group. Conclusions These results suggest that all drugs are beneficial in improving biochemical indices in

  6. Human herpesvirus-6 has no apparent influence on course of HCV hepatitis, but may complicate HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Julieta; Simoes, Patricia; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Humberto, Cruz Ortiz; Ramon, Albert M

    2003-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is a widespread virus with occasional reactivation and a potential hepatotropism. The present study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of HHV-6 reactivation in viral (HCV, HBV) and alcoholic liver diseases and its implication for the course of the primary disease. Serological and immunohistochemical tests were done to document viral activity, hepatocellular apoptosis or proliferation, and autoantibody formation. While the course of HCV remains apparently uninfluenced by HHV-6, HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease show a higher incidence of autoantibody formation if HHV-6 is present. The data of this pilot study warrant more extensive investigations of the clinical pathology of HHV-6 in liver diseases. PMID:12655786

  7. Comparison of psychological functioning in children and their mothers living through a life-threatening and non life-threatening chronic disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Sonia; Rossi, Angela; Spano, Barbara; Petrocchi, Michela; Biondi, Gianni; Ammaniti, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Childhood chronic illness is a potential source of distress and can be a traumatic experience both for the child and for the family. Several studies highlighted the importance of integrating psychosocial care and standard medical practice in the child's care. The current pilot study is the first investigation that compared distress in children and their mothers living through a life-threatening illness (cancer) and a non life-threatening (juvenile rheumatoid arthritis) chronic disease. Findings show that there are differences in the psychological functioning in children with respect to age. Moreover, the presence of posttraumatic stress symptoms in mothers of children with cancer seems to be a possible key to understanding the psychological response in this specific population. PMID:25561695

  8. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G.; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score. PMID:27347222

  9. Pilot study of non-contrast-enhanced MRI vs. ultrasound in renal transplant recipients with acquired cystic kidney disease: a prospective intra-individual comparison.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Anja S; Lange, Christian; Kroll, Gisela; Floege, Jürgen; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane; Eitner, Frank; Schrading, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after kidney transplantation is 15-fold increased. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is one of the known risk factors. We performed a small pilot study to assess the role of non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for intensified screening in renal transplant recipients with ACKD. Renal ultrasound was used to assess the native kidneys of 215 renal transplant recipients. Thirty patients with 54 kidneys, fulfilling the criteria of ACKD, underwent non-enhanced MRI at 1.5T using T2- and T1-weighed as well as diffusion-weighted sequences with a high spatial resolution. Among the 54 kidneys assessed by both methods, three RCCs were identified (6%). Of those, one RCC was detected by both imaging methods (33%), while two RCCs were diagnosed by MRI alone (67%). MRI identified an additional four proteinaceous or hemorrhagic cysts that did not fulfill the criteria for RCC but were classified as suspicious. All of these lesions were stable in size and appearance in follow-up studies. In conclusion, non-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than ultrasound in identifying RCCs and lesions suspicious for RCC and thus appears to be a useful secondary screening tool in patients with ACKD after renal transplantation. PMID:24118352

  10. Effects of Sodium Thiosulfate on Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease: A Pilot Study of Feasibility, Safety and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Santhosh Jay; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Podaralla, Prashanth; Cabellon, Anton; Zheng, Sijie; Bierhals, Andrew; Spence, Karen; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Delmez, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Vascular calcification is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis. The objective of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of sodium thiosulfate (STS) in the progression of vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients. Methods Chronic hemodialysis patients underwent a battery of cardiovascular tests. Those with coronary artery calcium (Agatston scores >50) received intravenous STS after each dialysis for 5 months (n = 22) and the tests were repeated. Changes in MDCT-determined calcification were assessed as the mean annualized rate of change in 3 vascular beds (coronary, thoracic and carotid arteries) and in L1-L2 vertebral bone density. Results Although individual analyses showed coronary artery calcification progression in 14/22 subjects, there was no progression in the mean annualized rate of change of vascular calcification in the entire group. The L1-L2 vertebral bone density showed no changes. There were no correlations between rates of progression of vascular calcification and phosphorus, fetuin or C-reactive protein levels. Changes in coronary artery calcification scores correlated with those of the thoracic aorta. Conclusion STS treatment is feasible, appears safe and may decrease the rate of progression of vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients. A large, randomized, controlled trial is warranted. PMID:21242673

  11. Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders – Alzheimer's Disease: A Pilot Study of a Practice Redesign Intervention to Improve the Quality of Dementia Care

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, David B.; Roth, Carol P.; Frank, Janet C.; Hirsch, Susan H.; Katz, Diane; McCreath, Heather; Younger, Jon; Murawski, Marta; Edgerly, Elizabeth; Maher, Joanne; Maslow, Katie; Wenger, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a practice redesign intervention coupled with referral to local Alzheimer's Association chapters can improve the quality of dementia care. Design Pre-post intervention Setting Two community-based physician practices Participants Five physicians in each practice and their patients age 75 and older with dementia Intervention Adaptation of the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE)-2 intervention (screening, efficient collection of clinical data, medical record prompts, patient education/empowerment materials, and physician decision support/education). In addition, physicians faxed referral forms to local Alzheimer's Association chapters who assessed patients, provided counseling and education, and faxed information back to the physicians. Measurements Audits of pre- (5 per physician) and post- (10 per physician) intervention medical records using ACOVE-3 quality indicators for dementia to measure the quality of care provided. Results Based on 47 pre- and 90 post-intervention audits, the percentage of quality indicators satisfied rose from 38% to 46% with significant differences on quality indicators measuring the assessment of functional status (20% versus 51%), discussion of risk/benefits of antipsychotics (32% versus 100%), and counseling caregivers (2% versus 30%). Referral of patients to Alzheimer's Association chapters increased from 0 to 17%. Referred patients had higher quality scores (65% versus 41%) and better counseling about driving (50% versus 14%), caregiver counseling (100% versus 15%) and surrogate decision-maker specification (75% versus 44%). However, some quality indicators related to cognitive assessment and examination did not improve. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that a practice-based intervention can increase referral to AA chapters and improve quality of dementia care. PMID:20374405

  12. The hepatoprotective and hypolipidemic effects of Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) supplementation in a Cretan population with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mazokopakis, Elias E.; Papadomanolaki, Maria G.; Fousteris, Andreas A.; Kotsiris, Dimitrios A.; Lampadakis, Ioannis M.; Ganotakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Background A pilot study was conducted to determine the effects of Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) on Cretan patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Spirulina is a filamentous cyanobacterium taken as a dietary supplement. Methods Fifteen adult Cretan outpatients (13 men), median age 48 (range: 29-62) years, with NAFLD were orally supplemented with 6 g of Spirulina (Greek production) per day for six months. Anthropometric characteristics (height, weight, waist circumference), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, complete blood count, biochemical assessments, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, health-related quality of life and abdominal sonographic findings were recorded and measured, before and after Spirulina supplementation. Results At the end of the 6-month intervention period, the mean levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly decreased: 38.5%, 37.5%, 26.7%, 24.8%, 9.6%, 9.1%, and 13.5% respectively, whereas the mean levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and hemoglobin were significantly increased: 4.2% and 4.1% respectively. Spirulina supplementation resulted also in a significant reduction in weight and HOMA-IR index (8.1% and 19.6% respectively) and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life scale. No changes in sonographic findings were observed. Conclusion Spirulina supplementation at a high dosage of 6 g daily in NAFLD patients has strong and multiple beneficial metabolic effects and improves their health-related quality of life. PMID:25331487

  13. Prognostic value of cardiovascular MR imaging biomarkers on outcome in peripheral arterial disease: a 6-year follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Harrie; Westenberg, Jos; Setz-Pels, Wikke; Kersten, Erik; Tielbeek, Alexander; Duijm, Lucien; Post, Johannes; Teijink, Joep; de Roos, Albert

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore the prognostic value of outcome of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging biomarkers in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in comparison with traditional risk factors. Forty-two consecutive patients (mean age 64 ± 11 years, 22 men) referred for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) were included. At baseline a comprehensive cardiovascular MRI examination was performed: CE-MRA of the infra-renal aorta and run-off vessels, carotid vessel wall imaging, cardiac cine imaging and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment. Patients were categorized for outcome at 72 ± 5 months follow-up. One patient was lost to follow-up. Over 6 years, six patients had died (mortality rate 14.6 %), six patients (14.6 %) had experienced a cardiac event and three patients (7.3 %) a cerebral event. The mean MRA stenosis class (i.e., average stenosis severity visually scored over 27 standardized segments) was a significant independent predictor for all-cause mortality (beta 3.0 ± standard error 1.3, p = 0.02). Descending aorta PWV, age and diabetes mellitus were interrelated with stenosis severity but none of these were significant independent predictors. For cardiac morbidity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and mean MRA stenosis class were associated, but only LVEF was a significant independent predictor (beta -0.14 ± 0.05, p = 0.005). Diabetes mellitus was a significant independent predictor for cerebral morbidity (beta 2.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.03). Significant independent predictors for outcome in PAD are mean MRA stenosis class for all-cause mortality, LVEF for cardiac morbidity and diabetes mellitus for cerebral morbidity. PMID:27209283

  14. Yoga Therapy Decreases Dyspnea-Related Distress and Improves Functional Performance in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Donesky-Cuenco, DorAnne; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Paul, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There has been limited study of yoga training as a complementary exercise strategy to manage the symptom of dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Purpose The primary purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a yoga program for its safety, feasibility, and efficacy for decreasing dyspnea intensity (DI) and dyspnea-related distress (DD) in older adults with COPD. Methods Clinically stable patients with COPD (n = 29; age 69.9 ± 9.5; forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 47.7 ± 15.6% predicted; female = 21) were randomized to a 12-week yoga program specifically designed for people with COPD or usual-care control (UC). The twice-weekly yoga program included asanas (yoga postures) and visama vritti pranayama (timed breathing). Safety measure outcomes included heart rate, oxygen saturation, dyspnea, and pain. Feasibility was measured by patient-reported enjoyment, difficulty, and adherence to yoga sessions. At baseline and at 12 weeks, DI and DD were measured during incremental cycle ergometry and a 6-minute walk (6MW) test. Secondary efficacy outcomes included physical performance, psychologic well-being, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Results Yoga training was safe and feasible for patients with COPD. While yoga training had only small effects on DI after the 6MW test (effect size [ES], 0.20; p = 0.60), there were greater reductions in DD in the yoga group compared to UC (ES, 0.67; p = 0.08). Yoga training also improved 6MW distance (+71.7 ± 21.8 feet versus −27.6 ± 36.2 feet; ES = 0.78, p = 0.04) and self-reported functional performance (ES = 0.79, p = 0.04) compared to UC. There were small positive changes in muscle strength and HRQoL. Conclusions Elderly patients with COPD participated safely in a 12-week yoga program especially designed for patients with this chronic illness. After the program, the subjects tolerated more activity with less

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  16. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  17. The Pilot Training Study: Advanced Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, P. J.

    An overview is presented of advanced pilot training and of the formal advanced pilot training program that constitutes the primary means of providing this training. Section I deals with the various phases of advanced pilot training that a pilot may encounter during his career; Section II deals with the types of aircraft that require some form of…

  18. Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging Detects Microstructural Alterations in Brain of α-Synuclein Overexpressing Transgenic Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Amit; Latta, Peter; Drazanova, Eva; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana; Szabó, Nikoletta; Arab, Anas; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Sulcova, Alexandra; Starcuk, Zenon; Rektorova, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) will provide a sensitive tool for differentiating between α-synuclein-overexpressing transgenic mouse model of PD (TNWT-61) and wild-type (WT) littermates. This experiment was designed as a proof-of-concept study and forms a part of a complex protocol and ongoing translational research. Nine-month-old TNWT-61 mice and age-matched WT littermates underwent behavioral tests to monitor motor impairment and MRI scanning using 9.4 Tesla system in vivo. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and the DKI protocol were used to compare the whole brain white matter of TNWT-61 and WT mice. In addition, region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in gray matter regions such as substantia nigra, striatum, hippocampus, sensorimotor cortex, and thalamus known to show higher accumulation of α-synuclein. For the ROI analysis, both DKI (6 b-values) protocol and conventional (2 b-values) diffusion tensor imaging (cDTI) protocol were used. TNWT-61 mice showed significant impairment of motor coordination. With the DKI protocol, mean, axial, and radial kurtosis were found to be significantly elevated, whereas mean and radial diffusivity were decreased in the TNWT-61 group compared to that in the WT controls with both TBSS and ROI analysis. With the cDTI protocol, the ROI analysis showed decrease in all diffusivity parameters in TNWT-61 mice. The current study provides evidence that DKI by providing both kurtosis and diffusivity parameters gives unique information that is complementary to cDTI for in vivo detection of pathological changes that underlie PD-like symptomatology in TNWT-61 mouse model of PD. This result is a crucial step in search for a candidate diagnostic biomarker with translational potential and relevance for human studies. PMID:26153486

  19. Measuring the effect of an eight-week adaptive yoga program on the physical and psychological status of individuals with Parkinson's disease. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Boulgarides, L K; Barakatt, E; Coleman-Salgado, B

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects muscle tone, strength, flexibility, motor control, psychological outlook, cognition, and function. Exercise has been found to improve physical ability and psychological outlook, but the effect of yoga on individuals with PD has not been well researched. The purposes of this study were to identify outcome measures that were responsive to change in individuals with PD after an 8-week adaptive yoga program and to determine appropriate sample sizes for future studies. In a repeated measures design, 10 participants with a Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2 or 3 were tested prior to and after an 8-week control phase and again after they underwent an 8-week adaptive yoga program. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests revealed differences in time of measure that approached significance for the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (p = 0.008) and the 30-Second Chair Stand (TSCS) (p = 0.013). The interaction between time of measure and gender approached significance for the Sit-and-Reach Test (SRT) (p = 0.08 and 0.03, right and left respectively), with male participants improving in sit-and-reach flexibility compared with female participants after intervention. The interaction between time of measure and age approached significance for the Single-Leg Balance test (SLB) (p = 0.007), with younger participants improving in SLB time after intervention. Power calculations found that a sample size ranging from 33 to 153 would be required to achieve significance at the 0.01 level in the various outcome measures in a future study of this design. The depression subscale of the HADS, the TSCS, the SLB, and the right and left SRT were the measures that changed following the yoga intervention and are recommended as outcome measures in future studies investigating the effectiveness of yoga for individuals with PD. This preliminary study supports further investigation of adaptive yoga using a

  20. Short- and long-term effects of tactile massage on salivary cortisol concentrations in Parkinson’s disease: a randomised controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with limited knowledge about the normal function and effects of non-pharmacological therapies on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of the study was to analyse the basal diurnal and total secretion of salivary cortisol in short- and long-term aspects of tactile massage (TM). Methods Design: Prospective, Controlled and Randomised Multicentre Trial. Setting and interventions: Forty-five women and men, aged 50–79 years, were recruited. Twenty-nine of them were blindly randomised to tactile massage (TM) and 16 of them to the control group, rest to music (RTM). Ten interventions were given during 8 weeks followed by a 26 weeks of follow up. Salivary cortisol was collected at 8 am, 1 pm, 8 pm, and 8 am the next day, on five occasions. With the first and eighth interventions, it was collected immediately before and after intervention. Main outcome measures: The primary aim was to assess and compare cortisol concentrations before and immediately after intervention and also during the follow-up period. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration and severity of PD, effects of interventional time-point of the day, and levodopa doses on cortisol concentration. Results The median cortisol concentrations for all participants were 16.0, 5.8, 2.8, and 14.0 nmol/L at baseline, later reproduced four times without significant differences. Cortisol concentrations decreased significantly after TM intervention but no change in diurnal salivary cortisol pattern was found. The findings of reduced salivary cortisol concentrations immediately after the interventions are in agreement with previous studies. However, there was no significant difference between the TM and control groups. There were no significant correlations between cortisol concentrations and age, gender, BMI, time-point for intervention, time interval between anti

  1. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  2. ‘Kitchen and cooking,’ a serious game for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Petit, Pierre-David; Derreumaux, Alexandre; Orvieto, Ivan; Romagnoli, Matteo; Lyttle, Graham; David, Renaud; Robert, Philippe H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in employing serious games (SGs) for the assessment and rehabilitation of elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and related disorders. In the present study we examined the acceptability of ‘Kitchen and cooking’ – a SG developed in the context of the EU project VERVE (http://www.verveconsortium.eu/) – in these populations. In this game a cooking plot is employed to assess and stimulate executive functions (such as planning abilities) and praxis. The game is installed on a tablet, to be flexibly employed at home and in nursing homes. Twenty one elderly participants (9 MCI and 12 AD, including 14 outpatients and 7 patients living in nursing homes, as well as 11 apathetic and 10 non-apathetic) took part in a 1-month trail, including a clinical and neuropsychological assessment, and 4-week training where the participants were free to play as long as they wanted on a personal tablet. During the training, participants met once a week with a clinician in order to fill in self-report questionnaires assessing their overall game experience (including acceptability, motivation, and perceived emotions). The results of the self reports and of the data concerning game performance (e.g., time spent playing, number of errors, etc) confirm the overall acceptability of Kitchen and cooking for both patients with MCI and patients with AD and related disorders, and the utility to employ it for training purposes. Interestingly, the results confirm that the game is adapted also to apathetic patients. PMID:25852542

  3. CD14 C-159T polymorphism and its association with chronic lung diseases: A pilot study on isocyanate exposed population of Central India

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Protiti; Bathri, Rashmi; De, Sajal; Maudar, K. K.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: CD14 functions as a multifunctional receptor for bacterial cell wall components including endotoxin and lipopolysaccharide and is likely to influence the cytokine profile and subsequent immunoglobulin E production in response to antigen/allergen contact in allergic phenotypes. AIMS: The present study was to investigate genetic polymorphism in CD14 gene - 159C/T, which may be one of the risk factor for increased prevalence of Chronic Lung Diseases in the Central India. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Survivors of Methyl isocyanates toxicity in Bhopal still suffering from various respiratory ailments were examined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed to determine the polymorphism of C-159T. RESULTS: The genotype and allelic frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg’s equilibrium. Prevalence of CC, CT, and TT were 5.5%, 22.2% and 9.25% respectively in asthmatics; 16.6%, 20.3% and 5.5% respectively in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 5.5%, 14.8% and 1.85 respectively among interstitial lung disorder (ILD) patients; whereas the control cohort with no methyl isocyanate exposure displayed (CC, CT, and TT) cytosine, thymine as 2%, 1.6% and 2% respectively. Increased risk of Asthma among those carrying TT genotype and T allele (odds ratio [OR] =2.61 and 2.02 respectively). CONCLUSION: COPD risk significantly found among those with CC genotype and C allele (OR = 2.81 and 1.50 respectively), whereas ILD risk found significantly among CT genotype and C allele (OR = 1.75 and 1.40 respectively). Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C-159T polymorphism in CD14 gene might be a risk factor for development of CLD in this population. PMID:24019621

  4. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  7. MELBOURNE HIGH SCHOOL PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BESVINICK, SIDNEY L.; CRITTENDEN, JOHN

    TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE GRADUATES OF MELBOURNE HIGH SCHOOL, IN BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA, WERE SUFFICIENTLY DIFFERENT FROM GRADUATES OF ANOTHER HIGH SCHOOL IN THE SAME DISTRICT TO WARRANT FURTHER RESEARCH, A PILOT STUDY WAS CONDUCTED. MELBOURNE HAS RECEIVED ACCLAIM FOR ITS NONGRADED, CONTINUOUS PROGRESS, INNOVATIVE CURRICULUM AND FOR THE NUMEROUS…

  8. Rehabilitation Education: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kolk, Charles; Jaques, Marceline E.

    1972-01-01

    The presentation of undergraduate courses in rehabilitation could serve several purposes: (a) preparation for graduate level work; (b) training for support personnel; and (c) interdisciplinary education. This article describes a pilot study of a course in rehabilitation to investigate through pre- and post measures, attitude change, attainment of…

  9. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
. PMID:25806886

  10. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, A.; Moses, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station (ISS) and other space vehicles Caution & Warning (C&W) alerts are represented with various auditory tones that correspond to the type of event. This system relies on the crew's ability to remember what each tone represents in a high stress, high workload environment when responding to the alert. Furthermore, crew receive a year or more in advance of the mission that makes remembering the semantic meaning of the alerts more difficult. The current system works for missions conducted close to Earth where ground operators can assist as needed. On long duration missions, however, they will need to work off-nominal events autonomously. There is evidence that speech alarms may be easier and faster to recognize, especially during an off-nominal event. The Information Presentation Directed Research Project (FY07-FY09) funded by the Human Research Program included several studies investigating C&W alerts. The studies evaluated tone alerts currently in use with NASA flight deck displays along with candidate speech alerts. A follow-on study used four types of speech alerts to investigate how quickly various types of auditory alerts with and without a speech component - either at the beginning or at the end of the tone - can be identified. Even though crew were familiar with the tone alert from training or direct mission experience, alerts starting with a speech component were identified faster than alerts starting with a tone. The current study replicated the results from the previous study in a more rigorous experimental design to determine if the candidate speech alarms are ready for transition to operations or if more research is needed. Four types of alarms (caution, warning, fire, and depressurization) were presented to participants in both tone and speech formats in laboratory settings and later in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA). In the laboratory study, the alerts were presented by software and participants were

  11. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  12. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  13. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  14. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  15. Pulsed ATRA as single therapy restores long-term remission in PML-RARalpha-positive acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: real time quantification of minimal residual disease. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Visani, G; Buonamici, S; Malagola, M; Isidori, A; Piccaluga, P P; Martinelli, G; Ottaviani, E; Grafone, T; Baccarani, M; Tura, S

    2001-11-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), alone or combined with chemotherapy (CHT) is widely used to induce complete remission (CR) in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). If used alone, ATRA results in a substantial proportion of CRs. To maintain remission further, ATRA is commonly used with cycles of CHT, frequently followed by autologous (auto) or allogeneic (allo) stem cell transplantation (SCT), as early reports have shown that the continuous administration of ATRA as single therapy almost invariably leads to relapse in a short period of time (months). Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that induced resistance to ATRA is frequently suppressed by the intermittent use of the drug. In this study we applied an intermittent therapeutic protocol with ATRA in five APL patients who were either molecularly refractory after combined ATRA/CHT treatment, or relapsed, or at diagnosis, but not eligible for the combination treatment because of previous toxicity. They were treated with ATRA (45 mg/m2/day) for 21 days. The treatment was then prolonged continuously for 1 week every 2 weeks. Molecular analysis was performed by qualitative and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All patients obtained molecular remission, as assessed by qualitative RT-PCR, in a median of 3 months (range 1-15). Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed these data, showing a progressive reduction (1 or 2 logs) to a 'negligible quantity' of PML-RARalpha fusion transcript (ratio PML-RARalpha/ABL x 10(4) ABL < 10(-1)) in all but one patient treated with pulsed ATRA therapy. These data were confirmed with qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR. After a median follow-up of 17 months from the start of ATRA therapy, 4/5 patients (80%) are in continuous complete molecular remission. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical observation that intermittent ATRA therapy (without chemotherapy) is effective not only in inducing but also in maintaining long-term molecular remission in

  16. Patterns in Womanpower: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansl, Eva vB.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a pilot study conducted 25 years ago assessing challenges facing women who want to combine career, marriage, and family responsibilities. Study obtained case histories of 100 trained women whose study and/or work experience had been deflected by family responsibilities. Found a high quality of educated womanpower was latent. (Author/KS)

  17. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  18. Conducting a pilot study: case study of a novice researcher.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Pilot studies play a vital role in health research, but are often misused, mistreated and misrepresented. A well-conducted pilot study with clear aims and objectives within a formal framework ensures methodological rigour, can lead to higher-quality research and scientifically valid work that is publishable and can benefit patients and health service delivery. A pilot study contributes valuable information to assist researchers in the conduct of their study. Conducting a pilot study provides the researcher with the opportunity to develop and enhance the skills necessary before commencing the larger study. By conducting a pilot the researcher obtains preliminary data, can evaluate their data-analysis method and clarify the financial and human resources required. This article presents an overview of pilot studies, why they are conducted, what to consider when reporting pilot studies and the authors' experience of conducting a pilot study. To conduct a successful study, researchers need to develop their skills, choose the right methods and carefully plan for all aspects of the process. PMID:26618678

  19. NEW IMMIGRANT SURVEY: A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal aim of this work is to provide accurate data about immigrants and their families, including children, with regard to their economic, social, and political adaptation to the United States. This pilot study of a substantial sample of foreign-born respondents is expect...

  20. Handwashing Programme in Kindergarten: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, W. H.; Suen, L. K. P.; Kwok, Y. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured programme on handwashing which has taken into account of the developmental stage of children. Design/methodology/approach: This is a pilot study using a structured handwashing programme as intervention. The intervention group (n=15) receives the structured…

  1. Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgon, J. R.

    A New Zealand pilot study examined Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) scores compared to PAT: Reading Comprehension scores and compared with teacher ratings. TORCH is a reading test package published in 1987 by the Australian Council for Educational Research. It consists of 14 untimed passages intended to assess the extent to which readers in…

  2. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  3. Psychiatrically hospitalized college students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosecan, A S; Goldberg, R L; Wise, T N

    1992-07-01

    This pilot study presents data on an underreported group: college students who require psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study is too small to sustain broad generalizations, the authors found indications of significant correlations between students' hospitalization and the academic cycle, substance abuse, and distance from home. It is hoped that other institutions will undertake similar studies of this group of students to provide a broader body of data from which to draw inferences regarding prevention, intervention, and psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:1506564

  4. BIOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT STUDY PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  5. Image processing of angiograms: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L. E.; Evans, R. A.; Roehm, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The technology transfer application this report describes is the result of a pilot study of image-processing methods applied to the image enhancement, coding, and analysis of arteriograms. Angiography is a subspecialty of radiology that employs the introduction of media with high X-ray absorption into arteries in order to study vessel pathology as well as to infer disease of the organs supplied by the vessel in question.

  6. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Providing a web-based digital information management system of information for scientists and the public, including a system that supports the work of those officials who must make decisions that affect the state of the bay. The Tampa Bay Study is in its sixth year and will continue through September 2007. This paper presents a non-inclusive summary of key findings associated with the six primary project components listed above. Component 4 (above) is described in detail in the following chapter 13. More information on the Tampa Bay Study is available from our on-line digital information system for the Tampa Bay Study at http://gulfsci.usgs.gov.

  7. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  8. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  9. Pre-Study Walkthrough with a Commercial Pilot for a Preliminary Single Pilot Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor-Dreher, Ryan; Roberts, Z.; Ziccardi, J.; Vu, K-P. L.; Strybel, T.; Koteskey, Robert William; Lachter, Joel B.; Vi Dao, Quang; Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, V.

    2013-01-01

    The number of crew members in commercial flights has decreased to two members, down from the five-member crew required 50 years ago. One question of interest is whether the crew should be reduced to one pilot. In order to determine the critical factors involved in safely transitioning to a single pilot, research must examine whether any performance deficits arise with the loss of a crew member. With a concrete understanding of the cognitive and behavioral role of a co-pilot, aeronautical technologies and procedures can be developed that make up for the removal of the second aircrew member. The current project describes a pre-study walkthrough process that can be used to help in the development of scenarios for testing future concepts and technologies for single pilot operations. Qualitative information regarding the tasks performed by the pilots can be extracted with this technique and adapted for future investigations of single pilot operations.

  10. Probing the Process of Information Source Selection Using Palm Pilots: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik

    2002-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using PDAs (personal digital assistants or palm pilots) as a data collection device in studying information seeking behaviors of undergraduate students. Discusses results that shows heavy use of Internet search engines and that most information searches do not extend beyond the first…

  11. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A pilot study of a spaceborne sidelooking radar is summarized. The results of the system trade studies are given along with the electrical parameters for the proposed subsystems. The mechanical aspects, packaging, thermal control and dynamics of the proposed design are presented. Details of the data processor are given. A system is described that allows the data from a pass over the U. S. to be in hard copy form within two hours. Also included are the proposed schedule, work breakdown structure, and cost estimate.

  12. NORTHWEST ORGEON PILOT STUDY AREA (USA): THE USE OF LANDSCAPE SCIENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northwest Oregon Pilot Study Area encompasses approximately 59,167 km2 and varies in elevation from sea level to 3,200 m. Annual precipitation varies with elevation and meridian and ranges from 25 - 460cm. The study area comprises a mixture of federal, state, and privately ow...

  13. A Piloted Simulation Study of Wake Turbulence on Final Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1998-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been conducted in a research simulator to provide a means to estimate the effects of different levels of wake turbulence on final approach. A worst-case methodology was used to ensure conservative estimates. Fourteen airline pilots voluntarily participated in the study and flew almost 1000 approaches. The pilots rated the subjective severity of the disturbances using a special rating scale developed for this study. Several objective measures of the airplane/pilot response to the simulated wake turbulence were also made. All the data showed a large amount of variation between pilots and to a lesser extent for a given pilot. Therefore, the data were presented at 50, 70, 90 percentile levels as a function of vortex strength. The data allow estimates of the vortex strength for a given subjective or objective response and vice versa. The results of this study appear to be more conservative than the results of previous studies.

  14. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  15. Piloted studies of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision display parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several studies conducted at Langley Research Center over the past few years. The purposes of these studies were to investigate parameters of pictorial displays and imaging sensors that affect pilot approach and landing performance. Pictorial displays have demonstrated exceptional tracking performance and improved the pilots' spatial awareness. Stereopsis cueing improved pilot flight performance and reduced pilot stress. Sensor image parameters such as increased field-of-view. faster image update rate, and aiding symbology improved flare initiation. Finer image resolution and magnification improved attitude control performance parameters.

  16. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODS DEVELOPMENT PILOTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are needed to link exposure with health effects. EPA began methods development pilot studies in 2000 to address general questions about exposures and outcome measures. Selected pilot studies are highlighted in this poster. The “Literature Re...

  17. Subjective sleep problems in Huntington's disease: A pilot investigation of the relationship to brain structure, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric function.

    PubMed

    Baker, Chaya Rochel; Domínguez D, Juan F; Stout, Julie C; Gabery, Sanaz; Churchyard, Andrew; Chua, Phyllis; Egan, Gary F; Petersén, Åsa; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Poudel, Govinda R

    2016-05-15

    Subjective reports of sleep disturbance are a common feature of Huntington's disease (HD); however, there is limited research investigating the relationship between sleep problems with changes in brain and behaviour. This study aimed to investigate whether subjective reports of sleep problems in HD are associated with brain volume, neurocognitive decline, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. This retrospective pilot study used brain volume, neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric data from premanifest (pre-HD) and symptomatic HD (symp-HD). Subjective sleep problem was measured using the sleep item of the Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Pre-HD individuals reporting sleep problems had significantly poorer neuropsychiatric outcomes compared to those not reporting sleep problems. In the symp-HD group, those with sleep problems had significantly accelerated thalamic degeneration and poorer neuropsychiatric outcomes compared to those without sleep problems. There was no relationship between subjective sleep problems and neurocognitive measures. These findings suggest an association between subjective sleep disturbance, neuropathology, and development of neuropsychiatric symptoms in HD. Further studies using quantitative EEG-based monitoring of sleep in HD and changes in the brain and behaviour will be necessary to establish the causal nature of this relationship. PMID:27084236

  18. Hypericum for fatigue - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Dixon, M; Ernst, E

    1998-12-01

    Fatigue is a common reason for consulting a doctor but there is no definitive treatment. Hypericum perforatum has been shown to reduce symptoms of fatigue in depressed patients. It therefore may have potential value as a remedy for fatigue of unexplained origin. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effect of Hypericum on fatigue in a small group of patients in order to formulate a hypothesis upon which a randomized controlled trial could be subsequently based. The study protocol followed an uncontrolled, open design. Twenty patients consulting their doctors complaining of fatigue were treated with Hypericum extract (3×1 tablet daily) for six weeks. Compared to baseline values, perceived fatigue was significantly lower after 2 weeks of treatment and reduced significantly further after 6 weeks. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were also reduced. Baseline scores suggested that nearly half the sample may have been depressed at the start of the trial which was possibly related to fatigue. These results suggest there is scope for conducting a randomized placebo-controlled trial to investigate the specific effect of Hypericum on fatigue and that the study design must take account of the role of depression in fatigue. PMID:23196027

  19. [Mobbing in nursing. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Fornés Vives, Joana; Reinés Femenia, Joan; Sureda García, Catalina

    2004-09-01

    While planning to help shed light on the phenomenon of mobbing in the work place and to develop an instrument by which to measure it, the authors carried out a pilot study in which 160 persons from varying professional classes and autonomous communities in Spain participated, 65 of whom were nurses whose ages lie between 20 and 48 years, with a medium age of 33.98. By means of a factorial analysis, the authors discovered that the most common mobbing practices are grouped in a set of eight factors; these eight factors cover 74.17% of all the various factors. The two most significant factors refer to behaviors which can be considered to be personal humiliation and professional discredit. The most common mobbing practice, according to the overall findings of this study group, consists in providing contradictory information to the victim (19.4% once or more times per week), while in nursing, this practice consists of exposing the victim to criticism by the group (50%). PMID:15526573

  20. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  1. Uranium-contaminated soil pilot treatment study

    SciTech Connect

    Turney, W.R.J.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Michelotti, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot treatment study is proving to be effective for the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil from a site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by use of a two-step, zero-discharge, 100% recycle system. Candidate uranium-contaminated soils were characterized for uranium content, uranium speciation, organic content, size fractionization, and pH. Geochemical computer codes were used to forecast possible uranium leach scenarios. Uranium contamination was not homogenous throughout the soil. In the first step, following excavation, the soil was sorted by use of the ThemoNuclean Services segmented gate system. Following the sorting, uranium-contaminated soil was remediated in a containerized vat leach process by use of sodium-bicarbonate leach solution. Leach solution containing uranium-carbonate complexes is to be treated by use of ion-exchange media and then recycled. Following the treatment process the ion exchange media will be disposed of in an approved low-level radioactive landfill. It is anticipated that treated soils will meet Department of Energy site closure guidelines, and will be given {open_quotes}no further action{close_quotes} status. Treated soils are to be returned to the excavation site. A volume reduction of contaminated soils will successfully be achieved by the treatment process. Cost of the treatment (per cubic meter) is comparable or less than other current popular methods of uranium-contamination remediation.

  2. Coal log pipeline pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Lenau, C.W.; Burkett, W.

    2000-07-01

    After 8 years of extensive R and D in the new technology of coal log pipeline (CLP), a pilot plant is being built to demonstrate and test a complete CLP system for coal transportation. The system consists of a coal log fabrication plant, a 3,000-ft-length, 6-inch-diameter underground pipeline loop to transport 5.4-inch diameter coal logs, a log injection/ejection system, a pump bypass, a reservoir that serves as both the intake and the outlet of the CLP systems, an instrumentation system that includes pressure transducers, coal log sensors, and flowmeters, and an automatic control system that includes PLCs and a central computer. The pilot plant is to be completed in May of Year 2000. Upon completion of construction, the pilot plant will be used for running various types of coal, testing the degradation rate of drag reduction in CLP using Polyox (polyethylene oxide), testing the reliability of a special coal log sensor invented at the University of Missouri, testing the reliability and the efficiency of the pump-bypass system for pumping coal log trains through the pipe, and testing various hardware components and software for operating the pilot plant. Data collected from the tests will be used for designing future commercial systems of CLP. The pilot plant experiments are to be completed in two years. Then, the technology of CLP will be ready for commercial use.

  3. Magnetoencephalography to investigate central perception of exercise-induced breathlessness in people with chronic lung disease: a feasibility pilot

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Miriam J; Simpson, Michael IG; Currow, David C; Millman, Rebecca E; Hart, Simon P; Green, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuroimaging in chronic breathlessness is challenging. The study objective was to test the feasibility of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for functional neuroimaging of people with chronic breathlessness. Design Feasibility pilot study. Setting Respiratory clinic out-patients. Participants 8 patients (mean age=62; (range 47–83); 4 men) with chronic non-malignant lung disease; modified MRC breathlessness score ≥3 (median mMRC=4), intensity of exercise-induced breathlessness >3/10; no contraindication to MRI scanning. Methods and measures 4 MEG scans were conducted for each participant: (1) at rest (5 mins), (2) postseated leg exercise-induced breathlessness during recovery (10 mins). Recovery scans (2) were conducted with/without facial airflow in random order; both scans were repeated 1 h later. Participants rated breathlessness intensity (0–10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) at baseline, maximal exertion and every minute during recovery, and rated acceptability of study procedures at the end of the study (0–10 NRS). A structural MRI scan was conducted for MEG coregistration and source-space analyses. Rest data were compared with data from healthy volunteers (N=6; 5 men; mean age=30.7 years±3.9 years). Results Exercises and MEG scanning were acceptable to all participants; 7/8 completed the MRI scans. Maximum breathlessness intensity was induced by 5 min’ exercise. The same level was induced for repeat scans (median=8; IQR=7–8). All recovered to baseline by 10 min. Time-frequency profiles of data from the first and last 3 min were analysed in MEG source space based on breathlessness location estimates. Source localisation was performed, but anatomical source inference was limited to the level of the lobe. Differences in areas of activity were seen: during recovery scans; with and without airflow; and between participants/normal volunteers at rest. Conclusions MEG is a feasible method to investigate exercise-induced breathlessness

  4. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  5. Folates in lettuce: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Madelene; Jägerstad, Margaretha; Frølich, Wenche

    2007-01-01

    Background Leafy vegetables are good sources of folates and food shops nowadays offer an increasing number of lettuce varieties. Objective To obtain data on the folate content and forms in common lettuce varieties and spinach sold in the Nordic countries, and to investigate effects of different storage conditions and preparations in the consumer's home or at lunchtime restaurants. Design Folate was analysed in eight different lettuce varieties and spinach using a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method and the detected forms of folates were confirmed by a mass spectrometric detector [liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS)] following heat extraction, deconjugation with rat serum and purification by solid-phase extraction. Results Folate content, expressed in folic acid equivalents, in the lettuce samples varied six-fold, from 30 to 198 µg 100 g−1 on a fresh weight basis. The folate content was decreased by 14% after storage at 4°C for 8 days and by 2–40% after storage at 22°C for 2–4 h, depending on whether samples were stored as whole leaves, or small torn or cut pieces. LC-MS confirmed the identity of the folate forms: H4folate, 5-CH3-H4folate, 5-HCO-H4folate and 10-HCO-H4folate. Conclusion The considerable variation in folate content between varieties of lettuce in this pilot study, with one variety reaching the level found in spinach, indicates the potential to increase folate intake considerably by choosing folate-rich varieties of lettuce and storing at low temperatures.

  6. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SOIL STABILIZATION PILOT STUDY, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY AND HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a project plan for a pilot study at the United Chrome NPL site, Corvallis, Oregon and includes the health and safety and quality assurance/quality control plans. The plan reports results of a bench-scale study of the treatment process as iieasured by the ...

  7. Recommendations for planning pilot studies in clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Moore, Charity G; Carter, Rickey E; Nietert, Paul J; Stewart, Paul W

    2011-10-01

    Advances in clinical and translation science are facilitated by building on prior knowledge gained through experimentation and observation. In the context of drug development, preclinical studies are followed by a progression of phase I through phase IV clinical trials. At each step, the study design and statistical strategies are framed around research questions that are prerequisites for the next phase. In other types of biomedical research, pilot studies are used for gathering preliminary support for the next research step. However, the phrase "pilot study" is liberally applied to projects with little or no funding, characteristic of studies with poorly developed research proposals, and usually conducted with no detailed thought of the subsequent study. In this article, we present a rigorous definition of a pilot study, offer recommendations for the design, analysis and sample size justification of pilot studies in clinical and translational research, and emphasize the important role that well-designed pilot studies play in the advancement of science and scientific careers. PMID:22029804

  8. Piloted simulation study of two tilt-wing control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1994-01-01

    A two-phase piloted simulation study was conducted to investigate alternative wing and flap controls for tilt-wing aircraft. The initial phase of the study compared the flying qualities of both a conventional (programmed) flap and an innovative geared flap. The second phase of the study introduced an alternate method of pilot control for the geared flap and further studied the flying qualities of the programmed flap, and two geared flap configurations. In general, the pilot rating showed little variation between the programmed flap and the geared flap control concepts. Some differences between the two concepts were noticed and are discussed in this paper. The addition of pitch attitude stabilization in the second phase of the study greatly enhanced the aircraft flying qualities. This paper describes the simulated tilt-wing aircraft and the flap control concepts and presents the results of both phases of the simulation study.

  9. STATISTICAL COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF TWO INDOOR AIR PILOT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to compare the results between two previous indoor air PAH monitoring studies conducted by EPA in 1984 and 1987. Both of the previous studies were pilot studies involving ambient and indoor air monitoring at a small number of residences in Columbus...

  10. THE EFFECT OF THERMAL ENVIRONMENT ON LEARNING, A PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PECCOLO, CHARLES

    THIS IS A REPORT OF A FIRST PILOT STUDY WHICH PRECEDES A SERIES OF STUDIES BEING CONDUCTED BY THE IOWA CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND LENNOX INDUSTRIES INC., MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA. IT IS A DIGEST OF A THESIS BY DR. CHARLES PECCOLO WHO SERVED AS RESEARCHER ON THIS FIRST STUDY. THE STUDY AIMED AT MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL…

  11. Pilot Biofeedback Training in the Cognitive Awareness Training Study (CATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenking, M.

    2000-01-01

    One of the ongoing problems that pilots face today is a diminished state of awareness such as boredom, sleepiness, or fatigue during cruise conditions that could result in various pilot errors. This study utilized a cognitive training exercise to sharpen the pilot's awareness during simulated flight thereby providing them with a means to overcome these diminished states of awareness. This study utilizes psychophysiological methods in an attempt to assess a pilot's state of awareness more directly. In turn, the pilots will be able to train themselves to recognize these states of awareness and be more mentally sharp during mundane tasks such as those experienced in cruise conditions. The use of these measurement tools may be beneficial for researchers working within the NASA Aviation Safety Program. This paper will provide the reader with some background information concerning the motivation for the study, a brief description of the experimental setup and design matrix, the dependent and independent variables that were employed, and some preliminary findings based on some of the subjective and objective data that was collected. These preliminary findings are of part of an ongoing study being conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

  12. Automatic Generation of Test Oracles - From Pilot Studies to Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Smith, Ben

    1998-01-01

    There is a trend towards the increased use of automation in V&V. Automation can yield savings in time and effort. For critical systems, where thorough V&V is required, these savings can be substantial. We describe a progression from pilot studies to development and use of V&V automation. We used pilot studies to ascertain opportunities for, and suitability of, automating various analyses whose results would contribute to V&V. These studies culminated in the development of an automatic generator of automated test oracles. This was then applied and extended in the course of testing an Al planning system that is a key component of an autonomous spacecraft.

  13. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to Enhance Dual-Task Gait Training in Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot RCT

    PubMed Central

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Lamont, Robyn M.; Brauer, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and safety of a combined anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and dual task gait training intervention in people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and to provide data to support a sample size calculation for a fully powered trial should trends of effectiveness be present. Design A pilot, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled parallel group trial with 12 week follow-up. Setting A university physiotherapy department. Interventions Sixteen participants diagnosed with PD received nine dual task gait training sessions over 3 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive either active or sham tDCS applied for the first 20 minutes of each session. Main Measures The primary outcome was gait speed while undertaking concurrent cognitive tasks (word lists, counting, conversation). Secondary measures included step length, cadence, Timed Up and Go, bradykinesia and motor speed. Results Gait speed, step length and cadence improved in both groups, under all dual task conditions. This effect was maintained at follow-up. There was no difference between the active and sham tDCS groups. Time taken to perform the TUGwords also improved, with no difference between groups. The active tDCS group did however increase their correct cognitive response rate during the TUGwords and TUGcount. Bradykinesia improved after training in both groups. Conclusion Three weeks of dual task gait training resulted in improved gait under dual task conditions, and bradykinesia, immediately following training and at 12 weeks follow-up. The only parameter enhanced by tDCS was the number of correct responses while performing the dual task TUG. tDCS applied to M1 may not be an effective adjunct to dual task gait training in PD. Trial Registration Australia-New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001093774 PMID:27359338

  14. 78 FR 52548 - The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study... Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study, 0925-0593, Expiration 8/31/2014--Revision, Eunice Kennedy Shriver... activities for the NCS Vanguard Study and receive a renewal of the Vanguard Study clearance. The NCS...

  15. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  16. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) The design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms and the current state-of-the-art understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. (2) Assimilation of laboratory core flood and rock consumption data. Use of this data in 1-D and 2-D limited area simulations, and a 3-D model of the entire pilot project. (3) Simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2-D area of the field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long term consumption functions and two relative permeability adjustment mechanisms. (4) Scale up of 2-D simulation results, and their use in a 271 acre 1.097 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 2/), 7 layered 3-D model of the pilot. (5) Comparison of 3-D simulator results with initial field alkaline flood performance. (6) Recommended additional application of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods. 10 refs.

  17. Will More Diversified Staffs Diversify Newspaper Content? A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; and Others

    A pilot study asked 94 students enrolled in introductory newswriting classes at three separate universities to evaluate 18 news stories. About half the stories concerned topics that proponents of multiculturalism have suggested would receive more emphasis if newspapers employed more women and minorities: topics such as breast cancer, divorce,…

  18. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS & PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Led by the United States, represented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes was instituted to create an international forum where current trends, developments, and expert...

  19. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  20. Outcome evaluation of a pilot study using "nudges"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every school day, over 31 million U.S. children eat school lunches. Unfortunately, students often do not choose the healthy options in the school cafeteria. This paper describes outcome results of a pilot study using "nudges" to improve elementary school students' fruits and vegetables selections. A...

  1. Results of the "In Control: No Alcohol!" Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mares, Suzanne H. W.; van der Vorst, Haske; Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E. E.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50% of Dutch 12-year olds already started drinking. Since it is known that delaying the onset of alcohol use results in a lower risk of alcohol-related problems, the recently developed "In control: No alcohol!" prevention program is targeted at elementary school children and their mothers. In this pilot study, the success of program…

  2. PILOT STUDY OF FLUORIDE AND ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot plant studies were conducted on the removal of fluoride and arsenic from potable water using activated alumina as the adsorbent. The tests were run using water from the community of Why, Arizona, that contained 3 mg/L fluoride and 0.15 mg/L arsenic. The experimental data sh...

  3. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  4. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  5. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  6. Community College Administrators and Faculty Scholarship: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshood, Nabil

    1995-01-01

    Describes a pilot study examining the attitudes of presidents and chief academic officers at the 19 New Jersey community colleges toward faculty scholarship. Indicates that although 81% of respondents were willing to offer more incentives for scholarship, 87% were unwilling to reduce teaching loads and 77% were unwilling to require scholarship.…

  7. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  8. Causes of Mortality among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The…

  9. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  10. Minesweeper and Hypothetical Thinking Action Research & Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research project and Pilot Study was designed and implemented to improve students' hypothetical thinking abilities by exploring the possibility that learning and playing the computer game Minesweeper may inherently help improve hypothetical thinking. One objective was to use educational tools to make it easier for students to learn the…

  11. Achieving Competence: Army-VOTEC School Partnership Pilot Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Mary W.

    To reduce Army training costs, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) investigated use of training at civilian secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical (VOTEC) institutions as an alternative to initial job training in Army service schools. Three models were used in the pilot study: the preservice training model in which…

  12. Job Rotation at Cardiff University Library Service: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earney, Sally; Martins, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents case study research of a job rotation pilot involving six library assistants in Cardiff University Library Service (ULS). Firstly, it investigates whether job rotation improves motivation and secondly, whether there is an improvement in skills, both technical and "soft". Following a review of the literature, semi-structured…

  13. Assessing Student Engagement: HSSSE Pilot Study with Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    NAIS and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation recently launched a three-year pilot study on the use of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) among independent schools. HSSSE, administered by Indiana University, is a survey designed to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of high school students about their work. This…

  14. Initial Scale Development: Sample Size for Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Brooks, Gordon P.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies are often recommended by scholars and consultants to address a variety of issues, including preliminary scale or instrument development. Specific concerns such as item difficulty, item discrimination, internal consistency, response rates, and parameter estimation in general are all relevant. Unfortunately, there is little discussion…

  15. [Treatment of spasticity with a transcutaneous neurostimulator. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, R; Jordt, M; Hansen, E

    1995-04-24

    In this pilot study the neurostimulator KDC 5000 is used with efficacy on seven out of 11 patients with spastic palsy, and treatment was given without any side-effects. No other treatment has sufficiently helped these patients, and we therefore conclude that such treatment with a neuro-stimulator could be beneficial for selected patients with spastic palsy of extremities. PMID:7762102

  16. CSO DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY: SPRING CREEK CSO STORAGE FACILITY UPGRADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research summary presents the results of a pilot-scale disinfection study performed for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under a contract to Camp Dresser & McKee of Woodbury, New York. The main ob...

  17. RESEARCH PLAN FOR PILOT STUDIES OF THE BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a research plan for an assessment of risks to biodiversity. he plan describes the theoretical basis of the research approach and the data and methods to be used in the assessment. nitial research activities are formulated as a set of pilot studies that will e...

  18. The CITRA Pilot Studies Program: Mentoring Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Wethington, Elaine; Breckman, Risa; Meador, Rhoda; Reid, M. Carrington; Sabir, Myra; Lachs, Mark; Pillemer, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We developed an innovative pilot studies program to foster partnerships between university researchers and agencies serving older people in New York City. The development of researchers willing to collaborate with frontline service agencies and service agencies ready to partner with researchers is critical for translating scientific research into evidence-based practice that benefits community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods We adapted the traditional academic pilot studies model to include key features of community-based participatory research. Results In partnership with a network of 265 senior centers and service agencies, we built a multistep program to recruit and educate scientific investigators and agencies in the principles of community-based research and to fund research partnerships that fulfilled essential elements of research translation from university to community: scientific rigor, sensitivity to community needs, and applicability to frontline practice. We also developed an educational and monitoring infrastructure to support projects. Implications Pilot studies programs developing community-based participatory research require an infrastructure that can supplement individual pilot investigator efforts with centralized resources to ensure proper implementation and dissemination of the research. The financial and time investment required to maintain programs such as those at the Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging, or CITRA, may be a barrier to establishing similar programs. PMID:18192638

  19. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  20. Dissolution Studies With Pilot Plant and Actual INTEC Calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Garn, Troy Gerry

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/ Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive A1(NO3)3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt. % of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt. % dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt. % dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  1. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated {gt}95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  2. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print. PMID:27209871

  3. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  4. Peyronie's disease: a case study with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D Eileen; Lofton, Susan P; Hale, Theresa; Durant, Norma; Grant, LaVerne F

    2008-04-01

    Peyronie's disease involves the development of fibrous plaques in the connective tissue of the penis usually near the dorsal midline of the penile shaft in middle-aged and older men. This case study describes a 57-year-old man who presented with a history of prostatitis and complaints of anxiety related to penile pain and erectile difficulties. The diagnostic work-up and clinical interaction are described. PMID:18488585

  5. Inflammatory Pathways in Parkinson's Disease; A BNE Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Durrenberger, Pascal. F.; Grünblatt, Edna; Fernando, Francesca S.; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Evans, Jordan; Riederer, Peter; Reynolds, Richard; Dexter, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The aetiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is yet to be fully understood but it is becoming more and more evident that neuronal cell death may be multifactorial in essence. The main focus of PD research is to better understand substantia nigra homeostasis disruption, particularly in relation to the wide-spread deposition of the aberrant protein α-synuclein. Microarray technology contributed towards PD research with several studies to date and one gene, ALDH1A1 (Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1), consistently reappeared across studies including the present study, highlighting dopamine (DA) metabolism dysfunction resulting in oxidative stress and most probably leading to neuronal cell death. Neuronal cell death leads to increased inflammation through the activation of astrocytes and microglia. Using our dataset, we aimed to isolate some of these pathways so to offer potential novel neuroprotective therapeutic avenues. To that effect our study has focused on the upregulation of P2X7 (purinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel, 7) receptor pathway (microglial activation) and on the NOS3 (nitric oxide synthase 3) pathway (angiogenesis). In summary, although the exact initiator of striatal DA neuronal cell death remains to be determined, based on our analysis, this event does not remain without consequence. Extracellular ATP and reactive astrocytes appear to be responsible for the activation of microglia which in turn release proinflammatory cytokines contributing further to the parkinsonian condition. In addition to tackling oxidative stress pathways we also suggest to reduce microglial and endothelial activation to support neuronal outgrowth. PMID:22548201

  6. Subregional Basal Forebrain Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kilimann, Ingo; Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopez; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; dos Santos, Gláucia Aparecida Bento; da Silva, Rafael Emídio; Mitchell, Alex J.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Filippi, Massimo; Hampel, Harald; Klöppel, Stefan; Teipel, Stefan J.

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological studies in Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest severe and region-specific neurodegeneration of the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS). Here, we studied the between-center reliability and diagnostic accuracy of MRI-based BFCS volumetry in a large multicenter data set, including participants with prodromal (n = 41) or clinically manifest AD (n = 134) and 148 cognitively healthy controls. Atrophy was determined using voxel-based and region-of-interest based analyses of high-dimensionally normalized MRI scans using a newly created map of the BFCS based on postmortem in cranio MRI and histology. The AD group showed significant volume reductions of all subregions of the BFCS, which were most pronounced in the posterior nucleus basalis Meynert (NbM). The mild cognitive impairment-AD group showed pronounced volume reductions in the posterior NbM, but preserved volumes of anterior-medial regions. Diagnostic accuracy of posterior NbM volume was superior to hippocampus volume in both groups, despite higher multicenter variability of the BFCS measurements. The data of our study suggest that BFCS morphometry may provide an emerging biomarker in AD. PMID:24503619

  7. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Broeckx, Sarah; Zimmerman, Marieke; Crocetti, Sara; Suls, Marc; Mariën, Tom; Ferguson, Stephen J; Chiers, Koen; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Wuertz, Karin; Spaas, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1) PRP; 2) MSCs; 3) MSCs and PRP; or 4) chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), 6 months (T3) and 12 months (T4) post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC) II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II) and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced) MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment. PMID:24465787

  8. Trazodone for Alzheimer's disease: a naturalistic follow-up study.

    PubMed

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Garre-Olmo, Josep; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Turon-Estrada, Antoni; Pericot-Nierga, Imma

    2008-01-01

    This study intended to provide a patient profile for trazodone (a triazolopyridine-derivative of phenylpiperazine) prescription in everyday clinical practice in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to describe clinical evaluation and the impact on caregiver burden at a 6-month follow-up. A naturalistic, prospective and observational study was performed, with a 6-month follow-up in 396 patients with probable AD, according to the NINCDS-ARDRA criteria. At the baseline and at the 6-month visit, patients were administered the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to determine their Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) to assess the impact on caregiver burden. Trazodone was prescribed for 6.1% of patients. With respect to the baseline visit, the untreated group showed an increased global NPI score (3.1 points; 95% CI=1.9-4.2; p=0.001) and ZBI score (2.2 points; 95% CI=0.9-3.4; p=0.001). At 6 months, the global NPI and ZBI scores remained unchanged for the treated group. The treated group showed a significant reduction in the NPI irritability subscale score (2.1 points; 95% CI=0.4-3.7; p=0.015). In the clinical practice, trazodone treatment was prescribed for patients with irritability, agitation and disinhibition. After 6 months, patients treated with trazodone exhibited no increase in BPSD frequency or severity, nor was an increase noted in the caregiver burden. PMID:17897735

  9. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia. PMID:26017202

  10. Radiation-induced renal disease. A clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Keane, W F; Crosson, J T; Staley, N A; Anderson, W R; Shapiro, F L

    1976-01-01

    Radiation injury to the renal parenchyma is an unusual cause of renal insufficiency. Light, immunofluorescence and electron microscopic studies were performed on the renal tissue from two patients in whom renal insufficiency developed within a year after they received abdominal irradiation. The glomerular lesion in both patients was similar. Mild endothelial cell swelling and basement membrane splitting were noted consistently on light microscopy. The electron microscopic examination revealed marked subendothelial expansion with electron-lucent material associated with deposition of basement membrane-like material adjacent to the endothelial cells. In some capillary loops, the endothelial cell lining appeared to be completely lost. The pathogenesis of radiation-induced renal injury is still uncertain. It is speculated that local activation of the coagulation system with consequent thrombosis of the renal microvasculature may be extremely important. PMID:1251842

  11. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  12. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  13. Levodopa and executive performance in Parkinson's disease: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Sedano, Berta; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Barbanoj, Manel; García-Sánchez, Carmen; Campolongo, Antonia; Gironell, Alexandre; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gich, Ignasi

    2008-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may experience fluctuations in executive performance after oral levodopa (LD). Their relationship with the pharmacokinetic profile of LD and with distinct cognitive processes associated with frontal-basal ganglia circuits is not well understood. In this randomized, double-blind, crossover study we plotted acute cognitive changes in 14 PD patients challenged with faster (immediate-release, IR) versus slower (controlled-release, CR) increases in LD plasma concentrations. We monitored motor status, LD plasma levels, and performance on four tasks of executive function (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-WCST, Sternberg test, Stroop and Tower of Hanoi), 1 hr before and over +6 hr after IR and CR-LD dose. Analysis of variance demonstrated significant but divergent changes in the Sternberg (6-digit but not 2- and 4-digit) test: improvement after CR-LD and worsening after IR-LD. Marginal improvement (p = .085) was observed with CR-LD in the WCST, while no significant differences were seen for the Stroop or Tower of Hanoi tests. Executive-related performance after LD challenge may differ depending on the LD time-to-peak plasma concentration and specific task demands. A slower rise in LD levels appears to have a more favorable impact on more difficult working memory tests. These results require replication to determine their generalization. PMID:18764978

  14. Assessing candidate serum biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Matthew; Schrag, Matthew; Mueller, Claudius; Zhou, Weidong; Crofton, Andrew; Petersen, Floyd; Dickson, April; Kirsch, Wolff M

    2012-01-01

    Because of the growing impact of late onset cognitive loss, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of improved diagnostic techniques for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that may pave the way for earlier (and more effective) therapeutic efforts. Serum-based biomarkers are the least expensive and invasive modality for screening and routine monitoring. We systematically reviewed the literature to assemble a list of serum biomarkers relevant to AD. In parallel, we conducted a proteomic LC-MS/MS analysis of serum collected from neurologically normal subjects and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early AD (n = 6 in all). Complement C3 and alpha-2-macroglobulin were identified from both the literature review and our proteomic screen for further validation. For these two candidates, ELISA was performed on serum collected from a small independent cohort of subjects for longitudinal analysis. Serum was serially collected from neurologically normal subjects (n = 5) and subjects with MCI who were subsequently followed for a period of two years (n = 5) and regrouped into stable MCI and progressive MCI or AD (n = 6). The ability of each marker to predict which subjects with MCI would progress to dementia and which would remain cognitively stable was assessed. Patients with probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy were also identified (n = 3). This preliminary analysis tested the most-promising serum protein biomarkers for AD and we concluded that none are yet ready for use in the clinical diagnosis and management of dementia. However, a more thorough assessment in longitudinal studies with higher statistical power is warranted. PMID:22426016

  15. Microsporidia and Its Relation to Crohn's Disease. A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Ballester, Juan C.; Garcia-Ballesteros, Carlos; Amigo, Victoria; Ballester, Ferran; Gil-Borrás, Rafael; Catalán-Serra, Ignacio; Magnet, Angela; Fenoy, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen; Ferrando-Marco, Jose; Cuéllar, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background The cause of Crohn's Disease (CD) remains unknown. Recently a decrease in the global lymphocyte population in the peripheral blood of CD patients has been reported. This decrease was more evident in γδ T lymphocytes, especially γδ CD8+T subsets. Furthermore, a decrease of IL-7 was also observed in these patients. We propose the hypothesis that microsporidia, an obligate intracellular opportunistic parasite recently related to fungi, in CD patients can take advantage of the lymphocytes and IL-7 deficits to proliferate and to contribute to the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods and Findings In this case-control study, serum samples were collected from 36 CD patients and from 36 healthy individuals (controls), IgE and IgG anti-Encephalitozoon antibodies were determined by ELISA; and forty-four intestinal tissue samples were analyzed through real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), twenty CD patients, nine with others diseases and 15 healthy subjects. We observed that IgE anti-Encephalitozoon levels were significantly higher in patients with CD: 0.386(±0.256) vs control group, 0.201(±0.147), P<0.001. However, IgG anti-Encephalitozoon values were significantly lower in CD patients: 0.361(±0.256) vs control group, 0.876(±0.380), P<0.001. In the group of CD patients, 6/20 (30%) were positive by real time PCR for microsporidia and, all the patients of the control group were negative by real time PCR. Conclusions These results suggest that CD patients are a group at risk for microsporidiasis and, moreover that microsporidia may be involved as a possible etiologic factor of CD. PMID:23637975

  16. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  17. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  18. Spinal patterns as predictors of personality profiles: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koren, T; Rosenwinkel, E

    1992-01-01

    The present pilot study is part of an ongoing effort to further the investigation of the relationship between spinal patterns and personality. The present pilot study seeks to identify likely spinal patterns of certain personality profiles and asks whether changing posture can affect personality, and/or can emotional states alter posture? Forty patients of a private chiropractic practice participated in the study. Four radiographs (x-rays) of each subject were taken and each subject completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Measurements obtained from the radiographs and the MMPI data were used to derive general linear models of the predictability of the MMPI in terms of the spinal/postural measures. Several models were highly significant and preliminary support for the authors' hypothesis that spinal patterns are likely to be predictive of personality profiles is suggested. Support for previous research is offered and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1428613

  19. Support for Students Exposed to Trauma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaycox, Lisa H.; Langley, Audra K.; Stein, Bradley D.; Wong, Marleen; Sharma, Priya; Scott, Molly; Schonlau, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of trauma exposure among students, the need for intervention programs is clear. Delivery of such programs in the school setting eliminates key barriers to access, but there are few programs that demonstrate efficacy in this setting. Programs to date have been designed for delivery by clinicians, who are a scarce resource in many schools. This study describes preliminary feasibility and acceptability data from a pilot study of a new program, Support for Students Exposed to Trauma, adapted from the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) program. Because of its “pilot” nature, all results from the study should be viewed as preliminary. Results show that the program can be implemented successfully by teachers and school counselors, with good satisfaction among students and parents. Pilot data show small reductions in symptoms among the students in the SSET program, suggesting that this program shows promise that warrants a full evaluation of effectiveness. PMID:20811511

  20. Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Mission: Human Research Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B. (Editor); Walker, Karen R. (Editor); Hargens, Alan (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Life Sciences, Microgravity Science and Spacelab Mission contains a number of human experiments directed toward identifying the functional, metabolic and neurological characteristics of muscle weakness and atrophy during space flight. To ensure the successful completion of the flight experiments, a ground-based pilot study, designed to mimic the flight protocols as closely as possible, was carried out in the head-down tilt bed rest model. This report records the rationales, procedures, preliminary results and estimated value of the pilot study, the first of its kind, for 12 of the 13 planned experiments in human research. The bed rest study was conducted in the Human Research Facility at Ames Research Center from July 11 - August 28, 1995. Eight healthy male volunteers performed the experiments before, during and after 17 days bed rest. The immediate purposes of this simulation were to integrate the experiments, provide data in a large enough sample for publication of results, enable investigators to review individual experiments in the framework of a multi-disciplinary study and relay the experience of the pilot study to the mission specialists prior to launch.

  1. Patient-Provider Interactions Affect Symptoms in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dossett, Michelle L.; Mu, Lin; Davis, Roger B.; Bell, Iris R.; Lembo, Anthony J.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Yeh, Gloria Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether the benefits that some patients derive from complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) are related to the therapies recommended or to the consultation process as some CIM provider visits are more involved than conventional medical visits. Many patients with gastrointestinal conditions seek out CIM therapies, and prior work has demonstrated that the quality of the patient-provider interaction can improve health outcomes in irritable bowel syndrome, however, the impact of this interaction on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is unknown. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of conducting a 2x2 factorial design study preliminarily exploring the impact of the patient-provider interaction, and the effect of an over-the-counter homeopathic product, Acidil, on symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with GERD. Methods 24 subjects with GERD-related symptoms were randomized in a 2x2 factorial design to receive 1) either a standard visit based on an empathic conventional primary care evaluation or an expanded visit with questions modeled after a CIM consultation and 2) either Acidil or placebo for two weeks. Subjects completed a daily GERD symptom diary and additional measures of symptom severity and health-related quality of life. Results There was no significant difference in GERD symptom severity between the Acidil and placebo groups from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.41), however, subjects who received the expanded visit were significantly more likely to report a 50% or greater improvement in symptom severity compared to subjects who received the standard visit (p = 0.01). Total consultation length, perceived empathy, and baseline beliefs in CIM were not associated with treatment outcomes. Conclusion An expanded patient-provider visit resulted in greater GERD symptom improvement than a standard empathic medical visit. CIM consultations may have enhanced placebo effects, and further studies to assess the

  2. Decreased Diversity of the Oral Microbiota of Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Chronic Liver Disease: A Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Cheng, Yiwen; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered gut microbiota is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus-induced chronic liver disease (HBV-CLD). However, the structure and composition of the oral microbiota of patients with HBV-CLD remains unclear. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that decreased oral bacterial diversity was found in patients with HBV-CLD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly, which indicated that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota participated in the process of HBV-CLD development. However, the changing patterns of the oral microbiota in patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis (LC) were almost similar to patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBV infection resulted in an increase in potential H2S- and CH3SH-producing phylotypes such as Fusobacterium, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Parvimonas and Treponema, which might contribute to the increased oral malodor. These key oral-derived phylotypes might invade into the gut as opportunistic pathogens and contribute to altering the composition of the gut microbiota. This study provided important clues that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota might be involved in the development of HBV-CLD. Greater understanding of the relationships between the dysbiosis of oral microbiota and the development of HBV-CLD might facilitate the development of non-invasive differential diagnostic procedures and targeted treatments of HBV-CLD patients harbouring specific oral phylotypes. PMID:26606973

  3. Decreased Diversity of the Oral Microbiota of Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Chronic Liver Disease: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Cheng, Yiwen; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered gut microbiota is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus-induced chronic liver disease (HBV-CLD). However, the structure and composition of the oral microbiota of patients with HBV-CLD remains unclear. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that decreased oral bacterial diversity was found in patients with HBV-CLD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly, which indicated that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota participated in the process of HBV-CLD development. However, the changing patterns of the oral microbiota in patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis (LC) were almost similar to patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBV infection resulted in an increase in potential H2S- and CH3SH-producing phylotypes such as Fusobacterium, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Parvimonas and Treponema, which might contribute to the increased oral malodor. These key oral-derived phylotypes might invade into the gut as opportunistic pathogens and contribute to altering the composition of the gut microbiota. This study provided important clues that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota might be involved in the development of HBV-CLD. Greater understanding of the relationships between the dysbiosis of oral microbiota and the development of HBV-CLD might facilitate the development of non-invasive differential diagnostic procedures and targeted treatments of HBV-CLD patients harbouring specific oral phylotypes. PMID:26606973

  4. Nurses' perspectives on nurse-coordinated prevention programmes in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Jorstad, H.T.; Chan, Y.K.; Scholte op Reimer, W.J.M.; Doornenbal, J.; Tijssen, J.G.P.; Peters, R.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) is increasingly provided by nurse-coordinated prevention programs (NCPP). Little is known about nurses’ perspectives on these programs. Aim: To investigate nurses’ perspectives/experiences in NCPPs in acute coronary syndrome patients. Methods: Thirteen nurses from NCPPs in 11 medical centers in the RESPONSE trial completed an online survey containing 45 items evaluating 3 outcome categories: (1) conducting NCPP visits; (2) effects of NCPP interventions on risk profiles and (3) process of care. Results: Nurses felt confident in counseling/motivating patients to reduce CAD risk. Interventions targeting LDL, blood pressure and medication adherence were reported as successful, corresponding with significant improvements of these risk factors. Improving weight, smoking and physical activity was reported as less effective. Screening for anxiety/depression was suggested as an improvement. Conclusions: Nurses acknowledge the importance and effectiveness of NCPPs, and correctly identify which components of the program are the most successful. Our study provides a basis for implementation and quality improvement for NCCPs. PMID:26572788

  5. A pilot study of energy efficient air cleaning for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara A.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Katsapov, Gregory Y.; Fisk, William J.

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory pilot study has been undertaken with the material that showed the most promise (high capacity and low pressure drop) based on the literature review and associated calculations. The best-performing air cleaner was a commercially available pleated filter that contained a thin layer of small activated carbon particles between two sheets of non-woven fibrous webbing. We will refer to this unit as the ''ozone filter'' although it is marketed for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile passenger compartments. This pilot study strongly suggests that ozone air cleaning can be practical in commercial air handling systems; however, further tests are needed to assess air cleaner performance under a wider range of conditions.

  6. The H-ATLAS 1000 lens survey: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, Robert; Coppin, Kristen; Serjeant, Stephen; Verma, Aprajita; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Negrello, Mattia; Dye, Simon; Ivison, Rob; Riechers, Dominik; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Michalowski, Michal; Van Der Werf, Paul; Bremer, Malcolm; Clements, Dave; Lapi, Andrea; Temi, Pasquale; Baker, Andrew; Omont, Alain; De Zotti, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Strong gravitational lensing is one of the very few probes capable of mapping galactic dark matter distributions. Lensing provides independent cosmological parameter estimates and enables the study of galaxy populations that are otherwise too faint for detailed study. We pioneered a major new strong gravitational lens selection method via submm-wave surveys (Negrello et al. 2010 Science). When combined with near-IR surveys we can now generate the first ever 1000-lens survey. We request a pilot foreground lens redshift survey for 50 lenses. This pilot alone increases the number of confirmed submm-selected lens systems at z > 0.5 by x5, placing our new lensing discoveries on a par with SLACS (but at much higher lens redshifts), and distinguishing between NFW and SIS models of the foreground population. Combining this data with ongoing mm-wave source redshifts, we will constrain Omega_Lambda to around +/-0.01.

  7. Risk factors for hidradenitis suppurativa: a pilot study*

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Bombonatto, Giovana; Martin, Manoela; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2012-01-01

    The hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease whose etiology is not fully understood. We conducted a pilot case-control study matched by sex and age with other dermatological patients to analyze possible risk factors associated with this disease. We included 15 cases and 45 controls, 67% were women. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis identified significant association with smoking, higher body mass index and family history. The use of hormonal contraceptives was less frequent in women with hidradenitis. PMID:23197222

  8. Patient education and migraine: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Centonze, V; Polito, B M; Cassiano, M A; Albano, M G; Ricchetti, G; Bassi, A; Causarano, V; Dalfino, L; Albano, O

    1998-01-01

    Our study examines the effectiveness of an educational approach to migraine patients. A course in migraine education was set up for 30 patients suffering from this disease; meetings were structured taking into consideration specific educational aims, with parameters evaluated before the course, at the end of the course and at a 3-month follow-up. The results, particularly the increase in the migraineurs' knowledge of their disease and the decrease in the use of symptomatic drugs, suggest the effectiveness of the course. Furthermore, our study suggests that there is a need to build educational processes into therapeutic protocols, as they enable patients to manage their chronic diseases more correctly. PMID:9626596

  9. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  10. A Pilot Study of Hungarian Discourse Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Der, Csilla Ilona; Marko, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first attempt at detecting formal and positional characteristics of single-word simple discourse markers in a spontaneous speech sample of Hungarian. In the first part of the research, theoretical claims made in the relevant literature were tested. The data did not confirm or only partially confirmed the claims that Hungarian…

  11. DISCOVER in Lebanon: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance-based assessment, in identifying gifted students in Lebanon. DISCOVER is grounded in Gardner's MI theory and consists of tasks involving problem-solving and creative abilities. The sample consisted of 49 middle-class 5-th graders, with a mean age of 10.2…

  12. THE NORTH CAROLINA HERALD PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory



    The sampling design for the National Children's Study (NCS) calls for a population-based, multi-stage, clustered household sampling approach. The full sample is designed to be representative of both urban and rural births in the United States, 2007-2011. While other sur...

  13. Commercial conspiracy theories: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed many people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as) wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs. The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed. Limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:23818886

  14. Commercial conspiracy theories: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed many people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as) wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs. The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed. Limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:23818886

  15. Cavity wounds management: a multicentre pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Facy, Olivier; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Ribemont, Annie-Claude; Sigal, Michele-Lea; Couffinhal, Jean-Claude; Trial, Chloe; Tacca, Olivier; Bohbot, Serge

    The objective of this study was to assess acceptability (based on pain at removal), efficacy and tolerance of an absorbent and cohesive rope(UrgoClean Rope, Laboratoires Urgo) in the local management of deep cavity wounds. This study was a prospective, multicentre (13), non comparative clinical study. Patients presenting with an acute or chronic non-infected cavity wound were followed up for four weeks and assessed weekly with a physical examination, in addition to volumetric,planimetric and photographic evaluations. Pain at removal was the primary criterion, assessed on a Visual Analogic Scale. The percentage of the wound surface area reduction and volumetric reduction were considered as secondary efficacy criteria. Forty three patients were included in this study. After one week of treatment dressing removal was painless and continued to be so throughout the period of the trial(four weeks). Median surface area at baseline was 7.74 cm2 and was reduced by 54.5% at week 4 (relative area reduction). Median wound volumetric value was noted 12 ml at baseline and was reduced by 72.7% by the end of treatment. The cohesiveness of the new rope was considered very good by health professionals. No residue was observed on the wound bed during the dressing change with the new rope. There were no adverse events related to the tested rope, during this trial.Pain-free removal associated with good efficacy and tolerance were observed with this new cohesive rope in the healing process of deep cavity wounds and could represent a therapeutic alternative to the usual ropes used in such indications. PMID:24180023

  16. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  17. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  18. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  19. Pilot study of MK-462 in migraine.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R; Claghorn, J; Sramek, J J; Block, G; Panebianco, D; Cheng, H; Olah, T V; Reines, S A

    1996-04-01

    MK-462 is a potent, selective 5HT1D receptor agonist which may be useful in treating acute migraine. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study to assess the preliminary efficacy and safety of oral doses of MK-462 20 mg (n = 8) and 40 mg (n = 36) vs placebo (n = 21), administered to 65 male and post-menopausal female migraine patients aged 22-51 with moderate or severe migraine headache. Headache severity and functional disability were measured at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 h post-dose. The 20 mg dose was well tolerated and 4/8 patients obtained relief in headache severity at the 2 h time point. The 40 mg dose was well tolerated and was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to placebo at the 1.5 and 2 h time points (with 27/36 or 75% obtaining relief at 2 h compared to 7/21 or 33% for placebo). Adverse events occurred in 50% of patients on 20 mg MK-462, 72% of those on 40 mg MK-462, and in 52% of placebo-treated subjects. The most common adverse events associated with MK-462 were drowsiness (20 mg 12%; 40 mg 44%; placebo 24%), dry mouth (40 mg 36%; placebo 19%), and lightheadedness/dizziness (40 mg 17%; placebo 10%). Based on these preliminary results, MK-462 appears worthy of continued study for the treatment of acute migraine. PMID:8665577

  20. Piloted Simulation Study of Rudder Pedal Force/Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted in 2006 to determine optimum rudder pedal force/feel characteristics for transport aircraft. As part of this research, an evaluation of four metrics for assessing rudder pedal characteristics previously presented in the literature was conducted. This evaluation was based upon the numerical handling qualities ratings assigned to a variety of pedal force/feel systems used in the simulation study. It is shown that, with the inclusion of a fifth metric, most of the rudder pedal force/feel system designs that were rated poorly by the evaluation pilots could be identified. It is suggested that these metrics form the basis of a certification requirement for transport aircraft.

  1. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  2. SERDP munition disposal source characterization pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Couch, R.G.; Fried, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting studies to develop and implement technologies for the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal of obsolete munitions and propellants which are stored at various locations across the country. One proposed disposal technique is the open-air burning or detonation (OB/OD) of this material. Although OB/OD is viewed as an efficient and cost-effective method for reducing the inventory of unwanted munitions and propellants, questions regarding its safety and environmental impacts must be addressed. Since very large amounts of munitions and propellants must be consumed inexpensively in relatively short time periods and with the very restrictive Federal and State regulations on environmental issues, it is clear that traditional OB/OD procedures will not be acceptable and that it is necessary to develop modified or advanced OB/OD technology. The effectiveness and environmental impact of the OB/OD technology must be verified by experimental data and with validated numerical models for acceptance by Federal and State regulators. Specifically, technology must be developed and tested that minimizes toxic bum and detonation products the noise (peak pressure) and destructive effect (impulse) of the explosive blast generation and travel distance of shrapnel, and entrainment of dust. Three explosion attenuation scenarios are analyzed: Contained water, aqueous foams, and wet sand.

  3. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Valente, Denis Souto; Silveira Eifler, Luciano; Carvalho, Lauro Aita; Filho, Gustavo Azambuja Pereira; Ribeiro, Vinicius Weissheimer; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions. PMID:26609429

  4. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Denis Souto; Silveira Eifler, Luciano; Carvalho, Lauro Aita; Filho, Gustavo Azambuja Pereira; Ribeiro, Vinicius Weissheimer; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions. PMID:26609429

  5. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms, along with the current understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. Assimilation of laboratory coreflood and rock consumption data, and their use in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) limited area simulations and in three-dimensional (3D) models of the entire pilot project are given. This paper also reports simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2D area of a field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long-term consumption functions, and two relative-permeability adjustment mechanisms. The scale-up of 2D simulation results and their use in a 271-acre (1096.7-ha), seven-layered, 3D model of the pilot are also discussed and 3D simulator results are compared with initial field alkaline flood performance. Finally, recommended additional applications of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods are discussed.

  6. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  7. Baclofen-assisted detoxification from opiates. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krystal, J H; McDougle, C J; Kosten, T R; Price, L H; Aghajanian, G K; Charney, D S

    1992-01-01

    In an open label pilot study, five opiate-dependent patients underwent baclofen-assisted opiate detoxification after abrupt discontinuation of methadone. Patients received baclofen in oral doses up to 80 mg/day, and all patients subjectively reported some reduction in discomfort. However, 3 of 5 (60%) patients could not complete detoxification with baclofen, primarily because of insufficient suppression of vomiting, myalgias, and headache. These patients successfully completed their detoxification with clonidine. These findings suggest that, in the dose range studied, baclofen is of limited use as a primary treatment for opiate dependence, although adjunctive roles for this medication in detoxification should be explored. PMID:1324986

  8. Vitamin D-mediated calcium absorption in patients with clinically stable Crohn's disease: a pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D is the critical hormone for intestinal absorption of calcium. Optimal calcium absorption is important for proper mineralization of bone in the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures, among other important functions. Diseases associated with gut inflammation, such as Crohn's ...

  9. Congestive Heart Failure home monitoring pilot study in urban Denver.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Saba; Li, Xin; Semenov, Nikolay; Apodaca-Madrid, Jesús; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Newman, Kimberly E; Long, Carlin S; Neuman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    With a growing number of low-income patients developing Congestive Heart Failure in urban Denver, accessible and affordable solutions are needed to provide home management options. A multidisciplinary team evaluated currently available options for telemonitoring and developed a solution for an initial pilot study. This system is currently used in the Denver Metro area (Colorado) for 44 CHF patients. Preliminary results show this approach is effective and has reduced the patients' average length of stay at the hospital compared to historical data and control patients who do not use a remote monitoring system. PMID:22255008

  10. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  11. Research plan for pilot studies of the biodiversity research consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; White, D.; Preston, E.M.; Master, L.L.; Loveland, T.R.

    1993-06-03

    This report presents a research plan for an assessment of risks to biodiversity. The plan describes the theoretical basis of the research approach and the data and methods to be used in the assessment. Initial research activities are formulated as a set of pilot studies that will examine nine research questions concerning the assumptions, data, and methods of the approach. A collection of government, academic, and nongovernmental organizations, called the Biodiversity Research Consortium, has developed this research approach and prepared the plan. Authors of the plan represent current members of the Consortium.

  12. Physical and cognitive stimulation in Alzheimer Disease. the GAIA Project: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maci, Tiziana; Pira, Francesco Le; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Nuovo, Santo Di; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Zappia, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Several data suggest that physical activity and cognitive stimulation have a positive effect on the quality of life (QoL) of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), slowing the decline due to the disease. A pilot project was undertaken to assess the effect of cognitive stimulation, physical activity, and socialization on patients with AD and their informal caregiver's QoL and mood. Fourteen patients with AD were randomly divided into active treatment group and control group. At the end of treatment, a significant improvement in apathy, anxiety, depression, and QoL in the active treatment group was found. Considering caregivers, those of the active treatment group exhibited a significant improvement in their mood and in their perception of patients' QoL. This study provides evidence that a combined approach based on cognitive stimulation, physical activity, and socialization is a feasible tool to improve mood and QoL in patients with AD and their caregivers. PMID:22495338

  13. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Iragüen, D; Urcelay, S; San Martín, B

    2011-04-01

    Iragüen, D., Urcelay, S., San Martín, B. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.34, 108-115. In Chile, there is no present government policy to survey and analyse adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the field of veterinary medicine. The intent of this study is to assess, for the first time, ADR frequency in treated animals. To this purpose, a 6-month period pilot study based on WHO recommendations was conducted to monitor ADRs in cats and dogs for frequently used drugs and common labelled signs. Of a total of 149 detected ADRs, 29 (6 in cats and 23 in dogs) were notified by means of ADR report forms, while the rest was identified after reviewing patient clinical records, thus evidencing strong under-reporting problems. More than 70% of ADRs were related to antimicrobials, vaccines and tranquilizers. In dogs, there was a significant effect on ADRs' presentation when acepromazine, amoxicillin, carprofen, ivermectin, sextuple vaccine (polyvalent vaccine that confers immunity against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, Leptospira canicola, L. icterohemmoragiae, canine adenovirus type 2 and canine parainfluenza virus) and phytomenadione (subcutaneous injection) were administered. In the case of cats, a significant influence on ADRs was detected when acepromazine, amoxicillin or vitamin K was administered. Present results suggest the need for a pharmacovigilance programme in veterinary medicine for timely ADR-presenting drug detection and drug safety improvement. PMID:21395600

  14. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics. PMID:26594860

  15. Traffic scenario generation technique for piloted simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies of cockpit traffic display concepts require the development of representative traffic scenarios. With the exception of specific aircraft interaction issues, most research questions can be addressed using traffic scenarios consisting of prerecorded aircraft movements merged together to form a desired traffic pattern. Prerecorded traffic scenarios have distinct research advantages, allowing control of traffic encounters with repeatability of scenarios between different test subjects. A technique is described for generation of prerecorded jet transport traffic scenarios suitable for use in piloted simulation studies. Individual flight profiles for the aircraft in the scenario are created interactively with a computer program designed specifically for this purpose. The profiles are then time-correlated and merged into a complete scenario. This technique was used to create traffic scenarios for the Denver, Colorado area with operations centered at Stapleton International Airport. Traffic scenarios for other areas may also be created using this technique, with appropriate modifications made to the navigation fix locations contained in the flight profile generation program.

  16. Pilot Study of Enhanced Minor Planet Detection Using NEOWISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukrov, Greta; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Nugent, C.; Stevenson, R.; Clyne, E.; Masci, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The solar system science component of NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), known as NEOWISE, extracted detections of more than 158,000 asteroids and comets, including 34,000 new discoveries. These objects were detected through a search algorithm that actively rejected inertially fixed sources such as stars and galaxies and selected candidate moving objects through the construction of position-time pairs known as tracklets. A minimum of five detections were required in order to construct a tracklet; this system enabled the discovery of new minor planets as well as detection of previously known objects. However, many more asteroids are potentially recoverable in the NEOWISE data, such as objects that failed to appear in five or more images. Stacking of objects with well-known ephemerides at the observational epoch has allowed for the recovery of many objects that fell below the single-frame detection threshold. Additional objects were recovered by searching the NEOWISE source lists for objects that appeared fewer than five times in single frames. We present the results of a pilot study that has allowed for the recovery of minor planets from the NEOWISE data using both techniques, resulting in the derivation of diameters and albedos for the sample. This pilot study will be extended to the entire catalog of known minor planets by the NEOWISE project in the near future.

  17. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  18. Quality assurance project plan: 1991 EMAP wetlands southeastern pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.M.; Lee, J.M.; Turner, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    The goal of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program - Wetlands (EMAP-Wetlands) Southeastern Pilot Study is to develop field indicators of salt marsh condition. These indicators are of four general types: (1) vegetation; (2) hydrology; (3) soil parameters; and (4) soil constituents. Field measurements and samples will be collected during late summer/early fall in 1991 and will be analyzed to identify which indicators and measurements best delineate salt marsh in good condition from that in impaired condition. Thus the project will involve field work, laboratory analysis, and data analysis. Results from this project will be used to establish criteria and parameters for long-term monitoring and assessment of salt marshes, particularly those parameters that may serve as indicators of healthy salt marsh and deteriorated salt marsh. Since EMAP-Wetlands-Southeastern is a pilot study, the measurement criteria will be evaluated as one of the project goals. Of concern will be how well the standardized sampling methods performed in actual field conditions, and which of these methods can be used to assess and characterize salt marshes.

  19. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial. PMID:20145447

  20. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities. PMID:26561889

  1. A piloted simulation study of data link ATC message exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1989-01-01

    Data link Air Traffic Control (ATC) and Air Traffic Service (ATS) message and data exchange offers the potential benefits of increased flight safety and efficiency by reducing communication errors and allowing more information to be transferred between aircraft and ground facilities. Digital communication also presents an opportunity to relieve the overloading of ATC radio frequencies which hampers message exchange during peak traffic hours in many busy terminal areas. A piloted simulation study to develop pilot factor guidelines and assess potential flight crew benefits and liabilities from using data link ATC message exchange was completed. The data link ATC message exchange concept, implemented on an existing navigation computer Control Display Unit (CDU) required maintaining a voice radio telephone link with an appropriate ATC facility. Flight crew comments, scanning behavior, and measurements of time spent in ATC communication activities for data link ATC message exchange were compared to similar measures for simulated conventional voice radio operations. The results show crew preference for the quieter flight deck environment and a perception of lower communication workload.

  2. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudloo, Mehran; Abolhassani, Farid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin

    2016-07-01

    The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family's health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors. PMID:27424015

  3. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakre, Tushar P.; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Methods: Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Results: Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Conclusions: Students were not

  4. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls. PMID:27332171

  5. Magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves in dogs: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Soens, Iris Van; Polis, Ingeborgh E; Nijs, Jozef X; Struys, Michel M; Bhatti, Sofie F; Ham, Luc M Van

    2008-11-01

    A model for magnetic stimulation of the radial and sciatic nerves in dogs was evaluated. Onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes of magnetic and electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve were compared, and the effect of the direction of the current in the magnetic coil on onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude of the magnetic motor evoked potential was studied in both nerves. The results demonstrate that magnetic stimulation is a feasible method for stimulating the radial and sciatic nerves in dogs. No significant differences were observed in onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes during magnetic and electrical stimulation, indicating conformity between the techniques. Orthodromic or antidromic magnetic nerve stimulation resulted in no significant differences. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of magnetic stimulation of nerves in dogs. PMID:17869140

  6. Pilot study on agricultural pesticide poisoning in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Mustapha; Ouedraogo, Richard; Ilboudo, Sylvain; Guissou, Pierre I.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic data related to agricultural pesticide poisoning cases in Burkina Faso were collected. The study was carried out using retrospective (from January 2002 to June 2010) surveys conducted among farmers and healthcare centers. One hundred and fifty-three (153) pest control products were recorded during the survey and 56 active ingredients were identified. Out of the 153 pest control products, 49 (i.e. 32%) were authorized for sale in Burkina Faso. The main risk factors are socio-demographic characteristics of farmers, their low education level, and some attitudes and practices on using agricultural pesticides. Pesticide poisonings are relatively frequent and their management was not always efficacious. Actions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning as a global public health problem and to improve management of pesticide poisoning. To this purpose, advanced investigations should be carried out over a longer period of time to complement the present pilot study. PMID:24678256

  7. Musical Stimulation in the Developmentally Delayed Child: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nanelle Lavina; Molnar, Eva T.; Knasel, Anne L.

    1987-01-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2468780

  8. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  9. The Pilot Training Study: A Cost-Estimating Model for Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, S. L.

    A means for estimating the resource requirements and attendant costs of any configuration of the undergraduate pilot training system (UPT) is described by inputs that are supplied by the user of the model. The inputs consist of data such as UPT graduate requirements, course syllabus requirements, instructor-student ratios, administrative and…

  10. 76 FR 12367 - Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study AGENCY... visibility benefits are required because the studies conducted in the 1970s and 1980s do not reflect current... Control Number 1024-0255). The purpose of this IC is to conduct a pilot study to test the...

  11. International Youth Foundation Program Identification System. Pilot Study One: Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss (William L.) and Associates, Ltd., Alexandria, VA.

    An evaluation of Round One of a pilot study of a system for identifying effective youth organizations around the world is presented in this report. The report begins with a page of general observations about the successes and shortcomings of the pilot study, indicating that in general the study accomplished its objectives but that a need for…

  12. Study to determine the IFR operational profile and problems of the general aviation single pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    General aviation single pilot operating under instrument flight rules (GA SPIFR) was studied. The objectives of the study were to (1) develop a GA SPIFR operational profile, (2) identify problems experienced by the GA SPIFR pilot, and (3) identify research tasks which have the potential for eliminating or reducing the severity of the problems. To obtain the information necessary to accomplish these objectives, a mail questionnaire survey of instrument rated pilots was conducted. The general aviation IFR single pilot operational profile and selected data analysis examples are presented.

  13. Mirtazapine in amphetamine detoxification: a placebo-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos I; Saguansiritham, Rapeepun

    2005-09-01

    The present study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of mirtazapine in amphetamine detoxification in a 14-day randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial in a Thai population. Subjects retained at a Specialized Probation Center, Department of Probation, Ministry of Justice, Thailand (n=20), who met DSM-IV criteria for amphetamine dependence and the inclusion criteria of the study, were randomized for either mirtazapine treatment or placebo. Efficacy was assessed by the Amphetamine Withdrawal Questionnaire (AWQ) for amphetamine withdrawal symptoms and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale (MADRS) for depression. Mirtazapine safety was assessed by interview during each follow-up period on days 3 and 14 after treatment. Nine subjects were randomized to the mirtazapine group and 11 to the placebo group. Among the initial 20 subjects, 16 (seven in the mirtazapine and nine in the placebo group) completed the study. There were significant improvements in the total AWQ score changes in the mirtazapine group versus placebo both at days 3 (P<0.005) and 14 (P<0.030). Significant improvements in favour of mirtazapine were also seen in the hyperarousal and the anxiety subscale score changes at days 3 (P<0.029) and 14 (P<0.018), respectively. No significant differences were seen (P>0.05) in the MADRS scores changes within or between the groups. Mild adverse events, such as headache, sedation, nausea and vomiting, were reported. In conclusion, despite its small sample size, this randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial lends support to the hypothesis that mirtazapine may be an option in the meager armamentarium of amphetamine detoxification treatment. PMID:16096515

  14. Social Media in Adolescent Health Literacy Education: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Carrie KW; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda SS

    2015-01-01

    Background While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual’s approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. Objective The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents’ oral health literacy (OHL) education. Methods A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. Results No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants’ sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further

  15. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  16. Study Skills Analysis: A Pilot Study Linking a Success and Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urciuoli, Jannette Alejandra; Bluestone, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    This study explored a concept that learning study skills in the context of the content area under study may transfer across courses, multiplying the benefits towards academic success. Methods that have been reported to influence academic growth at the community college level include success courses and applied study skills. In this pilot project…

  17. Shared Decision Making for Routine Infant Circumcision: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Teri M.; Beal, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is important that expectant parents receive accurate information about the benefits and risks of circumcision as well as the benefits and risks of having an intact foreskin when making a decision about routine infant circumcision (RIC). A pilot study was conducted using the shared decision making (SDM) conceptual model to guide expectant parents through a 3-phase decision-making program about RIC as part of their childbirth education class. The participants showed a high level of preparedness following each of the 3 phases. Preparedness score were highest for those who decided to keep their expected sons’ penises natural. This SDM program was an effective way of guiding expectant parents through the decision-making process for RIC. PMID:26834440

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, F; Guillaume, S; Broadbent, H; Campbell, I C; Schmidt, U

    2013-02-01

    The search for new treatments to improve outcome in people with anorexia nervosa continues. This pilot study investigated whether one session of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces eating disorder related symptoms following exposure to visual and real food stimuli. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Ten right-handed people with anorexia nervosa underwent one session of rTMS. Subjective experiences related to the eating disorder (e.g. urge to restrict, feeling full etc.) were assessed before and after rTMS. Non-parametric repeated measures tests were used. rTMS was safe and well-tolerated, and resulted in reduced levels of feeling full, feeling fat and feeling anxious. Thus, rTMS may reduce core symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Future research should establish the therapeutic potential of rTMS in anorexia nervosa. PMID:21880470

  19. Causes of Mortality Among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The mortality rates (per 100,000) were as follows: total accidental injuries, 10.80; suicide, 6.17; cancer, 1.94; and homicide, 0.53. Within the accident and injury category, alcohol-related vehicular deaths (per 100,000) were 3.37 and alcohol-related nontraffic injuries were 1.49. Men had significantly higher rates of suicide (10.46) than women (2.34). Suggestions for future research and implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26322333

  20. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  1. Transitional care for seriously mentally ill persons: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Linda E; Gerson, Linda; Carbo, Cynthia

    2007-12-01

    This article reports the results of a pilot study of a nurse-based in-home transitional care intervention for seriously mentally ill persons. The goals of the intervention were to address the lack of continuity of care in existing programs and to meet the immediate postdischarge needs of severely mentally ill persons. This article focuses primarily on the applicability and feasibility of the intervention for this population, given the challenges of engaging seriously mentally ill patients in a community-based protocol and the complexity of their illnesses. Factors that are important to community adjustment postdischarge were identified: caregiver concerns and health status impeding illness management, lack of structure/involvement in daily activities, structural and functional factors affecting adherence, and presence of symptoms after discharge. Use of an advanced practice nurse to provide transitional care can offer an alternative to patients who might otherwise be left poorly treated or untreated in the community setting. PMID:18037440

  2. Biofilm's Role in Chronic Cholesteatomatous Otitis Media: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jacopo; Calò, Lea; Giuliani, Monica; Sergi, Bruno; Lucidi, Daniela; Meucci, Duino; Bassotti, Ezio; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2016-05-01

    Cholesteatoma is a destructive lesion involving the temporal bone, which may induce severe complications due to its expansion and erosion of adjacent structures. Bacterial biofilm plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many otolaryngologic inflammatory/infectious chronic diseases. In this pilot study, we investigated, by means of cultural examination and with scanning electron microscope, the presence of bacterial biofilm in a series of samples from the epitympanic and mastoid region in patients affected by cholesteatoma and from the promontory region in patients with healthy mucosa who were undergoing to stapes surgery. The preliminary data support the association between biofilm and cholesteatoma (81.3% of the cases) and allow us to hypothesize that keratinized matrix of cholesteatoma may represent the ideal substrate for biofilm colonization and survival; this finding is consistent with the clinical course of aural cholesteatoma, characterized by recurrent exacerbations and recalcitrant course. PMID:26932953

  3. Impact of nutrition messages on children's food choice: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Katie; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2006-03-01

    This pilot study tested the influence of nutrition message framing on snack choice among kindergarteners. Three classrooms were randomly assigned to watch one of the following 60s videos: (a) a gain-framed nutrition message (i.e. the positive benefits of eating apples) (n=14); (b) a loss-framed message (i.e. the negative consequences of not eating apples) (n=18); or (c) a control scene (children playing a game) (n=18). Following this, the children were offered a choice between animal crackers and an apple for their snack. Among the children who saw one of the nutrition message videos, 56% chose apples rather than animal crackers; in the control condition only 33% chose apples. This difference was statistically significant (chi2=7.56, p<0.01). These results suggest that videos containing nutritional messages may have a positive influence on children's short-term food choices. PMID:16442667

  4. Do antidepressants cause folic acid depletion? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, K.A.; Jamjoom, S.; Donaldson, D.; Dickerson, J.W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of tricyclic antidepressants is common; folic acid depletion is a potential consequence adversely affecting the mental state. In a pilot study prior to research in the community, serum and red cell folate and serum vitamin B 12 levels were measured in the following elderly psychiatric inpatients: 14 controls (patients not receiving any drugs with known antifolate activity), 11 receiving tricyclic antidepressants, 13 receiving antipsychotics (phenothiazines) and four receiving an anticonvulsant (carbamazepine). Patients on prolonged treatment with carbamazepine or phenothiazine drugs had lower concentrations of folate in serum and erythrocytes compared with controls; the decrease was statistically significant for the effect of phenothiazines on serum folate levels. Tricyclic antidepressants, which are in widespread use in the community, did not cause folate depletion during the first two years of treatment. PMID:3204543

  5. Familial Paraphilia: A Pilot Study with the Construction of Genograms

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M. W.; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors. PMID:23738209

  6. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  7. Magnetotelluric pilot study in the Rio Grande Rift, southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    A magnetotelluric (MT) pilot study consisting of approximately 25 stations distributed in and around the Rio Grande Rift of the southwest United States was carried out in the summer of 2012. Both broadband (100 Hz to 1000 s) and long-period (up to 10 000 s) MT data were collected across two profiles that run perpendicular to the rift axis near Denver, Colorado and Taos, New Mexico, respectively. Time-domain EM data was also collected at each site to account for galvanic distortion in the near-surface. The tectonic forces and rheologic properties behind the initiation and propagation of the rift are poorly understood. Surface mapping of volcanism, normal faulting and sedimentary basins reveals a narrow band of crustal deformation confined to a region in close proximity to the rift axis while geophysical results suggest that deformation is distributed across a much broader and deeper region of the lithosphere. In particular, seismic tomography shows low seismic wave speeds into the lower crust and upper mantle. The magnetotelluric technique is a well-proven passive electromagnetic method that allows for the detection of apparent resistivity at a wide range of depth scales. Complimenting the seismic results with MT data will provide important new information on the geologic and geophysical properties that control the rifting process in this low-strain rate environment. Properties to which the MT method is particular sensitive include temperature, fluid content, and mineral alteration. Preliminary results from this most recent survey are encouraging, showing good data quality up to 10 000 s. In an important precursor to full 2D modeling, the magnetotelluric phase tensor has been used to assess the dimensionality of the electrical resistivity structure at depth. This pilot study provides proof of concept for a much larger magnetotelluric experiment planned to take place in the Rio Grande Rift in 2013.

  8. Serendipitous results of a pilot study: precaution indicated.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, S B; Proskin, H M

    1995-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to estimate sample size for a clinical trial in a F area. In 1992, 98 children 14 years of age living in Fall River, MA were examined for dental caries: Fall River was fluoridated in 1973. Residence histories showed that 74% lived there from birth (B), 12% were residents from kindergarten or 1st grade (K1) and 14% moved into the community at a later time (LT). Findings on caries prevalence showed an inverse relation between DMFS and initial age of residence; mean DMFS was 3.00 for Group B, 5.33 for Group K1 and 6.93 for Group LT. A one-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p=0.05). Because residence from birth or from early life can be considered a proxy for systemic fluoride exposure, and because controversy currently surrounds the issue of topical versus systemic benefits in explaining the mechanism of action of fluoride, the results appeared to have importance. However, internal analyses of the data comparing surface-specific (pit and fissure) results among the groups for early erupting teeth with varying systemic exposure to fluoridated water and for late erupting teeth, all with appreciable systemic exposure, showed comparable relative differences in DMFS scores. Lack of internal validity, therefore, discounted a conclusion from overall results of the role of systemic fluorides in providing decay preventive benefits. If there is any conclusion that can be drawn it is that serendipitous escapades with data from a pilot study, if not rigorously analyzed and cautiously interpreted, tend to further muddy the waters (fluoridated in this case) on controversial issues and should best be avoided. PMID:8694985

  9. Pilot study of a compassion meditation intervention in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Heather L; Darnall, Beth D; Seppala, Emma M; Doty, James R; Hah, Jennifer M; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of anger as an important predictor of chronic pain outcomes suggests that treatments that target anger may be particularly useful within the context of chronic pain. Eastern traditions prescribe compassion cultivation to treat persistent anger. Compassion cultivation has been shown to influence emotional processing and reduce negativity bias in the contexts of emotional and physical discomfort, thus suggesting it may be beneficial as a dual treatment for pain and anger. Our objective was to conduct a pilot study of a 9-week group compassion cultivation intervention in chronic pain to examine its effect on pain severity, anger, pain acceptance and pain-related interference. We also aimed to describe observer ratings provided by patients’ significant others and secondary effects of the intervention. Methods Pilot clinical trial with repeated measures design that included a within-subjects wait-list control period. Twelve chronic pain patients completed the intervention (F= 10). Data were collected from patients at enrollment, treatment baseline and post-treatment; participant significant others contributed data at the enrollment and post-treatment time points. Results In this predominantly female sample, patients had significantly reduced pain severity and anger and increased pain acceptance at post-treatment compared to treatment baseline. Significant other qualitative data corroborated patient reports for reductions in pain severity and anger. Conclusions Compassion meditation may be a useful adjunctive treatment for reducing pain severity and anger, and for increasing chronic pain acceptance. Patient reported reductions in anger were corroborated by their significant others. The significant other corroborations offer a novel contribution to the literature and highlight the observable emotional and behavioral changes in the patient participants that occurred following the compassion intervention. Future studies may further examine how

  10. Therapeutic effect of hybrid training of voluntary and electrical muscle contractions in middle-aged obese women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sechang; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Shida, Takashi; Arai, Emi; Isobe, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Shoda, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise training is an effective therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hybrid training (HYB) of voluntary and electrical muscle contractions was developed to prevent disuse atrophy during space flight. HYB can be applied to obtain a strength training effect accompanying articular movement. In this pilot study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of HYB in NAFLD. Methods A total of 15 middle-aged obese women with NAFLD who had no improvement in serum alanine aminotransferase levels and/or liver fat deposition after 12 weeks of lifestyle counseling participated in an HYB program. HYB of the quadriceps and hamstrings was conducted for 20 minutes twice a week for 24 weeks. Results NAFLD patients showed attenuated intramyocellular lipid levels in the quadriceps after the HYB intervention (−15.5%). Levels of leptin (−17.4%), tumor necrosis factor-α (−23.2%), and interleukin-6 (−30.5%) were also decreased after the intervention. HYB led to a significant body weight reduction (−4.7%), which in turn was associated with a significant decrease in serum alanine aminotransferase (−35.8%), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (−21.6%), ferritin (−16.0%), oxidative stress (−17.8%) levels, and insulin resistance values (−2.7%). Conclusion In NAFLD, HYB exerts an antiobesity effect and attenuates liver dysfunction and insulin resistance in association with an increase in muscle strength and a decrease in ectopic muscle fat. Therefore, HYB has great potential as a new type of exercise therapy for liver disease in patients with NAFLD. PMID:25767392

  11. Center for interdisciplinary remotely-piloted aircraft studies (CIRPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluth, R.T.; Durkee, P.A.; Seinfield, J.H.; Flagen, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    A remotely-piloted aircraft research facility is described that will provide new capabilities for atmospheric and oceanographic measurements. The aircraft can fly up to 24 hours over remote ocean regions, at low altitude, and in various other challenging mission scenarios. The aircraft will fly research missions at speeds of 40 m/s and provide high spatial resolution measurements. Whether flying with an onboard pilot or in remote-pilot mode, data will be transmitted in real-time to a ground station for analysis and decision making purposes. The facility will expand the opportunities for universities to participate in field measurement programs. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. What to Consider Before Beginning Graduate Education: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Imus, F Scott; Burns, Shari

    2015-10-01

    The literature supports a general theme that college students lack metacognitive awareness about learning, which leads to poor examination performance and ultimately high attrition rates. However, the literature emphasizes that when college students receive instruction about learning, examination performance goes up and attrition goes down. This pilot study focused on a specific subset of learners: graduate students in a nurse anesthesia program. Given new evidence-based wellness approaches to learning, the nurse anesthesia program conducted a descriptive study aimed at exploring student perceptions. The study goals were to provide students with evidence-based information about wellness factors that influence learning. The book The New Science of Learning by Doyle and Zakrajsek (Stylus Publishing, 2013) was used to provide students with neuroscience evidence about learning that might assist their transition to graduate school. The book was mailed to 34 student registered nurse anesthetists before matriculation. An 8-item Likert-style online survey evaluated the students' perceptions of the book along with identifying any changes the students made in anticipation of starting the rigorous nurse anesthesia program. The study demonstrated that student registered nurse anesthetists could benefit from instruction about wellness approaches that enhance learning before matriculation. Additionally, the study provided the framework for future research. PMID:26638456

  13. Student Perceptions of International Education and Study Abroad: A Pilot Study at York University, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trilokekar, Roopa Desai; Rasmi, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    International student mobility has been identified as a key strategy for the internationalization of higher education. Although an institutional priority, Canada has among the lowest levels of international student mobility, with only 2% of full-time university students participating in study-abroad programs. This pilot study, conducted at a large…

  14. Mental Health Services in Pilot Study Areas: Report on a European Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) conducted a study to collect data on mental health resources of pilot areas within several European countries. This report presents data from the study and provides a detailed and reliable description of the development of mental health services within the WHO European Region. Part I of the report describes the…

  15. 77 FR 13343 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... November 10, 2011 (76 FR 70150), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance entitled... Pilot Program (76 FR 70152, November 10, 2011) intended to collect ] information and experience on the... Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program. This program allowed...

  16. Corrosion coupon studies at coal liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Fossil Energy Materials Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have supplied corrosion coupons to coal-liquefaction pilot plants for exposure in selected vessels. These vessels were chosen on the basis of previous corrosion experience, anticipated corrosion behavior (especially important when operating conditions were changed), accessibility, and availability. Alloys exposed were selected to give a series with a corrosion resistance ranging from less than to greater than that thought to be needed for each application. Corrosion rates calculated from weight changes of the exposed coupons provide information useful in selecting materials for coal-liquefaction plants. The results presented are from coupons exposed in the Wilsonville, Alabama, and Fort Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal pilot plants; the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, H-Coal Pilot Plant; and the Baytown, Texas, Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant.

  17. 78 FR 76629 - The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study; Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study... instruments must be requested in writing. Proposed Collection: The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study, 0925-0593, Expiration 8/31/2014--Revision, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of...

  18. Study of the use of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter on pilot control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a filter on the pilot's control output could improve the performance of the pilot-aircraft system. What is needed is a filter with a sharp high frequency cut-off, no resonance peak, and a minimum of lag at low frequencies. The present investigation studies the usefulness of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter in performing the needed function. The nonlinear filter is compared with a linear, first order filter, and no filter. An analytical study using pilot models and a simulation study using experienced test pilots was performed. The results showed that the nonlinear filter does promote quick, steady maneuvering. It is shown that the nonlinear filter attenuates the high frequency remnant and adds less phase lag to the low frequency signal than does the linear filter. It is also shown that the rate limit in the nonlinear filter can be set to be too restrictive, causing an unstable pilot-aircraft system response.

  19. NASA study of an automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A Pilot Advisory System (PAS) concept for high-density uncontrolled airports is discussed where the general aviation pilots will be provided with automatic audio voice airport and air traffic advisories within two minute intervals and with mid-air collision warnings whenever such situations arise. Free of manual inputs, the PAS includes the options of fixed-base operator runway select, automatic restart and self-test, and remote inquiry of system status and messages.

  20. Endothelin-1 levels in scleroderma patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Javor, Sanja; Laborai, Erika; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent endogenous vasoconstrictor, which mediates vascular wall cells proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation through two types of ET-1 receptors (ET-A and ET-B). In our retrospective study the serum levels of ET-1 in 18 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with and without digital ulcers (DUs) were assessed to observe possible correlation between the levels of ET-1, the evolution of SSc, and the therapy with an ET-1 antagonist (bosentan). In all our patients, the levels of ET-1 were found higher than normal range and correlate with the severity of the disease. Furthermore we also observed that in patients without DUs the levels of ET-1 were higher and did not correlate with new DUs development. In conclusion, the levels of ET-1 in our studied patients do not correlate with the possible development of DUs. The reduction of ET-1 levels in DUs patients in therapy with bosentan confirms the efficacy of this molecule both for treatment and prevention of digital ulcers. The inhibition of ET-A receptor by its antagonist may activate the opposite ET-B receptors, with well-known function ET-1 degradation and reducing of ET-1 serum level as confirmed in our pilot study. PMID:23984086

  1. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. Methods in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. Results total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. Conclusion the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods. PMID:26605187

  2. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only. PMID:22925126

  3. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; Miller, Jason; Arcori, Leann; Lumeng, Julie C.; Han-Markey, Theresa; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD). Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M). Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders. PMID:26404363

  4. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gygax, Marine Jequier; Schneider, Patrick; Newman, Christopher John

    2011-05-01

    Mirror therapy, which provides the visual illusion of a functional paretic limb by using the mirror reflection of the non-paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6-14 y; five males, five females; Manual Ability Classification System levels: one at level I, two at level II, four at level III, three at level IV) randomly assigned to 15 minutes of daily bimanual training with and without a mirror for 3 weeks. Assessments of maximal grasp and pinch strengths, and upper limb function measured by the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation were performed at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (intervention), and 9 (wash-out). Testing of grasp strength behind the mirror improved performance by 15% (p=0.004). Training with the mirror significantly improved grasp strength (with mirror +20.4%, p=0.033; without +5.9%, p>0.1) and upper limb dynamic position (with mirror +4.6%, p=0.044; without +1.2%, p>0.1), while training without a mirror significantly improved pinch strength (with mirror +6.9%, p>0.1; without +21.9%, p=0.026). This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia and that it may improve strength and dynamic function of the paretic arm. PMID:21410693

  5. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders. PMID:10474669

  6. Thermoacoustic CT of the breast: pilot study observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Robert A.; Kiser, William L., Jr.; Romilly, A. P.; Scmidt, Phyllis

    2001-06-01

    In order to assess the potential clinical utility of using thermoacoustic computer tomography (TCT) to image the breast, we conducted a retrospective pilot study of 78 patients. We recruited patients in three age groups (<40,40-50,>50 years). The study population was further segregated into normal and suspicious based on the results of the previous x-ray mammography and ultrasound. Image quality was evaluated qualitatively by consensus of two trained mammographers using a 4-point scale. The appearance of normal anatomy, cysts, benign disease and cancer was noted. Patients were also asked to rate the comfort of the TCT exam and to indicate a personal preference for x-ray mammography or TCT. Analysis of the data indicated that TCT image quality was dependent upon both patient age and breast density, improving with both increasing breast density and decreasing patient age. Fibrocystic disease was well seen, cysts appearing as areas of low RF absorption. Fibroadenomas did not demonstrate contrast enhancement with the exception of one patient with associated atypical hyperplasia. Cancer displayed higher RF absorption than surrounding tissues in 4/7 patients in whom cancer was confirmed, including one patient with a 7-mm ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

  7. Sleep characteristics of individuals with chronic stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughmi, Mayis; Al-Sharman, Alham; Stevens, Suzanne; Siengsukon, Catherine F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in sleep characteristics in individuals with chronic stroke are not well described, particularly compared with healthy individuals. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was to explore the sleep characteristics in individuals with chronic stroke compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Sixteen individuals with chronic stroke and ten age- and sex-matched controls underwent two nights of polysomnographic recording. The sleep characteristics of interest included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and percent time, as well as time in minutes spent in stages N1, N2, and N3 and stage R sleep. The individuals with chronic stroke spent less percent time in stage N3 compared with controls (P=0.048). No significant differences in the other sleep characteristics were found between the stroke and control groups. Individuals with chronic stroke present with altered stage N3 sleep compared with healthy controls. These alterations in stage N3 sleep might be a sign of neuronal dysfunction and may impact recovery following stroke. A larger scale study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26543384

  8. Impact of healing touch on pediatric oncology outpatients: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; Fletcher, Nancy B; Hamilton, Craig A; McLean, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Healing Touch (HT) is a biofield therapy used to enhance well-being. We conducted a pilot study to assess its effects in pediatric oncology patients. We enrolled patients in the continuation or consolidation phase of therapy. Patients or their parent completed simple visual analogue scales (VASs; 0-10) for relaxation, vitality, overall well-being, stress, anxiety, and depression before and after a 20-minute period of rest and a standardized HT treatment. Patients' heart rates were monitored and later analyzed for heart rate variability (HRV) characteristics. Of the nine patients, all completed VASs and six had usable HRV data. The average age was 9 years. VAS scores for stress decreased significantly more for HT treatment than for rest (HT: 4.4-1.7; rest: 2.3-2.3; p = .03). The HRV characteristic of total power was significantly lower during HT than for rest (HT 599 +/- 221; rest: 857 +/- 155; p = .048), and sympathetic activity was somewhat but not significantly lower (HT: 312 +/- 158; rest: 555 +/- 193; p = .06). HT is associated with lowered stress and changes in HRV. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these effects in larger samples and to explore the impact on additional clinically relevant measures. PMID:19476730

  9. Acupuncture and burning mouth syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Tarozzi, Marco; Varoni, Elena; Franchini, Roberto; Carrassi, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition most common in middle-aged and elderly women, with prevalence rates in the general population ranging from 0.5% to 5%. Defined by the International Headache Society as "an intraoral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found," BMS is considered a form of neuropathic pain. The management of BMS remains unsatisfactory. In this pilot study, we investigated the use of acupuncture in a small group of BMS patients. The study group, after 4 refusals, was composed of 10 BMS patients (9 females and 1 male; mean age, 65.2 years; range, from 48 to 80 years; mean duration of BMS, 2.6 years; SD ± 0.8 years). Oral pain/burning sensation (primary outcome) was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Health-related quality of life (secondary outcome) was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Acupuncture treatment lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 20 sessions. Patients reported a mean reduction in pain of 0.99 points on the VAS (max 2.1-min 0.1), which, although slight, was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test P < 0.009). No significant improvement in the overall score for quality of life was observed, although subjects receiving acupuncture treatment seemed better able cope with their oral symptoms. PMID:23336607

  10. A Pilot Study of Neurofeedback for Chronic PTSD.

    PubMed

    Gapen, Mark; van der Kolk, Bessel A; Hamlin, Ed; Hirshberg, Laurence; Suvak, Michael; Spinazzola, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    EEG Biofeedback (also known as neurofeedback) has been in use as a clinical intervention for well over 30 years; however, it has made very little impact on clinical care. One reason for this has been the difficulty in designing research to measure clinical change in the real world. While substantial evidence exists for its efficacy in treating attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, relatively little evidence exists for its utility in other disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study represents a "proof-of-concept" pilot for the use of neurofeedback with multiply-traumatized individuals with treatment-resistant PTSD. Participants completed 40 sessions of neurofeedback training two times per week with sensors randomly assigned (by the study coordinator, who was not blind to condition) to sensor placements of either T4-P4 or T3-T4. We found that neurofeedback significantly reduced PTSD symptoms (Davidson Trauma Scale scores averaged 69.14 at baseline to 49.26 at termination), and preceded gains in affect regulation (Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities-Affect Dysregulation scores averaged 23.63 at baseline to 17.20 at termination). We discuss a roadmap for future research. PMID:26782083